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Sample records for algae higher plants

  1. Metabolic engineering of higher plants and algae for isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Kempinski, Chase; Jiang, Zuodong; Bell, Stephen; Chappell, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of compounds derived from the five carbon precursors, dimethylallyl diphosphate, and isopentenyl diphosphate. These molecules present incredible natural chemical diversity, which can be valuable for humans in many aspects such as cosmetics, agriculture, and medicine. However, many terpenoids are only produced in small quantities by their natural hosts and can be difficult to generate synthetically. Therefore, much interest and effort has been directed toward capturing the genetic blueprint for their biochemistry and engineering it into alternative hosts such as plants and algae. These autotrophic organisms are attractive when compared to traditional microbial platforms because of their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as a carbon substrate instead of supplied carbon sources like glucose. This chapter will summarize important techniques and strategies for engineering the accumulation of isoprenoid metabolites into higher plants and algae by choosing the correct host, avoiding endogenous regulatory mechanisms, and optimizing potential flux into the target compound. Future endeavors will build on these efforts by fine-tuning product accumulation levels via the vast amount of available "-omic" data and devising metabolic engineering schemes that integrate this into a whole-organism approach. With the development of high-throughput transformation protocols and synthetic biology molecular tools, we have only begun to harness the power and utility of plant and algae metabolic engineering.

  2. Phragmoplast of the green alga Spirogyra is functionally distinct from the higher plant phragmoplast

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Cytokinesis in the green alga Spirogyra (Zygnemataceae) is characterized by centripetal growth of a septum, which impinges on a persistent, centrifugally expanding telophase spindle, leading to a phragmoplast-like structure of potential phylogenetic significance (Fowke, L. C., and J. D. Pickett-Heaps. 1969. J. Phycol. 5:273-281). Combining fluorescent tagging of the cytoskeleton in situ and video- enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy of live cells, the process of cytokinesis was investigated with emphasis on cytoskeletal reorganization and concomitant redistribution of organelles. Based on a sequence of cytoskeletal arrangements and the effects of cytoskeletal inhibitors thereon, cytokinetic progression could be divided into three functional stages with respect to the contribution of microfilaments (MFs) and microtubules (MTs): (1) Initiation: in early prophase, a cross wall initial was formed independently of MFs and MTs at the presumptive site of wall growth. (2) Septum ingrowth: numerous organelles accumulated at the cross wall initial concomitant with reorganization of the extensive peripheral interphase MF array into a distinct circumferential MF array. This array guided the ingrowing septum until it contacted the expanding interzonal MT array. (3) Cross wall closure: MFs at the growing edge of the septum coaligned with and extended along the interzonal MTs toward the daughter nuclei. Thus, actin-based transportation of small organelles during this third stage occurred, in part, along a scaffold previously deployed in space by MTs. Displacement of the nuclei- associated interzonal MT array by centrifugation and depolymerization of the phragmoplast-like structure showed that the success of cytokinesis at the third stage depends on the interaction of both MF and MT cytoskeletons. Important features of the phragmoplast-like structure in Spirogyra were different from the higher plant phragmoplast: in particular, MFs were responsible for the

  3. Strategies for psbA gene expression in cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants: from transcription to PSII repair.

    PubMed

    Mulo, Paula; Sakurai, Isamu; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-01-01

    The Photosystem (PS) II of cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants is prone to light-induced inactivation, the D1 protein being the primary target of such damage. As a consequence, the D1 protein, encoded by the psbA gene, is degraded and re-synthesized in a multistep process called PSII repair cycle. In cyanobacteria, a small gene family codes for the various, functionally distinct D1 isoforms. In these organisms, the regulation of the psbA gene expression occurs mainly at the level of transcription, but the expression is fine-tuned by regulation of translation elongation. In plants and green algae, the D1 protein is encoded by a single psbA gene located in the chloroplast genome. In chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the psbA gene expression is strongly regulated by mRNA processing, and particularly at the level of translation initiation. In chloroplasts of higher plants, translation elongation is the prevalent mechanism for regulation of the psbA gene expression. The pre-existing pool of psbA transcripts forms translation initiation complexes in plant chloroplasts even in darkness, while the D1 synthesis can be completed only in the light. Replacement of damaged D1 protein requires also the assistance by a number of auxiliary proteins, which are encoded by the nuclear genome in green algae and higher plants. Nevertheless, many of these chaperones are conserved between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we describe the specific features and fundamental differences of the psbA gene expression and the regeneration of the PSII reaction center protein D1 in cyanobacteria, green algae and higher plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Photosystem II.

  4. Energetic metabolism response in algae and higher plant species from simulation experiments with the clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilenko, A.; Popova, A. F.

    Adenylate state is acknowledged to be among the most convenient approaches in the study of physiological changes in plant cells under simulation of altered gravity condition with the clinostat. Adenylate levels and the ATP/ADP ratio in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial extracts of cultivated cells of Haplopappus gracilis and algae cells of Chlorella vulgaris under initial stages of the fast-rotating and slow-rotating clinorotation, as well as the long-term clinorotation, have been investigated. For analysis of ATP and ADP levels in the plant cells under the clinorotation, we applied a high-sensitive bioluminescence method using the luciferase and piruvate kinase enzyme systems. It has been shown that the adenylate ratio is already increased during at the start of clinorotation with the different speed of rotation in the biological material tested. The considerable changes in mitochondrial ultrastructure of Chlorella cells, as well as the rising ATP level and dropping of the ATP/ADP ratio appear after long-duration clinorotation if compared to control material. It is probably connected with the distinctions in ATP-synthetase functioning in mitochondria of the cells under the clinorotation conditions.

  5. A Comprehensive Phylogeny Reveals Functional Conservation of the UV-B Photoreceptor UVR8 from Green Algae to Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, María B.; Tossi, Vanesa; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Cassia, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) is present in sunlight (280–315 nm) and has diverse effects on living organisms. Low fluence rate of exposure induces a specific photomorphogenic response regulated by the UV-B response locus 8 (UVR8) receptor. UVR8 was first described in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the absence of stimuli it is located in the cytoplasm as a homodimer. However, upon UV-B irradiation, it switches to a monomer and interacts with the ubiquitin ligase E3 COP1 via the UVR8 β-propeller domain and the VP core. This induces the expression of the transcription factor HY5 leading to changes in the expression of genes associated with UV-B acclimation and stress tolerance. UVR8 senses UV-B through tryptophan residues being Trp233 and 285 the most important. Based on the comparison and analysis of UVR8 functionally important motifs, we report a comprehensive phylogeny of UVR8, trying to identify UVR8 homologs and the ancestral organism where this gene could be originated. Results obtained showed that Chlorophytes are the first organisms from the Viridiplantae group where UVR8 appears. UVR8 is present in green algae, bryophytes, lycophytes, and angiosperms. All the sequences identified contain tryptophans 233 and 285, arginines involved in homodimerization and the VP domain suggesting they are true UVR8 photoreceptors. We also determined that some species from bryophytes and angiosperms contain more than one UVR8 gene copy posing the question if UVR8 could constitute a gene family in these species. In conclusion, we described the functional conservation among UVR8 proteins from green algae to higher plants. PMID:27895654

  6. Composition and biosynthesis of thylakoid membrane polypeptides in the red alga Cyanidium caldarium: Comparison with the thylakoid polypeptide composition of higher plants and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yurina, N P; Karakashev, G V; Karapetyan, N V; Odintsova, M S

    1991-10-01

    The polypeptide composition of thylakoid membranes of the red alga Cyanidium caldarium was studied by PAGE in the presence of lithium dodecyl sulfate. The thylakoid membranes were shown to contain 65 polypeptides with mol wt from 110 to 10 kDa. PS I isolated from C. caldarium cells is composed of at least 5 components, one of which is the chlorophyll-protein complex with mol wt of 110 kDa typical of higher plants. Cyt f, c 552, b 6 and b 559 were identified. Inhibition of carotenoid biosynthesis with norflurazon caused no changes in the polypeptide composition of thylakoid membranes of the algae grown in dark. The suppression of the biosynthesis rate of some thylakoid polypeptides in the algae grown with norflurazon in light is a result of membrane photodestruction. Thylakoid membranes from C. caldarium cells are more similar in the number of protein components to thylakoid membranes from cells of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans than to those of higher plants (Pisum sativum), which was proved by immune-blotting assays: Thylakoid membranes of the red alga and cyanobacteria contain 28 homologous polypeptides, while thylakoid membranes of the alga and pea, only 15.

  7. Evaluation of higher plant virus resistance genes in the green alga, Chlorella variabilis NC64A, during the early phase of infection with Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Janet M.; Dunigan, David D.; Blanc, Guillaume; Gurnon, James R.; Xia, Yuannan; Van Etten, James L.

    2014-01-01

    With growing industrial interest in algae plus their critical roles in aquatic systems, the need to understand the effects of algal pathogens is increasing. We examined a model algal host–virus system, Chlorella variabilis NC64A and virus, PBCV-1. C. variabilis encodes 375 homologs to genes involved in RNA silencing and in response to virus infection in higher plants. Illumina RNA-Seq data showed that 325 of these homologs were expressed in healthy and early PBCV-1 infected (≤60 min) cells. For each of the RNA silencing genes to which homologs were found, mRNA transcripts were detected in healthy and infected cells. C. variabilis, like higher plants, may employ certain RNA silencing pathways to defend itself against virus infection. To our knowledge this is the first examination of RNA silencing genes in algae beyond core proteins, and the first analysis of their transcription during virus infection. PMID:23701839

  8. Immunological cross-reactions between P700 chlorophyll-proteins isolated from two marine green algae and one higher plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaonan; Zhou, Baicheng; Tseng, C. K.

    1991-06-01

    P700 Chl-protein was isolated from a marine green alga Bryopsis corticulans with SDS-resolved thylakoid membranes by SDS-PAGE. After elution from the gel, the recovered protein revealed a 100 KD polypeptide by re-electrophoresis. The same SDS-PAGE procedure was used to isolate P700 Chl-proteins from spinach ( Spinacea oleracea) and another marine green alga Codium fragile. Polyclonal antibodies to Bryopsis P700 protein were raised in rabbits. The antibodies were shown to cross-react with P700 Chl-protein and Chl-protein complexes containing P700 protein from B. Corticulans, C. f ragile, and even spinach. Results indicate similarity of the amino acid sequences of the P700 Chl-proteins and the highly conserved structure of the apoproteins of phylogenetically distant species over evolution. The antibodies cross-react with none of the components of PSII in the species tested, indicating an independent pathway of evolution of photosystem I and photosystem II of later origin.

  9. DGDG and Glycolipids in Plants and Algae.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Barbara; Dörmann, Peter; Hölzl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic organelles in plants and algae are characterized by the high abundance of glycolipids, including the galactolipids mono- and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG, DGDG) and the sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG). Glycolipids are crucial to maintain an optimal efficiency of photosynthesis. During phosphate limitation, the amounts of DGDG and SQDG increase in the plastids of plants, and DGDG is exported to extraplastidial membranes to replace phospholipids. Algae often use betaine lipids as surrogate for phospholipids. Glucuronosyldiacylglycerol (GlcADG) is a further glycolipid that accumulates under phosphate deprived conditions. In contrast to plants, a number of eukaryotic algae contain very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids of 20 or more carbon atoms in their glycolipids. The pathways and genes for galactolipid and sulfolipid synthesis are largely conserved between plants, Chlorophyta, Rhodophyta and algae with complex plastids derived from secondary or tertiary endosymbiosis. However, the relative contribution of the endoplasmic reticulum- and plastid-derived lipid pathways for glycolipid synthesis varies between plants and algae. The genes for glycolipid synthesis encode precursor proteins imported into the photosynthetic organelles. While most eukaryotic algae contain the plant-like galactolipid (MGD1, DGD1) and sulfolipid (SQD1, SQD2) synthases, the red alga Cyanidioschyzon harbors a cyanobacterium-type DGDG synthase (DgdA), and the amoeba Paulinella, derived from a more recent endosymbiosis event, contains cyanobacterium-type enzymes for MGDG and DGDG synthesis (MgdA, MgdE, DgdA).

  10. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  11. Polyamine biosynthetic diversity in plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Fuell, Christine; Elliott, Katherine A; Hanfrey, Colin C; Franceschetti, Marina; Michael, Anthony J

    2010-07-01

    Polyamine biosynthesis in plants differs from other eukaryotes because of the contribution of genes from the cyanobacterial ancestor of the chloroplast. Plants possess an additional biosynthetic route for putrescine formation from arginine, consisting of the enzymes arginine decarboxylase, agmatine iminohydrolase and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase, derived from the cyanobacterial ancestor. They also synthesize an unusual tetraamine, thermospermine, that has important developmental roles and which is evolutionarily more ancient than spermine in plants and algae. Single-celled green algae have lost the arginine route and are dependent, like other eukaryotes, on putrescine biosynthesis from the ornithine. Some plants like Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens have lost ornithine decarboxylase and are thus dependent on the arginine route. With its dependence on the arginine route, and the pivotal role of thermospermine in growth and development, Arabidopsis represents the most specifically plant mode of polyamine biosynthesis amongst eukaryotes. A number of plants and algae are also able to synthesize unusual polyamines such as norspermidine, norspermine and longer polyamines, and biosynthesis of these amines likely depends on novel aminopropyltransferases similar to thermospermine synthase, with relaxed substrate specificity. Plants have a rich repertoire of polyamine-based secondary metabolites, including alkaloids and hydroxycinnamic amides, and a number of polyamine-acylating enzymes have been recently characterised. With the genetic tools available for Arabidopsis and other model plants and algae, and the increasing capabilities of comparative genomics, the biological roles of polyamines can now be addressed across the plant evolutionary lineage.

  12. Introduced aquatic plants and algae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-native aquatic plants such as waterhyacinth and hydrilla severely impair the uses of aquatic resources including recreational faculties (lakes, reservoirs, rivers) as well as timely delivery of irrigation water for agriculture. Costs associated with impacts and management of all types of aquatic...

  13. Antibody Production in Plants and Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Kushnir, Natasha; Streatfield, Stephen J

    2016-04-29

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a wide range of modern applications, including research, diagnostic, therapeutic, and industrial uses. Market demand for mAbs is high and continues to grow. Although mammalian systems, which currently dominate the biomanufacturing industry, produce effective and safe recombinant mAbs, they have a limited manufacturing capacity and high costs. Bacteria, yeast, and insect cell systems are highly scalable and cost effective but vary in their ability to produce appropriate posttranslationally modified mAbs. Plants and green algae are emerging as promising production platforms because of their time and cost efficiencies, scalability, lack of mammalian pathogens, and eukaryotic posttranslational protein modification machinery. So far, plant- and algae-derived mAbs have been produced predominantly as candidate therapeutics for infectious diseases and cancer. These candidates have been extensively evaluated in animal models, and some have shown efficacy in clinical trials. Here, we review ongoing efforts to advance the production of mAbs in plants and algae.

  14. Plant algae method for arsenic removal from arsenic contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    de la Paix, Mupenzi Jean; Lanhai, Li; de Dieu, Habumugisha Jean; John, Maina Nyongesah

    2012-01-01

    Field studies were carried out in Urumqi River Basin in Northwest China. The study focused on experimentation on a plant algae method that was tested by taking various water chemistries into consideration. The results from a greenhouse experiment evaluated for four doses of P (0, 100, 200, and 300 μmol/L) using two ferns (30 and 60 day old) on 15 L of contaminated groundwater per plant revealed that the biomass of 30-day old ferns gained was higher than 60-day fern. As solution-P increased from 0 to 450 μmol/L, Phosphorus concentration in the fronds increased from 1.9 to 3.9 mg/kg and 1.95 to 4.0 mg/kg for 30-d and 60-d ferns respectively. This study showed that the plant algae method may be a good solution to maximize arsenic uptake in the short term under normal climatic conditions.

  15. Algae.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario

    2014-07-07

    Algae frequently get a bad press. Pond slime is a problem in garden pools, algal blooms can produce toxins that incapacitate or kill animals and humans and even the term seaweed is pejorative - a weed being a plant growing in what humans consider to be the wrong place. Positive aspects of algae are generally less newsworthy - they are the basis of marine food webs, supporting fisheries and charismatic marine megafauna from albatrosses to whales, as well as consuming carbon dioxide and producing oxygen. Here we consider what algae are, their diversity in terms of evolutionary origin, size, shape and life cycles, and their role in the natural environment and in human affairs.

  16. Assembly of Photosynthetic Antenna Protein / Pigments Complexes from Algae and Plants for Development of Nanobiodevices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-10

    Assembly of Photosynthetic Antenna Protein / Pigments Complexes from Algae and Plants for Development of Nanobiodevices Key...Assembly of Photosynthetic Antenna Protein / Pigments Complexes from Algae and Plants for Development of Nanobiodevices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This is the report of a project to use photosynthetic antenna pigment complexes from algae and plants as

  17. The occurrence of hormesis in plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Cedergreen, Nina; Streibig, Jens C; Kudsk, Per; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Duke, Stephen O

    2006-10-17

    This paper evaluated the frequency, magnitude and dose/concentration range of hormesis in four species: The aquatic plant Lemna minor, the micro-alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the two terrestrial plants Tripleurospermum inodorum and Stellaria media exposed to nine herbicides and one fungicide and binary mixtures thereof. In total 687 dose-response curves were included in the database. The study showed that both the frequency and the magnitude of the hormetic response depended on the endpoint being measured. Dry weight at harvest showed a higher frequency and a larger hormetic response compared to relative growth rates. Evaluating hormesis for relative growth rates for all species showed that 25% to 76% of the curves for each species had treatments above 105% of the control. Fitting the data with a dose-response model including a parameter for hormesis showed that the average growth increase ranged from 9+/-1% to 16+/-16% of the control growth rate, while if measured on a dry weight basis the response increase was 38+/-13% and 43+/-23% for the two terrestrial species. Hormesis was found in >70% of the curves with the herbicides glyphosate and metsulfuron-methyl, and in >50% of the curves for acifluorfen and terbuthylazine. The concentration ranges of the hormetic part of the dose-response curves corresponded well with literature values.

  18. Evolution and diversity of plant cell walls: from algae to flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Popper, Zoë A; Michel, Gurvan; Hervé, Cécile; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T; Tuohy, Maria G; Kloareg, Bernard; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2011-01-01

    All photosynthetic multicellular Eukaryotes, including land plants and algae, have cells that are surrounded by a dynamic, complex, carbohydrate-rich cell wall. The cell wall exerts considerable biological and biomechanical control over individual cells and organisms, thus playing a key role in their environmental interactions. This has resulted in compositional variation that is dependent on developmental stage, cell type, and season. Further variation is evident that has a phylogenetic basis. Plants and algae have a complex phylogenetic history, including acquisition of genes responsible for carbohydrate synthesis and modification through a series of primary (leading to red algae, green algae, and land plants) and secondary (generating brown algae, diatoms, and dinoflagellates) endosymbiotic events. Therefore, organisms that have the shared features of photosynthesis and possession of a cell wall do not form a monophyletic group. Yet they contain some common wall components that can be explained increasingly by genetic and biochemical evidence.

  19. [Environmental Effects of Algae Bloom Cluster: Impact on the Floating Plant Water Hyacinth Photosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Bao, Xian-ming; Gu, Dong-xiang; Wu, Ting-ting; Shi, Zu-liang; Liu, Guo-feng; Han Shi-qun; Zhou, Shi-qun; Zhou, Qing

    2015-06-01

    It is an efficient and effective ecological restoration method by using the adaptability, large biomass of aquatic plants to purify the polluted water at present. However, there is a lack of systematic research on the impact on the physiological ecology of aquatic plants and its environmental effects of algae blooms cluster in summer. The aim of this paper is to reveal the mechanism of macrophytes demise in a shallow ecosystem by studying the influence on photosynthesis of water hyacinth caused by the cynaobacterial blooms gathered, and also to provide the theoretical basis for full effects of purification function of macrophytes to reduce the negative effects on the aquatic plants after algae blooms gathered during the higher temperature (not lower 25 degrees C) through simulating experiments. Results showed the dissolved oxygen quickly consumed in root zone of aquatic plants after algae blooms gathered and showed a lack of oxygen (DO < 0.2 mg x L(-1)); and the ORP was lower than -100 mV after 1 d, and it declined to -200 mV at the end of the experiment, and pH declined 0. 7unit compared with that of control group ( CK). There were lots of nutrients releasing to the water after the algae cell died and the NH4+ -N concentration was 102 times higher than that of the control group root zone. And the macrophytes photosynthesis reduced quickly and the plant body damaged with the intimidation of higher NH4+ -N concentration (average content was 45.6 mg x L(-1)) and hypoxia after algae cell decomposed. The average net photosynthesis rate, leaf transpiration rate were 0.6 times, 0.55 times of the control group, and they reduced to 3.96 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1), 1.38 mmol x (m2 x s)(-1), respectively. At the end of the experiment, they were 22.0 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) and 7.61 mmol x (m2 x s)(-1) for the control group. Results also showed the algae bloom together had the irreversible damage to the aquatic plants. So in the practice of ecological restoration, it should

  20. A Receptor-Like Kinase, Related to Cell Wall Sensor of Higher Plants, is Required for Sexual Reproduction in the Unicellular Charophycean Alga, Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale Complex.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Naoko; Marukawa, Yuka; Abe, Jun; Hashiba, Sayuri; Ichikawa, Machiko; Tanabe, Yoichi; Ito, Motomi; Nishii, Ichiro; Tsuchikane, Yuki; Sekimoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Here, we cloned the CpRLK1 gene, which encodes a receptor-like protein kinase expressed during sexual reproduction, from the heterothallic Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale complex, one of the closest unicellular alga to land plants. Mating-type plus (mt(+)) cells with knockdown of CpRLK1 showed reduced competence for sexual reproduction and formed an abnormally enlarged conjugation papilla after pairing with mt(-) cells. The knockdown cells were unable to release a naked gamete, which is indispensable for zygote formation. We suggest that the CpRLK1 protein is an ancient cell wall sensor that now functions to regulate osmotic pressure in the cell to allow proper gamete release.

  1. Treatment efficacy of algae-based sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Durga Madhab; Chanakya, H N; Ramachandra, T V

    2013-09-01

    Lagoons have been traditionally used in India for decentralized treatment of domestic sewage. These are cost effective as they depend mainly on natural processes without any external energy inputs. This study focuses on the treatment efficiency of algae-based sewage treatment plant (STP) of 67.65 million liters per day (MLD) capacity considering the characteristics of domestic wastewater (sewage) and functioning of the treatment plant, while attempting to understand the role of algae in the treatment. STP performance was assessed by diurnal as well as periodic investigations of key water quality parameters and algal biota. STP with a residence time of 14.3 days perform moderately, which is evident from the removal of total chemical oxygen demand (COD) (60 %), filterable COD (50 %), total biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (82 %), and filterable BOD (70 %) as sewage travels from the inlet to the outlet. Furthermore, nitrogen content showed sharp variations with total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) removal of 36 %; ammonium N (NH4-N) removal efficiency of 18 %, nitrate (NO3-N) removal efficiency of 22 %, and nitrite (NO2-N) removal efficiency of 57.8 %. The predominant algae are euglenoides (in facultative lagoons) and chlorophycean members (maturation ponds). The drastic decrease of particulates and suspended matter highlights heterotrophy of euglenoides in removing particulates.

  2. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    DOE PAGES

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; ...

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence ofmore » phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.« less

  3. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee -Hong; Jimenez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Price, Dana C.; Wei, Chia -Lin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Lagarias, J. Clark; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence of phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.

  4. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems.

    PubMed

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee-Hong; Jiménez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N; van Baren, Marijke J; Price, Dana C; Wei, Chia-Lin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Lagarias, J Clark; Worden, Alexandra Z

    2014-11-04

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence of phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. Expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in plants and green algae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhixin; Guo, Cheng; Sutharzan, Sreeskandarajan; Li, Pei; Echt, Craig S; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Chun

    2014-01-10

    Tandem repeats (TRs) extensively exist in the genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Based on the sequenced genomes and gene annotations of 31 plant and algal species in Phytozome version 8.0 (http://www.phytozome.net/), we examined TRs in a genome-wide scale, characterized their distributions and motif features, and explored their putative biological functions. Among the 31 species, no significant correlation was detected between the TR density and genome size. Interestingly, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (42,059 bp/Mbp) and castor bean Ricinus communis (55,454 bp/Mbp) showed much higher TR densities than all other species (13,209 bp/Mbp on average). In the 29 land plants, including 22 dicots, 5 monocots, and 2 bryophytes, 5'-UTR and upstream intergenic 200-nt (UI200) regions had the first and second highest TR densities, whereas in the two green algae (C. reinhardtii and Volvox carteri) the first and second highest densities were found in intron and coding sequence (CDS) regions, respectively. In CDS regions, trinucleotide and hexanucleotide motifs were those most frequently represented in all species. In intron regions, especially in the two green algae, significantly more TRs were detected near the intron-exon junctions. Within intergenic regions in dicots and monocots, more TRs were found near both the 5' and 3' ends of genes. GO annotation in two green algae revealed that the genes with TRs in introns are significantly involved in transcriptional and translational processing. As the first systematic examination of TRs in plant and green algal genomes, our study showed that TRs displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation in plants and green algae.

  6. Ecotoxicological effects of carbon nanomaterials on algae, fungi and plants.

    PubMed

    Basiuk, Elena V; Ochoa-Olmos, Omar E; De la Mora-Estrada, León F

    2011-04-01

    The ecotoxicological effects of carbon nanomateriales (CNMs), namely fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, on algae, fungi and plants are analyzed. In different toxicity tests, both direct and indirect effects were found. The direct effects are determined by nanomaterial chemical composition and surface reactivity, which might catalyze redox reactions in contact with organic molecules and affect respiratory processes. Some indirect effects of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) are physical restraints or release of toxic ions. Accumulation of CNPs in photosynthetic organs provokes obstruction in stomata, foliar heating and alteration in physiological processes. The phytotoxicity studies of CNMs should be focused on determining phytotoxicity mechanisms, size distribution of CNPs in solution, uptake and translocation of nanoparticles by plants, on characterization of their physical and chemical properties in rhizosphere and on root surfaces. More studies on plants and algae, as a part of food chain, are needed to understand profoundly the toxicity and health risks of CNMs as ecotoxicological stressors. Correct and detailed physical and chemical characterization of CNMs is very important to establish the exposure conditions matching the realistic ones. Ecotoxicity experiments should include examinations of both short and long-term effects. One must take into account that real carbon nanomaterials are complex mixtures of carbon forms and metal residues of variable chemistry and particle size, and the toxicity reported may reflect these byproducts/residues/impurities rather than the primary material structure. One more recommendation is not only to focus on the inherent toxicity of nanoparticles, but also consider their possible interactions with existing environmental contaminants.

  7. Plant based phosphorus recovery from wastewater via algae and macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Andrew N; Powell, Nicola; Guieysse, Benoit

    2012-12-01

    At present, resource recovery by irrigation of wastewater to plants is usually driven by the value of the water resource rather than phosphorus recovery. Expanded irrigation for increased phosphorus recovery may be expected as the scarcity and price of phosphorus increases, but providing the necessary treatment, storage and conveyance comes at significant expense. An alternative to taking the wastewater to the plants is instead to take the plants to the wastewater. Algal ponds and macrophyte wetlands are already in widespread use for wastewater treatment and if harvested, would require less than one-tenth of the area to recover phosphorus compared to terrestrial crops/pastures. This area could be further decreased if the phosphorus content of the macrophytes and algae biomass was tripled from 1% to 3% via luxury uptake. While this and many other opportunities for plant based recovery of phosphorus exist, e.g. offshore cultivation, much of this technology development is still in its infancy. Research that enhances our understanding of how to maximise phosphorus uptake and harvest yields; and further add value to the biomass for reuse would see the recovery of phosphorus via plants become an important solution in the future.

  8. Triacylglycerol Accumulation in Photosynthetic Cells in Plants and Algae.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhi-Yan; Benning, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Plant and algal oils are some of the most energy-dense renewable compounds provided by nature. Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are the major constituent of plant oils, which can be converted into fatty acid methyl esters commonly known as biodiesel. As one of the most efficient producers of TAGs, photosynthetic microalgae have attracted substantial interest for renewable fuel production. Currently, the big challenge of microalgae based TAGs for biofuels is their high cost compared to fossil fuels. A conundrum is that microalgae accumulate large amounts of TAGs only during stress conditions such as nutrient deprivation and temperature stress, which inevitably will inhibit growth. Thus, a better understanding of why and how microalgae induce TAG biosynthesis under stress conditions would allow the development of engineered microalgae with increased TAG production during conditions optimal for growth. Land plants also synthesize TAGs during stresses and we will compare new findings on environmental stress-induced TAG accumulation in plants and microalgae especially in the well-characterized model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and a biotechnologically relevant genus Nannochloropsis.

  9. Green Algae and the Origins of Multicellularity in the Plant Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Umen, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The green lineage of chlorophyte algae and streptophytes form a large and diverse clade with multiple independent transitions to produce multicellular and/or macroscopically complex organization. In this review, I focus on two of the best-studied multicellular groups of green algae: charophytes and volvocines. Charophyte algae are the closest relatives of land plants and encompass the transition from unicellularity to simple multicellularity. Many of the innovations present in land plants have their roots in the cell and developmental biology of charophyte algae. Volvocine algae evolved an independent route to multicellularity that is captured by a graded series of increasing cell-type specialization and developmental complexity. The study of volvocine algae has provided unprecedented insights into the innovations required to achieve multicellularity. PMID:25324214

  10. Lipidomic Analysis of Oxidized Fatty Acids in Plant and Algae Oils.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Christine E; Hennebelle, Marie; Otoki, Yurika; Zamora, Daisy; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2017-03-08

    Linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA) in plant or algae oils are precursors to oxidized fatty acid metabolites known as oxylipins. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify oxylipins in soybean, corn, olive, canola, and four high-oleic acid algae oils at room temperature or after heating for 10 min at 100 °C. Flaxseed oil oxylipin concentrations were determined in a follow-up experiment that compared it to soybean, canola, corn, and olive oil. Published consumption data for soybean, canola, corn, and olive oil were used to estimate daily oxylipin intake. The LA and ALA fatty acid composition of the oils was generally related to their respective oxylipin metabolites, except for olive and flaxseed oil, which had higher LA derived monohydroxy and ketone oxylipins than other oils, despite their low LA content. Algae oils had the least amount of oxylipins. The change in oxylipin concentrations was not significantly different among the oils after short-term heating. The estimated oxylipin intake from nonheated soybean, canola, corn, and olive oil was 1.1 mg per person per day. These findings suggest that oils represent a dietary source of LA and ALA derived oxylipins and that the response of oils to short-term heating does not differ among the various oils.

  11. Regulation and function of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Brzezowski, Pawel; Richter, Andreas S; Grimm, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    Tetrapyrroles are macrocyclic molecules with various structural variants and multiple functions in Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes. Present knowledge about the metabolism of tetrapyrroles reflects the complex evolution of the pathway in different kingdoms of organisms, the complexity of structural and enzymatic variations of enzymatic steps, as well as a wide range of regulatory mechanisms, which ensure adequate synthesis of tetrapyrrole end-products at any time of development and environmental condition. This review intends to highlight new findings of research on tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants and algae. In the course of the heme and chlorophyll synthesis in these photosynthetic organisms, glutamate, one of the central and abundant metabolites, is converted into highly photoreactive tetrapyrrole intermediates. Thereby, several mechanisms of posttranslational control are thought to be essential for a tight regulation of each enzymatic step. Finally, we wish to discuss the potential role of tetrapyrroles in retrograde signaling and point out perspectives of the formation of macromolecular protein complexes in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis as an efficient mechanism to ensure a fine-tuned metabolic flow in the pathway. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis.

  12. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  13. Somatic hybridization in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Constabel, F

    1976-11-01

    Somatic hybridization in higher plants has come into focus since methods have been established for protoplast fusion and uptake of foreign DNA and organelles by protoplasts. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was an effective agent for inducing fusion. Treatment of protoplasts with PEG resulted in 5 to 30% heterospecific fusion products. Protoplasts of different species, genera and even families were compatible when fused. A number of protoplast combinations (soybean + corn, soybean + pea, soybean + tobacco, carrot + barley, etc.) provided fusion products which underwent cell division and callus formation. Fusion products initially were heterokaryocytes. In dividing heterokaryocytes, random distribution of mitotic nuclei was observed to be accompanied by multiple wall formation and to result in chimeral callus. Juxtaposition of mitotic nuclei suggested nuclear fusion and hybrid formation. Fusion of heterospecific interphase nuclei was demonstrated in soybean + pea and carrot + barley heterokaryons. Provided parental protoplasts carry suitable markers, the fusion products can be recognized. For the isolation and cloning of hybrid cells, fusion experiments must be supplemented with a selective system. Complementation of two non-allelic genes that prevent or inhibit growth under special culture conditions appears as the principle on which to base the selection of somatic hybrids. As protoplasts of some species have been induced to regenerate entire plants, the development of hybrid plants from protoplast fusion products is feasible and has already been demonstrated for tobacco.

  14. Cellular Auxin Transport in Algae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyun; van Duijn, Bert

    2014-01-27

    The phytohormone auxin is one of the main directors of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxin is generated in apical plant parts and transported from cell-to-cell in a polar fashion. Auxin is present in all plant phyla, and the existence of polar auxin transport (PAT) is well established in land plants. Algae are a group of relatively simple, autotrophic, photosynthetic organisms that share many features with land plants. In particular, Charophyceae (a taxon of green algae) are closest ancestors of land plants. In the study of auxin function, transport and its evolution, the algae form an interesting research target. Recently, proof for polar auxin transport in Chara species was published and auxin related research in algae gained more attention. In this review we discuss auxin transport in algae with respect to land plants and suggest directions for future studies.

  15. Antihyperglycemic effect of crude extracts of some Egyptian plants and algae.

    PubMed

    AbouZid, Sameh Fekry; Ahmed, Osama Mohamed; Ahmed, Rasha Rashad; Mahmoud, Ayman; Abdella, Ehab; Ashour, Mohamed Badr

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major global health problem. Various plant extracts have proven antidiabetic activity and are considered as promising substitution for antidiabetic drugs. The antihyperglycemic effect of 16 plants and 4 algae, commonly used in Egypt for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, was investigated. A diabetes model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide (120 mg/kg body weight [b.wt.]), then streptozotocin (200 mg/kg b.wt.) after 15 min. Hydroethanolic extracts (80%) of the plants and algae under investigation were prepared. The extracts were orally administered to nicotinamide-streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice by a gastric tube at doses 10 or 50 mg/kg b.wt. for 1 week. The antidiabetic activity was assessed by detection of serum glucose concentrations at the fasting state and after 2 h of oral glucose loading (4.2 mg/kg b.wt.). Extracts prepared from Cassia acutifolia, Fraxinus ornus, Salix aegyptiaca, Cichorium intybus, and Eucalyptus globulus showed the highest antihyperglycemic activity among the tested plants. Extracts prepared from Sonchus oleraceus, Bougainvillea spectabilis (leaves), Plantago psyllium (seeds), Morus nigra (leaves), and Serena repens (fruits) were found to have antihyperglycemic potentials. Extracts prepared from Caulerpa lentillifera and Spirulina versicolor showed the most potent antihyperglycemic activity among the tested algae. However, some of the tested plants have insulinotropic effects, all assessed algae have not. Identification of lead compounds from these plants and algae for novel antidiabetic drug development is recommended.

  16. Origin of land plants: Do conjugating green algae hold the key?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The terrestrial habitat was colonized by the ancestors of modern land plants about 500 to 470 million years ago. Today it is widely accepted that land plants (embryophytes) evolved from streptophyte algae, also referred to as charophycean algae. The streptophyte algae are a paraphyletic group of green algae, ranging from unicellular flagellates to morphologically complex forms such as the stoneworts (Charales). For a better understanding of the evolution of land plants, it is of prime importance to identify the streptophyte algae that are the sister-group to the embryophytes. The Charales, the Coleochaetales or more recently the Zygnematales have been considered to be the sister group of the embryophytes However, despite many years of phylogenetic studies, this question has not been resolved and remains controversial. Results Here, we use a large data set of nuclear-encoded genes (129 proteins) from 40 green plant taxa (Viridiplantae) including 21 embryophytes and six streptophyte algae, representing all major streptophyte algal lineages, to investigate the phylogenetic relationships of streptophyte algae and embryophytes. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate that either the Zygnematales or a clade consisting of the Zygnematales and the Coleochaetales are the sister group to embryophytes. Conclusions Our analyses support the notion that the Charales are not the closest living relatives of embryophytes. Instead, the Zygnematales or a clade consisting of Zygnematales and Coleochaetales are most likely the sister group of embryophytes. Although this result is in agreement with a previously published phylogenetic study of chloroplast genomes, additional data are needed to confirm this conclusion. A Zygnematales/embryophyte sister group relationship has important implications for early land plant evolution. If substantiated, it should allow us to address important questions regarding the primary adaptations of viridiplants during the conquest of land. Clearly

  17. Diversity of regulatory mechanisms of photosynthetic carbon metabolism in plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Tamoi, Masahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the regulatory mechanisms of the Calvin cycle in algae, we analyzed the molecular properties of the enzymes involved in this cycle. We demonstrated that these enzymes were not regulated by redox modulation through the ferredoxin/thioredoxin system under light/dark conditions and were not sensitive to treatments with hydrogen peroxide in vitro, unlike the chloroplastic thiol-modulated enzymes of plants. On the other hand, we found that cyanobacteria possessed a unique enzyme involved in the Calvin cycle. The CP12 protein played an important role in regulating carbon metabolism in the Calvin cycle in cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae. This review described the regulatory mechanisms of the Calvin cycle in algae and also the effects of alterations to photosynthetic carbon metabolism on plant productivity, carbon partitioning, and the carbon/nitrogen balance using transgenic plants expressing algal genes.

  18. The fast and slow kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction in plants, algae and cyanobacteria: a viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, George C; Tsimilli-Michael, Merope; Stamatakis, Kostas

    2007-01-01

    The light-induced/dark-reversible changes in the chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence of photosynthetic cells and membranes in the mus-to-several min time window (fluorescence induction, FI; or Kautsky transient) reflect quantum yield changes (quenching/de-quenching) as well as changes in the number of Chls a in photosystem II (PS II; state transitions). Both relate to excitation trapping in PS II and the ensuing photosynthetic electron transport (PSET), and to secondary PSET effects, such as ion translocation across thylakoid membranes and filling or depletion of post-PS II and post-PS I pools of metabolites. In addition, high actinic light doses may depress Chl a fluorescence irreversibly (photoinhibitory lowering; q(I)). FI has been studied quite extensively in plants an algae (less so in cyanobacteria) as it affords a low resolution panoramic view of the photosynthesis process. Total FI comprises two transients, a fast initial (OPS; for Origin, Peak, Steady state) and a second slower transient (SMT; for Steady state, Maximum, Terminal state), whose details are characteristically different in eukaryotic (plants and algae) and prokaryotic (cyanobacteria) oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. In the former, maximal fluorescence output occurs at peak P, with peak M lying much lower or being absent, in which case the PSMT phases are replaced by a monotonous PT fluorescence decay. In contrast, in phycobilisome (PBS)-containing cyanobacteria maximal fluorescence occurs at M which lies much higher than peak P. It will be argued that this difference is caused by a fluorescence lowering trend (state 1 --> 2 transition) that dominates the FI pattern of plants and algae, and correspondingly by a fluorescence increasing trend (state 2 --> 1 transition) that dominates the FI of PBS-containing cyanobacteria. Characteristically, however, the FI pattern of the PBS-minus cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina resembles the FI patterns of algae and plants and not of the PBS

  19. Cyanophora paradoxa genome elucidates origin of photosynthesis in algae and plants.

    PubMed

    Price, Dana C; Chan, Cheong Xin; Yoon, Hwan Su; Yang, Eun Chan; Qiu, Huan; Weber, Andreas P M; Schwacke, Rainer; Gross, Jeferson; Blouin, Nicolas A; Lane, Chris; Reyes-Prieto, Adrián; Durnford, Dion G; Neilson, Jonathan A D; Lang, B Franz; Burger, Gertraud; Steiner, Jürgen M; Löffelhardt, Wolfgang; Meuser, Jonathan E; Posewitz, Matthew C; Ball, Steven; Arias, Maria Cecilia; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M; Rensing, Stefan A; Symeonidi, Aikaterini; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Green, Beverley R; Rajah, Veeran D; Boore, Jeffrey; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2012-02-17

    The primary endosymbiotic origin of the plastid in eukaryotes more than 1 billion years ago led to the evolution of algae and plants. We analyzed draft genome and transcriptome data from the basally diverging alga Cyanophora paradoxa and provide evidence for a single origin of the primary plastid in the eukaryote supergroup Plantae. C. paradoxa retains ancestral features of starch biosynthesis, fermentation, and plastid protein translocation common to plants and algae but lacks typical eukaryotic light-harvesting complex proteins. Traces of an ancient link to parasites such as Chlamydiae were found in the genomes of C. paradoxa and other Plantae. Apparently, Chlamydia-like bacteria donated genes that allow export of photosynthate from the plastid and its polymerization into storage polysaccharide in the cytosol.

  20. Gravitropism in Higher Plant Shoots

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Salisbury, Frank B.

    1981-01-01

    It has long been known that applied ethylene can redirect the gravitropic response, but only occasionally has it been suggested that ethylene normally plays a role in gravitropism. Two inhibitors of ethylene synthesis [Co2+ and aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG)] and two inhibitors of ethylene action (Ag+ and CO2) were shown to delay the gravitropic response of cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), and castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) stems. Gentle shaking on a mechanical shaker does not inhibit the gravitropic response, but vigorous hand shaking for 120 seconds delays the response somewhat. AVG and Ag+ further delay the response of mechanically stimulated plants. AVG delays the response of defoliated and of decapitated plants. Plants laid on their side and restricted so that they cannot bend upward store both bending energy and gravitropic stimulus; they bend immediately when released from restriction (stored energy) and continue to bend for some hours after (stored stimulus). AVG retards the storage of bending energy but not of stimulus. In gravitropism, graviperception may first stimulate ethylene evolution, which may then influence bending directly, or responses involving ethylene could be more indirect. PMID:16661736

  1. Silicon transporters in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in the Earth's crust and exerts beneficial effects on plant growth and production by alleviating both biotic and abiotic stresses including diseases, pests, lodging, drought and nutrient imbalance. Silicon is taken up by the roots in the form ofsilicic acid, a noncharged molecule. Recently both influx (Lsil) and efflux (Lsi2) transporters for silicic acid have been identified in gramineous plants including rice, barley and maize. Lsil and its homologs are influx Si transporters, which belong to a Nod26-like major intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily in the aquaporin protein family. They are responsible for the transport of Si from the external solution to the root cells. On the other hand, Lsi2 and its homologs are efflux Si transporters, belonging to putative anion transporters and are responsible for the transport of Si out of the cells toward the xylem. All influx transporters show polar localization at the distal side. Among efflux transporters, Lsi2 in rice shows polar localization at the proximal side, but that in barley and maize does not show polar localization. The cell-specificity of localization of Si transporters and expression patterns are different between species. Rice Si transporters are also permeable to arsenite.

  2. Mitochondrial glycolate oxidation contributes to photorespiration in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Markus; Thiruveedhi, Krishnaveni; Rosenkranz, Ruben; Kebeish, Rashad; Hirsch, Heinz-Josef; Kreuzaler, Fritz; Peterhänsel, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate is an important reaction step in photorespiration. Land plants and charophycean green algae oxidize glycolate in the peroxisome using oxygen as a co-factor, whereas chlorophycean green algae use a mitochondrial glycolate dehydrogenase (GDH) with organic co-factors. Previous analyses revealed the existence of a GDH in the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtGDH). In this study, the contribution of AtGDH to photorespiration was characterized. Both RNA abundance and mitochondrial GDH activity were up-regulated under photorespiratory growth conditions. Labelling experiments indicated that glycolate oxidation in mitochondrial extracts is coupled to CO(2) release. This effect could be enhanced by adding co-factors for aminotransferases, but is inhibited by the addition of glycine. T-DNA insertion lines for AtGDH show a drastic reduction in mitochondrial GDH activity and CO(2) release from glycolate. Furthermore, photorespiration is reduced in these mutant lines compared with the wild type, as revealed by determination of the post-illumination CO(2) burst and the glycine/serine ratio under photorespiratory growth conditions. The data show that mitochondrial glycolate oxidation contributes to photorespiration in higher plants. This indicates the conservation of chlorophycean photorespiration in streptophytes despite the evolution of leaf-type peroxisomes.

  3. Heterotrimeric G proteins in green algae: an early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophyaceaen green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions.

  4. Xenobiotic sensing and signalling in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ramel, Fanny; Sulmon, Cécile; Serra, Anne-Antonella; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Couée, Ivan

    2012-06-01

    Anthropogenic changes and chemical pollution confront plant communities with various xenobiotic compounds or combinations of xenobiotics, involving chemical structures that are at least partially novel for plant species. Plant responses to chemical challenges and stimuli are usually characterized by the approaches of toxicology, ecotoxicology, and stress physiology. Development of transcriptomics and proteomics analysis has demonstrated the importance of modifications to gene expression in plant responses to xenobiotics. It has emerged that xenobiotic effects could involve not only biochemical and physiological disruption, but also the disruption of signalling pathways. Moreover, mutations affecting sensing and signalling pathways result in modifications of responses to xenobiotics, thus confirming interference or crosstalk between xenobiotic effects and signalling pathways. Some of these changes at gene expression, regulation and signalling levels suggest various mechanisms of xenobiotic sensing in higher plants, in accordance with xenobiotic-sensing mechanisms that have been characterized in other phyla (yeast, invertebrates, vertebrates). In higher plants, such sensing systems are difficult to identify, even though different lines of evidence, involving mutant studies, transcription factor analysis, or comparative studies, point to their existence. It remains difficult to distinguish between the hypothesis of direct xenobiotic sensing and indirect sensing of xenobiotic-related modifications. However, future characterization of xenobiotic sensing and signalling in higher plants is likely to be a key element for determining the tolerance and remediation capacities of plant species. This characterization will also be of interest for understanding evolutionary dynamics of stress adaptation and mechanisms of adaptation to novel stressors.

  5. Evaluation of Supercritical Extracts of Algae as Biostimulants of Plant Growth in Field Trials

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, Izabela; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Dmytryk, Agnieszka; Wilk, Radosław; Gramza, Mateusz; Rój, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the field trials was to determine the influence of supercritical algal extracts on the growth and development of winter wheat (variety Akteur). As a raw material for the supercritical fluid extraction, the biomass of microalga Spirulina plantensis, brown seaweed – Ascophyllum nodosum and Baltic green macroalgae was used. Forthial and Asahi SL constituted the reference products. It was found that the tested biostimulants did not influence statistically significantly the plant height, length of ear, and shank length. The ear number per m2 was the highest in the group where the Baltic macroalgae extract was applied in the dose 1.0 L/ha (statistically significant differences). Number of grains in ear (statistically significant differences) and shank length was the highest in the group treated with Spirulina at the dose 1.5 L/ha. In the group with Ascophyllum at the dose 1.0 L/ha, the highest length of ear was observed. The yield was comparable in all the experimental groups (lack of statistically significant differences). Among the tested supercritical extracts, the best results were obtained for Spirulina (1.5 L/ha). The mass of 1000 grains was the highest for extract from Baltic macroalgae and was 3.5% higher than for Asahi, 4.0% higher than for Forthial and 18.5% higher than for the control group (statistically significant differences). Future work is needed to fully characterize the chemical composition of the applied algal extracts. A special attention should be paid to the extracts obtained from Baltic algae because they are inexpensive source of naturally occurring bioactive compounds, which can be used in sustainable agriculture and horticulture. PMID:27826310

  6. Evaluation of Supercritical Extracts of Algae as Biostimulants of Plant Growth in Field Trials.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Izabela; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Dmytryk, Agnieszka; Wilk, Radosław; Gramza, Mateusz; Rój, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the field trials was to determine the influence of supercritical algal extracts on the growth and development of winter wheat (variety Akteur). As a raw material for the supercritical fluid extraction, the biomass of microalga Spirulina plantensis, brown seaweed - Ascophyllum nodosum and Baltic green macroalgae was used. Forthial and Asahi SL constituted the reference products. It was found that the tested biostimulants did not influence statistically significantly the plant height, length of ear, and shank length. The ear number per m(2) was the highest in the group where the Baltic macroalgae extract was applied in the dose 1.0 L/ha (statistically significant differences). Number of grains in ear (statistically significant differences) and shank length was the highest in the group treated with Spirulina at the dose 1.5 L/ha. In the group with Ascophyllum at the dose 1.0 L/ha, the highest length of ear was observed. The yield was comparable in all the experimental groups (lack of statistically significant differences). Among the tested supercritical extracts, the best results were obtained for Spirulina (1.5 L/ha). The mass of 1000 grains was the highest for extract from Baltic macroalgae and was 3.5% higher than for Asahi, 4.0% higher than for Forthial and 18.5% higher than for the control group (statistically significant differences). Future work is needed to fully characterize the chemical composition of the applied algal extracts. A special attention should be paid to the extracts obtained from Baltic algae because they are inexpensive source of naturally occurring bioactive compounds, which can be used in sustainable agriculture and horticulture.

  7. Conserved and diversified gene families of monovalent cation/h(+) antiporters from algae to flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Chanroj, Salil; Wang, Guoying; Venema, Kees; Zhang, Muren Warren; Delwiche, Charles F; Sze, Heven

    2012-01-01

    All organisms have evolved strategies to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental and environmental cues. One strategy is mediated by monovalent cation-proton antiporters (CPA) that are classified in two superfamilies. Many CPA1 genes from bacteria, fungi, metazoa, and plants have been functionally characterized; though roles of plant CPA2 genes encoding K(+)-efflux antiporter (KEA) and cation/H(+) exchanger (CHX) families are largely unknown. Phylogenetic analysis showed that three clades of the CPA1 Na(+)-H(+) exchanger (NHX) family have been conserved from single-celled algae to Arabidopsis. These are (i) plasma membrane-bound SOS1/AtNHX7 that share ancestry with prokaryote NhaP, (ii) endosomal AtNHX5/6 that is part of the eukaryote Intracellular-NHE clade, and (iii) a vacuolar NHX clade (AtNHX1-4) specific to plants. Early diversification of KEA genes possibly from an ancestral cyanobacterium gene is suggested by three types seen in all plants. Intriguingly, CHX genes diversified from three to four members in one subclade of early land plants to 28 genes in eight subclades of Arabidopsis. Homologs from Spirogyra or Physcomitrella share high similarity with AtCHX20, suggesting that guard cell-specific AtCHX20 and its closest relatives are founders of the family, and pollen-expressed CHX genes appeared later in monocots and early eudicots. AtCHX proteins mediate K(+) transport and pH homeostasis, and have been localized to intracellular and plasma membrane. Thus KEA genes are conserved from green algae to angiosperms, and their presence in red algae and secondary endosymbionts suggest a role in plastids. In contrast, AtNHX1-4 subtype evolved in plant cells to handle ion homeostasis of vacuoles. The great diversity of CHX genes in land plants compared to metazoa, fungi, or algae would imply a significant role of ion and pH homeostasis at dynamic endomembranes in the vegetative and reproductive success of flowering plants.

  8. Conserved and Diversified Gene Families of Monovalent Cation/H+ Antiporters from Algae to Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chanroj, Salil; Wang, Guoying; Venema, Kees; Zhang, Muren Warren; Delwiche, Charles F.; Sze, Heven

    2012-01-01

    All organisms have evolved strategies to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental and environmental cues. One strategy is mediated by monovalent cation–proton antiporters (CPA) that are classified in two superfamilies. Many CPA1 genes from bacteria, fungi, metazoa, and plants have been functionally characterized; though roles of plant CPA2 genes encoding K+-efflux antiporter (KEA) and cation/H+ exchanger (CHX) families are largely unknown. Phylogenetic analysis showed that three clades of the CPA1 Na+–H+ exchanger (NHX) family have been conserved from single-celled algae to Arabidopsis. These are (i) plasma membrane-bound SOS1/AtNHX7 that share ancestry with prokaryote NhaP, (ii) endosomal AtNHX5/6 that is part of the eukaryote Intracellular-NHE clade, and (iii) a vacuolar NHX clade (AtNHX1–4) specific to plants. Early diversification of KEA genes possibly from an ancestral cyanobacterium gene is suggested by three types seen in all plants. Intriguingly, CHX genes diversified from three to four members in one subclade of early land plants to 28 genes in eight subclades of Arabidopsis. Homologs from Spirogyra or Physcomitrella share high similarity with AtCHX20, suggesting that guard cell-specific AtCHX20 and its closest relatives are founders of the family, and pollen-expressed CHX genes appeared later in monocots and early eudicots. AtCHX proteins mediate K+ transport and pH homeostasis, and have been localized to intracellular and plasma membrane. Thus KEA genes are conserved from green algae to angiosperms, and their presence in red algae and secondary endosymbionts suggest a role in plastids. In contrast, AtNHX1–4 subtype evolved in plant cells to handle ion homeostasis of vacuoles. The great diversity of CHX genes in land plants compared to metazoa, fungi, or algae would imply a significant role of ion and pH homeostasis at dynamic endomembranes in the vegetative and reproductive success of flowering plants. PMID:22639643

  9. Aquatic phytoremendiation: Algae and aquatic plants for removal of toxic elements

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    A study to test several species of plants for heavy metal bioremoval is very briefly described. Adsorption isotherms were determined for cadmium, zinc, lead, nickel, and copper by measuring the amounts adsorbed by the biomass over a range of residual metal concentrations. Numerical results presented include adsorption characteristics of aquatic plants at pH 5 and specific adsorption of cadmium onto various biomass. The two best species were Phormidium, a blue-green alga, and Myriophyllum spicatum, water milfoil. The maximum metal ion absorbed the the minimal residual metal concentrations achieved allow estimation of the amount of biomass required to achieve a desired treatment level.

  10. The circadian system in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Stacey L

    2009-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates diverse aspects of plant growth and development and promotes plant fitness. Molecular identification of clock components, primarily in Arabidopsis, has led to recent rapid progress in our understanding of the clock mechanism in higher plants. Using mathematical modeling and experimental approaches, workers in the field have developed a model of the clock that incorporates both transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of clock genes. This cell-autonomous clock, or oscillator, generates rhythmic outputs that can be monitored at the cellular and whole-organism level. The clock not only confers daily rhythms in growth and metabolism, but also interacts with signaling pathways involved in plant responses to the environment. Future work will lead to a better understanding of how the clock and other signaling networks are integrated to provide plants with an adaptive advantage.

  11. Developing inexpensive malaria vaccines from plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-03-01

    Malaria is a parasitic, mosquito-borne, infectious disease that threatens nearly half of the global population. The last decade has seen a dramatic drop in the number of malaria-related deaths because of vector control methods and anti-malarial drugs. Unfortunately, this strategy is not sustainable because of the emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquitoes and drug-resistant Plasmodium parasites. Eradication of malaria will ultimately require low-cost easily administered vaccines that work in concert with current control methods. Low cost and ease of administration will be essential components of any vaccine, because malaria endemic regions are poor and often lack an adequate healthcare infrastructure. Recently, several groups have begun addressing these issues using inexpensive photosynthetic organisms for producing vaccine antigens and exploring oral delivery strategies. Immune responses from plant-based injectable malaria vaccines are promising, but attempts to adapt these for oral delivery suggest we are far from a feasible strategy. Here, we review examples of these technologies and discuss the progress and potential of this research, as well as the obstacles ahead.

  12. Regulation of cell division in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant's essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  13. Excitation energy transfer in vitro between phycobiliproteins and thylakoid photosystem II of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaonan; Tseng, C. K.

    1992-12-01

    The excitation energy transfer from phycobiliproteins to thylakoid PSII of higher plants was investigated. When incubated with spinach thylakoids, phycobiliproteins isolated from red and blue-green algae transferred light energy absorbed to spinach PSII. The efficiency of energy transfer was dependent on the kind of phycobiliproteins used. If spinach thylakoids were replaced by the thylakoids of Brassica chinensis, R-phycoerythin or C-phycocyanin did not transfer their excitation energy to PSII of Brassica chinensis unless allophycocyanin was present.

  14. Nickel: a micronutrient essential for higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.H.; Welch, R.M.; Cary, E.E.

    1987-11-01

    Nickel was established as an essential micronutrient for the growth of temperate cereal crops. Grain from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Onda; containing 40 to 80 nanograms of Ni per gram dry weight) grown in solution culture with negligible Ni concentrations (<30 nanograms of Ni per liter) exhibited greatly reduced germination rates (i.e. 50% less than grain from Ni-adequate plants) and seeding vigor of the viable grain was greatly depressed. Grain containing less than 30 nanograms per gram dry weight was inviable. Under Ni-deficient conditions, barley plants fail to produce viable grain because of a disruption of the maternal plants normal grain-filling and maturation processes that occur following formation of the grain embryo. The observations that (a) barley plants fail to complete their life cycle in the absence of Ni and (b) addition of Ni to the growth medium completely alleviates deficiency symptoms in the maternal plants satisfies the essentiality criteria; thus Ni should be considered a micronutrient for cereals. Because Ni is required by legumes, and is now established for cereals, the authors conclude that Ni should be added to the list of micronutrients essential for all higher plant growth.

  15. Phenol biosynthesis in higher plants. Gallic acid

    PubMed Central

    Dewick, P. M.; Haslam, E.

    1969-01-01

    The biosynthesis of gallic acid in a number of higher plants was investigated by using l-[U-14C]phenylalanine, (−)-[G-14C]shikimic acid, d-[1-14C]glucose and d-[6-14C]glucose as tracers. The results are compared with those obtained similarly for caffeic acid and are interpreted in terms of the dehydrogenation of 5-dehydroshikimic acid as a normal route of metabolism for gallic acid. PMID:5807212

  16. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Knight, Thomas J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.

    2004-12-14

    Increasing the concentration of prolines, such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that over-express glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  17. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Knight, Thomas J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.

    2003-04-29

    Increasing the concentration of prolines such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that overexpress glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramnate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  18. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Knight, Thomas J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.

    2003-07-15

    Increasing the concentration of prolines, such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that over-express glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  19. Multi-Level Light Capture Control in Plants and Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Wobbe, Lutz; Bassi, Roberto; Kruse, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Life on Earth relies on photosynthesis, and the ongoing depletion of fossil carbon fuels has renewed interest in phototrophic light-energy conversion processes as a blueprint for the conversion of atmospheric CO2 into various organic compounds. Light-harvesting systems have evolved in plants and green algae, which are adapted to the light intensity and spectral composition encountered in their habitats. These organisms are constantly challenged by a fluctuating light supply and other environmental cues affecting photosynthetic performance. Excess light can be especially harmful, but plants and microalgae are equipped with different acclimation mechanisms to control the processing of sunlight absorbed at both photosystems. We summarize the current knowledge and discuss the potential for optimization of phototrophic light-energy conversion.

  20. Nickel: an essential element for higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    The inability of cereal crops to complete their life cycle in the absence of Ni demonstrates that Ni is an essential micronutrient for the growth of higher plants. The growth of barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Onda), wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Era), and oats (Avena sativa L., cv. Astro) is depressed under Ni deficient conditions, and grain of severely Ni deficient barley was inviable. Evidence suggests that Ni is essential to the formation of the grain embryo and in the remobilization of N from the leaves to the grain during plant maturation. Nickel deficiency produces characteristic deficiency symptoms in cereals including, leaf chlorosis, premature senescence in oats, and the development of interveinal necrosis. Metabolic effects of Ni deficiency are extensive and cannot be alleviated by the addition of any other essential element.

  1. Cultivation of green algae Chlorella sp. in different wastewaters from municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Min, Min; Li, Yecong; Chen, Paul; Chen, Yifeng; Liu, Yuhuan; Wang, Yingkuan; Ruan, Roger

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth of green algae Chlorella sp. on wastewaters sampled from four different points of the treatment process flow of a local municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) and how well the algal growth removed nitrogen, phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and metal ions from the wastewaters. The four wastewaters were wastewater before primary settling (#1 wastewater), wastewater after primary settling (#2 wastewater), wastewater after activated sludge tank (#3 wastewater), and centrate (#4 wastewater), which is the wastewater generated in sludge centrifuge. The average specific growth rates in the exponential period were 0.412, 0.429, 0.343, and 0.948 day(-1) for wastewaters #1, #2, #3, and #4, respectively. The removal rates of NH4-N were 82.4%, 74.7%, and 78.3% for wastewaters #1, #2, and #4, respectively. For #3 wastewater, 62.5% of NO3-N, the major inorganic nitrogen form, was removed with 6.3-fold of NO2-N generated. From wastewaters #1, #2, and #4, 83.2%, 90.6%, and 85.6% phosphorus and 50.9%, 56.5%, and 83.0% COD were removed, respectively. Only 4.7% was removed in #3 wastewater and the COD in #3 wastewater increased slightly after algal growth, probably due to the excretion of small photosynthetic organic molecules by algae. Metal ions, especially Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Mn in centrate, were found to be removed very efficiently. The results of this study suggest that growing algae in nutrient-rich centrate offers a new option of applying algal process in MWTP to manage the nutrient load for the aeration tank to which the centrate is returned, serving the dual roles of nutrient reduction and valuable biofuel feedstock production.

  2. The liverwort Pellia endiviifolia shares microtranscriptomic traits that are common to green algae and land plants

    PubMed Central

    Alaba, Sylwia; Piszczalka, Pawel; Pietrykowska, Halina; Pacak, Andrzej M; Sierocka, Izabela; Nuc, Przemyslaw W; Singh, Kashmir; Plewka, Patrycja; Sulkowska, Aleksandra; Jarmolowski, Artur; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2015-01-01

    Liverworts are the most basal group of extant land plants. Nonetheless, the molecular biology of liverworts is poorly understood. Gene expression has been studied in only one species, Marchantia polymorpha. In particular, no microRNA (miRNA) sequences from liverworts have been reported. Here, Illumina-based next-generation sequencing was employed to identify small RNAs, and analyze the transcriptome and the degradome of Pellia endiviifolia. Three hundred and eleven conserved miRNA plant families were identified, and 42 new liverwort-specific miRNAs were discovered. The RNA degradome analysis revealed that target mRNAs of only three miRNAs (miR160, miR166, and miR408) have been conserved between liverworts and other land plants. New targets were identified for the remaining conserved miRNAs. Moreover, the analysis of the degradome permitted the identification of targets for 13 novel liverwort-specific miRNAs. Interestingly, three of the liverwort microRNAs show high similarity to previously reported miRNAs from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This is the first observation of miRNAs that exist both in a representative alga and in the liverwort P. endiviifolia but are not present in land plants. The results of the analysis of the P. endivifolia microtranscriptome support the conclusions of previous studies that placed liverworts at the root of the land plant evolutionary tree of life. PMID:25530158

  3. The liverwort Pellia endiviifolia shares microtranscriptomic traits that are common to green algae and land plants.

    PubMed

    Alaba, Sylwia; Piszczalka, Pawel; Pietrykowska, Halina; Pacak, Andrzej M; Sierocka, Izabela; Nuc, Przemyslaw W; Singh, Kashmir; Plewka, Patrycja; Sulkowska, Aleksandra; Jarmolowski, Artur; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2015-04-01

    Liverworts are the most basal group of extant land plants. Nonetheless, the molecular biology of liverworts is poorly understood. Gene expression has been studied in only one species, Marchantia polymorpha. In particular, no microRNA (miRNA) sequences from liverworts have been reported. Here, Illumina-based next-generation sequencing was employed to identify small RNAs, and analyze the transcriptome and the degradome of Pellia endiviifolia. Three hundred and eleven conserved miRNA plant families were identified, and 42 new liverwort-specific miRNAs were discovered. The RNA degradome analysis revealed that target mRNAs of only three miRNAs (miR160, miR166, and miR408) have been conserved between liverworts and other land plants. New targets were identified for the remaining conserved miRNAs. Moreover, the analysis of the degradome permitted the identification of targets for 13 novel liverwort-specific miRNAs. Interestingly, three of the liverwort microRNAs show high similarity to previously reported miRNAs from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This is the first observation of miRNAs that exist both in a representative alga and in the liverwort P. endiviifolia but are not present in land plants. The results of the analysis of the P. endivifolia microtranscriptome support the conclusions of previous studies that placed liverworts at the root of the land plant evolutionary tree of life.

