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Sample records for algal cell density

  1. Role of initial cell density of algal bioassay of toxic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Shrivastava, Alok Kumar

    2016-07-01

    A variety of toxicants such as, metal ions, pesticides, dyes, etc. are continuously being introduced anthropogenically in the environment and adversely affect to the biotic component of the ecosystem. Therefore, the assessment of negative effects of these toxicants is required. However, toxicity assessment anticipated by chemical analysis are extremely poor, therefore the application of the living systems for the same is an excellent approach. Concentration of toxicant as well as cell density both influenced the result of the algal toxicity assay. Here, Scenedesmus sp, a very fast growing green microalgae was selected for study the effects of initial cell densities on the toxicity of Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), paraquat and 2,4-D. Results demonstrated concentration dependent decrease in biomass and specific growth rate of Scenedesmus sp. on exposure of abovesaid toxicants. Paraquat and 2,4-D emerged as extremely toxic to the test alga which reflected from the lowest EC value and very steep decline in biomass was evident with increasing concentration of paraquat and 2,4-D in the medium. Result also demonstrated that initial cell density is a very important parameter than specific growth rate for algal bioassay of various toxicants. Present study clearly illustrated that the use of smaller cell density is always recommended for assaying toxicity of chemicals in algal assays. PMID:26593761

  2. Predicting Pb bioavailability to freshwater microalgae in the presence of fulvic acid: algal cell density as a variable.

    PubMed

    Slaveykova, Vera I

    2007-11-01

    In order to better understand the relationship between lead speciation and its bioavailability in natural waters, the interactions between Pb(II), fulvic acid and the freshwater alga, Chlorella kesslerii were studied at various algal cell densities. An increase in cellular lead or fulvic acid adsorbed to algae was observed with decrease of the cell density from ca. 10(7) to 10(5)cells ml(-1). In the presence of fulvic acid, cellular Pb was greater than that expected for the same free lead ion concentrations in the absence of fulvic acid in agreement to our previous study. This effect was found to be more pronounced at lower cell density, in accordance with increased fulvic acid adsorption to algae. Good fit between experimental observations and model predictions of cellular Pb at various cell densities, was observed by assuming that fulvic acid adsorbed to algae give rise to additional binding sites for Pb(II). The findings of this study indicate that a further extension of the biotic ligand model which includes the formation of a ternary complex and cell density (or concentration) as an input parameter is needed to improve its site-specific predictive capacity, especially in the case of dissolved organic matter-rich surface waters. This extension of predictive capacity would allow to reduce the deviations from the BLM model predictions for microalgae in the presence of dissolved organic matter and hence will serve as a mechanistic tool for establishing ambient site-specific water quality criteria. PMID:17555791

  3. [Temporal-spatial distribution of algal cells during drought period in Daning River of Three Gorges].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Zheng, Bing-Hui; Wang, Kun; Jiang, Xia; Zheng, Hao

    2013-06-01

    In order to provide basic data for algal bloom warning system, the study on temporal-spatial distribution of algal cells was carried out in Daning River of Three Gorges form April to September, 2011. The results of temporal distribution were as follows: the dominant algal species were blue algal, green algal and diatom. During the test, the density proportion of blue algae increased continuously, the density proportion of diatom decreased, while the density proportion of green algae did not change significantly. The results of spatial distribution were as follows: algal density was extremely significantly correlated with water temperature and chlorophyll a (Chl a), the correlation coefficient were 0.97 and 0.95, respectively; algal density was significantly correlated with light intensity (LI), dissolved oxygen (DO), pH and dissoluble total phosphorus (DTP), the correlation coefficient were 0.87, 0.83, 082 and 0.82, respectively; the algal density in 0 m of Caziba was higher than those in other water depths, and in Baishuihe the highest algal density occurred at 2.0 m water depth in June and July, in Shuanglong most algal cells were found in 0 m and 2.0 m in July, August and September, in Dachang algal density in different water depth did not change significantly during the test; the proportion of different algal species in vertical direction was different in the test, probably because different algal species fitted different environments.

  4. Regulation of the pigment optical density of an algal cell: filling the gap between photosynthetic productivity in the laboratory and in mass culture.

    PubMed

    Formighieri, Cinzia; Franck, Fabrice; Bassi, Roberto

    2012-11-30

    An increasing number of investors is looking at algae as a viable source of biofuels, beside cultivation for human/animal feeding or to extract high-value chemicals and pharmaceuticals. However, present biomass productivities are far below theoretical estimations implying that a large part of the available photosynthetically active radiation is not used in photosynthesis. Light utilisation inefficiency and rapid light attenuation within a mass culture due to high pigment optical density of wild type strains have been proposed as major limiting factors reducing solar-to-biomass conversion efficiency. Analysis of growth yields of mutants with reduced light-harvesting antennae and/or reduced overall pigment concentration per cell, generated by either mutagenesis or genetic engineering, could help understanding limiting factors for biomass accumulation in photobioreactor. Meanwhile, studies on photo-acclimation can provide additional information on the average status of algal cells in a photobioreactor to be used in modelling-based predictions. Identifying limiting factors in solar-to-biomass conversion efficiency is the first step for planning strategies of genetic improvement and domestication of algae to finally fill the gap between theoretical and industrial photosynthetic productivity. PMID:22426090

  5. Stability of alginate-immobilized algal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dainty, A.L.; Goulding, K.H.; Robinson, P.K.; Simpkins, I; Trevan, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were carried out using immobilized Chlorella cells to determine the diameter, compressibility, tolerance to phosphate chelation, and ability to retain algal cells during incubation of various alginate beads. These physical bead-characteristics were affected by a variety of interactive factors, including multivalent cation type (hardening agent) and cell, cation, and alginate concentration, the latter exhibiting a predominant influence. The susceptibility of alginate beads to phosphate chelation involved a complex interaction of cation type, concentration, and pH of phosphate solution. A scale of response ranging from gel swelling to gel shrinking was observed for a range of conditions. However, stable Ca alginate beads were maintained in incubation media with a pH of 5.5 and a phosphate concentration of 5 micro M. A preliminary investigation into cell leakage from the beads illustrated the importance of maintaining a stable gel structure and limiting cell growth to reduce leakage.

  6. The effect of light direction and suspended cell concentrations on algal biofilm growth rates.

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Peter J; Espie, George S; Allen, D Grant

    2014-10-01

    Algae biofilms were grown in a semicontinuous flat plate biofilm photobioreactor to study the effects of light direction and suspended algal cell populations on algal biofilm growth. It was determined that, under the growth conditions and biofilm thicknesses studied, light direction had no effect on long-term algal biofilm growth (26 days); however, light direction did affect the concentration of suspended algal cells by influencing the photon flux density in the growth medium in the photobioreactors. This suspended algal cell population affected short-term (7 days) algae cell recruitment and algal biofilm growth, but additional studies showed that enhanced suspended algal cell populations did not affect biofilm growth rates over the long term (26 days). Studying profiles of light transmittance through biofilms as they grew showed that most of the light became attenuated by the biomass after just a few days of growth (88 % after 3 days). The estimated biofilm thicknesses after these few days of growth were approximately 150 μm. The light attenuation data suggests that, although the biofilms grew to 700-900 μm, under these light intensities, only the first few hundred micrometers of the biofilm is receiving enough light to be photosynthetically active. We postulate that this photosynthetically active layer of the biofilm grows adjacent to the light source, while the rest of the biofilm is in a stationary growth phase. The results of this study have implications for algal biofilm photobioreactor design and operation.

  7. The effect of light direction and suspended cell concentrations on algal biofilm growth rates.

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Peter J; Espie, George S; Allen, D Grant

    2014-10-01

    Algae biofilms were grown in a semicontinuous flat plate biofilm photobioreactor to study the effects of light direction and suspended algal cell populations on algal biofilm growth. It was determined that, under the growth conditions and biofilm thicknesses studied, light direction had no effect on long-term algal biofilm growth (26 days); however, light direction did affect the concentration of suspended algal cells by influencing the photon flux density in the growth medium in the photobioreactors. This suspended algal cell population affected short-term (7 days) algae cell recruitment and algal biofilm growth, but additional studies showed that enhanced suspended algal cell populations did not affect biofilm growth rates over the long term (26 days). Studying profiles of light transmittance through biofilms as they grew showed that most of the light became attenuated by the biomass after just a few days of growth (88 % after 3 days). The estimated biofilm thicknesses after these few days of growth were approximately 150 μm. The light attenuation data suggests that, although the biofilms grew to 700-900 μm, under these light intensities, only the first few hundred micrometers of the biofilm is receiving enough light to be photosynthetically active. We postulate that this photosynthetically active layer of the biofilm grows adjacent to the light source, while the rest of the biofilm is in a stationary growth phase. The results of this study have implications for algal biofilm photobioreactor design and operation. PMID:25149444

  8. Evaluation of High Density Algal Cultivation for Secondary Wastewater Polishing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Xu, Shengnan; Bernards, Matthew; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of an algal membrane bioreactor (A-MBR) for secondary wastewater effluent polishing and determined the membrane fouling behavior and dominance of algae in the A-MBR. The continuous flow A-MBR (effective volume = 7.2 L) was operated with low biomass wastage for more than 180 days, resulting in an average algal mixed liquor suspended solid concentration of 4922 mg/L. At the influent concentrations of 43 mg/L COD, 1.6 mg/L total phosphorus (TP), and 11.8 mg/L total nitrogen (TN), the effluent COD, TP and TN concentrations were 26 ± 6 mg/L, 0.7 ± 0.3 mg/L, and 9.6 ± 1.2 mg/L, respectively. High-density algae cultivation facilitated P adsorption and chemical precipitation. However, the TN removal efficiency was only 14% because of low biomass wastage. Although bacteria represented less than 2% of the total biomass in the A-MBR, bacterial growth in the secondary wastewater effluent accelerated membrane fouling. PMID:26803026

  9. Air pollutant production by algal cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The production of phytotoxic air pollutants by cultures of Chlorella vulgaris and Euglena gracilis is considered. Algal and plant culture systems, a fumigation system, and ethylene, ethane, cyanide, and nitrogen oxides assays are discussed. Bean, tobacco, mustard green, cantaloupe and wheat plants all showed injury when fumigated with algal gases for 4 hours. Only coleus plants showed any resistance to the gases. It is found that a closed or recycled air effluent system does not produce plant injury from algal air pollutants.

  10. Algal cell disruption using microbubbles to localize ultrasonic energy

    PubMed Central

    Krehbiel, Joel D.; Schideman, Lance C.; King, Daniel A.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    Microbubbles were added to an algal solution with the goal of improving cell disruption efficiency and the net energy balance for algal biofuel production. Experimental results showed that disruption increases with increasing peak rarefaction ultrasound pressure over the range studied: 1.90 to 3.07 MPa. Additionally, ultrasound cell disruption increased by up to 58% by adding microbubbles, with peak disruption occurring in the range of 108 microbubbles/ml. The localization of energy in space and time provided by the bubbles improve efficiency: energy requirements for such a process were estimated to be one-fourth of the available heat of combustion of algal biomass and one-fifth of currently used cell disruption methods. This increase in energy efficiency could make microbubble enhanced ultrasound viable for bioenergy applications and is expected to integrate well with current cell harvesting methods based upon dissolved air flotation. PMID:25311188

  11. [Effects of water temperature and edible algal density on the population dynamics and sexual reproduction of Moina irrasa].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ying; Deng, Dao-Gui; Lei, Juan; Xi, Yi-Long

    2011-12-01

    This paper studied the population dynamics and sexual reproduction of Moina irrasa at different water temperature and edible algal density. The population density of M. irrasa was obviously higher at high than at medium and low densities of edible algae, with the maximum at high edible algal density and 20 degrees C. At the same temperatures, the average number of the offsprings first produced by per female M. irrasa declined with decreasing edible algal density, and the maximum value appeared at 25 degrees C and at high edible algal density. The male offsprings produced were obviously higher at high than at medium and low edible algal densities. There was a significant correlation between the male density and the population density of M. irrasa. The number of ephippia produced by M. irrasa declined with decreasing edible algal density, and was higher at 25 degrees C than at other temperatures. Edible algal density had larger effects on the population dynamics and sexual reproduction of M. irrasa, as compared with temperature. PMID:22384606

  12. Algal omics: unlocking bioproduct diversity in algae cell factories.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Michael T; Pienkos, Philip T

    2015-03-01

    Rapid advances in "omic" technologies are helping to unlock the full potential of microalgae as multi-use feedstocks, with utility in an array of industrial biotechnology, biofuel, and biomedical applications. In turn, algae are emerging as highly attractive candidates for development as microbial cell factories. In this review, we examine the wide array of potential algal bioproducts, with a focus upon the role of omic technologies in driving bioproduct discovery and optimization in microalgal systems.

  13. Sodium efflux from perfused giant algal cells.

    PubMed

    Clint, G M; Macrobbie, E A

    1987-06-01

    Internodal cells of the giant alga Chara corallina were perfused internally to replace the native cytoplasm, tonoplast and vacuole with artificial cytoplasm. Sodium efflux from perfused cells, measured by including (22)Na in the perfusion media, was increased by increasing the internal sodium concentration and by decreasing the external pH, and was inhibited by external application of the renal diuretic amiloride. The sodium efflux was markedly ATP-dependent, with a 50-fold decrease in efflux observed after perfusion with media lacking ATP. Efflux in the presence of ATP was reduced by 33% by inclusion of 10 μM N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in the perfusion medium. The membrane potential of the perfused cells approximated that of intact cells from the same culture. It is suggested that sodium efflux in perfused Chara cells proceeds via a secondary antiporter with protons, regulated by ATP in a catalytic role and with the proton motive force acting as the energy source.

  14. Flagellar waveform dynamics of freely swimming algal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtuldu, H.; Tam, D.; Hosoi, A. E.; Johnson, K. A.; Gollub, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    We present quantitative measurements of time-dependent flagellar waveforms for freely swimming biflagellated algal cells, for both synchronous and asynchronous beating. We use the waveforms in conjunction with resistive force theory as well as a singularity method to predict a cell's time-dependent velocity for comparison with experiments. While net propulsion is thought to arise from asymmetry between the power and recovery strokes, we show that hydrodynamic interactions between the flagella and cell body on the return stroke make an important contribution to enhance net forward motion.

  15. Flagellar waveform analysis of swimming algal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtuldu, Huseyin; Johnson, Karl; Gollub, Jerry

    2011-11-01

    The twin flagella of the green alga Chlamydomas reinhardtii are driven by dynein molecular motors to oscillate at about 50-60 Hz in a breaststroke motion. For decades, Chlamydomas has been used as a model organism for studies of flagellar motility, and of genetic disorders of ciliary motion. However, little is known experimentally about the flagellar waveforms, and the resulting time-dependent force distribution along the 250 nm diameter flagella. Here, we study flagellar dynamics experimentally by confining cells in quasi-2D liquid films. From simultaneous measurements of the cell body velocity and the time-dependent velocities along the center lines of the two flagella, we determine the drag coefficients, and estimate the power expended by the body and the flagella, comparing our findings with measurements based on the induced fluid flow field. We contrast the results for the quite different beating patterns of synchronous and asynchronous flagella, respectively. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-0803153.

  16. Separation of algal cells from water by column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Chen, Y.M.; Ju, Y.H.

    1999-08-01

    The dispersed air flotation (DiAF) process was utilized to separate algal cells (Chlorella sp.) from water. Two types of collector, cationic N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and anionic sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), were used. It was observed that 20% of cell removal was achieved in the presence of 40 mg/L of SDS, and ca. 86% of the cells were removed at 40 mg/L of CTAB. Upon the addition of 10 mg/L of chitosan, over 90% of the cells were removed when SDS (20 mg/L) was used as the collector. Air flow rate affected cell flotation slightly. Optimum pH values for cell flotation were from 4.0 to 5.0. Flotation efficiency decreased at high ionic strength. The electrostatic interaction between collector and cell surface plays a critical role in the separation processes.

  17. Plant and algal cell walls: diversity and functionality

    PubMed Central

    Popper, Zoë A.; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Domozych, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although plants and many algae (e.g. the Phaeophyceae, brown, and Rhodophyceae, red) are only very distantly related they are united in their possession of carbohydrate-rich cell walls, which are of integral importance being involved in many physiological processes. Furthermore, wall components have applications within food, fuel, pharmaceuticals, fibres (e.g. for textiles and paper) and building materials and have long been an active topic of research. As shown in the 27 papers in this Special Issue, as the major deposit of photosynthetically fixed carbon, and therefore energy investment, cell walls are of undisputed importance to the organisms that possess them, the photosynthetic eukaryotes (plants and algae). The complexities of cell wall components along with their interactions with the biotic and abiotic environment are becoming increasingly revealed. Scope The importance of plant and algal cell walls and their individual components to the function and survival of the organism, and for a number of industrial applications, are illustrated by the breadth of topics covered in this issue, which includes papers concentrating on various plants and algae, developmental stages, organs, cell wall components, and techniques. Although we acknowledge that there are many alternative ways in which the papers could be categorized (and many would fit within several topics), we have organized them as follows: (1) cell wall biosynthesis and remodelling, (2) cell wall diversity, and (3) application of new technologies to cell walls. Finally, we will consider future directions within plant cell wall research. Expansion of the industrial uses of cell walls and potentially novel uses of cell wall components are both avenues likely to direct future research activities. Fundamentally, it is the continued progression from characterization (structure, metabolism, properties and localization) of individual cell wall components through to defining their roles in almost every

  18. Effects of DDT and dicofol on population growth of Brachionus calyciflorus under different algal (Scenedesmus obliquus) densities.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ping; Xi, Yi-Long; Chu, Zhao-Xia; Xiang, Xian-Ling

    2014-09-01

    A number of organochlorine pesticides, including DDT and dicofol, used to be important in crop protection and management. Their residues may reach water bodies and eventually affect the non-target organisms such as rotifers. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of DDT (0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg l(-1)) and dicofol (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg l(-1)) on the population growth of rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus under two levels of Scenedesmus obliquus (1.0 x 10(6) and 3.0 x 10(6) cell ml(-1)). Regardless of the food level, DDT was more toxic than dicofol to B. calyciflorus. Under low food level, DDT at 0.1 and 0.2 mg l(-1) decreased the population growth rate (r), and DDT at 0.05-0.4 mg l(-1) decreased the maximum population density (K). Dicofol at 0.4 and 0.8 mg l(-1) decreased r and K, but dicofol at 0.2 mg l(-1) increased K. Under high food level, DDT at 0.05-0.2 mg l(-1) increased K, whereas DDT at 0.4 mg l(-1) as well as dicofol at 0.4 and 0.8 mg l(-1) decreased r and K. Increase in food level increased r exposed to DDT at 0.05-0.2 mg l(-1) as well as dicofol at 0.8 mg l(-1), and Kexposed to DDTat 0.05-0.2 mg l(-1) as well as dicofol at 0.1 and 0.2 mg l(-1). DDT concentration, algal density and their interaction affected r and K of B. calyciflorus. Both dicofol concentration and algal density affected r. Dicofol concentration, algal density and their interaction affected K. Both r and K were suitable endpoints for assessing the effects of DDT and dicofol on the rotifers population dynamics under two algal densities, and the latter was more sensitive.

  19. Flagellar Waveform Dynamics of Freely Swimming Algal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollub, Jerry; Kurtuldu, Huseyin; Johnson, Karl

    2012-02-01

    We study the time-dependent conformation patterns of flagella driving freely swimming algal cells, and use this information to determine the time-dependent forces acting on the cells, the induced cell velocities, and the power injected into the surrounding fluid. Conformational waves are evident along the flagella, as are synchronization transitions. The observed dynamics relate directly to the behavior of the dynein molecular motors ``walking'' along the microtubules of the flagella. We find that the irreversibility giving rise to net propulsion is due to the hydrodynamic interactions between the flagella and cell body. We determine the time-dependent power injected into the fluid by the cell body and flagella, and show that the propulsion efficiency is only about 3%.

  20. Flocculation of algal cells by amphoteric chitosan-based flocculant.

    PubMed

    Dong, Changlong; Chen, Wei; Liu, Cheng

    2014-10-01

    A kind of amphoteric chitosan-based flocculant (quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan, denoted as QCMC) has been prepared. QCMC presented significant improvement of water solubility in the whole pH range. The effects of pH, dosage, temperature and original turbidity of algal water on the flocculation performance were investigated. The optimal dosages of QCMC at pH 5, 9 and 12 with original turbidity of 20NTU at 20°C were 0.1, 0.6 and 2.0mg/L, respectively, which were much less than that of chitosan, PAM, Al2(SO4)3 and FeCl3. The floc properties during grow, breakage and regrow period were also evaluated at different pH values in terms of floc size, strength and density. It was demonstrated that QCMC produced larger, stronger and denser flocs than Al2(SO4)3. There is every indication that QCMC is more suitable for algal harvesting than other traditional coagulants or flocculants.

  1. Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of algal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, Ota; Jonáš, Alexandr; Pilát, Zdeněk; Zemánek, Pavel; Nedbal, Ladislav; Tříska, Jan; Kotas, Petr; Trtílek, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy can elucidate fundamental questions about intercellular variability and what governs it. Moreover, knowing the metabolic response on single cell level this can significantly contribute to the study and use of microalgae in systems biology and biofuel technology. Raman spectroscopy is capable to measure nutrient dynamics and metabolism in vivo, in real-time, label free making it possible to monitor/evaluate population variability. Also, degree of unsaturation of the algae oil (iodine value) can be measured using Raman spectra obtained from single microalgae. The iodine value is the determination of the amount of unsaturation contained in fatty acids (in the form of double bonds). Here we demonstrate the capacity of the spatially resolved Raman microspectroscopy to determine the effective iodine value in lipid storage bodies of individual living algal cells. We employed the characteristic peaks in the Raman scattering spectra at 1,656 cm-1 (cis C=C stretching mode) and 1,445 cm-1 (CH2 scissoring mode) as the markers defining the ratio of unsaturated-to-saturated carbon-carbon bonds of the fatty acids in the algal lipids.

  2. Coral host cells acidify symbiotic algal microenvironment to promote photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Barott, Katie L.; Venn, Alexander A.; Perez, Sidney O.; Tambutté, Sylvie; Tresguerres, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellate algae residing inside coral tissues supply the host with the majority of their energy requirements through the translocation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. The algae, in turn, rely on the host for the supply of inorganic carbon. Carbon must be concentrated as CO2 in order for photosynthesis to proceed, and here we show that the coral host plays an active role in this process. The host-derived symbiosome membrane surrounding the algae abundantly expresses vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA), which acidifies the symbiosome space down to pH ∼4. Inhibition of VHA results in a significant decrease in average H+ activity in the symbiosome of up to 75% and a significant reduction in O2 production rate, a measure of photosynthetic activity. These results suggest that host VHA is part of a previously unidentified carbon concentrating mechanism for algal photosynthesis and provide mechanistic evidence that coral host cells can actively modulate the physiology of their symbionts. PMID:25548188

  3. Production of biofuel using molluscan pseudofeces derived from algal cells

    DOEpatents

    Das, Keshav C.; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Shelton, James; Wilde, Susan B.; Haynie, Rebecca S.; Herrin, James A.

    2012-08-28

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for novel strategies to harvest algal lipids using mollusks which after feeding algae from the growth medium can convert algal lipids into their biomass or excrete lipids in their pseudofeces which makes algae harvesting energy efficient and cost effective. The bioconverter, filter-feeding mollusks and their pseudofeces can be harvested and converted to biocrude using an advanced thermochemical liquefaction technology. Methods, systems, and materials are disclosed for the harvest and isolation of algal lipids from the mollusks, molluscan feces and molluscan pseudofeces.

  4. Effects of four rice paddy herbicides on algal cell viability and the relationship with population recovery.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Ishihara, Satoru; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Iwafune, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    Paddy herbicides are a high-risk concern for aquatic plants, including algae, because they easily flow out from paddy fields into rivers, with toxic effects. The effect on algal population dynamics, including population recovery after timed exposure, must be assessed. Therefore, we demonstrated concentration-response relationships of four paddy herbicides for algal growth inhibition and mortality, and the relationship between the effect on algal cell viability and population recovery following exposure. We used SYTOX Green dye assay and flow cytometry to assess cell viability of the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Live cells could be clearly distinguished from dead cells during herbicide exposure. Our results showed that pretilachlor and quinoclamine had both algicidal and algistatic effects, whereas bensulfuron-methyl only had an algistatic effect, and pentoxazone only had an algicidal effect. Then, a population recovery test following a 72-h exposure was conducted. The algal population recovered in all tests, but the periods required for recovery differed among exposure concentrations and herbicides. The periods required for recovery were inconsistent with the dead cell ratio at the beginning of the recovery test; that is, population recovery could not be described only by cell viability. Consequently, the temporal effect of herbicides and subsequent recovery of the algal population could be described not only by the toxicity characteristics but also by toxicokinetics, such as rate of uptake, transport to the target site, and elimination of the substance from algal cells. PMID:21590715

  5. Simultaneous wastewater treatment, electricity generation and biomass production by an immobilized photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    He, Huanhuan; Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Hu, Youshuang; Zhao, Yingying

    2014-05-01

    A photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell (PAMFC) was constructed by the introduction of immobilized microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) into the cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells to fulfill electricity generation, biomass production and wastewater treatment. The immobilization conditions, including the concentration of immobilized matrix, initial inoculation concentration and cross-linking time, were investigated both for the growth of C. vulgaris and power generation. It performed the best at 5 % sodium alginate and 2 % calcium chloride as immobilization matrix, initial inoculation concentration of 10(6) cell/mL and cross-linking time of 4 h. Our findings indicated that C. vulgaris immobilization was an effective and promising approach to improve the performance of PAMFC, and after optimization the power density and Coulombic efficiency improved by 258 and 88.4 %, respectively. Important parameters such as temperature and light intensity were optimized on the performance. PAMFC could achieve a COD removal efficiency of 92.1 %, and simultaneously the maximum power density reached 2,572.8 mW/m(3) and the Coulombic efficiency was 14.1 %, under the light intensity of 5,000 lux and temperature at 25 °C.

  6. Digestion of algal biomass for electricity generation in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Koichi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    Algal biomass serves as a fuel for electricity generation in microbial fuel cells. This study constructed a model consortium comprised of an alga-digesting Lactobacillus and an iron-reducing Geobacter for electricity generation from photo-grown Clamydomonas cells. Total power-conversion efficiency (from Light to electricity) was estimated to be 0.47%.

  7. Influence of the Cell Wall on Intracellular Delivery to Algal Cells by Electroporation and Sonication

    PubMed Central

    Azencott, Harold R.; Peter, Gary F.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the cell wall’s role as a barrier to intracellular delivery, wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algal cells and mutant cells lacking a cell wall were exposed to electroporation or sonication. Flow cytometry determined intracellular uptake of calcein and bovine serum albumin (BSA) and loss of cell viability as functions of electroporation transmembrane potential and acoustic energy. Electroporation of wild-type cells increased calcein uptake with increasing transmembrane potential, but delivered much less BSA. Electroporation of wall-deficient cells had similar effects on calcein uptake, but increased BSA uptake as much as 7.5-fold relative to wild-type cells, which indicated that the cell wall was a significant barrier to BSA delivery during electroporation. Sonication of wild-type cells caused calcein and BSA uptake at similar levels. This suggests that the cell wall barrier to BSA delivery can be overcome by sonication. Increased electroporation transmembrane potential or acoustic energy also caused increased loss of cell viability, where wall-deficient cells were especially susceptible to lysis. Overall, we believe this is the first study to compare the effects of electroporation and sonication in a direct fashion in any cell type. Specifically, these findings suggest that electroporation primarily transports molecules across the plasma membrane, because its mechanism is specific to lipid bilayer disruption, whereas sonication transports molecules across both the plasma membrane and cell wall, because it non-specifically disrupts cell-surface barriers. PMID:17602827

  8. Effects of anodic oxidation of a substoichiometric titanium dioxide reactive electrochemical membrane on algal cell destabilization and lipid extraction.

    PubMed

    Hua, Likun; Guo, Lun; Thakkar, Megha; Wei, Dequan; Agbakpe, Michael; Kuang, Liyuan; Magpile, Maraha; Chaplin, Brian P; Tao, Yi; Shuai, Danmeng; Zhang, Xihui; Mitra, Somenath; Zhang, Wen

    2016-03-01

    Efficient algal harvesting, cell pretreatment and lipid extraction are the major steps challenging the algal biofuel industrialization. To develop sustainable solutions for economically viable algal biofuels, our research aims at devising innovative reactive electrochemical membrane (REM) filtration systems for simultaneous algal harvesting and pretreatment for lipid extraction. The results in this work particularly demonstrated the use of the Ti4O7-based REM in algal pretreatment and the positive impacts on lipid extraction. After REM treatment, algal cells exhibited significant disruption in morphology and photosynthetic activity due to the anodic oxidation. Cell lysis was evidenced by the changes of fluorescent patterns of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the treated algal suspension. The lipid extraction efficiency increased from 15.2 ± 0.6 g-lipidg-algae(-1) for untreated algae to 23.4 ± 0.7 g-lipidg-algae(-1) for treated algae (p<0.05), which highlights the potential to couple algal harvesting with cell pretreatment in an integrated REM filtration process. PMID:26722810

  9. Effects of fish density and river fertilization on algal standing stocks, invertebrates communities, and fish production in an Arctic River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deegan, Linda A.; Peterson, B.J.; Golden, H.; McIvor, C.C.; Miller, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the relative importance of bottom-up and top-down controls of an arctic stream food web by simultaneous manipulation of the top predator and nutrient availability. We created a two-step trophic system (algae to insects) by removal of the top predator (Arctic grayling, Thymallus arcticus) in fertilized and control stream reaches. Fish abundance was also increased 10 times to examine the effect of high fish density on stream ecosystem dynamics and fish. We measured the response of epilithic algae, benthic and drifting insects, and fish to nutrient enrichment and to changes in fish density. Insect grazers had little effect on algae and fish had little effect on insects. In both the control and fertilized reaches, fish growth, energy storage, and reproductive response of females declined with increased fish density. Fish growth and energy storage were more closely correlated with per capita insect availability than with per capita algal standing stock

  10. Black silicon SERS substrate: effect of surface morphology on SERS detection and application of single algal cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu-Luen; Juang, Yi-Je

    2014-03-15

    In this study, we have investigated the effect of the surface morphology of the black silicon substrate on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and explored its application of single algal cell detection. By adjusting the O2 and SF6 flow rates in the cryogenic plasma etching process, different surface morphologies of the black silicon substrate was produced without performing the lithographic process. It was found the Raman signals were better enhanced as the tip density of the black silicon substrate increased. In addition, as the thickness of the deposited gold layer increased, the SERS effect increased as well, which could be owing to the generation of more hot spots by bridging individual silicon tips through deposition of gold layer. For the black silicon substrate with tip density of 30 tips/μm(2) and covered by 400 nm deposited gold layer, the detection limit of 10 fM R6G solution concentration with uniform SERS effect across the substrate was achieved. Furthermore, detection of individual algal cell (Chlorella vulgaris) was performed at the SERS substrate as fabricated and the Raman signals of carotenoid and lipid were substantially enhanced.

  11. A colorimetric assay for determination of cell viability in algal cultures.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Juan M; Cossío, Belén R; Berl, Tomás; Rivard, Christopher J; Jiménez, Carlos

    2003-07-01

    In this work, we propose the determination of cell viability in algal cultures by using a colorimetric assay widely used for estimation of cell proliferation in animal cell cultures. The method is based on in vivo reduction by metabolically active cells of a tetrazolium compound (MTS=3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenil)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt) to a colored formazan, with maximal absorbance at 490 nm, that is released to the culture medium. For this purpose, we have tested two microalgae with high commercial value (Dunaliella and Spirulina) and two seaweeds with different morphology (Ulva and Gracilaria). Color development in this assay is directly proportional to the number of viable cells, to the incubation time in the presence of the assay solution, and to the incubation temperature. A direct significant correlation was found between algal photosynthesis rate and color development in all species used through this work. Moreover, the intensity of absorbance at 490 nm was significantly lower in stressed cells (e.g. in nutrient-limited cultures, in the presence of toxic substances, and in osmotically-stressed cultures). We conclude that cell viability of algal cultures can be rapidly and easily estimated through colorimetric determination of the reduction of MTS to formazan.

  12. Fueling Future with Algal Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-07-05

    Algae constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity, play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing (http://jgi.doe.gov/Algae) and contributes of the algal genome projects worldwide (GOLD database, 2012). The sequenced algal genomes offer catalogs of genes, networks, and pathways. The sequenced first of its kind genomes of a haptophyte E.huxleyii, chlorarachniophyte B.natans, and cryptophyte G.theta fill the gaps in the eukaryotic tree of life and carry unique genes and pathways as well as molecular fossils of secondary endosymbiosis. Natural adaptation to conditions critical for industrial production is encoded in algal genomes, for example, growth of A.anophagefferens at very high cell densities during the harmful algae blooms or a global distribution across diverse environments of E.huxleyii, able to live on sparse nutrients due to its expanded pan-genome. Communications and signaling pathways can be derived from simple symbiotic systems like lichens or complex marine algae metagenomes. Collectively these datasets derived from algal genomics contribute to building a comprehensive parts list essential for algal biofuel development.

  13. Algal autolysate medium to label proteins for NMR in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Fuccio, Carmelo; Luchinat, Enrico; Barbieri, Letizia; Neri, Sara; Fragai, Marco

    2016-04-01

    In-cell NMR provides structural and functional information on proteins directly inside living cells. At present, the high costs of the labeled media for mammalian cells represent a limiting factor for the development of this methodology. Here we report a protocol to prepare a homemade growth medium from Spirulina platensis autolysate, suitable to express uniformly labeled proteins inside mammalian cells at a reduced cost-per-sample. The human proteins SOD1 and Mia40 were overexpressed in human cells grown in (15)N-enriched S. platensis algal-derived medium, and high quality in-cell NMR spectra were obtained. PMID:27106902

  14. Unicellular Algal Growth: A Biomechanical Approach to Cell Wall Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Royce; Levine, Herbert

    1997-11-01

    We model a growing cell in a calcium solution as an elastic shell on short time scales. The turgor pressure and elastic properties (Young's modulus, thickness) of the cell wall determine a stressed cell shape. Enzyme-mediated relaxation of the unstressed toward the stressed configuration results in a slow (plastic) deformation of the cell. The cell wall thickness is then modulated by calcium-mediated fusion of material and elongation. We analyze small perturbations to a circular cell and find an instability related to modulations of the wall thickness, leading to growth rates which peak at a finite wave number.

  15. Biogenic gradients in algal density affect the emergent properties of spatially self-organized mussel beds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan-Xing; Weerman, Ellen J; Gupta, Rohit; Herman, Peter M J; Olff, Han; van de Koppel, Johan

    2014-07-01

    Theoretical models highlight that spatially self-organized patterns can have important emergent effects on the functioning of ecosystems, for instance by increasing productivity and affecting the vulnerability to catastrophic shifts. However, most theoretical studies presume idealized homogeneous conditions, which are rarely met in real ecosystems. Using self-organized mussel beds as a case study, we reveal that spatial heterogeneity, resulting from the large-scale effects of mussel beds on their environment, significantly alters the emergent properties predicted by idealized self-organization models that assume homogeneous conditions. The proposed model explicitly considers that the suspended algae, the prime food for the mussels, are supplied by water flow from the seaward boundary of the bed, which causes in combination with consumption a gradual depletion of algae over the simulated domain. Predictions of the model are consistent with properties of natural mussel patterns observed in the field, featuring a decline in mussel biomass and a change in patterning. Model analyses reveal a fundamental change in ecosystem functioning when this self-induced algal depletion gradient is included in the model. First, no enhancement of secondary productivity of the mussels comparing with non-patterns states is predicted, irrespective of parameter setting; the equilibrium amount of mussels is entirely set by the input of algae. Second, alternate stable states, potentially present in the original (no algal gradient) model, are absent when gradual depletion of algae in the overflowing water layer is allowed. Our findings stress the importance of including sufficiently realistic environmental conditions when assessing the emergent properties of self-organized ecosystems. PMID:24759542

  16. Biogenic gradients in algal density affect the emergent properties of spatially self-organized mussel beds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quan-Xing; Weerman, Ellen J.; Gupta, Rohit; Herman, Peter M. J.; Olff, Han; van de Koppel, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models highlight that spatially self-organized patterns can have important emergent effects on the functioning of ecosystems, for instance by increasing productivity and affecting the vulnerability to catastrophic shifts. However, most theoretical studies presume idealized homogeneous conditions, which are rarely met in real ecosystems. Using self-organized mussel beds as a case study, we reveal that spatial heterogeneity, resulting from the large-scale effects of mussel beds on their environment, significantly alters the emergent properties predicted by idealized self-organization models that assume homogeneous conditions. The proposed model explicitly considers that the suspended algae, the prime food for the mussels, are supplied by water flow from the seaward boundary of the bed, which causes in combination with consumption a gradual depletion of algae over the simulated domain. Predictions of the model are consistent with properties of natural mussel patterns observed in the field, featuring a decline in mussel biomass and a change in patterning. Model analyses reveal a fundamental change in ecosystem functioning when this self-induced algal depletion gradient is included in the model. First, no enhancement of secondary productivity of the mussels comparing with non-patterns states is predicted, irrespective of parameter setting; the equilibrium amount of mussels is entirely set by the input of algae. Second, alternate stable states, potentially present in the original (no algal gradient) model, are absent when gradual depletion of algae in the overflowing water layer is allowed. Our findings stress the importance of including sufficiently realistic environmental conditions when assessing the emergent properties of self-organized ecosystems. PMID:24759542

  17. Direct extraction of photosynthetic electrons from single algal cells by nanoprobing system.

    PubMed

    Ryu, WonHyoung; Bai, Seoung-Jai; Park, Joong Sun; Huang, Zubin; Moseley, Jeffrey; Fabian, Tibor; Fasching, Rainer J; Grossman, Arthur R; Prinz, Fritz B

    2010-04-14

    There are numerous sources of bioenergy that are generated by photosynthetic processes, for example, lipids, alcohols, hydrogen, and polysaccharides. However, generally only a small fraction of solar energy absorbed by photosynthetic organisms is converted to a form of energy that can be readily exploited. To more efficiently use the solar energy harvested by photosynthetic organisms, we evaluated the feasibility of generating bioelectricity by directly extracting electrons from the photosynthetic electron transport chain before they are used to fix CO(2) into sugars and polysaccharides. From a living algal cell, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, photosynthetic electrons (1.2 pA at 6000 mA/m(2)) were directly extracted without a mediator electron carrier by inserting a nanoelectrode into the algal chloroplast and applying an overvoltage. This result may represent an initial step in generating "high efficiency" bioelectricity by directly harvesting high energy photosynthetic electrons. PMID:20201533

  18. Flow cytometric measurement of pollutant stresses on algal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, D.L.; Eversman, S.

    1988-03-01

    The lichen Usnea fulvoreagens (Raes). Raes. was treated with four pH levels (5.5, 4.5, 3.5, and 2.5) of simulated acid rain (sulfuric acid, nitric acid, and a 1:1 combination of both) and automobile exhaust. The samples were dissociated and analyzed by a Becton-Dickinson FACS 440 flow cytometer. Analyses included measurement of chlorophyll autofluorescence and fluorescence due to uptake of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and calcofluor white M2R (CFW). Cell parameters measured were esterase activity (FDA), membrane permeability (FDA, CFW), and intracellular pH (FDA). Mean fluorescence intensity from FDA staining and numbers of events were incorporated with autofluorescence information to produce a stress index of relative cell stress. Results indicated that highly stressed samples (lower pH treatments and greater exposure to exhaust) exhibited a low stress index of FDA fluorescence.Au

  19. Flow cytometric measurement of pollutant stresses on algal cells.

    PubMed

    Berglund, D L; Eversman, S

    1988-03-01

    The lichen Usnea fulvoreagens (Räs). Räs. was treated with four pH levels (5.5, 4.5, 3.5, and 2.5) of simulated acid rain (sulfuric acid, nitric acid, and a 1:1 combination of both) and automobile exhaust. The samples were dissociated and analyzed by a Becton-Dickinson FACS 440 flow cytometer. Analyses included measurement of chlorophyll autofluorescence and fluorescence due to uptake of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and calcofluor white M2R (CFW). Cell parameters measured were esterase activity (FDA), membrane permeability (FDA, CFW), and intracellular pH (FDA). Mean fluorescence intensity from FDA staining and numbers of events were incorporated with autofluorescence information to produce a "stress index" of relative cell stress. Results indicated that highly stressed samples (lower pH treatments and greater exposure to exhaust) exhibited a low "stress index" of FDA fluorescence.

  20. Climatic forcings on algal cell size through the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannisdal, B.; Henderiks, J.

    2009-04-01

    Marine phytoplankton constitute the base of the marine food chain and are fundamental components in biogeochemical cycles. A better understanding of both the mechanisms and the rates of climatic adaptation by marine phytoplankton remains a critical challenge in predicting future impacts of climate change. Using coccolithophores (a prominent group of calcifying unicellular algae) as an example, we explore why different species respond differently to environmental change, and determine what climatic parameters drive changes in cell size over geological time scales. We use comprehensive time series of coccolith size - a proxy for cell size - over the Cenozoic, targeting the ancestry of extant taxa that have revealed distinct physiological responses in culture experiments. We employ a novel, information-theoretic method to quantify the relative influence of different environmental variables on coccolith size. This model-free technique detects the significance and relative strength of the causal influence of multiple climatic forcing variables (including non-linear relationships), while correcting for possible common causal interactions among the forcings. Our analyses suggest that the macroevolutionary size decrease within the Reticulofenestra lineage (the ancestry of today's most prolific bloomer Emiliania huxleyi) primarily reflects a physiological adaptation to CO2 limitation. In contrast, macroevolutionary size variability within the Coccolithus lineage (the ancestry of Coccolithus pelagicus and C. braarudii), while influenced by long-term trends in ocean temperature, is not affected by changes in CO2. Improved understanding of such heterogeneity within ecosystem functional groups, including taxon-specific climatic adaptation strategies, will be of fundamental importance to the assessment of future climate change impact and mitigation.

  1. High energy density electrochemical cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, J. J.; Williams, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Primary cell has an anode of lithium, a cathode containing dihaloisocyanuric acid, and a nonaqueous electrolyte comprised of a solution of lithium perchlorate in methyl formate. It produces an energy density of 213 watt hrs/lb and can achieve a high current density.

  2. Improved biomass productivity in algal biofilms through synergistic interactions between photon flux density and carbon dioxide concentration.

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Peter J; Molenda, Olivia; Edwards, Elizabeth; Espie, George S; Allen, D Grant

    2016-11-01

    Algal biofilms were grown to investigate the interaction effects of bulk medium CO2 concentration and photon flux density (PFD) on biomass productivities. When increasing the CO2 concentration from 0.04% to 2%, while maintaining a PFD of 100μmol/m(2)/s, biomass productivities increased from ∼0.5 to 2.0g/m(2)/d; however, the productivities plateaued when CO2 concentrations were incrementally increased above 2-12%. Statistical analysis demonstrates that there is a significant interaction between PFD and CO2 concentrations on biomass productivities. By simultaneously increasing PFD and CO2 concentrations, biomass productivities were significantly increased to 4.0 and 4.1g/m(2)/d in the experimental and modeled data, respectively. The second order model predicted increases in biomass productivities as both PFD and CO2 simultaneously increased yielding an optimum at 440μmol/m(2)/s and 7.1%; however, when conditions were extended to the highest end of their respective ranges, the conditions were detrimental to growth and productivities decreased.

  3. Algal cell disruption using microbubbles to localize ultrasonic energy for biofuel extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, Joel; Sch, Lance; King, Daniel; Freund, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Cell disruption is a critical step in the production of algal-based biofuels, but current mechanical disruption methods require significant energy, typically more than actually available in the cell's oil. We propose and investigate an ultrasound disruption process using ultrasound contrast agents to localize the delivered energy. Experiments in a flow cell with focused ultrasound show a significant benefit. The degree of disruption increases with increasing peak rarefactional ultrasound pressure for pressures between 1.90 and 3.07 MPa and increasing microbubble concentration up to 12 . 5 ×107 bubbles/ml. Estimates suggest the energy of this method is less than one fourth of the energy of other industrial mechanical disruption techniques and comparable with theoretical disruption estimates. The increase in efficiency would make this technique viable for bioenergy applications.

  4. Degradation of algal organic matter using microbial fuel cells and its association with trihalomethane precursor removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Liu, Dongmei; Lu, Lu; Zhao, Zhiwei; Xu, Yongpeng; Cui, Fuyi

    2012-07-01

    In order to provide an alternative for removal of algal organic matter (AOM) produced during algal blooms in aquatic environment, microbial fuel cell (MFC) was used to study AOM degradation and its association with THM precursor removal. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals in MFCs were 81 ± 6% and 73 ± 3% for AOM from Microcystis aeruginosa (AOM(M)) and Chlorella vulgaris (AOM(C)), respectively. THM precursor was also effectively degraded (AOM(M) 85 ± 2%, AOM(C) 72 ± 4%). The major AOM components (proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) were obviously removed in MFCs. The contribution of each component to the THM formation potential (THMFP) was obtained based on calculation. The THMFP produced from soluble microbial products was very low. If the energy input during operation process was not considered, MFCs treatment could recover electrical energy of 0.29 ± 0.02 kWh/kg COD (AOM(M)) and 0.35 ± 0.06 kWh/kg COD (AOM(C)).

  5. Characteristic changes in algal organic matter derived from Microcystis aeruginosa in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Lu, Lu; Liu, Dongmei; Cui, Fuyi; Wang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate behavior of algal organic matter (AOM) during bioelectrochemical oxidation in microbial fuel cell in terms of compositions and structures. Study revealed that the AOM derived from blue-green algae Microcystis aeruginosa could be degraded more completely (82% COD removal) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) than by anaerobic fermentation (24% COD removal) in a control reactor without closed-circuit electrode and electricity was produced simultaneously. A variety of techniques were used to characterize the changes in AOM compositions and structures during bioelectrochemical oxidation. The presence of syntrophic interactions between electrochemical active bacteria and fermentative bacteria to degrade large molecular organics into small molecular substances, which could be oxidized by electrode but not by fermentation. The dominant tryptophan protein-like substances, humic acid-like substances and Chlorophyll a in AOM were highly degraded during MFC treatment.

  6. Mapping of nutrient-induced biochemical changes in living algal cells using synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Heraud, Philip; Wood, Bayden R; Tobin, Mark J; Beardall, John; McNaughton, Don

    2005-08-15

    High quality Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were acquired from living Micrasterias hardyi cells maintained in an IR transparent flow-through cell using a FTIR microscope coupled to a synchrotron light source. Spectral maps of living, nutrient-replete cells showed band intensities consistent with the known location of the nucleus and the chloroplasts. These were very similar to maps acquired from fixed, air-dried cells. Bands due to lipids were lowest in absorbance in the region of the nucleus and highest in the chloroplast region and this trend was reversed for the absorbance of bands attributed to protein. Spectra acquired in 10 microm steps across living phosphorus-starved (P-starved) cells, repeated approximately every 30 min, were consistent over time, and bands correlated well with the known position of the nucleus and the observed chloroplasts, corroborating the observations with replete cells. Experiments in which missing nutrients were re-supplied to starved cells showed that cells could be maintained in a functional state in the flow-through cell for up to one day. Nitrogen-starved cells re-supplied with N showed an increase in lipid in all positions measured across the cell over a 23 h period of re-supply, with the largest increases occurring in positions where the chloroplasts were observed. Re-supply of phosphorus to P-starved cells produced no changes in bands attributable to lipid or protein. Due to their thin cell body ( approximately 12 microm) and large diameter ( approximately 300 microm) Micrasterias sp. make an ideal spectroscopic model to study nutrient kinetics in algal cells.

  7. Algal culture studies related to a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R. O.; Ollinger, O.; Venables, A.; Fernandez, E.

    1982-01-01

    Studies with algal cultures which relate to closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) are discussed. A description of a constant cell density apparatus for continuous culture of algae is included. Excretion of algal by-products, and nitrogen utilization and excretion are discussed.

  8. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of individual algal cells: effects of herbicide on Spirogyra distenta at different growth stages.

    PubMed

    Endo, Ryosuke; Omasa, Kenji

    2004-08-01

    Serious environmental degradation of aquatic ecosystems has been caused by eutrophication and by pollutants such as herbicides. Therefore, measurement of in situ algal photosynthetic activity is important for environmental monitoring. With ordinary nonimaging fluorometers, algal chlorophyll fluorescence can be measured easily, but heterogeneity within samples cannot be detected. Effects of a herbicide preparation containing 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1 -dimethylurea (DCMU) on photosynthetic activity at different growth stages of Spirogyra distenta were investigated by using a computer-aided microscopic imaging system for chlorophyll afluorescence. Photosystem II photochemical yield (phiPSII) images were used to diagnose photosynthetic activity of spiral filate chloroplasts in algal cells. The herbicide treatment caused a stronger decline in phiPSII values in younger than in mature algae cells. This result indicated that heterogeneity within algal samples should be considered when algae are used for environmental monitoring. Thus, measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence from young and mature chloroplasts with a microscopic imaging system makes it possible to improve the sensitivity for monitoring the environmental degradation of aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Comparison of cell rupturing by ozonation and ultrasonication for algal lipid extraction from Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanxing; Hong, Andy; Zhang, Daofang; Li, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Cell disruption is essential for lipid collection from cultivated microalgae. This study examines the performance of ultrasonication (US), conventional bubbling ozonation (CBO), and pressure-assisted ozonation (PAO) as a cell rupturing technique to obtain algal lipid from a freshwater unicellular microalgae Chlorella vulgaris, which was grown in BG11 medium at a temperature of 25 degrees C and illuminated by artificial lighting with light/dark cycle of 12 h/12 h. Changes in total organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorous, and chlorophyll contents in the algae suspension after ozonation and US treatments were measured to evaluate the effectiveness of cell rupture by these techniques. Lipid yields of 21 and 27 g/100 g biomass were obtained using US and PAO, respectively. Lipid yields of about 5 g/100 g biomass were obtained using CBO. In all rupturing treatments, C16 and C18 compounds were found to be predominant accounting for 90% of the fatty acids. Using US for rupturing, fatty acids of C 16:0, C18:1, and C18:2 were predominant, accounting for 76 +/- 4.2% of all the fatty acids. Using CBO and PAO involving ozone, fatty acids of C16:0 and C18:0 were predominant, accounting for 63-94% of the products. The results suggest that saturated fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) products are predominant with oxidative ozonation rupturing while unsaturated FAME products of lower-melting points predominant with physical ultrasonic rupturing means. PAO was an effective cell rupture method for biodiesel production with high lipid yield and more saturated hydrocarbon products.

  10. A Simple and Rapid Protocol for Measuring Neutral Lipids in Algal Cells Using Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Storms, Zachary J.; Cameron, Elliot; de la Hoz Siegler, Hector; McCaffrey, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Algae are considered excellent candidates for renewable fuel sources due to their natural lipid storage capabilities. Robust monitoring of algal fermentation processes and screening for new oil-rich strains requires a fast and reliable protocol for determination of intracellular lipid content. Current practices rely largely on gravimetric methods to determine oil content, techniques developed decades ago that are time consuming and require large sample volumes. In this paper, Nile Red, a fluorescent dye that has been used to identify the presence of lipid bodies in numerous types of organisms, is incorporated into a simple, fast, and reliable protocol for measuring the neutral lipid content of Auxenochlorella protothecoides, a green alga. The method uses ethanol, a relatively mild solvent, to permeabilize the cell membrane before staining and a 96 well micro-plate to increase sample capacity during fluorescence intensity measurements. It has been designed with the specific application of monitoring bioprocess performance. Previously dried samples or live samples from a growing culture can be used in the assay. PMID:24961928

  11. Application of nano TiO2 modified hollow fiber membranes in algal membrane bioreactors for high-density algae cultivation and wastewater polishing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiming; Yin, Jun; Deng, Baolin; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2015-10-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes with nano-TiO2 (5% of PVDF by mass, average size = 25 nm) additives were fabricated and applied for high-density algae (Chlorella vulgaris) cultivation. At the average light intensity of 121 μmol/m(2)/s, the algal membrane bioreactors (A-MBR) operated at a hydraulic retention time of 0.5d and an average solids retention time of 25d had an average algae biomass concentration of 2350 ± 74 mg/L (in COD units) and algal biomass production rate of 6.5 ± 0.1g/m(2)/d. The A-MBRs removed an average of 78% of phosphorus from the wastewater at the initial total phosphorus concentrations ranging from 3.5 to 8.6 mg/L. The nano TiO2-embedded membranes had improved surface hydrophilicity with its total resistance about 50% lower than that of the control. This study demonstrated that PVDF/TiO2 nanocomposite membranes had a better antifouling property for high-density algae cultivation and wastewater polishing.

  12. Pitfalls, artefacts and open questions in chlorophyll thermoluminescence of leaves or algal cells.

    PubMed

    Ducruet, Jean-Marc

    2013-07-01

    Thermoluminescence of intact photosynthetic organisms, leaves or algal cells, raises specific problems. The constitutive S2/3Q B (-) B bands constitute major probes of the state of photosystem II in vivo. The presence of a dark-stable acidic lumen causes a temperature downshift of B bands, specially the S3 B band, providing a lumen pH indicator. This is accompanied by a broadening of the S3 B band that becomes an envelope of elementary B bands. The occasional AT, Q and C bands are briefly examined in an in vivo context. It is emphasized that freezing below the nucleation temperature is not necessary for physiological studies, but a source of artefacts, hence should be avoided. In intact photosynthetic structures, a dark-electron transfer from stroma reductants to the quinonic acceptors of photosystem II via the cyclic/chlororespiratory pathways, strongly stimulated by moderate warming, gives rise to the afterglow (AG) luminescence emission that reflects chloroplast energy status. The decomposition of complex TL signals into elementary bands is necessary to determine the maximum temperature T m and the area of each of them. A comparison of TL signals after 1 flash and 2 flashes prevents from confusing the three main bands observed in vivo, i.e. the S2 and S3 B bands and the AG band. Finally, the thermoluminescence bands arising sometimes above 50 °C are mentioned. The basic principles of (thermo)luminescence established on isolated thylakoids should not be applied directly without a careful examination of in vivo conditions.

  13. Cell density determines epithelial migration in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, P; Misfeldt, D S

    1980-01-01

    The dog kidney epithelial cell line (MDCK) has been shown to exhibit a density-correlated inhibition of growth at approxmately 6.6 X 10(5) cells per cm2. When a confluent monolayer at its maximal density was wounded by removal of a wide swath of cells, migration of the cell sheet into the denuded area occurred. Precise measurements of the rate of migration for 5 day showed that the cells accelerated at a uniform rate of 0.24 micrometer . hr-2 and, by extrapolation, possessed an apparent initial velocity of 2.8 micrometer . hr-1 at the time of wounding. The apparent initial velocity was considered to be the result of a brief (< 10 hr) and rapid acceleration dependent on cell density. To verify this, wounds were made at different densities below the maximum. In these experiments, the cells did not migrate until a "threshold" density of 2.0 X 10(5) cells per cm2 was reached regardless of the density at the time of wounding. At the threshold density, the cell sheet began to accelerate at the previously measured rate (0.24 micrometer . hr-2). Any increase in density by cell division was balanced by cell migration, so that the same threshold density was maintained by the migrating cells. Each migrating cell sustained the movement of the cell sheet at a constant rate of acceleration. It is proposed that an acceleration is, in general, characteristic of the vectorial movement of an epithelial cell sheet. Images PMID:6933523

  14. Buoyant density constancy of Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kubitschek, H.E.; Ward, R.A.

    1985-06-01

    Buoyant densities of cells from exponentially growing cultures of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe 972h/sup -/ with division rates from 0.14 to 0.5 per h were determined by equilibrium centrifugation in Percoll gradients. Buoyant densities were independent of growth rate, with an average value (+/- standard error) of 1.0945 (+/- 0.00037) g/ml. When cells from these cultures were separated by size, mean cell volumes were independent of buoyant density, indicating that buoyant densities also were independent of cell age during the division cycle. These results support the suggestion that most or all kinds of cells that divide by equatorial fission may have similar, evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for regulation of buoyant density.