  4. Cis-Golgi cisternal assembly and biosynthetic activation occur sequentially in plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Bryon S; Kang, Byung-Ho; Gerl, Mathias J; Gergely, Zachary R; McMichael, Colleen M; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Staehelin, L Andrew

    2013-05-01

    The cisternal progression/maturation model of Golgi trafficking predicts that cis-Golgi cisternae are formed de novo on the cis-side of the Golgi. Here we describe structural and functional intermediates of the cis cisterna assembly process in high-pressure frozen algae (Scherffelia dubia, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and plants (Arabidopsis thaliana, Dionaea muscipula; Venus flytrap) as determined by electron microscopy, electron tomography and immuno-electron microscopy techniques. Our findings are as follows: (i) The cis-most (C1) Golgi cisternae are generated de novo from cisterna initiators produced by the fusion of 3-5 COPII vesicles in contact with a C2 cis cisterna. (ii) COPII vesicles fuel the growth of the initiators, which then merge into a coherent C1 cisterna. (iii) When a C1 cisterna nucleates its first cisterna initiator it becomes a C2 cisterna. (iv) C2-Cn cis cisternae grow through COPII vesicle fusion. (v) ER-resident proteins are recycled from cis cisternae to the ER via COPIa-type vesicles. (vi) In S. dubia the C2 cisternae are capable of mediating the self-assembly of scale protein complexes. (vii) In plants, ∼90% of native α-mannosidase I localizes to medial Golgi cisternae. (viii) Biochemical activation of cis cisternae appears to coincide with their conversion to medial cisternae via recycling of medial cisterna enzymes. We propose how the different cis cisterna assembly intermediates of plants and algae may actually be related to those present in the ERGIC and in the pre-cis Golgi cisterna layer in mammalian cells.

  5. Cis-Golgi cisternal assembly and biosynthetic activation occur sequentially in plants and algae

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Bryon S.; Kang, Byung-Ho; Gerl, Mathias J.; Gergely, Zachary R.; McMichael, Colleen M.; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.; Staehelin, L. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The cisternal progression/maturation model of Golgi trafficking predicts that cis-Golgi cisternae are formed de novo on the cis-side of the Golgi. Here we describe structural and functional intermediates of the cis cisterna assembly process in high-pressure frozen algae (Scherffelia dubia, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and plants (Arabidopsis thaliana, Dionaea muscipula; Venus Flytrap) as determined by electron microscopy, electron tomography and immuno-electron microscopy techniques. Our findings are as follows: (1) The cis-most (C1) Golgi cisternae are generated de novo from cisterna initiators produced by the fusion of 3–5 COPII vesicles in contact with a C2 cis cisterna. (2) COPII vesicles fuel the growth of the initiators, which then merge into a coherent C1 cisterna. (3) When a C1 cisterna nucleates its first cisterna initiator it becomes a C2 cisterna. (4) C2-Cn cis cisternae grow through COPII vesicle fusion. (5) ER-resident proteins are recycled from cis cisternae to the ER via COPIa-type vesicles. (6) In S. dubia the C2 cisternae are capable of mediating the self-assembly of scale protein complexes. (7) In plants, ~90% of native α-mannosidase I localizes to medial Golgi cisternae. (8) Biochemical activation of cis cisternae appears to coincide with their conversion to medial cisternae via recycling of medial cisterna enzymes. We propose how the different cis cisterna assembly intermediates of plants and algae may actually be related to those present in the ERGIC and in the pre-cis Golgi cisterna layer in mammalian cells. PMID:23369235

  6. Direction of illumination controls gametophyte orientation in seedless plants and related algae

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-Correa, Christopher; Ecker, Alice; Graham, Linda E

    2015-01-01

    The environmental influences that determine dorsiventral or axial gametophyte orientation are unknown for most modern seedless plants. To fill this gap, an experimental laboratory system was employed to evaluate the relative effects of light direction and gravity on body orientation of the dorsiventral green alga Coleochaete orbicularis, and gametophytes of liverworts Blasia pusilla and Marchantia polymorpha, early-diverging moss Sphagnum compactum, and fern Ceratopteris richardii, the latter functioning as experimental control. Replicate clonal cultures were experimentally illuminated only from above, only from below, or from multiple directions, with the same near-saturation PAR level for periods brief enough to minimize nutrient limitation effects, and orientation of new growth was evaluated. For all species tested, direction of illumination exerted stronger control over gametophyte body orientation than gravity. When illuminated only from below: 1) axial Sphagnum gametophores that had initially grown into an overlying air space inverted growth by 180°, burrowing into the substrate; 2) new growth of dorsiventral Blasia, Marchantia, and Ceratopteris gametophytes–whose ventral rhizoids initially penetrated agar substrate and dorsal surfaces initially faced overlying airspace–twisted 180° so that ventral surfaces bearing rhizoids faced overlying air space and rhizoids extended into the air; and 3) Coleochaete lost typical dorsiventral organization and diagnostic dorsal hairs. Direction of illumination also exerted stronger control over orientation of liverwort new growth than surface contact did. These results indicate that early land plants likely inherited light-directed gametophyte body orientation from ancestral streptophyte algae and suggest a mechanism for reorientation of gametophyte-dominant land plants after spatial disturbance. PMID:26237278

  7. Direction of illumination controls gametophyte orientation in seedless plants and related algae.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Correa, Christopher; Ecker, Alice; Graham, Linda E

    2015-01-01

    The environmental influences that determine dorsiventral or axial gametophyte orientation are unknown for most modern seedless plants. To fill this gap, an experimental laboratory system was employed to evaluate the relative effects of light direction and gravity on body orientation of the dorsiventral green alga Coleochaete orbicularis, and gametophytes of liverworts Blasia pusilla and Marchantia polymorpha, early-diverging moss Sphagnum compactum, and fern Ceratopteris richardii, the latter functioning as experimental control. Replicate clonal cultures were experimentally illuminated only from above, only from below, or from multiple directions, with the same near-saturation PAR level for periods brief enough to minimize nutrient limitation effects, and orientation of new growth was evaluated. For all species tested, direction of illumination exerted stronger control over gametophyte body orientation than gravity. When illuminated only from below: 1) axial Sphagnum gametophores that had initially grown into an overlying air space inverted growth by 180°, burrowing into the substrate; 2) new growth of dorsiventral Blasia, Marchantia, and Ceratopteris gametophytes-whose ventral rhizoids initially penetrated agar substrate and dorsal surfaces initially faced overlying airspace-twisted 180° so that ventral surfaces bearing rhizoids faced overlying air space and rhizoids extended into the air; and 3) Coleochaete lost typical dorsiventral organization and diagnostic dorsal hairs. Direction of illumination also exerted stronger control over orientation of liverwort new growth than surface contact did. These results indicate that early land plants likely inherited light-directed gametophyte body orientation from ancestral streptophyte algae and suggest a mechanism for reorientation of gametophyte-dominant land plants after spatial disturbance.

  8. The charophycean green algae provide insights into the early origins of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Pettolino, Filomena A; Bacic, Antony; Ralph, John; Lu, Fachuang; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Fei, Zhangzhun; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2011-10-01

    Numerous evolutionary innovations were required to enable freshwater green algae to colonize terrestrial habitats and thereby initiate the evolution of land plants (embryophytes). These adaptations probably included changes in cell-wall composition and architecture that were to become essential for embryophyte development and radiation. However, it is not known to what extent the polymers that are characteristic of embryophyte cell walls, including pectins, hemicelluloses, glycoproteins and lignin, evolved in response to the demands of the terrestrial environment or whether they pre-existed in their algal ancestors. Here we show that members of the advanced charophycean green algae (CGA), including the Charales, Coleochaetales and Zygnematales, but not basal CGA (Klebsormidiales and Chlorokybales), have cell walls that are comparable in several respects to the primary walls of embryophytes. Moreover, we provide both chemical and immunocytochemical evidence that selected Coleochaete species have cell walls that contain small amounts of lignin or lignin-like polymers derived from radical coupling of hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. Thus, the ability to synthesize many of the components that characterize extant embryophyte walls evolved during divergence within CGA. Our study provides new insight into the evolutionary window during which the structurally complex walls of embryophytes originated, and the significance of the advanced CGA during these events.

  9. Interaction of chiral herbicides with soil microorganisms, algae and vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Asad, Muhammad Asad Ullah; Lavoie, Michel; Song, Hao; Jin, Yujian; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2017-02-15

    Chiral herbicides are often used in agriculture as racemic mixtures, although studies have shown that the fate and toxicity of herbicide enantiomers to target and non-target plants can be enantioselective and that herbicide toxicity can be mediated by only one enantiomer. If one enantiomer is active against the target plant, the use of enantiomer-rich herbicide mixtures instead of racemic herbicides could decrease the amount of herbicide applied to a crop and the cost of herbicide application, as well as unintended toxic herbicide effects in the environment. Such a change in the management of herbicide applications requires in-depth knowledge and a critical analysis of the fate and effects of herbicide enantiomers in the environment. This review article first synthesizes the current state of knowledge on soil and plant biodegradation of herbicide enantiomers. Second, we discuss our understanding of the biochemical toxicity mechanisms associated with both enantiomers in target and non-target plants gained from state-of-the-art genomic, proteomic and metabolomic tools. Third, we present the emerging view on the "side effects" of herbicides in the root microbiome and their repercussions on target or non-target plant metabolism. Although our review of the literature indicates that the toxicity of herbicide enantiomers is highly variable depending on plant species and herbicides, we found general trends in the enantioselective toxic effects of different herbicides in vascular plants and algae. The present study will be helpful for pesticide risk assessments as well as for the management of applying enriched-enantiomer herbicides.

  10. Effect of free fall on higher plants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of exposure to the free-fall state on the orientation, morphogenesis, physiology, and radiation response of higher plants is briefly summarized. It is proposed that the duration of the space-flight experiments has been to brief to permit meaningful effects of free fall on general biochemistry, growth, and development to appear. However, two types of significant effect did occur. The first is on differential growth - i.e., tropism and epinasty - resulting from the absence of a normal geostimulus. For these phenomena it is suggested that ground-based experiments with the clinostat would suffice to mimic the effect of the free-fall state. The second is an apparent interaction between the radiation response and some flight condition, yielding an enhanced microspore abortion, a disturbed spindle function, and a stunting of stamen hairs. It is suggested that this apparent interaction may be derived from a shift in the rhythm of the cell cycle, induced by the free fall.

  11. Rhizoids and protonemata of characean algae: model cells for research on polarized growth and plant gravity sensing.

    PubMed

    Braun, M; Limbach, C

    2006-12-01

    Gravitropically tip-growing rhizoids and protonemata of characean algae are well-established unicellular plant model systems for research on gravitropism. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying gravity sensing and gravity-oriented growth. While in higher-plant statocytes the role of cytoskeletal elements, especially the actin cytoskeleton, in the mechanisms of gravity sensing is still enigmatic, there is clear evidence that in the characean cells actin is intimately involved in polarized growth, gravity sensing, and the gravitropic response mechanisms. The multiple functions of actin are orchestrated by a variety of actin-binding proteins which control actin polymerisation, regulate the dynamic remodelling of the actin filament architecture, and mediate the transport of vesicles and organelles. Actin and a steep gradient of cytoplasmic free calcium are crucial components of a feedback mechanism that controls polarized growth. Experiments performed in microgravity provided evidence that actomyosin is a key player for gravity sensing: it coordinates the position of statoliths and, upon a change in the cell's orientation, directs sedimenting statoliths to specific areas of the plasma membrane, where contact with membrane-bound gravisensor molecules elicits short gravitropic pathways. In rhizoids, gravitropic signalling leads to a local reduction of cytoplasmic free calcium and results in differential growth of the opposite subapical cell flanks. The negative gravitropic response of protonemata involves actin-dependent relocation of the calcium gradient and displacement of the centre of maximal growth towards the upper flank. On the basis of the results obtained from the gravitropic model cells, a similar fine-tuning function of the actomyosin system is discussed for the early steps of gravity sensing in higher-plant statocytes.

  12. Digitization workflows for flat sheets and packets of plants, algae, and fungi1

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Gil; Sweeney, Patrick; Wallace, Lisa E.; Rabeler, Richard K.; Allard, Dorothy; Brown, Herrick; Carter, J. Richard; Denslow, Michael W.; Ellwood, Elizabeth R.; Germain-Aubrey, Charlotte C.; Gilbert, Ed; Gillespie, Emily; Goertzen, Leslie R.; Legler, Ben; Marchant, D. Blaine; Marsico, Travis D.; Morris, Ashley B.; Murrell, Zack; Nazaire, Mare; Neefus, Chris; Oberreiter, Shanna; Paul, Deborah; Ruhfel, Brad R.; Sasek, Thomas; Shaw, Joey; Soltis, Pamela S.; Watson, Kimberly; Weeks, Andrea; Mast, Austin R.

    2015-01-01

    Effective workflows are essential components in the digitization of biodiversity specimen collections. To date, no comprehensive, community-vetted workflows have been published for digitizing flat sheets and packets of plants, algae, and fungi, even though latest estimates suggest that only 33% of herbarium specimens have been digitally transcribed, 54% of herbaria use a specimen database, and 24% are imaging specimens. In 2012, iDigBio, the U.S. National Science Foundation’s (NSF) coordinating center and national resource for the digitization of public, nonfederal U.S. collections, launched several working groups to address this deficiency. Here, we report the development of 14 workflow modules with 7–36 tasks each. These workflows represent the combined work of approximately 35 curators, directors, and collections managers representing more than 30 herbaria, including 15 NSF-supported plant-related Thematic Collections Networks and collaboratives. The workflows are provided for download as Portable Document Format (PDF) and Microsoft Word files. Customization of these workflows for specific institutional implementation is encouraged. PMID:26421256

  13. Digitization workflows for flat sheets and packets of plants, algae, and fungi.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gil; Sweeney, Patrick; Wallace, Lisa E; Rabeler, Richard K; Allard, Dorothy; Brown, Herrick; Carter, J Richard; Denslow, Michael W; Ellwood, Elizabeth R; Germain-Aubrey, Charlotte C; Gilbert, Ed; Gillespie, Emily; Goertzen, Leslie R; Legler, Ben; Marchant, D Blaine; Marsico, Travis D; Morris, Ashley B; Murrell, Zack; Nazaire, Mare; Neefus, Chris; Oberreiter, Shanna; Paul, Deborah; Ruhfel, Brad R; Sasek, Thomas; Shaw, Joey; Soltis, Pamela S; Watson, Kimberly; Weeks, Andrea; Mast, Austin R

    2015-09-01

    Effective workflows are essential components in the digitization of biodiversity specimen collections. To date, no comprehensive, community-vetted workflows have been published for digitizing flat sheets and packets of plants, algae, and fungi, even though latest estimates suggest that only 33% of herbarium specimens have been digitally transcribed, 54% of herbaria use a specimen database, and 24% are imaging specimens. In 2012, iDigBio, the U.S. National Science Foundation's (NSF) coordinating center and national resource for the digitization of public, nonfederal U.S. collections, launched several working groups to address this deficiency. Here, we report the development of 14 workflow modules with 7-36 tasks each. These workflows represent the combined work of approximately 35 curators, directors, and collections managers representing more than 30 herbaria, including 15 NSF-supported plant-related Thematic Collections Networks and collaboratives. The workflows are provided for download as Portable Document Format (PDF) and Microsoft Word files. Customization of these workflows for specific institutional implementation is encouraged.

  14. Cytotoxic, Virucidal, and Antiviral Activity of South American Plant and Algae Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Faral-Tello, Paula; Mirazo, Santiago; Dutra, Carmelo; Pérez, Andrés; Geis-Asteggiante, Lucía; Frabasile, Sandra; Koncke, Elina; Davyt, Danilo; Cavallaro, Lucía; Heinzen, Horacio; Arbiza, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection has a prevalence of 70% in the human population. Treatment is based on acyclovir, valacyclovir, and foscarnet, three drugs that share the same mechanism of action and of which resistant strains have been isolated from patients. In this aspect, innovative drug therapies are required. Natural products offer unlimited opportunities for the discovery of antiviral compounds. In this study, 28 extracts corresponding to 24 plant species and 4 alga species were assayed in vitro to detect antiviral activity against HSV-1. Six of the methanolic extracts inactivated viral particles by direct interaction and 14 presented antiviral activity when incubated with cells already infected. Most interesting antiviral activity values obtained are those of Limonium brasiliense, Psidium guajava, and Phyllanthus niruri, which inhibit HSV-1 replication in vitro with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of 185, 118, and 60 μg/mL, respectively. For these extracts toxicity values were calculated and therefore selectivity indexes (SI) obtained. Further characterization of the bioactive components of antiviral plants will pave the way for the discovery of new compounds against HSV-1. PMID:22619617

  15. Iron Isotope Fractionation in Higher Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelke, M.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Schoenberg, R.; Staubwasser, M.

    2006-12-01

    To maintain an optimal iron supply plants have adopted two different strategies for uptake of iron from soil [1]. Stable iron isotope compositions reflect these uptake strategies. These phenomena can be studied since MC- ICP-MS now routinely allows the resolution of small mass-dependent natural shifts in the relative abundances of the stable Fe isotopes to a precision of 0.05 per mil. In nature a range of about 4.5 per mil has been found for the fractionation between 56Fe and ^{54}Fe. We have measured various parts of different plant types and extracted the plant-available soil Fe with leaching techniques. The 56Fe/^{54}Fe ratio of soils is fractionated by -0.1 per mil relative to the international IRMM14 standard. Strategy I plants (dicots and non- grass monocots) are depleted by up to 1.6 per mil in the 56Fe/^{54}Fe ratio relative to the iron that is available to plants in soil. Isotope fractionation factors predict the depletion of heavy isotopes in the ferrous reservoir during reduction [2];the roots of strategy I plants reduce ferric iron to facilitate uptake. In contrast we found that 56Fe/^{54}Fe of strategy II plants (grasses) is 0.2 per mil heavier than that in soils. Strategy II plants mobilize ferric iron by complexation with siderophores. Indeed a minor enrichment of heavy isotopes is predicted for this process [3]. We also disclosed an evolution of iron towards light compositions during growth, but only in strategy I plants ; this points at entirely different translocation mechanisms between strategy I and II plants, where redox shifts are involved in Fe translocation in strategy I plants while all Fe remains in the ferric state in strategy II plants. We conclude that Fe isotopes serve to characterize (a) the Fe uptake pathways utilized by plants; (b) the Fe translocation mechanisms within plants; (c) the isotope composition of plant- available Fe by measurement of the 56Fe/^{54}Fe ratio of strategy II plants. [1] Roemheld, V. & Marschner, H. (1986

  16. Developing Higher Plant Systems in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of hypogravity and microgravity environments on plant cells are discussed. Experiments on embryos of carrots are discussed. Simulation and spacecraft environments were used in experiments.

  17. Impacts of the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (Melbourne Code) on the scientific names of plant pathogenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent changes in the new International Code of Nomenclature (ICN) for algae, fungi and plants require that only one name be used for pleomorphic fungi many of which have two or more scientific names at present. It is necessary to decide which of two competing scientific names will be applied to one...

  18. Metabolism of Tryptophol in Higher and Lower Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Laćan, Goran; Magnus, Volker; Šimaga, Šumski; Iskrić, Sonja; Hall, Prudence J.

    1985-01-01

    Bacteria, thallophytes, and seed plants (107 species), supplied with exogenous indole-3-ethanol (tryptophol), formed one or more of the following metabolites: O-acetyl tryptophol, an unknown tryptophol ester (or a set of structurally closely related esters), tryptophol glucoside, tryptophol galactoside, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and indole-3-carboxylic acid. The unknown ester was formed by all species examined; O-acetyl tryptophol appeared sporadically in representatives of most major taxonomic groups. Tryptophol galactoside was found in the algae Chlorella, Euglena, and Ochromonas. The glucoside was formed by many eucaryotic plants, but not by bacteria; it was a significant tryptophol metabolite in vascular plants. IAA, if detectable at all, was usually a minor metabolite, as should be expected, if tryptophol oxidase responds to feedback inhibition by IAA. Indole-3-carboxylic acid, formed by a few fungi and mosses, was the only tryptophol metabolite detected which is likely to be formed via IAA. PMID:16664264

  19. Oligosaccharides from land plants and algae: production and applications in therapeutics and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Josiane

    2009-06-01

    Since the past decades, oligosaccharides are considered for their potential biological activities. To exploit them, it was essential to obtain pure molecules in large amounts. Several strategies were developed to produce specific sugar sequences with specific substitution patterns from land plants and algae polysaccharides. Then, pure oligosaccharides were analyzed for their potential biological activities and relations between oligomers structure and function were tackled. First they can be health beneficial molecules when they are added to the diet to enhance the growth of probiotic bacteria, in that case, oligomers that resist to the digestive process are used as specific substrate for the growth of health beneficial bacteria. In other cases, oligomers have to interact with receptors on cells. In this instance, a specific conformation is needed to allow the sugar sequence to establish specific linkages with the receptor. So, to be adapted to the receptor, the oligosaccharides have to present specific groups to the receptor, there, the polymerization degree of oligosaccharides as well as the flexibility of the glycosidic linkages has to be considered.

  20. Arsenic and other heavy metal accumulation in plants and algae growing naturally in contaminated area of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, N K; Raghubanshi, A S; Upadhyay, A K; Rai, U N

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to quantify the arsenic (As) and other heavy metal concentrations in the plants and algae growing naturally in As contaminated blocks of North-24-Pargana and Nandia district, West Bengal, India to assess their bioaccumulation potential. The plant species included five macrophytes and five algae were collected from the nine selected sites for estimation of As and other heavy metals accumulated therein by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrophotometer (ICP-MS). Results revealed that maximum As concentration (117mgkg(-1)) was recorded in the agricultural soil at the Barasat followed by Beliaghat (111mgkg(-1)) sites of North-24-Pargana. Similarly, concentration of selenium (Si, 249mgkg(-1)), lead (Pb, 79.4mgkg(-1)), chromium (Cr, 138mgkg(-1)) was also found maximum in the soil at Barasat and cadmium (Cd, 163mgkg(-1)) nickel (Ni, 36.5mgkg(-1)) at Vijaynagar site. Among the macrophytes, Eichhornia crassipes found more dominating species in As contaminated area and accumulate As (597mgkg(-1)) in the shoot at kanchrapara site. The Lemna minor found to accumulate maximum As (735mgkg(-1)) in the leaves at Sonadanga and Pistia stratiotes accumulated minimum As (24.5mgkg(-1)) in the fronds from Ranaghat site. In case of diatoms, maximum As (760mgkg(-1)) was accumulated at Kanchrapara site followed by Hydrodictiyon reticulatum (403mgkg(-1)) at the Ranaghat site. High concentration of As and other heavy metal in soil indicates long term effects of irrigation with contaminated ground water, however, high concentration of heavy metals in naturally growing plants and algae revealed their mobilization through leaching and possible food chain contamination. Therefore, efficient heavy metal accumulator macrophytes Eichhornia crassipes, Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrhiza may be exploited in removing metals from contaminated water by developing a plant based treatment system. However, As accumulator algal species may be used as a bioresource for

  1. Isotopic discrimination of zinc in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Weiss, D J; Mason, T F D; Zhao, F J; Kirk, G J D; Coles, B J; Horstwood, M S A

    2005-03-01

    * The extent of isotopic discrimination of transition metals in biological processes is poorly understood but potentially has important applications in plant and biogeochemical studies. * Using multicollector inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry, we measured isotopic fractionation of zinc (Zn) during uptake from nutrient solutions by rice (Oryza sativa), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants. * For all three species, the roots showed a similar extent of heavy Zn enrichment relative to the nutrient solution, probably reflecting preferential adsorption on external root surfaces. By contrast, a plant-species specific enrichment of the light Zn isotope occurred in the shoots, indicative of a biological, membrane-transport controlled uptake into plant cells. The extent of the fractionation in the shoots further depended on the Zn speciation in the nutrient solution. * The observed isotopic depletion in heavy Zn from root to shoot (-0.13 to -0.26 per atomic mass unit) is equivalent to roughly a quarter of the total reported terrestrial variability of Zn isotopic compositions (c. 0.84 per atomic mass unit). Plant uptake therefore represents an important source of isotopic variation in biogeochemical cycling of Zn.

  2. Bioconcentration of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and organochlorine pesticides in algae is an important contaminant route to higher trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yao-Wen; Zeng, Eddy Y; Qiu, Hanlin; Yu, Kefu; Cai, Shuqun

    2017-02-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) present in water may be bioconcentrated in phytoplankton and further transferred into higher trophic levels. In the present study, seawater, sediment, phytoplankton and macroalgae (Ulva lactuca L.) samples were collected from two estuarine bays in South China and analyzed for 24 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and 22 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). The concentrations of PBDE congeners except BDE-209 were low in both phytoplankton and Ulva. BDE-209 was the predominant congener in phytoplankton and Ulva, accounting for 89.5% and 86.6% of the total average concentrations of PBDEs (48.5 and 4.1ngg(-1)dw), respectively. The average concentrations of DDTs, HCHs and 1-chloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDMU) in phytoplankton were 398, 241 and 11.3ngg(-1)dw, respectively, while those of DDTs and HCHs in Ulva were 8.4 and 33.1ngg(-1)dw. The levels of both PBDEs and OCPs were an order of magnitude higher in phytoplankton than in Ulva, indicating that phytoplankton with larger surface areas have higher uptake efficiency for POPs than Ulva. Bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of DDT and PBDE in phytoplankton from the two bays were in the range of 10(5)-10(6), suggesting that bioconcentration may be one of the key sources of POPs and algae can be an important route for POPs to move toward higher trophic levels.

  3. Alkaloids in Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Güven, Kasım Cemal; Percot, Aline; Sezik, Ekrem

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the alkaloids found in green, brown and red marine algae. Algal chemistry has interested many researchers in order to develop new drugs, as algae include compounds with functional groups which are characteristic from this particular source. Among these compounds, alkaloids present special interest because of their pharmacological activities. Alkaloid chemistry has been widely studied in terrestrial plants, but the number of studies in algae is insignificant. In this review, a detailed account of macro algae alkaloids with their structure and pharmacological activities is presented. The alkaloids found in marine algae may be divided into three groups: 1. Phenylethylamine alkaloids, 2. Indole and halogenated indole alkaloids, 3. Other alkaloids. PMID:20390105

  4. The cytoskeleton and gravitropism in higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the gravitropic response of plants have continued to elude plant biologists despite more than a century of research. Lately there has been increased attention on the role of the cytoskeleton in plant gravitropism, but several controversies and major gaps in our understanding of cytoskeletal involvement in gravitropism remain. A major question in the study of plant gravitropism is how the cytoskeleton mediates early sensing and signal transduction events in plants. Much has been made of the actin cytoskeleton as the cellular structure that sedimenting amyloplasts impinge upon to trigger the downstream signaling events leading to the bending response. There is also strong molecular and biochemical evidence that the transport of auxin, an important player in gravitropism, is regulated by actin. Organizational changes in microtubules during the growth response phase of gravitropism have also been well documented, but the significance of such reorientations in controlling differential cellular growth is unclear. Studies employing pharmacological approaches to dissect cytoskeletal involvement in gravitropism have led to conflicting results and therefore need to be interpreted with caution. Despite the current controversies, the revolutionary advances in molecular, biochemical, and cell biological techniques have opened up several possibilities for further research into this difficult area. The myriad proteins associated with the plant cytoskeleton that are being rapidly characterized provide a rich assortment of candidate regulators that could be targets of the gravity signal transduction chain. Cytoskeletal and ion imaging in real time combined with mutant analysis promises to provide a fresh start into this controversial area of research.

  5. Higher plant mitochondrial DNA: Genomes, genes, mutants, transcription, translation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains brief summaries of 63 presentations given at the International Workshop on Higher Plant Mitochondrial DNA. The presentations are organized into topical discussions addressing plant genomes, mitochondrial genes, cytoplasmic male sterility, transcription, translation, plasmids and tissue culture. (DT)

  6. Biodiesel and poly-unsaturated fatty acids production from algae and crop plants - a rapid and comprehensive workflow for lipid analysis.

    PubMed

    Furuhashi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Fragner, Lena; Roustan, Valentin; Schön, Verena; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-10-01

    Fatty acid methyl ester analysis (FAME) by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a widely used technique in biodiesel/bioproduct (e.g. poly-unsaturated fatty acids, PUFA) research but typically does not allow distinguishing between bound and free fatty acids. To understand and optimize biosynthetic pathways, however, the origin of the fatty acid is an important information. Furthermore the annotation of PUFAs is compromised in classical GC-EI-MS because the precursor molecular ion is missing. In the present protocol an alkaline methyl esterification step with TMS derivatization enabling the simultaneous analysis of bound and free fatty acids but also further lipids such as sterols in one GC-MS chromatogram is combined. This protocol is applied to different lipid extracts from single cell algae to higher plants: Chlorella vulgaris, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Coffea arabica, Pisum sativum and Cuscuta japonica. Further, field ionization (GC-FI-MS) is introduced for a better annotation of fatty acids and exact determination of the number of double bonds in PUFAs. The proposed workflow provides a convenient strategy to analyze algae and other plant crop systems with respect to their capacity for third generation biodiesel and high-quality bioproducts for nutrition such as PUFAs.

  7. The outer mitochondrial membrane in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Owen; van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Daley, Daniel O; Whelan, James

    2013-04-01

    The acquisition and integration of intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria and plastids, were important steps in the emergence of complex multicellular life. Although the outer membranes of these organelles have lost many of the functions of their free-living bacterial ancestor, others were acquired during organellogenesis. To date, the biological roles of these proteins have not been systematically characterized. In this review, we discuss the evolutionary origins and functions of outer membrane mitochondrial (OMM) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our analysis, using phylogenetic inference, indicates that several OMM proteins either acquired novel functional roles or were recruited from other subcellular localizations during evolution in Arabidopsis. These observations suggest the existence of novel communication routes and functions between organelles within plant cells.

  8. Controlled Ecological Life Support System: Use of Higher Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbits, T. W.; Alford, D. K.

    1982-01-01

    Results of two workshops concerning the use of higher plants in Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) are summarized. Criteria for plant selection were identified from these categories: food production, nutrition, oxygen production and carbon dioxide utilization, water recycling, waste recycling, and other morphological and physiological considerations. Types of plant species suitable for use in CELSS, growing procedures, and research priorities were recommended. Also included are productivity values for selected plant species.

  9. Higher plant diversity promotes higher diversity of fungal pathogens, while it decreases pathogen infection per plant.

    PubMed

    Rottstock, Tanja; Joshi, Jasmin; Kummer, Volker; Fischer, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Fungal plant pathogens are common in natural communities where they affect plant physiology, plant survival, and biomass production. Conversely, pathogen transmission and infection may be regulated by plant community characteristics such as plant species diversity and functional composition that favor pathogen diversity through increases in host diversity while simultaneously reducing pathogen infection via increased variability in host density and spatial heterogeneity. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of multi-host multi-pathogen interactions is of high significance in the context of biodiversity-ecosystem functioning. We investigated the relationship between plant diversity and aboveground obligate parasitic fungal pathogen ("pathogens" hereafter) diversity and infection in grasslands of a long-term, large-scale, biodiversity experiment with varying plant species (1-60 species) and plant functional group diversity (1-4 groups). To estimate pathogen infection of the plant communities, we visually assessed pathogen-group presence (i.e., rusts, powdery mildews, downy mildews, smuts, and leaf-spot diseases) and overall infection levels (combining incidence and severity of each pathogen group) in 82 experimental plots on all aboveground organs of all plant species per plot during four surveys in 2006. Pathogen diversity, assessed as the cumulative number of pathogen groups on all plant species per plot, increased log-linearly with plant species diversity. However, pathogen incidence and severity, and hence overall infection, decreased with increasing plant species diversity. In addition, co-infection of plant individuals by two or more pathogen groups was less likely with increasing plant community diversity. We conclude that plant community diversity promotes pathogen-community diversity while at the same time reducing pathogen infection levels of plant individuals.

  10. Hormonal control of transcription in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Teissere, M; Penon, P; van Huystee, R B; Azou, Y; Ricard, J

    1975-09-01

    1. Nucleolar RNA polymerase Ib obtained from auxin-treated lentil roots exhibits a higher transcriptional activity than the enzyme obtained from control roots. This difference is due to a change in the enzyme properties after auxin treatment. It is suggested that the hormonal effect is mediated by a factor that changes the molecular properties of nucleolar RNA polymerase. 2. Four fractions, alpha, beta, gamma and delta, that stimulate the activity of RNA polymerase Ib, have been extracted from lentil roots. Two of them, gamma and delta have been studied. Factor delta can stimulate nucleolar polymerase Ib and the nucleoplasmic enzyme II equally well, while factor gamma is specific for polymerase Ib. 3. The curve of UMP incorporation in vitro, with and without factors gamma or delta suggests that they are initiation factors. This conclusion is reinforced by the analysis of simultaneous incorporation of [gamma-32P]ATP and [3H]UMP in the RNAs synthesized in vitro. 4. Although the level of factor delta is independent of auxin treatment, that of factor gamma is doubled in auxin-treated roots. These results suggest that factor gamma is an auxin-induced protein that modulates the specific activity of the nucleolar RNA polymerase. 5. A general model of the mode of action of auxins at the molecular level is proposed. It integrates into a unified scheme the above results as well as those obtained by other workers.

  11. Biophysical characterization of higher plant Rubisco activase.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J Nathan; Hazra, Suratna; Dunkle, Alison M; Salvucci, Michael E; Wachter, Rebekka M

    2013-01-01

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a chaperone-like protein of the AAA+ family, which uses mechano-chemical energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to release tightly bound inhibitors from the active site of the primary carbon fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate oxygenase/carboxylase (Rubisco). Mechanistic and structural investigations of Rca have been hampered by its exceptional thermolability, high degree of size polydispersity and propensity towards subunit aggregation. In this work, we have characterized the thermal stability and self-association behavior of recombinant Rca preparations, and have developed ligand screening methods. Thermal denaturation profiles generated by circular dichroism indicate that creosote and tobacco short-form Rcas are the most stable proteins examined, with an estimated mid-point temperature of 45-47°C for protein denaturation. We demonstrate that ADP provides a higher degree of stabilization than ATP, that magnesium ions have a small stabilizing effect on ATP-bound, but a significant destabilizing effect on ADP-bound Rca, and that phosphate provides weak stabilization of the ADP-bound form of the protein. A dimeric species was identified by size-exclusion chromatography, suggesting that the two-subunit module may comprise the basic building block for larger assemblies. Evidence is provided that chromatographic procedures reflect non-equilibrium multimeric states. Dynamic light scattering experiments performed on nucleotide-bearing Rca support the notion that several larger, highly polydisperse assembly states coexist over a broad concentration range. No significant changes in aggregation are observed upon replacement of ADP with ATP. However, in the absence of nucleotides, the major protein population appears to consist of a monodisperse oligomer smaller than a hexamer.

  12. Toxicities of oils, dispersants and dispersed oils to algae and aquatic plants: review and database value to resource sustainability.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael; Pryor, Rachel

    2013-09-01

    Phytotoxicity results are reviewed for oils, dispersants and dispersed oils. The phytotoxicity database consists largely of results from a patchwork of reactive research conducted after oil spills to marine waters. Toxicity information is available for at least 41 crude oils and 56 dispersants. As many as 107 response parameters have been monitored for 85 species of unicellular and multicellular algae, 28 wetland plants, 13 mangroves and 9 seagrasses. Effect concentrations have varied by as much as six orders of magnitude due to experimental diversity. This diversity restricts phytotoxicity predictions and identification of sensitive species, life stages and response parameters. As a result, evidence-based risk assessments for most aquatic plants and petrochemicals and dispersants are not supported by the current toxicity database. A proactive and experimentally-consistent approach is recommended to provide threshold toxic effect concentrations for sensitive life stages of aquatic plants inhabiting diverse ecosystems.

  13. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in chloroplast genomes of lower and higher plants.

    PubMed

    George, Biju; Bhatt, Bhavin S; Awasthi, Mayur; George, Binu; Singh, Achuit K

    2015-11-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), contain repetitive DNA sequence where tandem repeats of one to six base pairs are present number of times. Chloroplast genome sequences have been  shown to possess extensive variations in the length, number and distribution of SSRs. However, a comparative analysis of chloroplast microsatellites is not available. Considering their potential importance in generating genomic diversity, we have systematically analysed the abundance and distribution of simple and compound microsatellites in 164 sequenced chloroplast genomes from wide range of plants. The key findings of these studies are (1) a large number of mononucleotide repeats as compared to SSR(2-6)(di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexanucleotide repeats) are present in all chloroplast genomes investigated, (2) lower plants such as algae show wide variation in relative abundance, density and distribution of microsatellite repeats as compared to flowering plants, (3) longer SSRs are excluded from coding regions of most chloroplast genomes, (4) GC content has a weak influence on number, relative abundance and relative density of mononucleotide as well as SSR(2-6). However, GC content strongly showed negative correlation with relative density (R (2) = 0.5, P < 0.05) and relative abundance (R (2) = 0.6, P < 0.05) of cSSRs. In summary, our comparative studies of chloroplast genomes illustrate the variable distribution of microsatellites and revealed that chloroplast genome of smaller plants possesses relatively more genomic diversity compared to higher plants.

  14. Effect of iodine disinfection products on higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, D.; Macler, B.; Macelroy, R. D.; Thorstenson, Y.; Sauer, R.

    1989-01-01

    Iodine is used to disinfect potable water on United States spacecraft. Iodinated potable water will likely be used to grow plants in space. Little is known about the effects of iodine disinfection products on plants. Seeds of select higher plants were germinated in water iodinated using the Shuttle Microbial Check Valve, and water to which measured amounts of iodine was added. Percent germination was decreased in seeds of most species germinated in iodinated water. Beans were most affected. Germination rates, determined from germination half-times, were decreased for beans germinated in iodinated water, and water to which iodide was added. Development was retarded and rootlets were conspicuously absent in bean and several other plant species germinated in iodinated water. Iodide alone did not elicit these responses. Clearly iodine disinfection products can affect higher plants. These effects must be carefully considered for plant experimentation and cultivation in space, and in design and testing of closed environmental life support systems.

  15. Controlled ecological life support system higher plant flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.; Wheeler, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Requirements for spaceflight experments which involve higher plants were determined. The plants are studied for use in controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS). Two categories of research requirements are discussed: (1) the physical needs which include nutrient, water and gas exchange requirements; (2) the biological and physiological functions which affect plants in zero gravity environments. Physical problems studies are given the priority since they affect all biological experiments.

  16. Multispecies methods of testing for toxicity: use of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis in nitrogen fixation and correlations between responses by algae and terrestrial plants

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T

    1991-12-01

    Responses of the Rhizobium-legume symbiotic relationship to long-term (5- to 7-week) and short-term (2-week) exposures of copper sulfate, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and streptomycin sulfate were examined in bush beans and clover. Toxic effects were evaluated by comparing plant biomass (yield), nodulation success, nitrogen fixation rate as indicated by acetylene reduction, and plant nitrogen content in controls and in plants exposed to various concentrations of the chemicals. Plants with long-term continuous root exposure were affected more than plants with short-term exposure, as indicated by reductions in nitrogen fixation rates and plant growth. Although rates of acetylene reduction (nitrogen fixation) were depressed, plant biomass and the numbers of root nodules produced were simpler, less expensive indices of exposure. In a second test, the responses of algae (Selenastrum capricornutum and Chlorella vulgaris) and terrestrial plants (radishes, barley, bush beans, and soybeans) to 21 different herbicides were compared to evaluate the use of a short-term (96-h) algal growth inhibition test for identifying chemicals potentially toxic to terrestrial plants. Two test end points were evaluated: (1) the highest concentration resulting in no statistically significant reduction in the growth rate of algae or terrestrial plants, and (2) the concentration at which algal growth or terrestrial plant biomass was reduced by 50%. Test results were correlated for the two algae and for all pairs of vascular plants. However, results of the algal tests did not correlate with those of the terrestrial plants. Furthermore, according to tests with Selenastrum capricornutum, there was only a 50% chance of successfully identifying herbicide levels that reduced terrestrial plant biomass. For the herbicides and species examined, short-term toxicity tests with algae were not good indicators of toxicity to terrestrial plants.

  17. Design of components for growing higher plants in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to design unique systems and components for growing higher plants in microgravity during long-term space missions (Mars and beyond). Specific design tasks were chosen to contribute to and supplement NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) project. Selected tasks were automated seeding of plants, plant health sensing, and food processing. Prototype systems for planting both germinated and nongerminated seeds were fabricated and tested. Water and air pressure differences and electrostatic fields were used to trap seeds for separation and transport for planting. An absorption spectrometer was developed to measure chlorophyll levels in plants as an early warning of plant health problems. In the area of food processing, a milling system was created using high-speed rotating blades which were aerodynamically configured to produce circulation and retractable to prevent leakage. The project produced significant results having substantial benefit to NASA. It also provided an outstanding learning experience for the students involved.

  18. Selenium in higher plants: understanding mechanisms for biofortification and phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Williams, Paul N; Meharg, Andrew A

    2009-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for many organisms, including plants, animals and humans. As plants are the main source of dietary Se, plant Se metabolism is therefore important for Se nutrition of humans and other animals. However, the concentration of Se in plant foods varies between areas, and too much Se can lead to toxicity. As we discuss here, plant Se uptake and metabolism can be exploited for the purposes of developing high-Se crop cultivars and for plant-mediated removal of excess Se from soil or water. Here, we review key developments in the current understanding of Se in higher plants. We also discuss recent advances in the genetic engineering of Se metabolism, particularly for biofortification and phytoremediation of Se-contaminated environments.

  19. The mitochondrial genome of Chara vulgaris: insights into the mitochondrial DNA architecture of the last common ancestor of green algae and land plants.

    PubMed

    Turmel, Monique; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2003-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has undergone radical changes during the evolution of green plants, yet little is known about the dynamics of mtDNA evolution in this phylum. Land plant mtDNAs differ from the few green algal mtDNAs that have been analyzed to date by their expanded size, long spacers, and diversity of introns. We have determined the mtDNA sequence of Chara vulgaris (Charophyceae), a green alga belonging to the charophycean order (Charales) that is thought to be the most closely related alga to land plants. This 67,737-bp mtDNA sequence, displaying 68 conserved genes and 27 introns, was compared with those of three angiosperms, the bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha, the charophycean alga Chaetosphaeridium globosum (Coleochaetales), and the green alga Mesostigma viride. Despite important differences in size and intron composition, Chara mtDNA strikingly resembles Marchantia mtDNA; for instance, all except 9 of 68 conserved genes lie within blocks of colinear sequences. Overall, our genome comparisons and phylogenetic analyses provide unequivocal support for a sister-group relationship between the Charales and the land plants. Only four introns in land plant mtDNAs appear to have been inherited vertically from a charalean algar ancestor. We infer that the common ancestor of green algae and land plants harbored a tightly packed, gene-rich, and relatively intron-poor mitochondrial genome. The group II introns in this ancestral genome appear to have spread to new mtDNA sites during the evolution of bryophytes and charalean green algae, accounting for part of the intron diversity found in Chara and land plant mitochondria.

  20. Transcriptomics of Desiccation Tolerance in the Streptophyte Green Alga Klebsormidium Reveal a Land Plant-Like Defense Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Andreas; Kaplan, Franziska; Blaas, Kathrin; Zechmann, Bernd; Komsic-Buchmann, Karin; Becker, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Background Water loss has significant effects on physiological performance and survival rates of algae. However, despite the prominent presence of aeroterrestrial algae in terrestrial habitats, hardly anything is known about the molecular events that allow aeroterrestrial algae to survive harsh environmental conditions. We analyzed the transcriptome and physiology of a strain of the alpine aeroterrestrial alga Klebsormidium crenulatum under control and strong desiccation-stress conditions. Principal Findings For comparison we first established a reference transcriptome. The high-coverage reference transcriptome includes about 24,183 sequences (1.5 million reads, 636 million bases). The reference transcriptome encodes for all major pathways (energy, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, sugars), nearly all deduced pathways are complete or missing only a few transcripts. Upon strong desiccation, more than 7000 transcripts showed changes in their expression levels. Most of the highest up-regulated transcripts do not show similarity to known viridiplant proteins, suggesting the existence of some genus- or species-specific responses to desiccation. In addition, we observed the up-regulation of many transcripts involved in desiccation tolerance in plants (e.g. proteins similar to those that are abundant in late embryogenesis (LEA), or proteins involved in early response to desiccation ERD), and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFO) known to act as osmolytes). Major physiological shifts are the up-regulation of transcripts for photosynthesis, energy production, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism, which is supported by elevated cellular glutathione content as revealed by immunoelectron microscopy as well as an increase in total antiradical power. However, the effective quantum yield of Photosystem II and CO2 fixation decreased sharply under the applied desiccation stress. In contrast, transcripts for cell integrative

  1. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2016-09-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal objects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charophyte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorption spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance between 400-550nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this high absorbance was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did hardly change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400-500nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation.

  2. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal obbjects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charopyhte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorbance spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900 nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance in the wave band of 400-550 nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did not change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400 – 500 nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation. PMID:27442511

  3. DNA methylation in higher plants: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, Boris F; Ashapkin, Vasili V

    2011-08-01

    A relatively high degree of nuclear DNA (nDNA) methylation is a specific feature of plant genomes. Targets for cytosine DNA methylation in plant genomes are CG, CHG and CHH (H is A, T, C) sequences. More than 30% total m(5)C in plant DNA is located in non-CG sites. DNA methylation in plants is species-, tissue-, organelle- and age-specific; it is involved in the control of all genetic functions including transcription, replication, DNA repair, gene transposition and cell differentiation. DNA methylation is engaged in gene silencing and parental imprinting, it controls expression of transgenes and foreign DNA in cell. Plants have much more complicated and sophisticated system of the multicomponent genome methylations compared to animals; DNA methylation in plant mitochondria is performed in other fashion as compared to that in nuclei. The nDNA methylation is carried out by cytosine DNA methyltransferases of, at least, three families. In contrast to animals the plants with the major maintenance methyltransferase MET1 (similar to animal Dnmt1) inactivated do survive. One and the same plant gene may be methylated at both adenine and cytosine residues; specific plant adenine DNA methyltransferase was described. Thus, two different systems of the genome modification based on methylation of cytosines and adenines seem to coexist in higher plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Epigenetic control of cellular and developmental processes in plants.

  4. The "Martian" flora: new collections of vascular plants, lichens, fungi, algae, and cyanobacteria from the Mars Desert Research Station, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Freebury, Colin E.; Hamilton, Paul B.; Saarela, Jeffery M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Mars Desert Research Station is a Mars analog research site located in the desert outside of Hanksville, Utah, U.S.A. Here we present a preliminary checklist of the vascular plant and lichen flora for the station, based on collections made primarily during a two-week simulated Mars mission in November, 2014. Additionally, we present notes on the endolithic chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and the identification of a fungal genus also based on these collections. Altogether, we recorded 38 vascular plant species from 14 families, 13 lichen species from seven families, six algae taxa including both chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and one fungal genus from the station and surrounding area. We discuss this floristic diversity in the context of the ecology of the nearby San Rafael Swell and the desert areas of Wayne and Emery counties in southeastern Utah. PMID:27350765

  5. The "Martian" flora: new collections of vascular plants, lichens, fungi, algae, and cyanobacteria from the Mars Desert Research Station, Utah.

    PubMed

    Sokoloff, Paul C; Freebury, Colin E; Hamilton, Paul B; Saarela, Jeffery M

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Desert Research Station is a Mars analog research site located in the desert outside of Hanksville, Utah, U.S.A. Here we present a preliminary checklist of the vascular plant and lichen flora for the station, based on collections made primarily during a two-week simulated Mars mission in November, 2014. Additionally, we present notes on the endolithic chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and the identification of a fungal genus also based on these collections. Altogether, we recorded 38 vascular plant species from 14 families, 13 lichen species from seven families, six algae taxa including both chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and one fungal genus from the station and surrounding area. We discuss this floristic diversity in the context of the ecology of the nearby San Rafael Swell and the desert areas of Wayne and Emery counties in southeastern Utah.

  6. Discovery of new anticancer agents from higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Chai, Hee-Byung; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2012-01-01

    1. ABSTRACT Small organic molecules derived from higher plants have been one of the mainstays of cancer chemotherapy for approximately the past half a century. In the present review, selected single chemical entity natural products of plant origin and their semi-synthetic derivatives currently in clinical trials are featured as examples of new cancer chemotherapeutic drug candidates. Several more recently isolated compounds obtained from plants showing promising in vivo biological activity are also discussed in terms of their potential as anticancer agents, with many of these obtained from species that grow in tropical regions. Since extracts of only a relatively small proportion of the ca. 300,000 higher plants on earth have been screened biologically to date, bioactive compounds from plants should play an important role in future anticancer drug discovery efforts. PMID:22202049

  7. Functional Characterization of UDP-apiose Synthases from Bryophytes and Green Algae Provides Insight into the Appearance of Apiose-containing Glycans during Plant Evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, James; Yang, Yiwen; Levy, Shahar; Adelusi, Oluwatoyin Oluwayemi; Hahn, Michael G; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2016-10-07

    Apiose is a branched monosaccharide that is present in the cell wall pectic polysaccharides rhamnogalacturonan II and apiogalacturonan and in numerous plant secondary metabolites. These apiose-containing glycans are synthesized using UDP-apiose as the donor. UDP-apiose (UDP-Api) together with UDP-xylose is formed from UDP-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcA) by UDP-Api synthase (UAS). It was hypothesized that the ability to form Api distinguishes vascular plants from the avascular plants and green algae. UAS from several dicotyledonous plants has been characterized; however, it is not known if avascular plants or green algae produce this enzyme. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of UAS homologs from avascular plants (mosses, liverwort, and hornwort), from streptophyte green algae, and from a monocot (duckweed). The recombinant UAS homologs all form UDP-Api from UDP-glucuronic acid albeit in different amounts. Apiose was detected in aqueous methanolic extracts of these plants. Apiose was detected in duckweed cell walls but not in the walls of the avascular plants and algae. Overexpressing duckweed UAS in the moss Physcomitrella patens led to an increase in the amounts of aqueous methanol-acetonitrile-soluble apiose but did not result in discernible amounts of cell wall-associated apiose. Thus, bryophytes and algae likely lack the glycosyltransferase machinery required to synthesize apiose-containing cell wall glycans. Nevertheless, these plants may have the ability to form apiosylated secondary metabolites. Our data are the first to provide evidence that the ability to form apiose existed prior to the appearance of rhamnogalacturonan II and apiogalacturonan and provide new insights into the evolution of apiose-containing glycans.

  8. Regulation of photosynthesis by ion channels in cyanobacteria and higher plants.

    PubMed

    Checchetto, Vanessa; Teardo, Enrico; Carraretto, Luca; Formentin, Elide; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Szabo, Ildiko

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthesis converts light energy into chemical energy, and supplies ATP and NADPH for CO2 fixation into carbohydrates and for the synthesis of several compounds which are essential for autotrophic growth. Oxygenic photosynthesis takes place in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts and photosynthetic prokaryote cyanobacteria. An ancestral photoautotrophic prokaryote related to cyanobacteria has been proposed to give rise to chloroplasts of plants and algae through an endosymbiotic event. Indeed, photosynthetic complexes involved in the electron transport coupled to H(+) translocation and ATP synthesis are similar in higher plants and cyanobacteria. Furthermore, some of the protein and solute/ion conducting machineries also share common structure and function. Electrophysiological and biochemical evidence support the existence of ion channels in the thylakoid membrane in both types of organisms. By allowing specific ion fluxes across thylakoid membranes, ion channels have been hypothesized to either directly or indirectly regulate photosynthesis, by modulating the proton motive force. Recent molecular identification of some of the thylakoid-located channels allowed to obtain genetic proof in favor of such hypothesis. Furthermore, some ion channels of the envelope membrane in chloroplasts have also been shown to impact on this light-driven process. Here we give an overview of thylakoid/chloroplast located ion channels of higher plants and of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We focus on channels shown to be implicated in the regulation of photosynthesis and discuss the possible mechanisms of action.

  9. Properties of shaker-type potassium channels in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Gambale, F; Uozumi, N

    2006-03-01

    Potassium (K(+)), the most abundant cation in biological organisms, plays a crucial role in the survival and development of plant cells, modulation of basic mechanisms such as enzyme activity, electrical membrane potentials, plant turgor and cellular homeostasis. Due to the absence of a Na(+)/K(+) exchanger, which widely exists in animal cells, K(+) channels and some type of K(+) transporters function as K(+) uptake systems in plants. Plant voltage-dependent K(+) channels, which display striking topological and functional similarities with the voltage-dependent six-transmembrane segment animal Shaker-type K(+) channels, have been found to play an important role in the plasma membrane of a variety of tissues and organs in higher plants. Outward-rectifying, inward-rectifying and weakly-rectifying K(+) channels have been identified and play a crucial role in K(+) homeostasis in plant cells. To adapt to the environmental conditions, plants must take advantage of the large variety of Shaker-type K(+) channels naturally present in the plant kingdom. This review summarizes the extensive data on the structure, function, membrane topogenesis, heteromerization, expression, localization, physiological roles and modulation of Shaker-type K(+) channels from various plant species. The accumulated results also help in understanding the similarities and differences in the properties of Shaker-type K(+) channels in plants in comparison to those of Shaker channels in animals and bacteria.

  10. Heat tolerance of higher plants cenosis to damaging air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Sofya; Shklavtsova, Ekaterina

    Designing sustained biological-technical life support systems (BTLSS) including higher plants as a part of a photosynthesizing unit, it is important to foresee the multi species cenosis reaction on either stress-factors. Air temperature changing in BTLSS (because of failure of a thermoregulation system) up to the values leading to irreversible damages of photosynthetic processes is one of those factors. However, it is possible to increase, within the certain limits, the plant cenosis tolerance to the unfavorable temperatures’ effect due to the choice of the higher plants possessing resistance both to elevated and to lowered air temperatures. Besides, the plants heat tolerance can be increased when subjecting them during their growing to the hardening off temperatures’ effect. Thus, we have come to the conclusion that it is possible to increase heat tolerance of multi species cenosis under the damaging effect of air temperature of 45 (°) СC.

  11. Higher Plants in Space: Microgravity Perception, Response, and Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hui Qiong; Han, Fei; Le, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Microgravity is a major abiotic stress in space. Its effects on plants may depend on the duration of exposure. We focused on two different phases of microgravity responses in space. When higher plants are exposed to short-term (seconds to hours) microgravity, such as on board parabolic flights and sounding rockets, their cells usually exhibit abiotic stress responses. For example, Ca 2+-, lipid-, and pH-signaling are rapidly enhanced, then the production of reactive oxygen species and other radicals increase dramatically along with changes in metabolism and auxin signaling. Under long-term (days to months) microgravity exposure, plants acclimatize to the stress by changing their metabolism and oxidative response and by enhancing other tropic responses. We conclude by suggesting that a systematic analysis of regulatory networks at the molecular level of higher plants is needed to understand the molecular signals in the distinct phases of the microgravity response and adaptation.

  12. Ecological Traits of the Algae-Bearing Tetrahymena utriculariae (Ciliophora) from Traps of the Aquatic Carnivorous Plant Utricularia reflexa.

    PubMed

    Šimek, Karel; Pitsch, Gianna; Salcher, Michaela M; Sirová, Dagmara; Shabarova, Tanja; Adamec, Lubomír; Posch, Thomas

    2016-09-10

    Trap fluid of aquatic carnivorous plants of the genus Utricularia hosts specific microbiomes consisting of commensal pro- and eukaryotes of largely unknown ecology. We examined the characteristics and dynamics of bacteria and the three dominant eukaryotes, i.e. the algae-bearing ciliate Tetrahymena utriculariae (Ciliophora), a green flagellate Euglena agilis (Euglenophyta), and the alga Scenedesmus alternans (Chlorophyta), associated with the traps of Utricularia reflexa. Our study focused on ecological traits and life strategies of the highly abundant ciliate whose biomass by far exceeds that of other eukaryotes and bacteria independent of the trap age. The ciliate was the only bacterivore in the traps, driving rapid turnover of bacterial standing stock. However, given the large size of the ciliate and the cell-specific uptake rates of bacteria we estimated that bacterivory alone would likely be insufficient to support its apparent rapid growth in traps. We suggest that mixotrophy based on algal symbionts contributes significantly to the diet and survival strategy of the ciliate in the extreme (anaerobic, low pH) trap-fluid environment. We propose a revised concept of major microbial interactions in the trap fluid where ciliate bacterivory plays a central role in regeneration of nutrients bound in rapidly growing bacterial biomass.

  13. Fractionation of metal stable isotopes by higher plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Blanckenburg, F.; Von Wiren, N.; Guelke, M.; Weiss, D.J.; Bullen, T.D.

    2009-01-01

    Higher plants induce chemical reactions in the rhizosphere, facilitating metal uptake by roots. Fractionation of the isotopes in nutrients such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc produces a stable isotope composition in the plants that generally differs from that of the growth medium. Isotope fractionation also occurs during transport of the metals within most plants, but its extent depends on plant species and on the metal, in particular, on the metal's redox state and what ligand it is bound to. The metal stable isotope variations observed in plants create an isotope signature of life at the Earth's surface, contributing substantially to our understanding of metal cycling processes in the environment and in individual organisms.

  14. Fungal elicitors of the phytoalexin response in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Charles A.

    1981-09-01

    Several types of fungal molecules including cell wall polysaccharides, polypeptides, glycoproteins and lipid molecules have been found to serve as elicitors of phytoalexins in higher plants. Recent work has shown that an extracellular enzyme, endopolygalacturonase, from culture filtrates of the fungus Rhizopus stolonifer elicits the biosynthesis of an antifungal antibiotic, casbene, in extracts of treated castor bean ( Ricinus communis L.) seedlings. A suggested mode of action of this elicitor in the plant in which fragments of the plant cell wall released through the catalytic action of the enzyme serve as secondary elicitors to trigger the plant response is proposed on the basis of preliminary observations. Possible modes of interaction of other types of fungal elicitors with plants are also discussed.

  15. The Interactions of Aquaporins and Mineral Nutrients in Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Ding, Lei; Gao, Limin; Li, Yingrui; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2016-07-29

    Aquaporins, major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) present in the plasma and intracellular membranes, facilitate the transport of small neutral molecules across cell membranes in higher plants. Recently, progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of aquaporin subcellular localization, transport selectivity, and gating properties. Although the role of aquaporins in maintaining the plant water status has been addressed, the interactions between plant aquaporins and mineral nutrients remain largely unknown. This review highlights the roles of various aquaporin orthologues in mineral nutrient uptake and transport, as well as the regulatory effects of mineral nutrients on aquaporin expression and activity, and an integrated link between aquaporins and mineral nutrient metabolism was identified.

  16. The Interactions of Aquaporins and Mineral Nutrients in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Ding, Lei; Gao, Limin; Li, Yingrui; Shen, Qirong; Guo, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins, major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) present in the plasma and intracellular membranes, facilitate the transport of small neutral molecules across cell membranes in higher plants. Recently, progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of aquaporin subcellular localization, transport selectivity, and gating properties. Although the role of aquaporins in maintaining the plant water status has been addressed, the interactions between plant aquaporins and mineral nutrients remain largely unknown. This review highlights the roles of various aquaporin orthologues in mineral nutrient uptake and transport, as well as the regulatory effects of mineral nutrients on aquaporin expression and activity, and an integrated link between aquaporins and mineral nutrient metabolism was identified. PMID:27483251

  17. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-07-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant`s essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  18. Algae Derived Biofuel

    SciTech Connect

    Jahan, Kauser

    2015-03-31

    One of the most promising fuel alternatives is algae biodiesel. Algae reproduce quickly, produce oils more efficiently than crop plants, and require relatively few nutrients for growth. These nutrients can potentially be derived from inexpensive waste sources such as flue gas and wastewater, providing a mutual benefit of helping to mitigate carbon dioxide waste. Algae can also be grown on land unsuitable for agricultural purposes, eliminating competition with food sources. This project focused on cultivating select algae species under various environmental conditions to optimize oil yield. Membrane studies were also conducted to transfer carbon di-oxide more efficiently. An LCA study was also conducted to investigate the energy intensive steps in algae cultivation.

  19. Proposals to clarify and enhance the naming of fungi under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, David L

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-three proposals to modify the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants adopted in 2011 with respect to the provisions for fungi are made, in accordance with the wishes of mycologists expressed at the 10(th) International Mycological Congress in Bangkok in 2014, and with the support of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF), the votes of which are presented here. The proposals relate to: conditions for epitypification, registration of later typifications, protected lists of names, removal of exemptions for lichen-forming fungi, provision of a diagnosis when describing a new taxon, citation of sanctioned names, avoiding homonyms in other kingdoms, ending preference for sexually typified names, and treatment of conspecific names with the same epithet. These proposals are also being published in Taxon, will be considered by the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi and General Committee on Nomenclature, and voted on at the 19(th) International Botanical Congress in Shenzhen, China, in 2017.

  20. Composition, architecture and dynamics of the photosynthetic apparatus in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Nevo, Reinat; Charuvi, Dana; Tsabari, Onie; Reich, Ziv

    2012-04-01

    The process of oxygenic photosynthesis enabled and still sustains aerobic life on Earth. The most elaborate form of the apparatus that carries out the primary steps of this vital process is the one present in higher plants. Here, we review the overall composition and supramolecular organization of this apparatus, as well as the complex architecture of the lamellar system within which it is harbored. Along the way, we refer to the genetic, biochemical, spectroscopic and, in particular, microscopic studies that have been employed to elucidate the structure and working of this remarkable molecular energy conversion device. As an example of the highly dynamic nature of the apparatus, we discuss the molecular and structural events that enable it to maintain high photosynthetic yields under fluctuating light conditions. We conclude the review with a summary of the hypotheses made over the years about the driving forces that underlie the partition of the lamellar system of higher plants and certain green algae into appressed and non-appressed membrane domains and the segregation of the photosynthetic protein complexes within these domains.

  1. Cellular Mechanisms of Gravitropic Response in Higher Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Sergei; Smolikova, Galina; Pozhvanov, Gregory; Suslov, Dmitry

    The evolutionary success of land plants in adaptation to the vectorial environmental factors was based mainly on the development of polarity systems. In result, normal plant ontogenesis is based on the positional information. Polarity is a tool by which the developing plant organs and tissues are mapped and the specific three-dimensional structure of the organism is created. It is due to their polar organization plants are able to orient themselves relative to the gravity vector and different vectorial cues, and to respond adequately to various stimuli. Gravitation is one of the most important polarized environmental factor that guides the development of plant organisms in space. Every plant can "estimate" its position relative to the gravity vector and correct it, if necessary, by means of polarized growth. The direction and the magnitude of gravitational stimulus are constant during the whole plant ontogenesis. The key plant response to the action of gravity is gravitropism, i.e. the directed growth of organs with respect to the gravity vector. This response is a very convenient model to study the mechanisms of plant orientation in space. The present report is focused on the main cellular mechanisms responsible for graviropic bending in higher plants. These mechanisms and structures include electric polarization of plant cells, Ca ({2+) }gradients, cytoskeleton, G-proteins, phosphoinositides and the machinery responsible for asymmetric auxin distribution. Those mechanisms tightly interact demonstrating some hierarchy and multiple feedbacks. The Ca (2+) gradients provide the primary physiological basis of polarity in plant cells. Calcium ions influence on the bioelectric potentials, the organization of actin cytoskeleton, the activity of Ca (2+) -binding proteins and Ca (2+) -dependent protein kinases. Protein kinases modulate transcription factors activity thereby regulating the gene expression and switching the developmental programs. Actin cytoskeleton affects

  2. Cytoskeletal and membrane dynamics during higher plant cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Colleen M; Bednarek, Sebastian Y

    2013-03-01

    Following mitosis, cytoplasm, organelles and genetic material are partitioned into daughter cells through the process of cytokinesis. In somatic cells of higher plants, two cytoskeletal arrays, the preprophase band and the phragmoplast, facilitate the positioning and de novo assembly of the plant-specific cytokinetic organelle, the cell plate, which develops across the division plane and fuses with the parental plasma membrane to yield distinct new cells. The coordination of cytoskeletal and membrane dynamics required to initiate, assemble and shape the cell plate as it grows toward the mother cell cortex is dependent upon a large array of proteins, including molecular motors, membrane tethering, fusion and restructuring factors and biosynthetic, structural and regulatory elements. This review focuses on the temporal and molecular requirements of cytokinesis in somatic cells of higher plants gleaned from recent studies using cell biology, genetics, pharmacology and biochemistry.

  3. Enhanced bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils with higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, A.P.; Banks, M.K.