  15. Expression of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast division genes and proteins regulated by the algal cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Miyagishima, Shin-Ya; Suzuki, Kenji; Okazaki, Kumiko; Kabeya, Yukihiro

    2012-10-01

    Chloroplasts have evolved from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont and their continuity has been maintained by chloroplast division, which is performed by the constriction of a ring-like division complex at the division site. It is believed that the synchronization of the endosymbiotic and host cell division events was a critical step in establishing a permanent endosymbiotic relationship, such as is commonly seen in existing algae. In the majority of algal species, chloroplasts divide once per specific period of the host cell division cycle. In order to understand both the regulation of the timing of chloroplast division in algal cells and how the system evolved, we examined the expression of chloroplast division genes and proteins in the cell cycle of algae containing chloroplasts of cyanobacterial primary endosymbiotic origin (glaucophyte, red, green, and streptophyte algae). The results show that the nucleus-encoded chloroplast division genes and proteins of both cyanobacterial and eukaryotic host origin are expressed specifically during the S phase, except for FtsZ in one graucophyte alga. In this glaucophyte alga, FtsZ is persistently expressed throughout the cell cycle, whereas the expression of the nucleus-encoded MinD and MinE as well as FtsZ ring formation are regulated by the phases of the cell cycle. In contrast to the nucleus-encoded division genes, it has been shown that the expression of chloroplast-encoded division genes is not regulated by the host cell cycle. The endosymbiotic gene transfer of minE and minD from the chloroplast to the nuclear genome occurred independently on multiple occasions in distinct lineages, whereas the expression of nucleus-encoded MIND and MINE is regulated by the cell cycle in all lineages examined in this study. These results suggest that the timing of chloroplast division in algal cell cycle is restricted by the cell cycle-regulated expression of some but not all of the chloroplast division genes. In addition, it is

  16. Algal-CAMs: isoforms of a cell adhesion molecule in embryos of the alga Volvox with homology to Drosophila fasciclin I.

    PubMed

    Huber, O; Sumper, M

    1994-09-15

    Proof that plants possess homologs of animal adhesion proteins is lacking. In this paper we describe the generation of monoclonal antibodies that interfere with cell-cell contacts in the 4-cell embryo of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, resulting in a hole between the cells. The number of following cell divisions is reduced and the cell division pattern is altered drastically. Antibodies given at a later stage of embryogenesis specifically inhibit inversion of the embryo, a morphogenetic movement that turns the embryo inside out. Immunofluorescence microscopy localizes the antigen (Algal-CAM) at cell contact sites of the developing embryo. Algal-CAM is a protein with a three-domain structure: an N-terminal extensin-like domain characteristic for plant cell walls and two repeats with homology to fasciclin I, a cell adhesion molecule involved in the neuronal development of Drosophila. Alternatively spliced variants of Algal-CAM mRNA were detected that are produced under developmental control. Thus, Algal-CAM is the first plant homolog of animal adhesion proteins. PMID:7925267

  17. The density of apical cells of dark-grown protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuchow, J. M.; Kern, V. D.; Wagner, T.; Sack, F. D.

    2000-01-01

    Determinations of plant or algal cell density (cell mass divided by volume) have rarely accounted for the extracellular matrix or shrinkage during isolation. Three techniques were used to indirectly estimate the density of intact apical cells from protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus. First, the volume fraction of each cell component was determined by stereology, and published values for component density were used to extrapolate to the entire cell. Second, protonemal tips were immersed in bovine serum albumin solutions of different densities, and then the equilibrium density was corrected for the mass of the cell wall. Third, apical cell protoplasts were centrifuged in low-osmolarity gradients, and values were corrected for shrinkage during protoplast isolation. Values from centrifugation (1.004 to 1.015 g/cm3) were considerably lower than from other methods (1.046 to 1.085 g/cm3). This work appears to provide the first corrected estimates of the density of any plant cell. It also documents a method for the isolation of protoplasts specifically from apical cells of protonemal filaments.

  18. Reminiscences of work with Alex Hope: the movement of water and ions in giant algal cells, 1963-1967.

    PubMed

    Barry, Peter H

    2009-12-01

    This article, from the Tribute to Alex Hope Symposium at the 2008 Australian Society for Biophysics meeting, represents reminiscences of PhD studies done under my former supervisor, Professor Alex Hope. The studies demonstrated and quantified electroosmosis in giant algal cells of Chara and isolated segments of cell wall by measuring instantaneous current-induced volume flows. The studies also uncovered and modelled an unstirred-layer transport number effect that gave rise to an additional transiently increasing current-induced volume flow component, which could be mistaken for electroosmosis. In addition, action potential induced volume flows and pressure changes were measured in these cells and successfully modelled. An appreciation of the influence of Alex Hope and his laboratory environment, together with some of the further studies that resulted from this work, is also mentioned.

  19. High density cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  20. Ecological risk assessment of herbicides in Japan: Integrating spatiotemporal variation in exposure and effects using a multimedia model and algal density dynamics models.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takehiko I; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Application of herbicides to paddy fields in Japan has strong seasonality, and their environmental concentrations exhibit clear spatiotemporal variation. The authors developed an approach that combines a multimedia environmental exposure model (Grid-Catchment Integrated Modeling System) and density dynamics models for algae. This approach enabled assessment of ecological risk when the exposure concentration shows spatiotemporal variation. First, risk maps of 5 herbicides (pretilachlor, butachlor, simetryn, mefenacet, and esprocarb) were created from the spatial predictions of environmental concentrations and 50% inhibitory concentrations of the herbicides. Simulations of algal density dynamics at high-risk sites were then conducted by incorporating the predicted temporal dynamics of the environmental concentration of each herbicide at the sites. The results suggested that the risk of pretilachlor was clearly the highest of the 5 herbicides, in terms of both the spatial distributions and the temporal durations. The present study highlights the importance of integrating exposure models and effect models to clarify spatial and temporal risk and to develop management plans for chemical exposure that shows high spatiotemporal variation. PMID:26183805

  1. Ecological risk assessment of herbicides in Japan: Integrating spatiotemporal variation in exposure and effects using a multimedia model and algal density dynamics models.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takehiko I; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Application of herbicides to paddy fields in Japan has strong seasonality, and their environmental concentrations exhibit clear spatiotemporal variation. The authors developed an approach that combines a multimedia environmental exposure model (Grid-Catchment Integrated Modeling System) and density dynamics models for algae. This approach enabled assessment of ecological risk when the exposure concentration shows spatiotemporal variation. First, risk maps of 5 herbicides (pretilachlor, butachlor, simetryn, mefenacet, and esprocarb) were created from the spatial predictions of environmental concentrations and 50% inhibitory concentrations of the herbicides. Simulations of algal density dynamics at high-risk sites were then conducted by incorporating the predicted temporal dynamics of the environmental concentration of each herbicide at the sites. The results suggested that the risk of pretilachlor was clearly the highest of the 5 herbicides, in terms of both the spatial distributions and the temporal durations. The present study highlights the importance of integrating exposure models and effect models to clarify spatial and temporal risk and to develop management plans for chemical exposure that shows high spatiotemporal variation.

  2. Cell specific, variable density, polymer microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Biocompatible polymeric microspheres having an average diameter below about 3 microns and having density at least 15% greater or lesser than organic cells and having covalent binding sites are provided in accordance with this invention. The microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing a hydroxy or amine substituted acrylic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate with a light or dense comonomer such as a fluoromonomer. A lectin or antibody is bound to the hydroxy or amine site of the bead to provide cell specificity. When added to a cell suspension the marked bead will specifically label the cell membrane by binding to specific receptor sites thereon. The labelled membrane can then be separated by density gradient centrifugation.

  3. Cell death in a harmful algal bloom causing species Alexandrium tamarense upon an algicidal bacterium induction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huajun; Lv, Jinglin; Peng, Yun; Zhang, Su; An, Xinli; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Jun; Tian, Yun; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-09-01

    Harmful algal blooms occur throughout the world, destroying aquatic ecosystems and threatening human health. The culture supernatant of the marine algicidal bacteria DHQ25 was able to lysis dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense. Loss of photosynthetic pigments, accompanied by a decline in Photosystem II (PSII) photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), in A. tamarense was detected under bacterial supernatant stress. Transmission electron microscope analysis showed obvious morphological modifications of chloroplast dismantling as a part of the algicidal process. The PSII electron transport chain was seriously blocked, with its reaction center damaged. This damage was detected in a relative transcriptional level of psbA and psbD genes, which encode the D1 and D2 proteins in the PSII reaction center. And the block in the electron transport chain of PSII might generate excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) which could destroy the membrane system and pigment synthesis and activated enzymic antioxidant systems including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). This study indicated that marine bacteria with indirect algicidal activity played an important role in the changes of photosynthetic process in a harmful algal bloom species.

  4. Algal biocathode for in situ terminal electron acceptor (TEA) production: synergetic association of bacteria-microalgae metabolism for the functioning of biofuel cell.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Srikanth, S; Chiranjeevi, P; Arora, Somya; Chandra, Rashmi

    2014-08-01

    Replacement of energy intensive mechanical aeration with sustainable oxygenic photosynthesis by microalgae at cathode was studied in dual-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC). The synergistic association between bacterial fermentation at anode and the oxygenic photosynthesis of microalgae at cathode facilitated good power output as well as treatment efficiency. However, MFC operation during spring showed higher bioelectrogenic activity (57.0 mW/m(2)) over summer (1.1 mW/m(2)) due to the higher oxygenic photosynthetic activity of microalgae and respective dissolved oxygen (DO) levels. This can be attributed to RuBisCO inactivation under high temperatures and light intensity of summer, which prevented rich algal biomass growth as well as their photosynthetic activity. Unlike abiotic cathode, the algal cathode potential increased with operation time due to the algal biomass growth during spring but was negligible during summer. The catalytic currents on voltammetric signatures and the bioprocess parameters also corroborated well with the observed power output.

  5. Red and green algal origin of diatom membrane transporters: insights into environmental adaptation and cell evolution.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters (MTs) facilitate the movement of molecules between cellular compartments. The evolutionary history of these key components of eukaryote genomes remains unclear. Many photosynthetic microbial eukaryotes (e.g., diatoms, haptophytes, and dinoflagellates) appear to have undergone serial endosymbiosis and thereby recruited foreign genes through endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer (E/HGT). Here we used the diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum as models to examine the evolutionary origin of MTs in this important group of marine primary producers. Using phylogenomics, we used 1,014 diatom MTs as query against a broadly sampled protein sequence database that includes novel genome data from the mesophilic red algae Porphyridium cruentum and Calliarthron tuberculosum, and the stramenopile Ectocarpus siliculosus. Our conservative approach resulted in 879 maximum likelihood trees of which 399 genes show a non-lineal history between diatoms and other eukaryotes and prokaryotes (at the bootstrap value ≥70%). Of the eukaryote-derived MTs, 172 (ca. 25% of 697 examined phylogenies) have members of both red/green algae as sister groups, with 103 putatively arising from green algae, 19 from red algae, and 50 have an unresolved affiliation to red and/or green algae. We used topology tests to analyze the most convincing cases of non-lineal gene history in which red and/or green algae were nested within stramenopiles. This analysis showed that ca. 6% of all trees (our most conservative estimate) support an algal origin of MTs in stramenopiles with the majority derived from green algae. Our findings demonstrate the complex evolutionary history of photosynthetic eukaryotes and indicate a reticulate origin of MT genes in diatoms. We postulate that the algal-derived MTs acquired via E/HGT provided diatoms and other related microbial eukaryotes the ability to persist under conditions of fluctuating ocean chemistry, likely contributing to

  6. Identification of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS) between 25 and 35 kD, which is secreted by fibroblastic primary avian tendon cells in culture, and causes the cells to self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. It effects an increase of procollagen production in avian tendon cell cultures of ten fold while proliferation rates are decreased. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use.

  7. Identification of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, R.I.

    1998-04-21

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS) between 25 and 35 kD, which is secreted by fibroblastic primary avian tendon cells in culture, and causes the cells to self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. It effects an increase of procollagen production in avian tendon cell cultures of ten fold while proliferation rates are decreased. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use. 2 figs.

  8. Cell specific, variable density, polymer microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Biocompatible polymeric microspheres having an average diameter below about 3 microns and having a density at least 15% greater or lesser than organic cells and having covalent binding sites are provided in accordance with this invention. The microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing a hydroxy or amine substituted acrylic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate with a light or dense comonomer such as a fluoromonomer. A lectin or antibody is bound to the hydroxy or amine site of the bead to provide cell specificity. When added to a cell suspension the marked bead will specifically label the cell membrane by binding to specific receptor sites thereon. The labelled membrane can then be separated by density gradient centrifugation.

  9. Phylogenomic Analyses Indicate that Early Fungi Evolved Digesting Cell Walls of Algal Ancestors of Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying; Wang, Sishuo; Sekimoto, Satoshi; Aerts, Andrea L; Choi, Cindy; Clum, Alicia; LaButti, Kurt M; Lindquist, Erika A; Yee Ngan, Chew; Ohm, Robin A; Salamov, Asaf A; Grigoriev, Igor V; Spatafora, Joseph W; Berbee, Mary L

    2015-05-14

    As decomposers, fungi are key players in recycling plant material in global carbon cycles. We hypothesized that genomes of early diverging fungi may have inherited pectinases from an ancestral species that had been able to extract nutrients from pectin-containing land plants and their algal allies (Streptophytes). We aimed to infer, based on pectinase gene expansions and on the organismal phylogeny, the geological timing of the plant-fungus association. We analyzed 40 fungal genomes, three of which, including Gonapodya prolifera, were sequenced for this study. In the organismal phylogeny from 136 housekeeping loci, Rozella diverged first from all other fungi. Gonapodya prolifera was included among the flagellated, predominantly aquatic fungal species in Chytridiomycota. Sister to Chytridiomycota were the predominantly terrestrial fungi including zygomycota I and zygomycota II, along with the ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that comprise Dikarya. The Gonapodya genome has 27 genes representing five of the seven classes of pectin-specific enzymes known from fungi. Most of these share a common ancestry with pectinases from Dikarya. Indicating functional and sequence similarity, Gonapodya, like many Dikarya, can use pectin as a carbon source for growth in pure culture. Shared pectinases of Dikarya and Gonapodya provide evidence that even ancient aquatic fungi had adapted to extract nutrients from the plants in the green lineage. This implies that 750 million years, the estimated maximum age of origin of the pectin-containing streptophytes represents a maximum age for the divergence of Chytridiomycota from the lineage including Dikarya.

  10. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  11. Rescue of heavy metal effects on cell physiology of the algal model system Micrasterias by divalent ions.

    PubMed

    Volland, Stefanie; Bayer, Elisabeth; Baumgartner, Verena; Andosch, Ancuela; Lütz, Cornelius; Sima, Evelyn; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2014-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that metals such as copper, zinc, aluminum, cadmium, chromium, iron and lead cause severe dose-dependent disturbances in growth, morphogenesis, photosynthetic and respiratory activity as well as on ultrastructure and function of organelles in the algal model system Micrasterias denticulata (Volland et al., 2011, 2012; Andosch et al., 2012). In the present investigation we focus on amelioration of these adverse effects of cadmium, chromium and lead by supplying the cells with different antioxidants and essential micronutrients to obtain insight into metal uptake mechanisms and subcellular metal targets. This seems particularly interesting as Micrasterias is adapted to extremely low-concentrated, oligotrophic conditions in its natural bog environment. The divalent ions of iron, zinc and calcium were able to diminish the effects of the metals cadmium, chromium and lead on Micrasterias. Iron showed most ameliorating effects on cadmium and chromium in short- and long-term treatments and improved cell morphogenesis, ultrastructure, cell division rates and photosynthesis. Analytical transmission electron microscopic (TEM) methods (electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI)) revealed that chromium uptake was decreased when Micrasterias cells were pre-treated with iron, which resulted in no longer detectable intracellular chromium accumulations. Zinc rescued the detrimental effects of chromium on net-photosynthesis, respiration rates and electron transport in PS II. Calcium and gadolinium were able to almost completely compensate the inhibiting effects of lead and cadmium on cell morphogenesis after mitosis, respectively. These results indicate that cadmium is taken up by calcium and iron transporters, whereas chromium appears to enter the algae cells via iron and zinc carriers. It was shown that lead is not taken up into Micrasterias at all but exerts its adverse effects on cell growth by substituting cell

  12. Rescue of heavy metal effects on cell physiology of the algal model system Micrasterias by divalent ions.

    PubMed

    Volland, Stefanie; Bayer, Elisabeth; Baumgartner, Verena; Andosch, Ancuela; Lütz, Cornelius; Sima, Evelyn; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2014-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that metals such as copper, zinc, aluminum, cadmium, chromium, iron and lead cause severe dose-dependent disturbances in growth, morphogenesis, photosynthetic and respiratory activity as well as on ultrastructure and function of organelles in the algal model system Micrasterias denticulata (Volland et al., 2011, 2012; Andosch et al., 2012). In the present investigation we focus on amelioration of these adverse effects of cadmium, chromium and lead by supplying the cells with different antioxidants and essential micronutrients to obtain insight into metal uptake mechanisms and subcellular metal targets. This seems particularly interesting as Micrasterias is adapted to extremely low-concentrated, oligotrophic conditions in its natural bog environment. The divalent ions of iron, zinc and calcium were able to diminish the effects of the metals cadmium, chromium and lead on Micrasterias. Iron showed most ameliorating effects on cadmium and chromium in short- and long-term treatments and improved cell morphogenesis, ultrastructure, cell division rates and photosynthesis. Analytical transmission electron microscopic (TEM) methods (electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI)) revealed that chromium uptake was decreased when Micrasterias cells were pre-treated with iron, which resulted in no longer detectable intracellular chromium accumulations. Zinc rescued the detrimental effects of chromium on net-photosynthesis, respiration rates and electron transport in PS II. Calcium and gadolinium were able to almost completely compensate the inhibiting effects of lead and cadmium on cell morphogenesis after mitosis, respectively. These results indicate that cadmium is taken up by calcium and iron transporters, whereas chromium appears to enter the algae cells via iron and zinc carriers. It was shown that lead is not taken up into Micrasterias at all but exerts its adverse effects on cell growth by substituting cell

  13. Rescue of heavy metal effects on cell physiology of the algal model system Micrasterias by divalent ions

    PubMed Central

    Volland, Stefanie; Bayer, Elisabeth; Baumgartner, Verena; Andosch, Ancuela; Lütz, Cornelius; Sima, Evelyn; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that metals such as copper, zinc, aluminum, cadmium, chromium, iron and lead cause severe dose-dependent disturbances in growth, morphogenesis, photosynthetic and respiratory activity as well as on ultrastructure and function of organelles in the algal model system Micrasterias denticulata (Volland et al., 2011, 2012; Andosch et al., 2012). In the present investigation we focus on amelioration of these adverse effects of cadmium, chromium and lead by supplying the cells with different antioxidants and essential micronutrients to obtain insight into metal uptake mechanisms and subcellular metal targets. This seems particularly interesting as Micrasterias is adapted to extremely low-concentrated, oligotrophic conditions in its natural bog environment. The divalent ions of iron, zinc and calcium were able to diminish the effects of the metals cadmium, chromium and lead on Micrasterias. Iron showed most ameliorating effects on cadmium and chromium in short- and long-term treatments and improved cell morphogenesis, ultrastructure, cell division rates and photosynthesis. Analytical transmission electron microscopic (TEM) methods (electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI)) revealed that chromium uptake was decreased when Micrasterias cells were pre-treated with iron, which resulted in no longer detectable intracellular chromium accumulations. Zinc rescued the detrimental effects of chromium on net-photosynthesis, respiration rates and electron transport in PS II. Calcium and gadolinium were able to almost completely compensate the inhibiting effects of lead and cadmium on cell morphogenesis after mitosis, respectively. These results indicate that cadmium is taken up by calcium and iron transporters, whereas chromium appears to enter the algae cells via iron and zinc carriers. It was shown that lead is not taken up into Micrasterias at all but exerts its adverse effects on cell growth by substituting cell

  14. Algal biofuels.

    PubMed

    Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-11-01

    The world is facing energy crisis and environmental issues due to the depletion of fossil fuels and increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Growing microalgae can contribute to practical solutions for these global problems because they can harvest solar energy and capture CO2 by converting it into biofuel using photosynthesis. Microalgae are robust organisms capable of rapid growth under a variety of conditions including in open ponds or closed photobioreactors. Their reduced biomass compounds can be used as the feedstock for mass production of a variety of biofuels. As another advantage, their ability to accumulate or secrete biofuels can be controlled by changing their growth conditions or metabolic engineering. This review is aimed to highlight different forms of biofuels produced by microalgae and the approaches taken to improve their biofuel productivity. The costs for industrial-scale production of algal biofuels in open ponds or closed photobioreactors are analyzed. Different strategies for photoproduction of hydrogen by the hydrogenase enzyme of green algae are discussed. Algae are also good sources of biodiesel since some species can make large quantities of lipids as their biomass. The lipid contents for some of the best oil-producing strains of algae in optimized growth conditions are reviewed. The potential of microalgae for producing petroleum related chemicals or ready-make fuels such as bioethanol, triterpenic hydrocarbons, isobutyraldehyde, isobutanol, and isoprene from their biomass are also presented.

  15. Significance of different carbon forms and carbonic anhydrase activity in monitoring and prediction of algal blooms in the urban section of Jialing River, Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yudong; Zhang, Zhi; Shen, Qian; Gao, Wenjin; Li, Yingfan

    2016-05-18

    The Three Gorges Dam is one of the largest hydroelectric power plants worldwide; its reservoir was preliminarily impounded in 2003 and finally impounded to 175 m in 2012. The impoundment caused some environmental problems, such as algal blooms. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is an important biocatalyst in the carbon utilization by algae and plays an important role in algal blooms. CA has received considerable attention for its role in red tides in oceans, but less investigation has been focused on its role in algal blooms in fresh water. In this study, the seasonal variation of water quality parameters, different carbon forms, carbonic anhydrase activity (CAA), and the algal cell density of four sampling sites in the urban section of the Jialing River were investigated from November 1, 2013 to October 31, 2014. Results indicated that CAA exhibited a positive correlation with dissoluble organic carbon (DOC), pH, and temperature, but a negative correlation with CO2 and dissoluble inorganic carbon (DIC). Algal cell density exhibited a positive correlation with flow velocity (V), pH, particulate organic carbon (POC), and CAA, a negative correlation with CO2, and a negative partial correlation with DIC. The relationship between CAA and algal cell density for the entire year can be described as cells = 23.278CAA - 42.666POC + 139.547pH - 1057.106. The algal bloom prediction model for the key control period can be described as cells = -45.895CAA + 776.103V- 29.523DOC + 14.219PIC + 35.060POC + 19.181 (2 weeks in advance) and cells = 69.200CAA + 203.213V + 4.184CO2 + 38.911DOC + 40.770POC - 189.567 (4 weeks in advance). The findings in this study demonstrate that the carbon utilization by algae is conducted by CA and provide a new method of monitoring algal cell density and predicting algal blooms.

  16. Significance of different carbon forms and carbonic anhydrase activity in monitoring and prediction of algal blooms in the urban section of Jialing River, Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yudong; Zhang, Zhi; Shen, Qian; Gao, Wenjin; Li, Yingfan

    2016-05-18

    The Three Gorges Dam is one of the largest hydroelectric power plants worldwide; its reservoir was preliminarily impounded in 2003 and finally impounded to 175 m in 2012. The impoundment caused some environmental problems, such as algal blooms. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is an important biocatalyst in the carbon utilization by algae and plays an important role in algal blooms. CA has received considerable attention for its role in red tides in oceans, but less investigation has been focused on its role in algal blooms in fresh water. In this study, the seasonal variation of water quality parameters, different carbon forms, carbonic anhydrase activity (CAA), and the algal cell density of four sampling sites in the urban section of the Jialing River were investigated from November 1, 2013 to October 31, 2014. Results indicated that CAA exhibited a positive correlation with dissoluble organic carbon (DOC), pH, and temperature, but a negative correlation with CO2 and dissoluble inorganic carbon (DIC). Algal cell density exhibited a positive correlation with flow velocity (V), pH, particulate organic carbon (POC), and CAA, a negative correlation with CO2, and a negative partial correlation with DIC. The relationship between CAA and algal cell density for the entire year can be described as cells = 23.278CAA - 42.666POC + 139.547pH - 1057.106. The algal bloom prediction model for the key control period can be described as cells = -45.895CAA + 776.103V- 29.523DOC + 14.219PIC + 35.060POC + 19.181 (2 weeks in advance) and cells = 69.200CAA + 203.213V + 4.184CO2 + 38.911DOC + 40.770POC - 189.567 (4 weeks in advance). The findings in this study demonstrate that the carbon utilization by algae is conducted by CA and provide a new method of monitoring algal cell density and predicting algal blooms. PMID:27142237

  17. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  18. Algal culture studies for CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Arnett, K.; Gladue, R.; Cox, J.; Lieberman, D.

    1987-01-01

    Microalgae are well-suited as a component of a Closed Environmental Life Support System (CELSS), since they can couple the closely related functions of food production and atmospheric regeneration. The objective was to provide a basis for predicting the response of CELSS algal cultures, and thus the food supply and air regeneration system, to changes in the culture parameters. Scenedesmus growth was measured as a function of light intensity, and the spectral dependence of light absorption by the algae as well as algal respiration in the light were determined as a function of cell concentration. These results were used to test and confirm a mathematical model that describes the productivity of an algal culture in terms of the competing processes of photosynthesis and respiration. The relationship of algal productivity to cell concentration was determined at different carbon dioxide concentrations, temperatures, and light intensities. The maximum productivity achieved by an air-grown culture was found to be within 10% of the computed maximum productivity, indicating that CO2 was very efficiently removed from the gas stream by the algal culture. Measurements of biomass productivity as a function of cell concentration at different light intensities indicated that both the productivity and efficiency of light utilization were greater at higher light intensities.

  19. Mechanism of Algal Aggregation by Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting. PMID:24771029

  20. Development and optimization of biofilm based algal cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Martin Anthony

    This dissertation describes research done on biofilm based algal cultivation systems. The system that was developed in this work is the revolving algal biofilm cultivation system (RAB). A raceway-retrofit, and a trough-based pilot-scale RAB system were developed and investigated. Each of the systems significantly outperformed a control raceway pond in side-by-side tests. Furthermore the RAB system was found to require significantly less water than the raceway pond based cultivation system. Lastly a TEA/LCA analysis was conducted to evaluate the economic and life cycle of the RAB cultivation system in comparison to raceway pond. It was found that the RAB system was able to grow algae at a lower cost and was shown to be profitable at a smaller scale than the raceway pond style of algal cultivation. Additionally the RAB system was projected to have lower GHG emissions, and better energy and water use efficiencies in comparison to a raceway pond system. Furthermore, fundamental research was conducted to identify the optimal material for algae to attach on. A total of 28 materials with a smooth surface were tested for initial cell colonization and it was found that the tetradecane contact angle of the materials had a good correlation with cell attachment. The effects of surface texture were evaluated using mesh materials (nylon, polypropylene, high density polyethylene, polyester, aluminum, and stainless steel) with openings ranging from 0.05--6.40 mm. It was found that both surface texture and material composition influence algal attachment.

  1. Integrated Bacillus sp. immobilized cell reactor and Synechocystis sp. algal reactor for the treatment of tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sekaran, G; Karthikeyan, S; Nagalakshmi, C; Mandal, A B

    2013-01-01

    The wastewater discharged from leather industries lack biodegradability due to the presence of xenobiotic compounds. The primary clarification and aerobic treatment in Bacillus sp. immobilized Chemo Autotrophic Activated Carbon Oxidation (CAACO) reactor removed considerable amount of pollution parameters. The residual untreated organics in the wastewater was further treated in algal batch reactor inoculated with Synechocystis sp. Sodium nitrate, K(2)HPO(4), MgSO(4).7H(2)O, NH(4)Cl, CaCl(2)·2H(2)O, FeCl(3) (anhydrous), and thiamine hydrochloride, rice husk based activated carbon (RHAC), immobilization of Bacillus sp. in mesoporous activated carbon, sand filter of dimensions diameter, 6 cm and height, 30 cm; and the CAACO reactor of dimensions diameter, 5.5 cm and height, 30 cm with total volume 720 ml, and working volume of 356 ml. In the present investigation, the CAACO treated tannery wastewater was applied to Synechocystis sp. inoculated algal batch reactor of hydraulic residence time 24 h. The BOD(5), COD, and TOC of treated wastewater from algal batch reactor were 20 ± 7, 167 ± 29, and 78 ± 16 mg/l respectively. The integrated CAACO system and Algal batch reactor was operated for 30 days and they accomplished a cumulative removal of BOD(5),COD, TOC, VFA and sulphide as 98 %, 95 %, 93 %, 86 %, and 100 %, respectively. The biokinetic constants for the growth of algae in the batch reactor were specific growth rate, 0.095(day(-1)) and yield coefficient, 3.15 mg of algal biomass/mg of COD destructed. The degradation of xenobiotic compounds in the algal batch reactor was confirmed through HPLC and FT-IR techniques. The integrated CAACO-Algal reactor system established a credible reduction in pollution parameters in the tannery wastewater. The removal mechanism is mainly due to co-metabolism between algae and bacterial species and the organics were completely metabolized rather than by adsorption.

  2. High energy density aluminum-oxygen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell. An example of this is the metal-air fuel cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, having high energy and power densities, being environmentally acceptable, and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum-oxygen system is currently under development for a UUV test vehicle, and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from S to 150 mA/sq cm have been identified. These materials are essential to realizing an acceptable mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 hours in a large scale, half-cell system.

  3. High energy density aluminum-oxygen cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    1993-11-01

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell. An example of this is the metal-air fuel cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, having high energy and power densities, being environmentally acceptable, and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum-oxygen system is currently under development for a UUV test vehicle, and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from S to 150 mA/sq cm have been identified. These materials are essential to realizing an acceptable mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 hours in a large scale, half-cell system.

  4. High Energy Density aluminum/oxygen cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, E. J.; Gibbons, D. W.

    An alternative to a secondary battery as the power source for vehicle propulsion is a fuel cell, an example of which is the metal/air cell using metals such as aluminum, zinc, or iron. Aluminum is a particularly attractive candidate, with high energy and power densities, environmentally acceptable and having a large, established industrial base for production and distribution. An aluminum/oxygen system is currently under development for a prototype unmanned, undersea vehicle (UUV) for the US navy and recent work has focussed upon low corrosion aluminum alloys, and an electrolyte management system for processing the by-products of the energy-producing reactions. This paper summarizes the progress made in both areas. Anode materials capable of providing high utilization factors over current densities ranging from 5 to 150 mA/cm 2 have been identified, such materials being essential to realize mission life for the UUV. With respect to the electrolyte management system, a filter/precipitator unit has been successfully operated for over 250 h in a large scale, half-cell system.

  5. Nanostructured magnesium increases bone cell density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Lucy; Webster, Thomas J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium has attracted some attention in orthopedics due to its biodegradability and mechanical properties. Since magnesium is an essential natural mineral for bone growth, it can be expected that as a biomaterial, it would support bone formation. However, upon degradation in the body, magnesium releases OH- which results in an alkaline pH that can be detrimental to cell density (for example, osteoblasts or bone forming cells). For this reason, modification of magnesium may be necessary to compensate for such detrimental effects to cells. This study created biologically inspired nanoscale surface features on magnesium by soaking magnesium in various concentrations of NaOH (from 1 to 10 N) and for various periods of time (from 10 to 30 min). The results provided the first evidence of increased roughness, surface energy, and consequently greater osteoblast adhesion, after 4 h as well as density up to 7 days on magnesium treated with any concentration of NaOH for any length of time compared to untreated controls. For these reasons, this study suggests that soaking magnesium in NaOH could be an inexpensive, simple and effective manner to promote osteoblast functions for numerous orthopedic applications and, thus, should be further studied.

  6. Cell division and density of symbiotic Chlorella variabilis of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria is controlled by the host's nutritional conditions during early infection process.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    The association of ciliate Paramecium bursaria with symbiotic Chlorella sp. is a mutualistic symbiosis. However, both the alga-free paramecia and symbiotic algae can still grow independently and can be reinfected experimentally by mixing them. Effects of the host's nutritional conditions against the symbiotic algal cell division and density were examined during early reinfection. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that algal cell division starts 24 h after mixing with alga-free P. bursaria, and that the algal mother cell wall is discarded from the perialgal vacuole membrane, which encloses symbiotic alga. Labelling of the mother cell wall with Calcofluor White Stain, a cell-wall-specific fluorochrome, was used to show whether alga had divided or not. Pulse labelling of alga-free P. bursaria cells with Calcofluor White Stain-stained algae with or without food bacteria for P. bursaria revealed that the fluorescence of Calcofluor White Stain in P. bursaria with bacteria disappeared within 3 days after mixing, significantly faster than without bacteria. Similar results were obtained both under constant light and dark conditions. This report is the first describing that the cell division and density of symbiotic algae of P. bursaria are controlled by the host's nutritional conditions during early infection.

  7. High-cell-density cultivation of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Riesenberg, D; Guthke, R

    1999-04-01

    High-cell-density cultivation (HCDC) is required to improve microbial biomass and product formation substantially. An overview of HCDC is given for microorganisms including bacteria, archae and eukarya (yeasts). Problems encountered by HCDC and their possible solutions are discussed. Improvements of strains, different types of bioreactors and cultivation strategies for successful HCDC are described. Stirred-tank reactors with and without cell retention, a dialysis-membrane reactor, a gas-lift reactor and a membrane cyclone reactor used for HCDC are outlined. Recently modified traditional feeding strategies and new ones are included, in particular those for unlimited growth to very dense cultures. Emphasis is placed on robust fermentation control because of the growing industrial interest in this field. Therefore, developments in the application of multivariate statistical control, artificial neural networks, fuzzy control and knowledge-based supervision (expert systems) are summarized. Recent advances using Escherichia coli--the pioneer organism for HCDC--are outlined. PMID:10341426

  8. Formation of harmful algal blooms cannot be explained by allelopathic interactions.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Per R; Pavia, Henrik; Toth, Gunilla

    2009-07-01

    Many planktonic microalgae produce a range of toxins and may form harmful algal blooms. One hypothesis is that some toxins are allelopathic, suppressing the growth of competitors, and it has been suggested that allelopathy may be one important mechanism causing algal blooms. In a metaanalysis of recent experimental work, we looked for evidence that allelopathy may explain the initiation of algal blooms. With few exceptions, allelopathic effects were only significant at very high cell densities typical of blooms. We conclude that there is no experimental support for allelopathy at prebloom densities, throwing doubts on allelopathy as a mechanism in bloom formation. Most studies tested allelopathy using cell-free manipulations. With simple models we show that cell-free manipulations may underestimate allelopathy at low cell densities if effects are transmitted during cell-cell interactions. However, we suggest that the evolution of allelopathy under field conditions may be unlikely even if based on cell-cell interactions. The spatial dispersion of cells in turbulent flow will make it difficult for an allelopathic cell to receive an exclusive benefit, and a dispersion model shows that dividing cells are rapidly separated constraining clone selection. Instead, we propose that reported allelopathic effects may be nonadaptive side effects of predator-prey or casual parasitic cell-cell interactions.

  9. A portable Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopic system for the identification and environmental monitoring of algal cells.

    PubMed

    Wood, Bayden R; Heraud, Philip; Stojkovic, Slobodanka; Morrison, Danielle; Beardall, John; McNaughton, Don

    2005-08-01

    We report the coupling of a portable Raman spectrometer to an acoustic levitation device to enable environmental monitoring and the potential taxonomic identification of microalgae. Spectra of living cells were recorded at 785 nm using a fiber-optic probe coupled to a portable Raman spectrometer. The spectra exhibit an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and clearly show bands from chlorophyll a and beta-carotene. Spectra of levitated photobleached microalgae clearly show a reduction in chlorophyll a concentration relative to beta-carotene after 10 min of exposure to a quartz halogen lamp. Spectra recorded from levitated nitrogen-limited cells also show a significant reduction in bands associated with chlorophyll a, as compared to nitrogen-replete cells. To investigate the diagnostic capability of the technique, four species of microalgae were analyzed. Good quality spectra of all four species were obtained showing varying ratios of beta-carotene to chlorophyll. The combination of an acoustic levitation device and a portable Raman spectrometer shows potential as a taxonomic and environmental monitoring tool with direct application to field studies in remote environments. PMID:16053309

  10. Selective control of the Prorocentrum minimum harmful algal blooms by a novel algal-lytic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis AFMB-008041.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Dong; Kim, Ji-Young; Park, Jae-Kweon; Lee, Choul-Gyun

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined the algal-lytic activities and biological control mechanisms of Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis AFMB-08041, which was isolated from surface seawater obtained at Masan Bay in Korea. In addition, we assessed whether AFMB-08041 could be used as a biocontrol agent to regulate harmful dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum. From these experiments, we found that the inoculation of AFMB-08041 at a final density of 2.5 x 10(4) cfu ml(-1) caused P. minimum cells to degrade (>90%) within 5 days. The algal cells were lysed through an indirect attack by the AFMB-08041 bacterial strain. Our results also suggest that the algal-lytic compounds produced by AFMB-08041 may have beta-glucosidase activity. However, P. haloplanktis AFMB-08041 was not able to suppress the growth of other alga such as Alexandrium tamarense, Akashiwo sanguinea, Cochlodinium polykrikoides, Gymnodinium catenatum, and Heterosigma akashiwo. Moreover, we observed that the growth of Prorocentrum dentatum, which has a very similar morphological structure to P. minimum, was also effectively suppressed by P. haloplanktis AFMB-08041. Therefore, the effect of AFMB-08041 on P. minimum degradation appears to be species specific. When testing in an indoor mesocosms, P. haloplanktis AFMB-08041 reduced the amount of viable P. minimum cells by 94.5% within 5 days after inoculation. The combined results of this study clearly demonstrate that this bacterium is capable of regulating the harmful algal blooms of P. minimum. In addition, these results will enable us to develop a new strategy for the anthropogenic control of harmful algal bloom-forming species in nature.

  11. [Systematic investigation into winter and spring algal blooms in Daning River of Three Gorges Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Cao, Cheng-jin; Zheng, Bing-hui; Zhang, Jia-lei; Huang, Min-sheng; Chen, Zhen-lou

    2009-12-01

    According to the survey conducted from winter and spring algal blooms, the changes of water quality and characteristics of Daning River of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) were studied. The results suggested that during the period of winter algal blooms centered on Tangjia bay in Daning river, chlorophyll a (Chl-a) had a wide range (the rates of (Chl-a)max and (Chl-a)min is 260). The contents of total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and potassium permanganate index were at very high levels because of bioaccumulation from algal blooms, but the values of dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH were very low. During winter algal blooms fastigium poor algae were observed accounting for 2 phylum 4 species, dominant species are Microcystis aeruginosa and Microcystis flos-aquae, the maximum value of algal density was 3.15 x 10(7) cells/L, and the correlation weighted nutrition state index was 80, which indicated water body was at high eutrophication level. However the spring algal blooms belonged to whole watershed outbreak, the values of Chl-a, TN, TP and potassium permanganate index became all markedly high with outbreak of algal blooms. There were 5 phylum 44 species algae being observed during spring algal blooms fastigium, different sections observed different dominant species and algal density values. The correlation weighted nutrition state index showed water of Dongping bar and Baishui River sections was at slight eutrophication level. During winter algal blooms there were significantly positive correlations between Chl-a and TN, TP, potassium permanganate index, water temperature, between pH and SD. Significantly negative correlations were observed between Chl-a and DO, SD, between pH and TN, TP, potassium permanganate index. In spring algal blooms significantly positive correlations were observed between Chi-a and TP, potassium permanganate index, DO, pH, between pH and Chla, TP, potassium permanganate index, DO, air temperature. Significantly negative correlations were

  12. Prechlorination of algae-laden water: The effects of transportation time on cell integrity, algal organic matter release, and chlorinated disinfection byproduct formation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Lan, Huachun; Liu, Ruiping; Miao, Shiyu; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-10-01

    The prechlorination-induced algal organic matter (AOM) released from Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) cells has been reported to serve as a source of precursors for chlorinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). However, previous studies have mainly focused on the precursors either extracted directly from the cell suspension or derived immediately after algal suspension prechlorination. This study aims to investigate the impacts of water transportation time after algal suspension prechlorination on cell integrity, AOM release, and DBP formation during the dissolved phase chlorination. The damage to cell integrity after prechlorination was indicated to depend not only on chlorine dose but also on transportation time. The highest dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) values were observed at 2 mg/L chlorine preoxidation before transportation, but were obtained at 0.4 mg/L chlorine after 480-min simulated transportation. The variation of DON with transportation time was indicated to be mainly influenced by the small molecular weight nitrogenous organic compounds, such as amino acids. Additionally, formation of the corresponding chlorinated carbonaceous disinfection byproducts (C-DBPs) and nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs) during the dissolved phase chlorination showed the same variation tendency as DOC and DON respectively. The highest C-DBP (98.4 μg/L) and N-DBP (5.5 μg/L) values were obtained at 0.4 mg/L chlorine preoxidation after 480-min simulated transportation. Therefore, when prechlorination is applied for algae-laden water pretreatment, not only chlorine dose but also transportation time needs to be considered with regard to their effects on cell integrity, AOM release, and chlorinated DBP formation.

  13. Prechlorination of algae-laden water: The effects of transportation time on cell integrity, algal organic matter release, and chlorinated disinfection byproduct formation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Lan, Huachun; Liu, Ruiping; Miao, Shiyu; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-10-01

    The prechlorination-induced algal organic matter (AOM) released from Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) cells has been reported to serve as a source of precursors for chlorinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). However, previous studies have mainly focused on the precursors either extracted directly from the cell suspension or derived immediately after algal suspension prechlorination. This study aims to investigate the impacts of water transportation time after algal suspension prechlorination on cell integrity, AOM release, and DBP formation during the dissolved phase chlorination. The damage to cell integrity after prechlorination was indicated to depend not only on chlorine dose but also on transportation time. The highest dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) values were observed at 2 mg/L chlorine preoxidation before transportation, but were obtained at 0.4 mg/L chlorine after 480-min simulated transportation. The variation of DON with transportation time was indicated to be mainly influenced by the small molecular weight nitrogenous organic compounds, such as amino acids. Additionally, formation of the corresponding chlorinated carbonaceous disinfection byproducts (C-DBPs) and nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs) during the dissolved phase chlorination showed the same variation tendency as DOC and DON respectively. The highest C-DBP (98.4 μg/L) and N-DBP (5.5 μg/L) values were obtained at 0.4 mg/L chlorine preoxidation after 480-min simulated transportation. Therefore, when prechlorination is applied for algae-laden water pretreatment, not only chlorine dose but also transportation time needs to be considered with regard to their effects on cell integrity, AOM release, and chlorinated DBP formation. PMID:27348194

  14. Cyanobacteria Toxin and Cell Propagation through Seven Lake Erie Treatment Plants during the 2013 Algal Bloom Season - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past five years, Lake Erie has been experiencing harmful algal blooms (HABs) of progressively increasing severity. Cognizant of the potential health and economic impacts, the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA’s) Water Supply and Water Resources Divis...

  15. Microflotation performance for algal separation.

    PubMed

    Hanotu, James; Bandulasena, H C Hemaka; Zimmerman, William B

    2012-07-01

    The performance of microflotation, dispersed air flotation with microbubble clouds with bubble size about 50 µm, for algae separation using fluidic oscillation for microbubble generation is investigated. This fluidic oscillator converts continuous air supply into oscillatory flow with a regular frequency to generate bubbles of the scale of the exit pore. Bubble characterization results showed that average bubble size generated under oscillatory air flow state was 86 µm, approximately twice the size of the diffuser pore size of 38 µm. In contrast, continuous air flow at the same rate through the same diffusers yielded an average bubble size of 1,059 µm, 28 times larger than the pore size. Following microbubble generation, the separation of algal cells under fluidic oscillator generated microbubbles was investigated by varying metallic coagulant types, concentration and pH. Best performances were recorded at the highest coagulant dose (150 mg/L) applied under acidic conditions (pH 5). Amongst the three metallic coagulants studied, ferric chloride yielded the overall best result of 99.2% under the optimum conditions followed closely by ferric sulfate (98.1%) and aluminum sulfate with 95.2%. This compares well with conventional dissolved air flotation (DAF) benchmarks, but has a highly turbulent flow, whereas microflotation is laminar with several orders of magnitude lower energy density.

  16. Formation of harmful algal blooms cannot be explained by allelopathic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Per R.; Pavia, Henrik; Toth, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    Many planktonic microalgae produce a range of toxins and may form harmful algal blooms. One hypothesis is that some toxins are allelopathic, suppressing the growth of competitors, and it has been suggested that allelopathy may be one important mechanism causing algal blooms. In a metaanalysis of recent experimental work, we looked for evidence that allelopathy may explain the initiation of algal blooms. With few exceptions, allelopathic effects were only significant at very high cell densities typical of blooms. We conclude that there is no experimental support for allelopathy at prebloom densities, throwing doubts on allelopathy as a mechanism in bloom formation. Most studies tested allelopathy using cell-free manipulations. With simple models we show that cell-free manipulations may underestimate allelopathy at low cell densities if effects are transmitted during cell–cell interactions. However, we suggest that the evolution of allelopathy under field conditions may be unlikely even if based on cell–cell interactions. The spatial dispersion of cells in turbulent flow will make it difficult for an allelopathic cell to receive an exclusive benefit, and a dispersion model shows that dividing cells are rapidly separated constraining clone selection. Instead, we propose that reported allelopathic effects may be nonadaptive side effects of predator–prey or casual parasitic cell–cell interactions. PMID:19549831

  17. X-ray microanalysis of calcium in fixed and in shock-frozen hydrated green algal cells: Mougeotia, Spirogyra and Zygnema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossbacher, Roland; Wagner, Gottfried; Pallaghy, Charles K.

    1984-04-01

    X-ray microanalysis, widely used for ionic detection in cell tissues, was performed on 0.5 μm thick glutaraldehyde-osmiumtetroxide fixed cell sections. Calcium in a water-insoluble state was found in membrane bound vesicles of about 0.5 μm in diameter. No other cell compartment showed a comparable calcium accumulation. In vivo staining by the fluorescent calcium indicator dye chlorotetracycline revealed a vesicular calcium pattern in Mougeotia matching the results by X-ray microanalysis: a dense population of calcium vesicles is located close to the chloroplast edge where the actin filaments are attached. The data find further support from X-ray microanalysis of shock-frozen hydrated Mougeotia cells and of the closely related green algal cells Spirogyra and Zygnema (Zygnemaceae). X-ray microanalysis as performed in this study seems a reliable tool for the detection of water-insoluble calcium stored by membrane-covered cytoplasmic compartments.

  18. Structural Impacts on Thallus and Algal Cell Components of Two Lichen Species in Response to Low-Level Air Pollution in Pacific Northwest Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Hyung-Shim Y.; Rubin, Laura; Crang, Richard F. E.

    2004-04-01

    Lichens have long been regarded as bioindicators of air pollution, and structural studies typically have indicated negative impacts in highly polluted areas. In this research, Parmelia sulcata and Platismatia glauca were collected from one clean and two polluted sites in the Pacific Northwest forests of the United States to investigate the anatomical and ultrastructural responses of relatively resistant lichens to moderate air pollution. Light microscopy of polluted materials revealed only slight increases in the algal cell proportions of the thallus, and a decrease in the fungal cells of the medulla. Using transmission electron microscopy, increased lipid droplets in the cytoplasm and an increase in the cell wall thickness of the photobionts were found in the polluted lichens. These results were compared with physiological data in which the net carbon uptake did not show any significant differences; however, the total chlorophyll content was heightened in the polluted samples. The increased total chlorophyll content and the absence of any changes in the algal cell proportions of the polluted samples suggest that the photobionts possessed a higher chlorophyll content per unit volume of the photobiont at polluted sites. The results also indicate that lichens have altered their storage allocation in different cellular compartments. This may be a result of symbiotic readjustment(s) between the photobiont and the mycobiont. In comparison with the physiological results from these two species, these changes do not represent damaging effects by low-level air pollution.

  19. Structural impacts on thallus and algal cell components of two lichen species in response to low-level air pollution in pacific northwest forests.

    PubMed

    Ra, Hyung-Shim Y; Rubin, Laura; Crang, Richard F E

    2004-04-01

    Lichens have long been regarded as bioindicators of air pollution, and structural studies typically have indicated negative impacts in highly polluted areas. In this research, Parmelia sulcata and Platismatia glauca were collected from one clean and two polluted sites in the Pacific Northwest forests of the United States to investigate the anatomical and ultrastructural responses of relatively resistant lichens to moderate air pollution. Light microscopy of polluted materials revealed only slight increases in the algal cell proportions of the thallus, and a decrease in the fungal cells of the medulla. Using transmission electron microscopy, increased lipid droplets in the cytoplasm and an increase in the cell wall thickness of the photobionts were found in the polluted lichens. These results were compared with physiological data in which the net carbon uptake did not show any significant differences; however, the total chlorophyll content was heightened in the polluted samples. The increased total chlorophyll content and the absence of any changes in the algal cell proportions of the polluted samples suggest that the photobionts possessed a higher chlorophyll content per unit volume of the photobiont at polluted sites. The results also indicate that lichens have altered their storage allocation in different cellular compartments. This may be a result of symbiotic readjustment(s) between the photobiont and the mycobiont. In comparison with the physiological results from these two species, these changes do not represent damaging effects by low-level air pollution.

  20. Nutritional role of two algal symbionts in the temperate sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima brandt.

    PubMed

    Bergschneider, Heather; Muller-Parker, Gisèle

    2008-08-01

    The intertidal sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima in the Pacific Northwest may host a single type of algal symbiont or two different algal symbionts simultaneously: zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium muscatinei) and zoochlorellae (green algae; Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta). A seasonal comparison of zooxanthellate and zoochlorellate anemones showed stable symbiont population densities in summer and winter, with densities of zoochlorellae about 4 times those of zooxanthellae. Photosynthesis-irradiance curves of freshly isolated symbionts show that the productivity (P(max) cell) of freshly isolated zooxanthellae was about 2.5 times that of zoochlorellae during July; comparable rates were obtained in other months. Models of algal carbon flux show that zoochlorellae may supply the host with more photosynthetic carbon per unit anemone biomass than zooxanthellae supply. Zooxanthellate anemone tissue was 2 per thousand ((13)C) and 5 per thousand ((15)N) enriched and zoochlorellate anemone tissue was 6 per thousand ((13)C) and 8 per thousand ((15)N) enriched over their respective symbionts, suggesting that zoochlorellate anemones receive less nutrition from their symbionts than do zooxanthellate individuals. The disparity between predicted contributions from the algal carbon budgets and the stable isotopic composition suggests that short-term measures of algal contributions may not reflect actual nutritional inputs to the host. Isotopic data support the hypothesis of substantial reliance on external food sources. This additional nutrition may allow both algae to persist in this temperate intertidal anemone in spite of differences in seasonal photosynthetic carbon contributions. PMID:18723639

  1. High Efficiency, High Density Terrestrial Panel. [for solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Wihl, M.; Rosenfield, T.

    1979-01-01

    Terrestrial panels were fabricated using rectangular cells. Packing densities in excess of 90% with panel conversion efficiencies greater than 13% were obtained. Higher density panels can be produced on a cost competitive basis with the standard salami panels.

  2. Human pluripotent stem cell culture density modulates YAP signaling.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Cheston; Lampe, Michael; Nillasithanukroh, Songkhun; Han, Wenqing; Lian, Xiaojun; Palecek, Sean P

    2016-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) density is an important factor in self-renewal and differentiation fates; however, the mechanisms through which hPSCs sense cell density and process this information in making cell fate decisions remain to be fully understood. One particular pathway that may prove important in density-dependent signaling in hPSCs is the Hippo pathway, which is regulated by cell-cell contact and mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton and has been linked to the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency. To probe regulation of Hippo pathway activity in hPSCs, we assessed whether Hippo pathway transcriptional activator YAP was differentially modulated by cell density. At higher cell densities, YAP phosphorylation and localization to the cytoplasm increased, which led to decreased YAP-mediated transcriptional activity. Furthermore, total YAP protein levels diminished at high cell density due to the phosphorylation-targeted degradation of YAP. Inducible shRNA knockdown of YAP reduced expression of YAP target genes and pluripotency genes. Finally, the density-dependent increase of neuroepithelial cell differentiation was mitigated by shRNA knockdown of YAP. Our results suggest a pivotal role of YAP in cell density-mediated fate decisions in hPSCs.

  3. Mechanism and challenges in commercialisation of algal biofuels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anoop; Nigam, Poonam Singh; Murphy, Jerry D

    2011-01-01

    Biofuels made from algal biomass are being considered as the most suitable alternative energy in current global and economical scenario. Microalgae are known to produce and accumulate lipids within their cell mass which is similar to those found in many vegetable oils. The efficient lipid producer algae cell mass has been reported to contain more than 30% of their cell weight as lipids. According to US DOE microalgae have the potential to produce 100 times more oil per acre land than any terrestrial plants. This article reviews up to date literature on the composition of algae, mechanism of oil droplets, triacylglycerol (TAG) production in algal biomass, research and development made in the cultivation of algal biomass, harvesting strategies, and recovery of lipids from algal mass. The economical challenges in the production of biofuels from algal biomass have been discussed in view of the future prospects in the commercialisation of algal fuels.

  4. Possible importance of algal toxins in the Salton Sea, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reifel, K.M.; McCoy, M.P.; Rocke, T.E.; Tiffany, M.A.; Hurlbert, S.H.; Faulkner, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    In response to wildlife mortality including unexplained eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis) die-off events in 1992 and 1994 and other mortality events including large fish kills, a survey was conducted for the presence of algal toxins in the Salton Sea. Goals of this survey were to determine if and when algal toxins are present in the Salton Sea and to describe the phytoplankton composition during those times. A total of 29 samples was collected for toxicity analysis from both nearshore and midlake sites visited biweekly from January to December 1999. Dinoflagellates and diatoms dominated most samples, but some were dominated by a prymnesiophyte (Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis) or a raphidophyte (Chattonella marina). Several types of blooms were observed and sampled. The dinoflagellate Gyrodinium uncatenum formed an extensive, dense (up to 310 000 cells ml-1) and long-lasting bloom during the winter in 1999. A coccolithophorid, Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis, occurred at high densities in surface films and nearshore areas during the spring and summer of 1999. These surface films also contained high densities of one or two other species (an unidentified scrippsielloid, Heterocapsa niei, Chattonella marina). Localized blooms were also observed in the Salton Sea. An unknown small dinoflagellate reached high densities (110 000 cells ml-1) inside Varner Harbor, and an unidentified species of Gymnodinium formed a dense (270 000 cells ml-1) band along part of the southern shoreline during the summer. Three species known to produce toxins in other systems were found. Protoceratium reticulatum (=Gonyaulax grindleyi) and Chattonella marina were found in several samples taken during summer months, and Prorocentrum minimum was found in low densities in several samples. Extracts of most samples, including those containing known toxic species, showed a low level (<10% mortality across all concentrations) of activity in the brine shrimp lethality assay and were not considered

  5. High resolution imaging of the ultrastructure of living algal cells using soft x-ray contact microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, T.W.; Cotton, R.A.; Page, A.M.; Tomie, T.; Majima, T.; Stead, A.D.

    1995-12-31

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy provides the biologist with a technique for examining the ultrastructure of living cells at a much higher resolution than that possible by various forms of light microscopy. Readout of the developed photoresist using atomic force microscopy (AFM) produces a detailed map of the carbon densities generated in the resist following exposure of the specimen to water-window soft x-rays (2--4nm) produced by impact of a high energy laser onto a suitable target. The established high resolution imaging method of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has inherent problems in the chemical pre-treatment required for producing the ultrathin sections necessary for this technique. Using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas the ultrastructural appearance of the cells following SXCM and TEM has been compared. While SXCM confirms the basic structural organization of the cell as seen by TEM (e.g., the organization of the thylakoid membranes within the chloroplast; flagellar insertion into the cytoplasm), there are important differences. These are in the appearance of the cell covering and the presence of carbon-dense spherical cellular inclusions.