    1996-10-01

    Introduction of higher plants into a bioremediation system can enhance degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons and target compounds, particularly relatively immobile and recalcitrant organic molecules. Over the past several years, an interdisciplinary team of civil engineers, chemical engineers, soil chemists, soil microbiologists, and plant scientists at Kansas State University have been studying phytoremediation systems. Greenhouse experiments have focused on selecting plants that are most adapted to degrading target compounds and to surviving in soils highly contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Plant species do not seem to differ in their ability to aid in the decomposition of pyrene and anthracene, but benzo[a]pyrene is much more difficult to degrade. Most species are ineffective in enhancing the degradation of benzo[a]pyrene. Four field studies have been initiated in California, Texas, New Jersey, and Virginia to test some of our greenhouse observations.

  4. 97. Catalog B, Higher Plants, 200 2 American Chestnut Tree, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. Catalog B, Higher Plants, 200 2 American Chestnut Tree, Negative No. 6032 (Photographer and date unknown) THIS GHOST FOREST OF BLIGHTED CHESTNUTS ONCE STOOD APPROXIMATELY AT THE LOCATION OF THE BYRD VISITOR CENTER. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

  5. Larvicidal algae.

    PubMed

    Marten, Gerald G

    2007-01-01

    Although most algae are nutritious food for mosquito larvae, some species kill the larvae when ingested in large quantities. Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) that kill larvae do so by virtue of toxicity. While blue-green algae toxins may offer possibilities for delivery as larvicides, the toxicity of live blue-green algae does not seem consistent enough for live algae to be useful for mosquito control. Certain species of green algae in the order Chlorococcales kill larvae primarily because they are indigestible. Where these algae are abundant in nature, larvae consume them to the exclusion of other food and then starve. Under the right circumstances, it is possible to introduce indigestible algae into a breeding habitat so they become abundant enough to render it unsuitable for mosquito production. The algae can persist for years, even if the habitat dries periodically. The main limitation of indigestible algae lies in the fact that, under certain conditions, they may not replace all the nutritious algae in the habitat. More research on techniques to ensure complete replacement will be necessary before indigestible algae can go into operational use for mosquito control.

  6. Microspectroscopy of the photosynthetic compartment of algae.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Valtere; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Barsanti, Laura; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    We performed microspectroscopic evaluation of the pigment composition of the photosynthetic compartments of algae belonging to different taxonomic divisions and higher plants. The feasibility of microspectroscopy for discriminating among species and/or phylogenetic groups was tested on laboratory cultures. Gaussian bands decompositions and a fitting algorithm, together with fourth-derivative transformation of absorbance spectra, provided a reliable discrimination among chlorophylls a, b and c, phycobiliproteins and carotenoids. Comparative analysis of absorption spectra highlighted the evolutionary grouping of the algae into three main lineages in accordance with the most recent endosymbiotic theories.

  7. Role of blue green algae biofertilizer in ameliorating the nitrogen demand and fly-ash stress to the growth and yield of rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R D; Dwivedi, S; Shukla, M K; Mishra, S; Srivastava, S; Singh, R; Rai, U N; Gupta, D K

    2008-02-01

    Rice is a major food crop throughout the world; however, accumulation of toxic metals and metalloids in grains in contaminated environments is a matter of growing concern. Field experiments were conducted to analyze the growth performance, elemental composition (Fe, Si, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni, Cd and As) and yield of the rice plants (Oryza sativa L. cv. Saryu-52) grown under different doses of fly-ash (FA; applied @ 10 and 100 tha(-1) denoted as FA(10) and FA(100), respectively) mixed with garden soil (GS) in combination with nitrogen fertilizer (NF; applied @ 90 and 120 kg ha(-1) denoted as NF(90) and NF(120), respectively) and blue green algae biofertilizer (BGA; applied @ 12.5 kg ha(-1) denoted as BGA(12.5)). Significant enhancement of growth was observed in the plants growing on amended soils as compared to GS and best response was obtained in amendment of FA(10)+NF(90)+BGA(12.5). Accumulation of Si, Fe, Zn and Mn was higher than Cu, Cd, Ni and As. Arsenic accumulation was detected only in FA(100) and its amendments. Inoculation of BGA(12.5) caused slight reduction in Cd, Ni and As content of plants as compared to NF(120) amendment. The high levels of stress inducible non-protein thiols (NP-SH) and cysteine in FA(100) were decreased by application of NF and BGA indicating stress amelioration. Study suggests integrated use of FA, BGA and NF for improved growth, yield and mineral composition of the rice plants besides reducing the high demand of nitrogen fertilizers.

  8. Reduction in toxicity of wastewater from three wastewater treatment plants to alga (Scenedesmus obliquus) in northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Sun, Qing; Zhou, Jiti; Masunaga, Shigeki; Ma, Fang

    2015-09-01

    The toxicity of municipal wastewater to the receiving water bodies is still unknown, due to the lack of regulated toxicity based index for wastewater discharge in China. Our study aims at gaining insight into the acute toxic effects of local municipal wastewater on alga, Scenedesmus obliquus. Four endpoints, i.e. cell density, chlorophyll-A concentration, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and cell membrane integrity, of alga were analyzed to characterize the acute toxicity effects of wastewater from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with different treatment techniques: sequencing batch reactor (SBR), Linpor and conventional activated sludge. Influent and effluent from each treatment stage in these three WWTPs were sampled and evaluated for their acute toxicity. Our results showed that all three techniques can completely affect the algal chlorophyll-A synthesis stimulation effects of influent; the algal cell growth stimulation effect was only completely removed by the secondary treatment process in conventional activated sludge technique; toxic effects on cell membrane integrity of two influents from WWTPs with SBR and conventional activated sludge techniques were completely removed; the acute toxicity on SOD activity was partially reduced in SBR and conventional activated sludge techniques while not significantly reduced by Linpor system. As to the disinfection unit, NaClO disinfection enhanced wastewater toxicity dramatically while UV radiation had no remarkable influence on wastewater toxicity. Our results illustrated that SOD activity and chlorophyll-A synthesis were relatively sensitive to municipal wastewater toxicity. Our results would aid to understand the acute toxicity of municipal wastewater, as well as the toxicity removal by currently utilized treatment techniques in China.

  9. The Relevance of Higher Plants in Lead Compound Discovery Programs⊥

    PubMed Central

    Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Pan, Li; Fletcher, Joshua N.; Chai, Heebyung

    2011-01-01

    Along with compounds from terrestrial microorganisms, the constituents of higher plants have provided a substantial number of the natural product-derived drugs used currently in western medicine. Interest in the elucidation of new structures of the secondary metabolite constituents of plants has remained high among the natural products community over the first decade of the 21st century, particularly of species that are used in systems of traditional medicine or are utilized as botanical dietary supplements. In this review, progress made in the senior author’s laboratory in research work on naturally occurring sweeteners and other taste-modifying substances and on potential anticancer agents from tropical plants will be described. PMID:21650152

  10. The family of DOF transcription factors: from green unicellular algae to vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Risueno, Miguel Angel; Martínez, Manuel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Carbonero, Pilar

    2007-04-01

    This article deals with the origin and evolution of the DOF transcription factor family through a phylogenetic analysis of those DOF sequences identified from a variety of representative organisms from different taxonomic groups: the green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the moss Physcomitrella patens, the fern Selaginella moellendorffii, the gymnosperm Pinus taeda, the dicotyledoneous Arabidopsis thaliana and the monocotyledoneous angiosperms Oryza sativa and Hordeum vulgare. In barley, we have identified 26 different DOF genes by sequence analyses of clones isolated from the screening of genomic libraries and of ESTs, whereas a single DOF gene was identified by bioinformatics searches in the Chlamydomonas genome. The phylogenetic analysis groups all these genes into six major clusters of orthologs originated from a primary basal grade. Our results suggest that duplications of an ancestral DOF, probably formed in the photosynthetic eukaryotic ancestor, followed by subsequent neo-, sub-functionalization and pseudogenization processes would have triggered the expansion of the DOF family. Loss, acquisition and shuffling of conserved motifs among the new DOFs likely underlie the mechanism of formation of the distinct subfamilies.

  11. Shedding light on ethylene metabolism in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria A.; Bianchetti, Ricardo E.; Freschi, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Ethylene metabolism in higher plants is regulated by a wide array of endogenous and environmental factors. During most physiological processes, ethylene levels are mainly determined by a strict control of the rate-limiting biosynthetic steps responsible for the production of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and its subsequent conversion to ethylene. Responsible for these reactions, the key enzymes ACC synthase and ACC oxidase are encoded by multigene families formed by members that can be differentially regulated at the transcription and post-translational levels by specific developmental and environmental signals. Among the wide variety of environmental cues controlling plant ethylene production, light quality, duration, and intensity have consistently been demonstrated to influence the metabolism of this plant hormone in diverse plant tissues, organs, and species. Although still not completely elucidated, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between light signal transduction and ethylene evolution appears to involve a complex network that includes central transcription factors connecting multiple signaling pathways, which can be reciprocally modulated by ethylene itself, other phytohormones, and specific light wavelengths. Accumulating evidence has indicated particular photoreceptors as essential mediators in light-induced signaling cascades affecting ethylene levels. Therefore, this review specifically focuses on discussing the current knowledge of the potential molecular mechanisms implicated in the light-induced responses affecting ethylene metabolism during the regulation of developmental and metabolic plant responses. Besides presenting the state of the art in this research field, some overlooked mechanisms and future directions to elucidate the exact nature of the light–ethylene interplay in higher plants will also be compiled and discussed. PMID:25520728

  12. Use of higher plants as screens for toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Kristen, U

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with the use of entire plants, seedlings, cell suspension cultures and pollen tubes for the estimation of potential toxicity in the environment, and for risk assessment of chemicals and formulations of human relevance. It is shown that the roots of onions and various crop seedlings, as well as in vitro growing pollen tubes of some mono- and dicotyledonous plants, are most frequently used to obtain toxicity data by determination of root and tube growth inhibition. Both roots and pollen tubes are chloroplast free, non-photosynthetic systems and, therefore, with regard to their cytotoxic reactions are closer to vertebrate tissues and cells than are chloroplast-containing plant organs. Root tips and anthers of flower buds are shown to be applicable to genotoxicity screening by microscopic analysis of mitotic or meiotic aberrations during cell division or microspore development, respectively. The processes of mitosis and meiosis are similar in plants and animals. Therefore, meristematic and sporogenic tissues of plants generally show patterns of cytotoxic response similar to those of embryogenic and spermatogenic tissues of vertebrates. The suitability of root tips, cell suspensions and pollen tubes for the investigation of mechanisms of toxic action and for the analysis of structure-activity relationships is also demonstrated. Two plant-based assays, the Allium test and the pollen tube growth test, both currently being evaluated alongside with established mammalian in vivo and in vitro protocols, are emphasized with regard to their potential use as alternatives to animal in vivo toxicity tests. For both assays, preliminary results indicate that the tips of growing roots and the rapidly elongating pollen tubes of certain higher plant species are as reliable as mammalian cell lines for detecting basal cytotoxicity. It is suggested that seeds and pollen grains, in particular, provide easily storable and convenient systems for inexpensive, relatively

  13. The Charophycean green algae as model systems to study plant cell walls and other evolutionary adaptations that gave rise to land plants.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Doyle, Jeff J; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2012-01-01

    The Charophycean green algae (CGA) occupy a key phylogenetic position as the evolutionary grade that includes the sister group of the land plants (embryophytes), and so provide potentially valuable experimental systems to study the development and evolution of traits that were necessary for terrestrial colonization. The nature and molecular bases of such traits are still being determined, but one critical adaptation is thought to have been the evolution of a complex cell wall. Very little is known about the identity, origins and diversity of the biosynthetic machinery producing the major suites of structural polymers (i. e., cell wall polysaccharides and associated molecules) that must have been in place for land colonization. However, it has been suggested that the success of the earliest land plants was partly based on the frequency of gene duplication, and possibly whole genome duplications, during times of radical habitat changes. Orders of the CGA span early diverging taxa retaining more ancestral characters, through complex multicellular organisms with morphological characteristics resembling those of land plants. Examination of gene diversity and evolution within the CGA could help reveal when and how the molecular pathways required for synthesis of key structural polymers in land plants arose.

  14. POT1 proteins in green algae and land plants: DNA-binding properties and evidence of co-evolution with telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shakirov, Eugene V.; Song, Xiangyu; Joseph, Jessica A.; Shippen, Dorothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Telomeric DNA terminates with a single-stranded 3′ G-overhang that in vertebrates and fission yeast is bound by POT1 (Protection Of Telomeres). However, no in vitro telomeric DNA binding is associated with Arabidopsis POT1 paralogs. To further investigate POT1–DNA interaction in plants, we cloned POT1 genes from 11 plant species representing major branches of plant kingdom. Telomeric DNA binding was associated with POT1 proteins from the green alga Ostreococcus lucimarinus and two flowering plants, maize and Asparagus. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that several residues critical for telomeric DNA recognition in vertebrates are functionally conserved in plant POT1 proteins. However, the plant proteins varied in their minimal DNA-binding sites and nucleotide recognition properties. Green alga POT1 exhibited a strong preference for the canonical plant telomere repeat sequence TTTAGGG with no detectable binding to hexanucleotide telomere repeat TTAGGG found in vertebrates and some plants, including Asparagus. In contrast, POT1 proteins from maize and Asparagus bound TTAGGG repeats with only slightly reduced affinity relative to the TTTAGGG sequence. We conclude that the nucleic acid binding site in plant POT1 proteins is evolving rapidly, and that the recent acquisition of TTAGGG telomere repeats in Asparagus appears to have co-evolved with changes in POT1 DNA sequence recognition. PMID:19783822

  15. Glycolate Pathway in Algae 1

    PubMed Central

    Hess, J. L.; Tolbert, N. E.

    1967-01-01

    No glycolate oxidase activity could be detected by manometric, isotopic, or spectrophotometric techniques in cell extracts from 5 strains of algae grown in the light with CO2. However, NADH:glyoxylate reductase, phosphoglycolate phosphatase and isocitrate dehydrogenase were detected in the cell extracts. The serine formed by Chlorella or Chlamydomonas after 12 seconds of photosynthetic 14CO2 fixation contained 70 to 80% of its 14C in the carboxyl carbon. This distribution of label in serine was similar to that in phosphoglycerate from the same experiment. Thus, in algae serine is probably formed directly from phosphoglycerate. These results differ from those of higher plants which form uniformly labeled serine from glycolate in short time periods when phosphoglycerate is still carboxyl labeled. In glycolate formed by algae in 5 and 10 seconds of 14CO2 fixation, C2 was at least twice as radioactive as C1. A similar skewed labeling in C2 and C3 of 3-phosphoglycerate and serine suggests a common precursor for glycolate and 3-phosphoglycerate. Glycine formed by the algae, however, from the same experiments was uniformly labeled. Manganese deficient Chlorella incorporated only 2% of the total 14CO2 fixed in 10 minutes into glycolate, while in normal Chlorella 30% of the total 14C was found in glycolate. Manganese deficient Chlorella also accumulated more 14C in glycine and serine. Glycolate excretion by Chlorella was maximal in 10 mm bicarbonate and occurred only in the light, and was not influenced by the addition of glycolate. No time dependent uptake of significant amounts of either glycolate or phosphoglycolate was observed. When small amounts of glycolate-2-14C were fed to Chlorella or Scenedesmus, only 2 to 3% was metabolized after 30 to 60 minutes. The algae were not capable of significant glycolate metabolism as is the higher plant. The failure to detect glycolate oxidase, the low level glycolate-14C metabolism, and the formation of serine from phosphoglycerate

  16. Experimental determination of magnesium isotope fractionation during higher plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolou-Bi, Emile B.; Poszwa, Anne; Leyval, Corinne; Vigier, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    Two higher plant species (rye grass and clover) were cultivated under laboratory conditions on two substrates (solution, phlogopite) in order to constrain the corresponding Mg isotope fractionations during plant growth and Mg uptake. We show that bulk plants are systematically enriched in heavy isotopes relative to their nutrient source. The Δ 26Mg plant-source range from 0.72‰ to 0.26‰ for rye grass and from 1.05‰ to 0.41‰ for clover. Plants grown on phlogopite display Mg isotope signatures (relative to the Mg source) ˜0.3‰ lower than hydroponic plants. For a given substrate, rye grass display lower δ 26Mg (by ˜0.3‰) relative to clover. Magnesium desorbed from rye grass roots display a δ 26Mg greater than the nutrient solution. Adsorption experiments on dead and living rye grass roots also indicate a significant enrichment in heavy isotopes of the Mg adsorbed on the root surface. Our results indicate that the key processes responsible for heavy isotope enrichment in plants are located at the root level. Both species also exhibit an enrichment in light isotopes from roots to shoots (Δ 26Mg leaf-root = -0.65‰ and -0.34‰ for rye grass and clover grown on phlogopite respectively, and Δ 26Mg leaf-root of -0.06‰ and -0.22‰ for the same species grown hydroponically). This heavy isotope depletion in leaves can be explained by biological processes that affect leaves and roots differently: (1) organo-Mg complex (including chlorophyll) formation, and (2) Mg transport within plant. For both species, a positive correlation between δ 26Mg and K/Mg was observed among the various organs. This correlation is consistent with the link between K and Mg internal cycles, as well as with formation of organo-magnesium compounds associated with enrichment in heavy isotopes. Considering our results together with the published range for δ 26Mg of natural plants and rivers, we estimate that a significant change in continental vegetation would induce a change of

  17. Biomass or growth rate endpoint for algae and aquatic plants: relevance for the aquatic risk assessment of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Bergtold, Matthias; Dohmen, Gerhard Peter

    2011-04-01

    Ecotoxicological studies with algae and aquatic plants are essential parts of the aquatic risk assessment for crop protection products (CPP). Growth rate is used as a response variable and in addition the effects on biomass and/or yield (in the following biomass) can be measured. The parameter biomass generally provides a lower numerical value compared with the growth rate for systematic and mathematical reasons. Therefore, some regulators prefer to use the EbC50 value (i.e., the concentration at which 50% reduction of biomass is observed) rather than ErC50 (the concentration at which a 50% inhibition of growth rate is observed) as the endpoint for ecotoxicological risk assessment. However, the parameter growth rate is scientifically more appropriate and robust against deviations in test conditions, permitting better interpretation of, and comparison between, studies. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the growth rate and biomass parameters with regard to their protectiveness and suitability for environmental risk assessment of CPP. It has been shown for a number of herbicides that the use of the EC50 value (without distinction between growth rate and biomass endpoints) from laboratory studies in combination with an assessment factor of 10 is sufficiently protective for aquatic plants (except for the herbicide 2,4-D). In this paper we evaluated EbC50 and ErC50 values separately. Data on 19 different herbicides were compiled from the literature or GLP reports. The EbC50 and ErC50 values obtained in laboratory studies were compared with effect concentrations in ecosystem studies (mainly mesocosm). This comparison of laboratory and field data shows that the overall aquatic risk assessment using ErC50 values in combination with the currently applied assessment factor of 10 is sufficient to exclude significant risk to aquatic plants in the environment.

  18. Slow molecular evolution in 18S rDNA, rbcL and nad5 genes of mosses compared with higher plants.

    PubMed

    Stenøien, H K

    2008-03-01

    The evolutionary potential of bryophytes (mosses, liverworts and hornworts) has been debated for decades. Fossil record and biogeographical distribution patterns suggest very slow morphological evolution and the retainment of several ancient traits since the split with vascular plants some 450 million years ago. Many have argued that bryophytes may evolve as rapidly as higher plants on the molecular level, but this hypothesis has not been tested so far. Here, it is shown that mosses have experienced significantly lower rates of molecular evolution than higher plants within 18S rDNA (nuclear), rbcL (chloroplast) and nad5 (mitochondrial) genes. Mosses are on an average evolving 2-3 times slower than ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms; and also green algae seem to be evolving faster than nonvascular plants. These results support the observation of a general correlation between morphological and molecular evolutionary rates in plants and also show that mosses are 'evolutionary sphinxes' regarding both morphological and molecular evolutionary potential.

  19. Genetic Manipulation of Condensed Tannins in Higher Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Mark P.; Bavage, Adrian D.; Strudwicke, Catherine; Morris, Phillip

    1998-01-01

    We have produced and analyzed transgenic birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.) plants harboring antisense dihydroflavonol reductase (AS-DFR) sequences. In initial experiments the effect of introducing three different antisense Antirrhinum majus L. DFR constructs into a single recipient genotype (S50) was assessed. There were no obvious effects on plant biomass, but levels of condensed tannins showed a statistical reduction in leaf, stem, and root tissues of some of the antisense lines. Transformation events were also found, which resulted in increased levels of condensed tannins. In subsequent experiments a detailed study of AS-DFR phenotypes was carried out in genotype S33 using pMAJ2 (an antisense construct comprising the 5′ half of the A. majus cDNA). In this case, reduced tannin levels were found in leaf and stem tissues and in juvenile shoot tissues. Analysis of soluble flavonoids and isoflavonoids in tannin down-regulated shoot tissues indicated few obvious default products. When two S33 AS-DFR lines were outcrossed, there was an underrepresentation of transgene sequences in progeny plants and no examples of inheritance of an antisense phenotype were observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the genetic manipulation of condensed tannin biosynthesis in higher plants. PMID:9501146

  20. Production of marine plant biomass: Management, cultivation, and genetic modification of macrophytic algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermeer, J. P.

    1982-12-01

    Every second of every day, the Sun's fusion reactions convert thousands of tons of hydrogen into helium with the release of almost unimaginable amounts of energy. Through the photosynthetic activity of plants, both aquatic and terrestrial, a small fraction of this energy is trapped and stored as plant biomass. The oceans cover a greater fraction of the globe than do the land masses, making it appropriate to consider their contribution to the total biomass production, and their potential as a source of raw materials for the extraction of chemicals and fuels. A rather broad synthesis, convering the total seaweed resource and some of the constraints placed on harvesting these plants, attempts to farm the oceans to increase the supply of desirable species, attempts to cultivate seaweeds in enclosures where environmental parameters are controlled, and finally, the limited amount of genetic manipulation that was applied to these plants was presented. Only the larger red and brown seaweeds were considered because they represent the bulk of the biomass.

  1. Lead stress effects on physiobiochemical activities of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Sengar, Rakesh Singh; Gautam, Madhu; Sengar, Rajesh Singh; Garg, Sanjay Kumar; Sengar, Kalpana; Chaudhary, Reshu

    2008-01-01

    Lead is a metallic pollutant emanating from various environmental sources including industrial wastes, combustion of fossil fuels, and use of agrochemicals. Lead may exist in the atmosphere as dusts, fumes, mists, and vapors, and in soil as a mineral. Soils along roadsides are rich in lead because vehicles burn leaded gasoline, which contributes to environmental lead pollution. Other important sources of lead pollution are geological weathering, industrial processing of ores and minerals, leaching of lead from solid wastes, and animal and human excreta. Lead is nondegradable, readily enters the food chain, and can subsequently endanger human and animal health. Lead is one of the most important environment pollutants and deserves the increasing attention it has received in recent decades. The present effort was undertaken to review lead stress effects on the physiobiochemical activity of higher plants. Lead has gained considerable attention as a potent heavy metal pollutant because of growing anthropogenic pressure on the environment. Lead-contaminated soils show a sharp decline in crop productivity. Lead is absorbed by plants mainly through the root system and in minor amounts through the leaves. Within the plants, lead accumulates primarily in roots, but some is translocated to aerial plant parts. Soil pH, soil particle size, cation-exchange capacity, as well as root surface area, root exudation, and mycorrhizal transpiration rate affect the availability and uptake of lead by plants. Only a limited amount of lead is translocated from roots to other organs because there are natural plant barriers in the root endodermis. At lethal concentrations, this barrier is broken and lead may enter vascular tissues. Lead in plants may form deposits of various sizes, present mainly in intercellular spaces, cell walls, and vacuoles. Small deposits of this metal are also seen in the endoplasmic reticulum, dictyosome, and dictyosome-derived vesicles. After entering the cells, lead

  2. Cloning higher plants from aseptically cultured tissues and cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    A review of aseptic culture methods for higher plants is presented, which focuses on the existing problems that limit or prevent the full realization of cloning plants from free cells. It is shown that substantial progress in clonal multiplication has been made with explanted stem tips or lateral buds which can be stimulated to produce numerous precocious axillary branches. These branches can then be separated or subdivided and induced to root in order to yield populations of genetically and phenotypically uniorm plantlets. Similarly, undifferentiated calluses can sometimes be induced to form shoots and/or roots adventitiously. Although the cell culture techniques required to produce somatic embryos are presently rudimentary, steady advances are being made in learning how to stimulate formation of somatic or adventive embryos from totipotent cells grown in suspension cultures. It is concluded that many problems exist in the producing and growing of totipotent or morphogenetically competent cell suspensions, but the potential benefits are great.

  3. Sucrose phosphate phosphatase in the green alga Klebsormidium flaccidum (Streptophyta) lacks an extensive C-terminal domain and differs from that of land plants.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Manabu; Uemura, Matsuo

    2012-04-01

    Previously, it was reported that like land plants, the green alga Klebsormidium flaccidum (Streptophyta) accumulates sucrose during cold acclimation (Nagao et al. Plant Cell Environ 31:872-885, 2008), suggesting that synthesis of sucrose could enhance the freezing tolerance of this alga. Because sucrose phosphate phosphatase (SPP; EC 3.1.3.24) is a key enzyme in the sucrose synthesis pathway in plants, we analyzed the SPP gene in K. flaccidum (KfSPP, GenBank accession number AB669024) to clarify its role in sucrose accumulation. As determined from its deduced amino acid sequence, KfSPP contains the N-terminal domain that is characteristic of the L-2-haloacid-dehalogenase family of phosphatases/hydrolases (the HAD phosphatase domain). However, it lacks the extensive C-terminal domain found in SPPs of land plants. Database searches revealed that the SPPs in cyanobacteria also lack the C-terminal domain. In addition, the green alga Coccomyxa (Chlorophyta) and K. flaccidum, which are closely related to land plants, have cyanobacterial-type SPPs, while Chlorella (Chlorophyta) has a land plant-type SPP. These results demonstrate that even K. flaccidum (Streptophyta), as a recent ancestor of land plants, has the cyanobacterial-type SPP lacking the C-terminal domain. Because SPP and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyze sequential reactions in sucrose synthesis in green plant cells and the lack of the C-terminal domain in KfSPP is predicted to decrease its activity, the interaction between decreased KfSPP activity and SPS activity may alter sucrose synthesis during cold acclimation in K. flaccidum.

  4. Induction of thyroid neoplasm following plant medicine marine algae (sargassum): a rare case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, George; Musumeci, Fabio; Byrne, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In this study induction of neoplasm in thyroid gland of one postoperative patient with breast cancer was conducted by marine algae (also seaweed, sargassum), which is presented here. A 41-year-old women was diagnosed as her right breast cancer complicated with lymph node metastasis in her right axilla on February, 1999. In June 19, 1999 she was given the combination chemotherapy of vincristine, cyclophosphamide, 5-Fluorouracil and cinobufacini drugs due to two lymph nodes on her right superclavicular following radical mastectomy. During chemotherapy she was also taken the adjuvant treatment of traditional medicine. Traditional medicine consisted of seaweed plant drugs (containing iodine 362,400 ug/kg). As to intermittent maintance treatment the total dosage of seaweed herb was at least exceeded 500 gram. Induction of thyroid tumor (thumb size) was found in June, 2001. A thyroidectomy due to thyroma was successfully performed. Histologically there revealed thyroid tissue without the evidence of metastasis of breast cancer. She had a 5-year survivor. The data indicated oncogenic function of some traditional herbs, and further experience of traditional medicine in treating thyroid disease especially in thyroid cancer.

  5. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Silva, Helton Colares; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda; Cavada, Benildo; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250 μg/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL), Vatairea macrocarpa (VML), Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL), Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL), and Hypnea musciformis (HML) showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24 h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining) and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units). The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins. PMID:24982871

  6. Toxicity of TiO(2) nanoparticles to cladocerans, algae, rotifers and plants - effects of size and crystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Clément, Laura; Hurel, Charlotte; Marmier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, there is an increasing risk of human and environmental exposure to nanotechnology-based materials. However, the data on the potential environmental effects of nanoparticles are scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of particle size and crystal structure (anatase and rutile) of titanium dioxide on their toxicity. Thus, acute and chronic toxicity tests included a modified acute test (72 h) using daphnies and algae, rotifers and plants as model organisms. Gradient of toxicity varied with the tested biological organisms. Our results revealed that TiO(2) nanoparticles in anatase crystal structure are toxic in the entire set of tests conducted. However, at highconcentration, through their antimicrobial properties, they significantly promoted growth of roots. Because of its lipophilicity, the rutile crystalline structure of TiO(2) NPs form larger aggregates in aqueous medium; then they have less effect on biological organisms, and thus a lower toxicity than the anatase crystalline form of TiO(2). We also demonstrated that exposure duration, aggregation and concentrations are contributing factors in nanoparticles-mediated toxicity.

  7. The rapid quantitation of the filamentous blue-green alga plectonema boryanum by the luciferase assay for ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, V. N.

    1974-01-01

    Plectonema boryanum is a filamentous blue green alga. Blue green algae have a procaryotic cellular organization similar to bacteria, but are usually obligate photoautotrophs, obtaining their carbon and energy from photosynthetic mechanism similar to higher plants. This research deals with a comparison of three methods of quantitating filamentous populations: microscopic cell counts, the luciferase assay for ATP and optical density measurements.

  8. Distribution, congruence, and hotspots of higher plants in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lina; Li, Jinya; Liu, Huiyuan; Qin, Haining

    2016-01-01

    Identifying biodiversity hotspots has become a central issue in setting up priority protection areas, especially as financial resources for biological diversity conservation are limited. Taking China’s Higher Plants Red List (CHPRL), including Bryophytes, Ferns, Gymnosperms, Angiosperms, as the data source, we analyzed the geographic patterns of species richness, endemism, and endangerment via data processing at a fine grid-scale with an average edge length of 30 km based on three aspects of richness information: species richness, endemic species richness, and threatened species richness. We sought to test the accuracy of hotspots used in identifying conservation priorities with regard to higher plants. Next, we tested the congruence of the three aspects and made a comparison of the similarities and differences between the hotspots described in this paper and those in previous studies. We found that over 90% of threatened species in China are concentrated. While a high spatial congruence is observed among the three measures, there is a low congruence between two different sets of hotspots. Our results suggest that biodiversity information should be considered when identifying biological hotspots. Other factors, such as scales, should be included as well to develop biodiversity conservation plans in accordance with the region’s specific conditions.

  9. Distribution, congruence, and hotspots of higher plants in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Li, Jinya; Liu, Huiyuan; Qin, Haining

    2016-01-01

    Identifying biodiversity hotspots has become a central issue in setting up priority protection areas, especially as financial resources for biological diversity conservation are limited. Taking China’s Higher Plants Red List (CHPRL), including Bryophytes, Ferns, Gymnosperms, Angiosperms, as the data source, we analyzed the geographic patterns of species richness, endemism, and endangerment via data processing at a fine grid-scale with an average edge length of 30 km based on three aspects of richness information: species richness, endemic species richness, and threatened species richness. We sought to test the accuracy of hotspots used in identifying conservation priorities with regard to higher plants. Next, we tested the congruence of the three aspects and made a comparison of the similarities and differences between the hotspots described in this paper and those in previous studies. We found that over 90% of threatened species in China are concentrated. While a high spatial congruence is observed among the three measures, there is a low congruence between two different sets of hotspots. Our results suggest that biodiversity information should be considered when identifying biological hotspots. Other factors, such as scales, should be included as well to develop biodiversity conservation plans in accordance with the region’s specific conditions. PMID:26750244

  10. Plant invasion is associated with higher plant-soil nutrient concentrations in nutrient-poor environments.

    PubMed

    Sardans, Jordi; Bartrons, Mireia; Margalef, Olga; Gargallo-Garriga, Albert; Janssens, Ivan A; Ciais, Phillipe; Obersteiner, Michael; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D; Chen, Han Y H; Peñuelas, Josep

    2017-03-01

    Plant invasion is an emerging driver of global change worldwide. We aimed to disentangle its impacts on plant-soil nutrient concentrations. We conducted a meta-analysis of 215 peer-reviewed articles and 1233 observations. Invasive plant species had globally higher N and P concentrations in photosynthetic tissues but not in foliar litter, in comparison with their native competitors. Invasive plants were also associated with higher soil C and N stocks and N, P, and K availabilities. The differences in N and P concentrations in photosynthetic tissues and in soil total C and N, soil N, P, and K availabilities between invasive and native species decreased when the environment was richer in nutrient resources. The results thus suggested higher nutrient resorption efficiencies in invasive than in native species in nutrient-poor environments. There were differences in soil total N concentrations but not in total P concentrations, indicating that the differences associated to invasive plants were related with biological processes, not with geochemical processes. The results suggest that invasiveness is not only a driver of changes in ecosystem species composition but that it is also associated with significant changes in plant-soil elemental composition and stoichiometry.

  11. Biochemical Analysis of Autophagy in Algae and Plants by Monitoring the Electrophoretic Mobility of ATG8.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Crespo, José L

    2016-01-01

    Identification of specific autophagy markers has been fundamental to investigate autophagy as catabolic process. Among them, the ATG8 protein turned out to be one of the most widely used and specific molecular markers of autophagy both in higher and lower eukaryotes. Here, we describe how ATG8 can be used to monitor autophagy in Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis by western blot analysis.

  12. The Study of Algae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushforth, Samuel R.

    1977-01-01

    Included in this introduction to the study of algae are drawings of commonly encountered freshwater algae, a summary of the importance of algae, descriptions of the seven major groups of algae, and techniques for collection and study of algae. (CS)

  13. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution.

  14. Management of Powdery Mildew in Squash by Plant and Alga Extract Biopesticides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shouan; Mersha, Zelalem; Vallad, Gary E.; Huang, Cheng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Although many fungicides are registered for use to control powdery mildew on cucurbits, management of resistance to fungicides in pathogen populations still remains a major challenge. Two biopesticides Regalia SC and HMO 736 were evaluated in the greenhouse and field for their efficacy against powdery mildew in squash. In greenhouses, Regalia SC alone significantly (P < 0.05) reduced powdery mildew compared to the nontreated control, and was as effective as the chemical standard Procure 480SC (triflumizole). In alternation with Procure 480SC, Regalia SC demonstrated greater or equivalent effects on reducing the disease. HMO 736 alone showed varying levels of disease control, but alternating with Procure 480SC significantly improved control efficacy. In addition, application of Regalia SC or HMO 736 each in alternation with Procure 480SC significantly increased the chlorophyll content in leaves and the total fresh weight of squash plants, when compared with the water control, Regalia SC and HMO 736 alone. In field trials, application of Regalia SC and HMO 736 each alone significantly reduced disease severity in one of two field trials during the early stage of disease development, but not during later stages when disease pressure became high. Both Regalia SC and HMO 736 each applied in alternation with Procure 480SC significantly improved the control efficacy compared to Procure 480SC alone. Results from this study demonstrated that an integrated management program can be developed for powdery mildew in squash by integrating the biopesticides Regalia SC, HMO 736 with the chemical fungicide Procure 480SC. PMID:27904459

  15. Management of Powdery Mildew in Squash by Plant and Alga Extract Biopesticides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shouan; Mersha, Zelalem; Vallad, Gary E; Huang, Cheng-Hua

    2016-12-01

    Although many fungicides are registered for use to control powdery mildew on cucurbits, management of resistance to fungicides in pathogen populations still remains a major challenge. Two biopesticides Regalia SC and HMO 736 were evaluated in the greenhouse and field for their efficacy against powdery mildew in squash. In greenhouses, Regalia SC alone significantly (P < 0.05) reduced powdery mildew compared to the nontreated control, and was as effective as the chemical standard Procure 480SC (triflumizole). In alternation with Procure 480SC, Regalia SC demonstrated greater or equivalent effects on reducing the disease. HMO 736 alone showed varying levels of disease control, but alternating with Procure 480SC significantly improved control efficacy. In addition, application of Regalia SC or HMO 736 each in alternation with Procure 480SC significantly increased the chlorophyll content in leaves and the total fresh weight of squash plants, when compared with the water control, Regalia SC and HMO 736 alone. In field trials, application of Regalia SC and HMO 736 each alone significantly reduced disease severity in one of two field trials during the early stage of disease development, but not during later stages when disease pressure became high. Both Regalia SC and HMO 736 each applied in alternation with Procure 480SC significantly improved the control efficacy compared to Procure 480SC alone. Results from this study demonstrated that an integrated management program can be developed for powdery mildew in squash by integrating the biopesticides Regalia SC, HMO 736 with the chemical fungicide Procure 480SC.

  16. The Green Tetrahymena utriculariae n. sp. (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea) with Its Endosymbiotic Algae (Micractinium sp.), Living in Traps of a Carnivorous Aquatic Plant.

    PubMed

    Pitsch, Gianna; Adamec, Lubomír; Dirren, Sebastian; Nitsche, Frank; Šimek, Karel; Sirová, Dagmara; Posch, Thomas

    2016-09-10

    The genus Tetrahymena (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea) probably represents the best studied ciliate genus. At present, more than forty species have been described. All are colorless, i.e. they do not harbor symbiotic algae, and as aerobes they need at least microaerobic habitats. Here, we present the morphological and molecular description of the first green representative, Tetrahymena utriculariae n. sp., living in symbiosis with endosymbiotic algae identified as Micractinium sp. (Chlorophyta). The full life cycle of the ciliate species is documented, including trophonts and theronts, conjugating cells, resting cysts and dividers. This species has been discovered in an exotic habitat, namely in traps of the carnivorous aquatic plant Utricularia reflexa (originating from Okavango Delta, Botswana). Green ciliates live as commensals of the plant in this anoxic habitat. Ciliates are bacterivorous, however, symbiosis with algae is needed to satisfy cell metabolism but also to gain oxygen from symbionts. When ciliates are cultivated outside their natural habitat under aerobic conditions and fed with saturating bacterial food, they gradually become aposymbiotic. Based on phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 genes T. utriculariae forms a sister group to Tetrahymena thermophila.

  17. Variation potential in higher plants: Mechanisms of generation and propagation

    PubMed Central

    Vodeneev, Vladimir; Akinchits, Elena; Sukhov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Long-distance intercellular electrical signals, including variation potential (VP) in higher plants, are a potential mechanism of coordinate functional responses in different plant cells under action of stressors. VP, which is caused by damaging factors (e.g., heating, crushing), is transient depolarization with an irregular shape. It can include a long-term depolarization and fast impulse depolarization (‘AP-like’ spikes). Mechanisms of VP generation and propagation are still under investigation. It is probable that VP is a local electrical response induced by propagation of hydraulic wave and (or) chemical agent. Both hypotheses are based on numerous experimental results but they predict VP velocities which are not in a good accordance with speed of variation potential propagation. Thus combination of hydraulic and chemical signals is the probable mechanism of VP propagation. VP generation is traditionally connected with transient H+-ATPase inactivation, but AP-like spikes are also connected with passive ions fluxes. Ca2+ influx is a probable mechanism which triggers H+-ATPase inactivation and ions channels activation at VP. PMID:26313506

  18. Effects of local Polynesian plants and algae on growth and expression of two immune-related genes in orbicular batfish (Platax orbicularis).

    PubMed

    Reverter, Miriam; Saulnier, Denis; David, Rarahu; Bardon-Albaret, Agnès; Belliard, Corinne; Tapissier-Bontemps, Nathalie; Lecchini, David; Sasal, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The emerging orbicular batfish (Platax orbicularis) aquaculture is the most important fish aquaculture industry in French Polynesia. However, bacterial infections are causing severe mortality episodes. Therefore, there is an urgent need to find an effective management solution. Besides the supplying difficulty and high costs of veterinary drugs in French Polynesia, batfish aquaculture takes place close to the coral reef, where use of synthetic persistent drugs should be restricted. Medicinal plants and bioactive algae are emerging as a cheaper and more sustainable alternative to chemical drugs. We have studied the effect of local Polynesian plants and the local opportunistic algae Asparagopsis taxiformis on batfish when orally administered. Weight gain and expression of two immune-related genes (lysozyme g - Lys G and transforming growth factor beta - TGF-β1) were studied to analyze immunostimulant activity of plants on P. orbicularis. Results showed that several plants increased Lys G and TGF-β1 expression on orbicular batfish after 2 and 3 weeks of oral administration. A. taxiformis was the plant displaying the most promising results, promoting a weight gain of 24% after 3 weeks of oral administration and significantly increasing the relative amount of both Lys G and TGF-β1 transcripts in kidney and spleen of P. orbicularis.

  19. Need for higher fuel burnup at the Hatch Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Beckhman, J.T.

    1996-03-01

    Hatch is a BWR 4 and has been in operation for some time. The first unit became commercial about 1975. Obtaining higher burnups, or higher average discharge exposures, is nothing new at Hatch. Since we have started, the discharge exposure of the plant has increased. Now, of course, we are not approaching the numbers currently being discussed but, the average discharge exposure has increased from around 20,000 MWD/MTU in the early to mid-1980s to 34,000 MWD/MTU in 1994, I am talking about batch average values. There are also peak bundle and peak rod values. You will have to make the conversions if you think in one way or the other because I am talking in batch averages. During Hatch`s operating history we have had some problems with fuel failure. Higher burnup fuel raises a concern about how much fuel failure you are going to have. Fuel failure is, of course, an economic issue with us. Back in the early 1980s, we had a problem with crud-induced localized corrosion, known as CILC. We have gotten over that, but we had some times when it was up around 27 fuel failures a year. That is not a pleasant time to live through because it is not what you want from an economic viewpoint or any other. We have gotten that down. We have had some fuel failures recently, but they have not been related to fuel burnup or to corrosion. In fact, the number of failures has decreased from the early 1980s to the 90s even though burnup increased during that time. The fuel failures are more debris-related-type failures. In addition to increasing burnups, utilities are actively evaluating or have already incorporated power uprate and longer fuel cycles (e.g., 2-year cycles). The goal is to balance out the higher power density, longer cycles, higher burnup, and to have no leakers. Why do we as an industry want to have higher burnup fuel? That is what I want to tell you a little bit about.

  20. Transport, Compartmentation, and Metabolism of Homoserine in Higher Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Serge; Curien, Gilles; Bligny, Richard; Gout, Elisabeth; Douce, Roland

    1998-01-01

    The transport, compartmentation, and metabolism of homoserine was characterized in two strains of meristematic higher plant cells, the dicotyledonous sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) and the monocotyledonous weed Echinochloa colonum. Homoserine is an intermediate in the synthesis of the aspartate-derived amino acids methionine, threonine (Thr), and isoleucine. Using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, we showed that homoserine actively entered the cells via a high-affinity proton-symport carrier (Km approximately 50–60 μm) at the maximum rate of 8 ± 0.5 μmol h−1 g−1 cell wet weight, and in competition with serine or Thr. We could visualize the compartmentation of homoserine, and observed that it accumulated at a concentration 4 to 5 times higher in the cytoplasm than in the large vacuolar compartment. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance permitted us to analyze the phosphorylation of homoserine. When sycamore cells were incubated with 100 μm homoserine, phosphohomoserine steadily accumulated in the cytoplasmic compartment over 24 h at the constant rate of 0.7 μmol h−1 g−1 cell wet weight, indicating that homoserine kinase was not inhibited in vivo by its product, phosphohomoserine. The rate of metabolism of phosphohomoserine was much lower (0.06 μmol h−1 g−1 cell wet weight) and essentially sustained Thr accumulation. Similarly, homoserine was actively incorporated by E. colonum cells. However, in contrast to what was seen in sycamore cells, large accumulations of Thr were observed, whereas the intracellular concentration of homoserine remained low, and phosphohomoserine did not accumulate. These differences with sycamore cells were attributed to the presence of a higher Thr synthase activity in this strain of monocot cells. PMID:9490758

  1. Combination of a higher-tier flow-through system and population modeling to assess the effects of time-variable exposure of isoproturon on the green algae Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Weber, Denis; Schaefer, Dieter; Dorgerloh, Michael; Bruns, Eric; Goerlitz, Gerhard; Hammel, Klaus; Preuss, Thomas G; Ratte, Hans Toni

    2012-04-01

    A flow-through system was developed to investigate the effects of time-variable exposure of pesticides on algae. A recently developed algae population model was used for simulations supported and verified by laboratory experiments. Flow-through studies with Desmodesmus subspicatus and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata under time-variable exposure to isoproturon were performed, in which the exposure patterns were based on the results of FOrum for Co-ordination of pesticide fate models and their USe (FOCUS) model calculations for typical exposure situations via runoff or drain flow. Different types of pulsed exposure events were realized, including a whole range of repeated pulsed and steep peaks as well as periods of constant exposure. Both species recovered quickly in terms of growth from short-term exposure and according to substance dissipation from the system. Even at a peak 10 times the maximum predicted environmental concentration of isoproturon, only transient effects occurred on algae populations. No modified sensitivity or reduced growth was observed after repeated exposure. Model predictions of algal growth in the flow-through tests agreed well with the experimental data. The experimental boundary conditions and the physiological properties of the algae were used as the only model input. No calibration or parameter fitting was necessary. The combination of the flow-through experiments with the algae population model was revealed to be a powerful tool for the assessment of pulsed exposure on algae. It allowed investigating the growth reduction and recovery potential of algae after complex exposure, which is not possible with standard laboratory experiments alone. The results of the combined approach confirm the beneficial use of population models as supporting tools in higher-tier risk assessments of pesticides.

  2. Multispecies methods of testing for toxicity: Use of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis in nitrogen fixation and correlations between responses by algae and terrestrial plants

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Responses of the Rhizobium-legume symbiotic relationship to long-term (5- to 7-week) and short-term (2-week) exposures of copper sulfate, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and streptomycin sulfate were examined in bush beans and clover. Toxic effects were evaluated by comparing plant biomass (yield), nodulation success, nitrogen fixation rate as indicated by acetylene reduction, and plant nitrogen content in controls and in plants exposed to various concentrations of the chemicals. Plants with long-term continuous root exposure were affected more than plants with short-term exposure, as indicated by reductions in nitrogen fixation rates and plant growth. Although rates of acetylene reduction (nitrogen fixation) were depressed, plants biomass and the numbers of root nodules produced were simpler, less expensive indices of exposure. In a second test, the responses of algae (Selenastrum capricornutum and Chlorella vulgaris) and terrestrial plants (radishes, barley, bush beans, and soybeans) to 21 different herbicides were compared to evaluate the use of a short-term (96-h) algal growth inhibition test for identifying chemicals potentially toxic to terrestrial plants.

  3. Polyketide folding in higher plants: biosynthesis of the phenylanthraquinone knipholone.

    PubMed

    Bringmann, Gerhard; Noll, Torsten F; Gulder, Tanja; Dreyer, Michael; Grüne, Matthias; Moskau, Detlef

    2007-04-27

    The biosynthesis of knipholone, as an axially chiral phenylanthraquinone, in higher plants was examined by feeding experiments with [13C2]-labeled precursors. [13C2]-Acetate and advanced synthetic intermediates were fed to sterile cultures of Kniphofia pumila (Asphodelaceae), with subsequent NMR analysis on the isolated natural product involving 2D INADEQUATE and SELINQUATE experiments. Due to its uneven number of carbon atoms, and because of its uncertain decarboxylation site, the "northern" part of the molecule (i.e., the chrysophanol portion) might originate from four different cyclization modes. According to the labeling pattern of the product isolated after incorporation, this anthraquinone part of knipholone is formed by the so-called F folding mode (originally established for fungi). The acetophenone part of the molecule, which does not undergo a decarboxylation reaction, originates from four acetate units. The surprising lack of randomization of the intact [13C2] units in this "southern" part reveals the absence of a free symmetric intermediate as initially anticipated. This is in agreement with the intact incorporation of the "authentic" southern molecular portion, 4,6-dihydroxy-2-methoxyacetophenone, while the corresponding symmetrical candidate trihydroxyacetophenone was clearly not incorporated, showing that the O-methylation of the freshly cyclized tetraketide is the step that prevents symmetrization of the acetophenone.

  4. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae

    SciTech Connect

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    The red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae may be grown outdoors year-round in central Florida with yields averaging 35.5 g dry wt/m/sup 2/.day, greater than the most productive terrestrial plants. This occurs only when the plants are in a suspended culture, with vigorous aeration and an exchange of 25 or more culture volumes of enriched seawater per day, which is not cost-effective. A culture system was designed in which Gracilaria, stocked at a density of 2 kg wet wt/m/sup 2/, grows to double its biomass in one to two weeks; it is then harvested to its starting density, and anaerobically digested to methane. The biomass is soaked for 6 hours in the digester residue, storing enough nutrients for two weeks' growth in unenriched seawater. The methane is combusted for energy and the waste gas is fed to the culture to provide mixing and CO/sub 2/, eliminating the need for aeration and seawater exchange. The green alga Ulva lactuca, unlike Gracilaria, uses bicarbonate as a photosynthesis carbon source, and can grow at high pH, with little or no free CO/sub 2/. It can therefore produce higher yields than Gracilaria in low water exchange conditions. It is also more efficiently converted to methane than is Gracilaria, but cannot tolerate Florida's summer temperatures so cannot be grown year-round. Attempts are being made to locate or produce a high-temperature tolerant strain.

  5. Relative rates of evolution among the three genetic compartments of the red alga Porphyra differ from those of green plants and do not correlate with genome architecture.

    PubMed

    Smith, David R; Hua, Jimeng; Lee, Robert W; Keeling, Patrick J

    2012-10-01

    In photosynthetic eukaryotes, relative silent-site nucleotide substitution rates (which can be used to approximate relative mutation rates) among mitochondrial, plastid, and nuclear genomes (mtDNAs, ptDNAs, and nucDNAs) are estimated to be 1:3:10 respectively for seed plants and roughly equal for green algae. These estimates correlate with certain genome characteristics, such as size and coding density, and have therefore been taken to support a relationship between mutation rate and genome architecture. Plants and green algae, however, represent a small fraction of the major eukaryotic plastid-bearing lineages. Here, we investigate relative rates of mutation within the model red algal genus Porphyra. In contrast to plants, we find that the levels of silent-site divergence between the Porphyra purpurea and Porphyra umbilicalis mtDNAs are three times that of their ptDNAs and five times that of their nucDNAs. Moreover, relative mutation rates do not correlate with genome architecture: despite an estimated three-fold difference in their mutation rate, the mitochondrial and plastid genome coding densities are equivalent - an observation that extends to organisms with secondary red algal plastids. These findings are supported by within-species silent-site polymorphism data from P. purpurea.

  6. Algae Resources

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    Algae are highly efficient at producing biomass, and they can be found all over the planet. Many use sunlight and nutrients to create biomass, which contain key components—including lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates— that can be converted and upgraded to a variety of biofuels and products. A functional algal biofuels production system requires resources such as suitable land and climate, sustainable management of water resources, a supplemental carbon dioxide (CO2) supply, and other nutrients (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus). Algae can be an attractive feedstock for many locations in the United States because their diversity allows for highpotential biomass yields in a variety of climates and environments. Depending on the strain, algae can grow by using fresh, saline, or brackish water from surface water sources, groundwater, or seawater. Additionally, they can grow in water from second-use sources such as treated industrial wastewater; municipal, agricultural, or aquaculture wastewater; or produced water generated from oil and gas drilling operations.

  7. Na+ Tolerance and Na+ Transport in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    TESTER, MARK; DAVENPORT, ROMOLA

    2003-01-01

    Tolerance to high soil [Na+] involves processes in many different parts of the plant, and is manifested in a wide range of specializations at disparate levels of organization, such as gross morphology, membrane transport, biochemistry and gene transcription. Multiple adaptations to high [Na+] operate concurrently within a particular plant, and mechanisms of tolerance show large taxonomic variation. These mechanisms can occur in all cells within the plant, or can occur in specific cell types, reflecting adaptations at two major levels of organization: those that confer tolerance to individual cells, and those that contribute to tolerance not of cells per se, but of the whole plant. Salt‐tolerant cells can contribute to salt tolerance of plants; but we suggest that equally important in a wide range of conditions are processes involving the management of Na+ movements within the plant. These require specific cell types in specific locations within the plant catalysing transport in a coordinated manner. For further understanding of whole plant tolerance, we require more knowledge of cell‐specific transport processes and the consequences of manipulation of transporters and signalling elements in specific cell types. PMID:12646496

  8. [Allelopathic effect of artemisinin on green algae].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ye-Kuan; Yuan, Ling; Huang, Jian-Guo; Li, Long-Yun

    2013-05-01

    To study the growth effects of differing concentrations of artemisinin on green algae and to evaluate the ecological risk. The effects of artemisinin on the growth and the content change of chlorophyll, protein, oxygen, conductivity, SOD, CAT, MDA in Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus oblique were studied through 96 h toxicity tests. Artemisinin accelerated the growth of algae at a lower concentration ( <40 microg . L-1) with content increase of chlorophyll or protein and so on, and it inhibited the growth of algae at higher concentration ( >80 microg . L-1). The content of chlorophyll or protein in algae cells reduced with the increasing concentration of artemisinin, exhibiting the good concentration-effect relationship. SOD and CAT activity was stimulated at low concentrations ( <40 microg . L-1 ) and inhibited at high concentrations ( >80 microg . L- 1). However, MDA content increased significantly with the increase of concentration. According to the seven kinds of indicators changes, the time-response and dose-response suggested that the surfactant first hurt in Ch. pyrenoidosa was damaging membrane by changing membrane lipid molecules soluble. And primary mechanism on Chlorophyta cells might be related to the oxidation damage of lipid and other biological large molecules caused by artemisinin. The large-scale intensive planting of Artemisia annua may reduce the surrounding water productivity.

  9. Cesium-137 accumulation in higher plants before and after Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Sawidis, T.; Drossos, E.; Papastefanou, C. ); Heinrick, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Cesium-137 concentrations in plant species of three biotypes of northern Greece, differing in location as well as in vegetation, are reported following the Chernobyl reactor accident. The cesium uptake by plants was due to the foliar deposition rather than the root uptake. The highest level of cesium in plants was found in Ranunculus sardous, a pubescent plant. The {sup 137}Cs concentration was about 22kBq kg{sup {minus}1}d.w. A high level of cesium was also found in Salix alba ({sup 137}Cs: 19.6 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} d.w.), a deciduous tree showing that hairy leaves or leaves having rough and large surfaces can absorb greater amounts of radioactivity (surface effect). A comparison is also made between the results of measurements of the present study and the results of measurements of some herbarium plants collected one year before the accident as well as the results of measurements of some new plants grown and collected one year after the accident resulting in a natural removal rate of {sup 137}Cs in plants varying from 14 to 130 days.

  10. Cell wall, cytoskeleton, and cell expansion in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Bashline, Logan; Lei, Lei; Li, Shundai; Gu, Ying

    2014-04-01

    To accommodate two seemingly contradictory biological roles in plant physiology, providing both the rigid structural support of plant cells and the adjustable elasticity needed for cell expansion, the composition of the plant cell wall has evolved to become an intricate network of cellulosic, hemicellulosic, and pectic polysaccharides and protein. Due to its complexity, many aspects of the cell wall influence plant cell expansion, and many new and insightful observations and technologies are forthcoming. The biosynthesis of cell wall polymers and the roles of the variety of proteins involved in polysaccharide synthesis continue to be characterized. The interactions within the cell wall polymer network and the modification of these interactions provide insight into how the plant cell wall provides its dual function. The complex cell wall architecture is controlled and organized in part by the dynamic intracellular cytoskeleton and by diverse trafficking pathways of the cell wall polymers and cell wall-related machinery. Meanwhile, the cell wall is continually influenced by hormonal and integrity sensing stimuli that are perceived by the cell. These many processes cooperate to construct, maintain, and manipulate the intricate plant cell wall--an essential structure for the sustaining of the plant stature, growth, and life.

  11. Reconciling functions and evolution of isoprene emission in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Loreto, Francesco; Fineschi, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Compilation and analysis of existing inventories reveal that isoprene is emitted by c. 20% of the perennial vegetation of tropical and temperate regions of the world. Isoprene emitters are found across different plant families without any clear phylogenetic thread. However, by critically appraising information in inventories, several ecological patterns of isoprene emission can be highlighted, including absence of emission from C4 and annual plants, and widespread emission from perennial and deciduous plants of temperate environments. Based on this analysis, and on available information on biochemistry, ecology and functional roles of isoprene, it is suggested that isoprene may not have evolved to help plants face heavy or prolonged stresses, but rather assists C3 plants to run efficient photosynthesis and to overcome transient and mild stresses, especially during periods of active plant growth in warm seasons. When the stress status persists, or when evergreen leaves cope with multiple and repeated stresses, isoprene biosynthesis is replaced by the synthesis of less volatile secondary compounds, in part produced by the same biochemical pathway, thus indicating causal determinism in the evolution of isoprene-emitting plants in response to the environment.

  12. Regulation of phosphate starvation responses in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao Juan; Finnegan, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting mineral nutrient for plant growth. Many soils worldwide are deficient in soluble inorganic phosphate (Pi), the form of P most readily absorbed and utilized by plants. A network of elaborate developmental and biochemical adaptations has evolved in plants to enhance Pi acquisition and avoid starvation. Scope Controlling the deployment of adaptations used by plants to avoid Pi starvation requires a sophisticated sensing and regulatory system that can integrate external and internal information regarding Pi availability. In this review, the current knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms that control Pi starvation responses and the local and long-distance signals that may trigger Pi starvation responses are discussed. Uncharacterized mutants that have Pi-related phenotypes and their potential to give us additional insights into regulatory pathways and Pi starvation-induced signalling are also highlighted and assessed. Conclusions An impressive list of factors that regulate Pi starvation responses is now available, as is a good deal of knowledge regarding the local and long-distance signals that allow a plant to sense and respond to Pi availability. However, we are only beginning to understand how these factors and signals are integrated with one another in a regulatory web able to control the range of responses demonstrated by plants grown in low Pi environments. Much more knowledge is needed in this agronomically important area before real gains can be made in improving Pi acquisition in crop plants. PMID:20181569

  13. Bioinformatics Reveal Five Lineages of Oleosins and the Mechanism of Lineage Evolution Related to Structure/Function from Green Algae to Seed Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H C

    2015-09-01

    Plant cells contain subcellular lipid droplets with a triacylglycerol matrix enclosed by a layer of phospholipids and the small structural protein oleosin. Oleosins possess a conserved central hydrophobic hairpin of approximately 72 residues penetrating into the lipid droplet matrix and amphipathic amino- and carboxyl (C)-terminal peptides lying on the phospholipid surface. Bioinformatics of 1,000 oleosins of green algae and all plants emphasizing biological implications reveal five oleosin lineages: primitive (in green algae, mosses, and ferns), universal (U; all land plants), and three in specific organs or phylogenetic groups, termed seed low-molecular-weight (SL; seed plants), seed high-molecular-weight (SH; angiosperms), and tapetum (T; Brassicaceae) oleosins. Transition from one lineage to the next is depicted from lineage intermediates at junctions of phylogeny and organ distributions. Within a species, each lineage, except the T oleosin lineage, has one to four genes per haploid genome, only approximately two of which are active. Primitive oleosins already possess all the general characteristics of oleosins. U oleosins have C-terminal sequences as highly conserved as the hairpin sequences; thus, U oleosins including their C-terminal peptide exert indispensable, unknown functions. SL and SH oleosin transcripts in seeds are in an approximately 1:1 ratio, which suggests the occurrence of SL-SH oleosin dimers/multimers. T oleosins in Brassicaceae are encoded by rapidly evolved multitandem genes for alkane storage and transfer. Overall, oleosins have evolved to retain conserved hairpin structures but diversified for unique structures and functions in specific cells and plant families. Also, our studies reveal oleosin in avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp and no acyltransferase/lipase motifs in most oleosins.

  14. Bioinformatics Reveal Five Lineages of Oleosins and the Mechanism of Lineage Evolution Related to Structure/Function from Green Algae to Seed Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain subcellular lipid droplets with a triacylglycerol matrix enclosed by a layer of phospholipids and the small structural protein oleosin. Oleosins possess a conserved central hydrophobic hairpin of approximately 72 residues penetrating into the lipid droplet matrix and amphipathic amino- and carboxyl (C)-terminal peptides lying on the phospholipid surface. Bioinformatics of 1,000 oleosins of green algae and all plants emphasizing biological implications reveal five oleosin lineages: primitive (in green algae, mosses, and ferns), universal (U; all land plants), and three in specific organs or phylogenetic groups, termed seed low-molecular-weight (SL; seed plants), seed high-molecular-weight (SH; angiosperms), and tapetum (T; Brassicaceae) oleosins. Transition from one lineage to the next is depicted from lineage intermediates at junctions of phylogeny and organ distributions. Within a species, each lineage, except the T oleosin lineage, has one to four genes per haploid genome, only approximately two of which are active. Primitive oleosins already possess all the general characteristics of oleosins. U oleosins have C-terminal sequences as highly conserved as the hairpin sequences; thus, U oleosins including their C-terminal peptide exert indispensable, unknown functions. SL and SH oleosin transcripts in seeds are in an approximately 1:1 ratio, which suggests the occurrence of SL-SH oleosin dimers/multimers. T oleosins in Brassicaceae are encoded by rapidly evolved multitandem genes for alkane storage and transfer. Overall, oleosins have evolved to retain conserved hairpin structures but diversified for unique structures and functions in specific cells and plant families. Also, our studies reveal oleosin in avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp and no acyltransferase/lipase motifs in most oleosins. PMID:26232488

  15. Algae from the arid southwestern United States: an annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, W.H.; Gaines, S.R.

    1983-06-01

    Desert algae are attractive biomass producers for capturing solar energy through photosynthesis of organic matter. They are probably capable of higher yields and efficiencies of light utilization than higher plants, and are already adapted to extremes of sunlight intensity, salinity and temperature such as are found in the desert. This report consists of an annotated bibliography of the literature on algae from the arid southwestern United States. It was prepared in anticipation of efforts to isolate desert algae and study their yields in the laboratory. These steps are necessary prior to setting up outdoor algal culture ponds. Desert areas are attractive for such applications because land, sunlight, and, to some extent, water resources are abundant there. References are sorted by state.

  16. Algae fuel clean electricity generation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, D.

    1993-02-08

    The paper describes plans for a 600-kW pilot generating unit, fueled by diesel and Chlorella, a green alga commonly seen growing on the surface of ponds. The plant contains Biocoil units in which Chlorella are grown using the liquid effluents from sewage treatment plants and dissolved carbon dioxide from exhaust gases from the combustion unit. The algae are partially dried and fed into the combustor where diesel fuel is used to maintain ignition. Diesel fuel is also used for start-up and as a backup fuel for seasonal shifts that affect the algae growing conditions. Since the algae use the carbon dioxide emitted during the combustion process, the process will not contribute to global warming.

  17. Symbiosis and the social network of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Volkening, Jeremy D; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2013-02-01

    In the Internet era, communicating with friends and colleagues via social networks constitutes a significant proportion of our daily activities. Similarly animals and plants also interact with many organisms, some of which are pathogens and do no good for the plant, while others are beneficial symbionts. Almost all plants indulge in developing social networks with microbes, in particular with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and emerging evidence indicates that most employ an ancient and widespread central 'social media' pathway made of signaling molecules within what is called the SYM pathway. Some plants, like legumes, are particularly active recruiters of friends, as they have established very sophisticated and beneficial interactions with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, also via the SYM pathway. Interestingly, many members of the Brassicaceae, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, seem to have removed themselves from this ancestral social network and lost the ability to engage in mutually favorable interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Despite these generalizations, recent studies exploring the root microbiota of A. thaliana have found that in natural conditions, A. thaliana roots are colonized by many different bacterial species and therefore may be using different and probably more recent 'social media' for these interactions. In general, recent advances in the understanding of such molecular machinery required for plant-symbiont associations are being obtained using high throughput genomic profiling strategies including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics. The crucial mechanistic understanding that such data reveal may provide the infrastructure for future efforts to genetically manipulate crop social networks for our own food and fiber needs.