  6. Density-Gradient Determination of Osmotic Potential in Plant Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabors, Murray W.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring osmotic potential which is suitable for high school and college biology classes. This method introduces students to the hard-to-visualize technique of using density gradients to separate cells or cell constituents of differing densities. (JR)

  7. Atmosphere stabilization and element recycle in an experimental mouse-algal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smernoff, David T.

    1986-01-01

    Life support systems based on bioregeneration rely on the control and manipulation of organisms. Experiments conducted with a gas-closed mouse-algal system designed to investigate principles of photosynthetic gas exchange focus primarily on observing gas exchange phenomena under varying algal environmental conditions and secondarily on studying element cycling through compartments of the experimental system. Inherent instabilities exit between the uptake and release of carbon dioxide CO2 and oxygen O2 by the mouse and algae. Variations in light intensity and cell density alter the photosynthetic rate of the algae and enable maintenance of physiologic concentrations of CO2 and O2. Different nitrogen sources (urea and nitrate) result in different algal assimilatory quotients (AQ). Combinations of photosynthetic rate and AQ ratio manipulations have been examined for their potential in stabilizing atmospheric gas concentrations in the gas-closed algal-mouse system. Elemental mass balances through the experimental systems compartments are being studied with the concurrent development of a mathematical simulation model. Element cycling experiments include quantification of elemental flows through system compartments and wet oxidation of system waste materials for use as an algal nutrient source. Oxidized waste products demonstrate inhibitory properties although dilution has been shown to allow normal growth.

  8. Pretreatment of algae-laden and manganese-containing waters by oxidation-assisted coagulation: Effects of oxidation on algal cell viability and manganese precipitation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jr-Lin; Hua, Lap-Cuong; Wu, Yuting; Huang, Chihpin

    2016-02-01

    Preoxidation is manipulated to improve performance of algae and soluble manganese (Mn) removal by coagulation-sedimentation for water treatment plants (WTPs) when large amount of soluble Mn presents in algae-laden waters. This study aimed to investigate the effects of preoxidation on the performance of coagulation-sedimentation for the simultaneous removal of algae and soluble Mn, including ionic and complexed Mn. NaOCl, ClO2, and KMnO4 were used to pretreat such algae-laden and Mn containing waters. The variation of algal cell viability, residual cell counts, and concentrations of Mn species prior to and after coagulation-sedimentation step were investigated. Results show that NaOCl dosing was effective in reducing the viability of algae, but precipitated little Mn. ClO2 dosing had a strongest ability to lower algae viability and oxidize ionic and complexed soluble Mn, where KMnO4 dosing oxidized ionic and complexed Mn instead of reducing the viability of cells. Preoxidation by NaOCl only improved the algae removal by sedimentation, whereas most of soluble Mn still remained. On the other hand, ClO2 preoxidation substantially improved the performance of coagulation-sedimentation for simultaneous removal of algae and soluble Mn. Furthermore, KMnO4 preoxidation did improve the removal of algae by sedimentation, but left significant residual Mn in the supernatant. Images from FlowCAM showed changes in aspect ratio (AR) and transparency of algae-Mn flocs during oxidation-assisted coagulation, and indicates that an effective oxidation can improve the removal of most compact algae-Mn flocs by sedimentation. It suggests that an effective preoxidation for reducing algal cell viability and the concentration of soluble Mn is a crucial step for upgrading the performance of coagulation-sedimentation.

  9. Pretreatment of algae-laden and manganese-containing waters by oxidation-assisted coagulation: Effects of oxidation on algal cell viability and manganese precipitation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jr-Lin; Hua, Lap-Cuong; Wu, Yuting; Huang, Chihpin

    2016-02-01

    Preoxidation is manipulated to improve performance of algae and soluble manganese (Mn) removal by coagulation-sedimentation for water treatment plants (WTPs) when large amount of soluble Mn presents in algae-laden waters. This study aimed to investigate the effects of preoxidation on the performance of coagulation-sedimentation for the simultaneous removal of algae and soluble Mn, including ionic and complexed Mn. NaOCl, ClO2, and KMnO4 were used to pretreat such algae-laden and Mn containing waters. The variation of algal cell viability, residual cell counts, and concentrations of Mn species prior to and after coagulation-sedimentation step were investigated. Results show that NaOCl dosing was effective in reducing the viability of algae, but precipitated little Mn. ClO2 dosing had a strongest ability to lower algae viability and oxidize ionic and complexed soluble Mn, where KMnO4 dosing oxidized ionic and complexed Mn instead of reducing the viability of cells. Preoxidation by NaOCl only improved the algae removal by sedimentation, whereas most of soluble Mn still remained. On the other hand, ClO2 preoxidation substantially improved the performance of coagulation-sedimentation for simultaneous removal of algae and soluble Mn. Furthermore, KMnO4 preoxidation did improve the removal of algae by sedimentation, but left significant residual Mn in the supernatant. Images from FlowCAM showed changes in aspect ratio (AR) and transparency of algae-Mn flocs during oxidation-assisted coagulation, and indicates that an effective oxidation can improve the removal of most compact algae-Mn flocs by sedimentation. It suggests that an effective preoxidation for reducing algal cell viability and the concentration of soluble Mn is a crucial step for upgrading the performance of coagulation-sedimentation. PMID:26689663

  10. Optimizing algal cultivation & productivity : an innovative, multidiscipline, and multiscale approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Murton, Jaclyn K.; Hanson, David T.; Turner, Tom; Powell, Amy Jo; James, Scott Carlton; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Scholle, Steven; August, Andrew; Dwyer, Brian P.; Ruffing, Anne; Jones, Howland D. T.; Ricken, James Bryce; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2010-04-01

    Progress in algal biofuels has been limited by significant knowledge gaps in algal biology, particularly as they relate to scale-up. To address this we are investigating how culture composition dynamics (light as well as biotic and abiotic stressors) describe key biochemical indicators of algal health: growth rate, photosynthetic electron transport, and lipid production. Our approach combines traditional algal physiology with genomics, bioanalytical spectroscopy, chemical imaging, remote sensing, and computational modeling to provide an improved fundamental understanding of algal cell biology across multiple cultures scales. This work spans investigations from the single-cell level to ensemble measurements of algal cell cultures at the laboratory benchtop to large greenhouse scale (175 gal). We will discuss the advantages of this novel, multidisciplinary strategy and emphasize the importance of developing an integrated toolkit to provide sensitive, selective methods for detecting early fluctuations in algal health, productivity, and population diversity. Progress in several areas will be summarized including identification of spectroscopic signatures for algal culture composition, stress level, and lipid production enabled by non-invasive spectroscopic monitoring of the photosynthetic and photoprotective pigments at the single-cell and bulk-culture scales. Early experiments compare and contrast the well-studied green algae chlamydomonas with two potential production strains of microalgae, nannochloropsis and dunnaliella, under optimal and stressed conditions. This integrated approach has the potential for broad impact on algal biofuels and bioenergy and several of these opportunities will be discussed.

  11. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Eighth Annual National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing & Media August 19-21, 2014 Atlanta, GA Harmful Algal Blooms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page What's the ...

  12. Harmful Algal Blooms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.

    2007-01-01

    What are Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)? Freshwater and marine harmful algal blooms (HABs) can occur anytime water use is impaired due to excessive accumulations of algae. HAB occurrence is affected by a complex set of physical, chemical, biological, hydrological, and meteorological conditions making it difficult to isolate specific causative environmental factors. Potential impairments include reduction in water quality, accumulation of malodorous scums in beach areas, algal production of toxins potent enough to poison both aquatic and terrestrial organisms, and algal production of taste-and-odor compounds that cause unpalatable drinking water and fish. HABs are a global problem, and toxic freshwater and (or) marine algae have been implicated in human and animal illness and death in over 45 countries worldwide and in at least 27 U.S. States (Yoo and others, 1995; Chorus and Bartram, 1999; Huisman and others, 2005).

  13. No-observed-effect concentrations in batch and continuous algal toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, M.R.; Chen, C.Y.

    2000-06-01

    In this study, the authors compare the no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) of Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu, and Pb based on different response parameters, using batch and continuous algal toxicity tests. For both batch and continuous tests, parameters based on total cell volume (TCV) were found to be less sensitive than those related to cell densities. The above observation mainly occurred because, under the stresses from metal toxicants evaluated in this and a previous study, the mean cell volume (MCV) of algae increased considerably. The increase of MCV compensates for the effects brought about by the reduction in cell density and eventually results in less variation in TCVs. This study shows that parameters based on cell density are quite sensitive and ideal for the estimation of NOECs. In addition, comparison of the NOEC values derived from different culture techniques shows that the continuous methods generally yields lower NOEC values than that obtained by the batch tests. The results of this study also indicate that the NOEC provides more protection to the test organism than the effective concentration at 10% growth reduction (EC10). For toxicity test methods that produce small variations among replicates, the NOEC is still a good indicator of low toxic effect. Furthermore, for the continuous algal toxicity test, a relatively simple approach is proposed to determine the NOEC values based on the algal culture's control charts. The proposed method produced identical results as those based on conventional hypothesis-testing methods.

  14. Variation of algal viability during electrochemical disinfection using Ti/RuO2 electrodes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenyan; Wang, Ke; Chen, Li; Ruan, Lingling; Sui, Lili

    2011-01-01

    This paper studied the influence of the operating conditions, e.g., current density, electrolyte and exposure time, on the variation of the algal viability during electrochemical disinfection processes. An electrochemical tube employing Ti/RuO2 as anodes was constructed for inactivation of cyanobacteria (often called blue-green algae) Microcystis aeruginosa. Viability of algal cells was determined by 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazoliumchloride (TTC) dehydrogenase activity assay and neutral red (NR) staining assay. Algal suspensions with cell density of 5-7 x 10(9) L(-1) were exposed to current densities from 1 to 8 mA cm(-2) at room temperature (25-30 degrees C) for 30 min. The results showed that the cell viability decreased obviously with the increase of current density. After exposure to 4 mA cm(-2) for more than 7 min, Microcystis aeruginosa didn't have the ability to resume growth. Comparative disinfection tests with different electrolytes were conducted, including chlorides, sulfates, nitrates and phosphates. Microcystis aeruginosa appeared to be sensitive to electro-generated chlorine oxidants. The inactivation effect was also demonstrated to occur in chlorine-free electrolytes. However, decrease of the inactivation effect by adding ascorbic acid as an oxidant scavenger indicated that the reactive oxygen species, especially *OH radicals, played an important role for chlorine-free electrolytes. PMID:22053471

  15. Label-free density difference amplification-based cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Song, Jihwan; Song, Minsun; Kang, Taewook; Kim, Dongchoul; Lee, Luke P

    2014-11-01

    The selective cell separation is a critical step in fundamental life sciences, translational medicine, biotechnology, and energy harvesting. Conventional cell separation methods are fluorescent activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting based on fluorescent probes and magnetic particles on cell surfaces. Label-free cell separation methods such as Raman-activated cell sorting, electro-physiologically activated cell sorting, dielectric-activated cell sorting, or inertial microfluidic cell sorting are, however, limited when separating cells of the same kind or cells with similar sizes and dielectric properties, as well as similar electrophysiological phenotypes. Here we report a label-free density difference amplification-based cell sorting (dDACS) without using any external optical, magnetic, electrical forces, or fluidic activations. The conceptual microfluidic design consists of an inlet, hydraulic jump cavity, and multiple outlets. Incoming particles experience gravity, buoyancy, and drag forces in the separation chamber. The height and distance that each particle can reach in the chamber are different and depend on its density, thus allowing for the separation of particles into multiple outlets. The separation behavior of the particles, based on the ratio of the channel heights of the inlet and chamber and Reynolds number has been systematically studied. Numerical simulation reveals that the difference between the heights of only lighter particles with densities close to that of water increases with increasing the ratio of the channel heights, while decreasing Reynolds number can amplify the difference in the heights between the particles considered irrespective of their densities. PMID:25553185

  16. Enhanced performance of an air-cathode microbial fuel cell with oxygen supply from an externally connected algal bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kakarla, Ramesh; Kim, Jung Rae; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Min, Booki

    2015-11-01

    An algae bioreactor (ABR) was externally connected to air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to increase power generation by supplying a high amount of oxygen to cathode electrode. The MFC with oxygen fed from ABR produced maximum cell voltage and cathode potential at a fixed loading of 459 mV and 10 mV, respectively. During polarization analysis, the MFC displayed a maximum power density of 0.63 W/m(2) (at 2.06 A/m(2)) using 39.2% O2 from ABR, which was approximately 30% higher compared with use of atmospheric air (0.44 W/m(2), 20.8% O2,). The cyclic voltammogram analysis exhibited a higher reduction current of -137 mA with 46.5% O2 compared to atmospheric air (-115 mA). Oxygen supply by algae bioreactor to air-cathode MFC could also maintain better MFC performance in long term operation by minimizing cathode potential drop over time.

  17. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  18. Algal recycling enhances algal productivity and settleability in Pediastrum boryanum pure cultures.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason B K; Craggs, Rupert J; Shilton, Andy N

    2015-12-15

    Recycling a portion of gravity harvested algae (i.e. algae and associated bacteria biomass) has been shown to improve both algal biomass productivity and harvest efficiency by maintaining the dominance of a rapidly-settleable colonial alga, Pediastrum boryanum in both pilot-scale wastewater treatment High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAP) and outdoor mesocosms. While algal recycling did not change the relative proportions of algae and bacteria in the HRAP culture, the contribution of the wastewater bacteria to the improved algal biomass productivity and settleability with the recycling was not certain and still required investigation. P. boryanum was therefore isolated from the HRAP and grown in pure culture on synthetic wastewater growth media under laboratory conditions. The influence of recycling on the productivity and settleability of the pure P. boryanum culture was then determined without wastewater bacteria present. Six 1 L P. boryanum cultures were grown over 30 days in a laboratory growth chamber simulating New Zealand summer conditions either with (Pr) or without (Pc) recycling of 10% of gravity harvested algae. The cultures with recycling (Pr) had higher algal productivity than the controls (Pc) when the cultures were operated at both 4 and 3 d hydraulic retention times by 11% and 38% respectively. Furthermore, algal recycling also improved 1 h settleability from ∼60% to ∼85% by increasing the average P. boryanum colony size due to the extended mean cell residence time and promoted formation of large algal bio-flocs (>500 μm diameter). These results demonstrate that the presence of wastewater bacteria was not necessary to improve algal productivity and settleability with algal recycling.

  19. [Variations in the optical absorption and attenuation properties of cultured phytoplankton and their relationships with cell size].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen; Sun, Zhao-Hua; Cao, Wen-Xi; Wang, Gui-Fen

    2012-12-01

    The spectral absorption and attenuation coefficients of 16 phytoplankton species were measured in the laboratory using acs instrument. Ancillary measurements included particle size distribution and chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a). The results indicated that both algal cell size and Chl a were the two major factors dominating the magnitudes of the spectral absorption and attenuation coefficients. The spectral behaviors of attenuation spectra were dominated by algal cell size, the relationship of them didn't follow the monotonic function. Both the ratio of absorption in blue and red waveband and the spectral slope of absorption coefficient were influenced by the product of algal cell density and squares of cell size rather than algal cell size alone. The relationship between algal cell size and both absorption and attenuation spectra would be interpreted by Mie theory for homogenous sphere, which imply that the heterogeneity and non-spherical shape in algal cell morphology and internal structure have little effect on the inherent association among them.

  20. Disruption of cell-to-cell signaling does not abolish the antagonism of Phaeobacter gallaeciensis toward the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum in algal systems.

    PubMed

    Prol García, M J; D'Alvise, P W; Gram, L

    2013-09-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates Phaeobacter gallaeciensis antagonism in broth systems; however, we demonstrate here that QS is not important for antagonism in algal cultures. QS mutants reduced Vibrio anguillarum to the same extent as the wild type. Consequently, a combination of probiotic Phaeobacter and QS inhibitors is a feasible strategy for aquaculture disease control.

  1. Method and system of culturing an algal mat

    DOEpatents

    Das, Keshav C; Cannon, Benjamin R; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Chinnasamy, Senthil

    2014-05-13

    A system and method for culturing algae are presented. The system and method utilize a fog of growth medium that is delivered to an algal mat generator along with a stream of CO.sub.2 to promote growth of algal cells contained in the generator.

  2. Composition for detection of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS), which is secreted by fibroblastic cells in culture, preferably tendon cells, and which provides a means by which the cells self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use.

  3. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities

    PubMed Central

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Saidi, Hassan; Odula, Paul Ochieng; Mandela, Pamela Idenya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Methods: Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of the retina were taken and imported into FIJI software for analysis. Results: Neural retinal cell densities of deprived eyes were reduced along with increasing period of deprivation. The percentage of reductions were 60.9% (P < 0.001), 41.6% (P = 0.003), and 18.9% (P = 0.326) for ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In non-deprived eyes, cell densities in contrast were increased by 116% (P < 0.001), 52% (P < 0.001) and 59.6% (P < 0.001) in ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. Conclusion: In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye. PMID:26425316

  4. Ultraviolet radiation dose calculation for algal suspensions using UVA and UVB extinction coefficients.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Enrique; Muñiz, Selene; Korkaric, Muris; Wagner, Bettina; de Cáceres, Miquel; Behra, Renata

    2014-03-01

    Although the biological importance of ultraviolet light (UVR) attenuation has been recognised in marine and freshwater environments, it is not generally considered in in vitro ecotoxicological studies using algal cell suspensions. In this study, UVA and UVB extinction were determined for cultures of algae with varying cell densities, and the data were used to calculate the corresponding extinction coefficients for both UVA and UVB wavelength ranges. Integrating the Beer-Lambert equation to account for changes in the radiation intensity reaching each depth, from the surface until the bottom of the experimental vessel, we obtained the average UVA and UVB intensity to which the cultured algal cells were exposed. We found that UVR intensity measured at the surface of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultures lead to a overestimation of the UVR dose received by the algae by 2-40 times. The approach used in this study allowed for a more accurate estimation of UVA and UVB doses. PMID:24607609

  5. Water-quality parameters and benthic algal communities at selected streams in Minnesota, August 2000 - Study design, methods and data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, K.E.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the study design, sampling methods, and summarizes the physical, chemical, and benthic algal data for a component of the multiagency study that was designed to document diurnal water-quality measurements (specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen), benthic algal community composition and chlorophyll-a content, and primary productivity at 12 stream sites on 6 streams in Minnesota during August 2000. Specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen concentrations and percent dissolved oxygen saturation measurements were made with submersible data recorders at 30 minute intervals for a period of 3-6 days during August 2000. Benthic algae collected from wood and rock substrate were identified and enumerated. Biovolume (volume of algal cells per unit area), density (number of cells per unit area), and chlorophyll-a content from benthic algae were determined. These data can be used as part of the multiagency study to develop an understanding of the relations among nutrient concentrations, algal abundance, algal community composition, and primary production and respiration processes in rivers of differing ecoregions in Minnesota.

  6. Using live algae at the anode of a microbial fuel cell to generate electricity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Poon, Karen; Choi, Martin M F; Wang, Ruihua

    2015-10-01

    Live green microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa was introduced in the anode of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to act as an electron donor. By controlling the oxygen content, light intensity, and algal cell density at the anode, microalgae would generate electricity without requiring externally added substrates. Two models of algal microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were constructed with graphite/carbon electrodes and no mediator. Model 1 algal MFC has live microalgae grown at the anode and potassium ferricyanide at the cathode, while model 2 algal MFC had live microalgae in both the anode and cathode in different growth conditions. Results indicated that a higher current produced in model 1 algal MFC was obtained at low light intensity of 2500 lx and algal cell density of 5 × 10(6) cells/ml, in which high algal density would limit the electricity generation, probably by increasing oxygen level and mass transfer problem. The maximum power density per unit anode volume obtained in model 1 algal MFC was relatively high at 6030 mW/m(2), while the maximum power density at 30.15 mW/m(2) was comparable with that of previous reported bacteria-driven MFC with graphite/carbon electrodes. A much smaller power density at 2.5 mW/m(2) was observed in model 2 algal MFC. Increasing the algal cell permeability by 4-nitroaniline would increase the open circuit voltage, while the mitochondrial acting and proton leak promoting agents resveratrol and 2,4-dinitrophenol would increase the electric current production in algal MFC.

  7. Using live algae at the anode of a microbial fuel cell to generate electricity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Poon, Karen; Choi, Martin M F; Wang, Ruihua

    2015-10-01

    Live green microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa was introduced in the anode of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to act as an electron donor. By controlling the oxygen content, light intensity, and algal cell density at the anode, microalgae would generate electricity without requiring externally added substrates. Two models of algal microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were constructed with graphite/carbon electrodes and no mediator. Model 1 algal MFC has live microalgae grown at the anode and potassium ferricyanide at the cathode, while model 2 algal MFC had live microalgae in both the anode and cathode in different growth conditions. Results indicated that a higher current produced in model 1 algal MFC was obtained at low light intensity of 2500 lx and algal cell density of 5 × 10(6) cells/ml, in which high algal density would limit the electricity generation, probably by increasing oxygen level and mass transfer problem. The maximum power density per unit anode volume obtained in model 1 algal MFC was relatively high at 6030 mW/m(2), while the maximum power density at 30.15 mW/m(2) was comparable with that of previous reported bacteria-driven MFC with graphite/carbon electrodes. A much smaller power density at 2.5 mW/m(2) was observed in model 2 algal MFC. Increasing the algal cell permeability by 4-nitroaniline would increase the open circuit voltage, while the mitochondrial acting and proton leak promoting agents resveratrol and 2,4-dinitrophenol would increase the electric current production in algal MFC. PMID:26018284

  8. Zinc-oxygen primary cell yields high energy density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, C. B.

    1968-01-01

    Zinc-oxygen primary cell yields high energy density for battery used as an auxiliary power source in space vehicle systems. Maximum reliability and minimum battery weight is achieved by using a stacking configuration of 23 series-connected modules with 6 parallel-connected cells per module.

  9. Algal genotype and photoacclimatory responses of the symbiotic alga Symbiodinium in natural populations of the sea anemone Anemonia viridis

    PubMed Central

    Bythell, J. C.; Douglas, A. E.; Sharp, V. A.; Searle, J. B.; Brown, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    As an approach to investigate the impact of solar radiation on an alga–invertebrate symbiosis, the genetic variation and photosynthetic responses of the dinoflagellate algal symbiosis in an intertidal and a subtidal population of the sea anemone Anemonia viridis were explored. Allozyme analysis of the anemones indicated that the two populations were genetically very similar, with a Nei's index value of genetic identity (I) of 0.998. The algae in all animals examined were identified as Symbiodinium of clade a by PCR-RFLP analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. The symbiosis in the two populations did not differ significantly in algal population density, chlorophyll a content per algal cell or any photosynthetic parameter obtained from studies of the relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. We conclude that there is not necessarily genetic variation or photosynthetic plasticity of the symbiotic algae in Anemonia viridis inhabiting environments characterized by the different solar irradiances of the subtidal and intertidal habitats.

  10. Algal Biofuels Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    This fact sheet provides information on algal biofuels, which are generating considerable interest around the world. They may represent a sustainable pathway for helping to meet the U.S. biofuel production targets set by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  11. Distribution, behavior, and condition of herbivorous fishes on coral reefs track algal resources.

    PubMed

    Tootell, Jesse S; Steele, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Herbivore distribution can impact community structure and ecosystem function. On coral reefs, herbivores are thought to play an important role in promoting coral dominance, but how they are distributed relative to algae is not well known. Here, we evaluated whether the distribution, behavior, and condition of herbivorous fishes correlated with algal resource availability at six sites in the back reef environment of Moorea, French Polynesia. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that increased algal turf availability would coincide with (1) increased biomass, (2) altered foraging behavior, and (3) increased energy reserves of herbivorous fishes. Fish biomass and algal cover were visually estimated along underwater transects; behavior of herbivorous fishes was quantified by observations of focal individuals; fish were collected to assess their condition; and algal turf production rates were measured on standardized tiles. The best predictor of herbivorous fish biomass was algal turf production, with fish biomass increasing with algal production. Biomass of herbivorous fishes was also negatively related to sea urchin density, suggesting competition for limited resources. Regression models including both algal turf production and urchin density explained 94 % of the variation in herbivorous fish biomass among sites spread over ~20 km. Behavioral observations of the parrotfish Chlorurus sordidus revealed that foraging area increased as algal turf cover decreased. Additionally, energy reserves increased with algal turf production, but declined with herbivorous fish density, implying that algal turf is a limited resource for this species. Our findings support the hypothesis that herbivorous fishes can spatially track algal resources on coral reefs.

  12. Integrity of the permeability barrier regulates epidermal Langerhans cell density.

    PubMed

    Proksch, E; Brasch, J; Sterry, W

    1996-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that barrier requirements regulate epidermal liquid and DNA synthesis. In the present study, we examined the possibility that the integrity of the permeability barrier influences epidermal Langerhans cells involved with the immune response. Barrier disruption was achieved by treatment of human skin with acetone, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS), or tape stripping, until a 10-20-fold increase in transepidermal water loss was achieved. Serial biopsies were performed 6-168 h after treatment, and Langerhans cells were complexed with anti-CD1a (Leu6) or S-100 antibodies, and visualized with an immunoperoxidase technique. Acetone treatment resulted in an increase in epidermal Langerhans cell density, reaching a maximum of 94% over control (P < 0.01) by 24 and 48 h post-treatment. Following SDS treatment or tape stripping, epidermal Langerhans cell density was increased by 100 and 175% (P < 0.01), respectively. There was a linear correlation between the degree of barrier disruption and the increase in epidermal Langerhans cell density. Studies with the Ki-S3 proliferation-associated nuclear antigen revealed a two- to threefold increase in epidermal proliferation after barrier disruption. The time curves of the increase in Langerhans cell density and the increase in epidermal proliferation were similar, suggesting that there was a coordinate regulation. In contrast with our previous studies employing patch test reactions to allergens or irritants, disruption of barrier function neither resulted in an increased dermal Langerhans cell density, nor influenced T lymphocytes (CD3+, Leu4+), macrophages (KiM8+), ICAM-1 or ELAM-1 expression in the skin. In addition, barrier disruption did not result in either dermal inflammation or epidermal spongiosis. In summary, these findings support our hypothesis that the permeability barrier influences epidermal Langerhans cell density, which is involved in maintaining an immunological barrier.

  13. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces hematopoietic stem cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Gui-Hai; Wang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Jun; Wei, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced senescence in hematopoietic stem cells (HCs). Mouse Sca-1+ HCs were separated and purified using the magnetic activated cell sorting technique. Ox-LDL induced significant senescence in HCs measured by SA-β-Gal staining, and reduced CFU-Mix colony-forming capacity, arresting cells at G0/G1 phase. In agreement with the cell cycle arrest, ox-LDL markedly reduced the expression of CDK4, cyclin D, and cyclin E. As possible contributing factors for cell senescence, ox-LDL also induced cellular oxidative stress and reduced telomerase activity.

  14. Density gradient electrophoresis of cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Giranda, V.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Ground based confirmation of the electrophoretic heterogeneity of human embryonic kidney cell cultures, the general characterization of their electrophoretic migration, and observations on the general properties of cultures derived from electrophoretic subpopulations were studied. Cell migration in a density gradient electrophoresis column and cell electrophoretic mobility was determined. The mobility and heterogeneity of cultured human embryonic kidney cells with those of fixed rat erythrocytes as model test particle was compared. Electrophoretically separated cell subpopulations with respect to size, viability, and culture characteristics were examined.

  15. Anorexia Reduces GFAP+ Cell Density in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Labrada-Moncada, Francisco Emmanuel; Varman, Durairaj Ragu; Krüger, Janina; Morales, Teresa; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder observed primarily in young women. The neurobiology of the disorder is unknown but recently magnetic resonance imaging showed a volume reduction of the hippocampus in anorexic patients. Dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA) is a murine model that mimics core features of this disorder, including severe weight loss due to voluntary reduction in food intake. The energy supply to the brain is mediated by astrocytes, but whether their density is compromised by anorexia is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate GFAP+ cell density in the main regions of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus) in the DIA model. Our results showed that GFAP+ cell density was significantly reduced (~20%) in all regions of the hippocampus, except in CA1. Interestingly, DIA significantly reduced the GFAP+ cells/nuclei ratio in CA2 (−23%) and dentate gyrus (−48%). The reduction of GFAP+ cell density was in agreement with a lower expression of GFAP protein. Additionally, anorexia increased the expression of the intermediate filaments vimentin and nestin. Accordingly, anorexia increased the number of reactive astrocytes in CA2 and dentate gyrus more than twofold. We conclude that anorexia reduces the hippocampal GFAP+ cell density and increases vimentin and nestin expression. PMID:27579183

  16. Anorexia Reduces GFAP+ Cell Density in the Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Haro, Daniel; Labrada-Moncada, Francisco Emmanuel; Varman, Durairaj Ragu; Krüger, Janina; Morales, Teresa; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder observed primarily in young women. The neurobiology of the disorder is unknown but recently magnetic resonance imaging showed a volume reduction of the hippocampus in anorexic patients. Dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA) is a murine model that mimics core features of this disorder, including severe weight loss due to voluntary reduction in food intake. The energy supply to the brain is mediated by astrocytes, but whether their density is compromised by anorexia is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate GFAP+ cell density in the main regions of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus) in the DIA model. Our results showed that GFAP+ cell density was significantly reduced (~20%) in all regions of the hippocampus, except in CA1. Interestingly, DIA significantly reduced the GFAP+ cells/nuclei ratio in CA2 (-23%) and dentate gyrus (-48%). The reduction of GFAP+ cell density was in agreement with a lower expression of GFAP protein. Additionally, anorexia increased the expression of the intermediate filaments vimentin and nestin. Accordingly, anorexia increased the number of reactive astrocytes in CA2 and dentate gyrus more than twofold. We conclude that anorexia reduces the hippocampal GFAP+ cell density and increases vimentin and nestin expression. PMID:27579183

  17. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density

  18. Change in Photosystem II Photochemistry During Algal Growth Phases of Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Oukarroum, Abdallah

    2016-06-01

    Sensitivity of photosynthetic processes towards environmental stress is used as a bioanalytical tool to evaluate the responses of aquatic plants to a changing environment. In this paper, change of biomass density, chlorophyll a fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters during growth phases of two microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus were studied. The photosynthetic growth behaviour changed significantly with cell age and algae species. During the exponential phase of growth, the photosynthesis capacity reached its maximum and decreased in ageing algal culture during stationary phase. In conclusion, the chlorophyll a fluorescence OJIP method and the derived fluorescence parameters would be an accurate method for obtaining information on maximum photosynthetic capacities and monitoring algal cell growth. This will contribute to more understanding, for example, of toxic actions of pollutants in microalgae test. PMID:26868257

  19. Observations on gas exchange and element recycle within a gas-closed algal-mouse system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smernoff, D. T.; Wharton, R. A., Jr.; Averner, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    Life support systems based on bioregeneration rely on the control and manipulation of organisms. Algae are potentially useful for a variety of Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) functions including the revitalization of atmospheres, production of food and for nitrogen fixation. The results of experiments conducted with a gas-closed algal-mouse system designed to investigate gas exchange phenomena under varying algal environmental conditions, and the ability of algae to utilize oxidized mouse solid waste are reported. Inherent instabilities exist between the uptake and release of carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxygen (O2) by the mouse and algae in a gas-closed system. Variations in light intensity and cell density alter the photosynthetic rate of the algae and enable short-term steady-state concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O2. Different nitrogen sources (urea and nitrate) result in different algal assimilatory quotients (AQ). Combinations of photosynthetic rate and AQ ratio manipulations were examined for their potential in stabilizing atmospheric gas concentrations in the gas-closed algal-mouse system.

  20. Remote sensing models using Landsat satellite data to monitor algal blooms in Lake Champlain.

    PubMed

    Trescott, A; Park, M-H

    2013-01-01

    Lake Champlain is significantly impaired by excess phosphorus loading, requiring frequent lake-wide monitoring for eutrophic conditions and algal blooms. Satellite remote sensing provides regular, synoptic coverage of algal production over large areas with better spatial and temporal resolution compared with in situ monitoring. This study developed two algal production models using Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM(+)) satellite imagery: a single band model and a band ratio model. The models predicted chlorophyll a concentrations to estimate algal cell densities throughout Lake Champlain. Each model was calibrated with in situ data compiled from summer 2006 (July 24 to September 10), and then validated with data for individual days in August 2007 and 2008. Validation results for the final single band and band ratio models produced Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) coefficients of 0.65 and 0.66, respectively, confirming satisfactory model performance for both models. Because these models have been validated over multiple days and years, they can be applied for continuous monitoring of the lake.

  1. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG

  2. Algal functional annotation tool

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations tomore » interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on

  3. Detection and quantification of subtle changes in red blood cell density using a cell phone.

    PubMed

    Felton, Edward J; Velasquez, Anthony; Lu, Shulin; Murphy, Ryann O; ElKhal, Abdala; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Sharda, Anish; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic levitation has emerged as a technique that offers the ability to differentiate between cells with different densities. We have developed a magnetic levitation system for this purpose that distinguishes not only different cell types but also density differences in cells of the same type. This small-scale system suspends cells in a paramagnetic medium in a capillary placed between two rare earth magnets, and cells levitate to an equilibrium position determined solely by their density. Uniform reference beads of known density are used in conjunction with the cells as a means to quantify their levitation positions. In one implementation images of the levitating cells are acquired with a microscope, but here we also introduce a cell phone-based device that integrates the magnets, capillary, and a lens into a compact and portable unit that acquires images with the phone's camera. To demonstrate the effectiveness of magnetic levitation in cell density analysis we carried out levitation experiments using red blood cells with artificially altered densities, and also levitated those from donors. We observed that we can distinguish red blood cells of an anemic donor from those that are healthy. Since a plethora of disease states are characterized by changes in cell density magnetic cell levitation promises to be an effective tool in identifying and analyzing pathologic states. Furthermore, the low cost, portability, and ease of use of the cell phone-based system may potentially lead to its deployment in low-resource environments. PMID:27431921

  4. Detection and quantification of subtle changes in red blood cell density using a cell phone.

    PubMed

    Felton, Edward J; Velasquez, Anthony; Lu, Shulin; Murphy, Ryann O; ElKhal, Abdala; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Sharda, Anish; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic levitation has emerged as a technique that offers the ability to differentiate between cells with different densities. We have developed a magnetic levitation system for this purpose that distinguishes not only different cell types but also density differences in cells of the same type. This small-scale system suspends cells in a paramagnetic medium in a capillary placed between two rare earth magnets, and cells levitate to an equilibrium position determined solely by their density. Uniform reference beads of known density are used in conjunction with the cells as a means to quantify their levitation positions. In one implementation images of the levitating cells are acquired with a microscope, but here we also introduce a cell phone-based device that integrates the magnets, capillary, and a lens into a compact and portable unit that acquires images with the phone's camera. To demonstrate the effectiveness of magnetic levitation in cell density analysis we carried out levitation experiments using red blood cells with artificially altered densities, and also levitated those from donors. We observed that we can distinguish red blood cells of an anemic donor from those that are healthy. Since a plethora of disease states are characterized by changes in cell density magnetic cell levitation promises to be an effective tool in identifying and analyzing pathologic states. Furthermore, the low cost, portability, and ease of use of the cell phone-based system may potentially lead to its deployment in low-resource environments.

  5. Accelerating Commercialization of Algal Biofuels Through Partnerships (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure describes National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) algal biofuels research capabilities and partnership opportunities. NREL is accelerating algal biofuels commercialization through: (1) Advances in applied biology; (2) Algal strain development; (3) Development of fuel conversion pathways; (4) Techno-economic analysis; and (5) Development of high-throughput lipid analysis methodologies. NREL scientists and engineers are addressing challenges across the algal biofuels value chain, including algal biology, cultivation, harvesting and extraction, and fuel conversion. Through partnerships, NREL can share knowledge and capabilities in the following areas: (1) Algal Biology - A fundamental understanding of algal biology is key to developing cost-effective algal biofuels processes. NREL scientists are experts in the isolation and characterization of microalgal species. They are identifying genes and pathways involved in biofuel production. In addition, they have developed a high-throughput, non-destructive technique for assessing lipid production in microalgae. (2) Cultivation - NREL researchers study algal growth capabilities and perform compositional analysis of algal biomass. Laboratory-scale photobioreactors and 1-m2 open raceway ponds in an on-site greenhouse allow for year-round cultivation of algae under a variety of conditions. A bioenergy-focused algal strain collection is being established at NREL, and our laboratory houses a cryopreservation system for long-term maintenance of algal cultures and preservation of intellectual property. (3) Harvesting and Extraction - NREL is investigating cost-effective harvesting and extraction methods suitable for a variety of species and conditions. Areas of expertise include cell wall analysis and deconstruction and identification and utilization of co-products. (4) Fuel Conversion - NREL's excellent capabilities and facilities for biochemical and thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels are being

  6. Enhanced power production from microbial fuel cells with high cell density culture.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Dan-Dan; Li, Bing; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Sun, De-Zhen; Si, Rong-Wei; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Improvement of power production in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with a high cell density culture strategy was developed. By using high cell density culture, the voltage output and power density output of the MFC were enhanced about 0.6 and 1.6 times compared to the control, respectively. Further analysis showed that riboflavin concentration in the MFC was dramatically increased from 0.1 mg/L to 1.2 mg/L by high cell density culture. Moreover, the biofilm formation on the anode surface was significantly enhanced by this new strategy. The increased accumulation of electron shuttle (riboflavin) as well as enhanced biofilm formation contributed to the improvement in anodic electrochemical activity and these factors were the underlying mechanism for MFC performance improvement by high cell density culture. This work demonstrated that high cell density culture would be a simple and practical strategy for MFC manipulation.

  7. High Energy Density Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems for Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS) technology for energy storage has been a NASA power system concept for many years. Compared to battery-based energy storage systems, RFCS has received relatively little attention or resources for development because the energy density and electrical efficiency were not sufficiently attractive relative to advanced battery systems. Even today, RFCS remains at a very low technology readiness level (TRL of about 2 indicating feasibility has been demonstrated). Commercial development of the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells for automobiles and other terrestrial applications and improvements in lightweight pressure vessel design to reduce weight and improve performance make possible a high energy density RFCS energy storage system. The results from this study of a lightweight RFCS energy storage system for a remotely piloted, solar-powered, high altitude aircraft indicate an energy density up to 790 w-h/kg with electrical efficiency of 53.4% is attainable. Such an energy storage system would allow a solar-powered aircraft to carry hundreds of kilograms of payload and remain in flight indefinitely for use in atmospheric research, earth observation, resource mapping. and telecommunications. Future developments in the areas of hydrogen and oxygen storage, pressure vessel design, higher temperature and higher- pressure fuel cell operation, unitized regenerative fuel cells, and commercial development of fuel cell technology will improve both the energy density and electrical efficiency of the RFCS.

  8. Algal sensory photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Only five major types of sensory photoreceptors (BLUF-proteins, cryptochromes, phototropins, phytochromes, and rhodopsins) are used in nature to regulate developmental processes, photosynthesis, photoorientation, and control of the circadian clock. Sensory photoreceptors of algae and protists are exceptionally rich in structure and function; light-gated ion channels and photoactivated adenylate cyclases are unique examples. During the past ten years major progress has been made with respect to understanding the function, photochemistry, and structure of key sensory players of the algal kingdom.

  9. Isolation of Lipid Droplets from Cells by Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Brasaemle, Dawn L; Wolins, Nathan E

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplets are organelles found in most mammalian cells, as well as in various plant tissues and yeast. They are composed of a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a membrane monolayer of phospholipids and cholesterol in which specific proteins are embedded. This unit provides protocols for isolating lipid droplets from mammalian cells by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27580706

  10. High volumetric power density, non-enzymatic, glucose fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Oncescu, Vlad; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    The development of new implantable medical devices has been limited in the past by slow advances in lithium battery technology. Non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells are promising replacement candidates for lithium batteries because of good long-term stability and adequate power density. The devices developed to date however use an “oxygen depletion design” whereby the electrodes are stacked on top of each other leading to low volumetric power density and complicated fabrication protocols. Here we have developed a novel single-layer fuel cell with good performance (2 μW cm−2) and stability that can be integrated directly as a coating layer on large implantable devices, or stacked to obtain a high volumetric power density (over 16 μW cm−3). This represents the first demonstration of a low volume non-enzymatic fuel cell stack with high power density, greatly increasing the range of applications for non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells. PMID:23390576

  11. A random graph model of density thresholds in swarming cells.

    PubMed

    Jena, Siddhartha G

    2016-03-01

    Swarming behaviour is a type of bacterial motility that has been found to be dependent on reaching a local density threshold of cells. With this in mind, the process through which cell-to-cell interactions develop and how an assembly of cells reaches collective motility becomes increasingly important to understand. Additionally, populations of cells and organisms have been modelled through graphs to draw insightful conclusions about population dynamics on a spatial level. In the present study, we make use of analogous random graph structures to model the formation of large chain subgraphs, representing interactions between multiple cells, as a random graph Markov process. Using numerical simulations and analytical results on how quickly paths of certain lengths are reached in a random graph process, metrics for intercellular interaction dynamics at the swarm layer that may be experimentally evaluated are proposed. PMID:26893102

  12. Reduction of freeze-thaw-induced hemolysis of red blood cells by an algal ice-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jae-Shin; Raymond, James A

    2004-01-01

    Antarctic sea ice diatoms produce ice-binding proteins (IBPs) that are strong inhibitors of the recrystallization of ice. Their function may be to reduce cell damage in the frozen state. We show here that an IBP from the diatom Navicula glaciei Vanheurck also has the ability to reduce freeze-thaw damage to red blood cells and that the effect may be due to its ability to inhibit recrystallization of ice.

  13. Effect of cell density on adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hongxu; Guo, Likun; Wozniak, Michal J.; Kawazoe, Naoki; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Zhang, Xingdong; Chen, Guoping

    2009-04-10

    The effect of cell density on the adipogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was investigated by using a patterning technique to induce the formation of a cell density gradient on a micropatterned surface. The adipogenic differentiation of MSCs at a density gradient from 5 x 10{sup 3} to 3 x 10{sup 4} cells/cm{sup 2} was examined. Lipid vacuoles were observed at all cell densities after 1-3 weeks of culture in adipogenic differentiation medium although the lipid vacuoles were scarce at the low cell density and abundant at the high cell density. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that adipogenesis marker genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4) were detected in the MSCs cultured at all cell densities. The results suggest that there was no apparent effect of cell density on the adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs.

  14. A novel direct ethanol fuel cell with high power density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Zhao, T. S.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    2011-08-01

    A new type of direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) that is composed of an alkaline anode and an acid cathode separated with a charger conducting membrane is developed. Theoretically it is shown that the voltage of this novel fuel cell is 2.52 V, while, experimentally it has been demonstrated that this fuel cell can yield an open-circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.60 V and a peak power density of 240 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which represent the highest performance of DEFCs that has so far been reported in the open literature.

  15. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John; Sarisky-Reed, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    The framework for National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap was constructed at the Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap Workshop, held December 9-10, 2008, at the University of Maryland-College Park. The Workshop was organized by the Biomass Program to discuss and identify the critical challenges currently hindering the development of a domestic, commercial-scale algal biofuels industry. This Roadmap presents information from a scientific, economic, and policy perspectives that can support and guide RD&D investment in algal biofuels. While addressing the potential economic and environmental benefits of using algal biomass for the production of liquid transportation fuels, the Roadmap describes the current status of algae RD&D. In doing so, it lays the groundwork for identifying challenges that likely need to be overcome for algal biomass to be used in the production of economically viable biofuels.

  16. Regional Alterations in Purkinje Cell Density in Patients with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Skefos, Jerry; Cummings, Christopher; Enzer, Katelyn; Holiday, Jarrod; Weed, Katrina; Levy, Ezra; Yuce, Tarik; Kemper, Thomas; Bauman, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathological studies, using a variety of techniques, have reported a decrease in Purkinje cell (PC) density in the cerebellum in autism. We have used a systematic sampling technique that significantly reduces experimenter bias and variance to estimate PC densities in the postmortem brains of eight clinically well-documented individuals with autism, and eight age- and gender-matched controls. Four cerebellar regions were analyzed: a sensorimotor area comprised of hemispheric lobules IV–VI, crus I & II of the posterior lobe, and lobule X of the flocculonodular lobe. Overall PC density was thus estimated using data from all three cerebellar lobes and was found to be lower in the cases with autism as compared to controls, an effect that was most prominent in crus I and II (p<0.05). Lobule X demonstrated a trend towards lower PC density in only the males with autism (p = 0.05). Brain weight, a correlate of tissue volume, was found to significantly contribute to the lower lobule X PC density observed in males with autism, but not to the finding of lower PC density in crus I & II. Therefore, lower crus I & II PC density in autism is more likely due to a lower number of PCs. The PC density in lobule X was found to correlate with the ADI-R measure of the patient's use of social eye contact (R2 = −0.75, p = 0.012). These findings support the hypothesis that abnormal PC density may contribute to selected clinical features of the autism phenotype. PMID:24586223

  17. Time analysis of corneal endothelial cell density after cataract extraction.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Lin, L L; Fetherolf, E; Obstbaum, S A; Sugar, A

    1979-07-01

    Serial endothelial photographs were taken preoperatively and postoperatively in 200 eyes; 111 eyes contained a Rayner iris clip lens, 54 eyes contained a Fyodorov Sputnik lens, and 35 eyes had no lens. Central endothelial cell density was changed in all instances, with counts in implanted eyes declining 25 to 30%, and in nonimplanted eyes 10 to 15%. In both instances, the decline essentially ceased at about three months. The cause of the greater decline in implanted eyes appeared to be mechanical and subsequent cell loss after the 90-day period was virtually equal for the two groups. Methods that may be used to alter the difference in cell density occurring with implantation are best analyzed by using the 90-day period data for comparison. PMID:464015

  18. Algal morphogenesis: modelling interspecific variation in Micrasterias with reaction--diffusion patterned catalysis of cell surface growth

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Semi-cell morphogenesis in unicellular desmid algae of the genus Micrasterias generates a stellar shape by repeated dichotomous branching of growing tips of the cell surface. The numerous species of the genus display variations of the branching pattern that differ markedly in number of branchings, lobe width and lobe length. We have modelled this morphogenesis, following previous work by D. M. Harrison and M. Kolar (1988), on the assumptions that patterning occurs by chemical reaction-diffusion activity within the plasma membrane, leading to morphological expression by patterned catalysis of the extension of the cell surface. The latter has been simulated in simplified form by two-dimensional computations. Our results indicate that for generation of repeated branchings and for the control of diverse species-specific shapes, the loss of patterning activity and of rapid growth in regions separating the active growing tips is an essential feature. We believe this conclusion to be much more general than the specific details of our model. We discuss the limitations of the model especially in terms of what extra features might be addressed in three-dimensional computation.

  19. Cell density and mobility protect swarming bacteria against antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Butler, Mitchell T; Wang, Qingfeng; Harshey, Rasika M

    2010-02-23

    Swarming bacteria move in multicellular groups and exhibit adaptive resistance to multiple antibiotics. Analysis of this phenomenon has revealed the protective power of high cell densities to withstand exposure to otherwise lethal antibiotic concentrations. We find that high densities promote bacterial survival, even in a nonswarming state, but that the ability to move, as well as the speed of movement, confers an added advantage, making swarming an effective strategy for prevailing against antimicrobials. We find no evidence of induced resistance pathways or quorum-sensing mechanisms controlling this group resistance, which occurs at a cost to cells directly exposed to the antibiotic. This work has relevance to the adaptive antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms.

  20. Surface cell density effects on Escherichia coli gene expression during cell attachment.

    PubMed

    Mauter, Meagan S; Mauter, Meagan; Fait, Aaron; Elimelech, Menachem; Herzberg, Moshe

    2013-06-18

    Escherichia coli attachment to a surface initiates a complex series of interconnected signaling and regulation pathways that promote biofilm formation and maturation. The present work investigates the effect of deposited cell density on E. coli cell physiology, metabolic activity, and gene expression in the initial stages of biofilm development. Deposited cell density is controlled by exploiting the relationship between ionic strength and bacterial attachment efficiency in a packed bed column. Distinct differences in cell transcriptome are analyzed by comparing sessile cultures at two different cell surface densities and differentiating ionic strength effects by analyzing planktonic cultures in parallel. Our results indicate that operons regulating trypotophan production and the galactitol phosphotransferase system (including dihydroxyacetone phosphate synthesis) are strongly affected by cell density on the surface. Additional transcriptome and metabolomic impacts of cell density on succinate, proline, and pyroglutamic acid systems are also reported. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that surface cell density plays a major role in sessile cell physiology, commencing with the first stage of biofilm formation. These findings improve our understanding of biofilm formation in natural and engineered environmental systems and will contribute to future work ranging from pathogen migration in the environment to control of biofouling on engineered surfaces.

  1. Cortical cell and neuron density estimates in one chimpanzee hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christine E; Turner, Emily C; Sawyer, Eva Kille; Reed, Jamie L; Young, Nicole A; Flaherty, David K; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-01-19

    The density of cells and neurons in the neocortex of many mammals varies across cortical areas and regions. This variability is, perhaps, most pronounced in primates. Nonuniformity in the composition of cortex suggests regions of the cortex have different specializations. Specifically, regions with densely packed neurons contain smaller neurons that are activated by relatively few inputs, thereby preserving information, whereas regions that are less densely packed have larger neurons that have more integrative functions. Here we present the numbers of cells and neurons for 742 discrete locations across the neocortex in a chimpanzee. Using isotropic fractionation and flow fractionation methods for cell and neuron counts, we estimate that neocortex of one hemisphere contains 9.5 billion cells and 3.7 billion neurons. Primary visual cortex occupies 35 cm(2) of surface, 10% of the total, and contains 737 million densely packed neurons, 20% of the total neurons contained within the hemisphere. Other areas of high neuron packing include secondary visual areas, somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal granular cortex. Areas of low levels of neuron packing density include motor and premotor cortex. These values reflect those obtained from more limited samples of cortex in humans and other primates. PMID:26729880

  2. Cortical cell and neuron density estimates in one chimpanzee hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christine E; Turner, Emily C; Sawyer, Eva Kille; Reed, Jamie L; Young, Nicole A; Flaherty, David K; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-01-19

    The density of cells and neurons in the neocortex of many mammals varies across cortical areas and regions. This variability is, perhaps, most pronounced in primates. Nonuniformity in the composition of cortex suggests regions of the cortex have different specializations. Specifically, regions with densely packed neurons contain smaller neurons that are activated by relatively few inputs, thereby preserving information, whereas regions that are less densely packed have larger neurons that have more integrative functions. Here we present the numbers of cells and neurons for 742 discrete locations across the neocortex in a chimpanzee. Using isotropic fractionation and flow fractionation methods for cell and neuron counts, we estimate that neocortex of one hemisphere contains 9.5 billion cells and 3.7 billion neurons. Primary visual cortex occupies 35 cm(2) of surface, 10% of the total, and contains 737 million densely packed neurons, 20% of the total neurons contained within the hemisphere. Other areas of high neuron packing include secondary visual areas, somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal granular cortex. Areas of low levels of neuron packing density include motor and premotor cortex. These values reflect those obtained from more limited samples of cortex in humans and other primates.

  3. Very High Density of CHO Cells in Perfusion by ATF or TFF in WAVE Bioreactor™. Part I. Effect of the Cell Density on the Process

    PubMed Central

    Clincke, Marie-Françoise; Mölleryd, Carin; Zhang, Ye; Lindskog, Eva; Walsh, Kieron; Chotteau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    High cell density perfusion process of antibody producing CHO cells was developed in disposable WAVE Bioreactor™ using external hollow fiber filter as cell separation device. Both “classical” tangential flow filtration (TFF) and alternating tangential flow system (ATF) equipment were used and compared. Consistency of both TFF- and ATF-based cultures was shown at 20–35 × 106 cells/mL density stabilized by cell bleeds. To minimize the nutrients deprivation and by-product accumulation, a perfusion rate correlated to the cell density was applied. The cells were maintained by cell bleeds at density 0.9–1.3 × 108 cells/mL in growing state and at high viability for more than 2 weeks. Finally, with the present settings, maximal cell densities of 2.14 × 108 cells/mL, achieved for the first time in a wave-induced bioreactor, and 1.32 × 108 cells/mL were reached using TFF and ATF systems, respectively. Using TFF, the cell density was limited by the membrane capacity for the encountered high viscosity and by the pCO2 level. Using ATF, the cell density was limited by the vacuum capacity failing to pull the highly viscous fluid. Thus, the TFF system allowed reaching higher cell densities. The TFF inlet pressure was highly correlated to the viscosity leading to the development of a model of this pressure, which is a useful tool for hollow fiber design of TFF and ATF. At very high cell density, the viscosity introduced physical limitations. This led us to recommend cell densities under 1.46 × 108 cell/mL based on the analysis of the theoretical distance between the cells for the present cell line. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 29:754–767, 2013 PMID:23436789

  4. Collection and conversion of algal lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Chieh

    Sustainable economic activities mandate a significant replacement of fossil energy by renewable forms. Algae-derived biofuels are increasingly seen as an alternative source of energy with potential to supplement the world's ever increasing demand. Our primary objective is, once the algae were cultivated, to eliminate or make more efficient energy-intensive processing steps of collection, drying, grinding, and solvent extraction prior to conversion. To overcome the processing barrier, we propose to streamline from cultivated algae to biodiesel via algal biomass collection by sand filtration, cell rupturing with ozone, and immediate transesterification. To collect the algal biomass, the specific Chlorococcum aquaticum suspension was acidified to pH 3.3 to promote agglomeration prior to sand filtration. The algae-loaded filter bed was drained of free water and added with methanol and ozonated for 2 min to rupture cell membrane to accelerate release of the cellular contents. The methanol solution now containing the dissolved lipid product was collected by draining, while the filter bed was regenerated by further ozonation when needed. The results showed 95% collection of the algal biomass from the suspension and a 16% yield of lipid from the algae, as well as restoration of filtration velocity of the sand bed via ozonation. The results further showed increased lipid yield upon cell rupturing and transesterified products composed entirely of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) compounds, demonstrating that the rupture and transesterification processes could proceed consecutively in the same medium, requiring no separate steps of drying, extraction, and conversion. The FAME products from algae without exposure to ozone were mainly of 16 to 18 carbons containing up to 3 double bonds, while those from algae having been ozonated were smaller, highly saturated hydrocarbons. The new technique streamlines individual steps from cultivated algal lipid to transesterified products and

  5. Inference of cell-cell interactions from population density characteristics and cell trajectories on static and growing domains.

    PubMed

    Ross, Robert J H; Yates, C A; Baker, R E

    2015-06-01

    A key feature of cell migration is how cell movement is affected by cell-cell interactions. Furthermore, many cell migratory processes such as neural crest stem cell migration [Thomas and Erickson, 2008; McLennan et al., 2012] occur on growing domains or in the presence of a chemoattractant. Therefore, it is important to study interactions between migrating cells in the context of domain growth and directed motility. Here we compare discrete and continuum models describing the spatial and temporal evolution of a cell population for different types of cell-cell interactions on static and growing domains. We suggest that cell-cell interactions can be inferred from population density characteristics in the presence of motility bias, and these population density characteristics for different cell-cell interactions are conserved on both static and growing domains. We also study the expected displacement of a tagged cell, and show that different types of cell-cell interactions can give rise to cell trajectories with different characteristics. These characteristics are conserved in the presence of domain growth, however, they are diminished in the presence of motility bias. Our results are relevant for researchers who study the existence and role of cell-cell interactions in biological systems, so far as we suggest that different types of cell-cell interactions could be identified from cell density and trajectory data.

  6. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, D.; Casero, D.; Cokus, S. J.; Merchant, S. S.; Pellegrini, M.

    2012-07-01

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG pathway maps and batch gene identifier conversion.

  7. Defect density and dielectric constant in perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Samiee, Mehran; Konduri, Siva; Abbas, Hisham A.; Joshi, Pranav; Zhang, Liang; Dalal, Vikram; Ganapathy, Balaji; Kottokkaran, Ranjith; Noack, Max; Kitahara, Andrew

    2014-10-13

    We report on measurement of dielectric constant, mid-gap defect density, Urbach energy of tail states in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub x}Cl{sub 1−x} perovskite solar cells. Midgap defect densities were estimated by measuring capacitance vs. frequency at different temperatures and show two peaks, one at 0.66 eV below the conduction band and one at 0.24 eV below the conduction band. The attempt to escape frequency is in the range of 2 × 10{sup 11}/s. Quantum efficiency data indicate a bandgap of 1.58 eV. Urbach energies of valence and conduction band are estimated to be ∼16 and ∼18 meV. Measurement of saturation capacitance indicates that the relative dielectric constant is ∼18.

  8. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein alters endothelial progenitor cell populations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuqi; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala A; Liu, Lingjuan; Li, Xin; Xiao, Yuan; Zhang, Jia; Xie, Xiaoyun; Hao, Hong; Liu, Jason Z; He, Guanglong; Cowan, Peter J; Cui, Lianqun; Zhu, Hua; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Liu, Zhenguo

    2015-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is critical to atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemia. Bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are important to preventing atherosclerosis, and significantly decreased in hyperlipidemia. This study was to demonstrate ox-LDL and hyperlipidemia could exhibit similar effect on EPC population and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS production in BM and blood was significantly increased in male C57BL/6 mice with intravenous ox-LDL treatment, and in hyperlipidemic LDL receptor knockout mice with 4-month high-fat diet. ROS formation was effectively blocked with overexpression of antioxidant enzymes or N-acetylcysteine treatment. In hyperlipidemic and ox-LDL-treated mice, c-Kit(+)/CD31(+) cell number in BM and blood, and Sca-1(+)/Flk-1(+) cell number in blood, not in BM, were significantly decreased, which were not affected by inhibiting ROS production, while blood CD34(+)/Flk-1(+) cell number was significantly increased that was prevented with reduced ROS formation. However, blood CD34(+)/CD133(+) cell number increased in ox-LDL-treated mice, while decreased in hyperlipidemic mice. These data suggested that ox-LDL produced significant changes in BM and blood EPC populations similar (but not identical) to chronic hyperlipidemia with predominantly ROS-independent mechanism(s).

  9. Algal Biofuels; Algal Biofuels R&D at NREL (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    An overview of NREL's algal biofuels projects, including U.S. Department of Energy-funded work, projects with U.S. and international partners, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects.

  10. Cell Contraction Forces in Scaffolds with Varying Pore Size and Cell Density

    PubMed Central

    Corin, K. A.

    2010-01-01

    The contractile behavior of cells is relevant in understanding wound healing and scar formation. In tissue engineering, inhibition of the cell contractile response is critical for the regeneration of physiologically normal tissue rather than scar tissue. Previous studies have measured the contractile response of cells in a variety of conditions (e.g. on two-dimensional solid substrates, on free-floating tissue engineering scaffolds and on scaffolds under some constraint in a cell force monitor). Tissue engineering scaffolds behave mechanically like open-cell elastomeric foams: between strains of about 10 and 90%, cells progressively buckle struts in the scaffold. The contractile force required for an individual cell to buckle a strut within a scaffold has been estimated based on the strut dimensions (radius, r, and length, ℓ) and the strut modulus, Es. Since the buckling force varies, according to Euler's law, with r4∕ℓ2, and the relative density of the scaffold varies as (r∕ℓ)2, the cell contractile force associated with strut buckling is expected to vary with the square of the pore size for scaffolds of constant relative density. As the cell density increases, the force per cell to achieve a given strain in the scaffold is expected to decrease. Here we model the contractile response of fibroblasts by analyzing the response of a single tetrakaidecahedron to forces applied to individual struts (simulating cell contractile forces) using finite element analysis. We model tetrakaidecahedra of different strut lengths, corresponding to different scaffold pore sizes, and of varying numbers of loaded struts, corresponding to varying cell densities. We compare our numerical model with the results of free floating contraction experiments of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) in collagen-GAG scaffolds of varying pore size and with varying cell densities. PMID:20362329

  11. Fluid flow plate for decreased density of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vitale, Nicholas G.

    1999-01-01

    A fluid flow plate includes first and second outward faces. Each of the outward faces has a flow channel thereon for carrying respective fluid. At least one of the fluids serves as reactant fluid for a fuel cell of a fuel cell assembly. One or more pockets are formed between the first and second outward faces for decreasing density of the fluid flow plate. A given flow channel can include one or more end sections and an intermediate section. An interposed member can be positioned between the outward faces at an interface between an intermediate section, of one of the outward faces, and an end section, of that outward face. The interposed member can serve to isolate the reactant fluid from the opposing outward face. The intermediate section(s) of flow channel(s) on an outward face are preferably formed as a folded expanse.

  12. Algal sludge from Taihu Lake can be utilized to create novel PGPR-containing bio-organic fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Li, Rong; Cao, Liangliang; Shi, Juanjuan; Liu, Hongjun; Huang, Yan; Shen, Qirong

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of refloated algal sludge from Taihu Lake result in secondary environmental pollution due to annual refloatation. This study investigated the possibility to produce bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) using algal sludge as a solid-state fermentation (SSF) medium. Results showed that addition of algal sludge contributed to efficient SFF by a plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strain SQR9 and improved the nutrient contents in the novel BIO. The optimum water content and initial inoculation size were 45% and 5%, respectively. After 6 days of SSF, the biomass of strain SQR9 was increased to a cell density of more than 5 × 10(7) CFU g(-1). Microcystins were rapidly degraded, and a high germination index value was observed. Plant growth experiments showed that the produced BIO efficiently promoted plant growth. Additional testing showed that the novel SSF process was also suitable for other PGPR strains. This study provides a novel way of high-value utilization of algal sludge from Taihu Lake by producing low-cost but high-quality BIOs. PMID:24321283

  13. Algal sludge from Taihu Lake can be utilized to create novel PGPR-containing bio-organic fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Li, Rong; Cao, Liangliang; Shi, Juanjuan; Liu, Hongjun; Huang, Yan; Shen, Qirong

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of refloated algal sludge from Taihu Lake result in secondary environmental pollution due to annual refloatation. This study investigated the possibility to produce bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) using algal sludge as a solid-state fermentation (SSF) medium. Results showed that addition of algal sludge contributed to efficient SFF by a plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strain SQR9 and improved the nutrient contents in the novel BIO. The optimum water content and initial inoculation size were 45% and 5%, respectively. After 6 days of SSF, the biomass of strain SQR9 was increased to a cell density of more than 5 × 10(7) CFU g(-1). Microcystins were rapidly degraded, and a high germination index value was observed. Plant growth experiments showed that the produced BIO efficiently promoted plant growth. Additional testing showed that the novel SSF process was also suitable for other PGPR strains. This study provides a novel way of high-value utilization of algal sludge from Taihu Lake by producing low-cost but high-quality BIOs.

  14. Probing topological relations between high-density and low-density regions of 2MASS with hexagon cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yongfeng; Xiao, Weike

    2014-02-01

    We introduced a new two-dimensional (2D) hexagon technique for probing the topological structure of the universe in which we mapped regions of the sky with high and low galaxy densities onto a 2D lattice of hexagonal unit cells. We defined filled cells as corresponding to high-density regions and empty cells as corresponding to low-density regions. The numbers of filled cells and empty cells were kept the same by controlling the size of the cells. By analyzing the six sides of each hexagon, we could obtain and compare the statistical topological properties of high-density and low-density regions of the universe in order to have a better understanding of the evolution of the universe. We applied this hexagonal method to Two Micron All Sky Survey data and discovered significant topological differences between the high-density and low-density regions. Both regions had significant (>5σ) topological shifts from both the binomial distribution and the random distribution.

  15. High power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J.; Hitchens, G. Duncan; Manko, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells use a perfluorosulfonic acid solid polymer film as an electrolyte which simplifies water and electrolyte management. Their thin electrolyte layers give efficient systems of low weight, and their materials of construction show extremely long laboratory lifetimes. Their high reliability and their suitability for use in a microgravity environment makes them particularly attractive as a substitute for batteries in satellites utilizing high-power, high energy-density electrochemical energy storage systems. In this investigation, the Dow experimental PEM (XUS-13204.10) and unsupported high platinum loading electrodes yielded very high power densities, of the order of 2.5 W cm(exp -2). A platinum black loading of 5 mg per cm(exp 2) was found to be optimum. On extending the three-dimensional reaction zone of fuel cell electrodes by impregnating solid polymer electrolyte into the electrode structures, Nafion was found to give better performance than the Dow experimental PEM. The depth of penetration of the solid polymer electrolyte into electrode structures was 50-70 percent of the thickness of the platinum-catalyzed active layer. However, the degree of platinum utilization was only 16.6 percent and the roughness factor of a typical electrode was 274.

  16. Mechanical algal disruption for efficient biodiesel extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, Joel David

    Biodiesel from algae provides several benefits over current biodiesel feedstocks, but the energy requirements of processing algae into a useable fuel are currently so high as to be prohibitive. One route to improving this is via disruption of the cells prior to lipid extraction, which can significantly increase energy recovery. Unfortunately, several obvious disruption techniques require more energy than can be gained. This dissertation examines the use of microbubbles to improve mechanical disruption of algal cells using experimental, theoretical, and computational methods. New laboratory experiments show that effective ultrasonic disruption of algae is achieved by adding microbubbles to an algal solution. The configuration studied flows the solution through a tube and insonifies a small section with a high-pressure ultrasound wave. Previous biomedical research has shown effective cell membrane damage on animal cells with similar methods, but the present research is the first to extend such study to algal cells. Results indicate that disruption increases with peak negative pressure between 1.90 and 3.07 MPa and with microbubble concentration up to 12.5 x 107 bubbles/ml. Energy estimates of this process suggest that it requires only one-fourth the currently most-efficient laboratory-scale disruption process. Estimates of the radius near each bubble that causes disruption (i.e. the disruption radius) suggest that it increases with peak negative pressure and is near 9--20 microm for all cases tested. It is anticipated that these procedures can be designed for better efficiency and efficacy, which will be facilitated by identifying the root mechanisms of the bubble-induced disruption. We therefore examine whether bubble expansion alone creates sufficient cell deformation for cell rupture. The spherically-symmetric Marmottant model for bubble dynamics allows estimation of the flow regime under experimental conditions. Bubble expansion is modeled as a point source of

  17. Cell-density dependent effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Alipov, E D; Shcheglov, V S; Sarimov, R M; Belyaev, I Ya

    2003-01-01

    The changes in genome conformational state (GCS) induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in E. coli cells were measured by the method of anomalous viscosity time dependence (AVTD) in cellular lysates. Effects of X-rays at doses 0.1 cGy--1 Gy depended on post-irradiation time. Significant relaxation of DNA loops followed by a decrease in AVTD. The time of maximum relaxation was between 5-80 min depending on the dose of irradiation. U-shaped dose response was observed with increase of AVTD in the range of 0.1-4 Gy and decrease in AVTD at higher doses. No such increase in AVTD was seen upon irradiation of cells at the beginning of cell lysis while the AVTD decrease was the same. Significant differences in the effects of X-rays and gamma-rays at the same doses were observed suggesting a strong dependence of low-dose effects on LET. Effects of 0.01 cGy gamma-rays were studied at different cell densities during irradiation. We show that the radiation-induced changes in GCS lasted longer at higher cell density as compared to lower cell density. Only small amount of cells were hit at this dose and the data suggest cell-to-cell communication in response to low-dose ionizing radiation. This prolonged effect was also observed when cells were irradiated at high cell density and diluted to low cell density immediately after irradiation. These data suggest that cell-to-cell communication occur during irradiation or within 3 min post-irradiation. The cell-density dependent response to low-dose ionizing radiation was compared with previously reported data on exposure of E. coli cells to electromagnetic fields of extremely low frequency and extremely high frequency (millimeter waves). The body of our data show that cells can communicate in response to electromagnetic fields and ionizing radiation, presumably by reemission of secondary photons in infrared-submillimeter frequency range.

  18. Sludge-grown algae for culturing aquatic organisms: Part I. Algal growth in sludge extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, K. M.; Chiu, S. T.; Wong, M. H.

    1996-05-01

    This project is aimed at studying the feasibility of using sewage sludge to prepare culture media for microalgae ( Chlorella-HKBU) and the use of the sludge-grown algae as a feed for some aquatic organisms. Part I of the project included results on preparing sludge extracts and their use on algal culture. By comparing two culturing techniques, “aeration” and “shaking,” it was noted that both lag and log phases were shortened in the aeration system. A subsequent experiment noted that algal growth subject to aeration rates of 1.0 and 1.5 liters/min had similar lag and log phases. In addition, both aeration rates had a significantly higher ( P < 0.05) final cell density than that of 0.5 liters/min. A detailed study on the variation of growth conditions on the algal growth was done. The results indicated that pH values of all the cultures declined below 5 at day 12. The removal rates of ammonia N ranged from 62% to 70%. The sludge-grown algae contained a rather substantial amount of heavy metals (µg/g): Zn 289 581, Cu 443 682, Ni 310 963, Mn 96 126, Cr 25 118, and Fe 438 653. This implied that the rather high levels of heavy metals may impose adverse effects on higher trophic organisms.

  19. The Effects of Physicochemical Factors and Cell Density on Nitrite Transformation in a Lipid-Rich Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Du, Kui; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2015-12-28

    To understand the effects of physicochemical factors on nitrite transformation by microalgae, a lipid-rich Chlorella with high nitrite tolerance was cultured with 8 mmol/l sodium nitrite as sole nitrogen source under different conditions. The results showed that nitrite transformation was mainly dependent on the metabolic activities of algal cells rather than oxidation of nitrite by dissolved oxygen. Light intensity, temperature, pH, NaHCO3 concentrations, and initial cell densities had significant effects on the rate of nitrite transformation. Single-factor experiments revealed that the optimum conditions for nitrite transformation were light intensity: 300 μmol/m(2); temperature: 30°C; pH: 7-8; NaHCO3 concentration: 2.0 g/l; and initial cell density: 0.15 g/l; and the highest nitrite transformation rate of 1.36 mmol/l/d was achieved. There was a positive correlation between nitrite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella. The relationship between nitrite transformation rate (mg/l/d) and biomass productivity (g/l/d) could be described by the regression equation y = 61.3x (R(2) = 0.9665), meaning that 61.3 mg N element was assimilated by 1.0 g dry biomass on average, which indicated that the nitrite transformation is a process of consuming nitrite as nitrogen source by Chlorella. The results demonstrated that the Chlorella suspension was able to assimilate nitrite efficiently, which implied the feasibility of using flue gas for mass production of Chlorella without preliminary removal of NOX.

  20. Effects of Malaria Parasite Density on Blood Cell Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kotepui, Manas; Piwkham, Duangjai; PhunPhuech, Bhukdee; Phiwklam, Nuoil; Chupeerach, Chaowanee; Duangmano, Suwit

    2015-01-01

    Changes in blood cell parameters are already a well-known feature of malarial infections. To add to this information, the objective of this study was to investigate the varying effects that different levels of parasite density have on blood cell parameters. Patients diagnosed with malaria at Phobphra Hospital, Tak Province, Thailand between January 1st 2009 and January 1st 2012 were recruited as subjects for data collection. Blood cell parameters of 2,024 malaria-infected patients were evaluated and statistically analyzed. Neutrophil and platelet counts were significantly higher, however, RBC count was significantly lower in patients with P. falciparum infection compared to those with P. vivax infection (p<0.0001). Leukocyte counts were also significantly higher in patients with high parasitemia compared to those with low and moderate parasitemia. In terms of differential leukocyte count, neutrophil count was significantly higher in patients with high parasitemia compared to those with low and moderate parasitemia (p<0.0001). On the other hand, both lymphocyte and monocyte counts were significantly lower in patients with high parasitemia (p<0.0001). RBC count and Hb concentration, as well as platelet count were also significantly reduced (p<0.05) and (p<0.0001), respectively. To summarize, patients infected with different malaria parasites exhibited important distinctive hematological parameters, with neutrophil and eosinophil counts being the two hematological parameters most affected. In addition, patients infected with different malarial densities also exhibited important changes in leukocyte count, platelet count and hemoglobin concentration during the infection. These findings offer the opportunity to recognize and diagnose malaria related anemia, help support the treatment thereof, as well as relieve symptoms of severe malaria in endemic regions. PMID:25807235

  1. [Usage of flocculation in emergent control of algal bloom in drinking water supplying reservoir].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li-juan; Han, Bo-ping; Lin, Qiu-qi; Lei, La-mei

    2007-10-01

    An Anabaena circinalis bloom appeared in a reservoir for supplying drinking water in the south of China, in April 2006. Phytoplankton scums gathered and floated on the surface of the whole reservoir especially on the area of water intake, and the cell density of phytoplankton, cyanobacteria and Anabaena circinalis was as high as 7.3 x 10(7), 7.2 x 10(7), 4.1 x 10(7) cells x L(-1) respectively. To maintain drinking water supplying, an emergency program was initiated to control the cyanobacterial bloom. The zone immediately adjacent to the water intake was divided into two small zones by fishing nets and waterproof curtains to modify the water flow. Iron-based flocculants were then applied to control the algal bloom. As a result, the density of the phytoplankton decreased greatly, and at the first day the cell densities of phytoplankton, cyanobacterial, Anabaena circinalis decreased to 5.3 x 10(6), 4.7 x 10(6), 2 x 10(6) cells x L(-1) respectively, and the removal of them reached up to 93%, 94%, 95% respectively. The average of phytoplankton cell density was 1.2 x 10(7) cells x L(-1) and a highest density was 2.0 x 10(7) cells x L(-1) during the treatment from 22 to 30 April, while Chlorophyta and Bacillariophyta slightly increased. These encouraging results suggest that the flocculants used are efficient at removing Cyanobacteria.

  2. Short-term algal toxicity test based on phosphate uptake.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, H Hidehiro; Shimada, Akiko; Hirayama, Kimiaki

    2004-04-01

    In order to develop a short-term algal toxicity test, the growth of and the phosphate uptake by the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum during batch culture were observed. In the control medium, S. capricornutum took up phosphate earlier than it grew. It was also observed that the phosphate uptake was inhibited by the presence of a toxicant. From these results, phosphate uptake was considered as one of the useful effect parameters for a short-term algal toxicity test. As the removal rate of phosphate from the medium is a function of the amount of algal cell initially inoculated, the test period is variable. The relationship between the amount of inoculation and phosphate uptake was examined and the test conditions suitable for a 3-h toxicity test were established as one example. According to this test procedure, the inhibitory effect of some toxicants on the phosphate uptake was determined. For comparison, a conventional algal assay based on algal growth was also performed. The EC50s for both tests were close. This indicated that the algal toxicity test method proposed in this paper would be useful for the uses where rapidity is required. PMID:15087199

  3. Sterol phylogenesis and algal evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Nes, W.D.; Norton, R.A.; Crumley, F.G. ); Madigan, S.J.; Katz, E.R. )

    1990-10-01

    The stereochemistry of several sterol precursors and end products synthesized by two fungal-like microorganisms Prototheca wickerhamii (I) and Dictyostelium discoideum (II) have been determined by chromatographic (TLC, GLC, and HPLC) and spectral (UV, MS, and {sup 1}H NMR) methods. From I and II the following sterols were isolated from the cells: cycloartenol, cyclolaudenol, 24(28)-methylenecy-cloartanol, ergosterol, protothecasterol, 4{alpha}-methylergostanol, 4{alpha}-methylclionastanol, clionastanol, 24{beta}-ethylcholesta-8,22-enol, and dictyosterol. In addition, the mechanism of C-24 methylation was investigated in both organisms by feeding to I (2-{sup 3}H)lanosterol, (2-{sup 3}H)cycloartenol, (24{sup 3}H)lanosterol, and (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})methionine and by feeding to II (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})methionine. The results demonstrate that the 24{beta} configuration is formed by different alkylation routes in I and II. The authors conclude that Prototheca is an apoplastic Chlorella (i.e., an alga) and that Dictyostelium as well as the other soil amoebae that synthesize cycloartenol evolved from algal rather than fungal ancestors.

  4. Carbon and light limitation in mass algal culture

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The carbon limited kinetic responses of various fast growing algal species have been summarized. These results suggest that the growth responses of many algae used in mass culture may best be represented as a Monod fit of the specific growth rate (..mu..) to the free carbon dioxide concentration (CO/sub 2//sub f/). The environmental modifiers of primary importance appear to be light levels, temperature and the ionic strength of the growth media. The various mathematical models describing the algal biological response to limitng CO/sub 2//sub f/ concentration, the carbonate equilibrium chemistry and the physical configration of a flow-through microbial culture are combined to yield equations which predict the pH, total carbon concentration (C/sub T/) and algal cell concentration of a continuous alga culture, given a ..mu../sub max/ and K/sub SCO2/ for the alga of interest. This model is further used to illustrate the under-utilization of inorganic carbon in mass algal cultures in which the pH is uncontrolled. One method of pH control in such cultures involves the utilization of CO/sub 2/ supply from bacterial degradation of waste organics in the influent culture medium. In such a situation both the culture pH and algal cell production will often be governed by either carbon or light limitation depending primarily on the influent BOD loading, detention time and culture depth. In spite of the obvious over-simplification of considering only light and carbon limits in describing the behavior of mass algal culture, comparisons to actual field data suggest that these two parameters will be of paramount importance in controlling net algal cell production rates.

  5. A simple and versatile microfluidic cell density gradient generator for quantum dot cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Qiushui; Liu, Wu; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2013-05-21

    In this work, a simple and versatile microfluidic cell density gradient generator was successfully developed for cytotoxicity of quantum dots (QDs) assay. The microfluidic cell density gradient generator is composed of eight parallel channels which are respectively surrounded by 1-8 microwells with optimized length and width. The cells fall into microwells by gravity and the cell densities are obviously dependent of microwell number. In a case study, HepG2 and MCF-7 cells were successfully utilized for generating cell density gradients on the microfluidic chip. The microfluidic cell density gradient generator was proved to be easily handled, cell-friendly and could be used to conduct the subsequent cell-based assay. As a proof-of-concept, QD cytotoxicity was evaluated and the results exhibited obvious cell density-dependence. For comparison, QD cytotoxicity was also investigated with a series of cell densities infused by pipette tips. Higher reproducibility was observed on the microfluidic cell density gradient generator and cell density was demonstrated to be a vital factor in cytotoxic study. With higher efficiency, controllability and reproducibility, the microfluidic cell density gradient generator could be integrated into microfluidic analysis systems to promote chip-based biological assay.

  6. Mechanical algal disruption for efficient biodiesel extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, Joel David

    Biodiesel from algae provides several benefits over current biodiesel feedstocks, but the energy requirements of processing algae into a useable fuel are currently so high as to be prohibitive. One route to improving this is via disruption of the cells prior to lipid extraction, which can significantly increase energy recovery. Unfortunately, several obvious disruption techniques require more energy than can be gained. This dissertation examines the use of microbubbles to improve mechanical disruption of algal cells using experimental, theoretical, and computational methods. New laboratory experiments show that effective ultrasonic disruption of algae is achieved by adding microbubbles to an algal solution. The configuration studied flows the solution through a tube and insonifies a small section with a high-pressure ultrasound wave. Previous biomedical research has shown effective cell membrane damage on animal cells with similar methods, but the present research is the first to extend such study to algal cells. Results indicate that disruption increases with peak negative pressure between 1.90 and 3.07 MPa and with microbubble concentration up to 12.5 x 107 bubbles/ml. Energy estimates of this process suggest that it requires only one-fourth the currently most-efficient laboratory-scale disruption process. Estimates of the radius near each bubble that causes disruption (i.e. the disruption radius) suggest that it increases with peak negative pressure and is near 9--20 microm for all cases tested. It is anticipated that these procedures can be designed for better efficiency and efficacy, which will be facilitated by identifying the root mechanisms of the bubble-induced disruption. We therefore examine whether bubble expansion alone creates sufficient cell deformation for cell rupture. The spherically-symmetric Marmottant model for bubble dynamics allows estimation of the flow regime under experimental conditions. Bubble expansion is modeled as a point source of

  7. Algal growth response to particle-bound orthophosphate and zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, J.S.; Davis, J.A.; Chang, C.C.Y.

    1986-05-01

    Dissolved nutrient concentrations in natural waters may at times be controlled by interactions between particulate and solution phases. Effects of Zn (0-1 ..mu..M total Zn(II)) and orthophosphate (8-12 ..mu..M total P) additions on growth indices for the chlorophyte Selenastrum capricornutum Printz were examined in a synthetic growth medium containing 50 mg liter/sup -1/ colloidal titania. Over the Zn(II) concentration range used, detrimental growth and yield effects were observed. Addition of P to a synthetic growth medium (S-3) increased stationary phase cell density, but had minimal effect on growth rate and duration of lag phase. Presence of TiO/sub 2/ particles in culture media significantly reduced Zn and P dissolved fractions. Although adsorbed Zn and P were less available to Selenastrum, desorption of both solutes increased their availability. Rapid desorption of Zn(II) from TiO/sub 2/ particles served in effect to buffer Zn/sup 2 +/ free ion concentration, until Zn became partitioned primarily with the algal fraction as cell concentration approached stationary phase density. Although phosphate desorption from TiO/sub 2/ in nonbiological systems was negligible, Selenastrum was able to scavenge some P initially adsorbed onto TiO/sub 2/. Accurate primary productivity predictions in nature may therefore require an understanding of equilibrium and reaction rates involved in the partitioning of nutrients and toxic substances between dissolved and particulate phases.

  8. Low density of sympathetic nerve fibres and increased density of brain derived neurotrophic factor positive cells in RA synovium

    PubMed Central

    Weidler, C; Holzer, C; Harbuz, M; Hofbauer, R; Angele, P; Scholmerich, J; Straub, R

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between density of nerve fibres and the presence of BDNF+ cells. Methods: Densities of nerve fibres and BDNF+ cells were detected by quantitative immunohistochemistry in fresh synovial tissue from 52 patients with RA, 59 with OA, and 26 controls (Co). BDNF was also detected by in situ hybridisation. Results: Sympathetic nerve fibre density was similar in Co and OA but markedly reduced in RA (p = 0.002), whereas density of substance P positive (SP+) sensory nerve fibres was lower in OA than in Co and RA (p = 0.002). The ratio of sympathetic/SP+ sensory nerve fibre density was highest in OA and Co, followed by RA. The correlation between density of sympathetic nerve fibres and SP+ sensory nerve fibres in OA (R = 0.425, p = 0.001) was strongly positive, had a positive trend in Co (R = 0.243, NS), but was negative in RA (R = –0.292, p = 0.040). In RA and OA tissue the density of BDNF+ cells was high in sublining areas but markedly lower in Co (p = 0.001). BDNF+ cell density correlated positively with the ratio of sympathetic/SP+ sensory nerve fibre density in Co (R = 0.433, p = 0.045) and in OA (R = 0.613, p = 0.015), but not in RA (R = 0.101, NS). Immunohistochemical double staining demonstrated that some macrophages and fibroblasts were positive for BDNF. Conclusions: The correlation of density of SP+ sensory with sympathetic nerve fibres was positive in Co and OA but negative in RA. BDNF may have a stimulatory role on growth of sympathetic in relation to SP+ sensory nerve fibres in Co and OA, but not in RA. PMID:15608299

  9. Validation of algal viability treated with total residual oxidant and organic matter by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghyun; Choi, Eun Joo; Rhie, Kitae

    2015-08-15

    Algal cell growth after starch and oxidant treatments in seawater species (Isochrysis galbana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) and freshwater species (Selenastrum capricornutum and Scenedesmus obliquus) were evaluated by flow cytometry with fluorescein diacetate (FDA) staining to determine algal viability. Growth of algal cell was found to be significantly different among groups treated with NaOCl, starch and/or sodium thiosulfate, which are active substance (Total Residual Oxidant; TRO as Cl2), organic compound to meet efficacy testing standard and neutralizer of TRO by Ballast Water Management Convention of International Maritime Organization, respectively. The viability of algal cell treated with TRO in starch-add culture of 5days after treatment and neutralization was decreased significantly. ATP contents of the treated algal cells corresponded to the FL1 fluorescent signal of flow cytometry with FDA staining. I. galbana was the most sensitive to TRO-neutralized cultures during viability analysis.

  10. Focal high cell density generates a gradient of patterns in self-organizing vascular mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Henry; Reddy, Aneela; Sage, Andrew; Lu, Jinxiu; Garfinkel, Alan; Tintut, Yin; Demer, Linda L

    2012-01-01

    In embryogenesis, structural patterns, such as vascular branching, may form via a reaction-diffusion mechanism in which activator and inhibitor morphogens guide cells into periodic aggregates. We previously found that vascular mesenchymal cells (VMCs) spontaneously aggregate into nodular structures and that morphogen pairs regulate the aggregation into patterns of spots and stripes. To test the effect of a focal change in activator morphogen on VMC pattern formation, we created a focal zone of high cell density by plating a second VMC layer within a cloning ring over a confluent monolayer. After 24 h, the ring was removed and pattern formation monitored by phase-contrast microscopy. At days 2-8, the patterns progressed from uniform distributions to swirl, labyrinthine and spot patterns. Within the focal high-density zone (HDZ) and a narrow halo zone, cells aggregated into spot patterns, whilst in the outermost zone of the plate, cells formed a labyrinthine pattern. The area occupied by aggregates was significantly greater in the outermost zone than in the HDZ or halo. The rate of pattern progression within the HDZ increased as a function of its plating density. Thus, focal differences in cell density may drive pattern formation gradients in tissue architecture, such as vascular branching.

  11. Focal High Cell Density Generates a Gradient of Patterns in Self-Organizing Vascular Mesenchymal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Henry; Reddy, Aneela; Sage, Andrew; Lu, Jinxiu; Garfinkel, Alan; Tintut, Yin; Demer, Linda

    2012-01-01

    In embryogenesis, structural patterns, such as vascular branching, may form via a reaction-diffusion mechanism in which activator and inhibitor morphogens guide cells into periodic aggregates. We previously found that vascular mesenchymal cells (VMC) spontaneously aggregate into nodular structures and that morphogen pairs regulate the aggregation into patterns of spots and stripes. To test the effect of a focal change in activator morphogen on VMC pattern formation, we created a focal zone of high cell density by plating a second layer VMC within a cloning ring over a confluent monolayer. After 24 hours, the ring was removed, and pattern formation monitored by phase-contrast microscopy. At days 2–8, the patterns progressed from uniform distributions to swirl, labyrinthine, and spot patterns. Within the focal high-density zone and a narrow halo zone, cells aggregated into spot patterns; in the outermost zone of the plate, cells formed a labyrinthine pattern. Area occupied by aggregates was significantly greater in the outermost zone than in the HDZ or halo. The rate of pattern progression within the HDZ increased as a function of its plating density. Thus, focal differences in cell density may drive pattern formation gradients in tissue architecture, such as vascular branching. PMID:22797747

  12. Modulation of the cancer cell transcriptome by culture media formulations and cell density

    PubMed Central

    KIM, SEUNG WOOK; KIM, SUN-JIN; LANGLEY, ROBERT R.; FIDLER, ISAIAH J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how varying the composition of cell culture formulations and growing cancer cells at different densities might affect tumor cell genotype. Specifically, we compared gene expression profiles generated by human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells cultured in different media [minimum essential medium (MEM), Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM), or Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI)-1640 medium] containing different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS) or different sera (equine or bovine) that were grown at different cell densities. More than 2,000 genes were differentially modulated by at least a 2-fold difference when MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were 90% confluent and compared with cultures that were 50% confluent. Altering the concentration of serum produced an even more pronounced effect on MDA-MB-231 cancer cell gene expression in that 2,981 genes were differentially expressed in a comparison between cells cultured in 0.1% FBS and same cell density cultures that were maintained in 10% FBS. A comparison between MDA-MB-231 cancer cells that were 90% confluent in MEM, DMEM, or RPMI-1640 media, all containing 10% FBS, resulted in 8,925 differentially expressed genes. Moreover, one-quarter (25.6%) of genes from our genome-wide expression analysis were expressed at significantly different levels by cells grown in MEM, DMEM, or RPMI-1640 media. Genes associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were among the genes that were differentially modulated by cells grown in different cell culture formulations and these genes were verified at the protein level. Collectively, these results underscore the importance of accurate reporting and maintenance of uniform culture conditions to ensure reproducible results. PMID:25776572

  13. Scan-Free Absorbance Spectral Imaging A(x, y, λ) of Single Live Algal Cells for Quantifying Absorbance of Cell Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Isono, Takumi; Yamashita, Kyohei; Momose, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kitamura, Masashi; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kanda, Hiroaki; Kudo, Ayane; Okada, Norihide; Yagi, Takafumi; Nakata, Kazuaki; Mineki, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Label-free, non-invasive, rapid absorbance spectral imaging A(x,y,λ) microscopy of single live cells at 1.2 μm × 1.2 μm resolution with an NA = 0.85 objective was developed and applied to unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. By introducing the fiber assembly to rearrange a two-dimensional image to the one-dimensional array to fit the slit of an imaging spectrograph equipped with a CCD detector, scan-free acquisition of three-dimensional information of A(x,y,λ) was realized. The space-resolved absorbance spectra of the eyespot, an orange organelle about 1 μm, were extracted from the green-color background in a chlorophyll-rich single live cell absorbance image. Characteristic absorbance change in the cell suspension after hydrogen photoproduction in C. reinhardtii was investigated to find a single 715-nm absorption peak was locally distributed within single cells. The formula to calculate the absorbance of cell suspensions from that of single cells was presented to obtain a quantitative, parameter-free agreement with the experiment. It is quantitatively shown that the average number of chlorophylls per cell is significantly underestimated when it is evaluated from the absorbance of the cell suspensions due to the package effect. PMID:26061268

  14. Scan-Free Absorbance Spectral Imaging A(x, y, λ) of Single Live Algal Cells for Quantifying Absorbance of Cell Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Isono, Takumi; Yamashita, Kyohei; Momose, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kitamura, Masashi; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kanda, Hiroaki; Kudo, Ayane; Okada, Norihide; Yagi, Takafumi; Nakata, Kazuaki; Mineki, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Label-free, non-invasive, rapid absorbance spectral imaging A(x,y,λ) microscopy of single live cells at 1.2 μm × 1.2 μm resolution with an NA = 0.85 objective was developed and applied to unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. By introducing the fiber assembly to rearrange a two-dimensional image to the one-dimensional array to fit the slit of an imaging spectrograph equipped with a CCD detector, scan-free acquisition of three-dimensional information of A(x,y,λ) was realized. The space-resolved absorbance spectra of the eyespot, an orange organelle about 1 μm, were extracted from the green-color background in a chlorophyll-rich single live cell absorbance image. Characteristic absorbance change in the cell suspension after hydrogen photoproduction in C. reinhardtii was investigated to find a single 715-nm absorption peak was locally distributed within single cells. The formula to calculate the absorbance of cell suspensions from that of single cells was presented to obtain a quantitative, parameter-free agreement with the experiment. It is quantitatively shown that the average number of chlorophylls per cell is significantly underestimated when it is evaluated from the absorbance of the cell suspensions due to the package effect. PMID:26061268

  15. Scan-Free Absorbance Spectral Imaging A(x, y, λ) of Single Live Algal Cells for Quantifying Absorbance of Cell Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Isono, Takumi; Yamashita, Kyohei; Momose, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kitamura, Masashi; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kanda, Hiroaki; Kudo, Ayane; Okada, Norihide; Yagi, Takafumi; Nakata, Kazuaki; Mineki, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Label-free, non-invasive, rapid absorbance spectral imaging A(x,y,λ) microscopy of single live cells at 1.2 μm × 1.2 μm resolution with an NA = 0.85 objective was developed and applied to unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. By introducing the fiber assembly to rearrange a two-dimensional image to the one-dimensional array to fit the slit of an imaging spectrograph equipped with a CCD detector, scan-free acquisition of three-dimensional information of A(x,y,λ) was realized. The space-resolved absorbance spectra of the eyespot, an orange organelle about 1 μm, were extracted from the green-color background in a chlorophyll-rich single live cell absorbance image. Characteristic absorbance change in the cell suspension after hydrogen photoproduction in C. reinhardtii was investigated to find a single 715-nm absorption peak was locally distributed within single cells. The formula to calculate the absorbance of cell suspensions from that of single cells was presented to obtain a quantitative, parameter-free agreement with the experiment. It is quantitatively shown that the average number of chlorophylls per cell is significantly underestimated when it is evaluated from the absorbance of the cell suspensions due to the package effect.

  16. Sociality in Escherichia coli: Enterochelin Is a Private Good at Low Cell Density and Can Be Shared at High Cell Density

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many bacteria produce secreted iron chelators called siderophores, which can be shared among cells with specific siderophore uptake systems regardless of whether the cell produces siderophores. Sharing secreted products allows freeloading, where individuals use resources without bearing the cost of production. Here we show that the Escherichia coli siderophore enterochelin is not evenly shared between producers and nonproducers. Wild-type Escherichia coli grows well in low-iron minimal medium, and an isogenic enterochelin synthesis mutant (ΔentF) grows very poorly. The enterochelin mutant grows well in low-iron medium supplemented with enterochelin. At high cell densities the ΔentF mutant can compete equally with the wild type in low-iron medium. At low cell densities the ΔentF mutant cannot compete. Furthermore, the growth rate of the wild type is unaffected by cell density. The wild type grows well in low-iron medium even at very low starting densities. Our experiments support a model where at least some enterochelin remains associated with the cells that produce it, and the cell-associated enterochelin enables iron acquisition even at very low cell density. Enterochelin that is not retained by producing cells at low density is lost to dilution. At high cell densities, cell-free enterochelin can accumulate and be shared by all cells in the group. Partial privatization is a solution to the problem of iron acquisition in low-iron, low-cell-density habitats. Cell-free enterochelin allows for iron scavenging at a distance at higher population densities. Our findings shed light on the conditions under which freeloaders might benefit from enterochelin uptake systems. IMPORTANCE Sociality in microbes has become a topic of great interest. One facet of sociality is the sharing of secreted products, such as the iron-scavenging siderophores. We present evidence that the Escherichia coli siderophore enterochelin is relatively inexpensive to produce and is

  17. Cell density modulates growth, extracellular matrix, and protein synthesis of cultured rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Wolthuis, A; Boes, A; Grond, J

    1993-10-01

    Mesangial cell (MC) hyperplasia and accumulation of extracellular matrix are hallmarks of chronic glomerular disease. The present in vitro study examined the effects of cell density on growth, extracellular matrix formation, and protein synthesis of cultured rat MCs. A negative linear relationship was found between initial plating density and DNA synthesis per cell after 24 hours incubation in medium with 10% fetal calf serum (range: 1 x 10(3) to 7 x 10(5) MCs/2cm2, r = 0.996, P < 0.001). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of the amount of fibronectin in the conditioned medium after 72 hours showed a negative relationship with increasing cell density. In contrast, the amount of cell-associated fibronectin increased to maximal values in confluent cultures, and no further increase was seen at supraconfluency. The relative collagen synthesis in the conditioned medium and cell layer--assessed by collagenase digestion after 5 hours [3H]proline pulse labeling--showed a similar pattern. Secreted collagen decreased with increasing cell density from 3.4% to 0.2% of total protein synthesis. In contrast, cell-associated collagen increased from 1.1% to 11.8% of newly synthesized protein until confluency followed by a decrease to 4.2% at supraconfluency. Specific immunoprecipitation of collagen types I, III, and IV revealed a significant (twofold) increase in collagen I synthesis per cell at confluency. Collagen III and IV synthesis was not affected by cell density. Specific protein expression in both the medium and cell layer were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (150 to 20 kd, pI 5.0 to 7.0) after 20 hours steady-state metabolic labeling with [35S]methionine. Supraconfluent MCs displayed overexpression of 10, underexpression of four, new expression of five, and changed mobility of three different intracellular proteins. Of interest was the overexpression of two proteins (89 kd, pI 5.31 and 72 kd, pI 5.32) that were identified by immunoblotting as

  18. Carbonate fuel cell monolith design for high power density and low cost

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.; Doyon, J.

    1996-08-01

    Objective is higher power density operation and cost reduction. This is accomplished by the design of a bipolar plate where the separate corrugated current collectors are eliminated; cost reduction was also derived through higher power density and reduced material usage. The higher volumetric power density operation was achieved through lower cell resistance, increased active component surface area, and reduced cell height.

  19. Cell culture density affects the proliferation activity of human adipose tissue stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Seong; Lee, Myoung Woo; Ko, Young Jong; Chun, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Yoo, Keon Hee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of cell density on the proliferation activity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from adipose tissue (AT-MSCs) over time in culture. Passage #4 (P4) and #12 (P12) AT-MSCs from two donors were plated at a density of 200 (culture condition 1, CC1) or 5000 (culture condition 2, CC2) cells cm(-2) . After 7 days of incubation, P4 and P12 AT-MSCs cultured in CC1 were thin and spindle-shaped, whereas those cultured in CC2 had extensive cell-to-cell contacts and an expanded cell volume. In addition, P4 and P12 AT-MSCs in CC1 divided more than three times, while those in CC2 divided less than once on average. Flow cytometric analysis using 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester dye showed that the fluorescence intensity of AT-MSCs was lower in CC1 than in CC2. Furthermore, expression of proliferation-associated genes, such as CDC45L, CDC20A and KIF20A, in P4 AT-MSCs was higher in CC1 than in CC2, and this difference was also observed in P12 AT-MSCs. These data demonstrated that cell culture density affects the proliferation activity of MSCs, suggesting that it is feasible to design a strategy to prepare suitable MSCs using specific culture conditions.

  20. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  1. Itinerary of high density lipoproteins in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Perisa, Damir; Rohrer, Lucia; Kaech, Andres; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2016-02-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) and its main protein component apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) have multiple anti-atherogenic functions. Some of them are exerted within the vessel wall, so that HDL needs to pass the endothelial barrier. To elucidate their itinerary through endothelial cells (ECs), we labelled ApoA-I and HDL either fluorescently or with 1.4 nm nanogold and investigated their cellular localization by using immunofluorescent microscopy (IFM) and electron microscopy (EM). HDL as well as ApoA-I is taken up by ECs into the same route of intracellular trafficking. Time kinetics and pulse chase experiments revealed that HDL is trafficked through different vesicles. HDL partially co-localized with LDL, albumin, and transferrin. HDL did not co-localize with clathrin and caveolin-1. Fluorescent HDL was recovered at small proportions in early endosomes and endosome to trans-golgi network vesicles but not at all in recycling endosomes, in late endosomes or lysosomes. EM identified HDL mainly in large filled vesicles which however upon IFM did not colocalize with markers of multivesicular bodies or autophagosomes. The uptake or cellular distribution of HDL was altered upon pharmacological interference with cytochalasine D, colchicine and dynasore. Blockage of fluid phase uptake with Amiloride or EIPA did not reduce the uptake of HDL. Neither did we observe any co-localization of HDL with dextran as the marker of fluid phase uptake. In conclusion, HDL and ApoA-I are internalized and trafficked by endothelial cells through a non-classical endocytic route. PMID:26577406

  2. Algal Energy Conversion and Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazendonk, P.

    2015-12-01

    We address the potential for energy conversions and capture for: energy generation; reduction in energy use; reduction in greenhouse gas emissions; remediation of water and air pollution; protection and enhancement of soil fertility. These processes have the potential to sequester carbon at scales that may have global impact. Energy conversion and capture strategies evaluate energy use and production from agriculture, urban areas and industries, and apply existing and emerging technologies to reduce and recapture energy embedded in waste products. The basis of biocrude production from Micro-algal feedstocks: 1) The nutrients from the liquid fraction of waste streams are concentrated and fed into photo bioreactors (essentially large vessels in which microalgae are grown) along with CO2 from flue gasses from down stream processes. 2) The algae are processed to remove high value products such as proteins and beta-carotenes. The advantage of algae feedstocks is the high biomass productivity is 30-50 times that of land based crops and the remaining biomass contains minimal components that are difficult to convert to biocrude. 3) The remaining biomass undergoes hydrothermal liquefaction to produces biocrude and biochar. The flue gasses of this process can be used to produce electricity (fuel cell) and subsequently fed back into the photobioreactor. The thermal energy required for this process is small, hence readily obtained from solar-thermal sources, and furthermore no drying or preprocessing is required keeping the energy overhead extremely small. 4) The biocrude can be upgraded and refined as conventional crude oil, creating a range of liquid fuels. In principle this process can be applied on the farm scale to the municipal scale. Overall, our primary food production is too dependent on fossil fuels. Energy conversion and capture can make food production sustainable.

  3. Sterol phylogenesis and algal evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Nes, W D; Norton, R A; Crumley, F G; Madigan, S J; Katz, E R

    1990-01-01

    The stereochemistry of several sterol precursors and end products synthesized by two fungal-like micro-organisms Prototheca wickerhamii (I) and Dictyostelium discoideum (II) have been determined by chromatographic (TLC, GLC, and HPLC) and spectral (UV, MS, and 1H NMR) methods. From I and II the following sterols were isolated from the cells: cycloartenol, cyclolaudenol, 24(28)-methylenecycloartanol, ergosterol, protothecasterol, 4alpha-methylergostanol, 4alpha-methylclionastanol, clionastanol, 24beta-ethylcholesta-8,22-enol, and dictyosterol. In addition, the mechanism of C-24 methylation was investigated in both organisms by feeding to I [2-3H]lanosterol, [2-3H]cycloartenol, [24-3H]lanosterol, and [methyl-2H3]methionine and by feeding to II [methyl-2H3]methionine. The results demonstrate that the 24beta configuration is formed by different alkylation routes in I and II. The Delta25(27) route operates in I while the Delta24(28) route operates in II. Based on what is known in the literature regarding sterol distribution and phylogenesis together with our findings that the stereochemical outcome of squalene oxide cyclization leads to the production of cycloartenol rather than lanosterol (characteristic of the fungal genealogy) and the chirality of the C-24 alkyl group is similar in the two nonphotosynthetic microbes (beta oriented), we conclude that Prototheca is an apoplastic Chlorella (i.e., an alga) and that Dictyostelium as well as the other soil amoebae that synthesize cycloartenol evolved from algal rather than fungal ancestors. PMID:11607106

  4. Algal taxonomy forum: Algal Taxonomist, Let Serendipity Reign!

    PubMed

    Druehl, Louis

    2013-04-01

    The publication of a mini-review by Olivier De Clerck et al. in this issue of the Journal of Phycology presented an opportunity to open a dialogue on challenges faced by contemporary algal taxonomists. The Editorial Office solicited the following two additional contributions in response to De Clerck et al.'s paper; the responses were edited solely for clarity, space and format.

  5. Human endothelial progenitor cells internalize high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Srisen, Kaemisa; Röhrl, Clemens; Meisslitzer-Ruppitsch, Claudia; Ranftler, Carmen; Ellinger, Adolf; Pavelka, Margit; Neumüller, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) originate either directly from hematopoietic stem cells or from a subpopulation of monocytes. Controversial views about intracellular lipid traffic prompted us to analyze the uptake of human high density lipoprotein (HDL), and HDL-cholesterol in human monocytic EPCs. Fluorescence and electron microscopy were used to investigate distribution and intracellular trafficking of HDL and its associated cholesterol using fluorescent surrogates (bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate), cytochemical labels and fluorochromes including horseradish peroxidase and Alexa Fluor® 568. Uptake and intracellular transport of HDL were demonstrated after internalization periods from 0.5 to 4 hours. In case of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568, bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, a photooxidation method was carried out. HDL-specific reaction products were present in invaginations of the plasma membrane at each time of treatment within endocytic vesicles, in multivesicular bodies and at longer periods of uptake, also in lysosomes. Some HDL-positive endosomes were arranged in form of "strings of pearl"- like structures. HDL-positive multivesicular bodies exhibited intensive staining of limiting and vesicular membranes. Multivesicular bodies of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568-treated EPCs showed multilamellar intra-vacuolar membranes. At all periods of treatment, labeled endocytic vesicles and organelles were apparent close to the cell surface and in perinuclear areas around the Golgi apparatus. No HDL-related particles could be demonstrated close to its cisterns. Electron tomographic reconstructions showed an accumulation of HDL-containing endosomes close to the trans-Golgi-network. HDL-derived bodipy-cholesterol was localized in endosomal vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes and in many of the stacked Golgi cisternae and the trans-Golgi-network Internalized HDL-derived bodipy-cholesteryl oleate was channeled into the lysosomal intraellular

  6. Measuring natural phytoplankton fluorescence and biomass: a case study of algal bloom in the Pearl River estuary.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Cao, Wenxi; Yang, Yuezhong; Wang, Guifen; Zhou, Wen; Sun, Zhaohua

    2008-10-01

    A moored optical buoy was deployed in the Pearl River estuarine waters for a 15-day period. A four-day algal bloom event occurred during this study period. Both chlorophyll a concentration and algal cell density (a proxy for biomass) changed dramatically before and after the event. The chlorophyll concentration at a 2.3m depth rose from 5.15 mg/m(-3) at 15:00 h on August 19 to 23.62 mg/m(-3) at 9:00 h on August 21, and then decreased to 3.24 mg/m(-3) at 15:00 h on August 24. The corresponding cell density ranged from 1.57 x 10(5) to 1.76 x 10(6)cells/L. We used normalized fluorescence line height (NFLH) and normalized fluorescence intensity (NFI) in order to determine fluorescence activity. Combined with the in situ sampling dataset, we were able to correlate natural fluorescence (NFLH and NFI) with chlorophyll a concentrations, and found correlation coefficients of 0.72 and 0.75, respectively. We also found correlations between natural fluorescence and cell density, with correlation coefficients of 0.71 and 0.65, respectively. These results indicate that applying continuous time series of natural fluorescence can reflect changes in biomass. This technique will prove extremely useful for in situ and real-time observations using an optical buoy. Although there are still problems to solve in the real-time observation of natural fluorescence in algal bloom events, we discuss the primary factors affecting fluorescence signals and suggest possible methods for mitigating these issues.

  7. Effects of electron acceptors on soluble reactive phosphorus in the overlying water during algal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinzhi; Jiang, Xia; Zheng, Binghui; Niu, Yuan; Wang, Kun; Wang, Wenwen; Kardol, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Endogenous phosphorus (P) release from sediments is an important factor to cause eutrophication and, hence, algal bloom in lakes in China. Algal decomposition depletes dissolved oxygen (DO) and causes anaerobic conditions and therefore increases P release from sediments. As sediment P release is dependent on the iron (Fe) cycle, electron acceptors (e.g., NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), and Mn(4+)) can be utilized to suppress the reduction of Fe(3+) under anaerobic conditions and, as such, have the potential to impair the release of sediment P. Here, we used a laboratory experiment to test the effects of FeCl3, MnO2, and KNO3 on soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration and related chemical variables in the overlying water column during algal decomposition at different algal densities. Results showed that algal decomposition significantly depleted DO and thereby increased sediment Fe-bound P release. Compared with the control, addition of FeCl3 significantly decreased water SRP concentration through inhibiting sediment P release. Compared with FeCl3, addition of MnO2 has less potential to suppress sediment P release during algal decomposition. Algal decomposition has the potential for NO3 (-) removal from aquatic ecosystem through denitrification and by that alleviates the suppressing role of NO3 (-) on sediment P release. Our results indicated that FeCl3 and MnO2 could be efficient in reducing sediment P release during algal decomposition, with the strongest effect found for FeCl3; large amounts of NO3 (-) were removed from the aquatic ecosystem through denitrification during algal decomposition. Moreover, the amounts of NO3 (-) removal increased with increasing algal density.

  8. Daily variation in radiosensitivity of circulating blood cells and bone marrow cell density in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    Mice on a 12/12 light/dark cycle were bled during a twenty-four hour period each week for eight weeks to establish daily values of circulating blood cells. No significant daily variation was found in total red blood cells, hematocrit, or percentage of reticulocytes. A significant (P < 0.001) daily variation was found in total white blood cells, with the minimum occurring at 8 PM and the maximum occurring during the daylight hours from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mice were then exposed to 0 R, 20 R, 50 R, or 100 R of x-radiation to determine what dose significantly reduces the total white cell count in circulating blood. It was found that 100 R significantly (P < .05) reduces the total white cell count over a four week period post-exposure. To determine if circulating blood cells and bone marrow cells show a diurnal radiosensitivity, mice were exposed to 100 R or 200 R of x-radiation at noon or midnight. Hematocrits, reticulocyte and white blood cell counts, daily white blood cell rhythm, and bone marrow cell density indicate that these mice were more radiosensitive at night.

  9. Potential of carbon nanotubes in algal biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lambreva, Maya Dimova; Lavecchia, Teresa; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Antal, Taras Kornelievich; Orlanducci, Silvia; Margonelli, Andrea; Rea, Giuseppina

    2015-09-01

    A critical mass of knowledge is emerging on the interactions between plant cells and engineered nanomaterials, revealing the potential of plant nanobiotechnology to promote and support novel solutions for the development of a competitive bioeconomy. This knowledge can foster the adoption of new methodological strategies to empower the large-scale production of biomass from commercially important microalgae. The present review focuses on the potential of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance photosynthetic performance of microalgae by (i) widening the spectral region available for the energy conversion reactions and (ii) increasing the tolerance of microalgae towards unfavourable conditions occurring in mass production. To this end, current understanding on the mechanisms of uptake and localization of CNTs in plant cells is discussed. The available ecotoxicological data were used in an attempt to assess the feasibility of CNT-based applications in algal biotechnology, by critically correlating the experimental conditions with the observed adverse effects. Furthermore, main structural and physicochemical properties of single- and multi-walled CNTs and common approaches for the functionalization and characterization of CNTs in biological environment are presented. Here, we explore the potential that nanotechnology can offer to enhance functions of algae, paving the way for a more efficient use of photosynthetic algal systems in the sustainable production of energy, biomass and high-value compounds.

  10. [Selective feeding of Calanus sinicus on harmful algal blooms species in East China Sea in spring].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Wang, Xiao-dong; Song, Shu-qun

    2007-01-01

    From April 27th to June 5th 2005, the selective feeding of Calanus sinicus on harmful algal blooms (HABs) species was studied by in situ feeding experiments at six typical stations in a high frequency red tide occurring region of East China Sea. The results showed that the selective feeding behavior of C. sinicus was dependent on food density. It had an obvious food selectivity when the abundance of phytoplankton cell was low, but the selectivity changed from preference to discrimination at high phytoplankton cell abundance, with a threshold value of 329 cells ml. The selective feeding of C. sinicus was also dependent on food composition. It showed no selective feeding or discrimination on microzooplankton at most stations, but preferred to P. delicatissima and disliked Karenia mikimotoi at HABs occurring station, which induced the succession of phytoplankton community to K. mikimotoi blooming.

  11. Small herbivores suppress algal accumulation on Agatti atoll, Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernohorsky, Nicole H.; McClanahan, Timothy R.; Babu, Idrees; Horsák, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Despite large herbivorous fish being generally accepted as the main group responsible for preventing algal accumulation on coral reefs, few studies have experimentally examined the relative importance of herbivore size on algal communities. This study used exclusion cages with two different mesh sizes (1 × 1 cm and 6 × 6 cm) to investigate the impact of different-sized herbivores on algal accumulation rates on the shallow (<2 m) back-reef of Agatti atoll, Lakshadweep. The fine-mesh cages excluded all visible herbivores, which had rapid and lasting effects on the benthic communities, and, after 127 d of deployment, there was a visible and significant increase in algae (mainly macroalgae) with algal volume being 13 times greater than in adjacent open areas. The coarse-mesh cages excluded larger fishes (>8 cm body depth) while allowing smaller fishes to access the plots. In contrast to the conclusions of most previous studies, the exclusion of large herbivores had no significant effect on the accumulation of benthic algae and the amount of algae present within the coarse-mesh cages was relatively consistent throughout the experimental period (around 50 % coverage and 1-2 mm height). The difference in algal accumulation between the fine-mesh and coarse-mesh cages appears to be related to the actions of small individuals from 12 herbivorous fish species (0.17 ind. m-2 and 7.7 g m-2) that were able to enter through the coarse mesh. Although restricted to a single habitat, these results suggest that when present in sufficient densities and diversity, small herbivorous fishes can prevent the accumulation of algal biomass on coral reefs.