  18. Biochemical Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation during Lipid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, A.; Gamarra, B.; Cormier, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Although hydrogen isotopes (δ2H) of leaf wax lipids are increasingly being applied as (paleo-) hydrological proxies, we still do not understand some of the basic processes that shape the δ2H values of these compounds. In general, it is believed that three variables shape the δ2H values of leaf wax lipids: source water δ2H values, evaporative deuterium (2H) enrichment of leaf water and the biosynthetic fractionation (ɛbio) during the synthesis of organic compounds. While the influences of source water δ2H values and leaf water evaporative 2H enrichment have been well documented, very little is known how ɛbio shapes the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids. I will present the results from recent experiments, where we show that the magnitude of ɛbio, and thus the δ2H value of plant-derived lipids, strongly depends on the carbon (C) metabolism of a plant. Specifically, I will show that plants that rely for their tissue formation on recently assimilated C have δ2H values in their n-alkanes that are up to 60‰ more negative than plants that depend for their tissue formation on stored carbohydrates. Our findings can be explained by the fact that NADPH is the primary source of hydrogen in plant lipids and that the δ2H value of NADPH differs whether NADPH was generated directly in the light reaction of photosynthesis or whether it was generated by processing stored carbohydrates. As such, the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids will directly depend on whether the tissue containing these lipids was synthesized using recent assimilates, e.g. in a C autonomous state or, if it was synthesized from stored or otherwise aquired C sources, e.g. in a not C autonomous state. Given the magnidude of this effect, our results have important implications for interpretation of plant-derived lipid δ2H values when used as (paleo-) hydrological proxies. In addition, our results suggest, that δ2H values of plant-derived lipids could be employed as a new tools to assess the C

  19. Effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids from plant oils and algae on milk fat yield and composition are associated with mammary lipogenic and SREBF1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Angulo, J; Mahecha, L; Nuernberg, K; Nuernberg, G; Dannenberger, D; Olivera, M; Boutinaud, M; Leroux, C; Albrecht, E; Bernard, L

    2012-12-01

    The main aim of the present study was to examine the effects of long-term supplementing diets with saturated or unprotected polyunsaturated fatty acids from two different plant oils rich in either n-3 or n-6 fatty acids (FAs) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich algae on mammary gene expression and milk fat composition in lactating dairy cows. Gene expression was determined from mammary tissue and milk epithelial cells. Eighteen primiparous German Holstein dairy cows in mid-lactation were randomly assigned into three dietary treatments that consist of silage-based diets supplemented with rumen-stable fractionated palm fat (SAT; 3.1% of the basal diet dry matter, DM), or a mixture of linseed oil (2.7% of the basal diet DM) plus DHA-rich algae (LINA; 0.4% of the basal diet DM) or a mixture of sunflower oil (2.7% of the basal diet DM) plus DHA-rich algae (SUNA; 0.4% of the basal diet DM), for a period of 10 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, the cows were slaughtered and mammary tissues were collected to study the gene expression of lipogenic enzymes. During the last week, the milk yield and composition were determined, and milk was collected for FA measurements and the isolation of milk purified mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Supplementation with plant oils and DHA-rich algae resulted in milk fat depression (MFD; yield and percentage). The secretion of de novo FAs in the milk was reduced, whereas the secretion of trans-10,cis-12-CLA and DHA were increased. These changes in FA secretions were associated in mammary tissue with a joint down-regulation of mammary lipogenic enzyme gene expression (stearoyl-CoA desaturase, SCD1; FA synthase, FASN) and expression of the regulatory element binding transcription factor (SREBF1), whereas no effect was observed on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 1, mitochondrial (GPAM). A positive relationship between mammary SCD1 and SREBF1 mRNA abundances was observed, suggesting a similar

  20. Penetration and Toxicity of Nanomaterials in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chichiriccò, Giuseppe; Poma, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) comprise either inorganic particles consisting of metals, oxides, and salts that exist in nature and may be also produced in the laboratory, or organic particles originating only from the laboratory, having at least one dimension between 1 and 100 nm in size. According to shape, size, surface area, and charge, NMs have different mechanical, chemical, electrical, and optical properties that make them suitable for technological and biomedical applications and thus they are being increasingly produced and modified. Despite their beneficial potential, their use may be hazardous to health owing to the capacity to enter the animal and plant body and interact with cells. Studies on NMs involve technologists, biologists, physicists, chemists, and ecologists, so there are numerous reports that are significantly raising the level of knowledge, especially in the field of nanotechnology; however, many aspects concerning nanobiology remain undiscovered, including the interactions with plant biomolecules. In this review we examine current knowledge on the ways in which NMs penetrate plant organs and interact with cells, with the aim of shedding light on the reactivity of NMs and toxicity to plants. These points are discussed critically to adjust the balance with regard to the risk to the health of the plants as well as providing some suggestions for new studies on this topic. PMID:28347040

  1. Physiological Functions of the COPI Complex in Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hee-Kyung; Kang, Yong Won; Lim, Hye Min; Hwang, Inhwan; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2015-10-01

    COPI vesicles are essential to the retrograde transport of proteins in the early secretory pathway. The COPI coatomer complex consists of seven subunits, termed α-, β-, β'-, γ-, δ-, ε-, and ζ-COP, in yeast and mammals. Plant genomes have homologs of these subunits, but the essentiality of their cellular functions has hampered the functional characterization of the subunit genes in plants. Here we have employed virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and dexamethasone (DEX)-inducible RNAi of the COPI subunit genes to study the in vivo functions of the COPI coatomer complex in plants. The β'-, γ-, and δ-COP subunits localized to the Golgi as GFP-fusion proteins and interacted with each other in the Golgi. Silencing of β'-, γ-, and δ-COP by VIGS resulted in growth arrest and acute plant death in Nicotiana benthamiana, with the affected leaf cells exhibiting morphological markers of programmed cell death. Depletion of the COPI subunits resulted in disruption of the Golgi structure and accumulation of autolysosome-like structures in earlier stages of gene silencing. In tobacco BY-2 cells, DEX-inducible RNAi of β'-COP caused aberrant cell plate formation during cytokinesis. Collectively, these results suggest that COPI vesicles are essential to plant growth and survival by maintaining the Golgi apparatus and modulating cell plate formation.

  2. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on higher plants.

    PubMed

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; Souza, Tatiana da Silva

    2016-02-01

    Sewage treatment yields sludge, which is often used as a soil amendment in agriculture and crop production. Although the sludge contains elevated concentrations of macro and micronutrients, high levels of inorganic and organic compounds with genotoxic and mutagenic properties are present in sludge. Application of sludge in agriculture is a pathway for direct contact of crops to toxic chemicals. The objective of this study was to compile information related to the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge in different plant species. In addition, data are presented on toxicological effects in animals fed with plants grown in soils supplemented with sewage sludge. Despite the benefits of using sewage sludge as organic fertilizer, the data showcased in this review suggest that this residue can induce genetic damage in plants. This review alerts potential risks to health outcomes after the intake of food cultivated in sewage sludge-amended soils.

  3. Predicting molybdenum toxicity to higher plants: influence of soil properties.

    PubMed

    McGrath, S P; Micó, C; Curdy, R; Zhao, F J

    2010-10-01

    The effect of soil properties on the toxicity of molybdenum (Mo) to four plant species was investigated. Soil organic carbon or ammonium-oxalate extractable Fe oxides were found to be the best predictors of the 50% effective dose (ED50) of Mo in different soils, explaining>65% of the variance in ED50 for four species except for ryegrass (26-38%). Molybdenum concentrations in soil solution and consequently plant uptake were increased when soil pH was artificially raised because sorption of Mo to amorphous oxides is greatly reduced at high pH. The addition of sulphate significantly decreased Mo uptake by oilseed rape. For risk assessment, we suggest that Mo toxicity values for plants should be normalised using soil amorphous iron oxide concentrations.

  4. Experimental identification of Ca isotopic fractionations in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobert, Florian; Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Bourgeade, Pascale; Labolle, François; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Chabaux, François; Stille, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Hydroponic experiments have been performed in order to identify the co-occurring geochemical and biological processes affecting the Ca isotopic compositions within plants. To test the influence of the Ca concentration and pH of the nutritive solution on the Ca isotopic composition of the different plant organs, four experimental conditions were chosen combining two different Ca concentrations (5 and 60 ppm) and two pHs (4 and 6). The study was performed on rapid growing bean plants in order to have a complete growth cycle. Several organs (root, stem, leaf, reproductive) were sampled at two different growth stages (10 days and 6 weeks of culture) and prepared for Ca isotopic measurements. The results allow to identify three Ca isotopic fractionation levels. The first one takes place when Ca enters the lateral roots, during Ca adsorption on cation-exchange binding sites in the apoplasm. The second one takes place when Ca is bound to the polygalacturonic acids (pectins) of the middle lamella of the xylem cell wall. Finally, the last fractionation occurs in the reproductive organs, also caused by cation-exchange processes with pectins. However, the cell wall structures of these organs and/or number of available exchange sites seem to be different to those of the xylem wall. These three physico-chemical fractionation mechanisms allow to enrich the organs in the light 40Ca isotope. The amplitude of the Ca isotopic fractionation within plant organs is highly dependent on the composition of the nutritive solution: low pH (4) and Ca concentrations (5 ppm) have no effect on the biomass increase of the plants but induce smaller fractionation amplitudes compared to those obtained from other experimental conditions. Thus, Ca isotopic signatures of bean plants are controlled by the external nutritive medium. This study highlights the potential of Ca isotopes to be applied in plant physiology (to identify Ca uptake, circulation and storage mechanisms within plants) and in

  5. Recent advances of flowering locus T gene in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Rong, Xiaofeng; Huang, Xiaohua; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2012-01-01

    Flowering Locus T (FT) can promote flowering in the plant photoperiod pathway and also facilitates vernalization flowering pathways and other ways to promote flowering. The expression of products of the FT gene is recognized as important parts of the flowering hormone and can induce flowering by long-distance transportation. In the present study, many FT-like genes were isolated, and the transgenic results show that FT gene can promote flowering in plants. This paper reviews the progress of the FT gene and its expression products to provide meaningful information for further studies of the functions of FT genes.

  6. Photosynthetic and respiratory activity in germfree higher plant species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Equipment developed for the study of gas exchange in germfree plants is described. The equipment includes a gas exchange chamber to house the plant under study, a gas feed assembly to introduce and remove gas from the chamber, and a clinostat to rotate the apparatus. Fluorescent and incandescent lights are used to illuminate the chamber and a sealed plastic barrier is used to isolate the potting soil from the chamber atmosphere. The gas outflow from the chamber can be diverted to an infrared CO2 analyzer. The performance of the system was evaluated.

  7. Photosystem I shows a higher tolerance to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress than photosystem II in the intertidal macro-algae Ulva prolifera (Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Zheng, Zhenbing; Gu, Wenhui; Xie, Xiujun; Huan, Li; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2014-10-01

    The photosynthetic performance of the desiccation-tolerant, intertidal macro-algae Ulva prolifera was significantly affected by sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. Our results showed that photosynthetic activity decreased significantly with increases in sorbitol concentration. Although the partial activity of both photosystem I (PS I) and photosystem II (PS II) was able to recover after 30 min of rehydration, the activity of PS II decreased more rapidly than PS I. At 4 M sorbitol concentration, the activity of PS II was almost 0 while that of PS I was still at about one third of normal levels. Following prolonged treatment with 1 and 2 M sorbitol, the activity of PS I and PS II decreased slowly, suggesting that the effects of moderate concentrations of sorbitol on PS I and PS II were gradual. Interestingly, an increase in non-photochemical quenching occurred under these conditions in response to moderate osmotic stress, whereas it declined significantly under severe osmotic stress. These results suggest that photoprotection in U. prolifera could also be induced by moderate osmotic stress. In addition, the oxidation of PS I was significantly affected by osmotic stress. P700(+) in the thalli treated with high concentrations of sorbitol could still be reduced, as PS II was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), but it could not be fully oxidized. This observation may be caused by the higher quantum yield of non-photochemical energy dissipation in PS I due to acceptor-side limitation (Y(NA)) during rehydration in seawater containing DCMU.

  8. CAROTENOID BIOSYNTHESIS IN PHOTO-SYNTHETIC BACTERIA AND HIGHER PLANTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Investigation on the biosynthesis of plant sterols are described. A number of possible phytosterol precursors were identified in peas and larch and...of the steroid side chain. Using mevalonic acid and methionine doubly labelled with 14C and tritium studies were made regarding the mechanism of alkylation of the phytosterol side chain. (Author)

  9. Circadian rhythms and post-transcriptional regulation in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Andrés; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock of plants allows them to cope with daily changes in their environment. This is accomplished by the rhythmic regulation of gene expression, in a process that involves many regulatory steps. One of the key steps involved at the RNA level is post-transcriptional regulation, which ensures a correct control on the different amounts and types of mRNA that will ultimately define the current physiological state of the plant cell. Recent advances in the study of the processes of regulation of pre-mRNA processing, RNA turn-over and surveillance, regulation of translation, function of lncRNAs, biogenesis and function of small RNAs, and the development of bioinformatics tools have helped to vastly expand our understanding of how this regulatory step performs its role. In this work we review the current progress in circadian regulation at the post-transcriptional level research in plants. It is the continuous interaction of all the information flow control post-transcriptional processes that allow a plant to precisely time and predict daily environmental changes. PMID:26124767

  10. In search of actionable targets for agrigenomics and microalgal biofuel production: sequence-structural diversity studies on algal and higher plants with a focus on GPAT protein.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Panda, Prasanna Kumar

    2013-04-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) pathway provides several targets for genetic engineering to optimize microalgal lipid productivity. GPAT (glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase) is a crucial enzyme that catalyzes the initial step of TAG biosynthesis. Despite many recent biochemical studies, a comprehensive sequence-structure analysis of GPAT across diverse lipid-yielding organisms is lacking. Hence, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of plastid-located GPAT proteins from 7 microalgae and 3 higher plants species. The close evolutionary relationship observed between red algae/diatoms and green algae/plant lineages in the phylogenetic tree were further corroborated by motif and gene structure analysis. The predicted molecular weight, amino acid composition, Instability Index, and hydropathicity profile gave an overall representation of the biochemical features of GPAT protein across the species under study. Furthermore, homology models of GPAT from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Glycine max provided deep insights into the protein architecture and substrate binding sites. Despite low sequence identity found between algal and plant GPATs, the developed models exhibited strikingly conserved topology consisting of 14α helices and 9β sheets arranged in two domains. However, subtle variations in amino acids of fatty acyl binding site were identified that might influence the substrate selectivity of GPAT. Together, the results will provide useful resources to understand the functional and evolutionary relationship of GPAT and potentially benefit in development of engineered enzyme for augmenting algal biofuel production.

  11. The Plastid Genome of Polytoma uvella Is the Largest Known among Colorless Algae and Plants and Reflects Contrasting Evolutionary Paths to Nonphotosynthetic Lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Martinez, Francisco; Nedelcu, Aurora M; Smith, David R; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian

    2017-02-01

    The loss of photosynthesis is frequently associated with parasitic or pathogenic lifestyles, but it also can occur in free-living, plastid-bearing lineages. A common consequence of becoming nonphotosynthetic is the reduction in size and gene content of the plastid genome. In exceptional circumstances, it can even result in the complete loss of the plastid DNA (ptDNA) and its associated gene expression system, as reported recently in several lineages, including the nonphotosynthetic green algal genus Polytomella Closely related to Polytomella is the polyphyletic genus Polytoma, the members of which lost photosynthesis independently of Polytomella Species from both genera are free-living organisms that contain nonphotosynthetic plastids, but unlike Polytomella, Polytoma members have retained a genome in their colorless plastid. Here, we present the plastid genome of Polytoma uvella: to our knowledge, the first report of ptDNA from a nonphotosynthetic chlamydomonadalean alga. The P. uvella ptDNA contains 25 protein-coding genes, most of which are related to gene expression and none are connected to photosynthesis. However, despite its reduced coding capacity, the P. uvella ptDNA is inflated with short repeats and is tens of kilobases larger than the ptDNAs of its closest known photosynthetic relatives, Chlamydomonas leiostraca and Chlamydomonas applanata In fact, at approximately 230 kb, the ptDNA of P. uvella represents the largest plastid genome currently reported from a nonphotosynthetic alga or plant. Overall, the P. uvella and Polytomella plastid genomes reveal two very different evolutionary paths following the loss of photosynthesis: expansion and complete deletion, respectively. We hypothesize that recombination-based DNA-repair mechanisms are at least partially responsible for the different evolutionary outcomes observed in such closely related nonphotosynthetic algae.

  12. The Plastid Genome of Polytoma uvella Is the Largest Known among Colorless Algae and Plants and Reflects Contrasting Evolutionary Paths to Nonphotosynthetic Lifestyles1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The loss of photosynthesis is frequently associated with parasitic or pathogenic lifestyles, but it also can occur in free-living, plastid-bearing lineages. A common consequence of becoming nonphotosynthetic is the reduction in size and gene content of the plastid genome. In exceptional circumstances, it can even result in the complete loss of the plastid DNA (ptDNA) and its associated gene expression system, as reported recently in several lineages, including the nonphotosynthetic green algal genus Polytomella. Closely related to Polytomella is the polyphyletic genus Polytoma, the members of which lost photosynthesis independently of Polytomella. Species from both genera are free-living organisms that contain nonphotosynthetic plastids, but unlike Polytomella, Polytoma members have retained a genome in their colorless plastid. Here, we present the plastid genome of Polytoma uvella: to our knowledge, the first report of ptDNA from a nonphotosynthetic chlamydomonadalean alga. The P. uvella ptDNA contains 25 protein-coding genes, most of which are related to gene expression and none are connected to photosynthesis. However, despite its reduced coding capacity, the P. uvella ptDNA is inflated with short repeats and is tens of kilobases larger than the ptDNAs of its closest known photosynthetic relatives, Chlamydomonas leiostraca and Chlamydomonas applanata. In fact, at approximately 230 kb, the ptDNA of P. uvella represents the largest plastid genome currently reported from a nonphotosynthetic alga or plant. Overall, the P. uvella and Polytomella plastid genomes reveal two very different evolutionary paths following the loss of photosynthesis: expansion and complete deletion, respectively. We hypothesize that recombination-based DNA-repair mechanisms are at least partially responsible for the different evolutionary outcomes observed in such closely related nonphotosynthetic algae. PMID:27932420

  13. Stable transformation and reverse genetic analysis of Penium margaritaceum: a platform for studies of charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Fei, Zhangjun; Andreas, Amanda; Willats, William G T; Domozych, David S; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-02-01

    The charophyte green algae (CGA, Streptophyta, Viridiplantae) occupy a key phylogenetic position as the immediate ancestors of land plants but, paradoxically, are less well-studied than the other major plant lineages. This is particularly true in the context of functional genomic studies, where the lack of an efficient protocol for their stable genetic transformation has been a major obstacle. Observations of extant CGA species suggest the existence of some of the evolutionary adaptations that had to occur for land colonization; however, to date, there has been no robust experimental platform to address this genetically. We present a protocol for high-throughput Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Penium margaritaceum, a unicellular CGA species. The versatility of Penium as a model for studying various aspects of plant cell biology and development was illustrated through non-invasive visualization of protein localization and dynamics in living cells. In addition, the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) for reverse genetic studies was demonstrated by targeting genes associated with cell wall modification (pectin methylesterase) and biosynthesis (cellulose synthase). This provided evidence supporting current models of cell wall assembly and inter-polymer interactions that were based on studies of land plants, but in this case using direct observation in vivo. This new functional genomics platform has broad potential applications, including studies of plant organismal biology and the evolutionary innovations required for transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitats.

  14. The Impact of Higher Education Law on Physical Plant Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, John M.

    This paper reviews the basic legal relationships and duties that affect higher education facility management with special emphasis on the relationships with students, faculty, and staff in both public and private colleges and universities. An introduction briefly reviews the development of higher education law beginning with a landmark case in…

  15. An expanding universe of circadian networks in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Kay, Steve A

    2010-05-01

    Extensive circadian clock networks regulate almost every biological process in plants. Clock-controlled physiological responses are coupled with daily oscillations in environmental conditions resulting in enhanced fitness and growth vigor. Identification of core clock components and their associated molecular interactions has established the basic network architecture of plant clocks, which consists of multiple interlocked feedback loops. A hierarchical structure of transcriptional feedback overlaid with regulated protein turnover sets the pace of the clock and ultimately drives all clock-controlled processes. Although originally described as linear entities, increasing evidence suggests that many signaling pathways can act as both inputs and outputs within the overall network. Future studies will determine the molecular mechanisms involved in these complex regulatory loops.

  16. Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVS’s Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

  17. Final Report for Regulation of Embryonic Development in Higher Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, John J.

    2013-10-22

    The overall goal of the project was to define the cellular processes that underlie embryo development in plants at a mechanistic level. Our studies focused on a critical transcriptional regulator, Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON (LEC1), that is necessary and sufficient to induce processes required for embryo development. Because LEC1 regulates lipid accumulation during the maturation phase of embryo development, information about LEC1 may be useful in designing approaches to enhance biofuel production in plants. During the tenure of this project, we determined the molecular mechanisms by which LEC1 acts as a transcription factor in embryos. We also identified genes directly regulated by LEC1 and showed that many of these genes are involved in maturation processes. This information has been useful in dissecting the gene regulatory networks controlling embryo development. Finally, LEC1 is a novel isoform of a transcription factor that is conserved among eukaryotes, and LEC1 is active primarily in seeds. Therefore, we determined that the LEC1-type transcription factors first appeared in lycophytes during land plant evolution. Together, this study provides basic information that has implications for biofuel production.

  18. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Thomas W.

    2000-02-29

    Research in the latter part of the grant period was divided into two parts: (1) expansion of the macromolecular tool kit for studying plant cell division; (2) experiments in which the roles played by plant cell cycle regulators were to be cast in the light of the emerging yeast and animal cell paradigm for molecular control of the mitotic cycle. The first objectives were accomplished to a very satisfactory degree. With regard to the second part of the project, we were driven to change our objectives for two reasons. First, the families of cell cycle control genes that we cloned encoded such closely related members that the prospects for success at raising distinguishing antisera against each were sufficiently dubious as to be impractical. Epitope tagging is not feasible in Pisum sativum, our experimental system, as this species is not realistically transformable. Therefore, differentiating the roles of diverse cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases was problematic. Secondly, our procedure for generating mitotically synchronized pea root meristems for biochemical studies was far too labor intensive for the proposed experiments. We therefore shifted our objectives to identifying connections between the conserved proteins of the cell cycle engine and factors that interface it with plant physiology and development. In this, we have obtained some very exciting results.

  19. Gene sampling can bias multi-gene phylogenetic inferences: the relationship between red algae and green plants as a case study.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Yuji; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Sato, Mitsuhisa; Sakaguchi, Miako; Hashimoto, Tetsuo

    2009-05-01

    The monophyly of Plantae including glaucophytes, red algae, and green plants (green algae plus land plants) has been recovered in recent phylogenetic analyses of large multi-gene data sets (e.g., those including >30,000 amino acid [aa] positions). On the other hand, Plantae monophyly has not been stably reconstructed in inferences from multi-gene data sets with fewer than 10,000 aa positions. An analysis of 5,216 aa positions in Nozaki et al. (Nozaki H, Iseki M, Hasegawa M, Misawa K, Nakada T, Sasaki N, Watanabe M. 2007. Phylogeny of primary photosynthetic eukaryotes as deduced from slowly evolving nuclear genes. Mol Biol Evol. 24:1592-1595.) strongly rejected the monophyly of Plantae, whereas Hackett et al. (Hackett JD, Yoon HS, Li S, Reyes-Prieto A, Rummele SE, Bhattacharya D. 2007. Phylogenomic analysis supports the monophyly of cryptophytes and haptophytes and the association of rhizaria with chromalveolates. Mol Biol Evol. 24:1702-1713.) robustly recovered the Plantae clade in an analysis of 6,735 aa positions. We suspected that the significant incongruity observed between the two studies was attributable to a bias generally overlooked in multi-gene phylogenetic estimation, rather than data size, taxon sampling, or methods for tree reconstruction. Although glaucophytes were excluded from our analyses due to a shortage of sequence data, we found that the recovery of a sister-group relationship between red algae and green plants primarily depends on gene sampling in phylogenetic inferences from <10,000 aa positions. Phylogenetic analyses of data sets with fewer than 10,000 aa positions, which can be prepared without large-scale sequencing (e.g., expressed sequence tag analyses), are practical in challenging various unresolved issues in eukaryotic evolution. However, our results indicate that severe biases can arise from gene sampling in multi-gene inferences from <10,000 aa positions. We also address the validity of fast-evolving gene exclusion in multi

  20. Identification of the alternative terminal oxidase of higher plant mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Elthon, Thomas E.; McIntosh, Lee

    1987-01-01

    In addition to cytochrome oxidase, plant mitochondria have a second terminal oxidase called the alternative oxidase. The alternative oxidase is of great interest in that energy is not conserved when electrons flow through it. The potential energy of the system is thus lost as heat, and, in plants with high levels of the alternative oxidase, this results in thermogenesis. We have purified the alternative oxidase from mitochondria of the thermogenic spadix of Sauromatum guttatum and have identified its polypeptide constituents by using polyclonal antibodies. A 166-fold purification was achieved through a combination of cation-exchange (carboxymethyl-Sepharose) and hydrophobic-interaction (phenyl-Sepharose) chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies raised to the CM-Sepharose fractions readily immunoprecipitated alternative oxidase activity and immunoprecipitated four of the proteins that copurify with the activity. These proteins have apparent molecular masses of 37, 36, 35.5, and 35 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies raised individually to the 37-, 36-, and 35.5- plus 35-kDa proteins cross-reacted with all of these proteins, indicating the presence of common antigenic sites. The 37-kDa protein appears to be constitutive in Sauromatum, whereas expression of the 36- and 35-kDa proteins was correlated with presence of alternative pathway activity. The 35.5-kDa protein appears with loss of alternative pathway activity during senescence, indicating that this protein may be a degradation product of the 36-kDa protein. Binding of anti-36-kDa protein antibodies to total mitochondrial protein blots of five plant species indicated that similar proteins were always present when alternative pathway activity was observed. Images PMID:16593898

  1. Gravitropism in higher plant shoots. I - A role for ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Salisbury, Frank B.

    1981-01-01

    Two inhibitors of ethylene synthesis, Co(2+) and aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG), and two inhibitors of ethylene action, Ag(+) and CO2, are shown to delay the gravitropic response of cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), and castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) stems. Gentle shaking on a mechanical shaker does not inhibit the gravitropic response, but vigorous hand shaking for 120 seconds delays the response somewhat. AVG and Ag(+) further delay the response of mechanically stimulated plants. AVG retards the storage of bending energy but not of stimulus. In gravitropism, graviperception may first stimulate ethylene evolution, which may then influence bending directly, or responses involving ethylene could be more indirect.

  2. The cell biology of lignification in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Jaime; Serk, Henrik; Granlund, Irene; Pesquet, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Background Lignin is a polyphenolic polymer that strengthens and waterproofs the cell wall of specialized plant cell types. Lignification is part of the normal differentiation programme and functioning of specific cell types, but can also be triggered as a response to various biotic and abiotic stresses in cells that would not otherwise be lignifying. Scope Cell wall lignification exhibits specific characteristics depending on the cell type being considered. These characteristics include the timing of lignification during cell differentiation, the palette of associated enzymes and substrates, the sub-cellular deposition sites, the monomeric composition and the cellular autonomy for lignin monomer production. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of lignin biosynthesis and polymerization at the cell biology level. Conclusions The lignification process ranges from full autonomy to complete co-operation depending on the cell type. The different roles of lignin for the function of each specific plant cell type are clearly illustrated by the multiple phenotypic defects exhibited by knock-out mutants in lignin synthesis, which may explain why no general mechanism for lignification has yet been defined. The range of phenotypic effects observed include altered xylem sap transport, loss of mechanical support, reduced seed protection and dispersion, and/or increased pest and disease susceptibility. PMID:25878140

  3. Gravitropism in higher plant shoots. V - Changing sensitivity to auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, Frank B.; Gillespie, Linda; Rorabaugh, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    The relationship in plants between the sensitivity to auxin and differential growth and bending was investigated experimentally. Decapitated and marked sunflower hypocotyl sections were immersed in buffered auxin solutions of different concentrations (0, 10 to the -8th, or 0.001 molar) and were photographed at 1/2 hr intervals; the negatives were analyzed with a digitizer/computer to evaluate surface-length changes in terms of Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics. It was found that bending decreased with increasing concentration of auxin. Increasing the auxin concentration inhibits the elongation growth of lower surfaces but promotes upper-surface growth, indicating that the lower surfaces have a greater Km sensitivity to applied auxin than the upper surfaces. At optimum auxin levels (maximum growth), the growth of bottom surfaces exceeded that of top surfaces, indicating that bottom tissues had a greater Vmax sensitivity.

  4. Studies of genetic transformation of higher plants using irradiated pollen

    SciTech Connect

    Chyi, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    Pandey has reported extensively on an unusual genetic phenomenon he called egg transformation. When compatible pollen was treated wth genetically lethal dosage of ..gamma..-radiation (100,000 rad), and used as mentor pollen to overcome selfincompatibility of several Nicotiana species, some genetic characters were found to be transferred from the radiation killed pollen to nonhybrid progeny. Observed transformants were fertile, cytogenetically normal, and had maternal phenotypes except for those specific traits transferred from the donors. Heavily irradiated pollen was believed to discharge its radiation-fragmented DNA (chromatin) into the embryo sac and bring about the transformation of the egg. The frequency of gene transfer was reported to be over 50%, and happened for all three characters Pandey studied - self incompatible specificities, flower color, and pollen color. Plant species studied were tomato, pea, apple, rapeseed, and Nicotiana species, including various stocks from Dr. Pandey. Treatments included pollinations with soley irradiated donor pollen, with a mixture of irradiated donor and normal self pollen, with a mixture of normal donor and self pollen, and double pollinations with irradiated donor pollen and normal self pollen, using different time intervals to separate the two pollinations. A total of 6210 pollinations were made, and 17,522 seedlings representing 87,750 potential transformational events were screened. In no case was an unambiguous transformant recovered. This research was unable to confirm or expand upon the findings of Dr. Pandey, or elucidate the mechanisms underlying such phenomena. Alternative explanations for Pandey's data were postulated. This approach to gene transfer by using irradiated pollen appears to be of little practical use to plant breeders.

  5. Higher Plants in Space for MELiSSA -Literature Review and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabrodina, Marina; Kittang, Ann-Iren; Coelho, Liz Helena; Karoliussen, Irene; Aase Wolff, Silje; Iversen, Tor-Henning

    The human exploration of space requires the development of closed life support systems to regenerate oxygen, purify water, and produce food. MELiSSA (Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative) is a model system for advanced life support based on different microbial species and higher plants. The main objective of the LiRHiPliSMe (Literature Review of Higher Plants in Space for MELiSSA) project was to elaborate the preliminary roadmap for higher plant research activities for the MELiSSA project Phase 2 (Preliminary Space Experiments). The first task was to establish an understanding of the current knowledge concerning how higher plant will adapt to Moon/Mars physical factors different from Earth with focus on reduced gravity, space radiation, variations in magnetic field and combined effects of these factors. The literature related to how Moon/Mars physical factors can affect genetic processes, growth regulators, development, morphology, water and nutrients transport, gas exchange and metabolism of higher plants during one life cycle were collected. The possible effects of the space environment on the plant role as a food and on the mass balance in a Life Support System that includes a Higher Plant Compartment are reviewed. Based on this literature review there was made an assessment of where new or extended scientific knowledge about space factors effects on higher plant growth and development is needed. The requirements for research activities on higher plants in enclosed life support systems were identified. The required higher plant research activities for MELiSSA phase 2 both on ground and in space were placed in a timescale from the present until higher plants can be grown in closed life support systems on Moon and Mars.

  6. The leaves of green plants as well as a cyanobacterium, a red alga, and fungi contain insulin-like antigens.

    PubMed

    Silva, L B; Santos, S S S; Azevedo, C R; Cruz, M A L; Venâncio, T M; Cavalcante, C P; Uchôa, A F; Astolfi Filho, S; Oliveira, A E A; Fernandes, K V S; Xavier-Filho, J

    2002-03-01

    We report the detection of insulin-like antigens in a large range of species utilizing a modified ELISA plate assay and Western blotting. We tested the leaves or aerial parts of species of Rhodophyta (red alga), Bryophyta (mosses), Psilophyta (whisk ferns), Lycopodophyta (club mosses), Sphenopsida (horsetails), gymnosperms, and angiosperms, including monocots and dicots. We also studied species of fungi and a cyanobacterium, Spirulina maxima. The wide distribution of insulin-like antigens, which in some cases present the same electrophoretic mobility as bovine insulin, together with results recently published by us on the amino acid sequence of an insulin isolated from the seed coat of jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis) and from the developing fruits of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), suggests that pathways depending on this hormone have been conserved through evolution.

  7. Automorphosis of higher plants on a 3-D clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoson, T.; Kamisaka, S.; Yamashita, M.; Masuda, Y.

    On a three-dimensional (3-D) clinostat, various plant organs developed statocytes capable of responding to the gravity vector. The graviresponse of primary roots of garden cress and maize grown on the clinostat was the same as the control roots, whereas that of maize coleoptiles was reduced. When maize seedlings were grown in the presence of 10^-4 M gibberellic acid and kinetin, the graviresponse of both roots and shoots was suppressed. The corresponding suppression of amyloplast development was observed in the clinostatted and the hormone-treated seedlings. Maize roots and shoots showed spontaneous curvatures in different portions on the 3-D clinostat. The hormone treatment did not significantly influence such an automorphic curvature. When the root cap was removed, maize roots did not curve gravitropically. However, the removal suppressed the automorphic curvatures only slightly. On the other hand, the removal of coleoptile tip did not influence its graviresponse, whereas the spontaneous curvature of decapitated coleoptiles on the clinostat was strongly suppressed. Also, cytochalasin B differently affected the gravitropic and the automorphic curvatures of maize roots and shoots. From these results it is concluded that the graviperception and the early processes of signal transmission are unnecessary for automorphoses under simulated microgravity conditions. Moreover, the results support the view that the amyloplasts act as statoliths probably via an interaction with microfilaments.

  8. Light intensity-dependent retrograde signalling in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2013-11-15

    Plants are able to acclimate to highly fluctuating light environment and evolved a short- and long-term light acclimatory responses, that are dependent on chloroplasts retrograde signalling. In this review we summarise recent evidences suggesting that the chloroplasts act as key sensors of light intensity changes in a wide range (low, high and excess light conditions) as well as sensors of darkness. They also participate in transduction and synchronisation of systemic retrograde signalling in response to differential light exposure of distinct leaves. Regulation of intra- and inter-cellular chloroplast retrograde signalling is dependent on the developmental and functional stage of the plastids. Therefore, it is discussed in following subsections: firstly, chloroplast biogenic control of nuclear genes, for example, signals related to photosystems and pigment biogenesis during early plastid development; secondly, signals in the mature chloroplast induced by changes in photosynthetic electron transport, reactive oxygen species, hormones and metabolite biosynthesis; thirdly, chloroplast signalling during leaf senescence. Moreover, with a help of meta-analysis of multiple microarray experiments, we showed that the expression of the same set of genes is regulated specifically in particular types of signals and types of light conditions. Furthermore, we also highlight the alternative scenarios of the chloroplast retrograde signals transduction and coordination linked to the role of photo-electrochemical signalling.

  9. Molecular insights into Zeaxanthin-dependent quenching in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengqi; Tian, Lijin; Kloz, Miroslav; Croce, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms protect themselves from high-light stress by dissipating excess absorbed energy as heat in a process called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Zeaxanthin is essential for the full development of NPQ, but its role remains debated. The main discussion revolves around two points: where does zeaxanthin bind and does it quench? To answer these questions we have followed the zeaxanthin-dependent quenching from leaves to individual complexes, including supercomplexes. We show that small amounts of zeaxanthin are associated with the complexes, but in contrast to what is generally believed, zeaxanthin binding per se does not cause conformational changes in the complexes and does not induce quenching, not even at low pH. We show that in NPQ conditions zeaxanthin does not exchange for violaxanthin in the internal binding sites of the antennas but is located at the periphery of the complexes. These results together with the observation that the zeaxanthin-dependent quenching is active in isolated membranes, but not in functional supercomplexes, suggests that zeaxanthin is acting in between the complexes, helping to create/participating in a variety of quenching sites. This can explain why none of the antennas appears to be essential for NPQ and the multiple quenching mechanisms that have been observed in plants. PMID:26323786

  10. Carbon Partitioning in Green Algae (Chlorophyta) and the Enolase Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Polle, Jürgen E. W.; Neofotis, Peter; Huang, Andy; Chang, William; Sury, Kiran; Wiech, Eliza M.

    2014-01-01

    The exact mechanisms underlying the distribution of fixed carbon within photoautotrophic cells, also referred to as carbon partitioning, and the subcellular localization of many enzymes involved in carbon metabolism are still unknown. In contrast to the majority of investigated green algae, higher plants have multiple isoforms of the glycolytic enolase enzyme, which are differentially regulated in higher plants. Here we report on the number of gene copies coding for the enolase in several genomes of species spanning the major classes of green algae. Our genomic analysis of several green algae revealed the presence of only one gene coding for a glycolytic enolase [EC 4.2.1.11]. Our predicted cytosolic localization would require export of organic carbon from the plastid to provide substrate for the enolase and subsequent re-import of organic carbon back into the plastids. Further, our comparative sequence study of the enolase and its 3D-structure prediction may suggest that the N-terminal extension found in green algal enolases could be involved in regulation of the enolase activity. In summary, we propose that the enolase represents one of the crucial regulatory bottlenecks in carbon partitioning in green algae. PMID:25093929

  11. Molecular biology of Lea genes of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This report contains our progress to date in determining the function of the D-7 Lea proteins in cotton embryos. We have completely sequenced the D-7 gene and established {ital E. coli} transformants which synthesize reasonable amounts of the D-7 protein. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was required to assay fractions for D-7 protein during purification to homogeneity, since D-7 has no known enzymatic activity, contains no Trp, and little Phe or Tyr, and {ital E. coli} has several proteins of similar molecular weight to D-7. Purified D-7 was used to generate monospecific antibodies which are being used for determination of the cellular distribution of D-7, and also for exact quantitation of D-7 in late-stage cotton embryos. Computerized modelling of D-7 has shown similarities to proteins with a coiled-coil structure, but fitting D-7 to this structure resulted in a violation of the handedness rule. If the pitch of the helix is changed from 3.6 to 3.667, however, a three dimensional structure (not a coiled coil) is generated which has overall energetics of formation nearly as favorable as the traditional {alpha} helix. The driving force for the change in pitch is proposed to result from favorable energetics of dimerization. Preliminary evidence indicates that D-7 does indeed dimerize in solution. Future experiments will determine the exact 3D structure of D-7 and the related protein D-29, as well as test the hypothesis that D-7 and D-29 are involved in mitigating dehydration of embryos and plants through sequestering phosphate or other ions in sufficient quantity to prevent ion precipitation or crystallization. 13 refs., 3 figs. (MHB)

  12. Effects of the Extraterrestrial Environment on Plants: Recommendations for Future Space Experiments for the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Silje A.; Coelho, Liz H.; Karoliussen, Irene; Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang

    2014-01-01

    Due to logistical challenges, long-term human space exploration missions require a life support system capable of regenerating all the essentials for survival. Higher plants can be utilized to provide a continuous supply of fresh food, atmosphere revitalization, and clean water for humans. Plants can adapt to extreme environments on Earth, and model plants have been shown to grow and develop through a full life cycle in microgravity. However, more knowledge about the long term effects of the extraterrestrial environment on plant growth and development is necessary. The European Space Agency (ESA) has developed the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) program to develop a closed regenerative life support system, based on micro-organisms and higher plant processes, with continuous recycling of resources. In this context, a literature review to analyze the impact of the space environments on higher plants, with focus on gravity levels, magnetic fields and radiation, has been performed. This communication presents a roadmap giving directions for future scientific activities within space plant cultivation. The roadmap aims to identify the research activities required before higher plants can be included in regenerative life support systems in space. PMID:25370192

  13. Effects of the Extraterrestrial Environment on Plants: Recommendations for Future Space Experiments for the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartment.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Silje A; Coelho, Liz H; Karoliussen, Irene; Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang

    2014-05-05

    Due to logistical challenges, long-term human space exploration missions require a life support system capable of regenerating all the essentials for survival. Higher plants can be utilized to provide a continuous supply of fresh food, atmosphere revitalization, and clean water for humans. Plants can adapt to extreme environments on Earth, and model plants have been shown to grow and develop through a full life cycle in microgravity. However, more knowledge about the long term effects of the extraterrestrial environment on plant growth and development is necessary. The European Space Agency (ESA) has developed the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) program to develop a closed regenerative life support system, based on micro-organisms and higher plant processes, with continuous recycling of resources. In this context, a literature review to analyze the impact of the space environments on higher plants, with focus on gravity levels, magnetic fields and radiation, has been performed. This communication presents a roadmap giving directions for future scientific activities within space plant cultivation. The roadmap aims to identify the research activities required before higher plants can be included in regenerative life support systems in space.

  14. Logistic analysis of algae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Slegers, P M; Leduc, S; Wijffels, R H; van Straten, G; van Boxtel, A J B

    2015-03-01

    Energy requirements for resource transport of algae cultivation are unknown. This work describes the quantitative analysis of energy requirements for water and CO2 transport. Algae cultivation models were combined with the quantitative logistic decision model 'BeWhere' for the regions Benelux (Northwest Europe), southern France and Sahara. For photobioreactors, the energy consumed for transport of water and CO2 turns out to be a small percentage of the energy contained in the algae biomass (0.1-3.6%). For raceway ponds the share for transport is higher (0.7-38.5%). The energy consumption for transport is the lowest in the Benelux due to good availability of both water and CO2. Analysing transport logistics is still important, despite the low energy consumption for transport. The results demonstrate that resource requirements, resource distribution and availability and transport networks have a profound effect on the location choices for algae cultivation.

  15. [Pharmacology and toxicology of Spirulina alga].

    PubMed

    Chamorro, G; Salazar, M; Favila, L; Bourges, H

    1996-01-01

    Spirulina, a unicellular filamentous blue-green alga has been consumed by man since ancient times in Mexico and central Africa. It is currently grown in many countries by synthetic methods. Initially the interest in Spirulina was on its nutritive value: it was found almost equal to other plant proteins. More recently, some preclinical testing suggests it has several therapeutic properties such as hypocholesterolemic, immunological, antiviral and antimutagenic. This has led to more detailed evaluations such as nucleic acid content and presence of toxic metals, biogenic toxins and organic chemicals: they have shown absence or presence at tolerable levels according to the recommendations of international regulatory agencies. In animal experiments for acute, subchronic and chronic toxicity, reproduction, mutagenicity, and teratogenicity the algae did not cause body or organ toxicity. In all instances, the Spirulina administered to the animals were at much higher amounts than those expected for human consumption. On the other hand there is scant information of the effects of the algae in humans. This area needs more research.

  16. Oleosin of subcellular lipid droplets evolved in green algae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L; Huang, Anthony H C

    2013-04-01

    In primitive and higher plants, intracellular storage lipid droplets (LDs) of triacylglycerols are stabilized with a surface layer of phospholipids and oleosin. In chlorophytes (green algae), a protein termed major lipid-droplet protein (MLDP) rather than oleosin on LDs was recently reported. We explored whether MLDP was present directly on algal LDs and whether algae had oleosin genes and oleosins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MLDP in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was associated with endoplasmic reticulum subdomains adjacent to but not directly on LDs. In C. reinhardtii, low levels of a transcript encoding an oleosin-like protein (oleolike) in zygotes-tetrads and a transcript encoding oleosin in vegetative cells transferred to an acetate-enriched medium were found in transcriptomes and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The C. reinhardtii LD fraction contained minimal proteins with no detectable oleolike or oleosin. Several charophytes (advanced green algae) possessed low levels of transcripts encoding oleosin but not oleolike. In the charophyte Spirogyra grevilleana, levels of oleosin transcripts increased greatly in cells undergoing conjugation for zygote formation, and the LD fraction from these cells contained minimal proteins, two of which were oleosins identified via proteomics. Because the minimal oleolike and oleosins in algae were difficult to detect, we tested their subcellular locations in Physcomitrella patens transformed with the respective algal genes tagged with a Green Fluorescent Protein gene and localized the algal proteins on P. patens LDs. Overall, oleosin genes having weak and cell/development-specific expression were present in green algae. We present a hypothesis for the evolution of oleosins from algae to plants.

  17. Two histone H1-encoding genes of the green alga Volvox carteri with features intermediate between plant and animal genes.

    PubMed

    Lindauer, A; Müller, K; Schmitt, R

    1993-07-15

    Southern hybridization indicated the presence of at least two and possibly four histone H1-encoding genes occurring as singlets in the Volvox carteri genome. Two of these genes, H1-I and H1-II, have been cloned and characterized. Their coding sequences are each interrupted by three introns, but only the position of the second intron is identically conserved in both H1-I and H1-II. The encoded 260-amino-acid (aa) (H1-I) and 240-aa (H1-II) polypeptides possess the typical tripartite organization of animal H1 histones, with variable N- and C-terminal domains flanking a conserved 'globular' DNA-binding domain. Extensive differences in their variable regions suggest that H1-I and H1-II (62% identity) represent two isotypes with different functions. A prominent KAPKAP-KAA motif in the H1-I N-terminal region, similarly seen in single H1 variants of a mosquito and a nematode, has a putative function in packing condensed subtypes of chromatin. Different from higher plants, but like animals, the H1 genes of V. carteri possess a typical 3' palindrome for mRNA processing, resulting in non-polyadenylated mRNAs. Transcription initiates 33 nucleotides (nt) (H1-I) and 26 nt (H1-II) downstream of typical TATA boxes. A putative 20-bp conserved enhancer element upstream of each TATA box closely resembles the consensus sequence associated with the nucleosomal histone-encoding genes in V. carteri [Müller et al., Gene 93 (1990) 167-175] and suggests stringent regulation. Accordingly, transcription of H1 was shown to be restricted to late embryogenesis, when new flagella are produced. We discuss the inferred accessory role of histone H1 proteins in stabilizing axonemal microtubules, as has been recently observed in sea urchin flagella [Multigner et al., Nature 360 (1992) 33-39].

  18. Chaperonin Cofactors, Cpn10 and Cpn20, of Green Algae and Plants Function as Hetero-oligomeric Ring Complexes*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chin C.; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2012-01-01

    The chloroplast chaperonin system of plants and green algae is a curiosity as both the chaperonin cage and its lid are encoded by multiple genes, in contrast to the single genes encoding the two components of the bacterial and mitochondrial systems. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr), three genes encode chaperonin cofactors, with cpn10 encoding a single ∼10-kDa domain and cpn20 and cpn23 encoding tandem cpn10 domains. Here, we characterized the functional interaction of these proteins with the Escherichia coli chaperonin, GroEL, which normally cooperates with GroES, a heptamer of ∼10-kDa subunits. The C. reinhardtii cofactor proteins alone were all unable to assist GroEL-mediated refolding of bacterial ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase but gained this ability when CrCpn20 and/or CrCpn23 was combined with CrCpn10. Native mass spectrometry indicated the formation of hetero-oligomeric species, consisting of seven ∼10-kDa domains. The cofactor “heptamers” interacted with GroEL and encapsulated substrate protein in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Different hetero-oligomer arrangements, generated by constructing cofactor concatamers, indicated a preferential heptamer configuration for the functional CrCpn10-CrCpn23 complex. Formation of heptamer Cpn10/Cpn20 hetero-oligomers was also observed with the Arabidopsis thaliana (At) cofactors, which functioned with the chloroplast chaperonin, AtCpn60α7β7. It appears that hetero-oligomer formation occurs more generally for chloroplast chaperonin cofactors, perhaps adapting the chaperonin system for the folding of specific client proteins. PMID:22518837

  19. Algae. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    The plants and plantlike organisms informally grouped together as algae show great diversity of form and size and occur in a wide variety of habitats. These extremely important photosynthesizers are also economically significant. For example, some species contaminate water supplies; others provide food for aquatic animals and for man; still others…

  20. Radiocarbon behaviour in seawater and the brown algae Fucus serratus in the vicinity of the COGEMA La Hague spent fuel reprocessing plant (Goury)--France.

    PubMed

    Douville, Eric; Fiévet, Bruno; Germain, Pierre; Fournier, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Extensive studies of the radiocarbon (14C) distribution and transfer in the marine environment of the North-Cotentin peninsula and along the English Channel have been carried out. The main aims of these studies have been to estimate the spatial and temporal variation of the 14C concentration in seawater and to calculate 14C concentration factors for some biological species. Such information will be helpful in order to calculate precisely radiation doses to humans. First results obtained in the vicinity of the COGEMA La Hague nuclear plant (Goury) indicate a 14C labelling of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater (8.0-26.2 Bq.m(-3)) and a tight relationship between the 14C in the liquid releases from the plant and the 14C concentrations in DIC. The particulate organic carbon (POC) is also labelled. The concentration factor calculations for the brown algae (Fucus serratus) sampled from Goury, and also along the English Channel, give 14C values around 3000 Bq.kg(-1) fresh weight / Bq.L(-1).

  1. Biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis in higher plants reflects carbon metabolism of the plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Marc-André; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Compound-specific isotope analyses of plant material are frequently applied to understand the response of plants to the environmental changes. As it is generally assume that the main factors controlling δ2H values in plants are the plant's source water and evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water, hydrogen isotope analyses of plant material are mainly applied regarding hydrological conditions at different time scales. However, only few studies have directly addressed the variability of the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of organic compounds (ɛbio), accounting also for a large part in the δ2H values of plants but generally assumed to be constant. Here we present the results from a climate-controlled growth chambers experiment where tested the sensitivity of ɛbio to different light treatments. The different light treatments were applied to induce different metabolic status (autotrophic vs. heterotrophic) in 9 different plant species that we grew from large storage organs (e.g. tubers or roots). The results show a systematic ɛbio shift (up to 80 ) between the different light treatments for different compounds (i.e. long chain n-alkanes and cellulose). We suggest that this shift is due to the different NADPH pools used by the plants to build up the compounds from stored carbohydrates in heterotrophic or autotrophic conditions. Our results have important implications for the calibration and interpretation of sedimentary and tree rings records in geological studies. In addition, as the δ2H values reflect also strongly the carbon metabolism of the plant, our findings support the idea of δ2H values as an interesting proxy for plant physiological studies.

  2. Toxicities of oils, dispersants and dispersed oils to algae and aquatic plants: review and database value to resource sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Published toxicity results are reviewed for oils, dispersants and dispersed oils and aquatic plants. The historical phytotoxicity database consists largely of results from a patchwork of research conducted after oil spills to marine waters. Toxicity information is available for ...

  3. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    DOEpatents

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  4. Oxidation of Reduced Pyridine Nucleotide by a System Using Ascorbate and Hydrogen Peroxide from Plants and Algae 1

    PubMed Central

    Kow, Yoke Wah; Smyth, Douglas A.; Gibbs, Martin

    1982-01-01

    A NAD(P)H oxidizing system (NAAP) was detected and partially purified from leaves of spinach and Sedum praealtum, seeds and leaves of pea and cells of green and red algae which oxidized NAD(P)H in the presence of ascorbate and H2O2. The partially-purified spinach system had substrate Km values of 5 micromolar for NADH, 50 micromolar for H2O2, and 300 micromolar for l-ascorbic acid at the pH optimum of 6.8. NADH was a better electron donor than NADPH. Among other electron donors, isoascorbic acid had considerable activity but hydroquinone and resorcinol had only weak activities. The enzyme was inhibited by cyanide, α,α′-dipyridyl, and mono-and di-thiol reagents. Inhibition by thiol-reagents was partially restored by Fe2+ as was enzymic activity lost following dialysis against buffer. Subcellular localization studies with spinach and S. praealtum leaves indicated that a portion of the cell's NAAP was in the chloroplast fraction. Photosynthetic conditions resulted in a decrease in this activity solubilized from spinach and S. praealtum chloroplasts. The presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea or Fe2+ in the incubation medium eliminated the light-mediated inhibition of NAAP. NAAP may function in the recycling of NAD(P)H generated in the dark within the chloroplast. Inasmuch as all preparations of NAAP contained ascorbate peroxidase activity, the data do not rule out the possibility that NAAP is the same protein as ascorbate peroxidase or, alternatively, a combination of ascorbate peroxidase and some other enzyme. PMID:16662188

  5. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae

    PubMed Central

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST) and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups. PMID:26307970

  6. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae.

    PubMed

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2015-08-20

    Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST) and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups.

  7. [Ecological Effects of Algae Blooms Cluster: The Impact on Chlorophyll and Photosynthesis of the Water Hyacinth].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-feng; He, Jun; Yang, Yi-zhong; Han, Shi-qun

    2015-08-01

    The response of chlorophyll and photosynthesis of water hyacinth leaves in different concentrations of clustered algae cells was studied in the simulation experiment, and the aim was to reveal the mechanism of the death of aquatic plants during algae blooms occurred through studying the physiological changes of the macrophytes, so as to play the full function of the ecological restoration of the plants. And results showed the dissolved oxygen quickly consumed in root zone of aquatic plants after algae blooms gathered and showed the lack of oxygen (DO < 0.2 g x L(-1)); and the ORP was lower than -100 mV after 1 d, and it declined to -200 mV at the end of the experiment. There were lots of nutrients releasing to the water after the algae cell died and concentration of DTN in treatment 1 and 2 were 44.49 mg x L(-1) and 111.32 mg x L(-1), and the content of DTP were 2.57 mg x L(-1) and 9.10 mg x L(-1), respectively. The NH4+ -N concentrations were as high as 32.99 mg x L(-1) and 51.22 mg x L(-1), and the root zone with the anoxia, strong reducing, higher nutrients environment had a serious stress effects to the aquatic plants. The macrophytes photosynthesis reduced quickly and the plant body damaged with the intimidation of higher NH4+ -N concentration (average content was 45.6 mg x L(-1)) and hypoxia after algae cell decomposed. The average net photosynthesis rate, leaf transpiration rate of the treatment 2 reduced to 3.95 micromol (M2 x S)(-1), 0.088 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1), and only were 0.18 times, 0.11 times of the control group, respectively, at the end of the experiment, the control group were 22 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1), 0.78 micromol x (M2 x s)(-1). Results indicated the algae bloom together had the irreversible damage to the aquatic plants. Also it was found large amounts of new roots and the old roots were dead in the treatment 1, but roots were all died in the treatment 2, and leaves were yellow and withered. Experiment results manifested that the serious

  8. Amino acid content of selected plant, algae and insect species: a search for alternative protein sources for use in pet foods.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Sarah; Buff, Preston R; Yu, Zengshou; Fascetti, Andrea J

    2014-01-01

    In response to global economic duress and heightened consumer awareness of nutrition and health, sustainable and natural ingredients are in demand. Identification of alternative sources of nitrogen and amino acids, including taurine, may help meet dietary requirements while fostering sustainability and natural feeding approaches. Twenty plants, eighteen marine algae and five insect species were analysed. All samples were freeze-dried, hydrolysed and filtered prior to amino acid analysis. Samples for amino acids were analysed in duplicate and averaged. Nitrogen was analysed and crude protein (CP) determined by calculation. With the exception of taurine concentration in soldier fly larvae, all insects exceeded both the National Research Council's canine and feline minimal requirements (MR) for growth of all essential amino acids (EAA) and CP. Although some plants and marine algal species exceeded the canine and feline MR for growth for EAA and CP, only very low concentrations of taurine were found in plants. Taurine concentration in insects was variable but high, with the greatest concentration found in ants (6·42 mg/g DM) and adult flesh flies (3·33 mg/g DM). Taurine was also high in some macroalgae, especially the red algal species: Mazaella spp. (4·11 mg/g DM), Porphyra spp. (1·22 mg/g DM) and Chondracanthus spp. (6·28 mg/g DM). Preliminary results suggest that insects and some marine algal species may be practical alternatives to traditional protein and supplemental taurine sources in pet foods. Safety, bioavailability, palatability and source variability of alternative items as food ingredients should be investigated prior to incorporation into canine and feline diets.

  9. Klebsormidium flaccidum genome reveals primary factors for plant terrestrial adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hori, Koichi; Maruyama, Fumito; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Togashi, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Seo, Mitsunori; Sato, Syusei; Yamada, Takuji; Mori, Hiroshi; Tajima, Naoyuki; Moriyama, Takashi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Watanabe, Mai; Wada, Hajime; Kobayashi, Koichi; Saito, Masakazu; Masuda, Tatsuru; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Awai, Koichiro; Shimojima, Mie; Masuda, Shinji; Iwai, Masako; Nobusawa, Takashi; Narise, Takafumi; Kondo, Satoshi; Saito, Hikaru; Sato, Ryoichi; Murakawa, Masato; Ihara, Yuta; Oshima-Yamada, Yui; Ohtaka, Kinuka; Satoh, Masanori; Sonobe, Kohei; Ishii, Midori; Ohtani, Ryosuke; Kanamori-Sato, Miyu; Honoki, Rina; Miyazaki, Daichi; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Umetsu, Jumpei; Higashi, Kouichi; Shibata, Daisuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Sato, Naoki; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Ida, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Ken; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-28

    The colonization of land by plants was a key event in the evolution of life. Here we report the draft genome sequence of the filamentous terrestrial alga Klebsormidium flaccidum (Division Charophyta, Order Klebsormidiales) to elucidate the early transition step from aquatic algae to land plants. Comparison of the genome sequence with that of other algae and land plants demonstrate that K. flaccidum acquired many genes specific to land plants. We demonstrate that K. flaccidum indeed produces several plant hormones and homologues of some of the signalling intermediates required for hormone actions in higher plants. The K. flaccidum genome also encodes a primitive system to protect against the harmful effects of high-intensity light. The presence of these plant-related systems in K. flaccidum suggests that, during evolution, this alga acquired the fundamental machinery required for adaptation to terrestrial environments.

  10. Neuroprotective Effects of Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Pangestuti, Ratih; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health effects. Among marine organisms, marine algae have been identified as an under-exploited plant resource, although they have long been recognized as valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. Presently, several lines of studies have provided insight into biological activities and neuroprotective effects of marine algae including antioxidant, anti-neuroinflammatory, cholinesterase inhibitory activity and the inhibition of neuronal death. Hence, marine algae have great potential to be used for neuroprotection as part of pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals and functional foods. This contribution presents an overview of marine algal neuroprotective effects and their potential application in neuroprotection. PMID:21673890

  11. The comet assay in higher terrestrial plant model: Review and evolutionary trends.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Caroline; Manier, Nicolas; Cuny, Damien; Deram, Annabelle

    2015-12-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive technique for the measurement of DNA damage in individual cells. Although it has been primarily applied to animal cells, its adaptation to higher plant tissues significantly extends the utility of plants for environmental genotoxicity research. The present review focuses on 101 key publications and discusses protocols and evolutionary trends specific to higher plants. General consensus validates the use of the percentage of DNA found in the tail, the alkaline version of the test and root study. The comet protocol has proved its effectiveness and its adaptability for cultivated plant models. Its transposition in wild plants thus appears as a logical evolution. However, certain aspects of the protocol can be improved, namely through the systematic use of positive controls and increasing the number of nuclei read. These optimizations will permit the increase in the performance of this test, namely when interpreting mechanistic and physiological phenomena.

  12. Application of power plant flue gas in a photobioreactor to grow Spirulina algae, and a bioactivity analysis of the algal water-soluble polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Wei; Yang, Tsung-Shi; Chen, Mao-Jing; Chang, Yu-Ching; Lin, Chai-Yi; Wang, Eugene I-Chen; Ho, Chen-Lung; Huang, Kue-Ming; Yu, Chi-Cheng; Yang, Feng-Ling; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Lu, Ying-Chen; Chao, Louis Kuop-Ping

    2012-09-01

    A novel photobioreactor was developed with a total volume of 30 m(3) which required merely 100 m(3) of land footprint. The bioreactor was capable of utilizing CO(2) in the flue gas of a power plant as the carbon source for the growth of a freshwater alga, Spirulina platensis, mitigating the greenhouse effect caused by the same amount of CO(2) discharge. Results of the study indicated that the photobioreactor was capable of fixing 2,234 kg of CO(2) per annum. Upon deducting the energy consumption of operating the bioreactor unit, the estimated amount of CO(2) to be fixed by a scaled-up reactor would be 74 tons ha(-1)year(-1). In addition, the study prove that protein-free polysaccharides of S. platensis could induce the production of pro-IL-1 and IL-1 proteins through the mediation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPKs pathways. As a consequence, immunogenic activities of the macrophage cells were enhanced.

  13. Viruses and viruslike particles of eukaryotic algae.

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, J L; Lane, L C; Meints, R H

    1991-01-01

    Until recently there was little interest or information on viruses and viruslike particles of eukaryotic algae. However, this situation is changing. In the past decade many large double-stranded DNA-containing viruses that infect two culturable, unicellular, eukaryotic green algae have been discovered. These viruses can be produced in large quantities, assayed by plaque formation, and analyzed by standard bacteriophage techniques. The viruses are structurally similar to animal iridoviruses, their genomes are similar to but larger (greater than 300 kbp) than that of poxviruses, and their infection process resembles that of bacteriophages. Some of the viruses have DNAs with low levels of methylated bases, whereas others have DNAs with high concentrations of 5-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine. Virus-encoded DNA methyltransferases are associated with the methylation and are accompanied by virus-encoded DNA site-specific (restriction) endonucleases. Some of these enzymes have sequence specificities identical to those of known bacterial enzymes, and others have previously unrecognized specificities. A separate rod-shaped RNA-containing algal virus has structural and nucleotide sequence affinities to higher plant viruses. Quite recently, viruses have been associated with rapid changes in marine algal populations. In the next decade we envision the discovery of new algal viruses, clarification of their role in various ecosystems, discovery of commercially useful genes in these viruses, and exploitation of algal virus genetic elements in plant and algal biotechnology. Images PMID:1779928

  14. [Accumulation of polycyclic arenes in Baltic Sea algae].

    PubMed

    Veldre, I A; Itra, A R; Paal'me, L P; Kukk, Kh A

    1985-01-01

    The paper presents data on the level of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and some other polycyclic arenes in alga and phanerogam specimens from different gulfs of the Baltic Sea. Algae were shown to absorb BP from sea water. The mean concentration of BP in sea water was under 0.004 microgram/1, while in algae it ranged 0.1-21.2 micrograms/kg dry weight. Algae accumulate BP to a higher degree than phanerogams. The highest concentrations of BP were found in algae Enteromorpha while the lowest ones in Furcellaria. In annual green algae, BP level was higher in autumn, i. e. at the end of vegetation period, than in spring. Brown algae Fucus vesiculosus is recommended for monitoring polycyclic arene pollution in the area from Vormsi Island to Käsmu and green algae Cladophora or Enteromorpha in the eastern part of the Finnish Gulf.

  15. Attached algae of the Lake Erie shoreline near Nanticoke Generating Station

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, M.K.; Dunford, W.E.

    1981-11-01

    The distribution, species composition, and standing crop of attached algae were surveyed in the splash zone along the shore of Lake Erie from 1971 to 1978 to determine the impact of construction and operation of the Nanticoke Generating Station, a coal-fired power plant. Station operation has had no apparent influence on the spatial distribution of attached algae in the lake stations. However, the discharge of heated condenser cooling water has resulted in an accelerated growth of attached algae in the immediate vicinity of the station early in the growing season, but the effect was not sustained after May. The species composition at sites near the generating station differed from control areas. Three years after the initial operation of the plant the generating station had a lower percent abundance of Cladophora and a higher percent abundance of weakly attached algal species such as Zygnema; this is perhaps attributable to the sheltered conditions in the discharge area of the generating station.

  16. Attached algae of the Lake Erie shoreline near Nanticoke generating station

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, M.K.; Dunford, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution, species composition and standing crop of attached algae were surveyed in the splash zone along the shore of Lake Erie from 1971 to 1978 to determine the impact of construction and operation of the Nanticoke Generating Station, a coal-fired power plant. Station operation has had no apparent influence on the spatial distribution of attached algae in the lake stations. However, the discharge of heated condenser cooling water has resulted in an accelerated growth of attached algae in the immediate vicinity of the station early in the growing season, but the effect was not sustained after May. The species composition at sites near the generating station differed from control areas. Three years after the initial operation of the plant the generating station had a lower percent abundance of Cladophora and a higher percent abundance of weakly attached algal species such as Zygnema; this is perhaps attributable to the sheltered conditions in the discharge area of the generating station.

  17. Surface-bound iron: a metal ion buffer in the marine brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus?

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric P; Böttger, Lars H; Weerasinghe, Aruna J; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Matzanke, Berthold F; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Küpper, Frithjof C; Carrano, Carl J

    2014-02-01

    Although the iron uptake and storage mechanisms of terrestrial/higher plants have been well studied, the corresponding systems in marine algae have received far less attention. Studies have shown that while some species of unicellular algae utilize unique mechanisms of iron uptake, many acquire iron through the same general mechanisms as higher plants. In contrast, the iron acquisition strategies of the multicellular macroalgae remain largely unknown. This is especially surprising since many of these organisms represent important ecological and evolutionary niches in the coastal marine environment. It has been well established in both laboratory and environmentally derived samples, that a large amount of iron can be 'non-specifically' adsorbed to the surface of marine algae. While this phenomenon is widely recognized and has prompted the development of experimental protocols to eliminate its contribution to iron uptake studies, its potential biological significance as a concentrated iron source for marine algae is only now being recognized. This study used an interdisciplinary array of techniques to explore the nature of the extensive and powerful iron binding on the surface of both laboratory and environmental samples of the marine brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus and shows that some of this surface-bound iron is eventually internalized. It is proposed that the surface-binding properties of E. siliculosus allow it to function as a quasibiological metal ion 'buffer', allowing iron uptake under the widely varying external iron concentrations found in coastal marine environments.