  12. High-density lipoprotein, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell survival mechanisms.

    PubMed

    White, C Roger; Giordano, Samantha; Anantharamaiah, G M

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic injury is associated with acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting and open heart surgery. The timely re-establishment of blood flow is critical in order to minimize cardiac complications. Reperfusion after a prolonged ischemic period, however, can induce severe cardiomyocyte dysfunction with mitochondria serving as a major target of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. An increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces damage to mitochondrial respiratory complexes leading to uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial membrane perturbations also contribute to calcium overload, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and the release of apoptotic mediators into the cytoplasm. Clinical and experimental studies show that ischemic preconditioning (ICPRE) and postconditioning (ICPOST) attenuate mitochondrial injury and improve cardiac function in the context of I/R injury. This is achieved by the activation of two principal cell survival cascades: 1) the Reperfusion Injury Salvage Kinase (RISK) pathway; and 2) the Survivor Activating Factor Enhancement (SAFE) pathway. Recent data suggest that high density lipoprotein (HDL) mimics the effects of conditioning protocols and attenuates myocardial I/R injury via activation of the RISK and SAFE signaling cascades. In this review, we discuss the roles of apolipoproteinA-I (apoA-I), the major protein constituent of HDL, and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a lysosphingolipid associated with small, dense HDL particles as mediators of cardiomyocyte survival. Both apoA-I and S1P exert an infarct-sparing effect by preventing ROS-dependent injury and inhibiting the opening of the mPTP. PMID:27150975

  13. The Impairment of Osteogenesis in Bone Sialoprotein (BSP) Knockout Calvaria Cell Cultures Is Cell Density Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bouet, Guenaelle; Bouleftour, Wafa; Juignet, Laura; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Thomas, Mireille; Vanden-Bossche, Arnaud; Aubin, Jane E.; Vico, Laurence; Marchat, David; Malaval, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) belongs to the "small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein" (SIBLING) family, whose members interact with bone cells and bone mineral. BSP is strongly expressed in bone and we previously showed that BSP knockout (BSP-/-) mice have a higher bone mass than wild type (BSP+/+) littermates, with lower bone remodelling. Because baseline bone formation activity is constitutively lower in BSP-/- mice, we studied the impact of the absence of BSP on in vitro osteogenesis in mouse calvaria cell (MCC) cultures. MCC BSP-/- cultures exhibit fewer fibroblast (CFU-F), preosteoblast (CFU-ALP) and osteoblast colonies (bone nodules) than wild type, indicative of a lower number of osteoprogenitors. No mineralized colonies were observed in BSP-/- cultures, along with little/no expression of either osteogenic markers or SIBLING proteins MEPE or DMP1. Osteopontin (OPN) is the only SIBLING expressed in standard density BSP-/- culture, at higher levels than in wild type in early culture times. At higher plating density, the effects of the absence of BSP were partly rescued, with resumed expression of osteoblast markers and cognate SIBLING proteins, and mineralization of the mutant cultures. OPN expression and amount are further increased in high density BSP-/- cultures, while PHEX and CatB expression are differentiatlly regulated in a manner that may favor mineralization. Altogether, we found that BSP regulates mouse calvaria osteoblast cell clonogenicity, differentiation and activity in vitro in a cell density dependent manner, consistent with the effective skeletogenesis but the low levels of bone formation observed in vivo. The BSP knockout bone microenvironment may alter the proliferation/cell fate of early osteoprogenitors. PMID:25710686

  14. Functional balance between T cell chimeric receptor density and tumor associated antigen density: CTL mediated cytolysis and lymphokine production.

    PubMed

    Weijtens, M E; Hart, E H; Bolhuis, R L

    2000-01-01

    Genetically engineered expression of tumor-specific single chain antibody chimeric receptors (ch-Rec) on human T lymphocytes endow these cells with the parental monoclonal antibody (mAb) dictated tumor specificity and may be useful for clinical immuno-genetherapy. Therefore it was of importance to assess how the densities of tumor-specific receptors and tumor associated antigens (TAA), respectively, affect primary human T lymphocyte functions in relation to target cell susceptibilities to lysis. We therefore studied the functional balance between ch-Rec densities on human T lymphocytes and TAA on tumor cells. The gene construct encoding a ch-Rec derived from (1) a renal carcinoma cell (RCC) specific mouse mAb (G250), and (2) the human signal transducing Fc(epsilon)RI gamma-chain was used. To obtain ch-RecHIGH-POS and ch-RecLOW-POS T lymphocytes, two distinct retroviral vectors were used to introduce the gene constructs into primary human T lymphocytes. Levels of ch-Rec-redirected T lymphocyte mediated tumor cell lysis, as well as lymphokine production were determined using RCC lines as target/stimulator cells, which express either no or increasing densities of the TAA. A functional and dynamic balance between ch-Rec densities on cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) on the one hand and TAA densities on RCCs on the other, was found. In short, ch-RecHIGH-POS CTLs are triggered by TAAHIGH-POS as well as TAALOW-POS RCCs to lyse tumor cells and produce (IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha) lymphokine. In contrast, ch-RecLOW-POS T lymphocytes are only triggered for cytolysis and lymphokine production by relatively TAAHIGH-POS RCCs. In conclusion, (1) the activation of T lymphocyte responses is co-determined by the expression levels of the ch-Rec on T lymphocytes and the TAA on tumor cells and (2) at relatively high T lymphocyte ch-Rec expression levels the CTLs lyse tumor cells with a wide range of TAA densities. Gene Therapy (2000) 7, 35-42. PMID:10680014

  15. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression.

    PubMed

    Onesto, Valentina; Cosentino, Carlo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cesarelli, Mario; Amato, Francesco; Gentile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an integrate-and-fire model with information theory variables to analyse the extent of information in a network of nerve cells. We provide an estimate of the information in the network in bits as a function of cell density and short-term depression time. In the model, neurons are connected through a Delaunay triangulation of not-intersecting edges; in doing so, the number of connecting synapses per neuron is approximately constant to reproduce the early time of network development in planar neural cell cultures. In simulations where the number of nodes is varied, we observe an optimal value of cell density for which information in the grid is maximized. In simulations in which the posttransmission latency time is varied, we observe that information increases as the latency time decreases and, for specific configurations of the grid, it is largely enhanced in a resonance effect. PMID:27403421

  16. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Onesto, Valentina; Cosentino, Carlo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cesarelli, Mario; Amato, Francesco; Gentile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an integrate-and-fire model with information theory variables to analyse the extent of information in a network of nerve cells. We provide an estimate of the information in the network in bits as a function of cell density and short-term depression time. In the model, neurons are connected through a Delaunay triangulation of not-intersecting edges; in doing so, the number of connecting synapses per neuron is approximately constant to reproduce the early time of network development in planar neural cell cultures. In simulations where the number of nodes is varied, we observe an optimal value of cell density for which information in the grid is maximized. In simulations in which the posttransmission latency time is varied, we observe that information increases as the latency time decreases and, for specific configurations of the grid, it is largely enhanced in a resonance effect. PMID:27403421

  17. Rapid determination of cell mass and density using digitally controlled electric field in a microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuliang; Lai, Hok Sum Sam; Zhang, Guanglie; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Li, Wen Jung

    2014-11-21

    The density of a single cell is a fundamental property of cells. Cells in the same cycle phase have similar volume, but the differences in their mass and density could elucidate each cell's physiological state. Here we report a novel technique to rapidly measure the density and mass of a single cell using an optically induced electrokinetics (OEK) microfluidic platform. Presently, single cellular mass and density measurement devices require a complicated fabrication process and their output is not scalable, i.e., it is extremely difficult to measure the mass and density of a large quantity of cells rapidly. The technique reported here operates on a principle combining sedimentation theory, computer vision, and microparticle manipulation techniques in an OEK microfluidic platform. We will show in this paper that this technique enables the measurement of single-cell volume, density, and mass rapidly and accurately in a repeatable manner. The technique is also scalable - it allows simultaneous measurement of volume, density, and mass of multiple cells. Essentially, a simple time-controlled projected light pattern is used to illuminate the selected area on the OEK microfluidic chip that contains cells to lift the cells to a particular height above the chip's surface. Then, the cells are allowed to "free fall" to the chip's surface, with competing buoyancy, gravitational, and fluidic drag forces acting on the cells. By using a computer vision algorithm to accurately track the motion of the cells and then relate the cells' motion trajectory to sedimentation theory, the volume, mass, and density of each cell can be rapidly determined. A theoretical model of micro-sized spheres settling towards an infinite plane in a microfluidic environment is first derived and validated experimentally using standard micropolystyrene beads to demonstrate the viability and accuracy of this new technique. Next, we show that the yeast cell volume, mass, and density could be rapidly

  18. DNA Analysis of Algal Endosymbionts of Ciliates Reveals the State of Algal Integration and the Surprising Specificity of the Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Ryo; Kusuoka, Yasushi

    2016-04-01

    Many freshwater protists harbor unicellular green algae within their cells, but little is known of their degree of integration and specificity. Using algae-targeted PCR of whole ciliate cells collected at irregular intervals over 15 months from Lake Biwa, Japan, we explored the SSU-ITS rDNA of the endosymbiotic algae and its changes over time, obtaining sequences of algal rDNA fragments from four ciliate species. A high proportion of clonal algae was evident within the ciliate cells. The differences observed in those sequences from the SSU through to the ITS region were less than 1%. The name 'Chlorb' is proposed for these algae, with the implication that they represent a single 'species.' The sequences of the algal DNA fragments were identical for any given host species throughout the collection period, thus we conclude that these four ciliates stably retain their algae over long term. In contrast, algal DNA fragments obtained from Didinium sp. were variable within each sample, which indicates that this ciliate only temporarily holds its algal cells. The ITS1 sequences of Chlorb populations are close (at intraspecific level) to those of algae isolated from ciliates in Austria, which raises the possibility that Chlorb algae are universally shared as symbionts among various ciliates.

  19. Multicellular automaticity of cardiac cell monolayers: effects of density and spatial distribution of pacemaker cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elber Duverger, James; Boudreau-Béland, Jonathan; Le, Minh Duc; Comtois, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Self-organization of pacemaker (PM) activity of interconnected elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for applications such as PM activity in cardiac tissue to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) are often used as experimental models in studies on cardiac electrophysiology. These monolayers exhibit automaticity (spontaneous activation) of their electrical activity. At low plated density, cells usually show a heterogeneous population consisting of PM and quiescent excitable cells (QECs). It is therefore highly probable that monolayers of NRVMs consist of a heterogeneous network of the two cell types. However, the effects of density and spatial distribution of the PM cells on spontaneous activity of monolayers remain unknown. Thus, a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm was implemented to distribute PM and QECs in a binary-like 2D network. A FitzHugh-Nagumo excitable medium was used to simulate electrical spontaneous and propagating activity. Simulations showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of PM cells. In most simulations, the first initiation sites were found to be located near the substrate boundaries. Comparison with experimental data obtained from cardiomyocyte monolayers shows important similarities in the position of initiation site activity. However, limitations in the model that do not reflect the complex beat-to-beat variation found in experiments indicate the need for a more realistic cardiomyocyte representation.

  20. Continuous butanol fermentation from xylose with high cell density by cell recycling system.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Gao, Ming; Wang, Qunhui; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2013-02-01

    A continuous butanol production system with high-density Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 generated by cell recycling was established to examine the characteristics of butanol fermentation from xylose. In continuous culture without cell recycling, cell washout was avoided by maintaining pH>5.6 at a dilution rate of 0.26 h(-1), indicating pH control was critical to this experiment. Subsequently, continuous culture with cell recycling increased cell concentration to 17.4 g L(-1), which increased butanol productivity to 1.20 g L(-1) h(-1) at a dilution rate of 0.26 h(-1) from 0.529 g L(-1) h(-1) without cell recycling. The effect of dilution rates on butanol production was also investigated in continuous culture with cell recycling. Maximum butanol productivity (3.32 g L(-1) h(-1)) was observed at a dilution rate of 0.78 h(-1), approximately 6-fold higher than observed in continuous culture without cell recycling (0.529 g L(-1) h(-1)).

  1. Algal taxonomy forum: Algal Taxonomist, Let Serendipity Reign!

    PubMed

    Druehl, Louis

    2013-04-01

    The publication of a mini-review by Olivier De Clerck et al. in this issue of the Journal of Phycology presented an opportunity to open a dialogue on challenges faced by contemporary algal taxonomists. The Editorial Office solicited the following two additional contributions in response to De Clerck et al.'s paper; the responses were edited solely for clarity, space and format. PMID:27008510

  2. Assessment of the hydration state of sickle cells by phthalate ester density distribution.

    PubMed

    Kurantsin-Mills, J; Jacobs, H M; Lessin, L S

    1987-04-01

    Intracellular hemoglobin S (Hb SS) concentration, a function of cell hydration, has a major influence on the rate of Hb SS polymerization and, therefore, cellular sickling. To determine the density distribution of homozygous sickle hemoglobin cells as a function of cell hydration, cells were incubated in autologous plasma buffer mixtures with final osmolalities ranging from 195 to 490 mosm/kg at ambient Po2. The density distribution of the cells was determined by differential flotation on 20 mixtures of di-n-butyl and dimethyl phthalates with specific gravities of 1.062 to 1.142. Mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and mean cell volume (MCV) were determined by standard manual procedures. Cell shape was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the axial ratio (L/W) of the elliptical dense cell fraction measured by an image analyzer interfaced with a computer. The density distribution of normal red blood cells lies within a narrow 1.090 to 1.118 gm/ml density band with the middle or transitional 60% (T60) of the cells occupying a density range of 0.0067 +/- 0.0007 gm/ml (+/- SD). The density distribution of sickle cells shows a broader density band of 1.064 to 1.134 gm/ml, and the T60 was 0.0139 +/- 0.0022 gm/ml. The mean T60 did not change with osmotic variation but the mean T60 of Hb SS cells was significantly greater (P less than 0.005). MCHC and 1/MCV varied directly with the median density of the density distribution. By linear regression analysis and Ponder's osmotic equation, it is evident that sickle cells exhibit restricted volume increases in hypotonic media.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Excess algal symbionts increase the susceptibility of reef corals to bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunning, Ross; Baker, Andrew C.

    2013-03-01

    Rising ocean temperatures associated with global climate change are causing mass coral bleaching and mortality worldwide. Understanding the genetic and environmental factors that mitigate coral bleaching susceptibility may aid local management efforts to help coral reefs survive climate change. Although bleaching susceptibility depends partly on the genetic identity of a coral's algal symbionts, the effect of symbiont density, and the factors controlling it, remain poorly understood. By applying a new metric of symbiont density to study the coral Pocillopora damicornis during seasonal warming and acute bleaching, we show that symbiont cell ratio density is a function of both symbiont type and environmental conditions, and that corals with high densities are more susceptible to bleaching. Higher vulnerability of corals with more symbionts establishes a quantitative mechanistic link between symbiont density and the molecular basis for coral bleaching, and indicates that high densities do not buffer corals from thermal stress, as has been previously suggested. These results indicate that environmental conditions that increase symbiont densities, such as nutrient pollution, will exacerbate climate-change-induced coral bleaching, providing a mechanistic explanation for why local management to reduce these stressors will help coral reefs survive future warming.

  4. Luminescent Solar Concentrators in the Algal Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellier, Katie; Corrado, Carley; Carter, Sue; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    Today's industry for renewable energy sources and highly efficient energy management systems is rapidly increasing. Development of increased efficiency Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) has brought about new applications for commercial interests, including greenhouses for agricultural crops. This project is taking first steps to explore the potential of LSCs to enhance production and reduce costs for algae and cyanobacteria used in biofuels and nutraceuticals. This pilot phase uses LSC filtered light for algal growth trials in greenhouses and laboratory experiments, creating specific wavelength combinations to determine effects of discrete solar light regimes on algal growth and the reduction of heating and water loss in the system. Enhancing the optimal spectra for specific algae will not only increase production, but has the potential to lessen contamination of large scale production due to competition from other algae and bacteria. Providing LSC filtered light will reduce evaporation and heating in regions with limited water supply, while the increased energy output from photovoltaic cells will reduce costs of heating and mixing cultures, thus creating a more efficient and cost effective production system.

  5. Cell receptor and surface ligand density effects on dynamic states of adhering circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangjun; Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Schroeder, Joyce A; Jiang, Linan; Zohar, Yitshak

    2011-10-21

    Dynamic states of cancer cells moving under shear flow in an antibody-functionalized microchannel are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cell motion is analyzed with the aid of a simplified physical model featuring a receptor-coated rigid sphere moving above a solid surface with immobilized ligands. The motion of the sphere is described by the Langevin equation accounting for the hydrodynamic loadings, gravitational force, receptor-ligand bindings, and thermal fluctuations; the receptor-ligand bonds are modeled as linear springs. Depending on the applied shear flow rate, three dynamic states of cell motion have been identified: (i) free motion, (ii) rolling adhesion, and (iii) firm adhesion. Of particular interest is the fraction of captured circulating tumor cells, defined as the capture ratio, via specific receptor-ligand bonds. The cell capture ratio decreases with increasing shear flow rate with a characteristic rate. Based on both experimental and theoretical results, the characteristic flow rate increases monotonically with increasing either cell-receptor or surface-ligand density within certain ranges. Utilizing it as a scaling parameter, flow-rate dependent capture ratios for various cell-surface combinations collapse onto a single curve described by an exponential formula.

  6. Influence of plating density on individual cell growth, cell division and differentiation of neonatal rat heart primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Millart, H; Seraydarian, M W

    1986-01-01

    The influence of plating cell density of an originally enriched myocardial cell population has been studied in neonatal rat heart cells in culture. Low density (LDM) is defined as a density (24 h after plating) of 209 +/- 44 cells/mm2 (mean +/- SEM) and is compared with high density (HDM), 419 +/- 67 cells/mm2. Cell growth is evaluated by the total cell number, the percentage of myocardial cells (M) in culture (PAS method) and the protein content per cell. Some differentiation parameters such as beating rates, glycogen concentration, enzymatic activities (cytochrome C oxidase and glycogen phosphorylase) are studied with time in culture (48, 96 and 192 hr). High density was designed to yield a complete confluency of the cells within 24 hr after plating and to minimize cell division of the non-muscle cells (F). At high density, cell division of F cells is effectively limited, thus leading to a more stable model regarding the cell density per plate and the percentage of M cells: 85.7 +/- 4% and 33.4 +/- 6% in LDM cultures compared with 86.5 +/- 4.7% and 51.7 +/- 9.8% in HDM cultures at 24 and 192 hr (mean +/- SEM). Heart cells increase similarly in size with age in culture in both groups. In HDM cultures the spontaneous contractions begin sooner (24 hr) than in LDM cultures and are more rapidly synchronized. The beating rate is higher in HDM cultures between 48 and 96 hr; however, after this time it falls in HDM and does not fall in LDM. Thus the overgrowth of muscle cells by non-muscle cells is not responsible for loss of beating with time in culture but more likely high density could be a limiting factor for isotonic contraction. There is more glycogen per myocyte in LDM than in HDM cultures. The cell density influences the enzymatic activities of cytochrome C oxidase and glycogen phosphorylase. The cytochrome oxidase activity is higher in HDM cultures than in LDM cultures at 96 hr whereas glycogen phosphorylase activity is higher in LDM cultures at time 96 and 192

  7. Algal biofuels: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Leite, Gustavo B; Abdelaziz, Ahmed E M; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2013-10-01

    Biodiesel production using microalgae is attractive in a number of respects. Here a number of pros and cons to using microalgae for biofuels production are reviewed. Algal cultivation can be carried out using non-arable land and non-potable water with simple nutrient supply. In addition, algal biomass productivities are much higher than those of vascular plants and the extractable content of lipids that can be usefully converted to biodiesel, triacylglycerols (TAGs) can be much higher than that of the oil seeds now used for first generation biodiesel. On the other hand, practical, cost-effective production of biofuels from microalgae requires that a number of obstacles be overcome. These include the development of low-cost, effective growth systems, efficient and energy saving harvesting techniques, and methods for oil extraction and conversion that are environmentally benign and cost-effective. Promising recent advances in these areas are highlighted.

  8. Algal blooms and public health

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, P.R. . Harvard Medical School)

    1993-06-01

    Alterations in coastal ecology are expanding the geographic extent, frequency, magnitude, and species complexity'' of algal blooms throughout the world, increasing the threat of fish and shellfish poisonings, anoxia in marine nurseries, and of cholera. The World Health Organization and members of the medical profession have described the potential health effects of global climate change. They warn of the consequences of increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) rays and of warming: the possible damage to agriculture and nutrition, and the impact on habitats which may alter the distribution of vector-borne and water-based infectious diseases. Algal growth due to increased nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and warming are already affecting marine microflora and aquatic plants; and there is now clear evidence that marine organisms are a reservoir for enteric pathogens. The pattern of cholera in the Western Hemisphere suggests that environmental changes have already begun to influence the epidemiology of this infectious disease. 106 refs.

  9. Isoelectric focusing of red blood cells in a density gradient stabilized column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Miller, T. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of Ficoll and cell application pH on red blood cell electrophoretic mobility and focusing pH were investigated by focusing cells in a density gradient stabilized column. Sample loading, cell dispersion, column conductivity, resolution of separation, and the effect of Ampholines were examined.

  10. Impact of harmful algal blooms on several Lake Erie drinking water treatment facilities; methodology considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The propagation of cyanbacterial cells and their toxins were investigated at seven drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) on Lake Erie were investigated with regards to harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxin concentrations, water quality variations in treatment plant influents, and pr...

  11. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, S.; Seya, A.; Asano, A.

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  12. Strategies for optimizing algal biology for enhanced biomass production

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Amanda N.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Sayre, Richard T.

    2015-02-02

    One of the most environmentally sustainable ways to produce high-energy density (oils) feed stocks for the production of liquid transportation fuels is from biomass. Photosynthetic carbon capture combined with biomass combustion (point source) and subsequent carbon capture and sequestration has also been proposed in the intergovernmental panel on climate change report as one of the most effective and economical strategies to remediate atmospheric greenhouse gases. To maximize photosynthetic carbon capture efficiency and energy-return-on-investment, we must develop biomass production systems that achieve the greatest yields with the lowest inputs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that microalgae have among the greatest potentials for biomass production. This is in part due to the fact that all alga cells are photoautotrophic, they have active carbon concentrating mechanisms to increase photosynthetic productivity, and all the biomass is harvestable unlike plants. All photosynthetic organisms, however, convert only a fraction of the solar energy they capture into chemical energy (reduced carbon or biomass). To increase aerial carbon capture rates and biomass productivity, it will be necessary to identify the most robust algal strains and increase their biomass production efficiency often by genetic manipulation. We review recent large-scale efforts to identify the best biomass producing strains and metabolic engineering strategies to improve aerial productivity. In addition, these strategies include optimization of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna size to increase energy capture and conversion efficiency and the potential development of advanced molecular breeding techniques. To date, these strategies have resulted in up to twofold increases in biomass productivity.

  13. Triolein and trilinolein ameliorate oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Deng, Ze-yuan; Li, Xiao-ping; Rao, Huan; Fan, Ya-wei

    2014-05-01

    Uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein by endothelial cells is a critical step for the initiation of atherosclerosis. Triacylglycerol uptake in these cells is understood to be a part of the process. The present investigation, comparison among the effects of simple acylglycerol, including tristearin, triolein, and trilinolein, upon oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced oxidative stress was undertaken. Results indicated that trilinolein (78 % ± 0.02) and triolein (90 % ± 0.01) increased cell viability of endothelial cells exposed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein, whereas tristearin decreased the cell viability (55 % ± 0.03) (P < 0.05). Oxidized low-density lipoprotein treatment significantly increased apoptosis (23 %), compared to cells simultaneously exposed to trilinolein (19 %) or triolein (16 %), where apoptosis was reduced (P < 0.05). On the other hand, exposure to tristearin further increased oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced cell apoptosis (34 %). Treatment with trilinolein or triolein on oxidized low-density lipoprotein -stimulated endothelial cells inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and E-selectin mRNA. Moreover, both trilinolein and triolein demonstrated a strong antioxidant response to oxidative stress caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Taken together, the results indicate trilinolein and triolein possess anti-inflammatory properties, which are mediated via the antioxidant defense system.

  14. Evaluating the B-cell density with various activation functions using White Noise Path Integral Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aban, C. J. G.; Bacolod, R. O.; Confesor, M. N. P.

    2015-06-01

    A The White Noise Path Integral Approach is used in evaluating the B-cell density or the number of B-cell per unit volume for a basic type of immune system response based on the modeling done by Perelson and Wiegel. From the scaling principles of Perelson [1], the B- cell density is obtained where antigens and antibodies mutates and activation function f(|S-SA|) is defined describing the interaction between a specific antigen and a B-cell. If the activation function f(|S-SA|) is held constant, the major form of the B-cell density evaluated using white noise analysis is similar to the form of the B-cell density obtained by Perelson and Wiegel using a differential approach.A piecewise linear functionis also used to describe the activation f(|S-SA|). If f(|S-SA|) is zero, the density decreases exponentially. If f(|S-SA|) = S-SA-SB, the B- cell density increases exponentially until it reaches a certain maximum value. For f(|S-SA|) = 2SA-SB-S, the behavior of B-cell density is oscillating and remains to be in small values.

  15. Physiological responses to acid stress by Saccharomyces cerevisiae when applying high initial cell density

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhong-peng; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    High initial cell density is used to increase volumetric productivity and shorten production time in lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation. Comparison of physiological parameters in high initial cell density cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of acetic, formic, levulinic and cinnamic acids demonstrated general and acid-specific responses of cells. All the acids studied impaired growth and inhibited glycolytic flux, and caused oxidative stress and accumulation of trehalose. However, trehalose may play a role other than protecting yeast cells from acid-induced oxidative stress. Unlike the other acids, cinnamic acid did not cause depletion of cellular ATP, but abolished the growth of yeast on ethanol. Compared with low initial cell density, increasing initial cell density reduced the lag phase and improved the bioconversion yield of cinnamic acid during acid adaptation. In addition, yeast cells were able to grow at elevated concentrations of acid, probable due to the increase in phenotypic cell-to-cell heterogeneity in large inoculum size. Furthermore, the specific growth rate and the specific rates of glucose consumption and metabolite production were significantly lower than at low initial cell density, which was a result of the accumulation of a large fraction of cells that persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. PMID:27620460

  16. Flagellum Density Regulates Proteus mirabilis Swarmer Cell Motility in Viscous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Copeland, Matthew F.; Carey, Sonia; Sacotte, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an opportunistic pathogen that is frequently associated with urinary tract infections. In the lab, P. mirabilis cells become long and multinucleate and increase their number of flagella as they colonize agar surfaces during swarming. Swarming has been implicated in pathogenesis; however, it is unclear how energetically costly changes in P. mirabilis cell morphology translate into an advantage for adapting to environmental changes. We investigated two morphological changes that occur during swarming—increases in cell length and flagellum density—and discovered that an increase in the surface density of flagella enabled cells to translate rapidly through fluids of increasing viscosity; in contrast, cell length had a small effect on motility. We found that swarm cells had a surface density of flagella that was ∼5 times larger than that of vegetative cells and were motile in fluids with a viscosity that inhibits vegetative cell motility. To test the relationship between flagellum density and velocity, we overexpressed FlhD4C2, the master regulator of the flagellar operon, in vegetative cells of P. mirabilis and found that increased flagellum density produced an increase in cell velocity. Our results establish a relationship between P. mirabilis flagellum density and cell motility in viscous environments that may be relevant to its adaptation during the infection of mammalian urinary tracts and movement in contact with indwelling catheters. PMID:23144253

  17. Application of dielectric spectroscopy for monitoring high cell density in monoclonal antibody producing CHO cell cultivations.

    PubMed

    Párta, László; Zalai, Dénes; Borbély, Sándor; Putics, Akos

    2014-02-01

    The application of dielectric spectroscopy was frequently investigated as an on-line cell culture monitoring tool; however, it still requires supportive data and experience in order to become a robust technique. In this study, dielectric spectroscopy was used to predict viable cell density (VCD) at industrially relevant high levels in concentrated fed-batch culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells producing a monoclonal antibody for pharmaceutical purposes. For on-line dielectric spectroscopy measurements, capacitance was scanned within a wide range of frequency values (100-19,490 kHz) in six parallel cell cultivation batches. Prior to detailed mathematical analysis of the collected data, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to compare dielectric behavior of the cultivations. PCA analysis resulted in detecting measurement disturbances. By using the measured spectroscopic data, partial least squares regression (PLS), Cole-Cole, and linear modeling were applied and compared in order to predict VCD. The Cole-Cole and the PLS model provided reliable prediction over the entire cultivation including both the early and decline phases of cell growth, while the linear model failed to estimate VCD in the later, declining cultivation phase. In regards to the measurement error sensitivity, remarkable differences were shown among PLS, Cole-Cole, and linear modeling. VCD prediction accuracy could be improved in the runs with measurement disturbances by first derivative pre-treatment in PLS and by parameter optimization of the Cole-Cole modeling.

  18. Selective algicidal action of peptides against harmful algal bloom species.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Lee, Jong-Kook; Kim, Si Wouk; Park, Yoonkyung

    2011-01-01

    Recently, harmful algal bloom (HAB), also termed "red tide", has been recognized as a serious problem in marine environments according to climate changes worldwide. Many novel materials or methods to prevent HAB have not yet been employed except for clay dispersion, in which can the resulting sedimentation on the seafloor can also cause alteration in marine ecology or secondary environmental pollution. In the current study, we investigated that antimicrobial peptide have a potential in controlling HAB without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Here, antimicrobial peptides are proposed as new algicidal compounds in combating HAB cells. HPA3 and HPA3NT3 peptides which exert potent antimicrobial activity via pore forming action in plasma membrane showed that HPA3NT3 reduced the motility of algal cells, disrupted their plasma membrane, and induced the efflux of intracellular components. Against raphidoflagellate such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Chattonella sp., and C. marina, it displayed a rapid lysing action in cell membranes at 1~4 µM within 2 min. Comparatively, its lysing effects occurred at 8 µM within 1 h in dinoflagellate such as Cochlodium polykrikoides, Prorocentrum micans, and P. minimum. Moreover, its lysing action induced the lysis of chloroplasts and loss of chlorophyll a. In the contrary, this peptide was not effective against Skeletonema costatum, harmless algal cell, even at 256 µM, moreover, it killed only H. akashiwo or C. marina in co-cultivation with S. costatum, indicating to its selective algicidal activity between harmful and harmless algal cells. The peptide was non-hemolytic against red blood cells of Sebastes schlegeli, the black rockfish, at 120 µM. HAB cells were quickly and selectively lysed following treatment of antimicrobial peptides without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Thus, the antibiotic peptides examined in our study appear to have much potential in effectively controlling HAB with minimal impact on marine

  19. Algal blooms reduce the uptake of toxic methylmercury in freshwater food webs.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, Paul C; Folt, Carol L; Chen, Celia Y; Klaue, Bjoern; Blum, Joel D

    2002-04-01

    Mercury accumulation in fish is a global public health concern, because fish are the primary source of toxic methylmercury to humans. Fish from all lakes do not pose the same level of risk to consumers. One of the most intriguing patterns is that potentially dangerous mercury concentrations can be found in fish from clear, oligotrophic lakes whereas fish from greener, eutrophic lakes often carry less mercury. In this study, we experimentally tested the hypothesis that increasing algal biomass reduces mercury accumulation at higher trophic levels through the dilution of mercury in consumed algal cells. Under bloom dilution, as algal biomass increases, the concentration of mercury per cell decreases, resulting in a lower dietary input to grazers and reduced bioaccumulation in algal-rich eutrophic systems. To test this hypothesis, we added enriched stable isotopes of Hg to experimental mesocosms and measured the uptake of toxic methylmercury (CH3 200Hg+) and inorganic 201Hg2+ by biota at several algal concentrations. We reduced absolute spike detection limits by 50-100 times compared with previous techniques, which allowed us to conduct experiments at the extremely low aqueous Hg concentrations that are typical of natural systems. We found that increasing algae reduced CH3Hg+ concentrations in zooplankton 2-3-fold. Bloom dilution may provide a mechanistic explanation for lower CH3Hg+ accumulation by zooplankton and fish in algal-rich relative to algal-poor systems. PMID:11904388

  20. Methods for removing contaminants from algal oil

    DOEpatents

    Lupton, Francis Stephen

    2016-09-27

    Methods for removing contaminants from algal oil are provided. In an embodiment, a method comprises the steps of combining a sulfuric acid-aqueous solution that has a pH of about 1 or less with a contaminant-containing algal oil at treatment conditions effective to form an effluent. The effluent comprises a treated algal oil phase and contaminants in an acidic aqueous phase. The contaminants comprise metals, phosphorus, or combinations thereof. The acidic aqueous phase is removed from the effluent to form a contaminant-depleted algal oil.

  1. FGF7 and cell density are required for final differentiation of pancreatic amylase-positive cells from human ES cells.

    PubMed

    Takizawa-Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yoshie, Susumu; Yue, Fengming; Mogi, Akimi; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2013-12-01

    The major molecular signals of pancreatic exocrine development are largely unknown. We examine the role of fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) in the final induction of pancreatic amylase-containing exocrine cells from induced-pancreatic progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells. Our protocol consisted in three steps: Step I, differentiation of definitive endoderm (DE) by activin A treatment of hES cell colonies; Step II, differentiation of pancreatic progenitor cells by re-plating of the cells of Step I onto 24-well plates at high density and stimulation with all-trans retinoic acid; Step III, differentiation of pancreatic exocrine cells with a combination of FGF7, glucagon-like peptide 1 and nicotinamide. The expression levels of pancreatic endodermal markers such as Foxa2, Sox17 and gut tube endoderm marker HNF1β were up-regulated in both Step I and II. Moreover, in Step III, the induced cells expressed pancreatic markers such as amylase, carboxypeptidase A and chymotrypsinogen B, which were similar to those in normal human pancreas. From day 8 in Step III, cells immunohistochemically positive for amylase and for carboxypeptidase A, a pancreatic exocrine cell product, were induced by FGF7. Pancreatic progenitor Pdx1-positive cells were localized in proximity to the amylase-positive cells. In the absence of FGF7, few amylase-positive cells were identified. Thus, our three-step culture protocol for human ES cells effectively induces the differentiation of amylase- and carboxypeptidase-A-containing pancreatic exocrine cells.

  2. Density-modified displacement for DNAPL source zone remediation: density conversion and recovery in heterogeneous aquifer cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsburg, C Andrew; Pennell, Kurt D

    2002-07-15

    Low interfacial tension (IFT) displacement (mobilization) of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) offers potential as an efficient remediation technology for contaminated aquifer source zones. However, displacement of dense NAPLs (DNAPLs) is problematic due to the tendency for downward migration and redistribution of the mobilized DNAPL. To overcome this limitation, a density-modified displacement method (DMD) was developed, which couples in situ density conversion of DNAPLs via alcohol partitioning with low IFT NAPL displacement and recovery. The objective of this work was to evaluate the DMD method for two representative DNAPLs, chlorobenzene (CB) and trichloroethene (TCE). Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional (2-D) cell, configured to represent a heterogeneous unconfined aquifer system containing low permeability lenses. After release and redistribution of either CB- or TCE-NAPL, the 2-D aquifer cells were flushed with a 6% (wt) n-butanol aqueous solution to achieve DNAPL to light NAPL conversion, followed by a low IFT surfactant solution consisting of 4% (4:1) Aerosol MA/Aerosol OT + 20% n-butanol + 500 mg/L CaCl2. Visual observations and experimental measurements demonstrated that in situ density conversion and immiscible displacement of both CB and TCE were successful. Effluent NAPL densities ranged from 0.96 to 0.90 g/mL for CB and from 0.95 to 0.92 g/mL for TCE, while aqueous phase densities remained above 0.96 g/L. Density conversion of CB and TCE was achieved after flushing with 1.2 and 4.9 pore vol of 6% n-butanol solution, respectively. Recoveries of 90% CB and 85% TCE were realized after flushing with 1.2 pore vol of the low IFT surfactant solution, which was followed by a 1 pore vol posttreatment water flood. Surfactant and n-butanol recoveries ranged from 75 to 96% based on effluent concentration data. The observed minimal mobilization during the n-butanol density conversion preflood and near complete mobilization during the

  3. The density of the cell sap and endoplasm of Nitellopsis and Chara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.

    1991-01-01

    We measured the densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall of Nitellopsis obtusa and Chara corallina using interference microscopy, refractometry, immersion refractometry, equilibrium sedimentation and chemical microanalysis techniques. These values are important for the determination of many rheological properties of the cytoplasm as well as for understanding buoyancy regulation, dispersal mechanisms and how cells respond to gravity. The average densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall are 1,006.9, 1,016.7 and 1,371 kg m-3 for Nitellopsis and 1,005.0, 1,013.9, and 1,355.3 kg m-3 for Chara.

  4. Recent progress and future challenges in algal biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    Shurin, Jonathan B.; Burkart, Michael D.; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Modern society is fueled by fossil energy produced millions of years ago by photosynthetic organisms. Cultivating contemporary photosynthetic producers to generate energy and capture carbon from the atmosphere is one potential approach to sustaining society without disrupting the climate. Algae, photosynthetic aquatic microorganisms, are the fastest growing primary producers in the world and can therefore produce more energy with less land, water, and nutrients than terrestrial plant crops. We review recent progress and challenges in developing bioenergy technology based on algae. A variety of high-value products in addition to biofuels can be harvested from algal biomass, and these may be key to developing algal biotechnology and realizing the commercial potential of these organisms. Aspects of algal biology that differentiate them from plants demand an integrative approach based on genetics, cell biology, ecology, and evolution. We call for a systems approach to research on algal biotechnology rooted in understanding their biology, from the level of genes to ecosystems, and integrating perspectives from physical, chemical, and social sciences to solve one of the most critical outstanding technological problems. PMID:27781084

  5. Raman microspectroscopy based sensor of algal lipid unsaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, Ota; Pilát, Zdeněk; Jonáš, Alexandr; Zemánek, Pavel; Šerý, Mojmír; Ježek, Jan; Bernatová, Silvie; Nedbal, Ladislav; Trtílek, Martin

    2011-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for chemical analysis. This technique can elucidate fundamental questions about the metabolic processes and intercellular variability on a single cell level. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy can significantly contribute to the study and use of microalgae in systems biology and biofuel technology. Raman spectroscopy can be combined with optical tweezers. We have employed microfluidic system to deliver the sampled microalgae to the Raman-tweezers. This instrument is able to measure chemical composition of cells and to track metabolic processes in vivo, in real-time and label-free making it possible to detect population variability in a wide array of traits. Moreover, employing an active sorting switch, cells can be separated depending on input parameters obtained from Raman spectra. We focus on algal lipids which are promising potential products for biofuel as well as for nutrition. Important parameter characterizing the algal lipids is the degree of unsaturation of the constituent fatty acids. We demonstrate the capacity of our Raman tweezers based sensor to sort cells according to the degree of unsaturation in lipid storage bodies of individual living algal cells.

  6. Guided Cell Migration on Microtextured Substrates with Variable Local Density and Anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deok-Ho; Seo, Chang-Ho; Han, Karam; Kwon, Keon Woo; Levchenko, Andre; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2009-01-01

    This work reports the design of and experimentation with a topographically patterned cell culture substrate of variable local density and anisotropy as a facile and efficient platform to guide the organization and migration of cells in spatially desirable patterns. Using UV-assisted capillary force lithography, an optically transparent microstructured layer of a UV curable poly(urethane acrylate) resin is fabricated and employed as a cell-culture substrate after coating with fibronectin. With variable local pattern density and anisotropy present in a single cell-culture substrate, the differential polarization of cell morphology and movement in a single experiment is quantitatively characterized. It is found that cell shape and velocity are exquisitely sensitive to variation in the local anisotropy of the two-dimensional rectangular lattice arrays, with cell elongation and speed decreasing on symmetric lattice patterns. It is also found that cells could integrate orthogonal spatial cues when determining the direction of cell orientation and movement. Furthermore, cells preferentially migrate toward the topographically denser areas from sparser ones. Consistent with these results, it is demonstrated that systematic variation of local densities of rectangular lattice arrays enable a planar assembly of cells into a specified location. It is envisioned that lithographically defined substrates of variable local density and anisotropy not only provide a new route to tailoring the cell-material interface but could serve as a template for advanced tissue engineering. PMID:20046799

  7. Cell density-dependent linoleic acid toxicity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Túlio César; de Moraes, Lídia Maria Pepe; Campos, Elida Geralda

    2011-08-01

    Since the discovery of the apoptotic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, several compounds have been shown to cause apoptosis in this organism. While the toxicity of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) peroxides towards S. cerevisiae has been known for a long time, studies on the effect of nonoxidized PUFA are scarce. The present study deals specifically with linoleic acid (LA) in its nonoxidized form and investigates its toxicity to yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to synthesize PUFA, but can take up and incorporate them into its membranes. Reports from the literature indicate that LA is not toxic to yeast cells. However, we demonstrated that yeast cell growth decreased in cultures treated with 0.1 mM LA for 4 h, and 3-(4,5 dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide reduction (a measure of respiratory activity) decreased by 47%. This toxicity was dependent on the number of cells used in the experiment. We show apoptosis induction by LA concomitant with increases in malondialdehyde, glutathione content, activities of catalase and cytochrome c peroxidase, and decreases in two metabolic enzyme activities. While the main purpose of this study was to show that LA causes cell death in yeast, our results indicate some of the molecular mechanisms of the cell toxicity of PUFA. PMID:21457450

  8. High power density fuel cell comprising an array of microchannels

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2013-10-15

    A fuel cell according to one embodiment includes a porous electrolyte support structure defining an array of microchannels, the microchannels including fuel and oxidant microchannels; fuel electrodes formed along some of the microchannels; and oxidant electrodes formed along other of the microchannels. A method of making a fuel cell according to one embodiment includes forming an array of walls defining microchannels therebetween using at least one of molding, stamping, extrusion, injection and electrodeposition; processing the walls to make the walls porous, thereby creating a porous electrolyte support structure; forming anode electrodes along some of the microchannels; and forming cathode electrodes along other of the microchannels. Additional embodiments are also disclosed.

  9. A model for cell density effect on stress fiber alignment and collective directional migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeddoust, Mohammad; Shamloo, Amir

    2015-12-01

    In this study, numerical simulation of collective cell migration is presented in order to mimic the group migration of endothelial cells subjected to the concentration gradients of a biochemical factor. The developed 2D model incorporates basic elements of the cell, including both the cell membrane and the cell cytoskeleton, based on a viscoelastic cell mechanic model. Various cell processes—including cell random walk, cell-cell interactions, cell chemotaxis, and cellular cytoskeleton rearrangements—are considered and analyzed in our developed model. After validating the model by using available experimental data, the model is used to investigate various important parameters during collective cell chemotaxis, such as cell density, cytoskeleton organization, stress fiber reorientations, and intracellular forces. The results suggest that increasing the cell density causes the cell-cell interactions to affect the orientation of stress fibers throughout the cytoskeleton and makes the stress fibers more aligned in the direction of the imposed concentration gradient. This improved alignment of the stress fibers correlates with the intensification of the intracellular forces transferred in the gradient direction; this improves the cell group migration. Comparison of the obtained results with available experimental observations of collective chemotaxis of endothelial cells shows an interesting agreement.

  10. A model for cell density effect on stress fiber alignment and collective directional migration.

    PubMed

    Abeddoust, Mohammad; Shamloo, Amir

    2015-12-01

    In this study, numerical simulation of collective cell migration is presented in order to mimic the group migration of endothelial cells subjected to the concentration gradients of a biochemical factor. The developed 2D model incorporates basic elements of the cell, including both the cell membrane and the cell cytoskeleton, based on a viscoelastic cell mechanic model. Various cell processes--including cell random walk, cell-cell interactions, cell chemotaxis, and cellular cytoskeleton rearrangements--are considered and analyzed in our developed model. After validating the model by using available experimental data, the model is used to investigate various important parameters during collective cell chemotaxis, such as cell density, cytoskeleton organization, stress fiber reorientations, and intracellular forces. The results suggest that increasing the cell density causes the cell-cell interactions to affect the orientation of stress fibers throughout the cytoskeleton and makes the stress fibers more aligned in the direction of the imposed concentration gradient. This improved alignment of the stress fibers correlates with the intensification of the intracellular forces transferred in the gradient direction; this improves the cell group migration. Comparison of the obtained results with available experimental observations of collective chemotaxis of endothelial cells shows an interesting agreement. PMID:26717999

  11. Proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of collective cell invasion: tuning by ECM density and organization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kapoor, Aastha; Desai, Sejal; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Sen, Shamik

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells manoeuvre through extracellular matrices (ECMs) using different invasion modes, including single cell and collective cell invasion. These modes rely on MMP-driven ECM proteolysis to make space for cells to move. How cancer-associated alterations in ECM influence the mode of invasion remains unclear. Further, the sensitivity of the two invasion modes to MMP dynamics remains unexplored. In this paper, we address these open questions using a multiscale hybrid computational model combining ECM density-dependent MMP secretion, MMP diffusion, ECM degradation by MMP and active cell motility. Our results demonstrate that in randomly aligned matrices, collective cell invasion is more efficient than single cell invasion. Although increase in MMP secretion rate enhances invasiveness independent of cell–cell adhesion, sustenance of collective invasion in dense matrices requires high MMP secretion rates. However, matrix alignment can sustain both single cell and collective cell invasion even without ECM proteolysis. Similar to our in-silico observations, increase in ECM density and MMP inhibition reduced migration of MCF-7 cells embedded in sandwich gels. Together, our results indicate that apart from cell intrinsic factors (i.e., high cell–cell adhesion and MMP secretion rates), ECM density and organization represent two important extrinsic parameters that govern collective cell invasion and invasion plasticity. PMID:26832069

  12. Cell density in prostate histopathology images as a measure of tumor distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Hayley M.; Williams, Scott; Zhang, Alan M.; Ong, Cheng Soon; Rawlinson, David; Chakravorty, Rajib; Mitchell, Catherine; Haworth, Annette

    2014-03-01

    We have developed an automatic technique to measure cell density in high resolution histopathology images of the prostate, allowing for quantification of differences between tumour and benign regions of tissue. Haemotoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained histopathology slides from five patients were scanned at 20x magnification and annotated by an expert pathologist. Colour deconvolution and a radial symmetry transform were used to detect cell nuclei in the images, which were processed as a set of small tiles and combined to produce global maps of cell density. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests showed a significant difference in cell density distribution between tumour and benign regions of tissue for all images analyzed (p < 0.05), suggesting that cell density may be a useful feature for segmenting tumour in un-annotated histopathology images. ROC curves quantified the potential utility of cell density measurements in terms of specificity and sensitivity and threshold values were investigated for their classification accuracy. Motivation for this work derives from a larger study in which we aim to correlate ground truth histopathology with in-vivo multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) to validate tumour location and tumour characteristics. Specifically, cell density maps will be registered with T2-weighted MRI and ADC maps from diffusion-weighted MRI. The validated mpMRI data will then be used to parameterise a radiobiological model for designing focal radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate cancer patients.

  13. Myoid cell density in the thymus is reduced during mdx dystrophy and after muscle crush.

    PubMed

    Wong, A; Garrett, K L; Anderson, J E

    1999-01-01

    Thymic myoid cells share structural and behavioural features with cells of the skeletal muscle lineage: they express regulatory genes and contractile proteins, and they can form myofibers in culture. Historically, those features suggested that myoid cells could be precursors for muscle repair in addition to the satellite cells in muscle that are typically designated as the only muscle precursors. Muscles of the mutant mdx dystrophic mouse strain have a large demand for precursors, which is greatest at a young age. In the present study, immunostaining for troponin T was used to localize myoid cells. We tested the hypothesis that the myoid cell population changes when there is a demand for muscle precursors and that these changes would be anticipated if myoid cells have a role as myogenic precursors or stem cells in muscle. Chronic demands for muscle precursors in mdx dystrophic mice were accompanied by lower myoid cell density in comparison with density in two normal strains (C57BL10/ScSn and Swiss Webster). Acute demand for precursors was accompanied by a sharp decline in thymic myoid cell density within 2 days after a crush injury to one tibialis anterior muscle in normal but not dystrophic animals. To standardize the developmental age of the thymus, density was determined in all animals at 28 days of age. Given the current interest in nonmuscle sources of myogenic stem cells, these data suggest that changes in the density of thymic myoid cells may accompany acute and chronic demands for muscle precursors. Further experiments are required to determine whether thymic myoid cells are participants in distant muscle cell proliferation, new fiber formation, or the establishment of new stem cells in regenerated muscle.

  14. Efficient production of propionic acid through high density culture with recycling cells of Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Ge, Yongsheng; Xu, Jing; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore propionic acid production via high density culture of Propionibacterium acidipropionici and recycling of cells. Results showed that final cells of P. acidipropionici from high density culture still had high metabolic activity for reuse. Using our process, 75.9gl(-1) propionic acid was produced, which was 1.84-fold of that in fed-batch fermentation with low cell density (41.2gl(-1)); the corresponding productivity was 100.0% higher than that in fed-batch fermentation with low cell density (0.16gl(-1)h(-1)). This bioprocess may have potential for the industrial production of propionic acid. PMID:27318164

  15. Gene expression profiles of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells are modified by cell culture density.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Seong; Lee, Myoung Woo; Yoo, Keon Hee; Lee, Tae-Hee; Kim, Hye Jin; Jang, In Keun; Chun, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Park, Seung Jo; Lee, Soo Hyun; Son, Meong Hi; Jung, Hye Lim; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies conducted cell expansion ex vivo using low initial plating densities for optimal expansion and subsequent differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, MSC populations are heterogeneous and culture conditions can affect the characteristics of MSCs. In this study, differences in gene expression profiles of adipose tissue (AT)-derived MSCs were examined after harvesting cells cultured at different densities. AT-MSCs from three different donors were plated at a density of 200 or 5,000 cells/cm(2). After 7 days in culture, detailed gene expression profiles were investigated using a DNA chip microarray, and subsequently validated using a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Gene expression profiles were influenced primarily by the level of cell confluence at harvest. In MSCs harvested at ∼90% confluence, 177 genes were up-regulated and 102 genes down-regulated relative to cells harvested at ∼50% confluence (P<0.05, FC>2). Proliferation-related genes were highly expressed in MSCs harvested at low density, while genes that were highly expressed in MSCs harvested at high density (∼90% confluent) were linked to immunity and defense, cell communication, signal transduction and cell motility. Several cytokine, chemokine and growth factor genes involved in immunosuppression, migration, and reconstitution of damaged tissues were up-regulated in MSCs harvested at high density compared with MSCs harvested at low density. These results imply that cell density at harvest is a critical factor for modulating the specific gene-expression patterns of heterogeneous MSCs.

  16. Gene Expression Profiles of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Modified by Cell Culture Density

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Keon Hee; Lee, Tae-Hee; Kim, Hye Jin; Jang, In Keun; Chun, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Park, Seung Jo; Lee, Soo Hyun; Son, Meong Hi; Jung, Hye Lim; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies conducted cell expansion ex vivo using low initial plating densities for optimal expansion and subsequent differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, MSC populations are heterogeneous and culture conditions can affect the characteristics of MSCs. In this study, differences in gene expression profiles of adipose tissue (AT)-derived MSCs were examined after harvesting cells cultured at different densities. AT-MSCs from three different donors were plated at a density of 200 or 5,000 cells/cm2. After 7 days in culture, detailed gene expression profiles were investigated using a DNA chip microarray, and subsequently validated using a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Gene expression profiles were influenced primarily by the level of cell confluence at harvest. In MSCs harvested at ∼90% confluence, 177 genes were up-regulated and 102 genes down-regulated relative to cells harvested at ∼50% confluence (P<0.05, FC>2). Proliferation-related genes were highly expressed in MSCs harvested at low density, while genes that were highly expressed in MSCs harvested at high density (∼90% confluent) were linked to immunity and defense, cell communication, signal transduction and cell motility. Several cytokine, chemokine and growth factor genes involved in immunosuppression, migration, and reconstitution of damaged tissues were up-regulated in MSCs harvested at high density compared with MSCs harvested at low density. These results imply that cell density at harvest is a critical factor for modulating the specific gene-expression patterns of heterogeneous MSCs. PMID:24400072

  17. Ganglion Cell and Displaced Amacrine Cell Density Distribution in the Retina of the Howler Monkey (Alouatta caraya)

    PubMed Central

    Muniz, José Augusto Pereira Carneiro; de Athaide, Luana Modesto; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Finlay, Barbara L.; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

    2014-01-01

    Unlike all other New World (platyrrine) monkeys, both male and female howler monkeys (Alouatta sp.) are obligatory trichromats. In all other platyrrines, only females can be trichromats, while males are always dichromats, as determined by multiple behavioral, electrophysiological, and genetic studies. In addition to obligatory trichromacy, Alouatta has an unusual fovea, with substantially higher peak cone density in the foveal pit than every other diurnal anthropoid monkey (both platyrrhines and catarrhines) and great ape yet examined, including humans. In addition to documenting the general organization of the retinal ganglion cell layer in Alouatta, the distribution of cones is compared to retinal ganglion cells, to explore possible relationships between their atypical trichromacy and foveal specialization. The number and distribution of retinal ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells were determined in six flat-mounted retinas from five Alouatta caraya. Ganglion cell density peaked at 0.5 mm between the fovea and optic nerve head, reaching 40,700–45,200 cells/mm2. Displaced amacrine cell density distribution peaked between 0.5–1.75 mm from the fovea, reaching mean values between 2,050–3,100 cells/mm2. The mean number of ganglion cells was 1,133,000±79,000 cells and the mean number of displaced amacrine cells was 537,000±61,800 cells, in retinas of mean area 641±62 mm2. Ganglion cell and displaced amacrine cell density distribution in the Alouatta retina was consistent with that observed among several species of diurnal Anthropoidea, both platyrrhines and catarrhines. The principal alteration in the Alouatta retina appears not to be in the number of any retinal cell class, but rather a marked gradient in cone density within the fovea, which could potentially support high chromatic acuity in a restricted central region. PMID:25546077

  18. High power density fuel cell comprising an array of microchannels

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A; Morse, Jeffrey D; Upadhye, Ravindra S; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T

    2014-05-06

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell according to one embodiment includes an array of microchannels defined by a porous electrolyte support structure extending between bottom and upper support layers, the microchannels including fuel and oxidant microchannels; fuel electrodes formed along some of the microchannels; and air electrodes formed along other of the microchannels. A method of making a phosphoric acid fuel cell according to one embodiment includes etching an array of microchannels in a substrate, thereby forming walls between the microchannels; processing the walls to make the walls porous, thereby forming a porous electrolyte support structure; forming anode electrodes along some of the walls; forming cathode electrodes along other of the walls; and filling the porous electrolyte support structure with a phosphoric acid electrolyte. Additional embodiments are also disclosed.

  19. Algal Bloom Detection from HICO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Ruhul; Gould, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Ocean color satellites provide daily, global views of marine bio-optical properties in the upper ocean at various spatial scales. The most productive area of the global ocean is the coastal zone which is heavily impacted by urban and agricultural runoff, transportation, recreation, and oil and gas production. In recent years, harmful algal blooms (HABs) have become one of the serious environmental problems in the coastal areas on a global scale. The global nature of the problem has expanded in its frequency, severity, and extent over the last several decades. Human activities and population increases have contributed to an increase in various toxic and noxious algal species in the coastal regions worldwide. Eutrophication in estuaries and coastal waters is believed to be the major factor causing HABs. In this study, we assess the applicability of the Red Band Difference (RBD) HAB detection algorithm on data from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO). Our preliminary results show that due to various uncertainties such as atmospheric correction, calibration and possibly also the relatively low signal-to-noise ratio of HICO for fluorescence detection, it is difficult to extract the fluorescence portion of the reflectance spectrum that RBD uses for bloom detection. We propose an improved bloom detection technique for HICO using red and NIR bands. Our results are validated using other space-borne and ground based measurements.

  20. Cell density signal protein suitable for treatment of connective tissue injuries and defects

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    2002-08-13

    Identification, isolation and partial sequencing of a cell density protein produced by fibroblastic cells. The cell density signal protein comprising a 14 amino acid peptide or a fragment, variant, mutant or analog thereof, the deduced cDNA sequence from the 14 amino acid peptide, a recombinant protein, protein and peptide-specific antibodies, and the use of the peptide and peptide-specific antibodies as therapeutic agents for regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation. A method for treatment and repair of connective tissue and tendon injuries, collagen deficiency, and connective tissue defects.

  1. Process for selection of Oxygen-tolerant algal mutants that produce H.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Ghirardi, Maria L.; Seibert, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A process for selection of oxygen-tolerant, H.sub.2 -producing algal mutant cells comprising: (a) growing algal cells photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase; (b) inducing algal cells grown photoautrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase in step (a) anaerobically by (1) resuspending the cells in a buffer solution and making said suspension anaerobic with an inert gas; (2) incubating the suspension in the absence of light at ambient temperature; (c) treating the cells from step (b) with metronidazole, sodium azide, and added oxygen to controlled concentrations in the presence of white light. (d) washing off metronidazole and sodium azide to obtain final cell suspension; (e) plating said final cell suspension on a minimal medium and incubating in light at a temperature sufficient to enable colonies to appear; (f) counting the number of colonies to determine the percent of mutant survivors; and (g) testing survivors to identify oxygen-tolerant H.sub.2 -producing mutants.

  2. Cell seeding density is a critical determinant for copolymer scaffolds‐induced bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Leknes, Knut N.; Pedersen, Torbjorn O.; Xing, Zhe; Sun, Yang; Lie, Stein A.; Finne‐Wistrand, Anna; Mustafa, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Constructs intended for bone tissue engineering (TE) are influenced by the initial cell seeding density. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) density loaded onto copolymer scaffolds on bone regeneration. BMSCs were harvested from rat's bone marrow and cultured in media with or without osteogenic supplements. Cells were seeded onto poly(l‐lactide‐co‐ε‐caprolactone) [poly(LLA‐co‐CL)] scaffolds at two different densities: low density (1 × 106 cells/scaffold) or high density (2 × 106 cells/scaffold) using spinner modified flasks and examined after 1 and 3 weeks. Initial attachment and spread of BMSC onto the scaffolds was recorded by scanning electron microscopy. Cell proliferation was assessed by DNA quantification and cell differentiation by quantitative real‐time reverse transcriptase‐polymerized chain reaction analysis (qRT‐PCR). Five‐millimeter rat calvarial defects (24 defects in 12 rats) were implanted with scaffolds seeded with either low or high density expanded with or without osteogenic supplements. Osteogenic supplements significantly increased cell proliferation (p < 0.001). Scaffolds seeded at high cell density exhibited higher mRNA expressions of Runx2 p = 0.001, Col1 p = 0.001, BMP2 p < 0.001, BSP p < 0.001, and OC p = 0.013. More bone was formed in response to high cell seeding density (p = 0.023) and high seeding density with osteogenic medium (p = 0.038). Poly (LLA‐co‐CL) scaffolds could be appropriate candidates for bone TE. The optimal number of cells to be loaded onto scaffolds is critical for promoting Extracellular matrix synthesis and bone formation. Cell seeding density and osteogenic supplements may have a synergistic effect on the induction of new bone. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 103A: 3649–3658, 2015. PMID:26013960

  3. Influence of the Dislocation Density on the Performance of Heteroepitaxial Indium Phosphide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Flood, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Calculations are made to study the dependence of heteroepitaxial InP solar-cell efficiency on dislocation density. Effects of surface recombination velocity and cell emitter thickness are considered. Calculated results are compared with the available experimental results on representative InP solar cells. It is shown that heteroepitaxial InP cells with over 20 percent AM0 efficiency could be fabricated if dislocations are reduced to less than 100,000/sq cm.

  4. Effects of diabetic keratopathy on corneal optical density, central corneal thickness, and corneal endothelial cell counts

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Lin, Tao; Pan, Yingzhe

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic keratopathy is an ocular complication that occurs with diabetes. In the present study, the effect of diabetic keratopathy on corneal optical density, central corneal thickness, and corneal endothelial cell count was investigated. One hundred and eighty diabetic patients (360 eyes) were enrolled in the study during the period from March, 2012 to March, 2013. The patients were divided into three age groups: <5, 5–10 and >10 years, with 60 patients per group (120 eyes). During the same period, 60 healthy cases (120 eyes) were selected and labeled as the normal control group. The Pentacam was used to measure the corneal optical density, and central corneal thickness. Specular microscopy was used to examine the corneal endothelial cell density. The coefficient of partial correlation was used to control age and correlate the analysis between the corneal optical density, corneal endothelial cell density, and central corneal thickness. The stage of the disease, the medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness was analyzed in the diabetes group. The corneal optical density in the diabetes group increased compared with that of the normal control group. The medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness were positively correlated with the course of the disease. However, the corneal endothelial cell density was not associated with the course of diabetes. There was a positive association between the medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness of the diabetic patients. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness were sensitive indicators for early diabetic keratopathy. PMID:27588090

  5. LIF Density Measurement Calibration Using a Reference Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Williams, George J., Jr.; Lyons, Valerie J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. A pulsed UV laser was used to pump the ground state molybdenum at 345.64nm, and the non-resonant fluorescence at 550-nm was collected using a bandpass filter and a photomultiplier tube or intensified CCD array. The sensitivity of the fluorescence was evaluated to determine the limitations of the calibration technique. The suitability of the diagnostic calibration technique was assessed for application to ion engine erosion rate measurements.

  6. Reduced Neurite Density in Neuronal Cell Cultures Exposed to Serum of Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wollenhaupt-Aguiar, Bianca; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Chagas, Vinicius de Saraiva; Castro, Mauro A A; Passos, Ives Cavalcante; Kauer-Sant’Anna, Márcia; Kapczinski, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased inflammatory markers and oxidative stress have been reported in serum among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of this study is to assess whether biochemical changes in the serum of patients induces neurotoxicity in neuronal cell cultures. Methods: We challenged the retinoic acid-differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells with the serum of BD patients at early and late stages of illness and assessed neurite density and cell viability as neurotoxic endpoints. Results: Decreased neurite density was found in neurons treated with the serum of patients, mostly patients at late stages of illness. Also, neurons challenged with the serum of late-stage patients showed a significant decrease in cell viability. Conclusions: Our findings showed that the serum of patients with bipolar disorder induced a decrease in neurite density and cell viability in neuronal cultures. PMID:27207915

  7. Optimization towards high density quantum dots for intermediate band solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, D.; Sharma, G.; Fimland, B. O.; Thomassen, S. F.; Reenaas, T. W.

    2010-02-08

    We report high density quantum dots (QDs) formation with optimized growth temperature and V/III ratio. At lower growth temperature, QD density is increased, due to smaller surface migration length of In adatoms. With higher V/III, the QD density is higher but it results in large clusters formation and decreases the QD uniformity. The QD solar cell was fabricated and examined. An extended spectral response in contrast to the GaAs reference cell was presented but the external quantum efficiency at energies higher than GaAs band gap is reduced, resulting from the degradation for the emitter above the strained QD layers.

  8. Endothelial cell perturbation and low-density lipoprotein. Quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Morrel, E.M.; Holland, J.A.; Pritchard, K.A.; Colton, C.K.; Stemerman, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    The focal entry and accumulation of LDL within the arterial wall of the normal animal may represent an early stage in the development of the atherosclerotic plaque. Concentrations of LDL 10 to 100 times normal medial concentrations might be difficult to clear from the arterial wall, permitting accumulation of lipid. Elevated LDL concentrations, in proximity to smooth muscle cells, appear to stimulate SMC proliferation. High LDL concentrations might also enhance mononuclear cell adhesion to endothelium. Since LDL has a high affinity for heparin and heparin for growth factors, LDL accumulation may be a mechanism for the concentration of such materials in the intima. The observation of markedly enhanced macromolecular permeability foci could be related to several potential mechanisms of initiation of atherosclerosis. This observation is of particular note when the focal occurrence of atherosclerosis is considered. Although atherosclerosis is seen as a generalized thickening of the intima, it is the focal narrowing of the lumen that is often responsible for the stenosis which produces symptoms such as angina or myocardial infarction.

  9. Fluid Flow through a High Cell Density Fluidized-Bed during Centrifugal Bioreactor Culture

    PubMed Central

    Detzel, Christopher J.; Van Wie, Bernard J.; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2010-01-01

    An increasing demand for products such as tissues, proteins, and antibodies from mammalian cell suspension cultures is driving interest in increasing production through high-cell density bioreactors. The centrifugal bioreactor (CCBR) retains cells by balancing settling forces with surface drag forces due to medium throughput and is capable of maintaining cell densities above 108 cells/mL. This article builds on a previous study where the fluid mechanics of an empty CCBR were investigated showing fluid flow is nonuniform and dominated by Coriolis forces, raising concerns about nutrient and cell distribution. In this article, we demonstrate that the previously reported Coriolis forces are still present in the CCBR, but masked by the presence of cells. Experimental dye injection observations during culture of 15 μm hybridoma cells show a continual uniform darkening of the cell bed, indicating the region of the reactor containing cells is well mixed. Simulation results also indicate the cell bed is well mixed during culture of mammalian cells ranging in size from 10 to 20 μm. However, simulations also allow for a slight concentration gradient to be identified and attributed to Coriolis forces. Experimental results show cell density increases from 0.16 to 0.26 when centrifugal force is doubled by increasing RPM from 650 to 920 at a constant inlet velocity of 6.5 cm/s; an effect also observed in the simulation. Results presented in this article indicate cells maintained in the CCBR behave as a high-density fluidized bed of cells providing a homogeneous environment to ensure optimal growth conditions. PMID:20205172

  10. Constraints to commercialization of algal fuels.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Yusuf

    2013-09-10

    Production of algal crude oil has been achieved in various pilot scale facilities, but whether algal fuels can be produced in sufficient quantity to meaningfully displace petroleum fuels, has been largely overlooked. Limitations to commercialization of algal fuels need to be understood and addressed for any future commercialization. This review identifies the major constraints to commercialization of transport fuels from microalgae. Algae derived fuels are expensive compared to petroleum derived fuels, but this could change. Unfortunately, improved economics of production are not sufficient for an environmentally sustainable production, or its large scale feasibility. A low-cost point supply of concentrated carbon dioxide colocated with the other essential resources is necessary for producing algal fuels. An insufficiency of concentrated carbon dioxide is actually a major impediment to any substantial production of algal fuels. Sustainability of production requires the development of an ability to almost fully recycle the phosphorous and nitrogen nutrients that are necessary for algae culture. Development of a nitrogen biofixation ability to support production of algal fuels ought to be an important long term objective. At sufficiently large scale, a limited supply of freshwater will pose a significant limitation to production even if marine algae are used. Processes for recovering energy from the algal biomass left after the extraction of oil, are required for achieving a net positive energy balance in the algal fuel oil. The near term outlook for widespread use of algal fuels appears bleak, but fuels for niche applications such as in aviation may be likely in the medium term. Genetic and metabolic engineering of microalgae to boost production of fuel oil and ease its recovery, are essential for commercialization of algal fuels. Algae will need to be genetically modified for improved photosynthetic efficiency in the long term. PMID:23886651

  11. Subplasmalemmal linear densities in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system in lung.

    PubMed Central

    Kawanami, O.; Ferrans, V. J.; Crystal, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of subplasmalemmal linear densities in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system was investigated in pulmonary biopsies from 33 patients with fibrotic lung disorders. Subplasmalemmal linear densities, consisting of a thin layer of electron-dense material immediately subjacent to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, were found in 30 of the 33 patients, including each of 6 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis, 18 of 19 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, 4 of 5 patients with collagen-vascular diseases, 1 patient with pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis, and 1 patient with marked interstitial pulmonary fibrosis associated with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Subplasmalemmal linear densities were found in epithelioid cells, macrophages, and giant cells in granulomas in the 6 patients with sarcoidosis and in alveolar macrophages in 4 of these patients. In patients with other fibrotic lung disorders, subplasmalemmal linear densities were limited in distribution to interstitial and alveolar macrophages. In all patients with sarcoidosis some of the subplasmalemmal linear densities of adjacent mononuclear phagocytes, particularly of those in granulomas, were paired and formed specialized intercellular junctions. Such junctions also were observed in macrophages in 10 of the patients with other fibrotic lung disorders. The junctions formed by subplasmalemmal linear densities differed from other types of junctional structures. Subplasmalemmal linear densities appear to function in 1) the binding of action filalar junctions, which may contribute to the immobilization of mononuclear phagocytes in granulomas and alveolar lumens. Images Figures 5 and 66 Figure 7 figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7190361

  12. The Fabrication of Low Density, Small Cell Polystyrene Foam Parts with High Quality Surface Finish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, J. R.; Gobby, P. L.; Hollis, R. V.; Manzanares, R.; Moore, J. E.; Gomez, V. M.; Elliott, N. E.; Foreman, L. R.

    1997-11-01

    Foams are frequently used in Inertial Confinement Fusion and other high energy density physics experiments when low density starting materials are desired in targets. Small cell size, low density, structural integrity and fabricability are most often the desired properties of the foam materials. We report in this paper a technique we have used to produce rigid polystyrene foam parts with cell sizes of 2-3 microns, densities down to 30 mg/cc and machined surfaces of 2-3 microns, rms. This feat is accomplished by backfilling a larger foam piece with a low melting point surfactant or wax, machining the desired parts from the backfilled part, and subsequently leaching the surfactant (or wax) from the finished part. An average 2 percent shrinkage is observed when the parts are leached, but the parts show no resulting distortion. Density checks of the finished parts indicate the surfactant (wax) is essentially entirely removed by the leaching process.

  13. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  14. Cellulose Structural Polymorphism in Plant Primary Cell Walls Investigated by High-Field 2D Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Yang, Hui; Kubicki, James D; Hong, Mei

    2016-06-13

    The native cellulose of bacterial, algal, and animal origins has been well studied structurally using X-ray and neutron diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and is known to consist of varying proportions of two allomorphs, Iα and Iβ, which differ in hydrogen bonding, chain packing, and local conformation. In comparison, cellulose structure in plant primary cell walls is much less understood because plant cellulose has lower crystallinity and extensive interactions with matrix polysaccharides. Here we have combined two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to obtain detailed information about the structural polymorphism and spatial distributions of plant primary-wall cellulose. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation spectra of uniformly (13)C-labeled cell walls of several model plants resolved seven sets of cellulose chemical shifts. Among these, five sets (denoted a-e) belong to cellulose in the interior of the microfibril while two sets (f and g) can be assigned to surface cellulose. Importantly, most of the interior cellulose (13)C chemical shifts differ significantly from the (13)C chemical shifts of the Iα and Iβ allomorphs, indicating that plant primary-wall cellulose has different conformations, packing, and hydrogen bonding from celluloses of other organisms. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments with long mixing times and with water polarization transfer revealed the spatial distributions and matrix-polysaccharide interactions of these cellulose structures. Celluloses f and g are well mixed chains on the microfibril surface, celluloses a and b are interior chains that are in molecular contact with the surface chains, while cellulose c resides in the core of the microfibril, outside spin diffusion contact with the surface. Interestingly, cellulose d, whose chemical shifts differ most significantly from those of

  15. Antimony mediated growth of high-density InAs quantum dots for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tutu, F. K.; Wu, J.; Lam, P.; Tang, M.; Liu, H.; Miyashita, N.; Okada, Y.; Wilson, J.; Allison, R.

    2013-07-22

    We report enhanced solar cell performance using high-density InAs quantum dots. The high-density quantum dot was grown by antimony mediated molecular beam epitaxy. In-plane quantum dot density over 1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} was achieved by applying a few monolayers of antimony on the GaAs surface prior to quantum dot growth. The formation of defective large clusters was reduced by optimization of the growth temperature and InAs coverage. Comparing with a standard quantum dot solar cell without the incorporation of antimony, the high-density quantum dot solar cell demonstrates a distinct improvement in short-circuit current from 7.4 mA/cm{sup 2} to 8.3 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  16. Emergence of Algal Blooms: The Effects of Short-Term Variability in Water Quality on Phytoplankton Abundance, Diversity, and Community Composition in a Tidal Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Egerton, Todd A.; Morse, Ryan E.; Marshall, Harold G.; Mulholland, Margaret R.

    2014-01-01

    Algal blooms are dynamic phenomena, often attributed to environmental parameters that vary on short timescales (e.g., hours to days). Phytoplankton monitoring programs are largely designed to examine long-term trends and interannual variability. In order to better understand and evaluate the relationships between water quality variables and the genesis of algal blooms, daily samples were collected over a 34 day period in the eutrophic Lafayette River, a tidal tributary within Chesapeake Bay’s estuarine complex, during spring 2006. During this period two distinct algal blooms occurred; the first was a cryptomonad bloom and this was followed by a bloom of the mixotrophic dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium instriatum. Chlorophyll a, nutrient concentrations, and physical and chemical parameters were measured daily along with phytoplankton abundance and community composition. While 65 phytoplankton species from eight major taxonomic groups were identified in samples and total micro- and nano-phytoplankton cell densities ranged from 5.8 × 106 to 7.8 × 107 cells L−1, during blooms, cryptomonads and G. instriatum were 91.6% and 99.0%, respectively, of the total phytoplankton biomass during blooms. The cryptomonad bloom developed following a period of rainfall and concomitant increases in inorganic nitrogen concentrations. Nitrate, nitrite and ammonium concentrations 0 to 5 days prior were positively lag-correlated with cryptomonad abundance. In contrast, the G. insriatum bloom developed during periods of low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and their abundance was negatively correlated with inorganic nitrogen concentrations. PMID:27694775

  17. Emergence of Algal Blooms: The Effects of Short-Term Variability in Water Quality on Phytoplankton Abundance, Diversity, and Community Composition in a Tidal Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Egerton, Todd A.; Morse, Ryan E.; Marshall, Harold G.; Mulholland, Margaret R.

    2014-01-01

    Algal blooms are dynamic phenomena, often attributed to environmental parameters that vary on short timescales (e.g., hours to days). Phytoplankton monitoring programs are largely designed to examine long-term trends and interannual variability. In order to better understand and evaluate the relationships between water quality variables and the genesis of algal blooms, daily samples were collected over a 34 day period in the eutrophic Lafayette River, a tidal tributary within Chesapeake Bay’s estuarine complex, during spring 2006. During this period two distinct algal blooms occurred; the first was a cryptomonad bloom and this was followed by a bloom of the mixotrophic dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium instriatum. Chlorophyll a, nutrient concentrations, and physical and chemical parameters were measured daily along with phytoplankton abundance and community composition. While 65 phytoplankton species from eight major taxonomic groups were identified in samples and total micro- and nano-phytoplankton cell densities ranged from 5.8 × 106 to 7.8 × 107 cells L−1, during blooms, cryptomonads and G. instriatum were 91.6% and 99.0%, respectively, of the total phytoplankton biomass during blooms. The cryptomonad bloom developed following a period of rainfall and concomitant increases in inorganic nitrogen concentrations. Nitrate, nitrite and ammonium concentrations 0 to 5 days prior were positively lag-correlated with cryptomonad abundance. In contrast, the G. insriatum bloom developed during periods of low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and their abundance was negatively correlated with inorganic nitrogen concentrations.

  18. Sixty years in algal physiology and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pirson, A

    1994-06-01

    This personal perspective records research experiences in chemistry and biology at four German universities, two before and two after World War II. The research themes came from cytophysiology of green unicellular algae, in particular their photosynthesis. The function of inorganic ions in photosynthesis and dark respiration was investigated at different degrees of specific mineral stress (deficiencies), and the kinetics of recovery followed after the addition of the missing element. Two types of recovery of photosynthesis were observed: indirect restitution via growth processes and immediate normalisation. From the latter case (K(+), phosphate, Mn(++)) the effect of manganese was emphasized as its role in photosynthetic O2 evolution became established during our research. Other themes of our group, with some bearing on photosynthesis were: synchronization of cell growth by light-dark change and effects of blue (vs. red) light on the composition of green cells. Some experiences in connection with algal mass cultures are included. Discussion of several editorial projects shows how photosynthesis, as an orginally separated field of plant biochemistry and biophysics, became included into general cell physiology and even ecophysiology of green plants. The paper contains an appreciation of the authors' main mentor Kurt Noack (1888-1963) and of Ernst Georg Pringsheim (1881-1970), founder of experimental phycology.

  19. Simulated Macro-Algal Outbreak Triggers a Large-Scale Response on Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Justin Q.; Bellwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystem degradation has become common throughout the world. On coral reefs, macroalgal outbreaks are one of the most widely documented signs of degradation. This study simulated local-scale degradation on a healthy coral reef to determine how resident taxa, with the potential to reverse algal outbreaks, respond. We utilized a combination of acoustic and video monitoring to quantify changes in the movements and densities, respectively, of coral reef herbivores following a simulated algal outbreak. We found an unprecedented accumulation of functionally important herbivorous taxa in response to algal increases. Herbivore densities increased by 267% where algae were present. The increase in herbivore densities was driven primarily by an accumulation of the browsing taxa Naso unicornis and Kyphosus vaigiensis, two species which are known to be important in removing macroalgae and which may be capable of reversing algal outbreaks. However, resident individuals at the site of algal increase exhibited no change in their movements. Instead, analysis of the size classes of the responding individuals indicates that large functionally-important non-resident individuals changed their movement patterns to move in and feed on the algae. This suggests that local-scale reef processes may not be sufficient to mitigate the effects of local degradation and highlights the importance of mobile links and cross-scale interactions. PMID:26171788

  20. Flow cytometric quantification of tumour endothelial cells; an objective alternative for microvessel density assessment.

    PubMed

    Baeten, C I M; Wagstaff, J; Verhoeven, I C L; Hillen, H F P; Griffioen, A W

    2002-07-29

    Assessment of microvessel density by immunohistochemical staining is subject to a considerable inter-observer variation, and this has led to variability in correlation between microvessel density and clinical outcome in different studies. In order to improve the method of microvessel density measurement in tumour biopsies, we have developed a rapid, objective and quantitative method using flow cytometry on frozen tissues. Frozen tissue sections of archival tumour material were enzymatically digested. The single-cell suspension was stained for CD31 and CD34 for flow cytometry. The number of endothelial cells was quantified using light scatter- and fluorescence-characteristics. Tumour endothelial cells were detectable in a single cell suspension, and the percentage of endothelial cells detected in 32 colon carcinomas correlated highly (r=0.84, P<0.001) with the immunohistochemical assessment of microvessel density. Flow cytometric endothelial cells quantification was found to be more sensitive especially at lower levels of immunohistochemical microvessel density measurement. The current method was found to be applicable for various tumour types and has the major advantage that it provides a retrospective and quantitative approach to the angiogenic potential of tumours.

  1. Astrocytes and neurosteroids: metabolism of pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone. Regulation by cell density

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The rat central nervous system (CNS) has previously been shown to synthesize pregnenolone (PREG) and convert it to progesterone (PROG) and 7 alpha-hydroxy-PREG (7 alpha-OH PREG). Astrocytes, which participate to the regulation of the CNS function, might be involved in the metabolism of neurosteroids. Purified type 1 astrocytes were obtained from fetal rat forebrain with the use of selective culture conditions and were identified by immunostaining with specific antibodies (GFAP+, A2B5-). They were plated at low, intermediate, or high densities (2.5-5 x 10(5), 1-2 x 10(6), or 4-8 x 10(6) cells/dish, respectively) and maintained for 21 d. They were then incubated with 14C-PREG and 14C-DHEA for 24 h and the steroids extracted from cells and media were analyzed. Most radioactive derivatives were released into incubation media. Two metabolic pathways were mainly observed. PREG and DHEA were oxidized to PROG and androstenedione (ADIONE), respectively, [3 beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase, delta 5-->4 3- ketosteroid-isomerase (3 beta-HSD) activity], and converted to 7 alpha- OH PREG and 7 alpha-OH DHEA, respectively (7 alpha-hydroxylase activity). After low density plating, the formation of PROG and ADIONE was approximately 10% of incubated radioactivity, tenfold larger than that of 7 alpha-hydroxylated metabolites. In contrast, after high density plating, low levels of PROG and ADIONE were formed, whereas the conversion to either 7 alpha-OH PREG or 7 alpha-OH DHEA was > or = 50%. The results expressed per cell indicated that the 3 beta-HSD activity was almost completely inhibited at high cell density, in contrast to the 7 alpha-hydroxylation which was maintained or increased. The pattern of steroid metabolism was related to cell density at the time of measurement and not to an early commitment of cells: when primary cultures were plated at high density (8 x 10(6) cells/dish), then subcultured after several dilutions (3-, 9-, or 27-fold), the 3 beta- HSD activity was

  2. Role of algal biofilm in improving the performance of free surface, up-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Badhe, Neha; Saha, Shaswati; Biswas, Rima; Nandy, Tapas

    2014-10-01

    The role of algal biofilm in a pilot-scale, free-surface, up-flow constructed wetland (CW), was studied for its effect on chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia and phosphate removal during three seasons-autumn, winter and early spring. Effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) was also investigated in presence and absence of algal biofilm. Principal Component Analysis was used to identify the independent factors governing the performance of CW. The study showed algal biofilm significantly improved nutrient removal, especially phosphate. Ammonia removal varied with HRT, biofilm and ambient temperature. Increase in biofilm thickness affected ammonia removal efficiency adversely. Algal biofilm-assisted COD removal compensated for reduced macrophyte density during winter. Two-way ANOVA test and the coefficients of dependent factors derived through multiple linear regression model confirmed role of algal biofilm in improving nutrient removal in CW. The study suggests that algal biofilm can be a green solution for bio-augmenting COD and nutrient removal in CW. PMID:25105266

  3. Enhanced production of green tide algal biomass through additional carbon supply.

    PubMed

    de Paula Silva, Pedro H; Paul, Nicholas A; de Nys, Rocky; Mata, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Intensive algal cultivation usually requires a high flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (Ci) to support productivity, particularly for high density algal cultures. Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment can be used to overcome Ci limitation and enhance productivity of algae in intensive culture, however, it is unclear whether algal species with the ability to utilise bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)) as a carbon source for photosynthesis will benefit from CO2 enrichment. This study quantified the HCO3 (-) affinity of three green tide algal species, Cladophora coelothrix, Cladophora patentiramea and Chaetomorpha linum, targeted for biomass and bioenergy production. Subsequently, we quantified productivity and carbon, nitrogen and ash content in response to CO2 enrichment. All three species had similar high pH compensation points (9.7-9.9), and grew at similar rates up to pH 9, demonstrating HCO3 (-) utilization. Algal cultures enriched with CO2 as a carbon source had 30% more total Ci available, supplying twenty five times more CO2 than the control. This higher Ci significantly enhanced the productivity of Cladophora coelothrix (26%), Chaetomorpha linum (24%) and to a lesser extent for Cladophora patentiramea (11%), compared to controls. We demonstrated that supplying carbon as CO2 can enhance the productivity of targeted green tide algal species under intensive culture, despite their clear ability to utilise HCO3 (-).

  4. Enhanced Production of Green Tide Algal Biomass through Additional Carbon Supply

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Silva, Pedro H.; Paul, Nicholas A.; de Nys, Rocky; Mata, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Intensive algal cultivation usually requires a high flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (Ci) to support productivity, particularly for high density algal cultures. Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment can be used to overcome Ci limitation and enhance productivity of algae in intensive culture, however, it is unclear whether algal species with the ability to utilise bicarbonate (HCO3−) as a carbon source for photosynthesis will benefit from CO2 enrichment. This study quantified the HCO3− affinity of three green tide algal species, Cladophora coelothrix, Cladophora patentiramea and Chaetomorpha linum, targeted for biomass and bioenergy production. Subsequently, we quantified productivity and carbon, nitrogen and ash content in response to CO2 enrichment. All three species had similar high pH compensation points (9.7–9.9), and grew at similar rates up to pH 9, demonstrating HCO3− utilization. Algal cultures enriched with CO2 as a carbon source had 30% more total Ci available, supplying twenty five times more CO2 than the control. This higher Ci significantly enhanced the productivity of Cladophora coelothrix (26%), Chaetomorpha linum (24%) and to a lesser extent for Cladophora patentiramea (11%), compared to controls. We demonstrated that supplying carbon as CO2 can enhance the productivity of targeted green tide algal species under intensive culture, despite their clear ability to utilise HCO3−. PMID:24324672

  5. GaAsP solar cells on GaP/Si with low threading dislocation density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaung, Kevin Nay; Vaisman, Michelle; Lang, Jordan; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2016-07-01

    GaAsP on Si tandem cells represent a promising path towards achieving high efficiency while leveraging the Si solar knowledge base and low-cost infrastructure. However, dislocation densities exceeding 108 cm-2 in GaAsP cells on Si have historically hampered the efficiency of such approaches. Here, we report the achievement of low threading dislocation density values of 4.0-4.6 × 106 cm-2 in GaAsP solar cells on GaP/Si, comparable with more established metamorphic solar cells on GaAs. Our GaAsP solar cells on GaP/Si exhibit high open-circuit voltage and quantum efficiency, allowing them to significantly surpass the power conversion efficiency of previous devices. The results in this work show a realistic path towards dual-junction GaAsP on Si cells with efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  6. From immobilized cells to motile cells on a bed-of-nails: effects of vertical nanowire array density on cell behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Henrik; Li, Zhen; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Oredsson, Stina; Prinz, Christelle N.

    2015-01-01

    The field of vertical nanowire array-based applications in cell biology is growing rapidly and an increasing number of applications are being explored. These applications almost invariably rely on the physical properties of the nanowire arrays, creating a need for a better understanding of how their physical properties affect cell behaviour. Here, we investigate the effects of nanowire density on cell migration, division and morphology for murine fibroblasts. Our results show that few nanowires are sufficient to immobilize cells, while a high nanowire spatial density enables a ”bed-of-nails” regime, where cells reside on top of the nanowires and are fully motile. The presence of nanowires decreases the cell proliferation rate, even in the “bed-of-nails” regime. We show that the cell morphology strongly depends on the nanowire density. Cells cultured on low (0.1 μm−2) and medium (1 μm−2) density substrates exhibit an increased number of multi-nucleated cells and micronuclei. These were not observed in cells cultured on high nanowire density substrates (4 μm−2). The results offer important guidelines to minimize cell-function perturbations on nanowire arrays. Moreover, these findings offer the possibility to tune cell proliferation and migration independently by adjusting the nanowire density, which may have applications in drug testing. PMID:26691936

  7. Effects of ozone and peroxone on algal separation via dispersed air flotation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Truc Linh; Lee, D J; Chang, J S; Liu, J C

    2013-05-01

    Effects of pre-oxidation on algal separation by dispersed air flotation were examined. Ozone (O3) and peroxone (O3 and H2O2) could induce cell lysis, release of intracellular organic matter (IOM), and mineralization of organic substances. Separation efficiency of algal cells improved when pre-oxidized. Total of 76.4% algal cells was separated at 40 mg/L of N-cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), while 95% were separated after 30-min ozonation. Pre-oxidation by ozone and peroxone also enhanced flotation separation efficiency of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), polysaccharide, and protein, in which peroxone process exerted more significantly than O3. Two main mechanisms were involved in flotation separation of unoxidized algal suspension, namely hydrophobic cell surface and cell flocculation resulting from CTAB adsorption. However, flocculation by CTAB was hindered for pre-oxidized algal suspensions. It implied that the compositional changes in extracellular organic matter (EOM) by pre-oxidation were more determined for flotation separation of pre-oxidized cells.

  8. Algal viruses hitchhiking on zooplankton across phytoplankton blooms

    PubMed Central

    Frada, Miguel J; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    Viruses infecting marine phytoplankton are key biogeochemical ‘engines’ of the oceans, regulating the dynamics of algal populations and the fate of their extensive blooms. In addition they are important ecological and evolutionary drivers of microbial diversification. Yet, little is known about mechanisms influencing viral dispersal in aquatic systems, enabling the rapid infection and demise of vast phytoplankton blooms. In a recent study we showed that migrating zooplankton as copepods that graze on marine phytoplankton can act as transmission vectors for algal viruses. We demonstrated that these grazers can concentrate virions through topical adsorption and by ingesting infected cells and then releasing back to the medium, via detachment or defecation, high viral titers that readily infect host populations. We proposed that this zooplankton-driven process can potentially boost viral dispersal over wide oceanic scales and enhance bloom termination. Here, we highlight key results and further discuss the ecological and evolutionary consequences of our findings. PMID:26479489

  9. Didymosphenia geminata: Algal blooms in oligotrophic streams and rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundareshwar, P. V.; Upadhayay, S.; Abessa, M.; Honomichl, S.; Berdanier, B.; Spaulding, S. A.; Sandvik, C.; Trennepohl, A.

    2011-05-01

    In recent decades, the diatom Didymosphenia geminata has emerged as nuisance species in river systems around the world. This periphytic alga forms large “blooms” in temperate streams, presenting a counterintuitive result: the blooms occur primarily in oligotrophic streams and rivers, where phosphorus (P) availability typically limits primary production. The goal of this study is to examine how high algal biomass is formed under low P conditions. We reveal a biogeochemical process by which D. geminata mats concentrate P from flowing waters. First, the mucopolysaccaride stalks of D. geminata adsorb both iron (Fe) and P. Second, enzymatic and bacterial processes interact with Fe to increase the biological availability of P. We propose that a positive feedback between total stalk biomass and high growth rate is created, which results in abundant P for cell division. The affinity of stalks for Fe in association with iron-phosphorus biogeochemistry suggest a resolution to the paradox of algal blooms in oliogotrophic streams and rivers.

  10. Algal viruses hitchhiking on zooplankton across phytoplankton blooms.

    PubMed

    Frada, Miguel J; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    Viruses infecting marine phytoplankton are key biogeochemical 'engines' of the oceans, regulating the dynamics of algal populations and the fate of their extensive blooms. In addition they are important ecological and evolutionary drivers of microbial diversification. Yet, little is known about mechanisms influencing viral dispersal in aquatic systems, enabling the rapid infection and demise of vast phytoplankton blooms. In a recent study we showed that migrating zooplankton as copepods that graze on marine phytoplankton can act as transmission vectors for algal viruses. We demonstrated that these grazers can concentrate virions through topical adsorption and by ingesting infected cells and then releasing back to the medium, via detachment or defecation, high viral titers that readily infect host populations. We proposed that this zooplankton-driven process can potentially boost viral dispersal over wide oceanic scales and enhance bloom termination. Here, we highlight key results and further discuss the ecological and evolutionary consequences of our findings.

  11. Micro-structured surfaces for algal biofilm growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathananthan, Suthamathy; Genin, Scott N.; Aitchison, J. Stewart; Allen, D. Grant

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that cells respond to structured surface cues that are on the micro/nanometer scale. Tissue engineering and bio-fouling fields have utilized the semiconductor device fabrication processes to make micro- and nanometer patterned surfaces to study animal cell tissue formation and to prevent algae attachment on marine surfaces respectively. In this paper we describe the use of micro-structured surfaces to study the attachment and growth of algal films. This paper gives an overview of how micro-structured surfaces are made for this purpose, how they are incorporated into a photo bioreactor and how this patterning influences the growth of an algal biofilm. Our results suggest that surface patterning with deeper V-groove patterns that are of the same size scale as the algal species has resulted in higher biomass productivity giving them a chance to embed and attach on the slope and flat surfaces whereas shallower size grooves and completely flat surfaces did not show this trend.

  12. Study of cnidarian-algal symbiosis in the "omics" age.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eli; Weis, Virginia M

    2012-08-01

    The symbiotic associations between cnidarians and dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium) support productive and diverse ecosystems in coral reefs. Many aspects of this association, including the mechanistic basis of host-symbiont recognition and metabolic interaction, remain poorly understood. The first completed genome sequence for a symbiotic anthozoan is now available (the coral Acropora digitifera), and extensive expressed sequence tag resources are available for a variety of other symbiotic corals and anemones. These resources make it possible to profile gene expression, protein abundance, and protein localization associated with the symbiotic state. Here we review the history of "omics" studies of cnidarian-algal symbiosis and the current availability of sequence resources for corals and anemones, identifying genes putatively involved in symbiosis across 10 anthozoan species. The public availability of candidate symbiosis-associated genes leaves the field of cnidarian-algal symbiosis poised for in-depth comparative studies of sequence diversity and gene expression and for targeted functional studies of genes associated with symbiosis. Reviewing the progress to date suggests directions for future investigations of cnidarian-algal symbiosis that include (i) sequencing of Symbiodinium, (ii) proteomic analysis of the symbiosome membrane complex, (iii) glycomic analysis of Symbiodinium cell surfaces, and (iv) expression profiling of the gastrodermal cells hosting Symbiodinium. PMID:22983032

  13. High-density collagen gel tubes as a matrix for primary human bladder smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Micol, Lionel A; Ananta, Michael; Engelhardt, Eva-Maria; Mudera, Vivek C; Brown, Robert A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Frey, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Tissue-engineered grafts for the urinary tract are being investigated for the potential treatment of several urologic diseases. These grafts, predominantly tubular-shaped, usually require in vitro culture prior to implantation to allow cell engraftment on initially cell-free scaffolds. We have developed a method to produce tubular-shaped collagen scaffolds based on plastic compression. Our approach produces a ready cell-seeded graft that does not need further in vitro culture prior to implantation. The tubular collagen scaffolds were in particular investigated for their structural, mechanical and biological properties. The resulting construct showed an especially high collagen density, and was characterized by favorable mechanical properties assessed by axial extension and radial dilation. Young modulus in particular was greater than non-compressed collagen tubes. Seeding densities affected proliferation rate of primary human bladder smooth muscle cells. An optimal seeding density of 10(6) cells per construct resulted in a 25-fold increase in Alamar blue-based fluorescence after 2 wk in culture. These high-density collagen gel tubes, ready seeded with smooth muscle cells could be further seeded with urothelial cells, drastically shortening the production time of graft for urinary tract regeneration.

  14. Tip-growing cells of the moss Ceratodon purpureus Are gravitropic in high-density media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuchow, Jochen Michael; Kern, Volker Dieter; Sack, Fred David

    2002-01-01

    Gravity sensing in plants and algae is hypothesized to rely upon either the mass of the entire cell or that of sedimenting organelles (statoliths). Protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus show upward gravitropism and contain amyloplasts that sediment. If moss sensing were whole-cell based, then media denser than the cell should prevent gravitropism or reverse its direction. Cells that were inverted or reoriented to the horizontal displayed distinct negative gravitropism in solutions of iodixanol with densities of 1.052 to 1.320 as well as in bovine serum albumin solutions with densities of 1.037 to 1.184 g cm(-3). Studies using tagged molecules of different sizes and calculations of diffusion times suggest that both types of media penetrate through the apical cell wall. Estimates of the density of the apical cell range from 1.004 to 1.085. Because protonemata grow upward when the cells have a density that is lower than the surrounding medium, gravitropic sensing probably utilizes an intracellular mass in moss protonemata. These data provide additional support for the idea that sedimenting amyloplasts function as statoliths in gravitropism.

  15. Induction of xylanases by sugar cane bagasse at different cell densities of Cellulomonas flavigena.

    PubMed

    Amaya-Delgado, L; Vega-Estrada, J; Flores-Cotera, L B; Dendooven, L; Hidalgo-Lara, M E; Montes-Horcasitas, M C

    2006-04-01

    The effect of cell density on xylanolytic activity and productivity of Cellulomonas flavigena was evaluated under two different culturing conditions: fed-batch culture with discontinuous feed of sugar cane bagasse (SCB; condition 1) and glycerol fed-batch culture followed by addition of SBC as xylanases inducer (condition 2). The enzymatic profile of xylanases was similar in both systems, regardless of the initial cell density at time of induction. However, the xylanolytic activity changed with initial cell density at the time of induction (condition 2). The maximum volumetric xylanase activity increased with increased initial cell density from 4 to 34 g l(-1) but decreased above this value. The largest total volumetric xylanase productivity under condition 2 (1.3 IU ml(-1) h(-1)) was significantly greater compared to condition 1 (maximum 0.6 IU ml(-1) h(-1)). Consequently, induction of xylanase activity by SCB after growing of C. flavigena on glycerol at intermediate cell density can be a feasible alternative to improve activity and productivity of xylanolytic enzymes.

  16. Interactions of algal ligands, metal complexation and availability, and cell responses of the diatom Ditylum brightwellii with a gradual increase in copper.

    PubMed

    Rijstenbil, J W; Gerringa, L J A

    2002-01-01

    A continuous culture experiment was conducted to study interactions between copper-binding ligands released by light-limited Ditylum brightwellii, and toxic effects of Cu on this diatom. Over 6 months, the Cu concentration in the medium has been increased in seven steps (3-173 nM). At each Cu addition, Cu speciation, characteristics of Cu sorption to cellular binding sites, and cell characteristics were determined. Physiological effects of Cu were studied, using indicators for metal detoxification (thiols) and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde). Minor amounts of Cu (<1.4%) were chelated by a minimum amount of EDTA (57 nM), required to maintain a stable long-term continuous culture. The responses of D. brightwellii to Cu were monitored. (1) From 3 to 47 nM added Cu, decreasing pools of glutathione, increasing malondialdehyde contents, an increased release of lipophilic ligands, and cell lysis indicated the enhancement of lipid peroxidation. (2) From 47 to 94 nM Cu, a 16-fold increase in high-affinity (strong) hydrophilic ligands was measured (conditional stability constants K' approximately 10(12)) that complexed most Cu (maximum 97%); sexual reproduction was stimulated and cell volumes increased. (3) From 126 nM Cu, glutathione pools increased again, whereas cell division rates decreased slightly. (4) At 142 nM Cu, the number of lysed cells reached a maximum, as did the production of lipophilic compounds that complexed approximately 2% Cu. As the binding sites of the strong ligands became Cu-saturated above 142 nM Cu, larger amounts of Cu were bound to low-affinity (weak) dissolved ligands (3-30%) and cellular binding sites (0.2-2.5%). Probably due to saturation of organic complexes at 142 nM Cu, the MINEQL-calculated Cu2+ concentrations increased markedly; pCu values decreased from >11 to approximately 10; division rates were further inhibited; gamma-glutamylcysteine (phytochelatin precursor) was produced. (5) At 157 nM Cu, phytochelatin synthesis started, and

  17. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Cyd E.

    2014-03-25

    This white paper briefly reviews the research literature exploring complex algal communities as a means of increasing algal biomass production via increased tolerance, resilience, and resistance to a variety of abiotic and biotic perturbations occurring within harvesting timescales. This paper identifies what data are available and whether more research utilizing complex communities is needed to explore the potential of complex algal community stability (CACS) approach as a plausible means to increase biomass yields regardless of ecological context and resulting in decreased algal-based fuel prices by reducing operations costs. By reviewing the literature for what we do and do not know, in terms of CACS methodologies, this report will provide guidance for future research addressing pond crash phenomena.

  18. Low density lipoprotein uptake by an endothelial-smooth muscle cell bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.J.; Miguel, R.; Graham, D. )

    1991-03-01

    To study the interaction of endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and the means by which such interaction may affect lipid permeability of the arterial wall, cell bilayers were established by use of a transwell culture system. After confluent growth of both cell types had been achieved, iodine 125 bound to low-density lipoprotein (10 ng protein/ml) was added to the media of the upper well. After a 3-hour incubation period, the iodine 125-bound low-density lipoprotein content of the upper and lower media demonstrated an impedance to lipoprotein movement across the endothelial cell monolayer as compared to the bare porous polycarbonate filter of the transwell (p less than 10(-6)). The presence of smooth muscle cells in the bottom well significantly enhanced the permeability of the endothelial cell layer (p less than 10(-60)). This effect remained unchanged over a 9-day time course. Membrane binding and cellular uptake of low-density lipoprotein by endothelial cells was not altered by smooth muscle cells, indicating that this change in permeability could not be easily attributed to changes in receptor-mediated transport or transcytosis. Membrane binding (p less than 0.02) and cellular uptake (p less than 10(-6)) of low-density lipoprotein by smooth muscle cells in the bilayer, when adjusted for counts available in the smooth muscle cell media, were both reduced in the early incubation period as compared to isolated smooth muscle cells. The disproportionate reduction in uptake as compared to binding would suggest that this was not entirely a receptor-dependent process.

  19. Strategies for optimizing algal biology for enhanced biomass production

    DOE PAGES

    Barry, Amanda N.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Sayre, Richard T.

    2015-02-02

    One of the most environmentally sustainable ways to produce high-energy density (oils) feed stocks for the production of liquid transportation fuels is from biomass. Photosynthetic carbon capture combined with biomass combustion (point source) and subsequent carbon capture and sequestration has also been proposed in the intergovernmental panel on climate change report as one of the most effective and economical strategies to remediate atmospheric greenhouse gases. To maximize photosynthetic carbon capture efficiency and energy-return-on-investment, we must develop biomass production systems that achieve the greatest yields with the lowest inputs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that microalgae have among the greatest potentials formore » biomass production. This is in part due to the fact that all alga cells are photoautotrophic, they have active carbon concentrating mechanisms to increase photosynthetic productivity, and all the biomass is harvestable unlike plants. All photosynthetic organisms, however, convert only a fraction of the solar energy they capture into chemical energy (reduced carbon or biomass). To increase aerial carbon capture rates and biomass productivity, it will be necessary to identify the most robust algal strains and increase their biomass production efficiency often by genetic manipulation. We review recent large-scale efforts to identify the best biomass producing strains and metabolic engineering strategies to improve aerial productivity. In addition, these strategies include optimization of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna size to increase energy capture and conversion efficiency and the potential development of advanced molecular breeding techniques. To date, these strategies have resulted in up to twofold increases in biomass productivity.« less

  20. Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Stobbe, Per; Silvander, Christian Orrego; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-11-10

    Recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells producing IgG monoclonal antibody were cultivated in a novel perfusion culture system CellTank, integrating the bioreactor and the cell retention function. In this system, the cells were harbored in a non-woven polyester matrix perfused by the culture medium and immersed in a reservoir. Although adapted to suspension, the CHO cells stayed entrapped in the matrix. The cell-free medium was efficiently circulated from the reservoir into- and through the matrix by a centrifugal pump placed at the bottom of the bioreactor resulting in highly homogenous concentrations of the nutrients and metabolites in the whole system as confirmed by measurements from different sampling locations. A real-time biomass sensor using the dielectric properties of living cells was used to measure the cell density. The performances of the CellTank were studied in three perfusion runs. A very high cell density measured as 200 pF/cm (where 1 pF/cm is equivalent to 1 × 10(6)viable cells/mL) was achieved at a perfusion rate of 10 reactor volumes per day (RV/day) in the first run. In the second run, the effect of cell growth arrest by hypothermia at temperatures lowered gradually from 37 °C to 29 °C was studied during 13 days at cell densities above 100 pF/cm. Finally a production run was performed at high cell densities, where a temperature shift to 31 °C was applied at cell density 100 pF/cm during a production period of 14 days in minimized feeding conditions. The IgG concentrations were comparable in the matrix and in the harvest line in all the runs, indicating no retention of the product of interest. The cell specific productivity was comparable or higher than in Erlenmeyer flask batch culture. During the production run, the final harvested IgG production was 35 times higher in the CellTank compared to a repeated batch culture in the same vessel volume during the same time period.

  1. High-density polymer microarrays: identifying synthetic polymers that control human embryonic stem cell growth.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anne; Mjoseng, Heidi K; Zhang, Rong; Kalloudis, Michail; Koutsos, Vasileios; de Sousa, Paul A; Bradley, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The fabrication of high-density polymer microarray is described, allowing the simultaneous and efficient evaluation of more than 7000 different polymers in a single-cellular-based screen. These high-density polymer arrays are applied in the search for synthetic substrates for hESCs culture. Up-scaling of the identified hit polymers enables long-term cellular cultivation and promoted successful stem-cell maintenance.

  2. Development of a rotating algal biofilm growth system for attached microalgae growth with in situ biomass harvest.

    PubMed

    Gross, Martin; Henry, Wesley; Michael, Clayton; Wen, Zhiyou

    2013-12-01

    This work aimed to develop a rotating algal biofilm (RAB) cultivation system that can be widely adopted by microalgae producers for easy biomass harvest. Algal cells were grown on the surface of a material rotating between nutrient-rich liquid and CO2-rich gaseous phase. Scrapping biomass from the attached surface avoided the expensive harvest operations such as centrifugation. Among various attachment materials, cotton sheet resulted in best algal growth, durability, and cost effectiveness. A lab-scale RAB system was further optimized with harvest frequency, rotation speed, and CO2 levels. The algal biomass from the RAB system had a similar water content as that in centrifuged biomass. An open pond raceway retrofitted with a pilot-scale RAB system resulted in a much higher biomass productivity when compared to a control open pond. Collectively, the research shows that the RAB system is an efficient algal culture system for easy biomass harvest with enhanced biomass productivity.

  3. Eukaryotic algal phytochromes span the visible spectrum.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Nathan C; Duanmu, Deqiang; Martin, Shelley S; Bachy, Charles; Price, Dana C; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Worden, Alexandra Z; Lagarias, J Clark

    2014-03-11

    Plant phytochromes are photoswitchable red/far-red photoreceptors that allow competition with neighboring plants for photosynthetically active red light. In aquatic environments, red and far-red light are rapidly attenuated with depth; therefore, photosynthetic species must use shorter wavelengths of light. Nevertheless, phytochrome-related proteins are found in recently sequenced genomes of many eukaryotic algae from aquatic environments. We examined the photosensory properties of seven phytochromes from diverse algae: four prasinophyte (green algal) species, the heterokont (brown algal) Ectocarpus siliculosus, and two glaucophyte species. We demonstrate that algal phytochromes are not limited to red and far-red responses. Instead, different algal phytochromes can sense orange, green, and even blue light. Characterization of these previously undescribed photosensors using CD spectroscopy supports a structurally heterogeneous chromophore in the far-red-absorbing photostate. Our study thus demonstrates that extensive spectral tuning of phytochromes has evolved in phylogenetically distinct lineages of aquatic photosynthetic eukaryotes.

  4. Environmental performance of algal biofuel technology options.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Venkatesh; Stratton, Russell W; Pearlson, Matthew N; Jersey, Gilbert R; Beyene, Abraham G; Weissman, Joseph C; Rubino, Michele; Hileman, James I

    2012-02-21

    Considerable research and development is underway to produce fuels from microalgae, one of several options being explored for increasing transportation fuel supplies and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). This work models life-cycle GHG and on-site freshwater consumption for algal biofuels over a wide technology space, spanning both near- and long-term options. The environmental performance of algal biofuel production can vary considerably and is influenced by engineering, biological, siting, and land-use considerations. We have examined these considerations for open pond systems, to identify variables that have a strong influence on GHG and freshwater consumption. We conclude that algal biofuels can yield GHG reductions relative to fossil and other biobased fuels with the use of appropriate technology options. Further, freshwater consumption for algal biofuels produced using saline pond systems can be comparable to that of petroleum-derived fuels. PMID:22324757

  5. High Frequency Monitoring for Harmful Algal Blooms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are increasingly becoming a significant ecologic, economic, and social driver in the use of water resources. Cyanobacteria and their toxins play an important role in management decisions for drinking water utilities and public health officials. Online ...

  6. Autonomous bacterial localization and gene expression based on nearby cell receptor density

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Quan, David N; Cheng, Yi; Servinsky, Matthew D; Carter, Karen K; Jee, Kathleen J; Terrell, Jessica L; Zargar, Amin; Rubloff, Gary W; Payne, Gregory F; Valdes, James J; Bentley, William E

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli were genetically modified to enable programmed motility, sensing, and actuation based on the density of features on nearby surfaces. Then, based on calculated feature density, these cells expressed marker proteins to indicate phenotypic response. Specifically, site-specific synthesis of bacterial quorum sensing autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is used to initiate and recruit motile cells. In our model system, we rewired E. coli's AI-2 signaling pathway to direct bacteria to a squamous cancer cell line of head and neck (SCCHN), where they initiate synthesis of a reporter (drug surrogate) based on a threshold density of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This represents a new type of controller for targeted drug delivery as actuation (synthesis and delivery) depends on a receptor density marking the diseased cell. The ability to survey local surfaces and initiate gene expression based on feature density represents a new area-based switch in synthetic biology that will find use beyond the proposed cancer model here. PMID:23340842

  7. Elevated Periimplantation Uterine Natural Killer Cell Density in Human Endometrium Is Associated With Impaired Corticosteroid Signaling in Decidualizing Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Keiji; Venkatakrishnan, Radha; James, Sean; Šućurović, Sandra; Mulac-Jericevic, Biserka; Lucas, Emma S.; Takeda, Satoru; Shmygol, Anatoly; Brosens, Jan J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Decidualizing human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) profoundly up-regulate 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1), the enzyme that converts inert cortisone to active cortisol. We postulated that the induction of a cortisol gradient upon decidualization of the periimplantation endometrium may impact on the uterine natural killer (uNK) cell population and on local expression of corticosteroid-dependent target genes. Methods: Midluteal endometrial biopsies (n = 55) were processed for uNK cell (CD56) analysis and primary HESC cultures. The cultures remained either untreated or were decidualized for 4 or 8 days. A tissue microarray was constructed from endometria with normal (n = 18) and elevated uNK cell (n = 18) scores. An abnormal uNK cell test was defined as greater than 5% CD56+ cells in the subluminal stroma. Results: Increased uNK cell density was associated with lower endometrial expression of 11βHSD1 and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) but not glucocorticoid receptor in vivo. Elevated uNK cell density also corresponded to impaired induction of key decidual markers (11βHSD1, prolactin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1) and MR-dependent enzymes (dehydrogenase/reductase member 3 and retinol saturase) in differentiating HESC cultures. Increased uNK cell density in vivo was not associated with increased in vitro expression of either IL-15 or IL-11, two cytokines implicated in uNK cell regulation. Conclusions: Elevated levels of uNK cells in the stroma underlying the surface epithelium are associated with inadequate cortisol biosynthesis by resident decidualizing cells and suboptimal induction of key MR-dependent enzymes involved in lipid biogenesis and the retinoid transport pathway. Our observations suggest that uNK cell testing identifies those women at risk of reproductive failure due to relative uterine cortisol deficiency. PMID:24025400

  8. Density of states measurements in a p-i-n solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, R.S.; Wang, Q.

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe results of density of states (DOS) profiling in p-i-n solar-cell devices using drive-level capacitance (DLC) techniques. Near the p-i interface the defect density is high, decreasing rapidly into the interior, reaching low values in the central region of the cell, and rising rapidly again at the n-i interface. They show that the states in the central region are neutral dangling-bond defects, whereas those near the interfaces with the doped layers are charged dangling bonds.

  9. Direct conversion of algal biomass to biofuel

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Shuguang; Patil, Prafulla D; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for providing direct conversion of algal biomass. Optionally, the method and system can be used to directly convert dry algal biomass to biodiesels under microwave irradiation by combining the reaction and combining steps. Alternatively, wet algae can be directly processed and converted to fatty acid methyl esters, which have the major components of biodiesels, by reacting with methanol at predetermined pressure and temperature ranges.

  10. Direct utilization of waste water algal biomass for ethanol production by cellulolytic Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183.

    PubMed

    Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Sanitha, Mary; Kumar, Thangarathinam; Iyappan, Sellamuthu; Ramya, Mohandass

    2016-02-01

    Direct bioconversion of waste water algal biomass into ethanol using Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183 was demonstrated in this study. Fermentation of 2% (w/v) autoclaved algal biomass produced ethanol concentration of 0.52 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.19 g/g) where as fermentation of acid pretreated algal biomass (2%, w/v) produced ethanol concentration of 4.6 g L(-1) in GS2 media (solvent yield of 0.26 g/g). The control experiment with 2% (w/v) glucose in GS2 media produced ethanol concentration of 2.8 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.25 g/g). The microalgal strains from waste water algal biomass were identified as Chlamydomonas dorsoventralis, Graesiella emersonii, Coelastrum proboscideum, Scenedesmus obliquus, Micractinium sp., Desmodesmus sp., and Chlorella sp., based on ITS-2 molecular marker. The presence of glucose, galactose, xylose and rhamnose were detected by high performance liquid chromatography in the algal biomass. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of fermentation samples showed characteristic morphological changes in algal cells and bioaccessibility of C. phytofermentans.