  18. Surface-bound iron: a metal ion buffer in the marine brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus?

    PubMed Central

    Carrano, Carl J.

    2014-01-01

    Although the iron uptake and storage mechanisms of terrestrial/higher plants have been well studied, the corresponding systems in marine algae have received far less attention. Studies have shown that while some species of unicellular algae utilize unique mechanisms of iron uptake, many acquire iron through the same general mechanisms as higher plants. In contrast, the iron acquisition strategies of the multicellular macroalgae remain largely unknown. This is especially surprising since many of these organisms represent important ecological and evolutionary niches in the coastal marine environment. It has been well established in both laboratory and environmentally derived samples, that a large amount of iron can be ‘non-specifically’ adsorbed to the surface of marine algae. While this phenomenon is widely recognized and has prompted the development of experimental protocols to eliminate its contribution to iron uptake studies, its potential biological significance as a concentrated iron source for marine algae is only now being recognized. This study used an interdisciplinary array of techniques to explore the nature of the extensive and powerful iron binding on the surface of both laboratory and environmental samples of the marine brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus and shows that some of this surface-bound iron is eventually internalized. It is proposed that the surface-binding properties of E. siliculosus allow it to function as a quasibiological metal ion ‘buffer’, allowing iron uptake under the widely varying external iron concentrations found in coastal marine environments. PMID:24368501

  19. Advanced life support systems in lunar and Martian environments utilizing a higher plant based engineering paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberland, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes a higher-plant-based engineering paradigm for advanced life support in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) on the surface of the moon or Mars, called the CELSS Breadboard Project, designed at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Such a higher-plant-based system would use the plants for a direct food source, gas exchange, water reclamation, and plant residuals in a complex biological resource recovery scheme. The CELSS Breadboard Project utilizes a 'breadboard' approach of developing independent systems that are evaluated autonomously and are later interconnected. Such a scheme will enable evaluation of life support system methodologies tested for their efficiency in a life support system for habitats on the moon or Mars.

  20. Screening of native plants and algae growing on fly-ash affected areas near National Thermal Power Corporation, Tanda, Uttar Pradesh, India for accumulation of toxic heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, S; Srivastava, S; Mishra, S; Dixit, B; Kumar, A; Tripathi, R D

    2008-10-30

    The present investigation was carried out to screen native plants growing in fly-ash (FA) contaminated areas near National Thermal Power Corporation, Tanda, Uttar Pradesh, India with a view to using them for the eco-restoration of the area. A total number of 17 plants (9 aquatic, 6 terrestrial and 2 algal species) were collected and screened for heavy metal (Fe, Zn, Cu, Mo, B, Si, Al, Cr, Pb, Cd, Hg and As) accumulation. Differential accumulation of various heavy metals by different species of plants was observed. Hydrilla verticillata was found to be the most efficient metal accumulator among 9 aquatic plants, Eclipta alba among 6 terrestrial plants and Phormedium papyraceum between 2 algal species. In general, the maximum levels of most metals were found in terrestrial plants while the lowest in algal species. However, translocation of the metals from root to shoot was found to be higher in aquatic plants than terrestrial ones. These results suggest that various aquatic, terrestrial and algal species of plants may be used in a synergistic way to remediate and restore the FA contaminated areas.

  1. Thermal dissipation of light energy is regulated differently and by different mechanisms in lichens and higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, J; Azarkovich, M; Pfündel, E E; Shuvalov, V A; Heber, U

    2005-03-01

    Modulated chlorophyll fluorescence was used to compare dissipation of light energy as heat in photosystem II of homoiohydric and poikilohydric photosynthetic organisms which were either hydrated or dehydrated. In hydrated chlorolichens with an alga as the photobiont, fluorescence quenching revealed a dominant mechanism of energy dissipation which was based on a protonation reaction when zeaxanthin was present. CO2 was effective as a weak protonating agent and actinic light was not necessary. In a hydrated cyanobacterial lichen, protonation by CO2 was ineffective to initiate energy dissipation. This was also true for leaves of higher plants. Thus, regulation of zeaxanthin-dependent energy dissipation by protonation was different in leaves and in chlorolichens. A mechanism of energy dissipation different from that based on zeaxanthin became apparent on dehydration of both lichens and leaves. Quenching of maximum or Fm fluorescence increased strongly during dehydration. In lichens, this was also true for so-called basal or Fo fluorescence. In contrast to zeaxanthin-dependent quenching, dehydration-induced quenching could not be inhibited by dithiothreitol. Both zeaxanthin-dependent and dehydration-induced quenching cooperated in chlorolichens to increase thermal dissipation of light energy if desiccation occurred in the light. In cyanolichens, which do not possess a zeaxanthin cycle, only desiccation-induced thermal energy dissipation was active in the dry state. Fluorescence emission spectra of chlorolichens revealed stronger desiccation-induced suppression of 685-nm fluorescence than of 720-nm fluorescence. In agreement with earlier reports of , fluorescence excitation data showed that desiccation reduced flow of excitation energy from chlorophyll b of the light harvesting complex II to emitting centres more than flow from chlorophyll a of core pigments. The data are discussed in relation to regulation and localization of thermal energy dissipation mechanisms. It is

  2. Subcellular Distribution of Enzymes of Glycolate Metabolism in the Alga Cyanidium caldarium1

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Wolfgang; Beevers, Harry

    1989-01-01

    The intracellular distribution of enzymes capable of catalyzing the reactions from phosphoglycolate to glycerate in the bluegreen colored eucaryotic alga Cyanidium caldarium has been studied. After separating the organelles from a crude homogenate on a linear flotation gradient, the enzymes glycolate oxidase and glutamate-glyoxylate aminotransferase along with catalase were present in the peroxisomal fraction (density: 1.23 grams per cubic centimeter). Serine hydroxymethyltransferase was found in the mitochondrial fraction (density: 1.18 grams per cubic centimeter). In contrast to the observations in green leaves of higher plants, the enzymes for the conversion of serine to glycerate (serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase and hydroxypyruvate reductase) were found only in the soluble fraction of the gradient. The partial characterization of enzymes from Cyanidium participating in glycolate metabolism revealed only slight differences from the corresponding enzymes from higher plants. The phylogenetic implications of the observed similarities between the enigmatic alga Cyanidium and higher plants are discussed. PMID:16666880

  3. Leaf Optical Properties in Higher Plants: Linking Spectral Characteristics with Plant Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Gregory A.; Knapp, Alan K.

    1999-01-01

    A number of studies have addressed responses of leaf spectral reflectance, transmittance, or absorptance to physiological stress. Stressors included dehydration, ozone, herbicides, disease, insufficient mycorrhizae and N fertilization, flooding and insects. Species included conifers, grasses, and broadleaved trees. Increased reflectance with maximum responses near 700 nm wavelength occurred in all cases. Varying the chlorophyll content in leaves or pigment extracts can simulate this effect. Thus, common optical responses to stress result from decreases in leaf chlorophyll contents or the capacity of chloroplasts to absorb light. Leaf optic can be quite sensitive to any stressor that alters soil-plant-atmosphere processes.

  4. Magnetic separation of algae

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  5. Growth and development in inert non-aqueous liquids. [of higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    A preview is presented of the survival and growth capabilities of higher plants in non-aqueous, inert liquids. The two media which were used are mineral (white) oil and fluorochemical inert liquid FC-75. Both liquids dissolve oxygen and carbon dioxide readily, but are insoluble in water. Consequently, plants submerged in these liquids are capable of gas exchange with the atmosphere, but possess a water impermeable coating the dimensions of which are determined by the size of the liquid holding container. In a sense, growing plants in a tank of mineral oil imparts on them a cuticle. Plants plus prescribed volumes of water were innoculated into mineral oil. Organisms with minimal water supplied could then be observed. Also, submersed plants covered with an oil slick were shown to be capable of growth in dessicating atmospheres.

  6. Voltage-dependent calcium-permeable channels in the plasma membrane of a higher plant cell.

    PubMed Central

    Thuleau, P; Ward, J M; Ranjeva, R; Schroeder, J I

    1994-01-01

    Numerous biological assays and pharmacological studies on various higher plant tissues have led to the suggestion that voltage-dependent plasma membrane Ca2+ channels play prominent roles in initiating signal transduction processes during plant growth and development. However, to date no direct evidence has been obtained for the existence of such depolarization-activated Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane of higher plant cells. Carrot suspension cells (Daucus carota L.) provide a well-suited system to determine whether voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels are present in the plasma membrane of higher plants and to characterize the properties of putative Ca2+ channels. It is known that both depolarization, caused by raising extracellular K+, and exposure to fungal toxins or oligogalacturonides induce Ca2+ influx into carrot cells. By direct application of patch-clamp techniques to isolated carrot protoplasts, we show here that depolarization of the plasma membrane positive to -135 mV activates Ca(2+)-permeable channels. These voltage-dependent ion channels were more permeable to Ca2+ than K+, while displaying large permeabilities to Ba2+ and Mg2+ ions. Ca(2+)-permeable channels showed slow and reversible inactivation. The single-channel conductance was 13 pS in 40 mM CaCl2. These data provide direct evidence for the existence of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane of a higher plant cell and point to physiological mechanisms for plant Ca2+ channel regulation. The depolarization-activated Ca(2+)-permeable channels identified here could constitute a regulated pathway for Ca2+ influx in response to physiologically occurring stimulus-induced depolarizations in higher plant cells. PMID:8039493

  7. [Possibility of using higher plants in a life-support system on the moon].

    PubMed

    Terskov, I A; Lisovskiĭ, G M; Ushakova, S A; Parshina, O V; Moiseenko, L P

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses the possibility of repeated termination of plant vegetation by prolonged darkness approximating the lunar night. This may be helpful for the incorporation of higher plants into the life support system of lunar bases, the solar light being used for illumination. In this connection vegetables (beet Bordeaux, turnip Petrovskaya, carrot Chantanet, dill, radish Virovsky white) and wheat (variety Sonora) were cultivated during the lunar light-dark cycle (i. e. 15 day light: 15 day dark). The experiments demonstrated that traditional plant products can be obtained under the conditions of lunar photoperiod. Grain of wheat grown during the lunar photoperiod were tested as seed material for further cultivation under similar conditions.

  8. Aquatic food production modules in bioregenerative life support systems based on higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluem, V.; Paris, F.

    Most bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) are based on gravitropic higher plants which exhibit growth and seed generation disturbances in microgravity. Even when used for a lunar or martian base the reduced gravity may induce a decreased productivity in comparison to Earth. Therefore, the implementation of aquatic biomass production modules in higher plant and/or hybrid BLSS may compensate for this and offer, in addition, the possibility to produce animal protein for human nutrition. It was shown on the SLS-89 and SLS-90 space shuttle missions with the C.E.B.A.S.-MINI MODULE that the edible non gravitropic rootless higher aquatic plant Ceratophyllum demeresum exhibits an undisturbed high biomass production rate in space and that the teleost fish species, Xiphophorus helleri, adapts rapidly to space conditions without loss of its normal reproductive functions. Based on these findings a series of ground-based aquatic food production systems were developed which are disposed for utilization in space. These are plant production bioreactors for the species mentioned above and another suitable candidate, the lemnacean (duckweed) species, Wolffia arrhiza. Moreover, combined intensive aquaculture systems with a closed food loop between herbivorous fishes and aquatic and land plants are being developed which may be suitable for integration into a BLSS of higher complexity.

  9. Aquatic food production modules in bioregenerative life support systems based on higher plants.

    PubMed

    Bluem, V; Paris, F

    2001-01-01

    Most bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) are based on gravitropic higher plants which exhibit growth and seed generation disturbances in microgravity. Even when used for a lunar or martian base the reduced gravity may induce a decreased productivity in comparison to Earth. Therefore, the implementation of aquatic biomass production modules in higher plant and/or hybrid BLSS may compensate for this and offer, in addition, the possibility to produce animal protein for human nutrition. It was shown on the SLS-89 and SLS-90 space shuttle missions with the C.E.B.A.S.-MINI MODULE that the edible non gravitropic rootless higher aquatic plant Ceratophyllum demeresum exhibits an undisturbed high biomass production rate in space and that the teleost fish species, Xiphophorus helleri, adapts rapidly to space conditions without loss of its normal reproductive functions. Based on these findings a series of ground-based aquatic food production systems were developed which are disposed for utilization in space. These are plant production bioreactors for the species mentioned above and another suitable candidate, the lemnacean (duckweed) species, Wolffia arrhiza. Moreover, combined intensive aquaculture systems with a closed food loop between herbivorous fishes and aquatic and land plants are being developed which may be suitable for integration into a BLSS of higher complexity. Grant numbers: WS50WB9319-3, IVA1216-00588.

  10. The Cell Walls of Green Algae: A Journey through Evolution and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.; Ciancia, Marina; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Ulvskov, Peter; Willats, William G. T.

    2012-01-01

    The green algae represent a large group of morphologically diverse photosynthetic eukaryotes that occupy virtually every photic habitat on the planet. The extracellular coverings of green algae including cell walls are also diverse. A recent surge of research in green algal cell walls fueled by new emerging technologies has revealed new and critical insight concerning these coverings. For example, the late divergent taxa of the Charophycean green algae possess cell walls containing assemblages of polymers with notable similarity to the cellulose, pectins, hemicelluloses, arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), extensin, and lignin present in embryophyte walls. Ulvophycean seaweeds have cell wall components whose most abundant fibrillar constituents may change from cellulose to β-mannans to β-xylans and during different life cycle phases. Likewise, these algae produce complex sulfated polysaccharides, AGPs, and extensin. Chlorophycean green algae produce a wide array of walls ranging from cellulose–pectin complexes to ones made of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Larger and more detailed surveys of the green algal taxa including incorporation of emerging genomic and transcriptomic data are required in order to more fully resolve evolutionary trends within the green algae and in relationship with higher plants as well as potential applications of wall components in the food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:22639667

  11. Physiology and toxicology of hormone-disrupting chemicals in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Couée, Ivan; Serra, Anne-Antonella; Ramel, Fanny; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2013-06-01

    Higher plants are exposed to natural environmental organic chemicals, associated with plant-environment interactions, and xenobiotic environmental organic chemicals, associated with anthropogenic activities. The effects of these chemicals result not only from interaction with metabolic targets, but also from interaction with the complex regulatory networks of hormone signaling. Purpose-designed plant hormone analogues thus show extensive signaling effects on gene regulation and are as such important for understanding plant hormone mechanisms and for manipulating plant growth and development. Some natural environmental chemicals also act on plants through interference with the perception and transduction of endogenous hormone signals. In a number of cases, bioactive xenobiotics, including herbicides that have been designed to affect specific metabolic targets, show extensive gene regulation effects, which are more in accordance with signaling effects than with consequences of metabolic effects. Some of these effects could be due to structural analogies with plant hormones or to interference with hormone metabolism, thus resulting in situations of hormone disruption similar to animal cell endocrine disruption by xenobiotics. These hormone-disrupting effects can be superimposed on parallel metabolic effects, thus indicating that toxicological characterisation of xenobiotics must take into consideration the whole range of signaling and metabolic effects. Hormone-disruptive signaling effects probably predominate when xenobiotic concentrations are low, as occurs in situations of residual low-level pollutions. These hormone-disruptive effects in plants may thus be of importance for understanding cryptic effects of low-dosage xenobiotics, as well as the interactive effects of mixtures of xenobiotic pollutants.

  12. A conserved MYB transcription factor involved in phosphate starvation signaling both in vascular plants and in unicellular algae

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Vicente; Linhares, Francisco; Solano, Roberto; Martín, Ana C.; Iglesias, Joaquín; Leyva, Antonio; Paz-Ares, Javier

    2001-01-01

    Plants have evolved a number of adaptive responses to cope with growth in conditions of limited phosphate (Pi) supply involving biochemical, metabolic, and developmental changes. We prepared an EMS-mutagenized M2 population of an Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic line harboring a reporter gene specifically responsive to Pi starvation (AtIPS1∷GUS), and screened for mutants altered in Pi starvation regulation. One of the mutants, phr1 (phosphate starvation response 1), displayed reduced response of AtIPS1∷GUS to Pi starvation, and also had a broad range of Pi starvation responses impaired, including the responsiveness of various other Pi starvation-induced genes and metabolic responses, such as the increase in anthocyanin accumulation. PHR1 was positionally cloned and shown be related to the PHOSPHORUS STARVATION RESPONSE 1 (PSR1) gene from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. A GFP∷PHR1 protein fusion was localized in the nucleus independently of Pi status, as is the case for PSR1. PHR1 is expressed in Pi sufficient conditions and, in contrast to PSR1, is only weakly responsive to Pi starvation. PHR1, PSR1, and other members of the protein family share a MYB domain and a predicted coiled–coil (CC) domain, defining a subtype within the MYB superfamily, the MYB–CC family. Therefore, PHR1 was found to bind as a dimer to an imperfect palindromic sequence. PHR1-binding sequences are present in the promoter of Pi starvation-responsive structural genes, indicating that this protein acts downstream in the Pi starvation signaling pathway. PMID:11511543

  13. Phosphogypsum as a soil fertilizer: Ecotoxicity of amended soil and elutriates to bacteria, invertebrates, algae and plants.

    PubMed

    Hentati, Olfa; Abrantes, Nelson; Caetano, Ana Luísa; Bouguerra, Sirine; Gonçalves, Fernando; Römbke, Jörg; Pereira, Ruth

    2015-08-30

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a metal and radionuclide rich-waste produced by the phosphate ore industry, which has been used as soil fertilizer in many parts of the world for several decades. The positive effects of PG in ameliorating some soil properties and increasing crop yields are well documented. More recently concerns are emerging related with the increase of metal/radionuclide residues on soils and crops. However, few studies have focused on the impact of PG applications on soil biota, as well as the contribution to soils with elements in mobile fractions of PG which may affect freshwater species as well. In this context the main aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicity of soils amended with different percentages of Tunisian phosphogypsum (0.0, 4.9, 7.4, 11.1, 16.6 and 25%) and of elutriates obtained from PG - amended soil (0.0, 6.25, 12.5 and 25% of PG) to a battery of terrestrial (Eisenia andrei, Enchytraeus crypticus, Folsomia candida, Hypoaspis aculeifer, Zea mays, Lactuca sativa) and aquatic species (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, Raphidocelis subcapitata, Lemna minor). Both for amended soils and elutriates, invertebrates (especially D. magna and E. andrei) were the most sensitive species, displaying acute (immobilization) and chronic (reproduction inhibition) effects, respectively. Despite the presence of some concerning metals in PG and elutriates (e.g., zinc and cadmium), the extremely high levels of calcium found in both test mediums, suggest that this element was the mainly responsible for the ecotoxicological effects observed. Terrestrial and aquatic plants were the most tolerant species, which is in line with studies supporting the application of PG to increase crop yields. Nevertheless, no stimulatory effects on growth were observed for any of the species tested despite the high levels of phosphorus added to soils by PG. Given the importance of soil invertebrates for several soil functions and services, this study gives rise to new serious

  14. The ice nucleation activity of extremophilic algae.

    PubMed

    Kviderova, Jana; Hajek, Josef; Worland, Roger M

    2013-01-01

    Differences in the level of cold acclimation and cryoprotection estimated as ice nucleation activity in snow algae (Chlamydomonas cf. nivalis and Chloromonas nivalis), lichen symbiotic algae (Trebouxia asymmetrica, Trebouxia erici and Trebouxia glomerata), and a mesophilic strain (Chlamydomonas reinhardti) were evaluated. Ice nucleation activity was measured using the freezing droplet method. Measurements were performed using suspensions of cells of A750 (absorbance at 750 nm) ~ 1, 0.1, 0.01 and 0.001 dilutions for each strain. The algae had lower ice nucleation activity, with the exception of Chloromonas nivalis contaminated by bacteria. The supercooling points of the snow algae were higher than those of lichen photobionts. The supercooling points of both, mesophilic and snow Chlamydomonas strains were similar. The lower freezing temperatures of the lichen algae may reflect either the more extreme and more variable environmental conditions of the original localities or the different cellular structure of the strains examined.

  15. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, R.B.

    1990-02-01

    The goals of examining the mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover in higher plants remain the same. We will continue with two of the major approaches (1) in vivo chemical modification of RNA structure and (2) analysis of Rubisco SSU RNA structure and turnover in transgenic plants. We plan to reduce the amount of molecular physiology (studies of transcription and steady state levels) to a minimum and expand these efforts into the analysis of plant rebonucleases. We have also broadened our examination of light induced turnover of rubisco SSU RNA to include general RNA turnover. We plan to identify specific 3{prime}->5{prime} precessive ribonuclease by complementation of E. coli mutants. The activity of these novel RNases and their potential role in plant RNA turnover and processing will be characterized.

  16. Design and optimization of an experimental bioregenerative life support system with higher plants and silkworms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Enzhu; Bartsev, Sergey I.; Zhao, Ming; Liu, Professor Hong

    The conceptual scheme of an experimental bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) for planetary exploration was designed, which consisted of four elements - human metabolism, higher plants, silkworms and waste treatment. 15 kinds of higher plants, such as wheat, rice, soybean, lettuce, mulberry, et al., were selected as regenerative component of BLSS providing the crew with air, water, and vegetable food. Silkworms, which producing animal nutrition for crews, were fed by mulberry-leaves during the first three instars, and lettuce leaves last two instars. The inedible biomass of higher plants, human wastes and silkworm feces were composted into soil like substrate, which can be reused by higher plants cultivation. Salt, sugar and some household material such as soap, shampoo would be provided from outside. To support the steady state of BLSS the same amount and elementary composition of dehydrated wastes were removed periodically. The balance of matter flows between BLSS components was described by the system of algebraic equations. The mass flows between the components were optimized by EXCEL spreadsheets and using Solver. The numerical method used in this study was Newton's method.

  17. Hydrostatic factors affect the gravity responses of algae and roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, Mark P.; Wayne, Randy; Leopold, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis of Wayne et al. (1990) that plant cells perceive gravity by sensing a pressure differential between the top and the bottom of the cell was tested by subjecting rice roots and cells of Caracean algae to external solutions of various densities. It was found that increasing the density of the external medium had a profound effect on the polar ratio (PR, the ratio between velocities of the downwardly and upwardly streaming cytoplasm) of the Caracean algae cells. When these cells were placed in solutions of denser compound, the PR decreased to less than 1, as the density of the external medium became higher than that of the cell; thus, the normal gravity-induced polarity was reversed, indicating that the osmotic pressure of the medium affects the cell's ability to respond to gravity. In rice roots, an increase of the density of the solution inhibited the rate of gravitropism. These results agree with predictions of a hydrostatic model for graviperception.

  18. Gene Expression and Regulation of Higher Plants Under Soil Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Fu-Tai; Chu, Li-Ye; Shao, Hong-Bo; Liu, Zeng-Hui

    2009-01-01

    Higher plants not only provide human beings renewable food, building materials and energy, but also play the most important role in keeping a stable environment on earth. Plants differ from animals in many aspects, but the important is that plants are more easily influenced by environment than animals. Plants have a series of fine mechanisms for responding to environmental changes, which has been established during their long-period evolution and artificial domestication. The machinery related to molecular biology is the most important basis. The elucidation of it will extremely and purposefully promote the sustainable utilization of plant resources and make the best use of its current potential under different scales. This molecular mechanism at least includes drought signal recognition (input), signal transduction (many cascade biochemical reactions are involved in this process), signal output, signal responses and phenotype realization, which is a multi-dimension network system and contains many levels of gene expression and regulation. We will focus on the physiological and molecular adaptive machinery of plants under soil water stress and draw a possible blueprint for it. Meanwhile, the issues and perspectives are also discussed. We conclude that biological measures is the basic solution to solving various types of issues in relation to sustainable development and the plant measures is the eventual way. PMID:19949548

  19. Phototolerance of lichens, mosses and higher plants in an alpine environment: analysis of photoreactions.

    PubMed

    Heber, U; Bilger, W; Bligny, R; Lange, O L

    2000-11-01

    Adaptation to excessive light is one of the requirements of survival in an alpine environment particularly for poikilohydric organisms which in contrast to the leaves of higher plants tolerate full dehydration. Changes in modulated chlorophyll fluorescence and 820-nm absorption were investigated in the lichens Xanthoria elegans (Link) Th. Fr. and Rhizocarpon geographicum (L.) DC, in the moss Grimmia alpestris Limpr. and the higher plants Geum montanum L., Gentiana lutea L. and Pisum sativum L., all collected at altitudes higher than 2000 m above sea level. In the dehydrated state, chlorophyll fluorescence was very low in the lichens and the moss, but high in the higher plants. It increased on rehydration in the lichens and the moss, but decreased in the higher plants. Light-induced charge separation in photosystem II was indicated by pulse-induced fluorescence increases only in dried leaves, not in the dry moss and dry lichens. Strong illumination caused photodamage in the dried leaves, but not in the dry moss and dry lichens. Light-dependent increases in 820-nm absorption revealed formation of potential quenchers of chlorophyll fluorescence in all dehydrated plants, but energy transfer to quenchers decreased chlorophyll fluorescence only in the moss and the lichens, not in the higher plants. In hydrated systems, coupled cyclic electron transport is suggested to occur concurrently with linear electron transport under strong actinic illumination particularly in the lichens because far more electrons became available after actinic illumination for the reduction of photo-oxidized P700 than were available in the pool of electron carriers between photosystems II and I. In the moss Grimmia, but not in the lichens or in leaves, light-dependent quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence was extensive even under nitrogen, indicating anaerobic thylakoid acidification by persistent cyclic electron transport. In the absence of actinic illumination, acidification by ca. 8% CO2 in

  20. Diurnal adjustment in ultraviolet sunscreen protection is widespread among higher plants.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Paul W; Flint, Stephan D; Tobler, Mark A; Ryel, Ronald J

    2016-05-01

    The accumulation of ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds (flavonoids and related phenylpropanoids) in the epidermis of higher plants reduces the penetration of solar UV radiation to underlying tissues and is a primary mechanism of acclimation to changing UV conditions resulting from ozone depletion and climate change. Previously we reported that several herbaceous plant species were capable of rapid, diurnal adjustments in epidermal UV transmittance (T UV), but how widespread this phenomenon is among plants has been unknown. In the present study, we tested the generality of this response by screening 37 species of various cultivated and wild plants growing in four locations spanning a gradient of ambient solar UV and climate (Hawaii, Utah, Idaho and Louisiana). Non-destructive measurements of adaxial T UV indicated that statistically significant midday decreases in T UV occurred in 49 % of the species tested, including both herbaceous and woody growth forms, and there was substantial interspecific variation in the magnitude of these changes. In general, plants in Louisiana exhibited larger diurnal changes in T UV than those in the other locations. Moreover, across all taxa, the magnitude of these changes was positively correlated with minimum daily air temperatures but not daily UV irradiances. Results indicate that diurnal changes in UV shielding are widespread among higher plants, vary both within and among species and tend to be greatest in herbaceous plants growing in warm environments. These findings suggest that plant species differ in their UV protection "strategies" though the functional and ecological significance of this variation in UV sunscreen protection remains unclear at present.

  1. Respiratory Chain of Colorless Algae II. Cyanophyta

    PubMed Central

    Webster, D. A.; Hackett, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Whole cell difference spectra of the blue-green algae, Saprospira grandis, Leucothrix mucor, and Vitreoscilla sp. have one, or at the most 2, broad α-bands near 560 mμ. At −190° these bands split to give 4 peaks in the α-region for b and c-type cytochromes, but no α-band for a-type cytochromes is visible. The NADH oxidase activity of these organisms was shown to be associated with particulate fractions of cell homogenates. The response of this activity to inhibitors differed from the responses of the NADH oxidase activities of particulate preparations from the green algae and higher plants to the same inhibitors, but is more typical of certain bacteria. No cytochrome oxidase activity was present in these preparations. The respiration of Saprospira and Vitreoscilla can be light-reversibly inhibited by CO, and all 3 organisms have a CO-binding pigment whose CO complex absorbs near 570, 535, and 417 mμ. The action spectrum for the light reversal of CO-inhibited Vitreoscilla respiration shows maxima at 568, 534, and 416 mμ. The results suggest that the terminal oxidase in these blue-greens is an o-type cytochrome. Images PMID:5932404

  2. Rolling-circle replication of mitochondrial DNA in the higher plant Chenopodium album (L.).

    PubMed Central

    Backert, S; Dörfel, P; Lurz, R; Börner, T

    1996-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of higher plants are larger and more complex than those of all other groups of organisms. We have studied the in vivo replication of chromosomal and plasmid mitochondrial DNAs prepared from a suspension culture and whole plants of the dicotyledonous higher plant Chenopodium album (L.). Electron microscopic studies revealed sigma-shaped, linear, and open circular molecules (subgenomic circles) of variable size as well as a minicircular plasmid of 1.3 kb (mp1). The distribution of single-stranded mitochondrial DNA in the sigma structures and the detection of entirely single-stranded molecules indicate a rolling-circle type of replication of plasmid mp1 and subgenomic circles. About half of the sigma-like molecules had tails exceeding the lengths of the corresponding circle, suggesting the formation of concatemers. Two replication origins (nicking sites) could be identified on mpl by electron microscopy and by a new approach based on the mapping of restriction fragments representing the identical 5' ends of the tails of sigma-like molecules. These data provide, for the first time, evidence for a rolling-circle mode of replication in the mitochondria of higher plants. PMID:8887658

  3. The "resurrection method" for modification of specific proteins in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masashi; Dohi, Koji

    2005-11-07

    We describe a new method designated "the resurrection method" by which a modified protein is expressed in higher plants in place of the original protein. The modified gene constructed by introducing synonymous codon substitutions throughout the original gene to prevent the sequence-specific degradation of its mRNA during RNA silencing is expressed while the expression of the original gene is suppressed. Here, we report the successful alteration of the biochemical properties of green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana, suggesting that this method could be useful for gene control in living plants.

  4. Water-deficit stress-induced anatomical changes in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hong-Bo; Chu, Li-Ye; Jaleel, Cheruth Abdul; Zhao, Chang-Xing

    2008-03-01

    Water is vital for plant growth and development. Water-deficit stress, permanent or temporary, limits the growth and the distribution of natural vegetation and the performance of cultivated plants more than any other environmental factors do. Although research and practices aimed at improving water-stress resistance and water-use efficiency have been carried out for many years, the mechanism involved is still not clear. Further understanding and manipulating plant-water relations and water-stress tolerance at the scale of physiology and molecular biology can significantly improve plant productivity and environmental quality. Currently, post-genomics and metabolomics are very important to explore anti-drought gene resource in different life forms, but modern agricultural sustainable development must be combined with plant physiological measures in the field, on the basis of which post-genomics and metabolomics will have further a practical prospect. In this review, we discussed the anatomical changes and drought-tolerance strategies under drought condition in higher plants.

  5. Preliminary Modelling of Mass Flux at the Surface of Plant Leaves within the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Madeleine; Paille, Christel; Lasseur, Christophe

    The ESA project Micro Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an ecosystem of micro-organisms and higher plants, constructed with the objective of being operated as a tool to understand artificial ecosystems to be used for a long-term or permanent manned planetary base (e.g. Moon or Mars). The purpose of such a system is to provide for generation of food, water recycling, atmospheric regeneration and waste management within defined standards of quality and reliability. As MELiSSA consists of individual compartments which are connected to each other, the robustness of the system is fully dependent on the control of each compartment, as well as the flow management between them. Quality of consumables and reliability of the ecosystem rely on the knowledge, understanding and control of each of the components. This includes the full understanding of all processes related to the higher plants. To progress in that direction, this paper focuses on the mechanical processes driving the gas and liquid exchanges between the plant leaf and its environment. The process responsible for the mass transfer on the surface of plant leaves is diffusion. The diffusion flux is dependent on the behaviour of the stoma of the leaf and also on the leaf boundary layer (BL). In this paper, the physiology of the leaf is briefly examined in order to relate parameters such as light quality, light quantity, CO2 concentration, temperature, leaf water potential, humidity, vapour pressure deficit (VPD) gradients and pollutants to the opening or closing of stomata. The diffusion process is described theoretically and the description is compared to empirical approaches. The variables of the BL are examined and the effect airflow in the compartment has on the BL is investigated. Also presented is the impact changes in different environmental parameters may have on the fluid exchanges. Finally, some tests, to evaluate the accuracy of the concluded model, are suggested.

  6. Gravitropism in higher plant shoots. IV - Further studies on participation of ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; White, Rosemary G.; Salisbury, Frank B.

    1986-01-01

    Various hypotheses regarding the influence of ethylene on gravitropism in higher plant shoots were experimentally tested. It was found that ethylene at 1.0 and 10.0 cu cm/cu m decreased the rate of gravitropic bending in cocklebur stems, while 0.1 cm/cu m of ethylene had little effect. Treating cocklebur plants with 1.0 mmol aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, an ethylene synthesis inhibitor) delayed stem bending compared with controls, but adding 0.1 cu cm/cu m ethylene in the surrounding atmosphere partially restored the rate of bending of AVG-treated plants. Virtually all newly synthesized ethylene appeared in bottom halves of horizontal stems, where ethylene concentrations were as much as 100 times those in upright stems or in top halves of horizontal stems. Auxin applied to one side of a vertical stem caused extreme bending away from that side; gibberellic acid, kinetin, and abscisic acid were without effect.

  7. Analysis of an essential carotenogenic enzyme: ζ-carotene desaturase from unicellular Alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhi-Wei; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2010-11-10

    The green alga Dunaliella has become a valuable model organism for understanding the interesting mechanism of massive carotenoid accumulation. Previously, DNA sequences of several carotenogenic enzymes were obtained from Dunaliella. In this study, the cDNA of zds was isolated from Dunaliella salina using a polymerase chain reaction approach. The full-length cDNA sequence was 2178 base pairs (bp) containing a 1731 bp putative open reading frame which coded a 576 amino acid deduced polypeptide whose molecular weight was 63.9 kDa computationally. A complete homologous search displayed that the nucleotide and putative protein sequence have sequence identities of 69% and 66% with those of green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, respectively. It was predicted that this ζ-carotene desaturase (Zds) may be located in the chloroplast of D. salina. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the D. salina Zds had a closer relationship with the Zds of algae and higher plants than with those of other species.

  8. Structural characteristics and biological activity of Fucoidans from the brown algae Alaria sp. and Saccharina japonica of different reproductive status.

    PubMed

    Vishchuk, Olesya S; Tarbeeva, Dariya V; Ermakova, Svetlana P; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N

    2012-04-01

    Structural characteristics and the antitumor activity of fucoidans isolated from vegetative and reproductive tissue of the brown algae Alaria sp. and Saccharina japonica were studied. The reproductive status of the brown algae affected the yield of fucoidans and their structural characteristics. The fucoidan yield was 5.7% (w/w on the basis of the dried algae weight) for fertile and 3.8% for sterile Alaria sp. and 1.42 and 0.71% for fertile and sterile S. japonica, respectively. The fucoidans from fertile Alaria sp. and S. japonica had a slightly higher degree of sulfation and a somewhat more homogeneous monosaccharide composition, with predominate amounts of fucose and galactose, than those isolated from sterile algae tissue. The fucoidans from both the sterile and fertile brown algae tissue tested possessed selective cytotoxicity towards human breast cancer (T-47D) and melanoma (RPMI-7951) cell lines, but not to normal mouse epidermal cells (JB6 Cl41), and effectively inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of the breast cancer and melanoma cell lines. The fucoidans from reproductive tissue of brown algae possessed higher antitumor activity than those from vegetative plants.

  9. Higher plant modelling for life support applications: first results of a simple mechanistic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezard, Pauline; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Sasidharan L, Swathy

    2012-07-01

    In the case of closed ecological life support systems, the air and water regeneration and food production are performed using microorganisms and higher plants. Wheat, rice, soybean, lettuce, tomato or other types of eatable annual plants produce fresh food while recycling CO2 into breathable oxygen. Additionally, they evaporate a large quantity of water, which can be condensed and used as potable water. This shows that recycling functions of air revitalization and food production are completely linked. Consequently, the control of a growth chamber for higher plant production has to be performed with efficient mechanistic models, in order to ensure a realistic prediction of plant behaviour, water and gas recycling whatever the environmental conditions. Purely mechanistic models of plant production in controlled environments are not available yet. This is the reason why new models must be developed and validated. This work concerns the design and test of a simplified version of a mathematical model coupling plant architecture and mass balance purposes in order to compare its results with available data of lettuce grown in closed and controlled chambers. The carbon exchange rate, water absorption and evaporation rate, biomass fresh weight as well as leaf surface are modelled and compared with available data. The model consists of four modules. The first one evaluates plant architecture, like total leaf surface, leaf area index and stem length data. The second one calculates the rate of matter and energy exchange depending on architectural and environmental data: light absorption in the canopy, CO2 uptake or release, water uptake and evapotranspiration. The third module evaluates which of the previous rates is limiting overall biomass growth; and the last one calculates biomass growth rate depending on matter exchange rates, using a global stoichiometric equation. All these rates are a set of differential equations, which are integrated with time in order to provide

  10. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-01-01

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca[sup ++] as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca[sup ++]/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  11. [Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on substrate and germination of higher plants seeds].

    PubMed

    Tsetlin, V V; Levinskikh, M A; Nefedova, E L; Derendiaeva, T A; Fedotova, I V

    2008-01-01

    The investigation had the aim to evaluate the effects of low doses (< 1-10 cGy) of ionizing radiation on the physical-chemical qualities of high-purification water. It had also the goal to study germination rate and energy and sprouting of four species of higher plants exposed directly and indirectly (watering) to alpha- and beta-radiation from radionuclids sources. When compared with intact water, after exposure to beta-particles electrical currents in water-filled containers consistently tended upward and downward after exposure to alpha-particles. Radiation-induced changes in water parameters were observed throughout the experiment with higher plant seeds. Evaluation of the effect of irradiated water on sprouting showed that plant sensitivity varied with species and depended on type of radiation particles. Neither alpha- nor beta particles affected the wheat sprouts; however, both types of particles inhibited growth of mustard and accelerated growth of lentil and haricot Mash as compared with control crops. The investigation suggests that plant species for space greenhouses should be selected with account of their radioresistance and radiosensitivity.

  12. Carbon dioxide and the stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Taiz, L.; Zeiger, E.; Mawson, B. T.; Cornish, K.; Radin, J. W.; Turcotte, E. L.; Hercovitz, S.; Tallman, G.; Karlsson, P. E.; Bogomolni, R. A.; Talbott, L. D.; Srivastava, A.

    1992-01-01

    Research continued into the investigation of the effects of carbon dioxide on stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants. Topics discussed this period include a method of isolating a sufficient number of guard cell chloroplasts for biochemical studies by mechanical isolation of epidermal peels; the measurement of stomatal apertures with a digital image analysis system; development of a high performance liquid chromatography method for quantification of metabolites in guard cells; and genetic control of stomatal movements in Pima cotton. (CBS)

  13. Low-temperature perception leading to gene expression and cold tolerance in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Knight, Marc R; Knight, Heather

    2012-09-01

    Plant species exhibit a range of tolerances to low temperatures, and these constitute a major determinant of their geographical distribution and use as crops. When tolerance is insufficient, either chilling or freezing injuries result. A variety of mechanisms are employed to evade the ravages of extreme or sub-optimal temperatures. Many of these involve cold-responsive gene expression and require that the drop in temperature is first sensed by the plant. Despite intensive research over the last 100 yr or longer, we still cannot easily answer the question of how plants sense low temperature. Over recent years, genomic and post-genomic approaches have produced a wealth of information relating to the sequence of events leading from cold perception to appropriate and useful responses. However, there are also crucial and significant gaps in the pathways constructed from these data. We describe the literature pertaining to the current understanding of cold perception, signalling and regulation of low-temperature-responsive gene expression in higher plants, raising some of the key questions that still intrigue plant biologists today and that could be targets for future work. Our review focuses on the control of gene expression in the pathways leading from cold perception to chilling and freezing tolerance.

  14. Comparative study on sensitivity of higher plants and fish to heavy fuel oil.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskiene, N; Svecevicius, G; Vosyliene, M Z; Marciulioniene, D; Montvydiene, D

    2004-08-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted on higher plants [garden cress (Lepidium sativum), great duckweed (Spirodela polyrrhiza), and Tradescantia clone BNL 02] and fish [rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at all stages of development: eggs, larvae and adults] to estimate their sensitivity to heavy fuel oil (HFO). A number of biological indices (survival, growth, and physiological and morphological parameters) as well as the genotoxic impact (Tradescantia) of HFO was evaluated by acute and chronic toxicity tests. Fish were found to be more sensitive to the toxic effect of HFO than were higher plants. EC(50) values obtained for higher plants ranged from 8.7 g/L (L. sativum) to 19.8 g/L (Tradescantia), and maximum-acceptable-toxicant concentration (MATC) values ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 g/L of total HFO for L. sativum and Tradescantia, respectively. The 96-h LC(50) values ranged from 0.33 g/L, for larvae, to 2.97 g/L, for adult fish, and the MATC value for fish was found to be equal to 0.0042 g/L of total HFO. To evaluate and predict the ecological risk of the overall effects of oil spills, studies should be performed using a set of acute and chronic bioassays that include test species of different phylogenetic levels with the most sensitive morphological, physiological, and genotoxic indices.

  15. The main goals of experiments with the higher plants in the project MARS - 500.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita; Podolsky, Igor; Gushin, Vadim; Bingham, Gail; Bates, Scott

    At the present step of development of manned flight to Mars there is a current opinion that including a greenhouse in the composition of Life Support Systems (LSS) of Martian expedition would essentially improve a spacecraft habitat conditions and also would have impact to preventing of a number of possible consequences of continuous presence of human in artificial environment. Development of design objectives of future space greenhouses applicable for conditions of Martian expedition should be based, in our opinion, not only on the results of real space experiments, conducted onboard of orbital stations, but also on the results of ground-based experiments. In connection with above considerations there is a number of technological, biological and psychological experiments is planned to be conducted in the frame of MARS-500 project to resolve questions related to incorporation of higher plants in LSS of inter-planetary flights. The questions include: testing of developed elements of the greenhouse construction and methods for cultivation of vegetables under conditions of imitation of the flight of Martian expedition; selection of breeds and species of vegetables, characterized by high speed of biomass accumulation, attractive taste and appearance; investigation of growth, development and metabolism of plants under long-term continuous cultivation in manned pressurized object; comparison of the productivity of the plants as a function of utilization of different light source; determination of maximum amount of planted biomass of the plants and number of possible vegetation under conditions of long-term utilization of vegetation chamber of the greenhouse without substrate replacement; investigation of crops dietetic preferences of crew members; estimation of quality of plant biomass using seeding of the plants by microorganisms and nitrates and vitamins content as markers; development and approbation of methodical approaches to estimation of psychological factors of

  16. From Plants to Birds: Higher Avian Predation Rates in Trees Responding to Insect Herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Mäntylä, Elina; Alessio, Giorgio A.; Blande, James D.; Heijari, Juha; Holopainen, Jarmo K.; Laaksonen, Toni; Piirtola, Panu; Klemola, Tero

    2008-01-01

    Background An understanding of the evolution of potential signals from plants to the predators of their herbivores may provide exciting examples of co-evolution among multiple trophic levels. Understanding the mechanism behind the attraction of predators to plants is crucial to conclusions about co-evolution. For example, insectivorous birds are attracted to herbivore-damaged trees without seeing the herbivores or the defoliated parts, but it is not known whether birds use cues from herbivore-damaged plants with a specific adaptation of plants for this purpose. Methodology We examined whether signals from damaged trees attract avian predators in the wild and whether birds could use volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions or net photosynthesis of leaves as cues to detect herbivore-rich trees. We conducted a field experiment with mountain birches (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii), their main herbivore (Epirrita autumnata) and insectivorous birds. Half of the trees had herbivore larvae defoliating trees hidden inside branch bags and half had empty bags as controls. We measured predation rate of birds towards artificial larvae on tree branches, and VOC emissions and net photosynthesis of leaves. Principal Findings and Significance The predation rate was higher in the herbivore trees than in the control trees. This confirms that birds use cues from trees to locate insect-rich trees in the wild. The herbivore trees had decreased photosynthesis and elevated emissions of many VOCs, which suggests that birds could use either one, or both, as cues. There was, however, large variation in how the VOC emission correlated with predation rate. Emissions of (E)-DMNT [(E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene], β-ocimene and linalool were positively correlated with predation rate, while those of highly inducible green leaf volatiles were not. These three VOCs are also involved in the attraction of insect parasitoids and predatory mites to herbivore-damaged plants, which suggests that

  17. Phytate (Inositol Hexakisphosphate) in Soil and Phosphate Acquisition from Inositol Phosphates by Higher Plants. A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate (P) fixation to the soil solid phase is considered to be important for P availability and is often attributed to the strong binding of orthophosphate anion species. However, the fixation and subsequent immobilization of inositolhexa and pentaphosphate isomers (phytate) in soil is often much stronger than that of the orthosphate anion species. The result is that phytate is a main organic P form in soil and the dominating form of identifiable organic P. The reasons for the accumulation are not fully clear. Two hypothesis can be found in the literature in the last 20 years, the low activity of phytase (phosphatases) in soil, which makes phytate P unavailable to the plant roots, and, on the other hand, the strong binding of phytate to the soil solid phase with its consequent stabilization and accumulation in soil. The hypothesis that low phytase activity is responsible for phytate accumulation led to the development of genetically modified plant genotypes with a higher expression of phytase activity at the root surface and research on the effect of a higher phytate activity on P acquisition. Obviously, this hypothesis has a basic assumption, that the phytate mobility in soil is not the limiting step for P acquisition of higher plants from soil phytate. This assumption is, however, not justified considering the results on the sorption, immobilization and fixation of phytate to the soil solid phase reported in the last two decades. Phytate is strongly bound, and the P sorption maximum and probably the sorption strength of phytate P to the soil solid phase is much higher, compared to that of orthophosphate P. Mobilization of phytate seems to be a promising step to make it available to the plant roots. The excretion of organic acid anions, citrate and to a lesser extend oxalate, seems to be an important way to make phytate P available to the plants. Phytase activity at the root surface seems not be the limiting step in P acquisition from phytate. Phytate is not

  18. Formation of higher plant component microbial community in closed ecological system.

    PubMed

    Tirranen, L S

    2001-07-01

    Closed ecological systems (CES) place at the disposal of a researcher unique possibilities to study the role of microbial communities in individual components and of the entire system. The microbial community of the higher plant component has been found to form depending on specific conditions of the closed ecosystem: length of time the solution is reused, introduction of intrasystem waste water into the nutrient medium, effect of other component of the system, and system closure in terms of gas exchange. The higher plant component formed its own microbial complex different from that formed prior to closure. The microbial complex of vegetable polyculture is more diverse and stable than the monoculture of wheat. The composition of the components' microflora changed, species diversity decreased, individual species of bacteria and fungi whose numbers were not so great before the closure prevailed. Special attention should be paid to phytopathogenic and conditionally pathogenic species of microorganisms potentially hazardous to man or plants and the least controlled in CES. This situation can endanger creation of CES and make conjectural existence of preplanned components, man, specifically, and consequently, of CES as it is.

  19. Formation of higher plant component microbial community in closed ecological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirranen, L. S.

    2001-07-01

    Closed ecological systems (CES) place at the disposal of a researcher unique possibilities to study the role of microbial communities in individual components and of the entire system. The microbial community of the higher plant component has been found to form depending on specific conditions of the closed ecosystem: length of time the solution is reused, introduction of intrasystem waste water into the nutrient medium, effect of other component of the system, and system closure in terms of gas exchange. The higher plant component formed its own microbial complex different from that formed prior to closure. The microbial complex of vegetable polyculture is more diverse and stable than the monoculture of wheat. The composition of the components' microflora changed, species diversity decreased, individual species of bacteria and fungi whose numbers were not so great before the closure prevailed. Special attention should be paid to phytopathogenic and conditionally pathogenic species of microorganisms potentially hazardous to man or plants and the least controlled in CES. This situation can endanger creation of CES and make conjectural existence of preplanned components, man, specifically, and consequently, of CES as it is.

  20. Speed versus endurance tradeoff in plants: Leaves with higher photosynthetic rates show stronger seasonal declines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Sack, Lawren; Cao, Kun-Fang; Wei, Xue-Mei; Li, Nan

    2017-02-10

    We tested for a tradeoff across species between plant maximum photosynthetic rate and the ability to maintain photosynthesis under adverse conditions in the unfavorable season. Such a trade-off would be consistent with the observed trade-off between maximum speed and endurance in athletes and some animals that has been explained by cost-benefit theory. This trend would have importance for the general understanding of leaf design, and would simplify models of annual leaf carbon relations. We tested for such a trade-off using a database analysis across vascular plants and using an experimental approach for 29 cycad species, representing an ancient plant lineage with diversified evergreen leaves. In both tests, a higher photosynthetic rate per mass or per area in the favorable season was associated with a stronger absolute or percent decline in the unfavorable season. We resolved a possible mechanism based on biomechanics and nitrogen allocation; cycads with high leaf toughness (leaf mass per area) and higher investment in leaf construction than in physiological function (C/N ratio) tended to have lower warm season photosynthesis but less depression in the cool season. We propose that this trade-off, consistent with cost-benefit theory, represents a significant physio-phenological constraint on the diversity and seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic rate.

  1. Speed versus endurance tradeoff in plants: Leaves with higher photosynthetic rates show stronger seasonal declines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Sack, Lawren; Cao, Kun-Fang; Wei, Xue-Mei; Li, Nan

    2017-01-01

    We tested for a tradeoff across species between plant maximum photosynthetic rate and the ability to maintain photosynthesis under adverse conditions in the unfavorable season. Such a trade-off would be consistent with the observed trade-off between maximum speed and endurance in athletes and some animals that has been explained by cost-benefit theory. This trend would have importance for the general understanding of leaf design, and would simplify models of annual leaf carbon relations. We tested for such a trade-off using a database analysis across vascular plants and using an experimental approach for 29 cycad species, representing an ancient plant lineage with diversified evergreen leaves. In both tests, a higher photosynthetic rate per mass or per area in the favorable season was associated with a stronger absolute or percent decline in the unfavorable season. We resolved a possible mechanism based on biomechanics and nitrogen allocation; cycads with high leaf toughness (leaf mass per area) and higher investment in leaf construction than in physiological function (C/N ratio) tended to have lower warm season photosynthesis but less depression in the cool season. We propose that this trade-off, consistent with cost-benefit theory, represents a significant physio-phenological constraint on the diversity and seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic rate. PMID:28186201

  2. Roles of Organic Acid Anion Secretion in Aluminium Tolerance of Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Chen, Li-Song

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of the world's total land area and over 50% of the world's potential arable lands are acidic. Furthermore, the acidity of the soils is gradually increasing as a result of the environmental problems including some farming practices and acid rain. At mildly acidic or neutral soils, aluminium(Al) occurs primarily as insoluble deposits and is essentially biologically inactive. However, in many acidic soils throughout the tropics and subtropics, Al toxicity is a major factor limiting crop productivity. The Al-induced secretion of organic acid (OA) anions, mainly citrate, oxalate, and malate, from roots is the best documented mechanism of Al tolerance in higher plants. Increasing evidence shows that the Al-induced secretion of OA anions may be related to the following several factors, including (a) anion channels or transporters, (b) internal concentrations of OA anions in plant tissues, (d) temperature, (e) root plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase, (f) magnesium (Mg), and (e) phosphorus (P). Genetically modified plants and cells with higher Al tolerance by overexpressing genes for the secretion and the biosynthesis of OA anions have been obtained. In addition, some aspects needed to be further studied are also discussed. PMID:23509687

  3. Roles of organic acid anion secretion in aluminium tolerance of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Chen, Li-Song

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of the world's total land area and over 50% of the world's potential arable lands are acidic. Furthermore, the acidity of the soils is gradually increasing as a result of the environmental problems including some farming practices and acid rain. At mildly acidic or neutral soils, aluminium (Al) occurs primarily as insoluble deposits and is essentially biologically inactive. However, in many acidic soils throughout the tropics and subtropics, Al toxicity is a major factor limiting crop productivity. The Al-induced secretion of organic acid (OA) anions, mainly citrate, oxalate, and malate, from roots is the best documented mechanism of Al tolerance in higher plants. Increasing evidence shows that the Al-induced secretion of OA anions may be related to the following several factors, including (a) anion channels or transporters, (b) internal concentrations of OA anions in plant tissues, (d) temperature, (e) root plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase, (f) magnesium (Mg), and (e) phosphorus (P). Genetically modified plants and cells with higher Al tolerance by overexpressing genes for the secretion and the biosynthesis of OA anions have been obtained. In addition, some aspects needed to be further studied are also discussed.

  4. Physcomitrella HMGA-type proteins display structural differences compared to their higher plant counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Lyngaard, Carina; Stemmer, Christian; Stensballe, Allan; Graf, Manuela; Gorr, Gilbert; Decker, Eva; Grasser, Klaus D.

    2008-10-03

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins of the HMGA family are chromatin-associated proteins that act as architectural factors in nucleoprotein structures involved in gene transcription. To date, HMGA-type proteins have been studied in various higher plant species, but not in lower plants. We have identified two HMGA-type proteins, HMGA1 and HMGA2, encoded in the genome of the moss model Physcomitrella patens. Compared to higher plant HMGA proteins, the two Physcomitrella proteins display some structural differences. Thus, the moss HMGA proteins have six (rather than four) AT-hook DNA-binding motifs and their N-terminal domain lacks similarity to linker histone H1. HMGA2 is expressed in moss protonema and it localises to the cell nucleus. Typical of HMGA proteins, HMGA2 interacts preferentially with A/T-rich DNA, when compared with G/C-rich DNA. In cotransformation assays in Physcomitrella protoplasts, HMGA2 stimulated reporter gene expression. In summary, our data show that functional HMGA-type proteins occur in Physcomitrella.

  5. Risk assessment for selected xenobiotics by bioassay methods with higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Petra; Pestemer, Wilfried

    1990-05-01

    Different bioassays with higher plants were approved for use in a bioassay procedure for testing of xenobiotics according to the German Chemicals Act. Selected environmental pollutants (atrazine, cadmium chloride, 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, pentachlorophenol, potassium dichromate, thiourea), all from a list of reference chemicals, were tested with these methods. Dose-response curves for growth of oats and turnips were evaluated in soil and vermiculite (nonsorptive substrate), and availability to plants was calculated by comparing the EC50 values for one chemical in both substrates. The most active chemical was atrazine, followed by 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, pentachlorophenol, potassium dichromate, cadmium chloride, and thiourea. The least available compound to plants was pentachlorophenol, tested with turnips ( Brassica rapa var. rapa). The strongest inhibition of germination, demonstrated in an in vitro assay with garden cress ( Lepidium sativum), was found with 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, the lowest with atrazine. The effect of an extended exposure of the plants to the chemicals was evaluated in a long-term bioassay with oats ( Avena sativa) in hydroponic culture. Several dose-response curves during the growing period were derived. It was found that the EC50 values for atrazine and thiourea decreased markedly during the first four weeks; thereafter the changes were much smaller. As an overall conclusion, a bioassay procedure is proposed that can be included in the graduated plan recommended by the German Chemicals Act.

  6. Interaction of higher plant (jute), electrofused bacteria and mycorrhiza on anthracene biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Cheung, K C; Zhang, J Y; Deng, H H; Ou, Y K; Leung, H M; Wu, S C; Wong, M H

    2008-05-01

    The interaction of bacteria, mycorrhiza and jute (Corchotus capsulari, a higher plant) to reduce anthracene in different concentrations of spiked soils was investigated. Dominant indigenous bacterium (Pseudomonas sp.) isolated in the rhizosphere of jute was electrofused with anthracene degraders (Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) which were able to produce different types of biosurfactants. The highest population (56 x 10(5)CFU/g) was found in the planted soil with the inoculation of mixtures of electrofused anthracene degraders after 7 days. The growth of anthracene degraders in the spiked soil was improved by gene transfer from indigenous bacteria. After 35 days, enhanced anthracene removals were observed in inoculated soils planted with jute (65.5-75.2%) compared with unplanted soil without inoculation (12.5%). The interaction of jute and electrofused S. paucimobilis enabled the greatest reduction of soil anthracene with or without the addition of P. aeruginosa. Mycorrhizal colonization was not significantly inhibited by anthracene in soils up to 150 mg/kg. Inoculation of jute with Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices improved plant growth and enhanced anthracene removal in the presence of electrofused S. paucimobilis.

  7. Assessment of organochlorine pesticides residues in higher plants from oil exploration areas of Niger Delta, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sojinu, O Samuel; Sonibare, Oluwadayo O; Ekundayo, Olusegun O; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2012-09-01

    The concentrations and distributions of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in some higher plant samples collected from oil exploration areas of the Niger Delta, Nigeria were examined. The concentrations of Σ(25)OCP ranged from 82 to 424, 44 to 200 , 34 to 358, 33 to 106 and 16 to 75 ng/g in Olomoro, Oginni, Uzere, Irri and Calabar plants, respectively. The compositional profiles of the analysed OCPs in most of the plants showed no fresh inputs in the area. The OCPs detected in the samples could have resulted from pesticide usage for intense farming activities cum the use of pesticides to control household pests and insects in the area. Drilling fluids and corrosion inhibitors used in petroleum explorations also have chlorinated compounds as additives thereby serving as potential sources of OCPs. Among the studied plants, elephant grass showed high bioaccumulation and phytoremediation potentials of OCPs. The ΣHCH concentrations exceeded the allowable daily intake limit thereby serving as potential threat to humans.

  8. Membrane trafficking in higher plant cells: GFP and antibodies, partners for probing the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Satiat-Jeunemaitre, B; Boevink, P; Hawes, C

    1999-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells are characterised by the organised distribution of membrane bounded compartments in their cytoplasm. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus (GA) are part of this endomembrane machinery. They are involved in protein flow, and are in charge of specific functions such as the assembly, sorting and transport of newly synthesised proteins, glycoproteins or polysaccharides to their final destination, where the macromolecules are recognised either for action, storage, deposition or degradation. The structural and functional relationship between the ER and GA in higher plants is still a matter of debate. Therefore, it was essential to develop probes that would specifically label proteins or glycoproteins of the endomembrane system in situ. Here we compare two complementary approaches to probe plant endomembranes; immunocytochemistry on fixed cells, and in vivo studies using the expression of GFP tagged chimeric proteins. The structural relationship between ER and GA as based on pharmacological approaches using the two systems is explored.

  9. [Dynamics of cytoskeleton microtubules in higher plant meiosis. II. Perinuclear band formation].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V; Dorogova, N V; Seriukova, E G

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of correspondent meiotic abnormalities is a good tool for studying cytoskeletal rearrangements during plant cell division. The paper reports on the wheat x wheatgrass F1 hybrids, showing various abnormalities during organization of the prophase perinuclear band of microtubules (PNB) in male meiosis. Based on these data, it may be concluded that the perinuclear system of microtubules (MT) in higher plant meiosis is formed from fibrils of the radial system as a result of their translocation in the cell cytoplasm space. According to our data, at this stage the radial MT arrays pass through the following consequence of events: separating from the nuclear envelope, 2) approaching, 3) tangential orientation to the nuclear surface, 4) bending, 5) co-orientation, lateral interaction. As a result, a flat ring of well organized concentric bent MT bundles encircling the nucleus meridionally is organized.

  10. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  11. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailing description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  12. Sterol Biosynthesis in Sub-Cellular Particles of Higher Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, F. F.; Aexel, R. T.; Nicholas, H. J.

    1969-01-01

    Mevalonic acid-2-14C was administered to cut stems of bean seedlings (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) for time intervals varying from 20 min to 24 hr. The plants were homogenized in a pH 7.8 tris-sucrose buffer and the homogenates separated into chloroplast, mitochondrial, microsomal, and supernatant fractions by means of differential centrifugation. The distribution of radioactivity into non-saponifiable material in each of the fractions was then determined. After short incubation periods labeled squalene was localized in the supernatant fraction. Labeled sterol was limited at all incubation periods to the microsomal and supernatant fractions. The data presented clearly implicate the microsomal and supernatant fractions in sterol biosynthesis in higher plants. PMID:16657081

  13. Algae control problems and practices workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pryfogle, P.A.; Ghio, G.

    1996-09-01

    Western water resources are continuously facing increased demand from industry and the public. Consequently, many of these resources are required to perform multiple tasks as they cycle through the ecosystem. Many plants and animals depend upon these resources for growth. Algae are one group of plants associated with nutrient and energy cycles in many aquatic ecosystems. Although most freshwater algae are microscopic in size, they are capable of dominating and proliferating to the extent that the value of the water resource for both industrial and domestic needs is compromised. There is a great diversity of aquatic environments and systems in which algae may be found, and there are many varieties of treatment and control techniques available to reduce the impacts of excessive growth. This workshop was organized to exchange information about these control problems and practices.

  14. Effects of DCMU on chlorophyll fluorescence ratio F685/F735 in marine red, brown and green algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bao-Gan; Zuo, Dong-Mei; Zang, Ru-Bo

    1996-03-01

    The chlorophyll fluorescence ratio F685/F735 in vivo can be a useful indicator for stress detection in higher plants and seaweeds. DCMU [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea] treatment influences this ratio. The effets of DCMU on F685/F735 of marine red, brown and green algae under excitation light of different wavelengths were investigated. In the brown algae, Laminaria japonica and Undaria pinnatifida, DCMU did not increase this ratio under blue light excitation but increased the ratio slightly under excitation by green light. For the red algae, Halymenia sinensis, DCMU increased the ratio markedly under both blue and green light excitation. The percentage increase could reach 50% (under green light excitation) and was due to unequal enhancement at the two emission maxima by DCMU. A fraction of chlorophyll which contributed to fluorescence in the 735 nm region was less sensitive to DCMU and was likely from photosystem I of red algae. In the green alga, Ulva pertusa, DCMU caused a slight increase in F685/F735 value under blue, green and red light. Green light excitation during DCMU treatment increased the ratio most (16%) but induced the lowest ratio in the control (without DCMU). It is proposed that a considerable fraction of fluorescence from the 735 nm region at room temperature may be emitted by the chlorophyll of photosystem I in red algae.

  15. The physiological responses of Vallisneria natans to epiphytic algae with the increase of N and P concentrations in water bodies.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Zhi; Wang, Jin-Qi; Gao, Yong-Xia; Xie, Xue-Jian

    2015-06-01

    To reveal the mechanism of submerged plants decline in progressively eutrophicated freshwaters, physiological responses of Vallisneria natans to epiphytic algae were studied in simulation lab by measuring plant physiological indexes of chlorophyll content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity based on a 2 × 4 factorial design with two epiphytic conditions (with epiphytic algae and without) and four levels of N and P concentrations in water (N-P[mg.L(-1)]: 0.5, 0.05; 2.5, 0.25; 4.5, 0.45; 12.5, 1.25). Compared with control (non-presence of epiphytic algae), chlorophyll contents of V. natans were significantly decreased (p < 0.01) for the presence of epiphytic algae under any concentrations of N and P in water bodies. While the presence of epiphytic algae induced peroxidation of membrane lipids, MDA contents of V. natans had significantly increased (p < 0.05) by comparing with control. SOD activity significantly enhanced (p < 0.05) with the presence of epiphytic algae in the treatments of T2 and T3 in the whole culture process by comparing with control, sometimes reaching an extremely significant level (p < 0.01). However, in the treatments of T1 and T4, SOD activity had no obvious change with the presence of epiphytic algae (p < 0.05) by comparing with control. At the end of the experiment, the effects of epiphytic algae on chlorophyll content and SOD activity in the leaves of V. natans were increased at first and then decreased with the concentrations of N and P in water, and MDA content became higher with the increase of N and P. concentrations. Repeated measurement data testing showed that the effects of epiphytic algae on the chlorophyll content and MDA content and SOD activity were significant, respectively (p < 0.001), the effects of epiphytic algae were combining with effects of concentrations of N and P (p < 0.001), respectively, and their interaction (p < 0.001). Our observations

  16. Reorganization of microtubules in endosperm cells and cell fragments of the higher plant Haemanthus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The reorganization of the microtubular meshwork was studied in intact Haemanthus endosperm cells and cell fragments (cytoplasts). This higher plant tissue is devoid of a known microtubule organizating organelle. Observations on living cells were correlated with microtubule arrangements visualized with the immunogold method. In small fragments, reorganization did not proceed. In medium and large sized fragments, microtubular converging centers formed first. Then these converging centers reorganized into either closed bushy microtubular spiral or chromosome-free cytoplasmic spindles/phragmoplasts. Therefore, the final shape of organized microtubular structures, including spindle shaped, was determined by the initial size of the cell fragments and could be achieved without chromosomes or centrioles. Converging centers elongate due to the formation of additional structures resembling microtubular fir trees. These structures were observed at the pole of the microtubular converging center in anucleate fragments, accessory phragmoplasts in nucleated cells, and in the polar region of the mitotic spindle during anaphase. Therefore, during anaphase pronounced assembly of new microtubules occurs at the polar region of acentriolar spindles. Moreover, statistical analysis demonstrated that during the first two-thirds of anaphase, when chromosomes move with an approximately constant speed, kinetochore fibers shorten, while the length of the kinetochore fiber complex remains constant due to the simultaneous elongation of their integral parts (microtubular fir trees). The half-spindle shortens only during the last one-third of anaphase. These data contradict the presently prevailing view that chromosome-to-pole movements in acentriolar spindles of higher plants are concurrent with the shortening of the half-spindle, the self- reorganizing property of higher plant microtubules (tubulin) in vivo. It may be specific for cells without centrosomes and may be superimposed also on other

  17. Early diagenetic transformation of higher-plant triterpenoids in deep-sea sediments from Baffin Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Haven, H.L. Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison ); Peakman, T.M. ); Rullkoetter, J. )

    1992-05-01

    A sediment sequence of early Miocene to Holocene from Ocean Drilling Program Site 645 in central Baffin Bay was found to contain abundant triterpenoids of higher-plant origin including mono-desmethyl derivatives and other oxidative degradation products. 24-nor-triterpenoids of the oleanene, ursene, and lupane series were found in the nonaromatic hydrocarbon and alcohol fractions of the sediment extracts. Other diagenetic transformation products included 24,28-dinor-olean-17-ene and 24-nor-urs-12-en-11-one as well as their tentatively identified des-A counterparts. The identification of these novel degradation products was confirmed by synthesis of a suite of reference compounds. The simple reaction sequence applied to obtain 24-nor-urs-12-ene-from 3{alpha}-acetoxyurs-12-en-24-oic acid is likely to happen in a similar manner during early diagenesis of organic matter in nature. These results have implications for the understanding of the diagenetic reaction sequence leading to the formation of other demethylated triterpenoids of terrigenous origin (e.g., 24,28-dinor-lupanes). 28,30-dinot-17{alpha}-hopane is sometimes the dominant hydrocarbon in the most deeply buried samples. Its co-occurrence with higher plant triterpenoids and the low abundance of other regular hopanoids is not considered an indication, however, that 28,20-dinor-17{alpha}-hopane is derived from a higher plant precursor molecule. It is suggested that two independent sedimentary processes are responsible for the presence of the two types of demethylated triterpenoids observed in Baffin Bay sediments.

  18. Oleosin of Subcellular Lipid Droplets Evolved in Green Algae1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L.; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2013-01-01

    In primitive and higher plants, intracellular storage lipid droplets (LDs) of triacylglycerols are stabilized with a surface layer of phospholipids and oleosin. In chlorophytes (green algae), a protein termed major lipid-droplet protein (MLDP) rather than oleosin on LDs was recently reported. We explored whether MLDP was present directly on algal LDs and whether algae had oleosin genes and oleosins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MLDP in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was associated with endoplasmic reticulum subdomains adjacent to but not directly on LDs. In C. reinhardtii, low levels of a transcript encoding an oleosin-like protein (oleolike) in zygotes-tetrads and a transcript encoding oleosin in vegetative cells transferred to an acetate-enriched medium were found in transcriptomes and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The C. reinhardtii LD fraction contained minimal proteins with no detectable oleolike or oleosin. Several charophytes (advanced green algae) possessed low levels of transcripts encoding oleosin but not oleolike. In the charophyte Spirogyra grevilleana, levels of oleosin transcripts increased greatly in cells undergoing conjugation for zygote formation, and the LD fraction from these cells contained minimal proteins, two of which were oleosins identified via proteomics. Because the minimal oleolike and oleosins in algae were difficult to detect, we tested their subcellular locations in Physcomitrella patens transformed with the respective algal genes tagged with a Green Fluorescent Protein gene and localized the algal proteins on P. patens LDs. Overall, oleosin genes having weak and cell/development-specific expression were present in green algae. We present a hypothesis for the evolution of oleosins from algae to plants. PMID:23391579

  19. Studies on the chalcone synthase gene of two higher plants: petroselinum hortense and matthiola incana

    SciTech Connect

    Hemleben, V.; Frey, M.; Rall, S.; Koch, M.; Kittel, M.; Kreuzaler, F.; Ragg, H.; Fautz, E.; Hahlbrock, K.

    1982-01-01

    Two higher plant systems are presented which allow to study coordinated gene expression of the light-induced metabolic pathway of flavonoid biosynthesis: tissue culture cells of Petroselinum hortense (Apiaceae) and different developmental stages of various genotypes of Matthiola incana (Brassicaceae). The gene structure of the chalcone synthase is mainly studied. A cDNA clone (pLF56) of parsley has been constructed and characterized conferring the chalcone synthase gene sequence. Strong cross hybridization between the parsley cDNA and Matthiola DNA allowed to identify a HindIII fragment (6000 bp) identical in size for parsley and different Matthiola wild type lines and a mutant line.

  20. FrontiERs: movers and shapers of the higher plant cortical endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, Imogen; Hawes, Chris; Frigerio, Lorenzo

    2011-12-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in higher plants performs many important functions, yet our understanding of how its intricate network shape and dynamics relate to function is very limited. Recent work has begun to unpick key molecular players in the generation of the pleomorphic, highly dynamic ER network structure that pervades the entire cytoplasm. ER movement is acto-myosin dependent. ER shape is dependent on RHD3 (Root Hair Defective 3) and a family of proteins called reticulons. The major challenge that lies ahead is understanding how factors that control ER shape and movement are regulated and how this relates to the numerous functions of the ER.

  1. Design and implementation of components for a bioregenerative system for growing higher order plants in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakman, B.; Dioso, L.; Parker, D.; Segal, L.; Merriman, C.; Howard, I.; Vu, H.; Anderson, K.; Riley, S.; Amery, D.

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes the efforts of the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program during the 1988-89 scholastic year. The primary goal was to address specific needs in the design of an integrated system to grow higher order plants in space. The initial phase of the design effort concentrated on studying such a system and identifying its needs. Once these needs were defined, emphasis was placed on the design and fabrication of devices to meet them. Specific attention was placed on a hand-held harvester, a nutrient concentration sensor, an air-water separator, and a closed-loop biological system simulation.

  2. Seed sprout production: Consumables and a foundation for higher plant growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Michelle; Thomas, Terri; Johnson, Steve; Luttges, Marvin

    1990-01-01

    Seed sprouts can be produced as a source of fresh vegetable materials and as higher plant seedlings in space. Sprout production was undertaken to evaluate the mass accumulations possible, the technologies needed, and the reliability of the overall process. Baseline experiments corroborated the utility of sprout production protocols for a variety of seed types. The automated delivery of saturated humidity effectively supplants labor intensive manual soaking techniques. Automated humidification also lend itself to modest centrifugal sprout growth environments. A small amount of ultraviolet radiation effectively suppressed bacterial and fungal contamination, and the sprouts were suitable for consumption.

  3. Role of Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-01-01

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca[sup ++]/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  4. Ecological-floristic analysis of soil algae and cyanobacteria on the Tra-Tau and Yurak-Tau Mounts, Bashkiria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakieva, G. R.; Khaibullina, L. S.; Gaisina, L. A.; Kabirov, R. R.

    2012-09-01

    The species composition of the soil algae and cyanobacteria in the Tra-Tau and Yurak-Tau mountains is represented by 136 species belonging to five phyla: Cyanobacteria (56 species), Chlorophyta (52 species), Xanthophyta (13 species), Bacillariophyta (12 species), and Eustigmatophyta (3 species). Hantzschia amphioxys var. amphioxys, Hantzschia amphioxys var. constricta, Klebsormidium flaccidum, Leptolyngbya foveolarum, Luticola mutica, Navicula minima var. minima, Nostoc punctiforme, Phormidium jadinianum, Phormidium autumnale, and Pinnularia borealis were identified more often than other species. The composition of the algal flora depended on the soil properties; the higher plants also had a significant influence on the species composition of the soil algae.

  5. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  6. A new and unified nomenclature for male fertility restorer (RF) proteins in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kotchoni, Simeon O; Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C; Gachomo, Emma W; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2010-12-28

    The male fertility restorer (RF) proteins belong to extended protein families associated with the cytoplasmic male sterility in higher plants. Up till now, there is no devised nomenclature for naming the RF proteins. The systematic sequencing of new plant species in recent years has uncovered the existence of several novel RF genes and their encoded proteins. Their naming has been simply arbitrary and could not be adequately handled in the context of comparative functional genomics. We propose in this study a unified nomenclature for the RF extended protein families across all plant species. This new and unified nomenclature relies upon previously developed nomenclature for the first ever characterized RF gene, RF2A/ALDH2B2, a member of ALDH gene superfamily, and adheres to the guidelines issued by the ALDH Genome Nomenclature Committees. The proposed nomenclature reveals that RF gene superfamily encodes currently members of 51 families. This unified nomenclature accommodates functional RF genes and pseudogenes, and offers the flexibility needed to incorporate additional RFs as they become available in future. In addition, we provide a phylogenetic relationship between the RF extended families and use computational protein modeling to demonstrate the high divergence of RF functional specializations through specific structural features of selected members of RF superfamily.

  7. Nuclearly encoded splicing factors implicated in RNA splicing in higher plant organelles.

    PubMed

    de Longevialle, Andéol Falcon; Small, Ian D; Lurin, Claire

    2010-07-01

    Plant organelles arose from two independent endosymbiosis events. Throughout evolutionary history, tight control of chloroplasts and mitochondria has been gained by the nucleus, which regulates most steps of organelle genome expression and metabolism. In particular, RNA maturation, including RNA splicing, is highly dependent on nuclearly encoded splicing factors. Most introns in organelles are group II introns, whose catalytic mechanism closely resembles that of the nuclear spliceosome. Plant group II introns have lost the ability to self-splice in vivo and require nuclearly encoded proteins as cofactors. Since the first splicing factor was identified in chloroplasts more than 10 years ago, many other proteins have been shown to be involved in splicing of one or more introns in chloroplasts or mitochondria. These new proteins belong to a variety of different families of RNA binding proteins and provide new insights into ribonucleo-protein complexes and RNA splicing machineries in organelles. In this review, we describe how splicing factors, encoded by the nucleus and targeted to the organelles, take part in post-transcriptional steps in higher plant organelle gene expression. We go on to discuss the potential for these factors to regulate organelle gene expression.

  8. Scaling of respiration to nitrogen in leaves, stems and roots of higher land plants.

    PubMed

    Reich, Peter B; Tjoelker, Mark G; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Wright, Ian J; Oleksyn, Jacek; Machado, Jose-Luis

    2008-08-01

    Using a database of 2510 measurements from 287 species, we assessed whether general relationships exist between mass-based dark respiration rate and nitrogen concentration for stems and roots, and if they do, whether they are similar to those for leaves. The results demonstrate strong respiration-nitrogen scaling relationships for all observations and for data averaged by species; for roots, stems and leaves examined separately; and for life-forms (woody, herbaceous plants) and phylogenetic groups (angiosperms, gymnosperms) considered separately. No consistent differences in the slopes of these log-log scaling relations were observed among organs or among plant groups, but respiration rates at any common nitrogen concentration were consistently lower on average in leaves than in stems or roots, indicating that organ-specific relationships should be used in models that simulate respiration based on tissue nitrogen concentrations. The results demonstrate both common and divergent aspects of tissue-level respiration-nitrogen scaling for leaves, stems and roots across higher land plants, which are important in their own right and for their utility in modelling carbon fluxes at local to global scales.

  9. Microalgae Production from Power Plant Flue Gas: Environmental Implications on a Life Cycle Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Kadam, K. L.

    2001-06-22

    Power-plant flue gas can serve as a source of CO{sub 2} for microalgae cultivation, and the algae can be cofired with coal. This life cycle assessment (LCA) compared the environmental impacts of electricity production via coal firing versus coal/algae cofiring. The LCA results demonstrated lower net values for the algae cofiring scenario for the following using the direct injection process (in which the flue gas is directly transported to the algae ponds): SOx, NOx, particulates, carbon dioxide, methane, and fossil energy consumption. Carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons emissions were statistically unchanged. Lower values for the algae cofiring scenario, when compared to the burning scenario, were observed for greenhouse potential and air acidification potential. However, impact assessment for depletion of natural resources and eutrophication potential showed much higher values. This LCA gives us an overall picture of impacts across different environmental boundaries, and hence, can help in the decision-making process for implementation of the algae scenario.

  10. Cyanide metabolism in higher plants: cyanoalanine hydratase is a NIT4 homolog.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Markus; Volmer, Julia Jutta

    2006-05-01

    Cyanoalanine hydratase (E.C. 4.2.1.65) is an enzyme involved in the cyanide detoxification pathway of higher plants and catalyzes the hydrolysis of beta-cyano-L-alanine to asparagine. We have isolated the enzyme from seedlings of blue lupine (Lupinus angustifolius) to obtain protein sequence information for molecular cloning. In contrast to earlier reports, extracts of blue lupine cotyledons were found also to contain cyanoalanine-nitrilase (E.C. 3.5.5.4) activity, resulting in aspartic acid production. Both activities co-elute during isolation of cyanoalanine hydratase and are co-precipitated by an antibody directed against Arabidopsis thaliana nitrilase 4 (NIT4). The isolated cyanoalanine hydratase was sequenced by nanospray-MS/MS and shown to be a homolog of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum NIT4. Full-length cDNA sequences for two NIT4 homologs from blue lupine were obtained by PCR using degenerate primers and RACE-experiments. The recombinant LaNIT4 enzymes, like Arabidopsis NIT4, hydrolyze cyanoalanine to asparagine and aspartic acid but show a much higher cyanoalanine-hydratase activity. The two nitrilase genes displayed differential but overlapping expression. Taken together these data show that the so-called 'cyanoalanine hydratase' of plants is not a bacterial type nitrile hydratase enzyme but a nitrilase enzyme which can have a remarkably high nitrile-hydratase activity.

  11. Soluble, highly fluorescent variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for use in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Davis, S J; Vierstra, R D

    1998-03-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria has rapidly become a standard reporter in many biological systems. However, the use of GFP in higher plants has been limited by aberrant splicing of the corresponding mRNA and by protein insolubility. It has been shown that GFP can be expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana after altering the codon usage in the region that is incorrectly spliced, but the fluorescence signal is weak, possibly due to aggregation of the encoded protein. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we have generated a more soluble version of the codon-modified GFP called soluble-modified GFP (smGFP). The excitation and emission spectra for this protein are nearly identical to wild-type GFP. When introduced into A. thaliana, greater fluorescence was observed compared to the codon-modified GFP, implying that smGFP is 'brighter' because more of it is present in a soluble and functional form. Using the smGFP template, two spectral variants were created, a soluble-modified red-shifted GFP (smRS-GFP) and a soluble-modified blue-fluorescent protein (smBFP). The increased fluorescence output of smGFP will further the use of this reporter in higher plants. In addition, the distinct spectral characters of smRS-GFP and smBFP should allow for dual monitoring of gene expression, protein localization, and detection of in vivo protein-protein interactions.

  12. Influence of gaseous contaminants in the atmosphere of ISS on growth and development of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Podolsky, Igor; Moukhamedieva, Lana; Gostimskiy, Sergey; Bingham, Gail

    Continues exploitation of pressurized manned objects revealed that artificial gaseous atmosphere is a multi-component mixture containing adverse micro-dirt consisted of 14 classes of chemical compounds (Moukhamedieva, 2003). Dynamics of descendant process depend on duration of pressurized object utilization, resources of life support (e.g. level of closeness), parameters of microclimate and experimental tasks conducted by a crew. Previously it was shown that composition of gas environment of the space station remarkably altered growth and development of higher plants (Levinskikh et al., 2000). Specifically, it was found that the main changes in productivity and morphometric characteristics of the spaceflight plants of superdwarf wheat were caused by phytotoxic effect of ethylene (1,1-2,0 mg/m3) in the atmosphere of MIR orbital station. From 2003 to April, 2007 we have conducted 7 experiments focused on cultivation of dwarf peas in space greenhouse LADA onboard International Space Station (ISS-6-10, 12, 14). Results of the first 5 experiments showed that characteristics of growth and development of the peas planted in the space greenhouse had no differences if compared with ground control variants. In the similar experiments with peas during ISS-12 and ISS-14 it was found that total and seed productions of the plants were lower than ones of the previous experiments and ones of the ground controls. Cytological analysis of roots of the space seeds for the first time revealed significant increase of chromosomal aberrations in comparison with laboratory controls Analysis of total contamination of the atmosphere of the ISS by gaseous dirt showed consistent (starting from ISS-11) increasing of the toxicity coefficient (Kt). W e suppose that the accumulation of pollutant in the atmosphere of ISS is the main reason causing general decreasing of productivity and increasing of the number of chromosomal aberrations in the peas cultivated in space greenhouse LADA at the stage

  13. Identification and evaluation of a dominant alga from municipal wastewater in removal of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yixuan; Tang, Fei; Su, Xiaoling; Yin, Hua; Ge, Fei

    2016-12-01

    To access better removal of nutrients with algae-based techniques, a dominant alga from real municipal wastewater was identified and its capacity in removing low concentrations of nitrogen (NH(+)4 or NO(-)3) and phosphorus (PO(3-)4) was evaluated. Results showed that Oedogonium brevicingulatum, a filamentous green alga, was confirmed as the dominant alga in the secondary effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Low concentrations of NH(+)4 or NO(-)3 (≤5 mg N L(-1)) and PO(3-)4 (≤0.5 mg P L(-1)) were 100% removed by the algae in a 7-d test. The maximum nutrient removal rate (Vmax) and the half-saturation constant (Km) for NH(+)4 (10.03 ± 0.95 mg g(-1)d(-1) and 0.19 ± 0.03 mg L(-1)) and NO(-)3 (8.43 ± 0.21 mg g(-1) d(-1) and 0.27 ± 0.11 mg L(-1)) indicated the uptake capability for NH(+)4 is higher than that for NO(-)3. Meanwhile, it showed higher affinity for PO(3-)4 (Vmax: 1.42 ± 0.02 mg g(-1) d(-1); Km: 0.02 ± 0.00 mg L(-1)) with NH(+)4 as nitrogen source than that (Vmax: 1.24 ± 0.15 mg g(-1) d(-1); Km: 0.06 ± 0.03 mg L(-1)) with NO(-)3 as nitrogen source. Moreover, nutrient removal efficiencies were observed steady when nitrogen/phosphorus ratio ranged from 5:1 to 20:1. These results suggest that the dominant algae from municipal wastewater have potentials to be applied in nutrient removal.

  14. Synthetic polyester from algae oil.

    PubMed

    Roesle, Philipp; Stempfle, Florian; Hess, Sandra K; Zimmerer, Julia; Río Bártulos, Carolina; Lepetit, Bernard; Eckert, Angelika; Kroth, Peter G; Mecking, Stefan

    2014-06-23

    Current efforts to technically use microalgae focus on the generation of fuels with a molecular structure identical to crude oil based products. Here we suggest a different approach for the utilization of algae by translating the unique molecular structures of algae oil fatty acids into higher value chemical intermediates and materials. A crude extract from a microalga, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was obtained as a multicomponent mixture containing amongst others unsaturated fatty acid (16:1, 18:1, and 20:5) phosphocholine triglycerides. Exposure of this crude algae oil to CO and methanol with the known catalyst precursor [{1,2-(tBu2 PCH2)2C6H4}Pd(OTf)](OTf) resulted in isomerization/methoxycarbonylation of the unsaturated fatty acids into a mixture of linear 1,17- and 1,19-diesters in high purity (>99 %). Polycondensation with a mixture of the corresponding diols yielded a novel mixed polyester-17/19.17/19 with an advantageously high melting and crystallization temperature.

  15. Environmental life cycle comparison of algae to other bioenergy feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Clarens, Andres F; Resurreccion, Eleazer P; White, Mark A; Colosi, Lisa M

    2010-03-01

    Algae are an attractive source of biomass energy since they do not compete with food crops and have higher energy yields per area than terrestrial crops. In spite of these advantages, algae cultivation has not yet been compared with conventional crops from a life cycle perspective. In this work, the impacts associated with algae production were determined using a stochastic life cycle model and compared with switchgrass, canola, and corn farming. The results indicate that these conventional crops have lower environmental impacts than algae in energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and water regardless of cultivation location. Only in total land use and eutrophication potential do algae perform favorably. The large environmental footprint of algae cultivation is driven predominantly by upstream impacts, such as the demand for CO(2) and fertilizer. To reduce these impacts, flue gas and, to a greater extent, wastewater could be used to offset most of the environmental burdens associated with algae. To demonstrate the benefits of algae production coupled with wastewater treatment, the model was expanded to include three different municipal wastewater effluents as sources of nitrogen and phosphorus. Each provided a significant reduction in the burdens of algae cultivation, and the use of source-separated urine was found to make algae more environmentally beneficial than the terrestrial crops.

  16. Some effects of high- gradient magnetic field on tropism of roots of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrachuk, A.; Belyavskaya, N.

    The perception of gravity in living organisms is mostly based on the response of the gravisensing system to displacement of some specific mass caused by gravitational force. According to the starch-statolith hypothesis the amyloplasts play the role of specific mass in gravisensing cells of higher plants. Kuznetsov & Hasenstein (1996) have demonstrated that the high-gradient magnetic field (HGMF) exerts a directional ponderomotive force on diamagnetic substances, in particular, statoliths. This effect of the HGMF causes root response similar to that produced by the change in gravity vector. Their studies supported the starch-statolith hypothesis and showed that ponderomotive force can be used to modify force acting on statoliths by manipulating statolith locations within gravisensing cells. We have designed the HGMF facility that allows for generating the HGMF and analyzing its effects on higher plants' roots. It records by videosystem and measures with the help of image analysis software the parameters of kinetics of root bending under both the HGMF action and gravistimulation. Two species of plants (pea and cress) have been examined. The main results of the work are the following: 1) The magnetotropic effect of HGMF on root growth was found for both species. 2) The critical value of ponderomotive force that caused the magnetotropic effect was estimated by modeling the magnetic field spatial distribution in the region of root apex. 3) The electron-microscopic analysis of statocytes after the HGMF treatment was carried out. The displacement of amyloplasts in root statocytes of two species of plants in HGMF was firstly demonstrated at the ultrastructural level. 4) Spatial distribution of exogenous proton fluxes (pH) along the roots was studied. The changes in pH distribution along curvature zone and apices of roots were revealed in the HGMF. It is known that application of HGMFs or strong uniform magnetic fields may influence ion transport due to Ampere force. It

  17. Isotopic discrimination of zinc during root-uptake and cellular incorporation in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, T. F.; Weiss, D. J.; Coles, B. J.; Horstwood, M.; Parrish, R. R.; Zhao, F. J.; Kirk, G. J.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction: Isotopic variability of terrestrial zinc offers a unique tool for studying the geochemical and biochemical cycling of zinc through natural ecosystems. However, to realise this potential, the mechanisms controlling the isotopic composition of zinc during geosphere-biosphere interactions must first be understood. The uptake of zinc by plants involves a variety of abiotic and biochemical reactions, and can provide insights into the types of processes that may fractionate zinc isotopes within living systems. We therefore present an experimental study to quantify if and how zinc isotopes are fractionated during uptake in higher plants. Methodology: Two experimental approaches were taken: (1) a hydroponic study in which rice, lettuce, and tomato cultivars were grown in one of two nutrient solutions (a HEDTA + NTA buffered system, and an EDTA buffered system), and (2) a field-based study in which rice plants were grown in experimental paddy fields under both zinc-sufficient and zinc-deficient conditions. Upon harvest, roots, shoots, nutrient solutions and soils were acid digested, and matrix components were removed from the zinc fraction using anion exchange procedures. For soils the 'bioavailble' zinc fraction was abstracted using a 1 N HCl leaching step. Zinc isotopic compositions were determined on a ThermoElemental Axiom MC-ICP-MS, using copper as an internal reference to correct for mass discrimination effects. Combined measurement errors based on repeated analyses of ultra-pure standards and plant reference materials were <0.035 ppm per atomic mass unit (pamu) (2σ) for 66Zn/64Zn measurements. Results: Under hydroponic condisions, all three plant species exhibit a similar pattern of zinc isotopic discrimination, with a small enrichment from nutrient solution to root of +0.04 to +0.09 ppm pamu, followed by an isotopic depletion from root to shoot of -0.13 to -0.26 ppm pamu. While the same trend is observed with the HEDTA + NTA and EDTA nutrient

  18. Study of metal bioaccumulation by nuclear microprobe analysis of algae fossils and living algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P.; Wang, J.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.; Reinert, T.; Heitmann, J.; Spemann, D.; Vogt, J.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Butz, T.

    2000-03-01

    Microscopic ion-beam analysis of palaeo-algae fossils and living green algae cells have been performed to study the metal bioaccumulation processes. The algae fossils, both single cellular and multicellular, are from the late Neoproterozonic (570 million years ago) ocean and perfectly preserved within a phosphorite formation. The biosorption of the rare earth element ions Nd 3+ by the green algae species euglena gracilis was investigated with a comparison between the normal cells and immobilized ones. The new Leipzig Nanoprobe, LIPSION, was used to produce a proton beam with 2 μm size and 0.5 nA beam current for this study. PIXE and RBS techniques were used for analysis and imaging. The observation of small metal rich spores ( <10 μm) surrounding both of the fossils and the living cells proved the existence of some specific receptor sites which bind metal carrier ligands at the microbic surface. The bioaccumulation efficiency of neodymium by the algae cells was 10 times higher for immobilized algae cells. It confirms the fact that the algae immobilization is an useful technique to improve its metal bioaccumulation.

  19. Electric Current Precedes Emergence of a Lateral Root in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Shingo; Ezaki, Shu; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Yamafuji, Kaoru

    1992-01-01

    Stable electrochemical patterns appear spontaneously around roots of higher plants and are closely related to growth. An electric potential pattern accompanied by lateral root emergence was measured along the surface of the primary root of adzuki bean (Phaseolus angularis) over 21 h using a microelectrode manipulated by a newly developed apparatus. The electric potential became lower at the point where a lateral root emerged. This change preceded the emergence of the lateral root by about 10 h. A theory is presented for calculating two-dimensional patterns of electric potential and electric current density around the primary root (and a lateral root) using only data on the one-dimensional electric potential measured near the surface of the primary root. The development of the lateral root inside the primary root is associated with the influx of electric current of about 0.7 μA·cm−2 at the surface. Images Figure 7 PMID:16653036

  20. Roles of chloroplast RNA polymerase sigma factors in chloroplast development and stress response in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Kengo; Tanaka, Kan

    2004-11-01

    Chloroplast transcription in higher plants is performed by two types of RNA polymerases, plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) and nuclear-encoded RNA polymerase (NEP). PEP is a eubacteria-type multisubunit enzyme whose catalytic core subunits are encoded by the chloroplast genome, whereas NEP is the nuclear encoded T7 phage-type single subunit enzyme. PEP is critical for the biogenesis and maintenance of chloroplasts, and is finely tuned by the nuclear encoded sigma subunits. Of the six Arabidopsis sigma subunits, SIG2 is involved in the transcription of several chloroplast tRNA genes, including trnE encoding tRNA-Glu. SIG2 possibly couples translation and pigment synthesis in chloroplasts. On the other hand, SIG5 is induced by various stresses and contributes to repair of damaged photosystem II (PSII) through transcription of the psbD and psbC genes. Thus target genes and the physiological role of each sigma subunit are becoming clearer.

  1. Structural Basis for Broad Substrate Specificity in Higher Plant β-d-Glucan Glucohydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Hrmova, Maria; De Gori, Ross; Smith, Brian J.; Fairweather, Jon K.; Driguez, Hugues; Varghese, Joseph N.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2002-01-01

    Family 3 β-d-glucan glucohydrolases are distributed widely in higher plants. The enzymes catalyze the hydrolytic removal of β-d-glucosyl residues from nonreducing termini of a range of β-d-glucans and β-d-oligoglucosides. Their broad specificity can be explained by x-ray crystallographic data obtained from a barley β-d-glucan glucohydrolase in complex with nonhydrolyzable S-glycoside substrate analogs and by molecular modeling of enzyme/substrate complexes. The glucosyl residue that occupies binding subsite −1 is locked tightly into a fixed position through extensive hydrogen bonding with six amino acid residues near the bottom of an active site pocket. In contrast, the glucosyl residue at subsite +1 is located between two Trp residues at the entrance of the pocket, where it is constrained less tightly. The relative flexibility of binding at subsite +1, coupled with the projection of the remainder of bound substrate away from the enzyme's surface, means that the overall active site can accommodate a range of substrates with variable spatial dispositions of adjacent β-d-glucosyl residues. The broad specificity for glycosidic linkage type enables the enzyme to perform diverse functions during plant development. PMID:12034895

  2. Plasmodesmata without callose and calreticulin in higher plants - open channels for fast symplastic transport?

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Kirill N; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V; Pawlowski, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) represent membrane-lined channels that link adjacent plant cells across the cell wall. PD of higher plants contain a central tube of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) called desmotubule. Membrane and lumen proteins seem to be able to move through the desmotubule, but most transport processes through PD occur through the cytoplasmic annulus (Brunkard etal., 2013). Calreticulin (CRT), a highly conserved Ca(2+)-binding protein found in all multicellular eukaryotes, predominantly located in the ER, was shown to localize to PD, though not all PD accumulate CRT. In nitrogen-fixing actinorhizal root nodules of the Australian tree Casuarina glauca, the primary walls of infected cells containing the microsymbiont become lignified upon infection. TEM analysis of these nodules showed that during the differentiation of infected cells, PD connecting infected cells, and connecting infected and adjacent uninfected cells, were reduced in number as well as diameter (Schubert etal., 2013). In contrast with PD connecting young infected cells, and most PD connecting mature infected and adjacent uninfected cells, PD connecting mature infected cells did not accumulate CRT. Furthermore, as shown here, these PD were not associated with callose, and based on their diameter, they probably had lost their desmotubules. We speculate that either this is a slow path to PD degradation, or that the loss of callose accumulation and presumably also desmotubules leads to the PD becoming open channels and improves metabolite exchange between cells.

  3. A role for ethylene in the metabolism of cyanide by higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Goudey, J.S.; Tittle, F.L.; Spencer, M.S. )

    1989-04-01

    The action of ethylene on the capacity of plant tissues to metabolize cyanice to {beta}-cyanoalanine was examined. Beta-cyanoalanine synthase catalyzes the reaction between cyanide and cysteine to form {beta}-cyanoalanine and hydrogen sulfide. Levels of {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase activity in tissues of 6 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings were enhanced severalfold by 1 microliter per liter ethylene. The promotive effect of ethylene increased with increasing ethylene concentrations from 0.01 to 100 microliters per liter and with the period of exposure from 3 to 24 hours. Ethylene enhanced {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase activity in all regions of the seedling (shoots and roots, internodal regions, cotyledons). The promotive effect was eliminated by norbornadiene, a competitive inhibitor of ethylene action. Levels of {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase in seedlings of four other dicots (Phaseolus aureas, Glycine max, Lactuca sativa, Sinapis arvensis) and two monocots (Hordeum vulgares, Triticum aestivum) were also increased in response to ethylene. Our results suggest an important regulatory role for ethylene in the metabolism of cyanide by higher plants.

  4. Growth and development in higher plants under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, T.; Yuda, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Yamashita, M.; Ueda, J.

    Growth and development of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) and maize (Zea mays L. cv. Golden Cross Bantam) seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions were intensively studied using a 3-dimensional clinostat as a simulator of weightlessness. Epicotyls of etiolated pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were the most oriented toward the direction far from cotyledons. Mesocotyls of etiolated maize seedlings grew at random and coleoptiles curved slightly during clinostat rotation. Clinostat rotation promoted the emergence of the 3rd internodes in etiolated pea seedlings, while it significantly inhibited the growth of the 1st internodes. In maize seedlings, the growth of coleoptiles was little affected by clinostat rotation, but that of mesocotyls was suppressed, and therefore, the emergence of the leaf out of coleoptile was promoted. Clinostat rotation reduced the osmotic concentration in the 1st internodes of pea seedlings, although it has little effect on the 2nd and the 3rd internodes. Clinostat rotation also reduced the osmotic concentrations in both coleoptiles and mesocotyls of maize seedlings. Cell-wall extensibilities of the 1st and the 3rd internodes of pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were significantly lower and higher as compared with those on 1 g conditions, respectively. Cell-wall extensibility of mesocotyls in seedlings grown on the clinostat also decreased. Changes in cell wall properties seem to be well correlated to the growth of each organ in pea and maize seedlings. These results suggest that the growth and development of plants is controlled under gravity on earth, and that the growth responses of higher plants to microgravity conditions are regulated by both cell-wall mechanical properties and osmotic properties of stem cells.

  5. Higher plants as bioindicators of sulphur dioxide emissions in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Hijano, Concepción Fidalgo; Domínguez, Maria Dolores Petit; Gimínez, Rosario García; Sínchez, Pilar Hungría; García, Inís Sancho

    2005-12-01

    The evaluation of certain vascular plants that grow in the city of Madrid as biomonitors of SO(2) air pollution in urban environments has been carried out. Total concentration of sulphur in leaves of the chosen higher plants as well as other parameters in close relation to this contaminant (visible injury symptoms, chlorophyll a- and b-content and peroxidase activity) have been determined in order to study the spatial distribution and temporal changes in SO(2) deposition. Results obtained show that coniferous species such as Pinus pinea, were more sensitive to SO(2) atmospheric concentration than leafy species as Quercux ilex subspecies ballota and, in the same way, bush species, such as Pyracantha coccinea and Nerium oleander, were more sensitive than wooded species, such as Cedrus deodara and Pinus pinea, respectively. There is a higher accumulation of sulphur in vegetable species located near highways and dense traffic incidence roads and near areas with high density of population. The minimum values for accumulation of SO(2) were registered in winter and spring seasons (from January to April) due to the vegetative stop; while maximum values are obtained during the summer season (from June to September), due to the stoma opening. The highest increments in sulphur concentration, calculated as the difference between two consecutive months, are obtained in May and June for all considered species except for Cedrus deodara and Pyracantha coccinea, both species have few seasonal changes during the whole year. Some species are more sensitive to natural washing than others, showing a decrease in sulphur concentration after rainfall periods.

  6. Concepts, strategies and potentials using hypo-g and other features of the space environment for commercialization using higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    Opportunities for releasing, capturing, constructing and/or fixing the differential expressions or response potentials of the higher plant genome in the hypo-g environment for commercialization are explored. General strategies include improved plant-growing, crop and forestry production systems which conserve soil, water, labor and energy resources, and nutritional partitioning and mobilization of nutrients and synthates. Tissue and cell culture techniques of commercial potential include the growing and manipulation of cultured plant cells in vitro in a bioreactor to produce biologicals and secondary plants of economic value. The facilitation of plant breeding, the cloning of specific pathogen-free materials, the elimination of growing point or apex viruses, and the increase of plant yield are other O-g applications. The space environment may be advantageous in somatic embryogenesis, the culture of alkaloids, and the development of completely new crop plant germ plasm.

  7. Effects of epiphytic algae on biomass and physiology of Myriophyllum spicatum L. with the increase of nitrogen and phosphorus availability in the water body.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Zhi; Wang, Jin-Qi; Gao, Yong-Xia

    2017-04-01

    The disappearance of submerged vascular macrophytes in shallow eutrophic lakes is a common phenomenon in the world. To explore the mechanism of the decline in submerged macrophyte abundance due to the growth of epiphytic algae along a nutrient gradient in eutrophic water, a 2 × 3 factorial experiment was performed over 4 weeks with the submerged macrophyte (Myriophyllum spicatum L.) by determining the plant's biomass and some physiological indexes, such as chlorophyll (Chl) content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the leaves of M. spicatum L. on days 7, 14, 21, and 28, which are based on three groups of nitrogen and phosphorus levels in the water body (N-P [mg L(-1)]: NP1 0.5-0.05, NP2 2.5-0.25, NP3 4.5-0.45) and two levels of epiphytic algae (the epiphytic algae group and the control group). Epiphytic algal biomass was also assayed. The results indicated that epiphytic algal biomass remarkably enhanced in the course of the experiment with elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in the water. Under the same level of nutrient condition, plants' biomass accumulation and Chl content were higher in the control group than that in the epiphytic algae group, respectively, while MDA content and SOD activity in the former were lower than that in the latter. The influences of epiphytic algae on the biomass accumulation and Chl content and MDA content became greater and greater with elevated levels of nutrients. In general, in this experiment, water nutrients promoted the growth of both epiphytic algae and submerged plants, while the growth of epiphytic algae hindered submerged macrophytes' growth by reducing Chl content and promoting peroxidation of membrane lipids in plants.

  8. [Functional components in fish and algae oils].

    PubMed

    Conchillo, A; Valencia, I; Puente, A; Ansorena, D; Astiasarán, I

    2006-01-01

    An important area of the development of new functional foods is facussed on finding or applying food components which favour achieving a healthier lipid profile in the organism. The objective of this work was to carry out the characterisation of the lipid fraction of two oils, fish oil and algae oil, to evaluate their potential use as functional ingredients, in relation to the high molecular weight fatty acid content and the presence of sterols and other components of the unsaponificable fraction. Both oils showed a lipid fraction rich in high molecular weight polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, containing a 33.75% in the fish oil and a 43.97% in the algae oil. Eicosapentaenoic acid was the major fatty acid in fish oil, whereas docosahexaenoic was the most abundant fatty acid in algae oil. The omega-6/omega-3 ratio was lower than 0.4 in both oils. In the unsaponificable fraction, algae oil had a Mold lower cholesterol content and a higher proportion of squalene than fish oil. The phytosterol content was significantly higher in the algae oil.

  9. In silico identification and analysis of phytoene synthase genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Zheng, Q S; Wei, Y P; Chen, J; Liu, R; Wan, H J

    2015-08-14

    In this study, we examined phytoene synthetase (PSY), the first key limiting enzyme in the synthesis of carotenoids and catalyzing the formation of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in terpenoid biosynthesis. We used known amino acid sequences of the PSY gene in tomato plants to conduct a genome-wide search and identify putative candidates in 34 sequenced plants. A total of 101 homologous genes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PSY evolved independently in algae as well as monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Our results showed that the amino acid structures exhibited 5 motifs (motifs 1 to 5) in algae and those in higher plants were highly conserved. The PSY gene structures showed that the number of intron in algae varied widely, while the number of introns in higher plants was 4 to 5. Identification of PSY genes in plants and the analysis of the gene structure may provide a theoretical basis for studying evolutionary relationships in future analyses.

  10. Distribution of drimane sesquiterpenoids and tocopherols in liverworts, ferns and higher plants: Polygonaceae, Canellaceae and Winteraceae species.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Yoshinori; Ludwiczuk, Agnieszka; Harinantenaina, Liva; Toyota, Masao; Nishiki, Mayumi; Bardon, Alicia; Nii, Kaeko

    2012-06-01

    The liverwort, Porella vernicosa complex produces a very hot tasting polygodial, a drimane-type sesquiterpene dialdehyde. The same compound has been isolated from two ferns, Thelypteris hispidula and Blechnum fluviatile, as well as from the higher plants Polygonum hydropiper, P. hydropiper f. purpurascens (Polygonaceae), Cinnamosma, Caspicodendron, Canella and Warburgia species (Canellaceae), and Pseudowintera colorata, Tasmannia lanceolata, Drimys and Zygogynum species (Winteraceae). In addition, the liverworts and higher plants which elaborate polygodial and its related pungent drimane dials contain a small amount of alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol or delta-tocotrienol. The present paper gives the results of a comparative study on the drimane-type sesquiterpenoids in some liverworts, ferns and higher plants, and the role of tocopherols in these plant groups.

  11. Sustainability of algae derived biodiesel: a mass balance approach.

    PubMed

    Pfromm, Peter H; Amanor-Boadu, Vincent; Nelson, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A rigorous chemical engineering mass balance/unit operations approach is applied here to bio-diesel from algae mass culture. An equivalent of 50,000,000 gallons per year (0.006002 m3/s) of petroleum-based Number 2 fuel oil (US, diesel for compression-ignition engines, about 0.1% of annual US consumption) from oleaginous algae is the target. Methyl algaeate and ethyl algaeate diesel can according to this analysis conceptually be produced largely in a technologically sustainable way albeit at a lower available diesel yield. About 11 square miles of algae ponds would be needed with optimistic assumptions of 50 g biomass yield per day and m2 pond area. CO2 to foster algae growth should be supplied from a sustainable source such as a biomass-based ethanol production. Reliance on fossil-based CO2 from power plants or fertilizer production renders algae diesel non-sustainable in the long term.

  12. A nitrite transporter associated with nitrite uptake by higher plant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Miwa; Georgescu, Mihaela N; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2007-07-01

    Chloroplasts take up cytosolic nitrite during nitrate assimilation. In this study we identified a nitrite transporter located in the chloroplasts of higher plants. The transporter, CsNitr1-L, a member of the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT) family, was detected during light-induced chloroplast development in de-etiolating cucumber seedlings. We detected a CsNitr1-L-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein in the chloroplasts of leaf cells and found that an immunoreactive 51 kDa protein was present in the isolated inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. CsNitr1-L has an isoform, CsNitr1-S, with an identical 484 amino acid core sequence; however, in CsNitr1-S the 120 amino acid N-terminal extension is missing. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing CsNitr1-S absorbed nitrite from an acidic medium at a slower rate than mock-transformed control cells, and accumulated nitrite to only one-sixth the concentration of the control cells, suggesting that CsNitr1-S enhances the efflux of nitrite from the cell. Insertion of T-DNA in a single CsNitr1-L homolog (At1g68570) in Arabidopsis resulted in nitrite accumulation in leaves to more than five times the concentration found in the wild type. These results show that it is possible that both CsNitr1-L and CsNitr1-S encode efflux-type nitrite transporters, but with different subcellular localizations. CsNitr1-L may possibly load cytosolic nitrite into chloroplast stroma in the chloroplast envelope during nitrate assimilation. The presence of genes homologous to CsNitr1-L in the genomes of Arabidopsis and rice indicates that facilitated nitrite transport is of general physiological importance in plant nutrition.

  13. Contribution of PsbS Function and Stomatal Conductance to Foliar Temperature in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kulasek, Milena; Bernacki, Maciej Jerzy; Ciszak, Kamil; Witoń, Damian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Natural capacity has evolved in higher plants to absorb and harness excessive light energy. In basic models, the majority of absorbed photon energy is radiated back as fluorescence and heat. For years the proton sensor protein PsbS was considered to play a critical role in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of light absorbed by PSII antennae and in its dissipation as heat. However, the significance of PsbS in regulating heat emission from a whole leaf has never been verified before by direct measurement of foliar temperature under changing light intensity. To test its validity, we here investigated the foliar temperature changes on increasing and decreasing light intensity conditions (foliar temperature dynamics) using a high resolution thermal camera and a powerful adjustable light-emitting diode (LED) light source. First, we showed that light-dependent foliar temperature dynamics is correlated with Chl content in leaves of various plant species. Secondly, we compared the foliar temperature dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type, the PsbS null mutant npq4-1 and a PsbS-overexpressing transgenic line under different transpiration conditions with or without a photosynthesis inhibitor. We found no direct correlations between the NPQ level and the foliar temperature dynamics. Rather, differences in foliar temperature dynamics are primarily affected by stomatal aperture, and rapid foliar temperature increase during irradiation depends on the water status of the leaf. We conclude that PsbS is not directly involved in regulation of foliar temperature dynamics during excessive light energy episodes. PMID:27273581

  14. Matrix metalloproteinases in plants: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Marino, Giada; Funk, Christiane

    2012-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases belonging to the metzincin clan. MMPs have been characterized in detail in mammals, and they have been shown to play key roles in many physiological and pathological processes. Plant MMP-like proteases exist, but relatively few have been characterized. It has been speculated that plant MMPs are involved in remodeling of the plant extracellular matrix during growth, development and stress response. However, the precise functions and physiological substrates in higher plants remain to be determined. In this brief overview, we summarize the current knowledge of MMPs in higher plants and algae.

  15. Ranunculus glacialis L.: successful reproduction at the altitudinal limits of higher plant life.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Johanna; Steinacher, Gerlinde; Ladinig, Ursula

    2010-07-01

    Biodiversity decreases with increasing altitude, mainly because of the increasingly adverse climate. In the European Alps, only a few plant species occur above 4,000 m a.s.l., among these is Ranunculus glacialis L. Current studies have shown that R. glacialis has a highly conservative growth strategy and low developmental plasticity in response to different dates of snowmelt. Therefore, it was of particular interest to observe whether this strategy is maintained at higher altitudes and to reveal the reproductive limits. We examined the effect of the date of snowmelt on reproductive development and reproductive success in R. glacialis over several years at two subnival sites (2,650 and 2,880 m a.s.l.) and at a nival site (3,440 m a.s.l.) in the Austrian Alps. At the subnival sites, reproductive performance was relatively stable (prefloration period, i.e. snowmelt to onset of anthesis, 2-3 weeks; postfloration period, i.e. onset of anthesis until fruit maturity, 4-5 weeks). Depending on the date of flowering, the mean seed/ovule (S/O) ratio was 0.5-0.8. The temporal safety margin between seed maturation and the onset of winter conditions was at least 1 month. The situation was quite different in the nival zone: the prefloration period usually lasted 1 month, anthesis up to 2 weeks, and seed development 6-7 weeks; when seeds matured in time, the S/O ratio was 0.4-0.6. Overall, R. glacialis shows a high developmental plasticity. At higher altitudes, R. glacialis can double the time taken for seed development but runs a high risk of seeds not maturing in time.

  16. A survey for isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase, phosphoglucomutase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in C3-, C 4-and crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants, and green algae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1979-01-01

    Two isoenzymes each of glucosephosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9), phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.43) were separated by (NH4)2SO4 gradient solubilization and DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange chromatography from green leaves of the C3-plants spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), of the Crassulacean-acid-metabolism plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen, and from the green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardii. After isolation of cell organelles from spinach leaves by isopyenic centrifugation in sucrose gradients one of two isoenzymes of each of the four enzymes was found to be associated with whole chloroplasts while the other was restricted to the soluble cell fraction, implying the same intracellular distribution of these isoenzymes also in the other species.Among C4-plants, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were found in only one form in corn (Zea mays L.), sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) and Coix lacrymajobi L., but as two isoenzymes in Atriplex spongiosa L. and Portulaca oleracea L. In corn, the two dehydrogenases were mainly associated with isolated mesophyll protoplasts while in Atriplex spongiosa they were of similar specific activity in both mesophyll protoplasts and bundle-sheath strands. In all five C4-plants three isoenzymes of glucosephosphate isomerase and phosphoglucomutase were found. In corn two were localized in the bundle-sheath strands and the third one in the mesophyll protoplasts. The amount of activity of the enzymes was similar in each of the two cell fractions. Apparently, C4 plants have isoenzymes not only in two cell compartments, but also in physiologically closely linked cell types such as mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells.

  17. Larval settlement of the common Australian sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma in response to bacteria from the surface of coralline algae.

    PubMed

    Huggett, Megan J; Williamson, Jane E; de Nys, Rocky; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Steinberg, Peter D

    2006-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are increasingly seen as important for the successful settlement of marine invertebrate larvae. Here we tested the effects of biofilms on settlement of the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma. Larvae settled on many surfaces including various algal species, rocks, sand and shells. Settlement was reduced by autoclaving rocks and algae, and by treatment of algae with antibiotics. These results, and molecular and culture-based analyses, suggested that the bacterial community on plants was important for settlement. To test this, approximately 250 strains of bacteria were isolated from coralline algae, and larvae were exposed to single-strain biofilms. Many induced rates of settlement comparable to coralline algae. The genus Pseudoalteromonas dominated these highly inductive strains, with representatives from Vibrio, Shewanella, Photobacterium and Pseudomonas also responsible for a high settlement response. The settlement response to different bacteria was species specific, as low inducers were also dominated by species in the genera Pseudoalteromonas and Vibrio. We also, for the first time, assessed settlement of larvae in response to characterised, monospecific biofilms in the field. Larvae metamorphosed in higher numbers on an inducing biofilm, Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea, than on either a low-inducing biofilm, Pseudoalteromonas rubra, or an unfilmed control. We conclude that the bacterial community on the surface of coralline algae is important as a settlement cue for H. erythrogramma larvae. This study is also an example of the emerging integration of molecular microbiology and more traditional marine eukaryote ecology.

  18. Geometric description and electronic properties of the principal photosynthetic pigments of higher plants: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rivas, Francisco; Flores-Hidalgo, Manuel Alberto; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel; Barraza-Jimenez, Diana

    2015-10-01

    The geometric parameters, local and global chemical reactivity parameters (such as the ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, hardness, softness, chemical potential, and electrophilicity index), as well as the energy levels (HOMO/LUMO) and HOMO-LUMO energy gaps have been determined for the principal carotenoids in higher plants. DFT calculations performed using the B3LYP functional in combination with the 6-31G(d,p) (for geometric parameters) and 6-31 + G(d,p) (for energy parameters) basis sets were carried out to study these structures. The HOMO-LUMO energy gaps obtained with the TPSSh functional were compared with the corresponding energy gaps obtained with B3LYP (when both functionals were used with the 6-31 + G(d,p) basis set). Upon analyzing all of the calculated parameters of the studied molecules, both carotenes were found to be the most reactive, followed by β-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, lutein, violaxanthin, and finally neoxanthin, the least reactive molecule. The results reveal that all of the carotenoids show very high coplanarity in the photochemically active region, resulting in small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps. The calculated local and global chemical reactivity parameters indicate that all of the studied molecules may be classified as soft, as they are good electron donors/acceptors, making these molecules good candidates for use in artificial photosynthetic systems.

  19. Relative in vitro growth rates of duckweeds (Lemnaceae) - the most rapidly growing higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, P; Adelmann, K; Zimmer, S; Schmidt, C; Appenroth, K-J

    2015-01-01

    Relative growth rates (RGR), doubling times (DT) and relative weekly yields (RY) of 39 clones (ecotypes) from 13 species representing all five genera of duckweeds were determined under standardised cultivation conditions. RGR ranged overall from 0.153 to 0.519 day(-1) , DT from 1.34 to 4.54 days and RY from 2.9 to 37.8 week(-1) . The RGR and RY data can be compared directly to other published findings to only a limited extent on account of missing clonal designations for and limited accessibility to previously investigated clones, as well as the use of different data denominators. However, they are consistent with the published results of other comparative duckweed studies of similar scope in showing that RGR does not vary primarily at the level of the genus or species, but rather reflects the adaptation of individual clones to specific local conditions. The RGR data support the widely held assumption that duckweeds can grow faster than other higher plants and that they can thus surpass land-based agricultural crops in productivity. Duckweeds are highly promising for the production of biomass for nutrition and energy, but extensive clonal comparison will be required to identify the most suitable isolates for this purpose.

  20. [Mechanism of gravi-sensing and -transduction in gravitropism of higher plants].

    PubMed

    Morita, Miyo Terao; Tasaka, Masao

    2003-08-01

    In higher plants, some organs such as roots, hypocotyls, and stems, can sense the direction of gravity to regulate their orientation. Gravitropic response is composed of four steps; 1. gravity sensing and conversion of physical stimuli to biochemical signals, 2. intracellular signal transduction in gravity sensing cells, 3. signal transmitting to responding tissues, 4. differential growth of organs. Here we focus on the former two steps. Recent studies using modern technique have gradually unveiled early events and mechanism of gravitropic response. Genetic approach provided evidences that strongly support the classical theory for gravity sensing (step 1). Computational analysis suggested the existence of another gravity sensing mechanism in roots. Spatial and temporal ion imaging in living organs in real time provided information on step 2. In addition, reverse genetic approach suggested asymmetrical intracellular distribution of auxin transporter [correction of transpoter] is a possible link between step 2 and 3. However, molecular basis of the signaling mechanism remains unknown. We believe extensive molecular genetic approach combined with recent techniques cited here shed the light to this ambiguous area of research.

  1. Photosynthetic complex stoichiometry dynamics in higher plants: environmental acclimation and photosynthetic flux control

    PubMed Central

    Schöttler, Mark A.; Tóth, Szilvia Z.

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants is dynamically adjusted to long-term changes in environmental conditions such as growth light intensity and light quality, and to changing metabolic demands for ATP and NADPH imposed by stresses and leaf aging. By changing photosynthetic complex stoichiometry, a long-term imbalance between the photosynthetic production of ATP and NADPH and their metabolic consumption is avoided, and cytotoxic side reactions are minimized. Otherwise, an excess capacity of the light reactions, relative to the demands of primary metabolism, could result in a disturbance of cellular redox homeostasis and an increased production of reactive oxygen species, leading to the destruction of the photosynthetic apparatus and the initiation of cell death programs. In this review, changes of the abundances of the different constituents of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to environmental conditions and during leaf ontogenesis are summarized. The contributions of the different photosynthetic complexes to photosynthetic flux control and the regulation of electron transport are discussed. PMID:24860580

  2. C-13 dynamics in benthic algae: Effects of light, phosphorus, and biomass development

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Walter; Fanta, S.E.; Roberts, Brian J

    2008-07-01

    We performed three experiments in indoor streams and one experiment in a natural stream to investigate the effects of growth factors on {delta}{sup 13}C levels in benthic microalgae. In the indoor streams, algae grown under conditions of high light and high phosphorus had {delta}{sup 13}C values that were 16% higher than those in algae grown under conditions of low light and low phosphorus. Light effects were much stronger than phosphorus effects. The effects of both factors increased in strength as algal biomass accrued, and by the end of the experiments, algal {delta}{sup 13}C and biomass were highly correlated. In the natural stream, algae exposed to direct sunlight were enriched 15% over shaded algae, corroborating the strong effect of light in the indoor streams. Growth factors such as light and nutrients probably reduce discrimination against {delta}{sup 13}C (raising {delta}{sup 13}C values) in benthic microalgae by causing CO{sub 2} depletion both within individual cells and within the assemblage matrix. However, because the most marked fractionation occurred in older and thicker assemblages, CO{sub 2} depletion within the assemblage matrix appeared to be more important than depletion within individual cells. In the absence of carbon-concentrating mechanisms, elevated {delta}{sup 13}C suggests that inorganic carbon may limit the growth of benthic algae. The extensive range of d13C values (-14{per_thousand} to -36{per_thousand}) created by light and nutrient manipulations in this study easily encompassed the mean {delta}{sup 13}C values of both C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} terrestrial plants, indicating the challenge aquatic ecologists face in identifying carbon sources for higher trophic levels when light and nutrient conditions vary.

  3. Variation in natural selection for growth and phlorotannins in the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Jormalainen, V; Honkanen, T

    2004-07-01

    Directional selection for plant traits associated with resistance to herbivory tends to eliminate genetic variation in such traits. On the other hand, balancing selection arising from trade-offs between resistance and growth or spatially variable selection acts against the elimination of genetic variation. We explore both the amount of genetic variation and variability of natural selection for growth and concentration of phenolic secondary compounds, phlorotannins, in the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus. We measured variation in selection at two growing depths and two levels of nutrient availability in algae that had faced two kinds of past growing environments. Genetic variation was low for growth but high for phlorotannins. The form and strength of selection for both focal traits depended on the past growing environment of the algae. We found strong directional selection for growth rate in algae previously subjected to higher ultraviolet radiation, but not in algae previously subjected to higher nutrient availability. Stabilizing selection for growth occurred especially in the deep growing environment. Selection for phlorotannins was generally weak, but in some past-environment-current-environment combinations we detected either directional selection against phlorotannins or stabilizing selection. Thus, phlorotannins are not selectively neutral but affect the fitness of F. vesiculosus. In particular, there may be a fitness cost of producing phlorotannins, but the realization of such a cost varies from one environment to another. Genetic correlations between selective environments were high for growth but nonexistent for phlorotannins, emphasizing the high phenotypic plasticity of phlorotannin production. The highly heterogeneous selection, including directional, stabilizing, and spatially variable selection as well as temporal change in selection due to responses to past environmental conditions, probably maintains a high amount of genetic variation in phlorotannins

  4. The re-assimilation of ammonia produced by photorespiration and the nitrogen economy of C3 higher plants.

    PubMed

    Keys, Alfred J

    2006-02-01

    Photorespiration involves the conversion of glycine to serine with the release of ammonia and CO(2). In C(3) terrestrial higher plants the flux through glycine and serine is so large that it results in the production of ammonia at a rate far exceeding that from reduction of new nitrogen entering the plant. The photorespiratory nitrogen cycle re-assimilates this ammonia using the enzymes glutamine synthetase and glutamine:2-oxoglutarateaminotransferase.

  5. Processes for producing polyhydroxybutyrate and related polyhydroxyalkanoates in the plastids of higher plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Christopher R.; Nawrath, Christiane; Poirier, Yves

    1997-03-11

    The present invention relates to a process for producing poly-D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) and related polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in the plastids of plants. The production of PHB is accomplished by genetically transforming plants with modified genes from microorganisms. The genes encode the enzymes required to synthesize PHB from acetyl-CoA or related metabolites and are fused with additional plant sequences for targeting the enzymes to the plastid.

  6. Processes for producing polyhydroxybutyrate and related polyhydroxyalkanoates in the plastids of higher plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, C.R.; Nawrath, C.; Poirier, Y.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention relates to a process for producing poly-D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) and related polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in the plastids of plants. The production of PHB is accomplished by genetically transforming plants with modified genes from microorganisms. The genes encode the enzymes required to synthesize PHB from acetyl-CoA or related metabolites and are fused with additional plant sequences for targeting the enzymes to the plastid. 37 figs.

  7. Production characteristics of the "higher plants-soil-like substrate" system as an element of the bioregenerative life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, V. V.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Ushakova, S. A.; Tikhomirova, N. A.; Shihov, V. N.; Tirranen, L. S.; Gribovskaya, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    The study addresses the possibility of long-duration operation of a higher plant conveyor, using a soil-like substrate (SLS) as the root zone. Chufa (Cyperus esculentus L.), radish (Raphanus sativus L.), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were used as study material. A chufa community consisting of 4 age groups and radish and lettuce communities consisting of 2 age groups were irrigated with a nutrient solution, which contained mineral elements extracted from the SLS. After each harvest, inedible biomass of the harvested plants and inedible biomasses of wheat and saltwort were added to the SLS. The amounts of the inedible biomasses of wheat and saltwort to be added to the SLS were determined based on the nitrogen content of the edible mass of harvested plants. CO2 concentration in the growth chamber was maintained within the range of 1100-1700 ppm. The results of the study show that higher plants can be grown quite successfully using the proposed process of plant waste utilization in the SLS. The addition of chufa inedible biomass to the SLS resulted in species-specific inhibition of growth of both cultivated crops and microorganisms in the "higher plants - SLS" system. There were certain differences between the amounts of some mineral elements removed from the SLS with the harvested edible biomass and those added to it with the inedible biomasses of wheat and saltwort.

  8. Research on the effects of altered gravity and other factors on the growth and development of higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The establishment, maintenance and use of the NASA-UCSC Botanical Centrifuge is discussed. The broad goals of this project were: (1) to establish facilities for conducting experiments under conditions of sustained centrifugation; (2) to pursue research on the gravitational physiology of higher plants; (3) to develop experimental hardware suitable for studies of plant development in the weightless condition; and (4) to accommodate visiting investigators whose researches are of interest to the NASA Biomedical Program and who may require for some limited time, the use of a medium size centrifuge with associated facilities appropriate for plant physiological studies.

  9. [Transcription Factors in Developmental Genetics and the Evolution of Higher Plants].

    PubMed

    Lutova, L A; Dodueva, I E; Lebedeva, M A; Tvorogova, V E

    2015-05-01

    Transcription factors play an essential role in controlling various developmental programs in plants, coordinating the action of any genetic network. Among the most important groups of plant transcription factors are the homeodomain-containing transcription factors, in particular, those belonging to the KNOX and WOX families, the functions of which are associated with regulation of the meristem activity, development of the aboveground and underground parts of plants, and control of embryogenesis. This review examines the role of KNOX and WOX transcription factors in various developmental programs, as well as in the evolutionary complication of the body plan in terrestrial plants.

  10. Different hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid formation in higher plants: Implications for paleohydrology reconstruction at a global scale

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinzhao; Liu, Weiguo; An, Zhisheng; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have shown to differ significantly among plant life forms (e.g., among grasses, shrubs, and trees) in higher plants. However, the underlying causes for the differences in leaf wax δDn-alkane values among different plant life forms remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that leaf wax δDn-alkane values between major high plant lineages (eudicots versus monocots) differed significantly under the same environmental conditions. Such a difference primarily inherited from different hydrogen biosynthetic fractionations (εwax-lw). Based upon a reanalysis of the available leaf wax δDn-alkane dataset from modern plants in the Northern Hemisphere, we discovered that the apparent hydrogen fractionation factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values of major angiosperm lineages and precipitation δD values exhibited distinguishable distribution patterns at a global scale, with an average of −140‰ for monocotyledonous species, −107‰ for dicotyledonous species. Additionally, variations of leaf wax δDn-alkane values and the εwax-p values in gymnosperms are similar to those of dicotyledonous species. Therefore, the data let us believe that biological factors inherited from plant taxonomies have a significant effect on controlling leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants. PMID:26806719

  11. Different hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid formation in higher plants: Implications for paleohydrology reconstruction at a global scale.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinzhao; Liu, Weiguo; An, Zhisheng; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-25

    Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have shown to differ significantly among plant life forms (e.g., among grasses, shrubs, and trees) in higher plants. However, the underlying causes for the differences in leaf wax δDn-alkane values among different plant life forms remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that leaf wax δDn-alkane values between major high plant lineages (eudicots versus monocots) differed significantly under the same environmental conditions. Such a difference primarily inherited from different hydrogen biosynthetic fractionations (εwax-lw). Based upon a reanalysis of the available leaf wax δDn-alkane dataset from modern plants in the Northern Hemisphere, we discovered that the apparent hydrogen fractionation factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values of major angiosperm lineages and precipitation δD values exhibited distinguishable distribution patterns at a global scale, with an average of -140‰ for monocotyledonous species, -107‰ for dicotyledonous species. Additionally, variations of leaf wax δDn-alkane values and the εwax-p values in gymnosperms are similar to those of dicotyledonous species. Therefore, the data let us believe that biological factors inherited from plant taxonomies have a significant effect on controlling leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants.

  12. Different hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid formation in higher plants: Implications for paleohydrology reconstruction at a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhao; Liu, Weiguo; An, Zhisheng; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have shown to differ significantly among plant life forms (e.g., among grasses, shrubs, and trees) in higher plants. However, the underlying causes for the differences in leaf wax δDn-alkane values among different plant life forms remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that leaf wax δDn-alkane values between major high plant lineages (eudicots versus monocots) differed significantly under the same environmental conditions. Such a difference primarily inherited from different hydrogen biosynthetic fractionations (εwax-lw). Based upon a reanalysis of the available leaf wax δDn-alkane dataset from modern plants in the Northern Hemisphere, we discovered that the apparent hydrogen fractionation factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values of major angiosperm lineages and precipitation δD values exhibited distinguishable distribution patterns at a global scale, with an average of ‑140‰ for monocotyledonous species, ‑107‰ for dicotyledonous species. Additionally, variations of leaf wax δDn-alkane values and the εwax-p values in gymnosperms are similar to those of dicotyledonous species. Therefore, the data let us believe that biological factors inherited from plant taxonomies have a significant effect on controlling leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants.

  13. Characterization of phosphorus forms in lake macrophytes and algae by solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquatic macrophytes and algae are important sources of phosphorus (P) in the lake environment that cause blooms of algae under certain biogeochemical conditions. However, the knowledge of forms of P in these plants and algae and their contribution to internal loads of lake P is very limited. Witho...