  11. Investigating why recycling gravity harvested algae increases harvestability and productivity in high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2013-09-15

    It has previously been shown that recycling gravity harvested algae promotes Pediastrum boryanum dominance and improves harvestability and biomass production in pilot-scale High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs) treating domestic wastewater. In order to confirm the reproducibility of these findings and investigate the mechanisms responsible, this study utilized twelve 20 L outdoor HRAP mesocosms operated with and without algal recycling. It then compared the recycling of separated solid and liquid components of the harvested biomass against un-separated biomass. The work confirmed that algal recycling promoted P. boryanum dominance, improved 1 h-settleability by >20% and increased biomass productivity by >25% compared with controls that had no recycling. With regard to the improved harvestability, of particular interest was that recycling the liquid fraction alone caused a similar improvement in settleability as recycling the solid fraction. This may be due to the presence of extracellular polymeric substances in the liquid fraction. While there are many possible mechanisms that could account for the increased productivity with algal recycling, all but two were systematically eliminated: (i) the mean cell residence time was extended thereby increasing the algal concentration and more fully utilizing the incident sunlight and, (ii) the relative proportions of algal growth stages (which have different specific growth rates) was changed, resulting in a net increase in the overall growth rate of the culture.

  12. Investigating why recycling gravity harvested algae increases harvestability and productivity in high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2013-09-15

    It has previously been shown that recycling gravity harvested algae promotes Pediastrum boryanum dominance and improves harvestability and biomass production in pilot-scale High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs) treating domestic wastewater. In order to confirm the reproducibility of these findings and investigate the mechanisms responsible, this study utilized twelve 20 L outdoor HRAP mesocosms operated with and without algal recycling. It then compared the recycling of separated solid and liquid components of the harvested biomass against un-separated biomass. The work confirmed that algal recycling promoted P. boryanum dominance, improved 1 h-settleability by >20% and increased biomass productivity by >25% compared with controls that had no recycling. With regard to the improved harvestability, of particular interest was that recycling the liquid fraction alone caused a similar improvement in settleability as recycling the solid fraction. This may be due to the presence of extracellular polymeric substances in the liquid fraction. While there are many possible mechanisms that could account for the increased productivity with algal recycling, all but two were systematically eliminated: (i) the mean cell residence time was extended thereby increasing the algal concentration and more fully utilizing the incident sunlight and, (ii) the relative proportions of algal growth stages (which have different specific growth rates) was changed, resulting in a net increase in the overall growth rate of the culture. PMID:23866138

  13. Comparing new and conventional methods to estimate benthic algal biomass and composition in freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Kahlert, Maria; McKie, Brendan G

    2014-11-01

    We compared conventional microscope-based methods for quantifying biomass and community composition of stream benthic algae with output obtained for these parameters from a new instrument (the BenthoTorch), which measures fluorescence of algal pigments in situ. Benthic algae were studied in 24 subarctic oligotrophic (1.7-26.9, median 7.2 μg total phosphorus L(-1)) streams in Northern Sweden. Readings for biomass of the total algal mat, quantified as chlorophyll a, did not differ significantly between the BenthoTorch (median 0.52 μg chlorophyll a cm(-2)) and the conventional method (median 0.53 μg chlorophyll a cm(-2)). However, quantification of community composition of the benthic algal mat obtained using the BenthoTorch did not match those obtained from conventional methods. The BenthoTorch indicated a dominance of diatoms, whereas microscope observations showed a fairly even distribution between diatoms, blue-green algae (mostly nitrogen-fixing) and green algae (mostly large filamentous), and also detected substantial biovolumes of red algae in some streams. These results most likely reflect differences in the exact parameters quantified by the two methods, as the BenthoTorch does not account for variability in cell size and the presence of non-chlorophyll bearing biomass in estimating the proportion of different algal groups, and does not distinguish red algal chlorophyll from that of other algal groups. Our findings suggest that the BenthoTorch has utility in quantifying biomass expressed as μg chlorophyll a cm(-2), but its output for the relative contribution of different algal groups to benthic algal biomass should be used with caution. PMID:25277172

  14. Algal and fungal diversity in Antarctic lichens.

    PubMed

    Park, Chae Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo; Elvebakk, Arve; Kim, Ok-Sun; Jeong, Gajin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The composition of lichen ecosystems except mycobiont and photobiont has not been evaluated intensively. In addition, recent studies to identify algal genotypes have raised questions about the specific relationship between mycobiont and photobiont. In the current study, we analyzed algal and fungal community structures in lichen species from King George Island, Antarctica, by pyrosequencing of eukaryotic large subunit (LSU) and algal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domains of the nuclear rRNA gene. The sequencing results of LSU and ITS regions indicated that each lichen thallus contained diverse algal species. The major algal operational taxonomic unit (OTU) defined at a 99% similarity cutoff of LSU sequences accounted for 78.7-100% of the total algal community in each sample. In several cases, the major OTUs defined by LSU sequences were represented by two closely related OTUs defined by 98% sequence similarity of ITS domain. The results of LSU sequences indicated that lichen-associated fungi belonged to the Arthoniomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Lecanoromycetes, Leotiomycetes, and Sordariomycetes of the Ascomycota, and Tremellomycetes and Cystobasidiomycetes of the Basidiomycota. The composition of major photobiont species and lichen-associated fungal community were mostly related to the mycobiont species. The contribution of growth forms or substrates on composition of photobiont and lichen-associated fungi was not evident. PMID:25105247

  15. Algal and fungal diversity in Antarctic lichens.

    PubMed

    Park, Chae Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo; Elvebakk, Arve; Kim, Ok-Sun; Jeong, Gajin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The composition of lichen ecosystems except mycobiont and photobiont has not been evaluated intensively. In addition, recent studies to identify algal genotypes have raised questions about the specific relationship between mycobiont and photobiont. In the current study, we analyzed algal and fungal community structures in lichen species from King George Island, Antarctica, by pyrosequencing of eukaryotic large subunit (LSU) and algal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domains of the nuclear rRNA gene. The sequencing results of LSU and ITS regions indicated that each lichen thallus contained diverse algal species. The major algal operational taxonomic unit (OTU) defined at a 99% similarity cutoff of LSU sequences accounted for 78.7-100% of the total algal community in each sample. In several cases, the major OTUs defined by LSU sequences were represented by two closely related OTUs defined by 98% sequence similarity of ITS domain. The results of LSU sequences indicated that lichen-associated fungi belonged to the Arthoniomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Lecanoromycetes, Leotiomycetes, and Sordariomycetes of the Ascomycota, and Tremellomycetes and Cystobasidiomycetes of the Basidiomycota. The composition of major photobiont species and lichen-associated fungal community were mostly related to the mycobiont species. The contribution of growth forms or substrates on composition of photobiont and lichen-associated fungi was not evident.

  16. Multi-Cell High Latitude Density Structure Induced by Ion Drag during Active Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Crowley, G.

    2012-12-01

    During active periods two-cell convection patterns can produce four-cell density structure in the high-latitude thermosphere. During these periods density perturbations approaching 50% are possible. The occurrence of density structures that are more complex than the forcing itself suggests that the structure is caused by a profound change in the balance of forces. Using a General Circulation Model of the thermosphere, we compare the balance of forces in the upper and lower thermosphere during active and quiet times. We also examine the thermal structure caused by the dynamical adjustment to ion-drag forcing in relation to the other terms as a balanced state is approached. Simulations reveal that where ion drag is unable to accelerate the atmosphere into rapid motion (during quiet times or at low thermospheric altitudes) the Coriolis force is the dominant inertial term, and for fixed pressure levels centers of cyclonic motion are (per the usual meteorology relations) colder and denser than the surrounding air, while centers of anticyclonic motion are warmer and less dense. At fixed heights, densities are high in the evening anticyclonic gyre, and low in the dawn cyclonic gyre. However, this situation is radically changed during active periods when the atmosphere is spun up to rapid motion and the centrifugal force resulting from curved trajectories is the dominant inertial force. When this occurs, the high latitude anticyclones and cyclones both become centers of relatively cold high density air at fixed height. Cold low-density centers are found on both the dawn and dusk sides with a trough of low density air over the pole connecting them. This intrusion of low density splits the evening high density region that exists under quiet conditions giving the four cell pattern found by Crowley et al. [1989; 1996a, b]. Crowley, G., J. Schoendorf, R. G. Roble, F. A. Marcos (1996a). Cellular structures in the high latitude lower thermosphere, J. Geophys. Res. 101, 211

  17. Variations of algal communities cause darkening of a Greenland glacier.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Stefanie; Anesio, Alexandre M; Jorge Villar, Susana E; Benning, Liane G

    2014-08-01

    We have assessed the microbial ecology on the surface of Mittivakkat glacier in SE-Greenland during the exceptional high melting season in July 2012 when the so far most extreme melting rate for the Greenland Ice Sheet has been recorded. By employing a complementary and multi-disciplinary field sampling and analytical approach, we quantified the dramatic changes in the different microbial surface habitats (green snow, red snow, biofilms, grey ice, cryoconite holes). The observed clear change in dominant algal community and their rapidly changing cryo-organic adaptation inventory was linked to the high melting rate. The changes in carbon and nutrient fluxes between different microbial pools (from snow to ice, cryoconite holes and glacial forefronts) revealed that snow and ice algae dominate the net primary production at the onset of melting, and that they have the potential to support the cryoconite hole communities as carbon and nutrient sources. A large proportion of algal cells is retained on the glacial surface and temporal and spatial changes in pigmentation contribute to the darkening of the snow and ice surfaces. This implies that the fast, melt-induced algal growth has a high albedo reduction potential, and this may lead to a positive feedback speeding up melting processes.

  18. An algal solution to large scale wastewater amelioration

    SciTech Connect

    Adey, W.H.

    1995-06-01

    Wastewater nutrients can be lowered to oligotrophic levels through uptake by algal biomass, while photosynthetic oxygen removes bacterial BOD, and oxygen-based ions, with UV application, can break down xenobiotic organic compounds. Algae also uptake heavy metals in cell walls, and the high pH from CO{sub 25} removal precipitates metals, earth metals and phosphorus. Algal biomass produced from many wastewaters has valuable commercial applications. Algal Turf Scrubbing (ATS) was developed as a tool to control water quality in ecosystem models, often at oligotrophic levels. ATS has routinely achieved biomass production (and water amelioration capability) of over 50 g (dry mass) m{sup -2} day{sup -1} in secondary sewage. Engineering innovations, with mechanized harvest, have brought ATS to large scale with a pilot sewage plant in central California. This is a low cost, modular unit, at 1000 cubic meters per day, and plans are underway to expand to city capacity for Tertiary-Quinary water recovery. A wide variety of wastewater applications, from agricultural, to aquacultural to industrial will be discussed.

  19. Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Dendritic Spine Density by PirB

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Synapse density on cortical pyramidal neurons is modulated by experience. This process is highest during developmental critical periods, when mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are fully engaged. In mouse visual cortex, the critical period for ocular dominance (OD) plasticity coincides with the developmental pruning of synapses. At this time, mice lacking paired Ig-like receptor B (PirB) have excess numbers of dendritic spines on L5 neurons; these spines persist and are thought to underlie the juvenile-like OD plasticity observed in adulthood. Here we examine whether PirB is required specifically in excitatory neurons to exert its effect on dendritic spine and synapse density during the critical period. In mice with a conditional allele of PirB (PirBfl/fl), PirB was deleted only from L2/3 cortical pyramidal neurons in vivo by timed in utero electroporation of Cre recombinase. Sparse mosaic expression of Cre produced neurons lacking PirB in a sea of wild-type neurons and glia. These neurons had significantly elevated dendritic spine density, as well as increased frequency of miniature EPSCs, suggesting that they receive a greater number of synaptic inputs relative to Cre– neighbors. The effect of cell-specific PirB deletion on dendritic spine density was not accompanied by changes in dendritic branching complexity or axonal bouton density. Together, results imply a neuron-specific, cell-autonomous action of PirB on synaptic density in L2/3 pyramidal cells of visual cortex. Moreover, they are consistent with the idea that PirB functions normally to corepress spine density and synaptic plasticity, thereby maintaining headroom for cells to encode ongoing experience-dependent structural change throughout life. PMID:27752542

  20. Spontaneous oscillations of cell voltage, power density, and anode exit CO concentration in a PEM fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Rihko-Struckmann, Liisa; Sundmacher, Kai

    2011-10-28

    The spontaneous oscillations of the cell voltage and output power density of a PEMFC (with PtRu/C anode) using CO-containing H(2) streams as anodic fuels have been observed during galvanostatic operating. It is ascribed to the dynamic coupling of the CO adsorption (poisoning) and the electrochemical CO oxidation (reactivating) processes in the anode chamber of the single PEMFC. Accompanying the cell voltage and power density oscillations, the discrete CO concentration oscillations at the anode outlet of the PEMFC were also detected, which directly confirms the electrochemical CO oxidation taking place in the anode chamber during galvanostatic operating.

  1. Towards developing algal synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Mark Aden; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-06-15

    The genetic, physiological and metabolic diversity of microalgae has driven fundamental research into photosynthesis, flagella structure and function, and eukaryotic evolution. Within the last 10 years these organisms have also been investigated as potential biotechnology platforms, for example to produce high value compounds such as long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, pigments and antioxidants, and for biodiesel precursors, in particular triacylglycerols (TAGs). Transformation protocols, molecular tools and genome sequences are available for a number of model species including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, although for both species there are bottlenecks to be overcome to allow rapid and predictable genetic manipulation. One approach to do this would be to apply the principles of synthetic biology to microalgae, namely the cycle of Design-Build-Test, which requires more robust, predictable and high throughput methods. In this mini-review we highlight recent progress in the areas of improving transgene expression, genome editing, identification and design of standard genetic elements (parts), and the use of microfluidics to increase throughput. We suggest that combining these approaches will provide the means to establish algal synthetic biology, and that application of standard parts and workflows will avoid parallel development and capitalize on lessons learned from other systems. PMID:27284033

  2. Towards developing algal synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Mark Aden; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-06-15

    The genetic, physiological and metabolic diversity of microalgae has driven fundamental research into photosynthesis, flagella structure and function, and eukaryotic evolution. Within the last 10 years these organisms have also been investigated as potential biotechnology platforms, for example to produce high value compounds such as long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, pigments and antioxidants, and for biodiesel precursors, in particular triacylglycerols (TAGs). Transformation protocols, molecular tools and genome sequences are available for a number of model species including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, although for both species there are bottlenecks to be overcome to allow rapid and predictable genetic manipulation. One approach to do this would be to apply the principles of synthetic biology to microalgae, namely the cycle of Design-Build-Test, which requires more robust, predictable and high throughput methods. In this mini-review we highlight recent progress in the areas of improving transgene expression, genome editing, identification and design of standard genetic elements (parts), and the use of microfluidics to increase throughput. We suggest that combining these approaches will provide the means to establish algal synthetic biology, and that application of standard parts and workflows will avoid parallel development and capitalize on lessons learned from other systems.

  3. Cell density-dependent nuclear accumulation of ELK3 is involved in suppression of PAI-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shu; Nakao, Kazuyuki; Sekimoto, Toshihiro; Oka, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2013-07-01

    Cell-cell contact regulates the proliferation and differentiation of non-transformed cells, e.g., NIH/3T3 cells show growth arrest at high cell density. However, only a few reports described the dynamic behavior of transcription factors involved in this process. In this study, we showed that the mRNA levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) decreased drastically at high cell density, and that ELK3, a member of the Ets transcription factor family, repressed PAI-1 expression. We also demonstrated that while ELK3 was distributed evenly throughout the cell at low cell density, it accumulated in the nucleus at high cell density, and that binding of DNA by ELK3 at the A domain facilitated its nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, we found that ETS1, a PAI-1 activator, occupied the ELK3-binding site within the PAI-1 promoter at low cell density, while it was released at high cell density. These results suggest that at high cell density, the switching of binding of transcription factors from ETS1 to ELK3 occurs at a specific binding site of the PAI-1 promoter, leading to the cell-density dependent suppression of PAI-1 expression.

  4. Regulation of the membrane estrogen receptor-α: role of cell density, serum, cell passage number, and estradiol

    PubMed Central

    CAMPBELL, CELESTE H.; BULAYEVA, NATALIYA; BROWN, DAVID B.; GAMETCHU, BAHIRU; WATSON, CHERYL S.

    2005-01-01

    We used modified immunocytochemical conditions to quantify a membrane form of estrogen receptor-α (mERα) in a rat pituitary tumor cell line, GH3/B6/F10. We studied the regulation of mERα vs. levels of intracellular ERα (iERα) using our 96-well plate immunoassay. The anti-ERα antibody C542 was used to label the ERα (via conjugated alkaline phosphatase) in fixed permeabilized (for iERα) vs. nonpermeabilized cells (for mERα). Expression of mERα was highest at low cell densities (<1000 cells/well) and decreased significantly at densities where cellular processes touched, whereas the more abundant iERα increased with increasing cell density over the same range. Serum starvation for 48 h caused increases in mERα, whereas iERα levels showed no significant changes. A large decline in mERα and iERα levels with cell passage number was observed. Minutes after nM 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment, a portion of the cells rounded up and detached from the culture plate, whereas nM cholesterol had no such effect. Although E2 treatment did not change mERα levels, the antigen was reorganized from a fine particulate to aggregation into asymmetric large granules of staining. That common culturing conditions favor down-regulation of mERα may explain the relatively few reports of this protein in other experimental systems.—Campbell, C. H., Bulayeva, N., Brown, D. B., Gametchu, B., Watson, C. S. Regulation of the membrane estrogen receptor-α: role of cell density, serum, cell passage number, and estradiol. PMID:12468456

  5. The Role of Surface Receptor Density in Surface-Initiated Polymerizations for Cancer Cell Isolation.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Jacob L; Berron, Brad J

    2016-06-01

    Fluid biopsies potentially offer a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsies for the continual monitoring of metastatic cancer. Current established technologies for isolating circulating tumor cells (CTCs) suffer from poor purity and yield and require fixatives that preclude the collection of viable cells for longitudinal analyses of biological function. Antigen specific lysis (ASL) is a rapid, high-purity method of cell isolation based on targeted protective coatings on antigen-presenting cells and lysis depletion of unprotected antigen-negative cells. In ASL, photoinitiators are specifically labeled on cell surfaces that enable subsequent surface-initiated polymerization. Critically, the significant determinants of process yield have yet to be investigated for this emerging technology. In this work, we show that the labeling density of photoinitiators is strongly correlated with the yield of intact cells during ASL by flow cytometry analysis. Results suggest ASL is capable of delivering ∼25% of targeted cells after isolation using traditional antibody labeling approaches. Monomer formulations of two molecular weights of PEG-diacrylate (Mn ∼ 575 and 3500) are examined. The gelation response during ASL polymerization is also investigated via protein microarray analogues on planar glass. Finally, a density threshold of photoinitiator labeling required for protection during lysis is determined for both monomer formulations. These results indicate ASL is a promising technology for high yield CTC isolation for rare-cell function assays and fluid biopsies. PMID:27206735

  6. Cell and neuron densities in the primary motor cortex of primates

    PubMed Central

    Young, Nicole A.; Collins, Christine E.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2013-01-01

    Cell and neuron densities vary across the cortical sheet in a predictable manner across different primate species (Collins et al., 2010b). Primary motor cortex, M1, is characterized by lower neuron densities relative to other cortical areas. M1 contains a motor representation map of contralateral body parts from tail to tongue in a mediolateral sequence. Different functional movement representations within M1 likely require specialized microcircuitry for control of different body parts, and these differences in circuitry may be reflected by variation in cell and neuron densities. Here we determined cell and neuron densities for multiple sub-regions of M1 in six primate species, using the semi-automated flow fractionator method. The results verify previous reports of lower overall neuron densities in M1 compared to other parts of cortex in the six primate species examined. The most lateral regions of M1 that correspond to face and hand movement representations, are more neuron dense relative to medial locations in M1, which suggests differences in cortical circuitry within movement zones. PMID:23450743

  7. The effect of cell size and channel density on neuronal information encoding and energy efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Biswa; Faisal, A Aldo; Laughlin, Simon B; Niven, Jeremy E

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the determinants of neuronal energy consumption and their relationship to information coding is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Three of the main determinants are cell size, ion channel density, and stimulus statistics. Here we investigate their impact on neuronal energy consumption and information coding by comparing single-compartment spiking neuron models of different sizes with different densities of stochastic voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels and different statistics of synaptic inputs. The largest compartments have the highest information rates but the lowest energy efficiency for a given voltage-gated ion channel density, and the highest signaling efficiency (bits spike−1) for a given firing rate. For a given cell size, our models revealed that the ion channel density that maximizes energy efficiency is lower than that maximizing information rate. Low rates of small synaptic inputs improve energy efficiency but the highest information rates occur with higher rates and larger inputs. These relationships produce a Law of Diminishing Returns that penalizes costly excess information coding capacity, promoting the reduction of cell size, channel density, and input stimuli to the minimum possible, suggesting that the trade-off between energy and information has influenced all aspects of neuronal anatomy and physiology. PMID:23778164

  8. The effect of cell size and channel density on neuronal information encoding and energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Faisal, A Aldo; Laughlin, Simon B; Niven, Jeremy E

    2013-09-01

    Identifying the determinants of neuronal energy consumption and their relationship to information coding is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Three of the main determinants are cell size, ion channel density, and stimulus statistics. Here we investigate their impact on neuronal energy consumption and information coding by comparing single-compartment spiking neuron models of different sizes with different densities of stochastic voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels and different statistics of synaptic inputs. The largest compartments have the highest information rates but the lowest energy efficiency for a given voltage-gated ion channel density, and the highest signaling efficiency (bits spike(-1)) for a given firing rate. For a given cell size, our models revealed that the ion channel density that maximizes energy efficiency is lower than that maximizing information rate. Low rates of small synaptic inputs improve energy efficiency but the highest information rates occur with higher rates and larger inputs. These relationships produce a Law of Diminishing Returns that penalizes costly excess information coding capacity, promoting the reduction of cell size, channel density, and input stimuli to the minimum possible, suggesting that the trade-off between energy and information has influenced all aspects of neuronal anatomy and physiology.

  9. Density-based separation in multiphase systems provides a simple method to identify sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok A.; Patton, Matthew R.; Hennek, Jonathan W.; Lee, Si Yi Ryan; D’Alesio-Spina, Gaetana; Yang, Xiaoxi; Kanter, Julie; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.; Brugnara, Carlo; Whitesides, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Although effective low-cost interventions exist, child mortality attributable to sickle cell disease (SCD) remains high in low-resource areas due, in large part, to the lack of accessible diagnostic methods. The presence of dense (ρ > 1.120 g/cm3) cells is characteristic of SCD. The fluid, self-assembling step-gradients in density created by aqueous multiphase systems (AMPSs) identifies SCD by detecting dense cells. AMPSs separate different forms of red blood cells by density in a microhematocrit centrifuge and provide a visual means to distinguish individuals with SCD from those with normal hemoglobin or with nondisease, sickle-cell trait in under 12 min. Visual evaluation of a simple two-phase system identified the two main subclasses of SCD [homozygous (Hb SS) and heterozygous (Hb SC)] with a sensitivity of 90% (73–98%) and a specificity of 97% (86–100%). A three-phase system identified these two types of SCD with a sensitivity of 91% (78–98%) and a specificity of 88% (74–98%). This system could also distinguish between Hb SS and Hb SC. To the authors’ knowledge, this test demonstrates the first separation of cells by density with AMPSs, and the usefulness of AMPSs in point-of-care diagnostic hematology. PMID:25197072

  10. Method of Fabrication of High Power Density Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2008-09-09

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O(LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  11. Density measurement of samples under high pressure using synchrotron microtomography and diamond anvil cell techniques

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Haozhe; Wang, Luhong; De Carlo, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Accurate mass density information is critical in high-pressure studies of materials. It is, however, very difficult to measure the mass densities of amorphous materials under high pressure with a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Employing tomography to measure mass density of amorphous samples under high pressure in a DAC has recently been reported. In reality, the tomography data of a sample in a DAC suffers from not only noise but also from the missing angle problem owing to the geometry of the DAC. An algorithm that can suppress noise and overcome the missing angle problem has been developed to obtain accurate mass density information from such ill-posed data. The validity of the proposed methods was supported with simulations. PMID:20400834

  12. Dietary guidance normalizes large intestinal endocrine cell densities in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mazzawi, T; Hausken, T; Gundersen, D; El-Salhy, M

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: To determine the large intestinal endocrine cell types affected following dietary guidance in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Subjects/Methods: The study included 13 IBS patients and 13 control subjects. The patients received three sessions of individualized dietary guidance. Both the control subjects and the patients were scheduled for colonoscopies at baseline and again for the patients at 3–9 months after dietary guidance. Biopsy samples were taken from the colon and rectum and were immunostained for all types of large intestinal endocrine cells. The endocrine cells were quantified using computerized image analysis. Results: The daily total consumption (mean±s.e.m. values) of fruits and vegetables rich in FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) decreased significantly from 16.2±5.3 g before receiving dietary guidance to 9.2±3.2 g after receiving dietary guidance (P=0.02). In the total colon, the densities of serotonin cells were 46.8±8.9, 10.5±2.1 and 22.6±3.2 cells/mm2 in control subjects and in IBS patients before and after receiving dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.007); the corresponding densities of peptide YY cells were 11.6±1.8, 10.8±1.7 and 16.8±2.1 cells/mm2, respectively (P=0.06). The cell densities for both serotonin and peptide YY did not change significantly in the rectum. The densities of somatostatin cells in the rectum were 13.5±3.0, 13.2±3.0, and 22.3±3.2 cells/mm2 for control subjects and for IBS patients before and after receiving dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.01). Conclusions: The densities of the large intestinal endocrine cells tend to normalize following dietary guidance that may have contributed to the improvement of the patients with IBS symptoms. PMID:26603880

  13. A KINETIC MODEL FOR CELL DENSITY DEPENDENT BACTERIAL TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic transport model with the ability to account for variations in cell density of the aqueous and solid phases was developed for bacteria in porous media. Sorption kinetics in the advective-dispersive-sorptive equation was described by assuming that adsorption was proportio...

  14. On-line near infrared bioreactor monitoring of cell density and concentrations of glucose and lactate during insect cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiang; Arnold, Mark A; Murhammer, David W

    2014-03-10

    Near infrared spectroscopy is demonstrated as a suitable method for monitoring real time cell density and concentrations of glucose and lactate during insect cell cultivation. The utility of this approach is illustrated during the cultivation of Trichoplusia ni BTI-Tn-5B1-4 insect cells in a stirred-tank bioreactor. On-line near infrared measurements are made by passing unaltered culture medium through an autoclavable near infrared flow-through sample cell during the cultivation process. Single-beam near infrared spectra were collected over the combination spectral range (5000-4000cm(-1)) through a 1.5mm path length sample. Cell density calibration model was established by uni-variable linear regressions with measured mean absorbance values of on-line spectra collected during a cultivation run. Calibration models are generated for glucose and lactate by regression analysis of both off line and on line spectra collected during a series of pre-measurement cultivation runs. Analyte-specific calibration models are generated by using a combination of spectra from both natural, unaltered samples and samples spiked with known levels of glucose and lactate. Spiked samples are used to destroy concentration correlations between solutes, thereby enhancing the selectivity of the calibration models. Absorbance spectra are used to build partial least squares calibration models for glucose and lactate. The calibration model for cell density corresponds to a univariate linear regression calibration model based on the mean absorbance between 4750 and 4250cm(-1). The standard errors of prediction are 1.54mM, 0.83mM, and 0.38×10(6)cells/mL for the glucose, lactate, and cell density models, respectively.

  15. Location and Density of Immune Cells in Precursor Lesions and Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Astrid M; Jaramillo, Roberto; Baena, Armando; Castaño, Jorge; Olaya, Natalia; Zea, Arnold H; Herrero, Rolando; Sanchez, Gloria I

    2013-04-01

    Only a small proportion of women infected with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) develop cervical cancer. Host immune response seems to play a role eliminating the viral infection and preventing progression to cancer. Characterization of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in cervical pre-neoplastic lesions and cervical cancer may be helpful to understand the mechanisms that mediate this protection. The aim of this study was to determine if there are differences in the localization and density (cells/mm(2)) of CD8+ T-cells, CD4+ T-cells and Tregs (CD25 + Foxp3+) in cervical pre-neoplastic lesions and cervical cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of sections of 96 (26 CIN1, 21 CIN2, 25 CIN3, and 24 SCC) samples revealed that regardless of CIN grades, CD8+ T-cells are more abundant than CD4+, CD25+ and Foxp3+ cells in both the stroma and epithelium. There was a higher density of CD8+ cells in the stroma of cervical cancer compared to CIN3 (OR = 4.20, 95% CI 1.2-15), CIN2 (OR = 7.86, 95% CI 1.7-36.4) and CIN1 (OR = 4.25, 95% CI 1.1-17). Studies evaluating whether these cells are recruited before or after cancer progression will be helpful to understand the role of these cells in the natural history of HPV-induced lesions.

  16. Topological constraint in high-density cells' tracking of image sequences.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunming; Ma, Ling; Xu, Dongbin

    2011-01-01

    The multi-target tracking in cell image sequences is the main difficulty in cells' locomotion study. Aim to study cells' complexity movement in high-density cells' image, this chapter has proposed a system of segmentation and tracking. The proposed tracking algorithm has combined overlapping and topological constraints with track inactive and active cells, respectively. In order to improve performance of algorithm, size factor has been introduced as a new restriction to quantification criterion of similarity based on Zhang's method. And the distance threshold for transforming segmented image into graph is adjusted on considering the local distribution of cells' district in one image. The improved algorithm has been tested in two different image sequences, which have high or low contrast ration separately. Experimental results show that our approach has improved tracking accuracy from 3% to 9% compared with Zhang's algorithm, especially when cells are in high density and cells' splitting occurred frequently. And the final tracking accuracy can reach 90.24% and 77.08%.

  17. Selective Differentiation of Neural Progenitor Cells by High-Epitope Density Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Gabriel A.; Czeisler, Catherine; Niece, Krista L.; Beniash, Elia; Harrington, Daniel A.; Kessler, John A.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2004-02-01

    Neural progenitor cells were encapsulated in vitro within a three-dimensional network of nanofibers formed by self-assembly of peptide amphiphile molecules. The self-assembly is triggered by mixing cell suspensions in media with dilute aqueous solutions of the molecules, and cells survive the growth of the nanofibers around them. These nanofibers were designed to present to cells the neurite-promoting laminin epitope IKVAV at nearly van der Waals density. Relative to laminin or soluble peptide, the artificial nanofiber scaffold induced very rapid differentiation of cells into neurons, while discouraging the development of astrocytes. This rapid selective differentiation is linked to the amplification of bioactive epitope presentation to cells by the nanofibers.

  18. Algal Supply System Design - Harmonized Version

    SciTech Connect

    Abodeely, Jared; Stevens, Daniel; Ray, Allison; Newby, Deborah; Schaller, Kastli

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this design report is to provide an assessment of current technologies used for production, dewatering, and converting microalgae cultivated in open-pond systems to biofuel. The original draft design was created in 2011 and has subsequently been brought into agreement with the DOE harmonized model. The design report extends beyond this harmonized model to discuss some of the challenges with assessing algal production systems, including the ability to (1) quickly assess alternative algal production system designs, (2) assess spatial and temporal variability, and (3) perform large-scale assessments considering multiple scenarios for thousands of potential sites. The Algae Logistics Model (ALM) was developed to address each of these limitations of current modeling efforts to enable assessment of the economic feasibility of algal production systems across the United States. The (ALM) enables (1) dynamic assessments using spatiotemporal conditions, (2) exploration of algal production system design configurations, (3) investigation of algal production system operating assumptions, and (4) trade-off assessments with technology decisions and operating assumptions. The report discusses results from the ALM, which is used to assess the baseline design determined by harmonization efforts between U.S. DOE national laboratories. Productivity and resource assessment data is provided by coupling the ALM with the Biomass Assessment Tool developed at PNNL. This high-fidelity data is dynamically passed to the ALM and used to help better understand the impacts of spatial and temporal constraints on algal production systems by providing a cost for producing extracted algal lipids annually for each potential site.

  19. The Effect of Substrate Stiffness, Thickness, and Cross-Linking Density on Osteogenic Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Conleth A.; Vaughan, Ted J.; Billiar, Kristen L.; McNamara, Laoise M.

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenic cells respond to mechanical changes in their environment by altering their spread area, morphology, and gene expression profile. In particular, the bulk modulus of the substrate, as well as its microstructure and thickness, can substantially alter the local stiffness experienced by the cell. Although bone tissue regeneration strategies involve culture of bone cells on various biomaterial scaffolds, which are often cross-linked to enhance their physical integrity, it is difficult to ascertain and compare the local stiffness experienced by cells cultured on different biomaterials. In this study, we seek to characterize the local stiffness at the cellular level for MC3T3-E1 cells plated on biomaterial substrates of varying modulus, thickness, and cross-linking concentration. Cells were cultured on flat and wedge-shaped gels made from polyacrylamide or cross-linked collagen. The cross-linking density of the collagen gels was varied to investigate the effect of fiber cross-linking in conjunction with substrate thickness. Cell spread area was used as a measure of osteogenic differentiation. Finite element simulations were used to examine the effects of fiber cross-linking and substrate thickness on the resistance of the gel to cellular forces, corresponding to the equivalent shear stiffness for the gel structure in the region directly surrounding the cell. The results of this study show that MC3T3 cells cultured on a soft fibrous substrate attain the same spread cell area as those cultured on a much higher modulus, but nonfibrous substrate. Finite element simulations predict that a dramatic increase in the equivalent shear stiffness of fibrous collagen gels occurs as cross-linking density is increased, with equivalent stiffness also increasing as gel thickness is decreased. These results provide an insight into the response of osteogenic cells to individual substrate parameters and have the potential to inform future bone tissue regeneration strategies that

  20. Cell Density Sensing Alters TGF-β Signaling in a Cell-Type-Specific Manner, Independent from Hippo Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nallet-Staub, Flore; Yin, Xueqian; Gilbert, Cristèle; Marsaud, Véronique; Ben Mimoun, Saber; Javelaud, Delphine; Leof, Edward B.; Mauviel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell-cell contacts inhibit cell growth and proliferation in part by activating the Hippo pathway that drives the phosphorylation and nuclear exclusion of the transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ. Cell density and Hippo signaling have also been reported to block transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) responses, based on the ability of phospho-YAP/TAZ to sequester TGF-β-activated SMAD complexes in the cytoplasm. Herein, we provide evidence that epithelial cell polarization interferes with TGF-β signaling well upstream and independent of cytoplasmic YAP/TAZ. Rather, polarized basolateral presentation of TGF-β receptors I and II deprives apically delivered TGF-β of access to its receptors. Basolateral ligand delivery nonetheless remains entirely effective to induce TGF-β responses. These data demonstrate that cell-type-specific inhibition of TGF-β signaling by cell density is restricted to polarized epithelial cells and reflects the polarized distribution of TGF-β receptors, which thus affects SMAD activation irrespective of Hippo pathway activation. PMID:25758862

  1. A High Power-Density, Mediator-Free, Microfluidic Biophotovoltaic Device for Cyanobacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bombelli, Paolo; Müller, Thomas; Herling, Therese W; Howe, Christopher J; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2015-01-01

    Biophotovoltaics has emerged as a promising technology for generating renewable energy because it relies on living organisms as inexpensive, self-repairing, and readily available catalysts to produce electricity from an abundant resource: sunlight. The efficiency of biophotovoltaic cells, however, has remained significantly lower than that achievable through synthetic materials. Here, a platform is devised to harness the large power densities afforded by miniaturized geometries. To this effect, a soft-lithography approach is developed for the fabrication of microfluidic biophotovoltaic devices that do not require membranes or mediators. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells are injected and allowed to settle on the anode, permitting the physical proximity between cells and electrode required for mediator-free operation. Power densities of above 100 mW m-2 are demonstrated for a chlorophyll concentration of 100 μM under white light, which is a high value for biophotovoltaic devices without extrinsic supply of additional energy. PMID:26190957

  2. Quantitative Autofluorescence and Cell Density Maps of the Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ach, Thomas; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zhang, Tianjiao; Bentley, Mark J.; Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Smith, R. Theodore; Sloan, Kenneth R.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Lipofuscin (LF) accumulation within RPE cells is considered pathogenic in AMD. To test whether LF contributes to RPE cell loss in aging and to provide a cellular basis for fundus autofluorescence (AF) we created maps of human RPE cell number and histologic AF. Methods. Retinal pigment epithelium–Bruch's membrane flat mounts were prepared from 20 donor eyes (10 ≤ 51 and 10 > 80 years; postmortem: ≤4.2 hours; no retinal pathologies), preserving foveal position. Phalloidin-binding RPE cytoskeleton and LF-AF (488-nm excitation) were imaged at up to 90 predefined positions. Maps were assembled from 83,330 cells in 1470 locations. From Voronoi regions representing each cell, the number of neighbors, cell area, and total AF intensity normalized to an AF standard was determined. Results. Highly variable between individuals, RPE-AF increases significantly with age. A perifoveal ring of high AF mirrors rod photoreceptor topography and fundus-AF. Retinal pigment epithelium cell density peaks at the fovea, independent of age, yet no net RPE cell loss is detectable. The RPE monolayer undergoes considerable lifelong re-modeling. The relationship of cell size and AF, a surrogate for LF concentration, is orderly and linear in both groups. Autofluorescence topography differs distinctly from the topography of age-related rod loss. Conclusions. Digital maps of quantitative AF, cell density, and packing geometry provide metrics for cellular-resolution clinical imaging and model systems. The uncoupling of RPE LF content, cell number, and photoreceptor topography in aging challenges LF's role in AMD. PMID:25034602

  3. Anatomical Mapping and Density of Merkel Cells in Skin and Mucosae of the Dog.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Gustavo A; Rodríguez, Francisco; Quesada, Óscar; Herráez, Pedro; Fernández, Antonio; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Merkel cells (MCs) are specialized cutaneous receptor cells involved with tactile sense. Although the distribution of MCs has been extensively studied in humans and rodents, their precise distribution and density throughout skin in the dog has not previously been determined. Knowledge of their distribution could facilitate understanding of their functions. By using of immunohistochemistry, density, and anatomical mapping of the MCs population in the dog skin was determined. Assessment of the MCs innervation was also achieved. Different patterns were noted in epidermis, hair follicles, or mucosa, including variable-sized clusters, linear or horse-shaped arrangements, and scattered and individualized cells. MCs revealed great variations in density and distribution over the body surface, with the highest numbers in oral mucosa and facial skin. There was no correlation of MCs density with age, sex, type of breed, coat type or pigmentation. Between 41 and 65% of MCs in hairy and glabrous skin and 8-18% of MCs in oral mucosa were in intimate contact with intraepithelial axon terminals. These findings indicate that canine MCs are numerous in sensory receptive areas and may be associated with the tactile sense in the dog. The present article enhances the knowledge of the skin structure in this species. Anat Rec, 299:1157-1164, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27341526

  4. Anatomical Mapping and Density of Merkel Cells in Skin and Mucosae of the Dog.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Gustavo A; Rodríguez, Francisco; Quesada, Óscar; Herráez, Pedro; Fernández, Antonio; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Merkel cells (MCs) are specialized cutaneous receptor cells involved with tactile sense. Although the distribution of MCs has been extensively studied in humans and rodents, their precise distribution and density throughout skin in the dog has not previously been determined. Knowledge of their distribution could facilitate understanding of their functions. By using of immunohistochemistry, density, and anatomical mapping of the MCs population in the dog skin was determined. Assessment of the MCs innervation was also achieved. Different patterns were noted in epidermis, hair follicles, or mucosa, including variable-sized clusters, linear or horse-shaped arrangements, and scattered and individualized cells. MCs revealed great variations in density and distribution over the body surface, with the highest numbers in oral mucosa and facial skin. There was no correlation of MCs density with age, sex, type of breed, coat type or pigmentation. Between 41 and 65% of MCs in hairy and glabrous skin and 8-18% of MCs in oral mucosa were in intimate contact with intraepithelial axon terminals. These findings indicate that canine MCs are numerous in sensory receptive areas and may be associated with the tactile sense in the dog. The present article enhances the knowledge of the skin structure in this species. Anat Rec, 299:1157-1164, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The reasons for the high power density of fuel cells fabricated with directly deposited membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierrath, Severin; Breitwieser, Matthias; Klingele, Matthias; Britton, Benjamin; Holdcroft, Steven; Zengerle, Roland; Thiele, Simon

    2016-09-01

    In a previous study, we reported that polymer electrolyte fuel cells prepared by direct membrane deposition (DMD) produced power densities in excess of 4 W/cm2. In this study, the underlying origins that give rise to these high power densities are investigated and reported. The membranes of high power, DMD-fabricated fuel cells are relatively thin (12 μm) compared to typical benchmark, commercially available membranes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, at high current densities (2.2 A/cm2) reveals that mass transport resistance was half that of reference, catalyst-coated-membranes (CCM). This is attributed to an improved oxygen supply in the cathode catalyst layer by way of a reduced propensity of flooding, and which is facilitated by an enhancement in the back diffusion of water from cathode to anode through the thin directly deposited membrane. DMD-fabricated membrane-electrode-assemblies possess 50% reduction in ionic resistance (15 mΩcm2) compared to conventional CCMs, with contributions of 9 mΩcm2 for the membrane resistance and 6 mΩcm2 for the contact resistance of the membrane and catalyst layer ionomer. The improved mass transport is responsible for 90% of the increase in power density of the DMD fuel cell, while the reduced ionic resistance accounts for a 10% of the improvement.

  6. Two coexisting tank bromeliads host distinct algal communities on a tropical inselberg.

    PubMed

    Carrias, J-F; Céréghino, R; Brouard, O; Pélozuelo, L; Dejean, A; Couté, A; Corbara, B; Leroy, C

    2014-09-01

    The tank bromeliads Aechmea aquilega (Salisb.) and Catopsis berteroniana (Schultes f.) coexist on a sun-exposed Neotropical inselberg in French Guiana, where they permit conspicuous freshwater pools to form that differ in size, complexity and detritus content. We sampled the algal communities (both eukaryotic and cyanobacterial taxa, including colourless forms) inhabiting either A. aquilega (n = 31) or C. berteroniana (n = 30) and examined differences in community composition and biomass patterns in relation to several biotic and abiotic variables. Chlorella sp. and Bumilleriopsis sp. were the most common taxa and dominated the algal biomass in A. aquilega and C. berteroniana, respectively. Using a redundancy analysis, we found that water volume, habitat complexity and the density of phagotrophic protozoa and collector-gatherer invertebrates were the main factors explaining the distribution of the algal taxa among the samples. Hierarchical clustering procedures based on abundance and presence/absence data clearly segregated the samples according to bromeliad species, revealing that the algal communities in the smaller bromeliad species were not a subset of the communities found in the larger bromeliad species. We conclude that, even though two coexisting tank bromeliad populations create adjacent aquatic habitats, each population hosts a distinct algal community. Hence, bromeliad diversity is thought to promote the local diversity of freshwater algae in the Neotropics. PMID:24400863

  7. Platy algal banks: Modern and ancient

    SciTech Connect

    Brinton, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Plaly algal banks and associated cycles in the lower Ismay zone of the Paradox Formation are exposed along the walls of the San Juan River canyon, southeastern Utah. These complexes closely resemble algal bank reservoirs in the lower Ismay zone of Ismay and Cache, and possibly other Paradox basin fields. Similarities include facies relationships, lateral and vertical textural variations, and early diagenesis. Extensive algal banks exposed along the San Juan canyon generally have flat bases and mound and swale topographic surfaces, and are separated by interbank channels. The surficial mounds have a regular amplitude and wavelength suggesting a hydrologic rather than biologic influence on topography. The banks themselves, however, are believed to be thick, predominantly in-situ accumulations of platy algae. Distribution of algal banks can be mapped on a field scale; mound and swale topographic features may be identified in core on the basis of depositional and early diagenetic characteristics. Halimeda bioherms (Holocene) cover large areas behind the Great Barrier Reef, developing adjacent to the deep passes that separate the individual reefs. These large in-situ accumulations (20-50 m deep) display similar bank geometries, interbank features, topographic features, vertical textural sequence (including porosity type and distribution), and facies relationships to algal banks observed in the outcropping and subsurface Paradox Formation. Although the hydrodynamic and paleobathymetric settings differ markedly between these two examples, analogies between the mounds themselves are very close. The resemblance lends relevance to exploration and development drilling.

  8. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Related Proteins as Regulators of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Landowski, Lila M.; Young, Kaylene M.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a highly organised structure. Many signalling systems work in concert to ensure that neural stem cells are appropriately directed to generate progenitor cells, which in turn mature into functional cell types including projection neurons, interneurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Herein we explore the role of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family, in particular family members LRP1 and LRP2, in regulating the behaviour of neural stem and progenitor cells during development and adulthood. The ability of LRP1 and LRP2 to bind a diverse and extensive range of ligands, regulate ligand endocytosis, recruit nonreceptor tyrosine kinases for direct signal transduction and signal in conjunction with other receptors, enables them to modulate many crucial neural cell functions. PMID:26949399

  9. Current source density correlates of cerebellar Golgi and Purkinje cell responses to tactile input

    PubMed Central

    Tahon, Koen; Wijnants, Mike; De Schutter, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The overall circuitry of the cerebellar cortex has been known for over a century, but the function of many synaptic connections remains poorly characterized in vivo. We used a one-dimensional multielectrode probe to estimate the current source density (CSD) of Crus IIa in response to perioral tactile stimuli in anesthetized rats and to correlate current sinks and sources to changes in the spike rate of corecorded Golgi and Purkinje cells. The punctate stimuli evoked two distinct early waves of excitation (at <10 and ∼20 ms) associated with current sinks in the granular layer. The second wave was putatively of corticopontine origin, and its associated sink was located higher in the granular layer than the first trigeminal sink. The distinctive patterns of granular-layer sinks correlated with the spike responses of corecorded Golgi cells. In general, Golgi cell spike responses could be linearly reconstructed from the CSD profile. A dip in simple-spike activity of coregistered Purkinje cells correlated with a current source deep in the molecular layer, probably generated by basket cell synapses, interspersed between sparse early sinks presumably generated by synapses from granule cells. The late (>30 ms) enhancement of simple-spike activity in Purkinje cells was characterized by the absence of simultaneous sinks in the granular layer and by the suppression of corecorded Golgi cell activity, pointing at inhibition of Golgi cells by Purkinje axon collaterals as a likely mechanism of late Purkinje cell excitation. PMID:21228303

  10. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  11. Algal conditions in the Caloosahatchee River (1975-79), Lake Okeechobee to Franklin Lock, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Benjamin F.; La Rose, Henry R.

    1982-01-01

    Maximum numbers of suspended algae occurred in late spring and early summer, in each of the years 1975-79, in the Caloosahatchee River. Numbers exceeded 100,000 cells per milliliter at all stations sometime during the study. Concentrations decreased during late summer and autumn and were low during winter, except in January 1979 when numbers at most sites exceeded 100,000 cells per milliliter. The January 1979 bloom coincided with large discharges from Lake Okeechobee. During previous winters, discharges and algal numbers were lower. During other seasons, algal blooms occurred most frequently under low-flow or stagnant conditions. The upstream site at Moore Haven, which had the least discharge and was most stagnant, had consistently higher algal concentrations than downstream sites. Blue-green algae were dominant in the river during the summer at the upstream site throughout the year. The percentage of blue-green algae decreased downstream. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen were inversely correlated with concentrations of algae and decreased to near zero during algal blooms. The low concentrations of these forms of inorganic nitrogen relative to other major nutrients probably favor blue-green algae and limit growth of other algae. Contributions by the basin tributaries to the nutritive condition of the river were small because concentrations of nutrients, algal growth potential, and algae in the tributaries were generally less than those in the river. (USGS)

  12. Problems related to water quality and algal control in Lopez Reservoir, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Richard H.; Averett, Robert C.; Hines, Walter G.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the present enrichment status of Liopez Reservoir in San Luis Obispo county, California, and to evaluate copper sulfate algal treatment found that stratification in the reservoir regulates nutrient release and that algal control has been ineffective. Nuisance algal blooms, particularly from March to June, have been a problem in the warm multipurpose reservoir since it was initially filled following intense storms in 1968-69. The cyanophyte Anabaena unispora has been dominant; cospecies are the diatoms Stephanodiscus astraea and Cyclotella operculata, and the chlorophytes Pediastrum deplex and Sphaerocystis schroeteri. During an A. unispora bloom in May 1972 the total lake surface cell count was nearly 100,000 cells/ml. Thermal stratification from late spring through autumn results in oxygen deficiency in the hypolimnion and metalimnion caused by bacterial oxidation of organic detritus. The anaerobic conditions favor chemical reduction of organic matter, which constitute 10-14% of the sediment. As algae die, sink to the bottom, and decompose, nutrients are released to the hypolimnion , and with the autumn overturn are spread to the epilimnion. Algal blooms not only hamper recreation, but through depletion of dissolved oxygen in the epilimnion may have caused periodic fishkills. Copper sulfate mixed with sodium citrate and applied at 1.10-1.73 lbs/acre has not significantly reduced algal growth; a method for determining correct dosage is presented. (Lynch-Wisconsin)

  13. Correlations between watershed and reservoir characteristics, and algal blooms in subtropical reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Burford, Michele A; Johnson, Suzanne A; Cook, Andrew J; Packer, Timothy V; Taylor, Bradley M; Townsley, E Robert

    2007-10-01

    This study examined the correlations between watershed and reservoir characteristics, and water quality parameters related to algal blooms in seven subtropical reservoirs. Analysis of the dissimilarity of physico-chemical parameters resulted in separation of the reservoirs into three main groups: four reservoirs with the highest proportion of agriculture and/or urban land use in their watersheds; two reservoirs with a high proportion of forest cover; and one small reservoir with a relatively pristine watershed intermediate between the other two groups. All reservoirs were dominated by cyanobacteria, and at times, had species capable of producing toxins. However, the three reservoirs with the lowest percentage forest cover ( approximately 50%) had the highest frequency and magnitude of toxic species, principally Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. Analysis of dissimilarity of algal species composition resulted in three reservoir groups similar to that for the physico-chemical parameters, with the exception of the reservoir with the highest percentage urban land use being an outlier. Across all reservoirs, percentage forest cover in the watershed, watershed area and reservoir volume were all significantly correlated with algal cell concentrations and total nitrogen (TN), but not with chlorophyll a concentrations. Total phosphorus (TP) was only correlated with the proportion forest cover in the watershed, suggesting that reservoir volume and depth were of less importance for TP than for algal cell concentrations or TN. These results suggest that watershed pattern and reservoir characteristics, such as water volume and depth, have a measurable effect on the type of algal blooms in reservoirs. PMID:17632205

  14. Direct alcohol fuel cells: toward the power densities of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxin; Bellini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Fornasiero, Paolo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Miller, Hamish A; Wang, Lianqin; Vizza, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    A 2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanotube arrays was prepared on the surface of the Ti fibers of a nonwoven web electrode. After it was doped with Pd nanoparticles (1.5 mgPd  cm(-2) ), this anode was employed in a direct alcohol fuel cell. Peak power densities of 210, 170, and 160 mW cm(-2) at 80 °C were produced if the cell was fed with 10 wt % aqueous solutions of ethanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol, respectively, in 2 M aqueous KOH. The Pd loading of the anode was increased to 6 mg cm(-2) by combining four single electrodes to produce a maximum peak power density with ethanol at 80 °C of 335 mW cm(-2) . Such high power densities result from a combination of the open 3 D structure of the anode electrode and the high electrochemically active surface area of the Pd catalyst, which promote very fast kinetics for alcohol electro-oxidation. The peak power and current densities obtained with ethanol at 80 °C approach the output of H2 -fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  15. Increased cell proliferation and mucocyte density in the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida recovering from bleaching.

    PubMed

    Fransolet, David; Roberty, Stéphane; Herman, Anne-Catherine; Tonk, Linda; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Plumier, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Recovery of coral after bleaching episodes is a critical period for the health of the reef ecosystem. While events such as symbiont (genus Symbiodinium) shifting/shuffling or tissue apoptosis have been demonstrated to occur following bleaching, little is known concerning tissue recovery or cell proliferation. Here, we studied the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida exposed to a transient elevation of water temperature combined with high illumination (33°C and 1900 µmol photons x m(-2) x s(-1) for 30 h). Following such treatment bleached anemones showed a significant reduction of their Symbiodinium density. Cell proliferation in the ectodermis and gastrodermis was determined by assessing the densities of cells labeled with a thymidine analogue (EdU). Cell proliferation significantly increased during the first day following stress in both tissue types. This increased cell proliferation returned to pre-stress values after one week. Although cell proliferation was higher in the ectodermis in absence of stress, it was relatively more pronounced in the gastrodermis of stressed anemones. In addition, the ratio of ectodermal mucocytes significantly increased three weeks after induced stress. These results suggest that thermal/photic stress coupled with the loss of the symbionts is able to enhance cell proliferation in both gastrodermis and ectodermis of cnidarians. While new cells formed in the gastrodermis are likely to host new Symbiodinium, the fate of new cells in the ectodermis was only partially revealed. Some new ectodermal cells may, in part, contribute to the increased number of mucocytes which could eventually help strengthen the heterotrophic state until restoration of the symbiosis. PMID:23724115

  16. Algal photoreceptors: in vivo functions and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Many algae, particularly microalgae, possess a sophisticated light-sensing system including photoreceptors and light-modulated signaling pathways to sense environmental information and secure the survival in a rapidly changing environment. Over the last couple of years, the multifaceted world of algal photobiology has enriched our understanding of the light absorption mechanisms and in vivo function of photoreceptors. Moreover, specific light-sensitive modules have already paved the way for the development of optogenetic tools to generate light switches for precise and spatial control of signaling pathways in individual cells and even in complex biological systems. PMID:24081482

  17. Hippo signaling regulates microprocessor and links cell-density-dependent miRNA biogenesis to cancer.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masaki; Triboulet, Robinson; Mohseni, Morvarid; Schlegelmilch, Karin; Shrestha, Kriti; Camargo, Fernando D; Gregory, Richard I

    2014-02-27

    Global downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in human cancers and can have a causative role in tumorigenesis. The mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, we show that YAP, the downstream target of the tumor-suppressive Hippo-signaling pathway regulates miRNA biogenesis in a cell-density-dependent manner. At low cell density, nuclear YAP binds and sequesters p72 (DDX17), a regulatory component of the miRNA-processing machinery. At high cell density, Hippo-mediated cytoplasmic retention of YAP facilitates p72 association with Microprocessor and binding to a specific sequence motif in pri-miRNAs. Inactivation of the Hippo pathway or expression of constitutively active YAP causes widespread miRNA suppression in cells and tumors and a corresponding posttranscriptional induction of MYC expression. Thus, the Hippo pathway links contact-inhibition regulation to miRNA biogenesis and may be responsible for the widespread miRNA repression observed in cancer.

  18. Microbial high cell density fermentations in a stirred single-use bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Dreher, Thomas; Walcarius, Bart; Husemann, Ute; Klingenberg, Franziska; Zahnow, Christian; Adams, Thorsten; de Wilde, Davy; Casteels, Peter; Greller, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    : Microbial fermentations are of major importance in the field of biotechnology. The range of applications is rather extensive, for example, the production of vaccines, recombinant proteins, and plasmids. During the past decades single-use bioreactors have become widely accepted in the biopharmaceutical industry. This acceptance is due to the several advantages these bioreactors offer, such as reduced operational and investment costs. Although this technology is attractive for microbial applications, its usage is rarely found. The main limitations are a relatively low oxygen transfer rate and cooling capacity. The aim of this study was to examine a stirred single-use bioreactor for its microbial suitability. Therefore, the important process engineering parameters volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k L a), mixing time, and the heat transfer coefficient were determined. Based on the k L a characteristics a mathematical model was established that was used with the other process engineering parameters to create a control space. For a further verification of the control space for microbial suitability, Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris high cell density fermentations were carried out. The achieved cell density for the E. coli fermentation was OD600 = 175 (DCW = 60.8 g/L). For the P. pastoris cultivation a wet cell weight of 381 g/L was reached. The achieved cell densities were comparable to fermentations in stainless steel bioreactors. Furthermore, the expression of recombinant proteins with titers up to 9 g/L was guaranteed.