  14. Modulation of energy-dependent quenching of excitons in antennae of higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Avenson, Thomas J.; Cruz, Jeffrey A.; Kramer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Energy-dependent exciton quenching, or qE, protects the higher plant photosynthetic apparatus from photodamage. Initiation of qE involves protonation of violaxanthin deepoxidase and PsbS, a component of the photosystem II antenna complex, as a result of lumen acidification driven by photosynthetic electron transfer. It has become clear that the response of qE to linear electron flow, termed “qE sensitivity,” must be modulated in response to fluctuating environmental conditions. Previously, three mechanisms have been proposed to account for qE modulation: (i) the sensitivity of qE to the lumen pH is altered; (ii) elevated cyclic electron flow around photosystem I increases proton translocation into the lumen; and (iii) lowering the conductivity of the thylakoid ATP synthase to protons (gH+) allows formation of a larger steady-state proton motive force (pmf). Kinetic analysis of the electrochromic shift of intrinsic thylakoid pigments, a linear indicator of transthylakoid electric field component, suggests that, when CO2 alone was lowered from 350 ppm to 50 ppm CO2, modulation of qE sensitivity could be explained solely by changes in conductivity. Lowering both CO2 (to 50 ppm) and O2 (to 1%) resulted in an additional increase in qE sensitivity that could not be explained by changes in conductivity or cyclic electron flow associated with photosystem I. Evidence is presented for a fourth mechanism, in which changes in qE sensitivity result from variable partitioning of proton motive force into the electric field and pH gradient components. The implications of this mechanism for the storage of proton motive force and the regulation of the light reactions are discussed. PMID:15064404

  15. Primary charge separation and energy transfer in the photosystem I reaction center of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    White, N.T.H.; Beddard, G.S.; Thorne J.R.G.; Feehan, T.M.; Keyes, T.E.; Heathcote, P.

    1996-07-18

    Using low intensity femtosecond duration laser pulses at 708 nm, we have observed absorption transients associated with electron transfer through the primary electron acceptor A{sub 0} in the photosystem I (PSI) reaction center from spinach under nonreducing conditions. At this wavelength the electron donor P{sub 700} is excited directly, although some antenna chlorophylls are also excited. Using a nanosecond duration preflash of 690 nm to oxidize P{sub 700}, and then measuring the absorption transients from the antenna alone, it is possible by subtraction to isolate the absorption transients arising from electron transfer. We discuss this method critically. Th spectrum of A{sub 0}{sup -}-A{sub 0} does not appear promptly but takes nearly 3 ps to reach maximum intensity and resembles those spectra previously obtained from higher plants, with a maximum bleaching at 685{+-}2 nm and a shoulder in the region 670-675 nm. The decay time of the primary radical pair P{sub 700}{sup +}A{sub 0}{sup -} is calculated as 20 ps. Analysis of absorption transients indicates that the intrinsic rate constant forming the primary radical pair P{sub 700}{sup +}A{sub 0}{sup -} cannot be measured directly because energy migration in the antenna is fast and quenching is approaching `trap limited` behavior. With use of a detailed model of the antenna energy migration based on the X-ray structure, the intrinsic rate constant for electron transfer is estimated as k{sub 1} nearly equals 0.7 ps{sup -1}. 81 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Hemin inhibits ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in both a higher plant and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Sullivan, M.L.

    1988-05-03

    In eukaryotes, a major route for ATP-dependent protein breakdown proceeds through covalent intermediates of target proteins destined for degradation and the highly conserved, 76 amino acid protein ubiquitin. In rabbit reticulocytes, it has been shown that hemin effectively inhibits this pathway by blocking the catabolism of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. Here the authors demonstrate that hemin is also an effective inhibitor of the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway in both a higher plant, oats (Avena sativa), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Hemin inhibits all stages of the pathway in vitro, including ATP-dependent formation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, disassembly of conjugates by ubiquitin-protein lyase(s) (or isopeptidases), and degradation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates by ATP-dependent protease(s). Using ubiquitin-/sup 125/I-lysozyme conjugates synthesized in vitro as substrates, they determined the specific effects of hemin on the rates of disassembly and degradation separately. The concentration of hemin required for half-maximal inhibition of both processes was identical in each species, approx. 60 ..mu..M in oats and approx. 50 ..mu..M in yeast. Similar inhibitory effects were observed when two hemin analogues, mesoheme or protoporphyrin IX, were employed. These results demonstrate that the effect of hemin on ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis is not restricted to erythroid cells and as a result hemin may be a useful tool in studies of this pathway in all eukaryotic cells. These results also question models where hemin serves as a specific negative modulator of proteolysis in erythroid cells.

  17. Arabidopsis carotenoid mutants demonstrate that lutein is not essential for photosynthesis in higher plants.

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, B; McDonald, K A; Truong, M; Britton, G; DellaPenna, D

    1996-01-01

    Lutein, a dihydroxy beta, epsilon-carotenoid, is the predominant carotenoid in photosynthetic plant tissue and plays a critical role in light-harvesting complex assembly and function. To further understand lutein synthesis and function, we isolated four lutein-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis that define two loci, lut1 and lut2 (for lutein deficient). These loci are required for lutein biosynthesis but not for the biosynthesis of beta, beta-carotenoids. The lut1 mutations are recessive, accumulate high levels of zeinoxanthin, which is the immediate precursor of lutein, and define lut1 as a disruption in epsilon ring hydroxylation. The lut2 mutations are semidominant, and their biochemical phenotype is consistent with a disruption of epsilon ring cyclization. The lut2 locus cosegregates with the recently isolated epsilon cyclase gene, thus, providing additional evidence that the lut2 alleles are mutations in the epsilon cyclase gene. It appears likely that the epsilon cyclase is a key step in regulating lutein levels and the ratio of lutein to beta,beta-carotenoids. Surprisingly, despite the absence of lutein, neither the lut1 nor lut2 mutation causes a visible deleterious phenotype or altered chlorophyll content, but both mutants have significantly higher levels of beta, beta-carotenoids. In particular, there is a stable increase in the xanthophyll cycle pigments (violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin) in both lut1 and lut2 mutants as well as an increase in zeinoxanthin in lut1 and beta-carotene in lut2. The accumulation of specific carotenoids is discussed as it pertains to the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis and incorporation into the photosynthetic apparatus. Presumably, particular beta, beta-carotenoids are able to compensate functionally and structurally for lutein in the photosystems of Arabidopsis. PMID:8837513

  18. Plant Biology Personnel and Training at Doctorate-Granting Institutions. Higher Education Panel Report Number 62.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Charles J.

    Planning major research programs requires accurate information about funding and personnel. Since reliable baseline data for plant biology have not been available, a study was conducted to provide such data by measuring the total plant biology effort at major doctorate-granting institutions with graduate programs in botany during fall 1982.…

  19. Mitigating ammonia nitrogen deficiency in dairy wastewaters for algae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian; Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Ma, Xiaochen; Ma, Yiwei; Chen, Paul; Zheng, Hongli; Doan, Yen T T; Liu, Hui; Chen, Chi; Urriola, Pedro E; Shurson, Gerald C; Ruan, Roger

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrated that the limiting factor to algae growth on dairy wastewater was the ammonia nitrogen deficiency. Dairy wastewaters were mixed with a slaughterhouse wastewater that has much higher ammonia nitrogen content. The results showed the mixing wastewaters improved the nutrient profiles and biomass yield at low cost. Algae grown on mixed wastewaters contained high protein (55.98-66.91%) and oil content (19.10-20.81%) and can be exploited to produce animal feed and biofuel. Furthermore, algae grown on mixed wastewater significantly reduced nutrient contents remained in the wastewater after treatment. By mitigating limiting factor to algae growth on dairy wastewaters, the key issue of low biomass yield of algae grown on dairy wastewaters was resolved and the wastewater nutrient removal efficiency was significantly improved by this study.

  20. [Effect of methylmercury chloride on the primary photosynthetic activity of higher plants].

    PubMed

    Kukarskikh, G P; Graevskaia, E E; Lavrukhina, O G; Krendeleva, T E; Rubin, A B

    2004-01-01

    The effect of methylmercury chloride (MeHg) on the fluorescence characteristics of pea seedling leaves and thylakoids isolated from these leaves was studied by the pulse-amplitude-modulation (PAM) fluorometric method. In 3-4 days after the addition of MeHg (20 microM) to the nutritious solution, the maximal (Fv/Fm) and real (under steady state actinic light illumination) (deltaF/F'm) quantum photochemical yield of PS II decreased. The nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching coefficient in control (qN) decreased after its maximum value has been reached. In MeHg-treated samples, this decrease was not observed, possibly due to the disturbance of delta pH energy transducing processes in ATP synthase. This was confirmed by the results of experiments on isolated thylakoids. After MeHg (5 microM) treatment of thylakoids, the photophosphorylation rate and light-triggered Mg2+-dependent H+-ATPase activity were suppressed by 20-40%, depending on the duration of MeHg exposure. However, in experiments with isolated thylakoids, no decrease either in the electron transport rate or in the Fv/Fm ratio was observed. In total, the results obtained allow one to assume that MeHg at concentrations and time duration used directly damages the coupling complex. The PS II inactivation in leaves and algae cells may be a result of the oxidative stress processes.

  1. Long-term protection against tobacco mosaic virus induced by the marine alga oligo-sulphated-galactan Poly-Ga in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jeannette; Castro, Jorge; González, Alberto; Barrientos, Herna; Matsuhiro, Betty; Arce, Patricio; Zuñiga, Gustavo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the antiviral effect of the oligo-sulphated galactan Poly-Ga, the leaves of tobacco plants Xhanti(NN) were sprayed with water (control), with increasing concentrations of Poly-Ga, for increasing numbers of treatments or cultivated for increasing times after treatment. Control and treated plants were infected with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and the numbers of necrotic lesions were measured in infected leaves. The number of necrotic lesions decreased with increasing concentrations of Poly-Ga, with increasing numbers of treatments and with increasing time after treatment, indicating a long-term protection against TMV that mimicks vaccination. In addition, control Xhanti(nn) plants and plants treated with Poly-Ga and cultivated for increasing times after treatment were infected with TMV in the middle part of the plant, and the levels of TMV-capsid protein (CP) transcripts were measured in apical leaves. TMV-CP transcripts decreased in distant leaves, indicating that Poly-Ga induces systemic protection against TMV. The activities of the defence enzymes phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) and the amounts of several phenylpropanoid compounds (PPCs) were measured in control and treated plants without infection. A progressive increase in PAL activity was observed with increasing time after treatment, together with the accumulation of free and conjugated PPCs. In contrast, LOX activity remained unchanged. Interestingly, the increase in PAL activity showed a linear correlation with the decrease in necrotic lesions and the decrease in TMV-CP transcript level. Thus, Poly-Ga induced systemic and long-term protection against TMV in tobacco plants that is determined, at least in part, by a sustained activation of PAL and the accumulation of PPCs with potential antiviral activity.

  2. Production characteristics of lettuce Lactuca sativa L. in the frame of the first crop tests in the Higher Plant Chamber integrated into the MELiSSA Pilot Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia; Lawson, Jamie; Stasiak, Michael; Dixon, Mike; Paille, Christel; Peiro, Enrique; Fossen, Arnaud; Godia, Francesc

    Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an artificial closed ecosystem that is considered a tool for the development of a bioregenerative life support system for manned space missions. One of the five compartments of MELiSSA loop -Higher Plant Chamber was recently integrated into the MELiSSA Pilot Plant facility at Universitat Aut`noma deo Barcelona. The main contributions expected by integration of this photosynthetic compartment are oxygen, water, vegetable food production and CO2 consumption. Production characteristics of Lactuca sativa L., as a MELiSSA candidate crop, were investigated in this work in the first crop experiments in the MELiSSA Pilot Plant facility. The plants were grown in batch culture and totaled 100 plants with a growing area 5 m long and 1 m wide in a sealed controlled environment. Several replicates of the experiments were carried out with varying duration. It was shown that after 46 days of lettuce cultivation dry edible biomass averaged 27, 2 g per plant. However accumulation of oxygen in the chamber, which required purging of the chamber, and decrease in the food value of the plants was observed. Reducing the duration of the tests allowed uninterrupted test without opening the system and also allowed estimation of the crop's carbon balance. Results of productivity, tissue composition, nutrient uptake and canopy photosynthesis of lettuce regardless of test duration are discussed in the paper.

  3. A complete mitochondrial genome of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai), and fast evolving mitochondrial genes in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Liu, Huitao; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Zhuo, Guoyin; Hu, Songnian; Liu, Dongcheng; Yang, Wenlong; Zhan, Kehui; Zhang, Aimin; Yu, Jun

    2009-12-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes, encoding necessary proteins involved in the system of energy production, play an important role in the development and reproduction of the plant. They occupy a specific evolutionary pattern relative to their nuclear counterparts. Here, we determined the winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai) mitochondrial genome in a length of 452 and 526 bp by shotgun sequencing its BAC library. It contains 202 genes, including 35 known protein-coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA genes, as well as 149 open reading frames (ORFs; greater than 300 bp in length). The sequence is almost identical to the previously reported sequence of the spring wheat (T. aestivum cv. Chinese Spring); we only identified seven SNPs (three transitions and four transversions) and 10 indels (insertions and deletions) between the two independently acquired sequences, and all variations were found in non-coding regions. This result confirmed the accuracy of the previously reported mitochondrial sequence of the Chinese Spring wheat. The nucleotide frequency and codon usage of wheat are common among the lineage of higher plant with a high AT-content of 58%. Molecular evolutionary analysis demonstrated that plant mitochondrial genomes evolved at different rates, which may correlate with substantial variations in metabolic rate and generation time among plant lineages. In addition, through the estimation of the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates between orthologous mitochondrion-encoded genes of higher plants, we found an accelerated evolutionary rate that seems to be the result of relaxed selection.

  4. Interactions of metal-based engineered nanoparticles with aquatic higher plants: A review of the state of current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Thwala, Melusi; Klaine, Stephen J; Musee, Ndeke

    2016-07-01

    The rising potential for the release of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) into aquatic environments requires evaluation of risks to protect ecological health. The present review examines knowledge pertaining to the interactions of metal-based ENPs with aquatic higher plants, identifies information gaps, and raises considerations for future research to advance knowledge on the subject. The discussion focuses on ENPs' bioaccessibility; uptake, adsorption, translocation, and bioaccumulation; and toxicity effects on aquatic higher plants. An information deficit surrounds the uptake of ENPs and associated dynamics, because the influence of ENP characteristics and water quality conditions has not been well documented. Dissolution appears to be a key mechanism driving bioaccumulation of ENPs, whereas nanoparticulates often adsorb to plant surfaces with minimal internalization. However, few reports document the internalization of ENPs by plants; thus, the role of nanoparticulates' internalization in bioaccumulation and toxicity remains unclear, requiring further investigation. The toxicities of metal-based ENPs mainly have been associated with dissolution as a predominant mechanism, although nano toxicity has also been reported. To advance knowledge in this domain, future investigations need to integrate the influence of ENP characteristics and water physicochemical parameters, as their interplay determines ENP bioaccessibility and influences their risk to health of aquatic higher plants. Furthermore, harmonization of test protocols is recommended for fast tracking the generation of comparable data. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1677-1694. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Small intestinal hydrolysis of plant glucosides: higher glucohydrolase activities in rodents than passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Lessner, Krista M; Dearing, M Denise; Izhaki, Ido; Samuni-Blank, Michal; Arad, Zeev; Karasov, William H

    2015-09-01

    Glycosides are a major group of plant secondary compounds characterized by one or more sugars conjugated to a lipophilic, possibly toxic aglycone, which is released upon hydrolysis. We compared small intestinal homogenate hydrolysis activity of three rodent and two avian species against four substrates: amygdalin and sinigrin, two plant-derived glucosides, the sugar lactose, whose hydrolysis models some activity against flavonoid and isoflavonoid glucosides, and the disaccharide sugar maltose (from starch), used as a comparator. Three new findings extend our understanding of physiological processing of plant glucosides: (1) the capacity of passerine birds to hydrolyze plant glucosides seems relatively low, compared with rodents; (2) in this first test of vertebrates' enzymic capacity to hydrolyze glucosinolates, sinigrin hydrolytic capacity seems low; (3) in laboratory mice, hydrolytic activity against lactose resides on the enterocytes' apical membrane facing the intestinal lumen, but activity against amygdalin seems to reside inside enterocytes.

  6. Gene-enzyme telationships in somatic cells and their organismal derivatives in higher plants. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R. A.

    1980-04-21

    Progress is reported in the following subject areas: (1) chemistry of the arogenate molecule; (2) plant enzymology at the organismal level; (3) isolation of regulatory mutants in tobacco; and (4) stability of the haploid state in Nicotiana sylvestris.

  7. Time to pump iron: iron-deficiency-signaling mechanisms of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Walker, Elsbeth L; Connolly, Erin L

    2008-10-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for plants, yet it often limits plant growth. On the contrary, overaccumulation of iron within plant cells leads to oxidative stress. As a consequence, iron-uptake systems are carefully regulated to ensure that iron homeostasis is maintained. In response to iron limitation, plants induce expression of sets of activities that function at the root-soil interface to solubilize iron and subsequently transfer it across the plasma membrane of root cells. Recent advances have revealed key players in the signaling pathways that function to induce these iron-uptake responses. Transcription factors belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix, ABI3/VP1(B3), and NAC families appear to function either directly or indirectly in the upregulation of iron deficiency responses.

  8. Effect of low-intensity infrared and millimeter radiation on higher plants' biopotentials.

    PubMed

    Mironova, E A; Romanovskii, Y M

    2001-01-01

    This article studies the effect of local low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on the bioelectric responses of plants. In our investigation, we used thirty-three wavelengths in the visible and infrared spectrurm regions as well as three wavelengths in the millimeter spectrum region. As a result, we obtained the bioelectric responses of plants to electromagnetic radiation not only in the absorption region of cellular pigments (such as chlorophyll, flavin, and phytochrome) but also in the absorption region of water molecules.

  9. Genomics of Volvocine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Umen, James G.; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Volvocine algae are a group of chlorophytes that together comprise a unique model for evolutionary and developmental biology. The species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri represent extremes in morphological diversity within the Volvocine clade. Chlamydomonas is unicellular and reflects the ancestral state of the group, while Volvox is multicellular and has evolved numerous innovations including germ-soma differentiation, sexual dimorphism, and complex morphogenetic patterning. The Chlamydomonas genome sequence has shed light on several areas of eukaryotic cell biology, metabolism and evolution, while the Volvox genome sequence has enabled a comparison with Chlamydomonas that reveals some of the underlying changes that enabled its transition to multicellularity, but also underscores the subtlety of this transition. Many of the tools and resources are in place to further develop Volvocine algae as a model for evolutionary genomics. PMID:25883411

  10. Protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) function in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, P L

    1998-12-01

    In the past few years, molecular cloning studies have revealed the primary structure of plant protein serine/threonine phosphatases. Two structurally distinct families, the PP1/PP2A family and the PP2C family, are present in plants as well as in animals. This review will focus on the plant PP2C family of protein phosphatases. Biochemical and molecular genetic studies in Arabidopsis have identified PP2C enzymes as key players in plant signal transduction processes. For instance, the ABI1/ABI2 PP2Cs are central components in abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction. Arabidopsis mutants containing a single amino acid exchange in ABI1 or ABI2 show a reduced response to ABA. Another member of the PP2C family, kinase-associated protein phosphatase (KAPP), appears to be an important element in some receptor-like kinase (RLK) signalling pathways. Finally, an alfalfa PP2C acts as a negative regulator of a plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Thus, the plant PP2Cs function as regulators of various signal transduction pathways.

  11. Molecular Properties and Functional Divergence of the Dehydroascorbate Reductase Gene Family in Lower and Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Jie; Wang, Wei; Yang, Hai-Ling; Li, Yue; Kang, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Yang, Zhi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), which reduces oxidized ascorbate, is important for maintaining an appropriate ascorbate redox state in plant cells. To date, genome-wide molecular characterization of DHARs has only been conducted in bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens) and eudicots (e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana). In this study, to gain a general understanding of the molecular properties and functional divergence of the DHARs in land plants, we further conducted a comprehensive analysis of DHARs from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, gymnosperm Picea abies and monocot Zea mays. DHARs were present as a small gene family in all of the land plants we examined, with gene numbers ranging from two to four. All the plants contained cytosolic and chloroplastic DHARs, indicating dehydroascorbate (DHA) can be directly reduced in the cytoplasm and chloroplast by DHARs in all the plants. A novel vacuolar DHAR was found in Z. mays, indicating DHA may also be reduced in the vacuole by DHARs in Z. mays. The DHARs within each species showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, subcellular localizations, and enzymatic characteristics. This study provides new insights into the molecular characteristics and functional divergence of DHARs in land plants.

  12. Molecular Properties and Functional Divergence of the Dehydroascorbate Reductase Gene Family in Lower and Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan-Jie; Wang, Wei; Yang, Hai-Ling; Li, Yue; Kang, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Yang, Zhi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), which reduces oxidized ascorbate, is important for maintaining an appropriate ascorbate redox state in plant cells. To date, genome-wide molecular characterization of DHARs has only been conducted in bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens) and eudicots (e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana). In this study, to gain a general understanding of the molecular properties and functional divergence of the DHARs in land plants, we further conducted a comprehensive analysis of DHARs from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, gymnosperm Picea abies and monocot Zea mays. DHARs were present as a small gene family in all of the land plants we examined, with gene numbers ranging from two to four. All the plants contained cytosolic and chloroplastic DHARs, indicating dehydroascorbate (DHA) can be directly reduced in the cytoplasm and chloroplast by DHARs in all the plants. A novel vacuolar DHAR was found in Z. mays, indicating DHA may also be reduced in the vacuole by DHARs in Z. mays. The DHARs within each species showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, subcellular localizations, and enzymatic characteristics. This study provides new insights into the molecular characteristics and functional divergence of DHARs in land plants. PMID:26684301

  13. Bioremediation of Atmospheric Hydrocarbons via Bacteria Naturally Associated with Leaves of Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Al-Awadhi, H; Dashti, N; Khanafer, M; El-Nemr, I; Sorkhoh, N; Radwan, S S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria associated with leaves of sixteen cultivated and wild plant species from all over Kuwait were analyzed by a culture-independent approach. This technique depended on partial sequencing of 16S rDNA regions in total genomic DNA from the bacterial consortia and comparing the resulting sequences with those in the GenBank database. To release bacterial cells from leaves, tough methods such as sonication co-released too much leaf chloroplasts whose DNA interfered with the bacterial DNA. A more satisfactory bacterial release with a minimum of chloroplast co-release was done by gently rubbing the leaf surfaces with soft tooth brushes in phosphate buffer. The leaves of all plant species harbored on their surfaces bacterial communities predominated by hydrocarbonoclastic (hydrocarbon-utilizing) bacterial genera. Leaves of 6 representative plants brought about in the laboratory effective removal of volatile hydrocarbons in sealed microcosms. Each individual plant species had a unique bacterial community structure. Collectively, the phyllospheric microflora on the studied plants comprised the genera Flavobacterium, Halomonas, Arthrobacter, Marinobacter, Neisseria, Ralstonia, Ochrobactrum. Exiguobacterium, Planomicrobium, Propionibacterium, Kocuria, Rhodococcus and Stenotrophomonas. This community structure was dramatically different from the structure we determined earlier for the same plants using the culture-dependent approach, although in both cases, hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria were frequent.

  14. Two Bee-Pollinated Plant Species Show Higher Seed Production when Grown in Gardens Compared to Arable Farmland

    PubMed Central

    Cussans, John; Goulson, David; Sanderson, Roy; Goffe, Louis; Darvill, Ben; Osborne, Juliet L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Insect pollinator abundance, in particular that of bees, has been shown to be high where there is a super-abundance of floral resources; for example in association with mass-flowering crops and also in gardens where flowering plants are often densely planted. Since land management affects pollinator numbers, it is also likely to affect the resultant pollination of plants growing in these habitats. We hypothesised that the seed or fruit set of two plant species, typically pollinated by bumblebees and/or honeybees might respond in one of two ways: 1) pollination success could be reduced when growing in a floriferous environment, via competition for pollinators, or 2) pollination success could be enhanced because of increased pollinator abundance in the vicinity. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the pollination success of experimental plants of Glechoma hederacea L. and Lotus corniculatus L. growing in gardens and arable farmland. On the farms, the plants were placed either next to a mass-flowering crop (oilseed rape, Brassica napus L. or field beans, Vicia faba L.) or next to a cereal crop (wheat, Triticum spp.). Seed set of G. hederacea and fruit set of L. corniculatus were significantly higher in gardens compared to arable farmland. There was no significant difference in pollination success of G. hederacea when grown next to different crops, but for L. corniculatus, fruit set was higher in the plants growing next to oilseed rape when the crop was in flower. Conclusions/Significance The results show that pollination services can limit fruit set of wild plants in arable farmland, but there is some evidence that the presence of a flowering crop can facilitate their pollination (depending on species and season). We have also demonstrated that gardens are not only beneficial to pollinators, but also to the process of pollination. PMID:20668704

  15. Surface gas-exchange processes of snow algae

    PubMed Central

    Williams, William E.; Gorton, Holly L.; Vogelmann, Thomas C.

    2003-01-01

    The red-colored chlorophyte Chlamydomonas nivalis is commonly found in summer snowfields. We used a modified Li-Cor gas-exchange system to investigate surface gas-exchange characteristics of snow colonized by this alga, finding rates of CO2 uptake up to 0.3 μmol m−2⋅s−1 in dense algal blooms. Experiments varying the irradiance resulted in light curves that resembled those of the leaves of higher plants. Red light was more effective than white and much more effective than green or blue, because of the red astaxanthin that surrounds and masks the algal chloroplasts. Integrating daily course measurements of gas exchange showed CO2 uptake around 2,300 μmol⋅m−2⋅day−1 in heavily colonized patches, indicating that summer snowfields can be surprisingly productive. PMID:12518048

  16. Critical conditions for ferric chloride-induced flocculation of freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Nicholas B; Gloe, Lindsey M; Brady, Patrick V; Hewson, John C; Grillet, Anne M; Hankins, Matthew G; Pohl, Phillip I

    2012-02-01

    The effects of algae concentration, ferric chloride dose, and pH on the flocculation efficiency of the freshwater algae Chlorella zofingiensis can be understood by considering the nature of the electrostatic charges on the algae and precipitate surfaces. Two critical conditions are identified which, when met, result in flocculation efficiencies in excess of 90% for freshwater algae. First, a minimum concentration of ferric chloride is required to overcome the electrostatic stabilization of the algae and promote bridging of algae cells by hydroxide precipitates. At low algae concentrations, the minimum amount of ferric chloride required increases linearly with algae concentration, characteristic of flocculation primarily through electrostatic bridging by hydroxide precipitates. At higher algae concentrations, the minimum required concentration of ferric chloride for flocculation is independent of algae concentration, suggesting a change in the primary flocculation mechanism from bridging to sweep flocculation. Second, the algae must have a negative surface charge. Experiments and surface complexation modeling show that the surface charge of C. zofingiensis is negative above a pH of 4.0 ± 0.3 which agrees well with the minimum pH required for effective flocculation. These critical flocculation criteria can be extended to other freshwater algae to design effective flocculation systems.

  17. Differentiating moss from higher plants is critical in studying the carbon cycle of the boreal biome.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Dong, Wenjie; Liang, Shunlin; Zhao, Shuqing; Chen, Jingming; Xu, Wenfang; Li, Xianglan; Barr, Alan; Andrew Black, T; Yan, Wende; Goulden, Mike L; Kulmala, Liisa; Lindroth, Anders; Margolis, Hank A; Matsuura, Yojiro; Moors, Eddy; van der Molen, Michiel; Ohta, Takeshi; Pilegaard, Kim; Varlagin, Andrej; Vesala, Timo

    2014-06-26

    The satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is used for estimating gross primary production (GPP), often includes contributions from both mosses and vascular plants in boreal ecosystems. For the same NDVI, moss can generate only about one-third of the GPP that vascular plants can because of its much lower photosynthetic capacity. Here, based on eddy covariance measurements, we show that the difference in photosynthetic capacity between these two plant functional types has never been explicitly included when estimating regional GPP in the boreal region, resulting in a substantial overestimation. The magnitude of this overestimation could have important implications regarding a change from a current carbon sink to a carbon source in the boreal region. Moss abundance, associated with ecosystem disturbances, needs to be mapped and incorporated into GPP estimates in order to adequately assess the role of the boreal region in the global carbon cycle.

  18. Can genetically based clines in plant defence explain greater herbivory at higher latitudes?

    PubMed

    Anstett, Daniel N; Ahern, Jeffrey R; Glinos, Julia; Nawar, Nabanita; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-12-01

    Greater plant defence is predicted to evolve at lower latitudes in response to increased herbivore pressure. However, recent studies question the generality of this pattern. In this study, we tested for genetically based latitudinal clines in resistance to herbivores and underlying defence traits of Oenothera biennis. We grew plants from 137 populations from across the entire native range of O. biennis. Populations from lower latitudes showed greater resistance to multiple specialist and generalist herbivores. These patterns were associated with an increase in total phenolics at lower latitudes. A significant proportion of the phenolics were driven by the concentrations of two major ellagitannins, which exhibited opposing latitudinal clines. Our analyses suggest that these findings are unlikely to be explained by local adaptation of herbivore populations or genetic variation in phenology. Rather greater herbivory at high latitudes can be explained by latitudinal clines in the evolution of plant defences.

  19. Testing Crew Responses to Varied Higher Plant Presentations in the MARS-500 Day Mission Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquit, J. D.; Bates, S. C.; Gushin, V. I.; Synchev, V. N.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Podolsky, I. G.; Marchant, C. C.; Bingham, G. E.

    2008-06-01

    Maintaining psychological and behavioral health of humans during long-duration space missions is of great importance for the future success of space exploration as the hostile space environment adversely impacts the psychological, social, and physiological well-being of humans in space. Growing and tending plants has been proposed as a countermeasures for the negative impacts of long-duration space missions[3] as interactions with plant life on earth have been found to be beneficial to humans in other settings. Preliminary results from a pilot 14-day chamber study appear to support the notion that interactions with plant life may act as a countermeasure for the negative impacts of life in space. Additional data will be collected during the Mars 500-day Chamber Study at Institute of Biomedical Problems (IMBP).

  20. Characterization of a Nitric Oxide Synthase from the Plant Kingdom: NO Generation from the Green Alga Ostreococcus tauri Is Light Irradiance and Growth Phase Dependent[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Foresi, Noelia; Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; Parisi, Gustavo; Caló, Gonzalo; Salerno, Graciela; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    The search for a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) sequence in the plant kingdom yielded two sequences from the recently published genomes of two green algae species of the Ostreococcus genus, O. tauri and O. lucimarinus. In this study, we characterized the sequence, protein structure, phylogeny, biochemistry, and expression of NOS from O. tauri. The amino acid sequence of O. tauri NOS was found to be 45% similar to that of human NOS. Folding assignment methods showed that O. tauri NOS can fold as the human endothelial NOS isoform. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that O. tauri NOS clusters together with putative NOS sequences of a Synechoccocus sp strain and Physarum polycephalum. This cluster appears as an outgroup of NOS representatives from metazoa. Purified recombinant O. tauri NOS has a Km for the substrate l-Arg of 12 ± 5 μM. Escherichia coli cells expressing recombinant O. tauri NOS have increased levels of NO and cell viability. O. tauri cultures in the exponential growth phase produce 3-fold more NOS-dependent NO than do those in the stationary phase. In O. tauri, NO production increases in high intensity light irradiation and upon addition of l-Arg, suggesting a link between NOS activity and microalgal physiology. PMID:21119059

  1. Congruence and diversity of butterfly-host plant associations at higher taxonomic levels.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Paris, José R; Sánchez-Mercado, Ada; Viloria, Ángel L; Donaldson, John

    2013-01-01

    We aggregated data on butterfly-host plant associations from existing sources in order to address the following questions: (1) is there a general correlation between host diversity and butterfly species richness?, (2) has the evolution of host plant use followed consistent patterns across butterfly lineages?, (3) what is the common ancestral host plant for all butterfly lineages? The compilation included 44,148 records from 5,152 butterfly species (28.6% of worldwide species of Papilionoidea) and 1,193 genera (66.3%). The overwhelming majority of butterflies use angiosperms as host plants. Fabales is used by most species (1,007 spp.) from all seven butterfly families and most subfamilies, Poales is the second most frequently used order, but is mostly restricted to two species-rich subfamilies: Hesperiinae (56.5% of all Hesperiidae), and Satyrinae (42.6% of all Nymphalidae). We found a significant and strong correlation between host plant diversity and butterfly species richness. A global test for congruence (Parafit test) was sensitive to uncertainty in the butterfly cladogram, and suggests a mixed system with congruent associations between Papilionidae and magnoliids, Hesperiidae and monocots, and the remaining subfamilies with the eudicots (fabids and malvids), but also numerous random associations. The congruent associations are also recovered as the most probable ancestral states in each node using maximum likelihood methods. The shift from basal groups to eudicots appears to be more likely than the other way around, with the only exception being a Satyrine-clade within the Nymphalidae that feed on monocots. Our analysis contributes to the visualization of the complex pattern of interactions at superfamily level and provides a context to discuss the timing of changes in host plant utilization that might have promoted diversification in some butterfly lineages.

  2. Conservation and diversity of gene families explored using the CODEHOP strategy in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Morant, Marc; Hehn, Alain; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2002-01-01

    Background Availability of genomewide information on an increasing but still limited number of plants offers the possibility of identifying orthologues, or related genes, in species with major economical impact and complex genomes. In this paper we exploit the recently described CODEHOP primer design and PCR strategy for targeted isolation of homologues in large gene families. Results The method was tested with two different objectives. The first was to analyze the evolution of the CYP98 family of cytochrome P450 genes involved in 3-hydroxylation of phenolic compounds and lignification in a broad range of plant species. The second was to isolate an orthologue of the sorghum glucosyl transferase UGT85B1 and to determine the complexity of the UGT85 family in wheat. P450s of the CYP98 family or closely related sequences were found in all vascular plants. No related sequence was found in moss. Neither extensive duplication of the CYP98 genes nor an orthologue of UGT85B1 were found in wheat. The UGT85A subfamily was however found to be highly variable in wheat. Conclusions Our data are in agreement with the implication of CYP98s in lignification and the evolution of 3-hydroxylation of lignin precursors with vascular plants. High conservation of the CYP98 family strongly argues in favour of an essential function in plant development. Conversely, high duplication and diversification of the UGT85A gene family in wheat suggests its involvement in adaptative response and provides a valuable pool of genes for biotechnological applications. This work demonstrates the high potential of the CODEHOP strategy for the exploration of large gene families in plants. PMID:12153706

  3. Feasibility study of algae-based Carbon Dioxide capture ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SUMMARY: The biomass of microalgae contains approximately 50% carbon, which is commonly obtained from the atmosphere, but can also be taken from commercial sources that produce CO2, such as coal-fired power plants. A study of operational demonstration projects is being undertaken to evaluate the benefits of using algae to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial and small-scale utility power boilers. The operations are being studied for the use of CO2 from flue gas for algae growth along with the production of biofuels and other useful products to prepare a comprehensive characterization of the economic feasibility of using algae to capture CO2. Information is being generated for analyses of the potential for these technologies to advance in the market and assist in meeting environmental goals, as well as to examine their associated environmental implications. Three electric power generation plants (coal and fuel oil fired) equipped to send flue-gas emissions to algae culture at demonstration facilities are being studied. Data and process information are being collected and developed to facilitate feasibility and modeling evaluations of the CO2 to algae technology. An understanding of process requirements to apply this technology to existing industries would go far in advancing carbon capture opportunities. Documenting the successful use of this technology could help bring “low-tech”, low-cost, CO2 to algae, carbon capture to multiple size industries and

  4. Higher accumulation of F1-V fusion recombinant protein in plants after induction of protein body formation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M Lucrecia; Topal, Emel; Martin, Federico; Cardineau, Guy A

    2010-01-01

    Improving foreign protein accumulation is crucial for enhancing the commercial success of plant-based production systems since product yields have a major influence on process economics. Cereal grain evolved to store large amounts of proteins in tightly organized aggregates. In maize, gamma-Zein is the major storage protein synthesized by the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and stored in specialized organelles called protein bodies (PB). Zera (gamma-Zein ER-accumulating domain) is the N-terminal proline-rich domain of gamma-zein that is sufficient to induce the assembly of PB formation. Fusion of the Zera domain to proteins of interest results in assembly of dense PB-like, ER-derived organelles, containing high concentration of recombinant protein. Our main goal was to increase recombinant protein accumulation in plants in order to enhance the efficiency of orally-delivered plant-made vaccines. It is well known that oral vaccination requires substantially higher doses than parental formulations. As a part of a project to develop a plant-made plague vaccine, we expressed our model antigen, the Yersinia pestis F1-V antigen fusion protein, with and without a fused Zera domain. We demonstrated that Zera-F1-V protein accumulation was at least 3x higher than F1-V alone when expressed in three different host plant systems: Ncotiana benthamiana, Medicago sativa (alfalfa) and Nicotiana tabacum NT1 cells. We confirmed the feasibility of using Zera technology to induce protein body formation in non-seed tissues. Zera expression and accumulation did not affect plant development and growth. These results confirmed the potential exploitation of Zera technology to substantially increase the accumulation of value-added proteins in plants.

  5. Maize R2R3 Myb genes: Sequence analysis reveals amplification in the higher plants.

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, P D; Braun, E L; Wolfe, A D; Bowen, B; Grotewold, E

    1999-09-01

    Transcription factors containing the Myb-homologous DNA-binding domain are widely found in eukaryotes. In plants, R2R3 Myb-domain proteins are involved in the control of form and metabolism. The Arabidopsis genome harbors >100 R2R3 Myb genes, but few have been found in monocots, animals, and fungi. Using RT-PCR from different maize organs, we cloned 480 fragments corresponding to a 42-44 residue-long sequence spanning the region between the conserved DNA-recognition helices (Myb(BRH)) of R2R3 Myb domains. We determined that maize expresses >80 different R2R3 Myb genes, and evolutionary distances among maize Myb(BRH) sequences indicate that most of the amplification of the R2R3 Myb gene family occurred after the origin of land plants but prior to the separation of monocots and dicots. In addition, evidence is provided for the very recent duplication of particular classes of R2R3 Myb genes in the grasses. Together, these findings render a novel line of evidence for the amplification of the R2R3 Myb gene family in the early history of land plants and suggest that maize provides a possible model system to examine the hypothesis that the expansion of Myb genes is associated with the regulation of novel plant cellular functions.

  6. Higher effect of plant species diversity on productivity in natural than artificial ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Flombaum, Pedro; Sala, Osvaldo E.

    2008-01-01

    Current and expected changes in biodiversity have motivated major experiments, which reported a positive relationship between plant species diversity and primary production. As a first step in addressing this relationship, these manipulative experiments controlled as many potential confounding covariables as possible and assembled artificial ecosystems for the purpose of the experiments. As a new step in this endeavor, we asked how plant species richness relates to productivity in a natural ecosystem. Here, we report on an experiment conducted in a natural ecosystem in the Patagonian steppe, in which we assessed the biodiversity effect on primary production. Using a plant species diversity gradient generated by removing species while maintaining constant biomass, we found that aboveground net primary production increased with the number of plant species. We also found that the biodiversity effect was larger in natural than in artificial ecosystems. This result supports previous findings and also suggests that the effect of biodiversity in natural ecosystems may be much larger than currently thought. PMID:18427124

  7. Phosphoinositide kinases and the synthesis of polyphosphoinositides in higher plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drobak, B. K.; Dewey, R. E.; Boss, W. F.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are a family of inositol-containing phospholipids which are present in all eukaryotic cells. Although in most cells these lipids, with the exception of phosphatidylinositol, constitute only a very minor proportion of total cellular lipids, they have received immense attention by researchers in the past 15-20 years. This is due to the discovery that these lipids, rather than just having structural functions, play key roles in a wide range of important cellular processes. Much less is known about the plant phosphoinositides than about their mammalian counterparts. However, it has been established that a functional phosphoinositide system exists in plant cells and it is becoming increasingly clear that inositol-containing lipids are likely to play many important roles throughout the life of a plant. It is not our intention to give an exhaustive overview of all aspects of the field, but rather we focus on the phosphoinositide kinases responsible for the synthesis of all phosphorylated forms of phosphatidylinositol. Also, we mention some of the aspects of current phosphoinositide research which, in our opinion, are most likely to provide a suitable starting point for further research into the role of phosphoinositides in plants.

  8. Selection for Higher Gene Copy Number after Different Types of Plant Gene Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Corey M.; Puckett, Emily E.; Bekaert, Michaël; Pires, J. Chris; Conant, Gavin C.

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of the multitude of duplicate genes in the plant genomes are still incompletely understood. To gain an appreciation of the potential selective forces acting on these duplicates, we phylogenetically inferred the set of metabolic gene families from 10 flowering plant (angiosperm) genomes. We then compared the metabolic fluxes for these families, predicted using the Arabidopsis thaliana and Sorghum bicolor metabolic networks, with the families' duplication propensities. For duplications produced by both small scale (small-scale duplications) and genome duplication (whole-genome duplications), there is a significant association between the flux and the tendency to duplicate. Following this global analysis, we made a more fine-scale study of the selective constraints observed on plant sodium and phosphate transporters. We find that the different duplication mechanisms give rise to differing selective constraints. However, the exact nature of this pattern varies between the gene families, and we argue that the duplication mechanism alone does not define a duplicated gene's subsequent evolutionary trajectory. Collectively, our results argue for the interplay of history, function, and selection in shaping the duplicate gene evolution in plants. PMID:22056313

  9. Purification and characterization of cytochrome f-556.5 from the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Böhme, H; Pelzer, B; Böger, P

    1980-10-03

    The membrane-bound cytochrome f-556.5 from the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis was purified to apparent homogeneity. Most of its properties are comparable to cytochrome f isolated from higher plants and green algae. It is clearly distinguishable from soluble cytochrome c-554, also present in Spirulina, which probably replaces the function of plastocyanin in photosynthetic electron transport. 1. The reduced form of cytochrome f exhibits an asymmetrical alpha-band with a maximum at 556.5 nm, and a pronounced shoulder at 550 nm. The beta-, gamma and delta-bands coincide with those described for Scenedesmus cytochrome f-553, with maxima at 524 (532), 422, 331 and a protein peak at 276 nm. The maximum of ferricytochrome f is at 410.5 nm; there is no indication of a weak 695 nm band, described for soluble c-type cytochromes. The purest preparations had a delta/protein-peak ratio of 0.8; the gamma/alpha ratio was 7.3. Formation of a pyridine hemochromogen with a maximum at 550 nm indicated a c-type cytochrome. The molar extinction coefficient at 556.5 nm is 30200, the differential extinction coefficient 21 500. 2. The molecular weight determined by gel filtration or SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is 33 000 and 34 000, respectively. 3. The redox properties differ from those described for other cytochromes f isolated from green algae and higher plants: the midpoint redox potential is significantly more negative (+318 mV, pH 7.0) and from pH 6 to 10 no pH dependence is observed. 4. The isoelectric point was determined at pH 3.95, which is more acidic as compared to other cytochromes f. 5. Comparison of the amino acid composition indicated a distant relationship to higher plant cytochrome f and a closer relationship to cytochrome f from green algae.

  10. Plant species richness belowground: higher richness and new patterns revealed by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hiiesalu, Inga; Opik, Maarja; Metsis, Madis; Lilje, Liisa; Davison, John; Vasar, Martti; Moora, Mari; Zobel, Martin; Wilson, Scott D; Pärtel, Meelis

    2012-04-01

    Variation in plant species richness has been described using only aboveground vegetation. The species richness of roots and rhizomes has never been compared with aboveground richness in natural plant communities. We made direct comparisons of grassland plant richness in identical volumes (0.1 × 0.1 × 0.1 m) above and below the soil surface, using conventional species identification to measure aboveground richness and 454 sequencing of the chloroplast trnL(UAA) intron to measure belowground richness. We described above- and belowground richness at multiple spatial scales (from a neighbourhood scale of centimetres to a community scale of hundreds of metres), and related variation in richness to soil fertility. Tests using reference material indicated that 454 sequencing captured patterns of species composition and abundance with acceptable accuracy. At neighbourhood scales, belowground richness was up to two times greater than aboveground richness. The relationship between above- and belowground richness was significantly different from linear: beyond a certain level of belowground richness, aboveground richness did not increase further. Belowground richness also exceeded that of aboveground at the community scale, indicating that some species are temporarily dormant and absent aboveground. Similar to other grassland studies, aboveground richness declined with increasing soil fertility; in contrast, the number of species found only belowground increased significantly with fertility. These results indicate that conventional aboveground studies of plant richness may overlook many coexisting species, and that belowground richness becomes relatively more important in conditions where aboveground richness decreases. Measuring plant belowground richness can considerably alter perceptions of biodiversity and its responses to natural and anthropogenic factors.

  11. Integration of a Higher Plant Chamber into the European Space Agency's MELiSSA Pilot Plant: The Canadian Role in Advanced Life Support Test-Bed Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Geoffrey; Lawson, Jamie; Gidzinski, Danuta; Stasiak, Michael; Dixon, Mike; Peiro, Enrique; Godia, Francesc; Paille, Christel; Fossen, Arnaud; Lamaze, Brigitte; Lasseur, Christophe

    The European Space Agency's Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) project has been conceived as a tool for developing the technology of future biological life support systems required for long-term human space exploration missions to the Moon or Mars. The main life support functions of MELiSSA are the recycling of waste (inedible plant biomass, human excrement), carbon dioxide and minerals and the production of food, fresh water and air revitalization. Based on the principle of an aquatic ecosystem, MELiSSA is comprised of four microbial compartments and a higher plant compartment integrated in a closed loop. Each compartment is studied, designed and demonstrated at laboratory scale before being scaled-up for subsequent integration into the MELISSA Pilot Plant (MPP) at the Universitat Aut`noma de Barcelona. Work related to higher plant cultivation systems, o which have been historically focussed at the University of Guelph's Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility (CESRF), has included design of the HPC for the MPP, the metabolic characterization of MELiSSA candidate crops and the validation of theoretical gas exchange and nutrient dynamic models, The presented paper will review some of the recent data and HPC design work of CESRF conducted as part of Canada's involvement in the MELiSSA program and its partnership in the development of the MPP terrestrial demonstration test-bed.

  12. Unravelling the regulatory mechanisms that modulate the MEP pathway in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Cordoba, Elizabeth; Salmi, Mari; León, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of a substantial number of natural compounds of biological and biotechnological importance. In recent years, this pathway has become an obvious target to develop new herbicides and antimicrobial drugs. In addition, the production of a variety of compounds of medical and agricultural interest may be possible through the genetic manipulation of this pathway. To this end, a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate this pathway is of tremendous importance. Recent data have accumulated that show some of the multiple mechanisms that regulate the methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway in plants. In this review we will describe some of these and discuss their implications. It has been demonstrated that 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS), the first enzyme of this route, plays a major role in the overall regulation of the pathway. A small gene family codes for this enzyme in most of the plants which have been analysed so far, and the members of these gene families belong to different phylogenetic groups. Each of these genes exhibits a distinct expression pattern, suggesting unique functions. One of the most interesting regulatory mechanisms recently described for this pathway is the post-transcriptional regulation of the level of DXS and DXR proteins. In the case of DXS, this regulation appears conserved among plants, supporting its importance. The evidence accumulated suggests that this regulation might link the activity of this pathway with the plant's physiological conditions and the metabolic demand for the final products of this route.

  13. Position based nucleotide analysis of miR168 family in higher plants and its targets in mammalian transcripts.

    PubMed

    Javed, Mohammed; Solanki, Manish; Sinha, Anshika; Shukla, Lata Israni

    2017-02-15

    The conserved miR168 family is evaluated for position based nucleotide preference in higher plants. The mature miRNA sequences include miR168-5p and miR168-3p, were obtained from miRBase (v21, June 2014) for 15 families (28 plants) containing a-c subfamilies. The preferred position based nucleotide sequences were obtained for miR168-5p and miR168-3p using Data Analysis in Molecular Biology and Evolution (DAMBE). miR168-5p shows same nucleotides at positions 1-6, 8-9, 11-12, 15-17 and 19. Also, miR168-3p is present in 3 families (10 plants) shows the same nucleotide at position 1-11, 13-15 and 17-21. Our work suggests that miR168 family has conserved sequence in higher plants. The miR168-5p was subjected to cross kingdom analysis using psRNATarget. The seed region position 2-8 shows 70-95% pairing and cleavage site at position 10-14 were analysed for the base preference, in which pairing with the targets showed 80-96% Watson Crick pairing. The 123 targets in human transcriptome were identified showing 58% cleavage and 41% translation repression. Earlier reported Low density lipoprotein receptor adaptor protein 1(LDLRAP1) target validated for miR168a obtained from rice origin, could also be targeted from miR168 from any other plant sources. The randomly selected 10 targets include some important genes like RPL34, ATXN1, AKAPI3 and ALS2 and is involved in transcription, cell trafficking, cell metabolism and neurodegenerative disorder. This paper provides DAMBE analysis for miR168 across the plant kingdom and identification of new cross kingdom targets for miR168 using psRNATarget.

  14. DNA repair and recombination in higher plants: insights from comparative genomics of arabidopsis and rice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The DNA repair and recombination (DRR) proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, caused by environmental agents and other genotoxic agents, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to abide them. Results We identified genes potentially involved in DRR mechanisms in Arabidopsis and rice using similarity searches and conserved domain analysis against proteins known to be involved in DRR in human, yeast and E. coli. As expected, many of DRR genes are very similar to those found in other eukaryotes. Beside these eukaryotes specific genes, several prokaryotes specific genes were also found to be well conserved in plants. In Arabidopsis, several functionally important DRR gene duplications are present, which do not occur in rice. Among DRR proteins, we found that proteins belonging to the nucleotide excision repair pathway were relatively more conserved than proteins needed for the other DRR pathways. Sub-cellular localization studies of DRR gene suggests that these proteins are mostly reside in nucleus while gene drain in between nucleus and cell organelles were also found in some cases. Conclusions The similarities and dissimilarities in between plants and other organisms' DRR pathways are discussed. The observed differences broaden our knowledge about DRR in the plants world, and raises the potential question of whether differentiated functions have evolved in some cases. These results, altogether, provide a useful framework for further experimental studies in these organisms. PMID:20646326

  15. Causes and consequences of high osmotic potentials in epiphytic higher plants.

    PubMed

    Martin, Craig E; Lin, T C; Lin, K C; Hsu, C C; Chiou, W L

    2004-10-01

    Past reports of the water relations of epiphytes, particularly bromeliads, indicate that tissue osmotic potentials in these tropical and subtropical plants are very high (close to zero) and are similar to values for aquatic plants. This is puzzling because several ecophysiological studies have revealed a high degree of drought stress tolerance in some of these epiphytes. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1) to increase the number of epiphytic taxa sampled for tissue osmotic potentials; and (2) to explain the apparent discrepancy in the significance of the tissue water relations and tolerance of drought stress in epiphytes. Tissue osmotic potentials of 30 species of epiphytic ferns, lycophytes, and orchids were measured in a subtropical rain forest in northeastern Taiwan. Nearly all values were less negative than -1.0 MPa, in line with all previous data for epiphytes. It is argued that such high osmotic potentials, indicative of low solute concentrations, are the result of environmental constraints of the epiphytic habitat on productivity of these plants, and that low rates of photosynthesis and transpiration delay the onset of turgor loss in the tissues of epiphytes such that they appear to be very drought-stress tolerant. Maintenance of photosynthetic activity long into drought periods is ascribed to low rates of transpiration and, hence, delayed tissue desiccation, and hydration of the photosynthetic tissue at the expense of water from the water-storage parenchyma.

  16. Role of Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants. Progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1992-12-31

    The cytoskeleton including its microtubule (Mt) component participates in processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of Mts into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. The cortical array somehow directs the deposition of cellulose. Little molecular information is available regarding the formation of these arrays or the cellular signals to which they respond. Experimental data described here suggests that plant cells use calcium, in the form of a Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin complex, to affect the dynamics of Mts within the cortical array. Owing to the importance of Ca{sup ++} as a regulatory ion in higher plants we are probing for a putative Ca{sup ++}/Mt transduction pathway which may serve to integrate Mt activities within the growing and developing plant cell. We are using a lysed cell model in conjunction with immunocytochemical and biochemical methodologies to dissect how Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin interacts with Mts to affect their function.

  17. 14C and 13C characteristics of higher plant biomarkers in Washington margin surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Benitez-Nelson, Bryan C.; Montluçon, Daniel B.; Prahl, Fredrick G.; McNichol, Ann P.; Xu, Li; Repeta, Daniel J.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2013-03-01

    Plant wax lipids and lignin phenols are the two most common classes of molecular markers that are used to trace vascular plant-derived OM in the marine environment. However, their 13C and 14C compositions have not been directly compared, which can be used to constrain the flux and attenuation of terrestrial carbon in marine environment. In this study, we describe a revised method of isolating individual lignin phenols from complex sedimentary matrices for 14C analysis using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and compare this approach to a method utilizing preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC). We then examine in detail the 13C and 14C compositions of plant wax lipids and lignin phenols in sediments from the inner and mid shelf of the Washington margin that are influenced by discharge of the Columbia River. Plant wax lipids (including n-alkanes, n-alkanoic (fatty) acids, n-alkanols, and n-aldehydes) displayed significant variability in both δ13C (-28.3‰ to -37.5‰) and Δ14C values (-204‰ to +2‰), suggesting varied inputs and/or continental storage and transport histories. In contrast, lignin phenols exhibited similar δ13C values (between -30‰ and -34‰) and a relatively narrow range of Δ14C values (-45‰ to -150‰; HPLC-based measurement) that were similar to, or younger than, bulk OM (-195‰ to -137‰). Moreover, lignin phenol 14C age correlated with the degradation characteristics of this terrestrial biopolymer in that vanillyl phenols were on average ˜500 years older than syringyl and cinnamyl phenols that degrade faster in soils and sediments. The isotopic characteristics, abundance, and distribution of lignin phenols in sediments suggest that they serve as promising tracers of recently biosynthesized terrestrial OM during supply to, and dispersal within the marine environment. Lignin phenol 14C measurements may also provide useful constraints on the vascular plant end member in isotopic mixing models for carbon source

  18. Calcium-dependent protein kinases in plants: evolution, expression and function.

    PubMed

    Valmonte, Gardette R; Arthur, Kieren; Higgins, Colleen M; MacDiarmid, Robin M

    2014-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are plant proteins that directly bind calcium ions before phosphorylating substrates involved in metabolism, osmosis, hormone response and stress signaling pathways. CPKs are a large multigene family of proteins that are present in all plants studied to date, as well as in protists, oomycetes and green algae, but are not found in animals and fungi. Despite the increasing evidence of the importance of CPKs in developmental and stress responses from various plants, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of CPKs from algae to higher plants has not been undertaken. This paper describes the evolution of CPKs from green algae to plants using a broadly sampled phylogenetic analysis and demonstrates the functional diversification of CPKs based on expression and functional studies in different plant species. Our findings reveal that CPK sequence diversification into four major groups occurred in parallel with the terrestrial transition of plants. Despite significant expansion of the CPK gene family during evolution from green algae to higher plants, there is a high level of sequence conservation among CPKs in all plant species. This sequence conservation results in very little correlation between CPK evolutionary groupings and functional diversity, making the search for CPK functional orthologs a challenge.

  19. Engineering sciences design. Design and implementation of components for a bioregenerative system for growing higher order plants in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevill, Gale E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal was to address specific needs in the design of an integrated system to grow higher plants in space. With the needs defined, the emphasis was placed on the design and fabrication of devices to meet these needs. Specific attention was placed on a hand-held harvester, a nutrient concentration sensor, an air-water separator, and a closed-loop biological system simulation.

  20. The future viability of algae-derived biodiesel under economic and technical uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Brownbridge, George; Azadi, Pooya; Smallbone, Andrew; Bhave, Amit; Taylor, Benjamin; Kraft, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a techno-economic assessment of algae-derived biodiesel under economic and technical uncertainties associated with the development of algal biorefineries. A global sensitivity analysis was performed using a High Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) method. It was found that, considering reasonable ranges over which each parameter can vary, the sensitivity of the biodiesel production cost to the key input parameters decreases in the following order: algae oil content>algae annual productivity per unit area>plant production capacity>carbon price increase rate. It was also found that the Return on Investment (ROI) is highly sensitive to the algae oil content, and to a lesser extent to the algae annual productivity, crude oil price and price increase rate, plant production capacity, and carbon price increase rate. For a large scale plant (100,000 tonnes of biodiesel per year) the production cost of biodiesel is likely to be £0.8-1.6 per kg.

  1. Anti-Phytopathogenic Activities of Macro-Algae Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Edra; Dorta, Fernando; Medina, Cristian; Ramírez, Alberto; Ramírez, Ingrid; Peña-Cortés, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal mycelia growth or by reducing the disease symptoms in leaves caused by pathogen challenge. Organic extracts obtained from the brown-alga Lessonia trabeculata inhibited bacterial growth and reduced both the number and size of the necrotic lesion in tomato leaves following infection with Botrytis cinerea. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the red-alga Gracillaria chilensis prevent the growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi, showing a response which depends on doses and collecting-time. Similarly, aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the brown-alga Durvillaea antarctica were able to diminish the damage caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco leaves, and the aqueous procedure is, in addition, more effective and seasonally independent. These results suggest that macro-algae contain compounds with different chemical properties which could be considered for controlling specific plant pathogens. PMID:21673886

  2. Preparation of starch and other carbon fractions from higher plant leaves for stable carbon isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Wanek, W; Heintel, S; Richter, A

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of the carbon isotope composition of starch and cellulose still relies on chemical isolation of these water-insoluble plant constituents and subsequent elemental analysis by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) of the purified fractions, while delta(13)C values of low-molecular-weight organic compounds are now routinely measured by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). Here we report a simple and reliable method for processing milligram quantities of dried plant material for the analysis of the carbon isotope composition of lipids, soluble sugars, starch and cellulose from the same sample. We evaluated three different starch preparation methods, namely (1) enzymatic hydrolysis by alpha-amylase, (2) solubilization by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) followed by precipitation with ethanol, and (3) partial hydrolysis by HCl followed by precipitation of the resulting dextrins by ethanol. Starch recovery for three commercially available native starches (from potato, rice and wheat) varied from 48 to 81% for the techniques based on precipitation, whereas the enzymatic technique exhibited yields between 99 and 105%. In addition, the DMSO and HCl techniques introduced a significant (13)C fractionation of up to 1.9 per thousand, while the carbon isotope composition of native starches analyzed after enzymatic digestion did not show any significant difference from that of untreated samples. The enzymatic starch preparation method was then incorporated into a protocol for determination of delta(13)C signatures of lipids, soluble carbohydrates, starch and crude cellulose. The procedure is based on methanol/chloroform/water extraction of dried and ground leaf material. After recovery of the chloroform phase (lipid fraction), the methanol/water phase was deionized by ion exchange (soluble carbohydrate fraction) and the pellet treated with heat-stable alpha-amylase (starch fraction). The remaining insoluble material was subjected

  3. The role of volatile metabolites in microbial communities of the lSS higher plant link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirranen, L. S.; Gitelson, I. I.

    The possibility of controlling the microbial community composition through metabolites produced by microbes has been considered. Basing on the comparative analysis of the experimental data we have revealed the greater contribution of volatile metabolites to microbial interaction than non-volatile. Investigations proved that the interaction between microorganisms through extracted volatile materials is a widespread phenomenon peculiar to many microorganisms. Most cultures inhibited each other's growth, in a number of cases displayed bactericidal action. Stimulatory action occurred 6 - 8 times rarely. The individuality of affect on studied test-cultures growth and the spectrum of microbial resistance to volatile metabolites have been revealed. Based on the comparative cluster analysis of these spectra from 100 studied cultures we have revealed that studied organisms produce a complex of volatile metabolites including 82 inhibiting and 52 stimulating. It was found that excretion of volatile metabolites of studied microorganisms depended upon the culture age, concentration of nutrient medium separate components and volatile by-products excreted by other microorganisms. The production can be increased or decreased by volatile by-products of other microbes. This is related to strain features and the culture age. The prospects of using these regulating metabolites can be defined by the "range", specificity and safety for other members of the microbial community in insufficient concentrations. Volatile metabolites of either plants and microorganisms or other system links - humans and technological equipment installed inside the closed ecosystem - can influence the formation of microbial communities, gas composition of the system atmosphere and state of the plants through the atmosphere. Special experiments showed that volatile microorganism metabolites could accumulate in the environment, dissolve in atmospheric water and maintain their biological activity for many days

  4. Giant viruses infecting algae.

    PubMed

    Van Etten, J L; Meints, R H

    1999-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus (PBCV-1) is the prototype of a family of large, icosahedral, plaque-forming, double-stranded-DNA-containing viruses that replicate in certain unicellular, eukaryotic chlorella-like green algae. DNA sequence analysis of its 330, 742-bp genome leads to the prediction that this phycodnavirus has 376 protein-encoding genes and 10 transfer RNA genes. The predicted gene products of approximately 40% of these genes resemble proteins of known function. The chlorella viruses have other features that distinguish them from most viruses, in addition to their large genome size. These features include the following: (a) The viruses encode multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site-specific endonucleases; (b) PBCV-1 encodes at least part, if not the entire machinery to glycosylate its proteins; (c) PBCV-1 has at least two types of introns--a self-splicing intron in a transcription factor-like gene and a splicesomal processed type of intron in its DNA polymerase gene. Unlike the chlorella viruses, large double-stranded-DNA-containing viruses that infect marine, filamentous brown algae have a circular genome and a lysogenic phase in their life cycle.

  5. Miocene Coralline algae

    SciTech Connect

    Bosence, D.W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The coralline algae (Order Corallinales) were sedimentologically and ecologically important during the Miocene, a period when they were particularly abundant. The many poorly described and illustrated species and the lack of quantitative data in coralline thalli make specific determinations particularly difficult, but some species are well known and widespread in the Tethyan area. The sedimentologic importance of the Miocene coralline algae is reflected in the abundance of in-situ coralline buildups, rhodoliths, and coralline debris facies at Malta and Spain; similar sequences are known throughout the Tethyan Miocene. In-situ buildups vary from leafy crustose biostromes to walled reefs with dense coralline crusts and branches. Growth forms are apparently related to hydraulic energy. Rhodoliths vary from leafy, crustose, and open-branched forms in muddy sediments to dense, crustose, and radial-branching forms in coarse grainstones. Rhodolith form and internal structure correlate closely with hydraulic energy. Coralline genera are conservative and, as such, are useful in paleoenvironmental analysis. Of particular interest are the restricted depth ranges of recent coralline genera. More research is needed on the sedimentology, paleoecology, and systematics of the Cenozoic corallines, as they have particular value in paleoenvironmental analysis.

  6. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  7. Quantification and Localization of S-Nitrosothiols (SNOs) in Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Juan B; Valderrama, Raquel; Carreras, Alfonso; Chaki, Mounira; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are a family of molecules produced by the reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with -SH thiol groups present in the cysteine residues of proteins and peptides caused by a posttranslational modification (PTM) known as S-nitrosylation (strictly speaking S-nitrosation) that can affect the cellular function of proteins. These molecules are a relatively more stable form of NO and consequently can act as a major intracellular NO reservoir and, in some cases, as a long-distance NO signal. Additionally, SNOs can be transferred between small peptides and protein thiol groups through S-transnitrosylation mechanisms. Thus, detection and cellular localization of SNOs in plant cells can be useful tools to determine how these molecules are modulated under physiological and adverse conditions and to determine their importance as a mechanism for regulating different biochemical pathways. Using a highly sensitive chemiluminescence ozone technique and a specific fluorescence probe (Alexa Fluor 488 Hg-link phenylmercury), the methods described in this chapter enable us to determine SNOs in an nM range as well as their cellular distribution in the tissues of different plant species.

  8. Light-modulated NADP-malate dehydrogenases from mossfern and green algae: insights into evolution of the enzyme's regulation.

    PubMed

    Ocheretina, O; Haferkamp, I; Tellioglu, H; Scheibe, R

    2000-11-27

    Chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase is one of the best-studied light-regulated enzymes. In C3 plants, NADP-MDH is a part of the 'malate valve' that controls the export of reducing equivalents in the form of malate to the cytosol. NADP-MDH is completely inactive in the dark and is activated in the light with reduced thioredoxin. Compared with its permanently active NAD-linked counterparts, NADP-MDH exhibits N- and C-terminal sequence extensions, each bearing one regulatory disulphide. Upon reduction of the C-terminal disulphide, the enzyme active site becomes accessible for the substrate. Reduction of the N-terminal disulphide promotes a conformational change advantageous for catalysis. To trace the evolutionary development of this intricate regulation mechanism, we isolated cDNA clones for NADP-MDH from the mossfern Selaginella and from two unicellular green algae. While the NADP-MDH sequence from Selaginella demonstrates the classic cysteine pattern of the higher plant enzyme, the sequences from the green algae are devoid of the N-terminal regulatory disulphide. Phylogenetic analysis of new sequences and of those available in the databases led to the conclusion that the chloroplast NADP-MDH and the cytosolic NAD-dependent form arose via duplication of an ancestral eubacterial gene, which preceded the separation of plant and animal lineages. Redox-sensitive NADP-MDH activity was detected only in the 'green' plant lineage starting from the primitive prasinophytic algae but not in cyanobacteria, Cyanophora paradoxa, red algae and diatoms. The latter organisms therefore appear to utilize mechanisms other than the light-regulated 'malate valve' to remove from plastids excessive electrons produced by photosynthesis.

  9. Study on algae removal by immobilized biosystem on sponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong

    2006-10-01

    In this study, sponges were used to immobilize domesticated sludge microbes in a limited space, forming an immobilized biosystem capable of algae and microcystins removal. The removal effects on algae, microcystins and UV260 of this biosystem and the mechanism of algae removal were studied. The results showed that active sludge from sewage treatment plants was able to remove algae from a eutrophic lake’s water after 7 d of domestication. The removal efficiency for algae, organic matter and microcystins increased when the domesticated sludge was immobilized on sponges. When the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 5h, the removal rates of algae, microcystins and UV260 were 90%, 94.17% and 84%, respectively. The immobilized biosystem consisted mostly of bacteria, the Ciliata and Sarcodina protozoans and the Rotifer metazoans. Algal decomposition by zoogloea bacteria and preying by microcreatures were the two main modes of algal removal, which occurred in two steps: first, absorption by the zoogloea; second, decomposition by the zoogloea bacteria and the predacity of the microcreatures.

  10. The Role of Silicon in Higher Plants under Salinity and Drought Stress

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Devrim; Britto, Dev T.; Huynh, Wayne Q.; Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    2016-01-01

    Although deemed a “non-essential” mineral nutrient, silicon (Si) is clearly beneficial to plant growth and development, particularly under stress conditions, including salinity and drought. Here, we review recent research on the physiological, biochemical, and molecular mechanisms underlying Si-induced alleviation of osmotic and ionic stresses associated with salinity and drought. We distinguish between changes observed in the apoplast (i.e., suberization, lignification, and silicification of the extracellular matrix; transpirational bypass flow of solutes and water), and those of the symplast (i.e., transmembrane transport of solutes and water; gene expression; oxidative stress; metabolism), and discuss these features in the context of Si biogeochemistry and bioavailability in agricultural soils, evaluating the prospect of using Si fertilization to increase crop yield and stress tolerance under salinity and drought conditions. PMID:27486474

  11. Chlorophyll‐Derived Yellow Phyllobilins of Higher Plants as Medium‐Responsive Chiral Photoswitches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengjie; Wurst, Klaus; Jockusch, Steffen; Gruber, Karl; Podewitz, Maren; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The fall colors are signs of chlorophyll breakdown, the biological process in plants that generates phyllobilins. Most of the abundant natural phyllobilins are colorless, but yellow phyllobilins (phylloxanthobilins) also occur in fall leaves. As shown here, phylloxanthobilins are unique four‐stage photoswitches. Which switching mode is turned on is controlled by the molecular environment. In polar media, phylloxanthobilins are monomeric and undergo photoreversible Z/E isomerization, similar to that observed for bilirubin. Unlike bilirubin, however, the phylloxanthobilin Z isomers photodimerize in apolar solvents by regio‐ and stereospecific thermoreversible [2+2] cycloadditions from self‐assembled hydrogen‐bonded dimers. X‐ray analysis revealed the first stereostructure of a phylloxanthobilin and its hydrogen‐bonded self‐templating architecture, helping to rationalize its exceptional photoswitch features. The chemical behavior of phylloxanthobilins will play a seminal role in identifying biological roles of phyllobilins. PMID:27891749

  12. [Proteolytic enzymes and trypsin inhibitors of higher plants under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Domash, V I; Sharpio, T P; Zabreĭko, S A; Sosnovskaia, T F

    2008-01-01

    The response of the components of a protease-inhibitor system of legume and cereal crops to stress factors was studied. It was found that salinization, heavy metal ions, and phytopathogenic flora inhibit the activity of neutral, acidic, and alkaline proteases at early stages of seed germination, the degree of the inhibition of the endoprotease activity being dependent on the index of tolerance of legume and cereal crops. It was shown that, in response to unfavorable conditions, accumulation of trypsin inhibitors occurs, which is accompanied by the appearance of new protein components, as indicated by electrophoresis. The results confirm the presumption that serine protease inhibitors are involved in the response of plants to stress factors.

  13. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  14. Exploration of the gasification of Spirulina algae in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Hendry, Doug; Wilkinson, Nikolas; Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Jacoby, William

    2012-09-01

    This study presents non-catalytic gasification of Spirulina algae in supercritical water using a plug flow reactor and a mechanism for feeding solid carbon streams into high pressure (>25 MPa) environments. A 2(III)(3-1) factorial experimental design explored the effect of concentration, temperature, and residence time on gasification reactions. A positive displacement pump fed algae slurries into the reactor at a temperature range of 550-600°C, and residence times between 4 and 9s. The results indicate that algae gasify efficiently in supercritical water, highlighting the potential for a high throughput process. Additional experiments determined Arrhenius parameters of Spirulina algae. This study also presents a model of the gasification reaction using the estimated activation energy (108 kJ/mol) and other Arrhenius parameters at plug flow conditions. The maximum rate of gasification under the conditions studied of 53 g/Ls is much higher than previously reported.

  15. First description of a laccase-like enzyme in soil algae.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Schlosser, Dietmar; Reisser, Werner

    2010-09-01

    Laccases (EC 1.10.3.2) are versatile multi-copper oxidases so far found in higher plants, fungi, insects, prokaryotes and lichens. In the present study, the production of an extracellular laccase-like enzyme by the coccoid green soil alga Tetracystis aeria was investigated and the enzyme was partly characterized, thereby providing the first description of a laccase-like enzyme in soil algae. Enzyme production in algae cultures was considerably increased by addition of the fungal laccase inducer copper sulphate. Maximal enzyme production was observed during the stationary growth phase. Peroxidase or tyrosinase activity was not detected. The native enzyme exhibits an apparent molecular mass of about 212 kDa as observed with size exclusion chromatography and about 210-260 kDa as estimated by zymograms. The enzyme efficiently oxidizes 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (2,6-DMP), syringaldazine (SGZ) and the anthraquinone dye Acid Blue 62, while guaiacol and Remazol Brilliant Blue R are only poorly oxidized. The apparent kinetic parameters obtained for ABTS, 2,6-DMP and SGZ oxidation are within the range reported for fungal laccases. Oxidation of the phenolic substrate 2,6-DMP displays a remarkably high pH optimum (pH 8.0-8.5), which is interesting with respect to potential biotechnological applications.

  16. Characterization and dynamics of cytoplasmic F-actin in higher plant endosperm cells during interphase, mitosis, and cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have identified an F-actin cytoskeletal network that remains throughout interphase, mitosis, and cytokinesis of higher plant endosperm cells. Fluorescent labeling was obtained using actin monoclonal antibodies and/or rhodamine-phalloidin. Video-enhanced microscopy and ultrastructural observations of immunogold-labeled preparations illustrated microfilament-microtubule co-distribution and interactions. Actin was also identified in cell crude extract with Western blotting. During interphase, microfilament and microtubule arrays formed two distinct networks that intermingled. At the onset of mitosis, when microtubules rearranged into the mitotic spindle, microfilaments were redistributed to the cell cortex, while few microfilaments remained in the spindle. During mitosis, the cortical actin network remained as an elastic cage around the mitotic apparatus and was stretched parallel to the spindle axis during poleward movement of chromosomes. This suggested the presence of dynamic cross-links that rearrange when they are submitted to slow and regular mitotic forces. At the poles, the regular network is maintained. After midanaphase, new, short microfilaments invaded the equator when interzonal vesicles were transported along the phragmoplast microtubules. Colchicine did not affect actin distribution, and cytochalasin B or D did not inhibit chromosome transport. Our data on endosperm cells suggested that plant cytoplasmic actin has an important role in the cell cortex integrity and in the structural dynamics of the poorly understood cytoplasm- mitotic spindle interface. F-actin may contribute to the regulatory mechanisms of microtubule-dependent or guided transport of vesicles during mitosis and cytokinesis in higher plant cells. PMID:3680376

  17. Genetic engineering of corn and other higher plants: Progress report for the period August 1, 1984--July 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    We have developed a number of potential vectors for maize transformation. All vectors have used the bacterial CAT gene connected between a maize promoter and a maize polyadenylation site. The product of this gene is readily assayed in maize tissue and may provide a fast screen for young seedlings. We have found that chloramphenicol reduces the growth of young seedlings and causes bleaching of the first leaves, but does not kill the plant. A mosaic with a transforming DNA may allow better growth. We remove a portion of the root to assay for CAT activity. CAT activity should be detected even if only a small number of cells contain DNA. If activity is detected in these young plants, the plant will be potted, and F1 and F2 plants will be generated. These will then be screened for stable inheritance of the transforming DNA. The higher the expression of the CAT gene in these few cells, the more reliable will be the assay. Accordingly, we have connected the CAT gene to one of the strongest maize promoters active in the young seedling. This promoter was identified in a large scale screening operation that identified the single copy gene that expressed the most abundant polyA RNA. The promoter and coding regions have been sequenced. The product of this gene has not yet been determined.

  18. Inclusion of human mineralized exometabolites and fish wastes as a source of higher plant mineral nutrition in BTLSS mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Ushakova, Sofya; Anischenko, Olesya; Trifonov, Sergey V.

    Human exometabolites inclusion into an intrasystem mass exchange will allow increasing of a closure level of a biological-technical life support system (BTLSS). Previously at the IBP SB RAS it was shown that human mineralized exometabolites could be incorporated in the BTLSS mass exchange as a mineral nutrition source for higher plants. However, it is not known how that combined use of human mineralized exometabolites and fish wastes in the capacity of nutrient medium, being a part of the BTLSS consumer wastes, will affect the plant productivity. Several wheat vegetations were grown in an uneven-aged conveyor on a neutral substrate. A mixture of human mineralized exometabolites and fish wastes was used as a nutrient solution in the experiment treatment and human mineralized exometabolites were used in the control. Consequently, a high wheat yield in the experiment treatment practically equal to the control yield was obtained. Thus, mineralized fish wastes can be an additional source of macro-and micronutrients for plants, and use of such wastes for the plant mineral nutrition allows increasing of BTLSS closure level.

  19. Biological effects of weightlessness and clinostatic conditions registered in cells of root meristem and cap of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytnik, K. M.; Kordyum, E. L.; Belyavskaya, N. A.; Nedukha, E. M.; Tarasenko, V. A.

    Research in cellular reproduction, differentiation and vital activity, i.e. processes underlying the development and functioning of organisms, plants included, is essential for solving fundamental and applied problems of space biology. Detailed anatomical analysis of roots of higher plants grown on board the Salyut 6 orbital research station show that under conditions of weightlessness for defined duration mitosis, cytokinesis and tissue differentiation in plant vegetative organs occur essentially normally. At the same time, certain rearrangements in the structural organization of cellular organelles - mainly the plastid apparatus, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus and nucleus - are established in the root meristem and cap of the experimental plants. This is evidence for considerable changes in cellular metabolism. The structural changes in the subcellular level arising under spaceflight conditions are partially absent in clinostat experiments designed to simulate weightlessness. Various clinostatic conditions have different influences on the cell structural and functional organization than does space flight. It is suggested that alterations of cellular metabolism under weightlessness and clinostatic conditions occur within existing genetic programs.

  20. Association mapping for phenology and plant architecture in maize shows higher power for developmental traits compared with growth influenced traits.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, S; Bertin, P; Presterl, T; Jamin, P; Coubriche, D; Gouesnard, B; Laborde, J; Charcosset, A

    2017-03-01

    Plant architecture, phenology and yield components of cultivated plants have repeatedly been shaped by selection to meet human needs and adaptation to different environments. Here we assessed the genetic architecture of 24 correlated maize traits that interact during plant cycle. Overall, 336 lines were phenotyped in a network of 9 trials and genotyped with 50K single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Phenology was the main factor of differentiation between genetic groups. Then yield components distinguished dents from lower yielding genetic groups. However, most of trait variation occurred within group and we observed similar overall and within group correlations, suggesting a major effect of pleiotropy and/or linkage. We found 34 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for individual traits and six for trait combinations corresponding to PCA coordinates. Among them, only five were pleiotropic. We found a cluster of QTLs in a 5 Mb region around Tb1 associated with tiller number, ear row number and the first PCA axis, the latter being positively correlated to flowering time and negatively correlated to yield. Kn1 and ZmNIP1 were candidate genes for tillering, ZCN8 for leaf number and Rubisco Activase 1 for kernel weight. Experimental repeatabilities, numbers of QTLs and proportion of explained variation were higher for traits related to plant development such as tillering, leaf number and flowering time, than for traits affected by growth such as yield components. This suggests a simpler genetic determinism with larger individual QTL effects for the first category.

  1. An empirical review: Characteristics of plant microsatellite markers that confer higher levels of genetic variation1

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Benjamin J.; Culley, Theresa M.; Avanesyan, Alina; Stokes, Richard; Brzyski, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    During microsatellite marker development, researchers must choose from a pool of possible primer pairs to further test in their species of interest. In many cases, the goal is maximizing detectable levels of genetic variation. To guide researchers and determine which markers are associated with higher levels of genetic variation, we conducted a literature review based on 6782 genomic microsatellite markers published from 1997–2012. We examined relationships between heterozygosity (He or Ho) or allele number (A) with the following marker characteristics: repeat type, motif length, motif region, repeat frequency, and microsatellite size. Variation across taxonomic groups was also analyzed. There were significant differences between imperfect and perfect repeat types in A and He. Dinucleotide motifs exhibited significantly higher A, He, and Ho than most other motifs. Repeat frequency and motif region were positively correlated with A, He, and Ho, but correlations with microsatellite size were minimal. Higher taxonomic groups were disproportionately represented in the literature and showed little consistency. In conclusion, researchers should carefully consider marker characteristics so they can be tailored to the desired application. If researchers aim to target high genetic variation, dinucleotide motif lengths with large repeat frequencies may be best. PMID:26312192

  2. Engineering algae for biohydrogen and biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Beer, Laura L; Boyd, Eric S; Peters, John W; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2009-06-01

    There is currently substantial interest in utilizing eukaryotic algae for the renewable production of several bioenergy carriers, including starches for alcohols, lipids for diesel fuel surrogates, and H2 for fuel cells. Relative to terrestrial biofuel feedstocks, algae can convert solar energy into fuels at higher photosynthetic efficiencies, and can thrive in salt water systems. Recently, there has been considerable progress in identifying relevant bioenergy genes and pathways in microalgae, and powerful genetic techniques have been developed to engineer some strains via the targeted disruption of endogenous genes and/or transgene expression. Collectively, the progress that has been realized in these areas is rapidly advancing our ability to genetically optimize the production of targeted biofuels.

  3. Factors affecting spore germination in algae - review.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, S C

    2009-01-01

    This review surveys whatever little is known on the influence of different environmental factors like light, temperature, nutrients, chemicals (such as plant hormones, vitamins, etc.), pH of the medium, biotic factors (such as algal extracellular substances, algal concentration, bacterial extracellular products, animal grazing and animal extracellular products), water movement, water stress, antibiotics, UV light, X-rays, gamma-rays, and pollution on the spore germination in algae. The work done on the dormancy of algal spores and on the role of vegetative cells in tolerating environmental stress is also incorporated.

  4. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for "molecular pharming" in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered - from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity.

  5. Photoprotection and triplet energy transfer in higher plants: the role of electronic and nuclear fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Cupellini, Lorenzo; Jurinovich, Sandro; Prandi, Ingrid G; Caprasecca, Stefano; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-04-28

    Photosynthetic organisms employ several photoprotection strategies to avoid damage due to the excess energy in high light conditions. Among these, quenching of triplet chlorophylls by neighboring carotenoids (Cars) is fundamental in preventing the formation of singlet oxygen. Cars are able to accept the triplets from chlorophylls by triplet energy transfer (TET). We have here studied TET rates in CP29, a minor light-harvesting complex (LHC) of the Photosystem II in plants. A fully atomistic strategy combining classical molecular dynamics of the LHC in its natural environment with a hybrid time-dependent density functional theory/polarizable MM description of the TET is used. We find that the structural fluctuations of the pigment-protein complex can largely enhance the transfer rates with respect to those predicted using the crystal structure, reducing the triplet quenching times in the subnanosecond scale. These findings add a new perspective for the interpretation of the photoprotection function and its relation with structural motions of the LHC.

  6. Evidence for Two Catalytic Sites in the Functional Unit of H+-ATPase from Higher Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, G.; Berberian, G.; Beauge, L.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the nature of the complex ATP activation kinetics of plant H+-ATPases. To this aim we analyzed that activation in three isolated isoforms (AHA1, AHA2, and AHA3) of H+-ATPase from Arabidopsis thaliana. The isoforms were obtained by heterologous expression in endoplasmic reticulum of yeast. ATP stimulation was always with low affinity (K0.5 between 500 and 1800 [mu]M). In addition, the curves were not Michaelian and displayed positive cooperativity. Detailed studies with AHA2 showed that (a) enzyme solubilized with lysophosphatidylcholine exhibited Michaelian behavior even in the presence of soybean lecithin liposomes free of enzyme, (b) solubilized enzyme incorporated into the same liposomes displayed two-site kinetics with negative cooperativity, and (c) enzyme partially digested with trypsin lost the C-terminal portion of the molecule. Under this condition the ATP activation kinetics was Michaelian or had a slight negative cooperativity and the K0.5ATP was reduced 3-fold. These data suggest that the functional unit of the H+-ATPase has two catalytic ATP sites with variable cooperativity and kinetics competence of the E(ATP) and E(ATP)2 complexes. Such variability is likely modulated by the association of the enzyme with membrane structures and by a regulatory domain in the C terminus of the enzyme molecule. PMID:12228512

  7. Herbicides do not ensure for higher wheat yield, but eliminate rare plant species

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sabrina; Gabriel, Edith; Chadœuf, Joël; Bonneu, Florent; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Weed control is generally considered to be essential for crop production and herbicides have become the main method used for weed control in developed countries. However, concerns about harmful environmental consequences have led to strong pressure on farmers to reduce the use of herbicides. As food demand is forecast to increase by 50% over the next century, an in-depth quantitative analysis of crop yields, weeds and herbicides is required to balance economic and environmental issues. This study analysed the relationship between weeds, herbicides and winter wheat yields using data from 150 winter wheat fields in western France. A Bayesian hierarchical model was built to take account of farmers’ behaviour, including implicitly their perception of weeds and weed control practices, on the effectiveness of treatment. No relationship was detected between crop yields and herbicide use. Herbicides were found to be more effective at controlling rare plant species than abundant weed species. These results suggest that reducing the use of herbicides by up to 50% could maintain crop production, a result confirmed by previous studies, while encouraging weed biodiversity. Food security and biodiversity conservation may, therefore, be achieved simultaneously in intensive agriculture simply by reducing the use of herbicides. PMID:27453451

  8. Transport of phosphocholine in higher plant cells: sup 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gout, E.; Bligny, R.; Roby, C.; Douce, R. )

    1990-06-01

    Phosphocholine (PC) is an abundant primary form of organic phosphate that is transported in plant xylem sap. Addition of PC to the perfusate of compressed P{sub i}-starved sycamore cells monitored by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy resulted in an accumulation of PC and all the other phosphate esters in the cytoplasmic compartment. Addition of hemicholinium-3, an inhibitor of choline uptake, to the perfusate inhibited PC accumulation but not inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}). When the P{sub i}-starved cells were perfused with a medium containing either P{sub i} or PC, the resulting P{sub i} distribution in the cell was the same. Addition of choline instead of PC to the perfusate of compressed cells resulted in an accumulation of PC in the cytoplasmic compartment from choline kinase activity. In addition, PC phosphatase activity has been discovered associated with the cell wall. These results indicate that PC was rapidly hydrolyzed outside the cell and that choline and P{sub i} entered the cytosolic compartment where choline kinase re-forms PC.

  9. Transport of phosphocholine in higher plant cells: 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed Central

    Gout, E; Bligny, R; Roby, C; Douce, R

    1990-01-01

    Phosphocholine (PC) is an abundant primary form of organic phosphate that is transported in plant xylem sap. Addition of PC to the perfusate of compressed Pi-starved sycamore cells monitored by 31P NMR spectroscopy resulted in an accumulation of PC and all the other phosphate esters in the cytoplasmic compartment. Addition of hemicholinium-3, an inhibitor of choline uptake, to the perfusate inhibited PC accumulation but not inorganic phosphate (Pi). When the Pi-starved cells were perfused with a medium containing either Pi or PC, the resulting Pi distribution in the cell was the same. Addition of choline instead of PC to the perfusate of compressed cells resulted in an accumulation of PC in the cytoplasmic compartment from choline kinase activity. In addition, PC phosphatase activity has been discovered associated with the cell wall. These results indicate that PC was rapidly hydrolyzed outside the cell and that choline and Pi entered the cytosolic compartment where choline kinase re-forms PC. PMID:11607080

  10. PPR proteins of green algae

    PubMed Central

    Tourasse, Nicolas J; Choquet, Yves; Vallon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Using the repeat finding algorithm FT-Rep, we have identified 154 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins in nine fully sequenced genomes from green algae (with a total of 1201 repeats) and grouped them in 47 orthologous groups. All data are available in a database, PPRdb, accessible online at http://giavap-genomes.ibpc.fr/ppr. Based on phylogenetic trees generated from the repeats, we propose evolutionary scenarios for PPR proteins. Two PPRs are clearly conserved in the entire green lineage: MRL1 is a stabilization factor for the rbcL mRNA, while HCF152 binds in plants to the psbH-petB intergenic region. MCA1 (the stabilization factor for petA) and PPR7 (a short PPR also acting on chloroplast mRNAs) are conserved across the entire Chlorophyta. The other PPRs are clade-specific, with evidence for gene losses, duplications, and horizontal transfer. In some PPR proteins, an additional domain found at the C terminus provides clues as to possible functions. PPR19 and PPR26 possess a methyltransferase_4 domain suggesting involvement in RNA guanosine methylation. PPR18 contains a C-terminal CBS domain, similar to the CBSPPR1 protein found in nucleoids. PPR16, PPR29, PPR37, and PPR38 harbor a SmR (MutS-related) domain similar to that found in land plants pTAC2, GUN1, and SVR7. The PPR-cyclins PPR3, PPR4, and PPR6, in addition, contain a cyclin domain C-terminal to their SmR domain. PPR31 is an unusual PPR-cyclin containing at its N terminus an OctotricoPeptide Repeat (OPR) and a RAP domain. We consider the possibility that PPR proteins with a SmR domain can introduce single-stranded nicks in the plastid chromosome. PMID:24021981

  11. How Embryophytic is the Biosynthesis of Phenylpropanoids and their Derivatives in Streptophyte Algae?

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan; de Vries, Sophie; Slamovits, Claudio H; Rose, Laura E; Archibald, John M

    2017-03-13

    The origin of land plants from algae is a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. It is becoming increasingly clear that many characters that were once assumed to be "embryophyte-specific" can in fact be found in their closest algal relatives, the streptophyte algae. One such case is the phenylpropanoid pathway. While biochemical data indicate that streptophyte algae harbor lignin-like components, the phenylpropanoid core pathway, which serves as the backbone of lignin biosynthesis, has been proposed to have arisen at the base of the land plants. Here we revisit this hypothesis using a wealth of new sequence data from streptophyte algae. Tracing the biochemical pathway towards lignin biogenesis, we show that most of the genes required for phenylpropanoid synthesis and the precursors for lignin production were already present in streptophyte algae. Nevertheless, phylogenetic analyses and protein structure predictions of one of the key enzyme classes in lignin production, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), suggest that CADs of streptophyte algae are more similar to sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenases (SADs). This suggests that the end-products of the pathway leading to lignin biosynthesis in streptophyte algae may faciliate the production of lignin-like compounds and defense molecules. We hypothesize that streptophyte algae already possessed the genetic toolkit from which the capacity to produce lignin later evolved in vascular plants.

  12. Identification of a mechanism of photoprotective energy dissipation in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ruban, Alexander V; Berera, Rudi; Ilioaia, Cristian; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Kennis, John T M; Pascal, Andrew A; van Amerongen, Herbert; Robert, Bruno; Horton, Peter; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2007-11-22

    Under conditions of excess sunlight the efficient light-harvesting antenna found in the chloroplast membranes of plants is rapidly and reversibly switched into a photoprotected quenched state in which potentially harmful absorbed energy is dissipated as heat, a process measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence or qE. Although the biological significance of qE is established, the molecular mechanisms involved are not. LHCII, the main light-harvesting complex, has an inbuilt capability to undergo transformation into a dissipative state by conformational change and it was suggested that this provides a molecular basis for qE, but it is not known if such events occur in vivo or how energy is dissipated in this state. The transition into the dissipative state is associated with a twist in the configuration of the LHCII-bound carotenoid neoxanthin, identified using resonance Raman spectroscopy. Applying this technique to study isolated chloroplasts and whole leaves, we show here that the same change in neoxanthin configuration occurs in vivo, to an extent consistent with the magnitude of energy dissipation. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, performed on purified LHCII in the dissipative state, shows that energy is transferred from chlorophyll a to a low-lying carotenoid excited state, identified as one of the two luteins (lutein 1) in LHCII. Hence, it is experimentally demonstrated that a change in conformation of LHCII occurs in vivo, which opens a channel for energy dissipation by transfer to a bound carotenoid. We suggest that this is the principal mechanism of photoprotection.

  13. Photosynthetic unit size, carotenoids, and chlorophyll-protein composition of Prochloron sp., a prokaryotic green alga.

    PubMed

    Withers, N W; Alberte, R S; Lewin, R A; Thornber, J P; Britton, G; Goodwin, T W

    1978-05-01

    Six samples of the prokaryotic, unicellular algae Prochloron sp., which occur in association with didemnid ascidians, were collected from various localities in the tropical Pacific Ocean, and their pigments and chlorophyll-protein complexes were identified and characterized. No phycobilin pigments were detected in any of the species. Chlorophylls a and b were present in ratios of a/b = 4.4-6.9. The major carotenoids were beta-carotene (70%) and zeaxanthin (20%). Minor carotenoids of one isolate were identified as echinenone, cryptoxanthin, isocryptoxanthin, mutachrome, and trihydroxy-beta-carotene; no epsilon-ring carotenoids were found in any sample. Except for the absence of glycosidic carotenoids, the overall pigment composition is typical of cyanobacteria. A chlorophyll a/b-protein complex was present in Prochloron; it was electrophoretically and spectrally indistinguishable from the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein of higher plants and green algae. It accounted for 26% (compared to approximately 50% in green plants) of the total chlorophyll; 17% was associated with a P700-chlorophyll a-protein. The photosynthetic unit size of 240 +/- 10 chlorophylls per P700 in Prochloron was about half that of eukaryotic green plants. A model is proposed for the in vivo organization of chlorophyll in Prochloron.

  14. Role of Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin in the regulation of microtubules in higher plants. Progress report, FY91

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, R.

    1991-12-31

    This work is aimed at defining the role of calcium/calmodulin in regulating cortical microtubules (MTS) in higher plants. Recent thrust has been to define the effects of calcium upon microtubules in vivo. Using lysed protoplasts, we noted Mts are destabilized by calcium/calmodulin. This effect could be the result of gross depolymerization induced by Ca{sup ++}/calmodulin, or by an increase in the dynamic flux rate. Intact protoplasts exposed to high (10 mM) levels of calcium (which would be expected to increase intercellular calcium levels) contained microtubules that were hypersensitive to Mt inhibitors, compared to control protoplasts exposed to low calcium environments.

  15. Amino acids implicated in plant defense are higher in Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus-tolerant citrus varieties.

    PubMed

    Killiny, Nabil; Hijaz, Faraj

    2016-01-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening, has been threatening the citrus industry since the early 1900's and up to this date there are no effective cures for this disease. Field observations and greenhouse controlled studies demonstrated that some citrus genotypes are more tolerant to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) pathogen than others. However, the mechanisms underpinning tolerance has not been determined yet. The phloem sap composition of CLas-tolerant and sensitive citrus varieties was studied to identify metabolites that could be responsible for their tolerance to CLas. The citrus phloem sap was collected by centrifugation and was analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after methyl chloroformate derivatization. Thirty-three metabolites were detected in the phloem sap of the studied varieties: twenty 20 amino acids, eight 8 organic acids, and five 5 fatty acids. Interestingly, the levels of most amino acids, especially those implicated in plantdefense to pathogens such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine, and asparagine were higher in tolerant varieties. Although the level of organic acids varied between cultivars, this variation was not correlated with citrus resistance to CLas and could be cultivar specific. The fatty acids were found in trace amounts and in most cases their levels were not significantly different among varieties. Better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning citrus tolerance to CLas will help in developing economically tolerant varieties.

  16. Amino acids implicated in plant defense are higher in Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus-tolerant citrus varieties

    PubMed Central

    Killiny, Nabil; Hijaz, Faraj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening, has been threatening the citrus industry since the early 1900's and up to this date there are no effective cures for this disease. Field observations and greenhouse controlled studies demonstrated that some citrus genotypes are more tolerant to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) pathogen than others. However, the mechanisms underpinning tolerance has not been determined yet. The phloem sap composition of CLas-tolerant and sensitive citrus varieties was studied to identify metabolites that could be responsible for their tolerance to CLas. The citrus phloem sap was collected by centrifugation and was analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after methyl chloroformate derivatization. Thirty-three metabolites were detected in the phloem sap of the studied varieties: twenty 20 amino acids, eight 8 organic acids, and five 5 fatty acids. Interestingly, the levels of most amino acids, especially those implicated in plantdefense to pathogens such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine, and asparagine were higher in tolerant varieties. Although the level of organic acids varied between cultivars, this variation was not correlated with citrus resistance to CLas and could be cultivar specific. The fatty acids were found in trace amounts and in most cases their levels were not significantly different among varieties. Better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning citrus tolerance to CLas will help in developing economically tolerant varieties. PMID:27057814

  17. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  18. Biological importance of marine algae.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Ali A

    2010-01-01

    Marine organisms are potentially prolific sources of highly bioactive secondary metabolites that might represent useful leads in the development of new pharmaceutical agents. Algae can be classified into two main groups; first one is the microalgae, which includes blue green algae, dinoflagellates, bacillariophyta (diatoms)… etc., and second one is macroalgae (seaweeds) which includes green, brown and red algae. The microalgae phyla have been recognized to provide chemical and pharmacological novelty and diversity. Moreover, microalgae are considered as the actual producers of some highly bioactive compounds found in marine resources. Red algae are considered as the most important source of many biologically active metabolites in comparison to other algal classes. Seaweeds are used for great number of application by man. The principal use of seaweeds as a source of human food and as a source of gums (phycocollides). Phycocolloides like agar agar, alginic acid and carrageenan are primarily constituents of brown and red algal cell walls and are widely used in industry.

  19. Algae as promising organisms for environment and health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Algae, like other plants, produce a variety of remarkable compounds collectively referred to as secondary metabolites. They are synthesized by these organisms at the end of the growth phase and/or due to metabolic alterations induced by environmental stress conditions. Carotenoids, phenolic compounds, phycobiliprotein pigments, polysaccharides and unsaturated fatty acids are same of the algal natural products, which were reported to have variable biological activities, including antioxidant activity, anticancer activity, antimicroabial activity against bacteria-virus-algae-fungi, organic fertilizer and bioremediation potentials. PMID:21862867

  20. Organic Acids: The Pools of Fixed Carbon Involved in Redox Regulation and Energy Balance in Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Eprintsev, Alexander T

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are synthesized in plants as a result of the incomplete oxidation of photosynthetic products and represent the stored pools of fixed carbon accumulated due to different transient times of conversion of carbon compounds in metabolic pathways. When redox level in the cell increases, e.g., in conditions of active photosynthesis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in mitochondria is transformed to a partial cycle supplying citrate for the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate (citrate valve), while malate is accumulated and participates in the redox balance in different cell compartments (via malate valve). This results in malate and citrate frequently being the most accumulated acids in plants. However, the intensity of reactions linked to the conversion of these compounds can cause preferential accumulation of other organic acids, e.g., fumarate or isocitrate, in higher concentrations than malate and citrate. The secondary reactions, associated with the central metabolic pathways, in particularly with the TCA cycle, result in accumulation of other organic acids that are derived from the intermediates of the cycle. They form the additional pools of fixed carbon and stabilize the TCA cycle. Trans-aconitate is formed from citrate or cis-aconitate, accumulation of hydroxycitrate can be linked to metabolism of 2-oxoglutarate, while 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate can be formed from pyruvate and glyoxylate. Glyoxylate, a product of either glycolate oxidase or isocitrate lyase, can be converted to oxalate. Malonate is accumulated at high concentrations in legume plants. Organic acids play a role in plants in providing redox equilibrium, supporting ionic gradients on membranes, and acidification of the extracellular medium.

  1. Organic Acids: The Pools of Fixed Carbon Involved in Redox Regulation and Energy Balance in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Igamberdiev, Abir U.; Eprintsev, Alexander T.

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are synthesized in plants as a result of the incomplete oxidation of photosynthetic products and represent the stored pools of fixed carbon accumulated due to different transient times of conversion of carbon compounds in metabolic pathways. When redox level in the cell increases, e.g., in conditions of active photosynthesis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in mitochondria is transformed to a partial cycle supplying citrate for the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate (citrate valve), while malate is accumulated and participates in the redox balance in different cell compartments (via malate valve). This results in malate and citrate frequently being the most accumulated acids in plants. However, the intensity of reactions linked to the conversion of these compounds can cause preferential accumulation of other organic acids, e.g., fumarate or isocitrate, in higher concentrations than malate and citrate. The secondary reactions, associated with the central metabolic pathways, in particularly with the TCA cycle, result in accumulation of other organic acids that are derived from the intermediates of the cycle. They form the additional pools of fixed carbon and stabilize the TCA cycle. Trans-aconitate is formed from citrate or cis-aconitate, accumulation of hydroxycitrate can be linked to metabolism of 2-oxoglutarate, while 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate can be formed from pyruvate and glyoxylate. Glyoxylate, a product of either glycolate oxidase or isocitrate lyase, can be converted to oxalate. Malonate is accumulated at high concentrations in legume plants. Organic acids play a role in plants in providing redox equilibrium, supporting ionic gradients on membranes, and acidification of the extracellular medium. PMID:27471516

  2. Enhancement of Taihu blue algae anaerobic digestion efficiency by natural storage.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hengfeng; Lu, Minfeng; Zhao, Mingxing; Huang, Zhenxing; Ren, Hongyan; Yan, Qun; Ruan, Wenquan

    2013-12-01

    Taihu blue algae after different storage time from 0 to 60 d were anaerobic fermented to evaluate their digestibility and process stability. Results showed that anaerobic digestion (AD) of blue algae under 15 d natural storage led to the highest CH4 production of 287.6 mL g(-1) VS at inoculum substrate ratio 2.0, demonstrating 36.69% improvement comparing with that from fresh algae. Storage of blue algae led to cell death, microcystins (MCs) release and VS reduction by spontaneous fermentation. However, it also played an important role in removing algal cell wall barrier, pre-hydrolysis and pre-acidification, leading to the improvement in CH4 yield. Closer examination of volatile fatty acids (VFA) variation, VS removal rates and key enzymes change during AD proved short storage time (≤ 15 d) of blue algae had higher efficiencies in biodegradation and methanation. Furthermore, AD presented significant biodegradation potential for MCs released from Taihu blue algae.

  3. Gas Exchange of Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, Elizabeth C. B.; Lynch, Victoria H.

    1965-01-01

    Continuously growing cultures of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Starr 252, operating at constant density and under constant environmental conditions, produced uniform photosynthetic quotient (PQ = CO2/O2) and O2 values during 6 months of observations. The PQ for the entire study was 0.90 ± 0.024. The PQ remained constant over a threefold light-intensity change and a threefold change in O2 production (0.90 ± 0.019). At low light intensities, when the rate of respiration approached the rate of photosynthesis, the PQ became extremely variable. Six lamps of widely different spectral-energy distribution produced no significant change in the PQ (0.90 ± 0.025). Oxygen production was directly related to the number of quanta available, irrespective of spectral-energy distribution. Such dependability in producing uniform PQ and O2 values warrants a consideration of algae to maintain a constant gas environment for submarine or spaceship use. Images Fig. 1 PMID:14339260

  4. Higher β-diversity observed for herbs over woody plants is driven by stronger habitat filtering in a tropical understory.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephen J; Salpeter, Kara; Comita, Liza S

    2016-08-01

    Herbaceous plants are a key component of tropical forests. Previous work indicates that herbs contribute substantially to the species richness of tropical plant communities. However, the processes structuring tropical herb diversity, and how they contrast with woody communities, have been underexplored. Within the understory of a 50-ha forest dynamics plot in central Panama, we compared the diversity, distribution, and abundance of vascular herbaceous plants with woody seedlings (i.e., tree and lianas <1 cm DBH and ≥20 cm tall). Beta-diversity was calculated for each community using a null model approach. We then assessed the similarity in alpha and beta-diversity among herbs, tree seedlings, and liana seedlings. Strengths of habitat associations were measured using permutational ANOVA among topographic habitat-types. Variance partitioning was then used to quantify the amount of variation in species richness and composition explained by spatial and environmental variables (i.e., topography, soils, and shade) for each growth form. Species richness and diversity were highest for tree seedlings, followed by liana seedlings and then herbs. In contrast, beta-diversity was 16-127% higher for herbs compared to woody seedlings, indicating higher spatial variation in this stratum. We observed no correlation between local richness or compositional uniqueness of herbs and woody seedlings across sites, indicating that different processes control the spatial patterns of woody and herbaceous diversity and composition. Habitat associations were strongest for herbs, as indicated by greater compositional dissimilarity among habitat types. Likewise, environmental variables explained a larger proportion of the variation in species richness and composition for herbs than for woody seedlings (richness = 25%, 14%, 12%; composition = 25%, 9%, 6%, for herbs, trees, and lianas, respectively). These differences between strata did not appear to be due to differences in lifespan alone

  5. Granal stacking of thylakoid membranes in higher plant chloroplasts: the physicochemical forces at work and the functional consequences that ensue.

    PubMed

    Chow, Wah Soon; Kim, Eun-Ha; Horton, Peter; Anderson, Jan M

    2005-12-01

    The formation of grana in chloroplasts of higher plants is examined in terms of the subtle interplay of physicochemical forces of attraction and repulsion. The attractive forces between two adjacent membranes comprise (1) van der Waals attraction that depends on the abundance and type of atoms in each membrane, on the distance between the membranes and on the dielectric constant, (2) depletion attraction that generates local order by granal stacking at the expense of greater disorder (i.e. entropy) in the stroma, and (3) an electrostatic attraction of opposite charges located on adjacent membranes. The repulsive forces comprise (1) electrostatic repulsion due to the net negative charge on the outer surface of thylakoid membranes, (2) hydration repulsion that operates at small separations between thylakoid membranes due to layers of bound water molecules, and (3) steric hindrance due to bulky protrusions of Photosystem I (PSI) and ATP synthase into the stroma. In addition, specific interactions may occur, but they await experimental demonstration. Although grana are not essential for photosynthesis, they are ubiquitous in higher plants. Grana may have been selected during evolution for the functional advantages that they confer on higher plants. The functional consequences of grana stacking include (1) enhancement of light capture through a vastly increased area-to-volume ratio and connectivity of several PSIIs with large functional antenna size, (2) the ability to control the lateral separation of PSI from PSII and, therefore, the balanced distribution of excitation energy between two photosystems working in series, (3) the reversible fine-tuning of energy distribution between the photosystems by State 1-State 2 transitions, (4) the ability to regulate light-harvesting via controlled thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy, detected as non-photochemical quenching, (5) dynamic flexibility in the light reactions mediated by a granal structure in response to

  6. Boron uptake, localization, and speciation in marine brown algae.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric P; Wu, Youxian; Carrano, Carl J

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to the generally boron-poor terrestrial environment, the concentration of boron in the marine environment is relatively high (0.4 mM) and while there has been extensive interest in its use as a surrogate of pH in paleoclimate studies in the context of climate change-related questions, the relatively depth independent, and the generally non-nutrient-like concentration profile of this element have led to boron being neglected as a potentially biologically relevant element in the ocean. Among the marine plant-like organisms the brown algae (Phaeophyta) are one of only five lineages of photosynthetic eukaryotes to have evolved complex multicellularity. Many of unusual and often unique features of brown algae are attributable to this singular evolutionary history. These adaptations are a reflection of the marine coastal environment which brown algae dominate in terms of biomass. Consequently, brown algae are of fundamental importance to oceanic ecology, geochemistry, and coastal industry. Our results indicate that boron is taken up by a facilitated diffusion mechanism against a considerable concentration gradient. Furthermore, in both Ectocarpus and Macrocystis some boron is most likely bound to cell wall constituent alginate and the photoassimilate mannitol located in sieve cells. Herein, we describe boron uptake, speciation, localization and possible biological function in two species of brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera and Ectocarpus siliculosus.

  7. Over-expression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa leads to faster plant growth and higher seed yield

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipids extracted from seeds of Camelina sativa have been successfully used as a reliable source of aviation biofuels. This biofuel is environmentally friendly because the drought resistance, frost tolerance and low fertilizer requirement of Camelina sativa allow it to grow on marginal lands. Improving the species growth and seed yield by genetic engineering is therefore a target for the biofuels industry. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of purple acid phosphatase 2 encoded by Arabidopsis (AtPAP2) promotes plant growth by modulating carbon metabolism. Overexpression lines bolt earlier and produce 50% more seeds per plant than wild type. In this study, we explored the effects of overexpressing AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa. Results Under controlled environmental conditions, overexpression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa resulted in longer hypocotyls, earlier flowering, faster growth rate, higher photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, increased seed yield and seed size in comparison with the wild-type line and null-lines. Similar to transgenic Arabidopsis, activity of sucrose phosphate synthase in leaves of transgenic Camelina was also significantly up-regulated. Sucrose produced in photosynthetic tissues supplies the building blocks for cellulose, starch and lipids for growth and fuel for anabolic metabolism. Changes in carbon flow and sink/source activities in transgenic lines may affect floral, architectural, and reproductive traits of plants. Conclusions Lipids extracted from the seeds of Camelina sativa have been used as a major constituent of aviation biofuels. The improved growth rate and seed yield of transgenic Camelina under controlled environmental conditions have the potential to boost oil yield on an area basis in field conditions and thus make Camelina-based biofuels more environmentally friendly and economically attractive. PMID:22472516

  8. Isolation of photosystem II-enriched membranes and the oxygen-evolving complex subunit proteins from higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasusi; Leng, Jing; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2011-01-01

    We describe methods to isolate highly active oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) membranes and core complexes from higher plants, and to purify subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). The membrane samples used as the material for various in vitro studies of PSII are prepared by solubilizing thylakoid membranes with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100, and the core complexes are prepared by further solubilization of the PSII membranes with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-DDM). The OEC subunit proteins are dissociated from the PSII-enriched membranes by alkaline or salt treatment, and are then purified by ion-exchange chromatography using an automated high performance liquid chromatography system.

  9. Isolation and characterization of soluble boron complexes in higher plants. The mechanism of phloem mobility of boron.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, H; Penn, S G; Lebrilla, C B; Brown, P H

    1997-01-01

    Boron (B) polyol complexes have been isolated and characterized from the phloem sap of celery (Apium graveolens L.) and the extrafloral nectar of peach (Prunus persica L.). In celery the direct analysis of untreated phloem sap by matrix-assisted laser desorption-Fourier transform mass spectrometry, with verification by high-performance liquid chromagraphy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, revealed that B is present in the phloem as the mannitol-B-mannitol complex. Molecular modeling further predicted that this complex is present in the 3,4 3',4' bis-mannitol configuration. In the extrafloral nectar of peach, B was present as a mixture of sorbitol-B-sorbitol, fructose-B-fructose, or sorbitol-B-fructose. To our knowledge, these findings represent the first successful isolation and characterization of soluble B complexes from higher plants and provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed phloem B mobility in these species. PMID:9046600

  10. Genotoxicity Assessment of Volatile Organic Compounds in Landfill Gas Emission Using Comet Assay in Higher Terrestrial Plant.

    PubMed

    Na Roi-Et, Veerapas; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Chiemchaisri, Chart

    2017-02-01

    Genotoxicity model is developed to assess the individual subacute toxicity of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) at very low levels as in a landfill gas. Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum), a higher plant, was tested under variation of benzene 54-5656 ng/L, toluene 10-4362 ng/L, ethylbenzene 28-4997 ng/L, xylene 53-4845 ng/L, for 96 h. DNA fragmentation in plant leaves were investigated via comet assay. The results show that DNA migration ratio increased with the BTEX concentrations, but at different rates. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) of DNA fragmentation from the dose-response relationships indicated toluene has the highest EC50 value and followed by benzene, xylene and ethylbenzene. Alternatively, ethylbenzene has the highest toxicity unit and followed by xylene, benzene and toluene as described by toxicity unit (TU). In conclusion, comet assay of Pothos can be used in differentiating DNA fragmentation against very low levels of BTEX in the atmosphere. Pothos is recommended for genotoxicity assessment of a low BTEX contaminated atmosphere.

  11. Evidence for the occurrence of photorespiration in synurophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Shabana; Colman, Brian

    2011-09-01

    The fluxes of CO(2) and oxygen during photosynthesis by cell suspensions of Tessellaria volvocina and Mallomonas papillosa were monitored mass spectrometrically. There was no rapid uptake of CO(2,) only a slow drawdown to compensation concentrations of 26 μM for T. volvocina and 18 μM for M. papillosa, when O(2) evolution ceased, indicating a lack of active bicarbonate uptake by the cells. Darkening of the cells after a period of photosynthesis did not cause rapid release of CO(2), indicating the absence of an intracellular inorganic carbon pool. However, upon darkening a brief burst of CO(2) was observed similar to the post-illumination burst characteristic of C(3) higher plants. Treatment of the cells of both species with the membrane-permeable carbonic anhydrase inhibitor ethoxyzolamide had no adverse effect on photosynthetic rate, but stimulated the dark CO(2) burst indicating the dark oxidation of a compound formed in the light. In the absence of any active accumulation of inorganic carbon photosynthesis in these species should be inhibited by O(2). This was investigated in four synurophyte species T. volvocina, M. papillosa, Synura petersenii, and Synura uvella: photosynthetic O(2) evolution rates in all four algae, measured by O(2) electrode, were significantly higher (40-50%) in media at low O(2) (4%) than in air-equilibrated (21% O(2)) media, indicating an O(2) inhibition of photosynthesis (Warburg effect) and thus the occurrence of photorespiration in these species.

  12. The nucleotide sequence of blue-green algae phenylalanine-tRNA and the evolutionary origin of chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, L I; Barnett, W E; Lin, F K; Furr, T D; Heckman, J E; RajBhandary, U L; Chang, S H

    1982-01-01

    Phenylalanine tRNA from the blue-green alga, Agmenellum quadruplicatum, has been purified to homogeneity. The nucleotide sequence of this tRNA was determined to be: (see tests) Comparisons of the sequence and the modified nucleosides of this tRNA with those of other tRNAPhes thus far sequenced, indicate that this blue green algal tRNAPhe is typically prokaryotic and closely resembles the chloroplast tRNAPhes of higher plants and Euglena. The significance of this observation to the evolutionary origin of chloroplasts is discussed. Images PMID:6817301

  13. Hydrothermal liquefaction of municipal wastewater cultivated algae: Increasing overall sustainability and value streams of algal biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Griffin William

    The forefront of the 21st century presents ongoing challenges in economics, energy, and environmental remediation, directly correlating with priorities for U.S. national security. Displacing petroleum-derived fuels with clean, affordable renewable fuels represents a solution to increase energy independence while stimulating economic growth and reducing carbon-based emissions. The U.S. government embodied this goal by passing the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) in 2007, mandating 36 billion gallons of annual biofuel production by 2022. Algae possess potential to support EISA goals and have been studied for the past 30-50 years as an energy source due to its fast growth rates, noncompetitive nature to food markets, and ability to grow using nutrient waste streams. Algae biofuels have been identified by the National Research Council to have significant sustainability concerns involving water, nutrient, and land use. Utilizing municipal wastewater to cultivate algae provides both water and nutrients needed for growth, partially alleviating these concerns. This dissertation demonstrates a pathway for algae biofuels which increases both sustainability and production of high-value products. Algae are cultivated in pilot-scale open ponds located at the Lawrence Wastewater Treatment Plant (Lawrence, KS) using solely effluent from the secondary clarifier, prior to disinfection and discharge, as both water and nutrient sources. Open ponds were self-inoculated by wastewater effluent and produced a mixed-species culture of various microalgae and macroalgae. Algae cultivation provided further wastewater treatment, removing both nitrogen and phosphorus, which have devastating pollution effects when discharged to natural watersheds, especially in large draining watersheds like the Gulf Coast. Algae demonstrated significant removal of other trace metals such as iron, manganese, barium, aluminum, and zinc. Calcium did not achieve high removal rate but did present a

  14. Growth and Metabolism of the Green Alga, Chlorella Pyrenoidosa, in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, W. Ronald

    2003-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on living organisms during space flight has been a topic of interest for some time, and a substantial body of knowledge on the subject has accumulated. Despite this, comparatively little information is available regarding the influence of microgravity on algae, even though it has been suggested for long duration flight or occupancy in space that plant growth systems, including both higher plants and algae, are likely to be necessary for bioregenerative life support systems. High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating-Wall Vessel or HARV bioreactors developed at Johnson Space Center provide a laboratory-based approach to investigating the effects of microgravity on cellular reactions. In this study, the HARV bioreactor was used to examine the influence of simulated microgravity on the growth and metabolism of the green alga, Chlorella pyrenoidosa. After the first 2 days of culture, cell numbers increased more slowly in simulated microgravity than in the HARV gravity control; after 7 days, growth in simulated microgravity was just over half (58%) that of the gravity control and at 14 days it was less than half (42%). Chlorophyll and protein were also followed as indices of cell competence and function; as with growth, after 2-3 days, protein and chlorophyll levels were reduced in modeled microgravity compared to gravity controls. Photosynthesis is a sensitive biochemical index of the fitness of photosynthetic organisms; thus, CO2-dependent O2 evolution was tested as a measure of photosynthetic capacity of cells grown in simulated microgravity. When data were expressed with respect to cell number, modeled microgravity appeared to have little effect on CO2 fixation. Thus, even though the overall growth rate was lower for cells cultured in microgravity, the photosynthetic capacity of the cells appears to be unaffected. Cells grown in simulated microgravity formed loose clumps or aggregates within about 2 days of culture, with aggregation increasing over time

  15. Polysaccharides of the red algae.

    PubMed

    Usov, Anatolii I

    2011-01-01

    Red algae (Rhodophyta) are known as the source of unique sulfated galactans, such as agar, agarose, and carrageenans. The wide practical uses of these polysaccharides are based on their ability to form strong gels in aqueous solutions. Gelling polysaccharides usually have molecules built up of repeating disaccharide units with a regular distribution of sulfate groups, but most of the red algal species contain more complex galactans devoid of gelling ability because of various deviations from the regular structure. Moreover, several red algae may contain sulfated mannans or neutral xylans instead of sulfated galactans as the main structural polysaccharides. This chapter is devoted to a description of the structural diversity of polysaccharides found in the red algae, with special emphasis on the methods of structural analysis of sulfated galactans. In addition to the structural information, some data on the possible use of red algal polysaccharides as biologically active polymers or as taxonomic markers are briefly discussed.

  16. Molecular characterization of a novel heavy metal uptake transporter from higher plants and its potential for use in phytoremediation. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.I.

    1997-01-01

    'In the following the author reports on progress on the Department of Energy Grant from the Office of Energy Research and Office of Environmental Management on the topic of Molecular characterization of a novel heavy metal uptake transporter from higher plants and its potential use in phytoremediation. In this research the authors are investigating the following hypotheses: (1) A novel metal transporter cDNA isolated in my lab functions as a plasma membrane heavy metal and uptake transporter in plants roots. (2.) Over-expression of this cDNA in plants can be used to enhance plasma membrane metal uptake into plant tissues.'

  17. Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-18

    ABCLAT was built to help any model user with spatially explicit Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Carbon Dioxide nutrient flux information, and solar resource information evaluate algal cultivation potential. Initial applications of this modeling framework include Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool Canada and Australia. The Canadian application was copyrighted November 29th 2011 as the Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada. This copyright assertion is for the general framework from which any country or region with the requisite data could create a regionally specific application. The ABCLAT model framework developed by SNL looks at the growth potential in a given region as a function of available nutrients from wastewater and other sources, carbon dioxide from power plants, available solar potential, and if available, land cover and use information. The model framework evaluates the biomass potential, fixed carbon dioxide, potential algal biocrude and required land area for nutrient sources. ABCLAT is built with an object-oriented software program that can provide an easy to use interface for exploring questions related to aigal biomass production.

  18. Food production and gas exchange system using blue-green alga (Spirulina) for CELSS.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, M; Otsubo, K; Nitta, K; Hatayama, S

    1987-01-01

    In order to reduce the cultivation area required for the growth of higher plants in space adoption of algae, which have a higher photosynthetic ability, seems very suitable for obtaining oxygen and food as a useful source of high quality protein. The preliminary cultivation experiment for determining optimum cultivation conditions and for obtaining the critical design parameters of the cultivator itself has been conducted. Spirulina was cultivated in the 6-liter medium containing sodium hydrogen carbonate solution and a cultivation temperature controlled using a thermostat. Generated oxygen gas was separated using a polypropyrene porous hollow fiber membrane module. Through this experiment, oxygen gas (at a concentration of more than 46%) at a rate of 100-150 ml per minute could be obtained.

  19. Food production and gas exchange system using blue-green alga (Spirulina) for CELSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Otsubo, Koji; Nitta, Keiji; Hatayama, Shigeki

    In order to reduce the cultivation area required for the growth of higher plants in space adoption of algae, which have a higher photosynthetic ability, seems very suitable for obtaining oxygen and food as a useful source of high quality protein. The preliminary cultivation experiment for determining optimum cultivation conditions and for obtaining the critical design parameters of the cultivator itself has been conducted. Spirulina was cultivated in the 6-liter medium containing a sodium hydrogen carbonate solution and a cultivation temperature controlled using a thermostat. Generated oxygen gas was separated using a polypropyrene porous hollow fiber membrane module. Through this experiment, oxygen gas (at a concentration of more than 46%) at a rate of 100 ~ 150 ml per minute could be obtained.

  20. Food production and gas exchange system using blue-green alga (spirulina) for CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Otsubo, Koji; Nitta, Keiji; Hatayama, Shigeki

    1987-01-01

    In order to reduce the cultivation area required for the growth of higher plants in space adoption of algae, which have a higher photosynthetic ability, seems very suitable for obtaining oxygen and food as a useful source of high quality protein. The preliminary cultivation experiment for determining optimum cultivation conditions and for obtaining the critical design parameters of the cultivator itself was conducted. Spirulina was cultivated in the 6 liter medium containing a sodium hydrogen carbonate solution and a cultivation temperature controlled using a thermostat. Generated oxygen gas was separated using a polypropyrene porous hollow fiber membrane module. Through this experiment, oxygen gas (at a concentration of more than 46 percent) at a rate of 100 to approx. 150 ml per minute could be obtained.

  1. Comparative analysis of a CFo ATP synthase subunit II homologue derived from marine and fresh-water algae.

    PubMed

    Suda, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Okuda, Yuko; Tsunemoto, Mei; Matsuda, Yuri; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ikeda, Kazunori; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Harada, Kazuo; Bamba, Takeshi; Hirata, Kazumasa

    2009-11-01

    Comparative analysis was performed with a CFo ATP synthase subunit II homologue (CFo-II) derived from marine or fresh-water algae. The marine algae-derived CFo-II-transformed Escherichia coli grew and accumulated ATP more vigorously in NaCl or Cadmium containing medium, suggesting that this gene was useful for the development of stress-tolerant plant.

  2. Microscopic Gardens: A Close Look at Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Mary Ann

    1983-01-01

    Describes classroom activities using algae, including demonstration of eutrophication, examination of mating strains, and activities with Euglena. Includes on algal morphology/physiology, types of algae, and field sources for collecting these organisms. (JN)

  3. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica Louise.

    2013-01-01

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  4. [Impacts of human disturbance on the species composition of higher plants in the wetlands around Dianchi Lake, Yunnan Province of Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xi-Xi; Wu, Zhao-Lu; Luo, Kang; Ding, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Hai-Yan

    2013-09-01

    Introducing higher plants to build semi-natural wetland ecosystem is one of the key approaches to restore the wetlands and lakes that suffered from serious pollution and destruction. Based on the investigation data from 128 quadrats at 26 sampling sites in the wetlands around Dianchi Lake in December 2011-October 2012, and in combining with the references published in the 1960s, this paper discussed the impacts of human activities on the species composition of higher plants in the wetlands around the Lake. In 2012, there were 299 species of 88 families in the wetlands, of which, 181 species were native species, and 118 species were alien ones (including 32 invasive species). Of the 42 species of hydrophytes in the total species, 13 species were alien ones (including 2 invasive species). In comparing with the species data recorded in the 1960s, 232 plants were newly recorded and 43 species disappeared in 2012. Aquatic plants changed obviously. The decreased species were 2 submerged plants, 2 floating plants, and 5 floating leaved plants, and the increased species were 8 emergent plants. Fourteen community types were identified by cluster analysis, of which, the main communities were those dominated by alien species including Pistia stratiotes and Alternanthera philoxeroides. As compared with the data in the 1960s, the plant communities dominated by native species such as Ottelia acuminate and Vallisneria natans were not found presently. Therefore, in the practice of introducing higher plants to restore the degraded wetlands and lakes, it would be necessary to scientifically and appropriately select and blend plant species to avoid the wetland degradation by human activities.

  5. CHROMATOPHORE DEVELOPMENT, PITS, AND OTHER FINE STRUCTURE IN THE RED ALGA, LOMENTARIA BAILEYANA (HARV.) FARLOW

    PubMed Central

    Bouck, G. Benjamin

    1962-01-01

    Thin sections of the red alga, Lomentaria baileyana, a tubular member of the Rhodymeniales, were examined after permanganate fixation and Araldite embedding. Many of the cellular structures in Lomentaria were found to be similar to analogous structures in animals and higher plants. However, in the walls between cells are modified areas generally known as pits which are unique to the higher orders of red algae (Florideae). In this study the pits were found to consist of a plug-like structure surrounded by an uninterrupted membrane apparently continuous with the plasma membrane. Examination of the chromatophore revealed a characteristic limiting membrane, a relatively sparse distribution of plates, no grana, and a single disc apparently oriented parallel to the limiting membrane. In addition to their origin from non-lamellate proplastids, chromatophores were found capable of division by simple constriction. Floridean starch grains were observed outside the chromatophore and the possibility of an association of the first formed grains with portions of the endoplasmic reticulum is considered. Gland cells seem to have a high proportion of Golgi components (dictyosomes), and are believed to have some kind of secretory function. Many of the Golgi vesicles seem to open on the wall and presumably discharge their contents. PMID:19866599

  6. Enhanced lipid extraction from algae using free nitrous acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Naghdi, Forough Ghasemi; Ye, Liu; Lant, Paul; Pratt, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Lipid extraction has been identified as a major bottleneck for large-scale algal biodiesel production. In this work free nitrous acid (FNA) is presented as an effective and low cost pretreatment to enhance lipid recovery from algae. Two batch tests, with a range of FNA additions, were conducted to disrupt algal cells prior to lipid extraction by organic solvents. Total accessible lipid content was quantified by the Bligh and Dyer method, and was found to increase with pretreatment time (up to 48 h) and FNA concentration (up to 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L). Hexane extraction was used to study industrially accessible lipids. The mass transfer coefficient (k) for lipid extraction using hexane from algae treated with 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L FNA was found to be dramatically higher than for extraction from untreated algae. Consistent with extraction results, cell disruption analysis indicated the disruption of the cell membrane barrier.

  7. Aragonitic Pennsylvanian phylloid algae from New Mexico: The missing link

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, B.L.; Moore, C.H. Jr. ); Dickson, J.A.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Remarkably well-preserved codiacean algae (Eugonophyllum and Anchicodium) retaining original aragonite are present in the Virgilian Holder Formation, Sacramento Mountains, south-central New Mexico. The algae are preserved in a 20-cm-thick packstone between two thick (> 5m) shale beds. Aragonite is preserved as a felt-like mesh of needles in the algal skeletons, in the shell fragments of molluscs, in the walls of sponges, and in botryoidal and isopachous marine cements. The aragonite is confirmed by X-ray diffraction, by visual inspection of pristine aragonite needles with SEM, and by a high content of Sr as revealed by microprobe analysis. The average Sr content of the algae (9,091 ppm, n = 21) is comparable to modern codiaceans. Preservation of internal structure in Eugonophyllum was previously unknown. The medullary (interior) region of the Eugonophyllum thallus is composed of an aragonite felt punctuated by small (20 {mu}m diameter), parallel utricles. As in modern codiaceans, the utricles in the cortical (exterior) region of the thallus increase in diameter and their bulbous tips coalesce to form the outer cortex of the plant. This occurrence provides a key piece of evidence in support of hypotheses concerning the nature and origin of phylloid algal bioherms. Because the internal structure of most fossil phylloid algae is replaced by sparry mosaic calcite, taxonomic classification has been difficult even at the fundamental level of division (phylum). The authors discovery confirms that at least some ancient phylloid algae resembled the modern green algae Halimeda or Udotea, and lends credibility to the suggestion that ancient phylloid algal mounds are analogous to modern Halimeda mounds of the South Pacific.

  8. Results of the first stage (2002-2009) of investigation of higher plants onboard RS ISS, as an element of future closed Life Support Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita; Podolsky, Igor; Bingham, Gail; Novikova, Nataliya; Sugimoto, Manabu

    A key task for biomedical human support in long-term manned space expeditions is the develop-ment of the Life Support System (LSS). It is expected that in the first continuous interplanetary expeditions LSS of only a few biological elements of the LSS, such as higher plants will be in-cluded. Therefore, investigations of growth and development of higher plants for consideration in the LSS are of high importance. In a period from October, 2002 to December 2009, 15 ex-periments on cultivation of different plants, including two genetically marked species of dwarf peas, a leaf vegetable strain of Mizuna, radish, barley and wheat were conducted in space greenhouse "LADA" onboard Russian Segment (RS) of International Space Station (ISS). The experiments resulted in the conclusion that the properties of growth and development of plants grown in space greenhouse "LADA" were unaffected by spaceflight conditions. In experiments conducted in a period from 2003 to 2005, it was shown for the first time that pea plants pre-serve reproductive functions, forming viable seeds during at least four continuous full cycles of ontogenesis ("seed to seed") under spaceflight conditions. No changes were found in the genetic apparatus of the pea plants in the four "space" generations. Since 2005, there have been routine collections of microbiological samples from the surfaces of the plants grown on-board in "LADA" greenhouse. Analysis has shown that the properties of contamination of the plants grown aboard by microorganism contain no abnormal patterns. Since 2008, the plants cultivated in "LADA" greenhouse have been frozen onboard RS ISS in the MELFI refrigerator and transferred to the Earth for further investigations. Investigations of Mizuna plants grown and frozen onboard of ISS, showed no differences between "ground control" and "space" plants in chemical and biochemical properties. There also no stress-response was found in kashinriki strain barley planted and frozen onboard ISS.

  9. Genome analysis and its significance in four unicellular algae, Cyanidioschyzon [corrected] merolae, Ostreococcus tauri, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Misumi, Osami; Yoshida, Yamato; Nishida, Keiji; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Sakajiri, Takayuki; Hirooka, Syunsuke; Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Algae play a more important role than land plants in the maintenance of the global environment and productivity. Progress in genome analyses of these organisms means that we can now obtain information on algal genomes, global annotation and gene expression. The full genome information for several algae has already been analyzed. Whole genomes of the red alga Cyanidioschyzon [corrected] merolae, the green algae Ostreococcus tauri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana have been sequenced. Genome composition and the features of cells among the four algae were compared. Each alga maintains basic genes as photosynthetic eukaryotes and possesses additional gene groups to represent their particular characteristics. This review discusses and introduces the latest research that makes the best use of the particular features of each organism and the significance of genome analysis to study biological phenomena. In particular, examples of post-genome studies of organelle multiplication in C. merolae based on analyzed genome information are presented.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.