  19. High gravity and high cell density mitigate some of the fermentation inhibitory effects of softwood hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    After steam pretreatment of lignocellulosic substrates the fermentation of the biomass derived sugars to ethanol is typically problematic because of both the generally low sugar concentrations that can be supplied and the presence of naturally occurring and process derived inhibitors. As the majority of the inhibitory materials are usually associated with the hemicellulose rich, water soluble component, this fraction was supplemented with glucose to simulate high solids, un-detoxified substrate to see if a high gravity/high cell consistency approach might better cope with inhibition. Several yeast strains were assessed, with the Tembec T1, T2 and Lallemand LYCC 6469 strains showing the greatest ethanol productivity and yield. The addition of supplemental glucose enabled the faster and quantitatively higher removal of hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). High cell density could provide effective fermentation at high sugar concentrations while enhancing inhibitor reduction. A 77% ethanol yield could be achieved using strain LYCC 6469 after 48 h at high cell density. It was apparent that a high cell density approach improved ethanol production by all of the evaluated yeast strains. PMID:23410516

  20. High-efficiency rare cell identification on a high-density self-assembled cell arrangement chip

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsung-Ju; Wu, Jen-Kuei; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Fu, Chien-Yu; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chang, Hwan-You; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Tzeng, Chung-Yuh; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Detection of individual target cells among a large amount of blood cells is a major challenge in clinical diagnosis and laboratory protocols. Many researches show that two dimensional cells array technology can be incorporated into routine laboratory procedures for continuously and quantitatively measuring the dynamic behaviours of large number of living cells in parallel, while allowing other manipulations such as staining, rinsing, and even retrieval of targeted cells. In this study, we present a high-density cell self-assembly technology capable of quickly spreading over 300 000 cells to form a dense mono- to triple-layer cell arrangement in 5 min with minimal stacking of cells by the gentle incorporation of gravity and peripheral micro flow. With this self-assembled cell arrangement (SACA) chip technology, common fluorescent microscopy and immunofluorescence can be utilized for detecting and analyzing target cells after immuno-staining. Validated by experiments with real human peripheral blood samples, the SACA chip is suitable for detecting rare cells in blood samples with a ratio lower than 1/100 000. The identified cells can be isolated and further cultured in-situ on a chip for follow-on research and analysis. Furthermore, this technology does not require external mechanical devices, such as pump and valves, which simplifies operation and reduces system complexity and cost. The SACA chip offers a high-efficient, economical, yet simple scheme for identification and analysis of rare cells. Therefore, potentially SACA chip may provide a feasible and economical platform for rare cell detection in the clinic. PMID:24926391

  1. VEGF expression, microvessel density and dendritic cell decrease in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gulubova, Maya; Ivanova, Koni; Ananiev, Julian; Gerenova, Julieta; Zdraveski, Aleksandar; Stoyanov, Hristo; Vlaykova, Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the five most common cancers in the age between 20 and 50 years. Many factors including the potent angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and different dendritic cell types are known to be related to thyroid tumourogenesis. The study was performed to address the expression of VEGF and microvessel density in thyroid cancers and to evaluate the effect of VEGF expression in thyroid tumour cells on the dendritic cells. We investigated 65 patients with different types of thyroid carcinomas: papillary (PTC), oncocytic (OTC), follicular (FTC) and anaplastic (ATC), immunohistochemically with antibodies against VEGF, CD1a, CD83, S100 and CD31. Our results suggest that the expression of VEGF is significantly more often in PTC than ATC (92.3% vs. 60.0%, p = 0.025). The microvessel density marked with CD31 in the tumour border of PTC was significantly higher as compared to FTC (p = 0.039), but not to ATC and OTC (p = 0.337 and 0.134). We found that CD1a- and CD83-positive cells were dispersed with variable density and in OC CD31+ vessel numbers were positively correlated with CD83+ dendritic cells in tumour stroma (R = 0.847, p = 0.016). We did not find statistically significant associations of the survival of patients with PTC after the surgical therapy with VEGF expression and MVD. In conclusion we may state that VEGF expression in tumour cells of thyroid cancer can induce neovascularization and suppress dendritic cells. PMID:26019537

  2. Interleukin-8 in Hodgkin's disease. Preferential expression by reactive cells and association with neutrophil density.

    PubMed Central

    Foss, H. D.; Herbst, H.; Gottstein, S.; Demel, G.; Araujó, I.; Stein, H.

    1996-01-01

    Hodgkin's disease (HD) shows rare neoplastic Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells embedded in an abundant reactive infiltrate containing, among other cell types, neutrophilic granulocytes. Interleukin (IL)-8 is chemotactic for neutrophils. The expression of IL-8 was tested by in situ hybridization with 35S-labeled IL-8-specific RNA probes on 38 cases of HD. Reactive lesions, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of B and T phenotype, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis served as controls. IL-8 expression was observed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells in 3 of 33 cases of classical HD and in reactive cells in 20 of 33 HD cases as evidenced by combined isotopic in situ hybridization and immunohistology for the demonstration of cell-type-characteristic antigens or enzyme histochemistry for chloroacetate esterase. IL-8-positive cells were more numerous in cases of nodular sclerosing HD as compared with the mixed cellularity histotype (P = 0.01). The number of IL-8-positive cells and the density of neutrophils were positively correlated (P < 0. 01). In 5 cases of lymphocyte-predominant HD, IL-8 expression was not displayed. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cases contained IL-8 transcripts only in 1 of 23 cases in sparse reactive cells. In 4 of 7 cases of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, IL-8-specific signals were displayed in S100-negative cells. In conclusion, IL-8 expression in HD is largely confined to reactive cells and associated with infiltration by neutrophils. Elaboration of other cytokines by Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells and reactive cells may explain the frequent expression of this cytokine in HD, particularly in the nodular sclerosing type. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8644863

  3. High chromogranin A cell density in the colon of patients with lymphocytic colitis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, M; Lomholt-Beck, B; Gundersen, T D

    2011-01-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is a chronic condition that is characterized by watery diarrhoea with normal appearance of the colonic mucosa. MC is subdivided into two distinctive entities: lymphocytic colitis (LC) and collagenous colitis (CC). The etiology and pathophysiology of LC remain to be determined. The present study included 9 female patients with LC, with an average age of 34 years. Subjects (n=25) who underwent colonoscopy were used as controls. The subjects underwent colonoscopy due to gastrointestinal bleeding, where the source of bleeding was identified as haemorrhoids, or due to health concerns. The control subjects included 18 females and 7 males, with an average age of 49 years. Colonoscopy was performed in both patient and control groups, and biopsies were obtained from different segments of the colon. The biopsies were immunostained with the avidin-biotin complex method for human leucocytes CD45, collagen type III and chromogranin A (CgA). CgA was quantified by computer image analysis. The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in patients with LC was significantly higher than that in controls. The high density of colonic CgA, a common marker for endocrine cells, indicates the possibility that colonic hormones are involved in the pathophysiology of LC. Serotonin-containing cells are the major endocrine cell type in the colon and constitute approximately 88% of the total endocrine cell population. It is likely that the increase in colonic CgA in LC patients accounts for an increase in serotonin cells. PMID:21584496

  4. High cell-surface density of HER2 deforms cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Inhee; Reichelt, Mike; Shao, Lily; Akita, Robert W; Koeppen, Hartmut; Rangell, Linda; Schaefer, Gabriele; Mellman, Ira; Sliwkowski, Mark X

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancers (BC) with HER2 overexpression (referred to as HER2 positive) progress more aggressively than those with normal expression. Targeted therapies against HER2 can successfully delay the progression of HER2-positive BC, but details of how this overexpression drives the disease are not fully understood. Using single-molecule biophysical approaches, we discovered a new effect of HER2 overexpression on disease-relevant cell biological changes in these BC. We found HER2 overexpression causes deformation of the cell membranes, and this in turn disrupts epithelial features by perturbing cell-substrate and cell-cell contacts. This membrane deformation does not require receptor signalling activities, but results from the high levels of HER2 on the cell surface. Our finding suggests that early-stage morphological alterations of HER2-positive BC cells during cancer progression can occur in a physical and signalling-independent manner. PMID:27599456

  5. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 mediated endocytosis of β1-integrin influences cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rabiej, Verena K; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Wagner, Timo; Goetze, Kristina; Storck, Steffen E; Eble, Johannes A; Weggen, Sascha; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) has been shown to interact with β1-integrin and regulate its surface expression. LRP1 knock-out cells exhibit altered cytoskeleton organization and decreased cell migration. Here we demonstrate coupled endocytosis of LRP1 and β1-integrin and the involvement of the intracellular NPxY2 motif of LRP1 in this process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts harboring a knock in replacement of the NPxY2 motif of LRP1 by a multiple alanine cassette (AAxA) showed elevated surface expression of β1-integrin and decreased β1-integrin internalization rates. As a consequence, cell spreading was altered and adhesion rates were increased in our cell model. Cells formed more focal adhesion complexes, whereby in vitro cell migration rates were decreased. Similar results could be observed in a corresponding mouse model, the C57Bl6 LRP1 NPxYxxL knock in mice, therefore, the biochemistry of cellular adhesion was altered in primary cortical neurons. In vivo cell migration experiments demonstrated a disturbance of neuroblast cell migration along the rostral migratory stream. In summary, our results indicate that LRP1 interacts with β1-integrin mediating integrin internalization and thus correlates with downstream signaling of β1-integrin such as focal adhesion dynamics. Consequently, the disturbance of this interaction resulted in a dysfunction in in vivo and in vitro cell adhesion and cell migration.

  6. Common European harmful algal blooms affect the viability and innate immune responses of Mytilus edulis larvae.

    PubMed

    De Rijcke, M; Vandegehuchte, M B; Vanden Bussche, J; Nevejan, N; Vanhaecke, L; De Schamphelaere, K A C; Janssen, C R

    2015-11-01

    Like marine diseases, harmful algal blooms (HABs) are globally increasing in frequency, severity and geographical scale. As a result, bivalves will have to face the combined threat of toxic algae and marine pathogens more frequently in the (near) future. These stressors combined may further affect the recruitment of ecologically and economically important bivalve species as HABs can affect the growth, viability and development of their larvae. To date, little is known on the specific effects of HABs on the innate immune system of bivalve larvae. This study therefore investigates whether two common harmful algae can influence the larval viability, development and immunological resilience of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Embryos of this model organism were exposed (48 h) to five densities of Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries or Prorocentrum lima cells. In addition, the effect of six concentrations of their respective toxins: domoic acid (DA) and okadaic acid (OA) were assessed. OA was found to significantly reduce larval protein phosphatase activity (p < 0.001) and larval viability (p < 0.01) at concentrations as low as 37.8 μg l(-1). P. multiseries (1400 cells ml(-1)), P. lima (150 cells ml(-1)) and DA (dosed five times higher than typical environmental conditions i.e. 623.2 μg l(-1)) increased the phenoloxidase (PO) innate immune activity of the mussel larvae. These results suggest that the innate immune response of even the earliest life stages of bivalves is susceptible to the presence of HABs.

  7. Common European harmful algal blooms affect the viability and innate immune responses of Mytilus edulis larvae.

    PubMed

    De Rijcke, M; Vandegehuchte, M B; Vanden Bussche, J; Nevejan, N; Vanhaecke, L; De Schamphelaere, K A C; Janssen, C R

    2015-11-01

    Like marine diseases, harmful algal blooms (HABs) are globally increasing in frequency, severity and geographical scale. As a result, bivalves will have to face the combined threat of toxic algae and marine pathogens more frequently in the (near) future. These stressors combined may further affect the recruitment of ecologically and economically important bivalve species as HABs can affect the growth, viability and development of their larvae. To date, little is known on the specific effects of HABs on the innate immune system of bivalve larvae. This study therefore investigates whether two common harmful algae can influence the larval viability, development and immunological resilience of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Embryos of this model organism were exposed (48 h) to five densities of Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries or Prorocentrum lima cells. In addition, the effect of six concentrations of their respective toxins: domoic acid (DA) and okadaic acid (OA) were assessed. OA was found to significantly reduce larval protein phosphatase activity (p < 0.001) and larval viability (p < 0.01) at concentrations as low as 37.8 μg l(-1). P. multiseries (1400 cells ml(-1)), P. lima (150 cells ml(-1)) and DA (dosed five times higher than typical environmental conditions i.e. 623.2 μg l(-1)) increased the phenoloxidase (PO) innate immune activity of the mussel larvae. These results suggest that the innate immune response of even the earliest life stages of bivalves is susceptible to the presence of HABs. PMID:26348409

  8. Critical evaluation and modeling of algal harvesting using dissolved air flotation. DAF Algal Harvesting Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Hewson, John C.; Amendola, Pasquale; Reynoso, Monica; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Yongsheng; Hu, Qiang

    2014-07-14

    In our study, Chlorella zofingiensis harvesting by dissolved air flotation (DAF) was critically evaluated with regard to algal concentration, culture conditions, type and dosage of coagulants, and recycle ratio. Harvesting efficiency increased with coagulant dosage and leveled off at 81%, 86%, 91%, and 87% when chitosan, Al3+, Fe3+, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used at dosages of 70, 180, 250, and 500 mg g-1, respectively. The DAF efficiency-coagulant dosage relationship changed with algal culture conditions. In evaluating the influence of the initial algal concentration and recycle ratio revealed that, under conditions typical for algal harvesting, we found that it is possible that the number of bubbles is insufficient. A DAF algal harvesting model was developed to explain this observation by introducing mass-based floc size distributions and a bubble limitation into the white water blanket model. Moreover, the model revealed the importance of coagulation to increase floc-bubble collision and attachment, and the preferential interaction of bubbles with larger flocs, which limited the availability of bubbles to the smaller sized flocs. The harvesting efficiencies predicted by the model agree reasonably with experimental data obtained at different Al3+ dosages, algal concentrations, and recycle ratios. Based on this modeling, critical parameters for efficient algal harvesting were identified.

  9. Critical evaluation and modeling of algal harvesting using dissolved air flotation. DAF Algal Harvesting Modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Hewson, John C.; Amendola, Pasquale; Reynoso, Monica; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Yongsheng; Hu, Qiang

    2014-07-14

    In our study, Chlorella zofingiensis harvesting by dissolved air flotation (DAF) was critically evaluated with regard to algal concentration, culture conditions, type and dosage of coagulants, and recycle ratio. Harvesting efficiency increased with coagulant dosage and leveled off at 81%, 86%, 91%, and 87% when chitosan, Al3+, Fe3+, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used at dosages of 70, 180, 250, and 500 mg g-1, respectively. The DAF efficiency-coagulant dosage relationship changed with algal culture conditions. In evaluating the influence of the initial algal concentration and recycle ratio revealed that, under conditions typical for algal harvesting, we found that itmore » is possible that the number of bubbles is insufficient. A DAF algal harvesting model was developed to explain this observation by introducing mass-based floc size distributions and a bubble limitation into the white water blanket model. Moreover, the model revealed the importance of coagulation to increase floc-bubble collision and attachment, and the preferential interaction of bubbles with larger flocs, which limited the availability of bubbles to the smaller sized flocs. The harvesting efficiencies predicted by the model agree reasonably with experimental data obtained at different Al3+ dosages, algal concentrations, and recycle ratios. Based on this modeling, critical parameters for efficient algal harvesting were identified.« less

  10. Effects of Laser Peripheral Iridotomy on Corneal Endothelial Cell Density and Cell Morphology in Primary Angle Closure Suspect Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Hossein; Jahanian, Sara; Gharebaghi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of prophylactic laser peripheral iridotomy on corneal endothelial cell density and cell morphology in subjects with primary angle closure suspect (PACS) within a one-year follow-up period. Methods: In this quasi-experimental prospective study, from June 2012 to November 2013, thirty-five PACS eyes underwent laser peripheral iridotomy at clinics affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. After obtaining informed consent, specular microscopy was performed at baseline and at 3-month, 6-month and 12-month follow-up visits. Central, nasal and temporal endothelial cell counts and cell morphology were evaluated via non-contact specular microscopy. Results: The mean subject age was 53.4 ± 7.9 years, and the majority of subjects were women (88.2%). The mean central corneal endothelial cell count prior to laser peripheral iridotomy was 2528 ± 119.2, and this value changed to 2470 ± 175.9, 2425 ± 150.6, and 2407 ± 69.02 at the 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up visits, respectively; these differences did not reach statistical significance. Additionally, the changes in the number of cells, the hexagonality of cells, and the coefficient of variation (CV) in the central, nasal, and temporal areas were not significant. Conclusion: In PACS eyes, we did not find a decline in corneal endothelial cell density or a change in cell morphological characteristics, including cell hexagonality and CV, in the central, nasal, and temporal regions of the cornea in any of our subjects over a one-year follow-up period. PMID:27621781

  11. Effects of Laser Peripheral Iridotomy on Corneal Endothelial Cell Density and Cell Morphology in Primary Angle Closure Suspect Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Hossein; Jahanian, Sara; Gharebaghi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of prophylactic laser peripheral iridotomy on corneal endothelial cell density and cell morphology in subjects with primary angle closure suspect (PACS) within a one-year follow-up period. Methods: In this quasi-experimental prospective study, from June 2012 to November 2013, thirty-five PACS eyes underwent laser peripheral iridotomy at clinics affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. After obtaining informed consent, specular microscopy was performed at baseline and at 3-month, 6-month and 12-month follow-up visits. Central, nasal and temporal endothelial cell counts and cell morphology were evaluated via non-contact specular microscopy. Results: The mean subject age was 53.4 ± 7.9 years, and the majority of subjects were women (88.2%). The mean central corneal endothelial cell count prior to laser peripheral iridotomy was 2528 ± 119.2, and this value changed to 2470 ± 175.9, 2425 ± 150.6, and 2407 ± 69.02 at the 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up visits, respectively; these differences did not reach statistical significance. Additionally, the changes in the number of cells, the hexagonality of cells, and the coefficient of variation (CV) in the central, nasal, and temporal areas were not significant. Conclusion: In PACS eyes, we did not find a decline in corneal endothelial cell density or a change in cell morphological characteristics, including cell hexagonality and CV, in the central, nasal, and temporal regions of the cornea in any of our subjects over a one-year follow-up period.

  12. [Exploration of relationships between phytoplankton and related environmental factors in the Daning River during sensitive period of algal blooms].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bing-Hui; Zhang, Jia-Lei; Wang, Li-Jing; Wang, Li-Ping; Huang, Min-Sheng; Cao, Cheng-Jin; Wu, Guang-Ying

    2011-03-01

    To elucidate relationships between phytoplankton and related environmental factors, phytoplankton and environmental parameters of water quality in the Daning River were conducted using multivariate statistical analysis. Most of the investigated physico chemical parameters [water temperature, total nitrogen, nitrate-N (NO3(-) -N), pH and dissolved oxygen concentration (DO)] in Daning River are significantly different among those sampling sites (ANOVA, p < 0.05). The results indicate that the Daning River has a comparatively high spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the phytoplankton community composition (ANOVA, p < 0.05). The maximum cell density was recorded in Dachang and the minimum density was found at Wuxia-kou sites. Multi-algal species blooms were observed in the same time and place with the maximum density appeared. Correlation analysis was performed to illuminate the relationships between algae density and environmental variables, TN (r = - 0.789, p < 0.05), NO3(-) -N (r = - 0.825, p < 0.05) and NO2(-) -N (r = -0.803, p < 0.05) were negatively correlated with algae density. The results indicate that nitrogen soluble nutrients are key regulatory factors for phytoplankton abundance. The results of redundancy analysis (RDA) indicate that main soluble nutrients (TN, TP, NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N), suspended substance (SS) and transparency contributed significantly to phytoplankton community composition. Phytoplankton growth could enhance the pH value. The environmental characterizations and sample sites adjacency contributed significantly to phytoplankton community composition.

  13. Measurement of Single Cell Refractive Index, Dry Mass, Volume, and Density Using a Transillumination Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Jacques, Steven L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2012-09-01

    Phase contrast microscopy has become ubiquitous in the field of biology, particularly in qualitative investigations of cellular morphology. However, the use of quantitative phase retrieval methods and their connection to cellular refractive index and dry mass density remain under utilized. This is due in part to the restriction of phase and cellular mass determination to custom built instruments, involved mathematical analysis, and prohibitive sample perturbations. We introduce tomographic bright field imaging, an accessible optical imaging technique enabling the three dimensional measurement of cellular refractive index and dry mass density using a standard transillumination optical microscope. The validity of the technique is demonstrated on polystyrene spheres. The technique is then applied to the measurement of the refractive index, dry mass, volume, and density of red blood cells. This optical technique enables a simple and robust means to perform quantitative investigations of engineered and biological specimens in three dimensions using standard optical microscopes.

  14. Conditional Density-based Analysis of T cell Signaling in Single Cell Data

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Smita; Spitzer, Matthew H.; Mingueneau, Michael; Bendall, Sean C; Litvin, Oren; Stone, Erica; Pe’er, Dana; Nolan, Garry P

    2015-01-01

    Cellular circuits sense the environment, process signals, and compute decisions using networks of interacting proteins. To model such a system, the abundance of each activated protein species can be described as a stochastic function of the abundance of other proteins. High-dimensional single-cell technologies, like mass cytometry, offer an opportunity to characterize signaling circuit-wide. However, the challenge of developing and applying computational approaches to interpret such complex data remains. Here, we developed computational methods, based on established statistical concepts, to characterize signaling network relationships by quantifying the strengths of network edges and deriving signaling response functions. In comparing signaling between naïve and antigen-exposed CD4+ T-lymphocytes, we find that although these two cell subtypes had similarly-wired networks, naïve cells transmitted more information along a key signaling cascade than did antigen-exposed cells. We validated our characterization on mice lacking the extracellular-regulated MAP kinase (ERK2), which showed stronger influence of pERK on pS6 (phosphorylated-ribosomal protein S6), in naïve cells compared to antigen-exposed cells, as predicted. We demonstrate that by using cell-to-cell variation inherent in single cell data, we can algorithmically derive response functions underlying molecular circuits and drive the understanding of how cells process signals. PMID:25342659

  15. Effects of two copper compounds on Microcystis aeruginosa cell density, membrane integrity, and microcystin release.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuo-Pei

    2015-10-01

    Microcystin release following Microcystis aeruginosa cell lysis after copper-based algaecide treatment is often cited as a concern leading to restricted use of algaecide in restoration of natural water resources. To examine this concern, bench-scale experiments were conducted to study responses of M. aeruginosa to 8-day copper exposures as copper sulfate and copper-ethanolamine (Cu-EA). M. aeruginosa UTEX 2385 was cultured in BG11 medium to cell density of 10(6)cells/mL with total and extracellular microcystin of 93 and 53μg/L, respectively. Exposures of copper concentration ranged from 40 to 1000μgCu/L. Cell membrane integrity was indicated by erythrosine B. In the end of experiment, total microcystin and cell density in untreated control (313μg/L and 10(7)cells/mL) was 3.3 and 10 times greater than pretreatment value, respectively. Minimum amount of copper required to reduce M. aeruginosa population within 8 days was 160μgCu/L as copper sulfate and 80μgCu/L as Cu-EA, where total and extracellular microcystin concentrations (47 and 44μg/L for copper sulfate; 56 and 44μg/L for Cu-EA) were degraded with degradation rate coefficient 0.1 day(-1) and were less than pretreatment values. Given a copper concentration at 80µgCu/L as Cu-EA, M. aeruginosa cells were intact and less microcystin were released compared to treatments at 160-1000µgCu/L, where lysed cells and relatively greater microcystin release were observed. Based on the laboratory results, a minimum amount of copper required for reducing M. aeruginosa population could decrease total microcystin concentration and not compromise cells and minimize microcystin release.

  16. Algal Accessory Pigment Detection Using AVIRIS Image-Derived Spectral Radiance Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Ambrosia, Vincent G.

    1996-01-01

    Visual and derivative analyses of AVIRIS spectral data can be used to detect algal accessory pigments in aquatic communities. This capability extends the use of remote sensing for the study of aquatic ecosystems by allowing detection of taxonomically significant pigment signatures which yield information about the type of algae present. Such information allows remote sensing-based assessment of aquatic ecosystem health, as in the detection of nuisance blooms of cyanobacteria or toxic blooms of dinoflagellates. Remote sensing of aquatic systems has traditionally focused on quantification of chlorophyll a, a photoreactive (and light-harvesting) pigment which is common to all algae as well as cyanobacteria (bluegreen algae). Due to the ubiquitousness of this pigment within algae, chl a is routinely measured to estimate algal biomass both during ground-truthing and using various airborne or satellite based sensors, including AVIRIS. Within the remote sensing and aquatic sciences communities, ongoing research has been performed to detect algal accessory pigments for assessment of algal population composition. This research is based on the fact that many algal accessory pigments are taxonomically significant, and all are spectrally unique. Aquatic scientists have been refining pigment analysis techniques, primarily high performance liquid chromatography, or HPLC, to detect specific pigments as a time-saving alternative to individual algal cell identifications and counts. Remote sensing scientists are investigating the use of pigment signatures to construct pigment libraries analogous to mineral spectral libraries used in geological remote sensing applications. The accessory pigment approach has been used successfully in remote sensing using data from the Thematic Mapper, low-altitude, multiple channel scanners, field spectroradiometers and the AVIRIS hyperspectral scanner. Due to spectral and spatial resolution capabilities, AVIRIS is the sensor of choice for such

  17. Wolbachia Induces Density-Dependent Inhibition to Dengue Virus in Mosquito Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peng; Bian, Guowu; Pan, Xiaoling; Xi, Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    Wolbachia is a maternal transmitted endosymbiotic bacterium that is estimated to infect up to 65% of insect species. The ability of Wolbachia to both induce viral interference and spread into mosquito vector population makes it possible to develop Wolbachia as a biological control agent for dengue control. While Wolbachia induces resistance to dengue virus in the transinfected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, a similar effect was not observed in Aedes albopictus, which naturally carries Wolbachia infection but still serves as a dengue vector. In order to understand the mechanism of this lack of Wolbachia-mediated viral interference, we used both Ae. albopictus cell line (Aa23) and mosquitoes to characterize the impact of Wolbachia on dengue infection. A serial of sub-lethal doses of antibiotic treatment was used to partially remove Wolbachia in Aa23 cells and generate cell cultures with Wolbachia at different densities. We show that there is a strong negative linear correlation between the genome copy of Wolbachia and dengue virus with a dengue infection completely removed when Wolbacha density reaches a certain level. We then compared Wolbachia density between transinfected Ae. aegypti and naturally infected Ae. albopictus. The results show that Wolbachia density in midgut, fatbody and salivary gland of Ae. albopictus is 80-, 18-, and 24-fold less than that of Ae. aegypti, respectively. We provide evidence that Wolbachia density in somatic tissues of Ae. albopictus is too low to induce resistance to dengue virus. Our results will aid in understanding the mechanism of Wolbachia-mediated pathogen interference and developing novel methods to block disease transmission by mosquitoes carrying native Wolbachia infections. PMID:22848774

  18. Direct determination of defect density of states in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Upkar K.; Tripathi, Durgesh C.; Mohapatra, Y. N.

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of the occupied trap density of states (DOS) is important for optimization of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. We demonstrate a direct method for obtaining it from the trap related peak in capacitance-voltage characteristics under different levels of illumination, and its correlation with the dark current density-voltage characteristics. We use the method to measure the parameters of DOS, occupied trap distribution, and its temperature dependence for poly(3-hexathiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) based solar cells. The total occupied trap concentration is approximately 7 × 1015 cm-3 with a standard deviation for a truncated Gaussian distribution varying between 32 and 44 meV in the temperature range of 310-270 K within a total Gaussian DOS with a standard deviation of 92 meV.

  19. [Analysis of algal blooms in Da-Ning River of Three Gorges Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bing-Hui; Cao, Cheng-Jin; Zhang, Jia-Lei; Huang, Min-Sheng; Chen, Zhen-Lou

    2009-11-01

    According to the survey conducted from Apr. to Jun. 2007 and from Apr. to May. 2008, the changes of water quality, forms and distributions of nutrient salts and characters of algal blooms in Da-ning River of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) were studied. The results indicated that the concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient were abundant during sensitive period of algal blooms in Da-ning River. Total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) values are 0.84-3.21 mg/L and 0.011-0.531 mg/L respectively, and the nutrients concentrations become high gradually from upstream to downstream. Total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) is the major form of TN accounting for 84%, and total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) is dominant (TDP/TP = 60%). Algal blooms bring phosphorus nutrient bio-concentration. The rates of TN and TP are all in excess of 16, which show eutrophication is limited by phosphorus. Potassium permanganate index and dissolved oxygen (DO) are at low levels and change stably. But chlorophyll a (Chl-a) becomes frequently, the value is 1.41-219.04 mg x m(-3). Significant positive correlations are all observed by correlation analysis between Chl-a and the main parameters (r(Chla-TP) = 0.453, r(Chla-potassium permanganate index) = 0.641, r(Chla-DO) = 0.584, r(Chla-pH) = 0.409, p < 0.01), but significant negative correlations are observed between Chl-a and Secchi depth (SD) (r(Chla-SD) = - 0.392, p < 0.01). The pH is fluctuated by multiparameter esp. in algal blooms. Widespread algae are observed by microscope during sensitive period of algal blooms in Da-ning River accounting for 8 phylum 82 genus 124 species, which Bacillariophyta and Chlorophyta are dominant, and then Cyanophyta and Pyrrophyta. Three whole watershed algal blooms break out in Da-ning River during the period, and the highest values of algal density are 14-1 427 times as many as the normal values. The dominant species of algal blooms are mostly involved with O. borgei, C. microporum, Chlorococcum humicola, P

  20. Number Density of Mast Cells in the Primo Nodes of Rats.

    PubMed

    Gil, HyunJi; Bae, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, LiJung; Kim, SungChul; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2015-12-01

    Mast cells (MCs) play a major role in allergic reactions. Surprisingly, the acupuncture points have a higher density of MCs compared with nonacupoints in the skin, which is consistent with the augmentation of the immune function by acupuncture treatment. We hypothesized that the primo vascular system (PVS), which was proposed as the anatomical structure of the acupuncture points and meridians, should have a high density of MCs. In order to test that hypothesis, we investigated the primo nodes isolated from the surfaces of internal organs, such as the liver, the small and the large intestines, and the bladder. The harvested primo nodes were stained with toluidine blue, and the MCs were easily recognized by their red-purple stains and their characteristic granules. The results showed a high density of MCs in the primo nodes and confirmed the hypothesis. The MCs were uniformly distributed in the nodes. The relative concentration of the MCs with respect to other cells was ∼15%. We divided the sizes of the primo nodes into three classes: large, medium, and small. The number density and the relative concentration of MCs did not show a size-dependence. The current work suggests that the PVS may participate in the immune response to allergic inflammation, which closely involves MCs.

  1. Inertial Alfven-Wave-Driven Convective Cells in Low-Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhotelov, O.A.; Onishchenko, O.G.; Sagdeev, R.Z.; Stenflo, L.; Balikhin, M.A.

    2005-10-15

    The parametric interaction of inertial Alfven waves with large-scale convective cells in a low-density plasma is investigated. It is shown that, in plasmas where the Alfven velocity is comparable to or exceeds the speed of light, the parametric interaction is substantially suppressed. A compact expression for the optimal scale and instability growth rate of the fastest growing mode is obtained. The relevance of our theory to spacecraft measurements in the Earth's ionosphere is discussed.

  2. Retinal ganglion cell density of the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis): calculating visual resolution.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, John D; Manger, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    A single right retina from a black rhinoceros was whole mounted, stained and analyzed to determine the visual resolution of the rhinoceros, an animal with reputedly poor eyesight. A range of small (15-microm diameter) to large (100-microm diameter) ganglion cell types was seen across the retina. We observed two regions of high density of retinal ganglion cells at either end of a long, but thin, horizontal streak. The temporal specialization, which receives light from the anterior visual field, exhibited a ganglion cell density of approximately 2000/mm2, while the nasal specialization exhibited a density of approximately 1500/mm2. The retina exhibited a ganglion cell density bias toward the upper half, especially so, the upper temporal quadrant, indicating that the rhinoceros would be processing visual information from the visual field below the anterior horizon for the most part. Our calculations indicate that the rhinoceros has a visual resolution of 6 cycles/degree. While this resolution is one-tenth that of humans (60 cycles/deg) and less than that of the domestic cat (9 cycles/deg), it is comparable to that of the rabbit (6 cycles/deg), and exceeds that seen in a variety of other mammals including seals, dolphins, microbats, and rats. Thus, the reputation of the rhinoceros as a myopic, weakly visual animal is not supported by our observations of the retina. We calculate that the black rhinoceros could readily distinguish a 30 cm wide human at a distance of around 200 m given the appropriate visual background. PMID:18442443

  3. New stopping cell capabilities: RF carpet performance at high gas density and cryogenic operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, M.; Purushothaman, S.; Dickel, T.; Geissel, H.; Plass, W. R.; Schäfer, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Van de Walle, J.; Weick, H.; Dendooven, P.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a stopping cell to be used at the FRS and Super-FRS (Super-conducting FRagment Separator) at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy-Ion Research and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), both in Darmstadt, Germany. The cell has a stopping volume with a length of 1 m and a diameter of 25 cm. It is aimed at operation with high-density helium gas (up to 0.2 mg/cm3). Ours is the first realisation of a stopping cell in which the required purity of the helium stopping gas is ensured by operation at cryogenic temperatures. On the exit side, the ions are guided to the exit hole by an RF carpet with 4 electrodes per mm, operating at a frequency of 5.8 MHz. We present the first commissioning results of the cryogenic stopping cell. Using 219Rn ions emitted as alpha-decay recoils from a 223Ra source, a combined ion survival and extraction efficiency between 10 and 25% is measured for helium gas at a temperature of 85 K and with a density up to 0.07 mg/cm3 (equivalent to a pressure of 430 mbar at room temperature). This density is almost two times higher than demonstrated up to now for RF ion repelling structures in helium gas. Given the operational and design parameters of the system, it is projected that this technology is useful up to a helium gas density of at least 0.2 mg/cm3.

  4. In vivo bone formation by human bone marrow cells: effect of osteogenic culture supplements and cell densities.

    PubMed

    Mendes, S C; Van Den Brink, I; De Bruijn, J D; Van Blitterswijk, C A

    1998-12-01

    Bone marrow is known to contain a population of osteoprogenitor cells that can go through complete differentiation when cultured in a medium containing appropriate bioactive factors. In this study, porous particles of a calcium phosphate material were seeded with adult human bone marrow cells in the second passage. After an additional culture period of 1 wk in the particles, these hybrid constructs were subcutaneouslly implanted in nude mice with a survival period of 4 wk. The cell seeding densities range from 0-200 000 cells per particle and the cell culture system was designed to investigate the single and combined effects of dexamethasone and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2). The hybrid "material/tissue" constructs were processed for histology and the amount of de novo bone formation was quantified, for each culture condition, by histomorphometric techniques. The relative percentage of mineralized bone formation reached a maximal value of 19.77+/-5.06, for samples cultured in the presence of rhBMP-2 and with a seeding density of 200 000 cells/particle, compared to 0.52+/-0.45 for samples in which no cells had been cultured and had been incubated in culture medium supplemented with Dex and rhBMP-2. For the tested conditions and for the low cell numbers used in this study, rhBMP-2 proved to be an essential bioactive factor to obtain in vivo bone formation by our culture system. The results from this study prove the potential of cultured adult human bone marrow cells to initiate and accelerate de novo bone formation after transplantation into an ectopic site. PMID:15348953

  5. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications. PMID:27519944

  6. Production of nattokinase by high cell density fed-batch culture of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eun-Yeong; Kim, Kyung Mi; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Lee, In Young; Kim, Beom Soo

    2011-09-01

    Bacillus subtilis was cultivated to high cell density for nattokinase production by pH-stat fed-batch culture. A concentrated mixture solution of glucose and peptone was automatically added by acid-supplying pump when culture pH rose above high limit. Effect of the ratio of glucose to peptone in feeding solution was investigated on cell growth and nattokinase production by changing the ratio from 0.2 to 5 g glucose/g peptone. The highest cell concentration was 77 g/L when the ratio was 0.2 g glucose/g peptone. Cell concentration decreased with increasing the ratio of glucose to peptone in feeding solution, while the optimum condition existed for nattokinase production. The highest nattokinase activity was 14,500 unit/mL at a ratio of 0.33 g glucose/g peptone, which was 4.3 times higher than that in batch culture.

  7. High cell density cultivation of Rhodococcus opacus for lipid production at a pilot-plant scale.

    PubMed

    Voss, I; Steinbüchel, A

    2001-05-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG)-accumulating bacterium Rhodococcus opacus strain PD630 was investigated with respect to the fermentative production of TAGs consisting of an unusually high fraction of fatty acids with an odd-number of carbon atoms and unsaturated monoenic fatty acids from sugar beet molasses and sucrose. Fed-batch fermentations were optimized at the 30-1 scale in a stirred tank bioreactor at 30 degrees C using a mineral salts medium, which contained sugar beet molasses and sucrose as sole carbon sources. Approximately 37.5 g cell dry matter (CDM) per liter was the highest cell density that was obtained at that scale with a TAG content in the cells of 52%. This fermentative process was also applied to a 500-1 pilot-plant scale. Cell densities as high as 18.4 g CDM per liter were obtained, and 42% of the sucrose present in the medium was converted into cell mass which consisted of 38.4% TAGs. PMID:11414319

  8. High cell-surface density of HER2 deforms cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Inhee; Reichelt, Mike; Shao, Lily; Akita, Robert W.; Koeppen, Hartmut; Rangell, Linda; Schaefer, Gabriele; Mellman, Ira; Sliwkowski, Mark X.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancers (BC) with HER2 overexpression (referred to as HER2 positive) progress more aggressively than those with normal expression. Targeted therapies against HER2 can successfully delay the progression of HER2-positive BC, but details of how this overexpression drives the disease are not fully understood. Using single-molecule biophysical approaches, we discovered a new effect of HER2 overexpression on disease-relevant cell biological changes in these BC. We found HER2 overexpression causes deformation of the cell membranes, and this in turn disrupts epithelial features by perturbing cell–substrate and cell–cell contacts. This membrane deformation does not require receptor signalling activities, but results from the high levels of HER2 on the cell surface. Our finding suggests that early-stage morphological alterations of HER2-positive BC cells during cancer progression can occur in a physical and signalling-independent manner. PMID:27599456

  9. The role of cell size in density gradient electrophoretic separation of mouse leukemia cells according to position in the cell cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Cultured mouse leukemia cells line L5178Y were subjected to upward electrophoresis in a density gradient and the slower migrating cell populations were enriched in G2 cells. It is indicated that this cell line does not change electrophoretic mobility through the cell cycle. The possibility that increased sedimentation downward on the part of the larger G2 cells caused this separation was explored. Two different cell populations were investigated. The log phase population was found to migrate upward faster than the G2 population, and a similar difference between their velocities and calculated on the basis of a 1 um diameter difference between the two cell populations. The G2 and G1 enriched populations were isolated by Ficoll density gradient sedimentation. The bottom fraction was enriched in G2 cells and the top fraction was enriched with G1 cells, especially when compared with starting materials. The electrophoretic mobilities of these two cell populations did not differ significantly from one another. Cell diameter dependent migration curves were calculated and were found to be different. Families of migration curves that differ when cell size is considered as a parameter are predicted.

  10. Efficient black silicon solar cell with a density-graded nanoporous surface: Optical properties, performance limitations, and design rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hao-Chih; Yost, Vernon E.; Page, Matthew R.; Stradins, Paul; Meier, Daniel L.; Branz, Howard M.

    2009-09-01

    We study optical effects and factors limiting performance of our confirmed 16.8% efficiency "black silicon" solar cells. The cells incorporate density-graded nanoporous surface layers made by a one-step nanoparticle-catalyzed etch and reflect less than 3% of the solar spectrum, with no conventional antireflection coating. The cells are limited by recombination in the nanoporous layer which decreases short-wavelength spectral response. The optimum density-graded layer depth is then a compromise between reflectance reduction and recombination loss. Finally, we propose universal design rules for high-efficiency solar cells based on density-graded surfaces.

  11. The Ca2+/Mn2+-transporting SPCA2 pump is regulated by oxygen and cell density in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, James; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; Dmitriev, Ruslan I

    2016-08-15

    The mammalian SPCA1 and SPCA2 ATPases localize in membranes of the secretory pathway and transport ions of Ca(2+) and Mn(2+) The role of tissue-specific SPCA2 isoform, highly expressed in lungs, mammary gland and gastrointestinal tract, is poorly understood. To elucidate the function of SPCA2, we studied human colon cancer HCT116 cells, grown under ambient and decreased O2 levels. We found that in contrast with other Ca(2+)-ATPase isoforms the expression of SPCA2 was up-regulated under hypoxia (3% O2), in both adherent (2D) and spheroid (3D) cultures. In spheroids, experiencing lowest O2 levels (30-50 μM, measured by phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy), we observed lower staining with reactive oxygen species (ROS)-specific fluorescent probe, which correlated with increased SPCA2. However, SPCA2 expression was up-regulated in cells exposed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species donors, and when grown at higher density. We noticed that the culture exposed to hypoxia showed overall increase in S phase-positive cells and hypothesized that SPCA2 up-regulation under hypoxia can be linked to Mn(2+)-dependent cell cycle arrest. Consequently, we found that SPCA2-transfected cells display a higher number of cells entering S phase. Altogether, our results point at the important role of SPCA2 in regulation of cell cycle in cancer cells. PMID:27316461

  12. Spatiotemporal Distribution of Harmful Algal Flora in the Tropical Estuarine Complex of Goa, India

    PubMed Central

    Pednekar, Suraksha M.; Prabhu Matondkar, S. G.; Kerkar, Vijaya

    2012-01-01

    Mandovi and Zuari estuarine complex is monsoon-influenced estuaries located along the central west coast of India. During the past few years, there has been an increase in nutrient loading specially during monsoonal runoff which is responsible for the growth of harmful algal flora. To understand occurrence and distribution of harmful algal blooms species, daily/alternate day samplings were carried out in Mandovi and Zuari estuaries during 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 periods, respectively, comprising of monsoon (June–November) and nonmonsoon (December–May). In Mandovi, total 54 HAB species with 49 in monsoon and 36 during nonmonsoon period were reported. In Zuari, total 46 HAB species with 38 in monsoon and 41 were reported during nonmonsoon period. Bray-Curtis cluster analysis based on log-transformed phytoplankton density detected seven well-defined groups revealing spatiotemporal variability. The density of the dominant harmful algal species was significantly positively correlated with nutrients, but negatively correlated with salinity. The results of the study indicate that monsoon plays an important role in occurrence and distribution of harmful algal species having direct correlation with salinity variations and nutrient loading. PMID:22629154

  13. Spatiotemporal distribution of harmful algal flora in the tropical estuarine complex of Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Pednekar, Suraksha M; Prabhu Matondkar, S G; Kerkar, Vijaya

    2012-01-01

    Mandovi and Zuari estuarine complex is monsoon-influenced estuaries located along the central west coast of India. During the past few years, there has been an increase in nutrient loading specially during monsoonal runoff which is responsible for the growth of harmful algal flora. To understand occurrence and distribution of harmful algal blooms species, daily/alternate day samplings were carried out in Mandovi and Zuari estuaries during 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 periods, respectively, comprising of monsoon (June-November) and nonmonsoon (December-May). In Mandovi, total 54 HAB species with 49 in monsoon and 36 during nonmonsoon period were reported. In Zuari, total 46 HAB species with 38 in monsoon and 41 were reported during nonmonsoon period. Bray-Curtis cluster analysis based on log-transformed phytoplankton density detected seven well-defined groups revealing spatiotemporal variability. The density of the dominant harmful algal species was significantly positively correlated with nutrients, but negatively correlated with salinity. The results of the study indicate that monsoon plays an important role in occurrence and distribution of harmful algal species having direct correlation with salinity variations and nutrient loading.

  14. Recycling produced water for algal cultivation for biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Justin N.; Sullivan, Enid J.; Dean, Cynthia A.; Steichen, Seth A.

    2012-08-09

    Algal growth demands a continuous source of water of appropriate salinity and nutritional content. Fresh water sources are scarce in the deserts of the Southwestern United States, hence, salt water algae species are being investigated as a renewable biofuel source. The use of produced water from oil wells (PW) could offset the demand for fresh water in cultivation. Produced water can contain various concentrations of dissolved solids, metals and organic contaminants and often requires treatment beyond oil/water separation to make it suitable for algae cultivation. The produced water used in this study was taken from an oil well in Jal, New Mexico. An F/2-Si (minus silica) growth media commonly used to cultivate Nannochloropsis salina 1776 (NS 1776) was prepared using the produced water (F/2-Si PW) taking into account the metals and salts already present in the water. NS 1776 was seeded into a bioreactor containing 5L of the (F/2-Si PW) media. After eleven days the optical density at 750 nm (an indicator of algal growth) increased from 0 to 2.52. These results indicate algae are able to grow, though inhibited when compared with non-PW media, in the complex chemical conditions found in produced water. Savings from using nutrients present in the PW, such as P, K, and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, results in a 44.38% cost savings over fresh water to mix the F/2-Si media.

  15. Increasing Vero viable cell densities for yellow fever virus production in stirred-tank bioreactors using serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Diogo A; Silva, Marlon V; Gaspar, Luciane P; Castilho, Leda R

    2015-08-20

    In this work, changes in Vero cell cultivation methods have been employed in order to improve cell growth conditions to obtain higher viable cell densities and to increase viral titers. The propagation of the 17DD yellow fever virus (YFV) in Vero cells grown on Cytodex I microcarriers was evaluated in 3-L bioreactor vessels. Prior to the current changes, Vero cells were repeatedly displaying insufficient microcarrier colonization. A modified cultivation process with four changes has resulted in higher cell densities and higher virus titers than previously observed for 17DD YFV.

  16. A Comparison of Spatial Analysis Methods for the Construction of Topographic Maps of Retinal Cell Density

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Gisholt, Eduardo; Hemmi, Jan M.; Hart, Nathan S.; Collin, Shaun P.

    2014-01-01

    Topographic maps that illustrate variations in the density of different neuronal sub-types across the retina are valuable tools for understanding the adaptive significance of retinal specialisations in different species of vertebrates. To date, such maps have been created from raw count data that have been subjected to only limited analysis (linear interpolation) and, in many cases, have been presented as iso-density contour maps with contour lines that have been smoothed ‘by eye’. With the use of stereological approach to count neuronal distribution, a more rigorous approach to analysing the count data is warranted and potentially provides a more accurate representation of the neuron distribution pattern. Moreover, a formal spatial analysis of retinal topography permits a more robust comparison of topographic maps within and between species. In this paper, we present a new R-script for analysing the topography of retinal neurons and compare methods of interpolating and smoothing count data for the construction of topographic maps. We compare four methods for spatial analysis of cell count data: Akima interpolation, thin plate spline interpolation, thin plate spline smoothing and Gaussian kernel smoothing. The use of interpolation ‘respects’ the observed data and simply calculates the intermediate values required to create iso-density contour maps. Interpolation preserves more of the data but, consequently includes outliers, sampling errors and/or other experimental artefacts. In contrast, smoothing the data reduces the ‘noise’ caused by artefacts and permits a clearer representation of the dominant, ‘real’ distribution. This is particularly useful where cell density gradients are shallow and small variations in local density may dramatically influence the perceived spatial pattern of neuronal topography. The thin plate spline and the Gaussian kernel methods both produce similar retinal topography maps but the smoothing parameters used may affect

  17. Approaches for the detection of harmful algal blooms using oligonucleotide interactions.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Karen L; Leterme, Sophie C; Ellis, Amanda V; Lenehan, Claire E

    2015-01-01

    Blooms of microscopic algae in our waterways are becoming an increasingly important environmental concern. Many are sources of harmful biotoxins that can lead to death in humans, marine life and birds. Additionally, their biomass can cause damage to ecosystems such as oxygen depletion, displacement of species and habitat alteration. Globally, the number and frequency of harmful algal blooms has increased over the last few decades, and monitoring and detection strategies have become essential for managing these events. This review discusses developments in the use of oligonucleotide-based 'molecular probes' for the selective monitoring of algal cell numbers. Specifically, hybridisation techniques will be a focus.

  18. Effects of Electromagnetic Stimulation on Cell Density and Neural Markers in Murine Enteric Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreón-Rodríguez, A.; Belkind-Gerson, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Cañedo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-01

    Availability of adult stem cells from several organs like bone marrow, umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood has become a powerful therapeutic tool for many chronic diseases. Potential of adult stem cells for regeneration extents to other tissues among them the nervous system. However two obstacles should be resolved before such cells could be currently applied in clinical practice: a) slow growth rate and b) ability to form enough dense colonies in order to populate a specific injury or cellular deficiency. Many approaches have been explored as genetic differentiation programs, growth factors, and supplemented culture media, among others. Electromagnetic field stimulation of differentiation, proliferation, migration, and particularly on neurogenesis is little known. Since the biological effects of ELF-EMF are well documented, we hypothesize ELF-EMF could affect growth and maturation of stem cells derived of enteric tissue.

  19. Effects of Electromagnetic Stimulation on Cell Density and Neural Markers in Murine Enteric Cell Cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Carreon-Rodriguez, A.; Belkind-Gerson, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Canedo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-11

    Availability of adult stem cells from several organs like bone marrow, umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood has become a powerful therapeutic tool for many chronic diseases. Potential of adult stem cells for regeneration extents to other tissues among them the nervous system. However two obstacles should be resolved before such cells could be currently applied in clinical practice: a) slow growth rate and b) ability to form enough dense colonies in order to populate a specific injury or cellular deficiency. Many approaches have been explored as genetic differentiation programs, growth factors, and supplemented culture media, among others. Electromagnetic field stimulation of differentiation, proliferation, migration, and particularly on neurogenesis is little known. Since the biological effects of ELF-EMF are well documented, we hypothesize ELF-EMF could affect growth and maturation of stem cells derived of enteric tissue.

  20. Using hyperspectral imagery to monitor algal persence

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.M.; Monk, J.; Yan, Gu; Brignal, W.

    1997-08-01

    This paper illustrates how an inexpensive and easily deployable imaging spectrometer can be used to monitor and identify algal blooms at short notice, thus making practical the addition of airborne data to the usual in-situ measurements. Two examples are described, one in the Irish Sea and the other in a reservoir system in the London area.

  1. Algal endosymbionts in European Hydra strains reflect multiple origins of the zoochlorella symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Rajević, Nives; Kovačević, Goran; Kalafatić, Mirjana; Gould, Sven B; Martin, William F; Franjević, Damjan

    2015-12-01

    Symbiotic associations are of broad significance in evolution and biodiversity. Green Hydra is a classic example of endosymbiosis. In its gastrodermal myoepithelial cells it harbors endosymbiotic unicellular green algae, most commonly from the genus Chlorella. We reconstructed the phylogeny of cultured algal endosymbionts isolated and maintained in laboratory conditions for years from green Hydra strains collected from four different geographical sites within Croatia, one from Germany and one from Israel. Nuclear (18S rDNA, ITS region) and chloroplast markers (16S, rbcL) for maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses were used. We focused on investigating the positions of these algal endosymbiotic strains within the chlorophyte lineage. Molecular analyses established that different genera and species of unicellular green algae are present as endosymbionts in green Hydra, showing that endosymbiotic algae growing within green Hydra sampled from four Croatian localities are not monophyletic. Our results indicate that the intracellular algal endosymbionts of green Hydra have become established several times independently in evolution.

  2. Factors controlling the proliferative rate, final cell density, and life span of bovine vascular smooth muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Gospodarowicz, D; Hirabayashi, K; Giguère, L; Tauber, J P

    1981-06-01

    Low density vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell cultures maintained on extracellular-matrix(ECM)-coated dishes and plated in the presence of either plasma or serum will proliferate actively when serum-containing medium is replaced by a synthetic medium supplemented with three factors: high density lipoprotein (HDL, 250 micrograms protein/ml); insulin (2.5 micrograms/ml) or somatomedin C (10 ng/ml); and fibroblast growth factor (FGF, 100 ng/ml) or epidermal growth factor (EGF, 50 ng/ml). The omission of any of these three factors from the synthetic medium results in a lower growth rate of the cultures, as well as in a lower final cell density once cultures reach confluence. When cells are plated in the total absence of serum, transferrin (10 micrograms/ml) is also required to induce optimal cell growth. The effects of the substrate and medium supplements on the life span of VSM cultures have also been analyzed. Cultures maintained on plastic and exposed to medium supplemented with 5% bovine serum underwent 15 generations. However, when maintained on ECM-coated dishes the serum-fed cultures had a life span of at least 88 generations. Likewise, when cultures were maintained in a synthetic medium supplemented with HDL and either FGF or EGF, an effect on the tissue culture life span by the substrate was observed. Cultures maintained on plastic underwent 24 generations, whereas those maintained on ECM-coated dishes could be passaged repeatedly for 58 generations. These experiments demonstrate the influence of the ECM-substrate only in promoting cell growth but also in increasing the longevity of the cultures.

  3. Dissolved organic matter reduces algal accumulation of methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luengen, Allison C.; Fisher, Nicholas S.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) significantly decreased accumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) by the diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana in laboratory experiments. Live diatom cells accumulated two to four times more MeHg than dead cells, indicating that accumulation may be partially an energy-requiring process. Methylmercury enrichment in diatoms relative to ambient water was measured by a volume concentration factor (VCF). Without added DOM, the maximum VCF was 32 x 104, and the average VCF (from 10 to 72 h) over all experiments was 12.6 x 104. At very low (1.5 mg/L) added DOM, VCFs dropped by approximately half. At very high (20 mg/L) added DOM, VCFs dropped 10-fold. Presumably, MeHg was bound to a variety of reduced sulfur sites on the DOM, making it unavailable for uptake. Diatoms accumulated significantly more MeHg when exposed to transphilic DOM extracts than hydrophobic ones. However, algal lysate, a labile type of DOM created by resuspending a marine diatom in freshwater, behaved similarly to a refractory DOM isolate from San Francisco Bay. Addition of 67 μM L-cysteine resulted in the largest drop in VCFs, to 0.28 x 104. Although the DOM composition influenced the availability of MeHg to some extent, total DOM concentration was the most important factor in determining algal bioaccumulation of MeHg.

  4. High cell density cultivation and high recombinant protein production of Escherichia coli strain expressing uricase.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, S; Oda, H; Anazawa, H

    1995-12-01

    Uricase from Cellulomonas flavigena SK-4 is an industrially useful enzyme for commercial formulations of hair coloring. The uricase production by recombinant Escherichia coli strain with a high cell density cultivation technique was described. Of three kinds of media, synthetic media with the feeding of a high concentration of glucose solution were suitable for high cell density cultivation. As for feeding, both biomass concentration and uricase productivity were increased by about two (61.2 g dry cell weight (DCW)/liter) and three times (1037 U/ml broth), respectively, in 24 h by continuous supply. In the case of feeding by a DO-stat method, however, cell concentration was comparable to continuous glucose supply but uricase activity was reduced. By supplying pure oxygen to compensate for oxygen limitation during cultivation, the highest values of 77.4g DCW/liter and 1113 U/ml broth of the uricase activity were achieved with the total cultivation time of 15 h.

  5. Algal production in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for potential biofuel use.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J

    2011-01-01

    Wastewater treatment High Rate Algal Ponds with CO2 addition could provide cost-effective and efficient tertiary-level wastewater treatment with the co-benefit of algal biomass production for biofuel use. Wastewater grown algal biomass can have a lipid content of 10-30% of dry weight, which could be used to make biodiesel. This research investigated algal biomass and total lipid production by two pilot-scale wastewater treatment HRAP(S) (4-day HRT) with and without CO2 addition under New Zealand mid summer (Nov-Jan) conditions. The influence of CO2 addition on wastewater treatment performance was also determined. CO2 was added to one of the HRAPs (the HRAP(E)) by maintaining the maximum pH of the pond below 8. Measurements of HRAP influent and effluent water qualities, total lipid content and algal biomass production were made twice a week over the experimental period. Both HRAP(S) achieved high levels of organic compound and nutrient removal, with >85% SBOD5, >92 NH4(+)-N and >70% DRP removal. Algal/bacterial biomass production in the HRAP(E) (15.2 g/m2/d) was improved by CO2 addition by approximately 30% compared with that of the control HRAP(W) (10.6 g/m2/d). Total lipid content of the biomass grown on both HRAP(S) was slightly reduced (from 25% to 20%) with CO2 addition and the maximum total lipid content of approximately 40% was observed in the HRAP(W) when low NH4(+)-N concentration (<0.5 mg/L) and high maximum pH (>10.0) occurred. Total lipid content of the biomass increased by approximately 15% under nitrogen limiting conditions, however, overall algal/bacterial biomass production was reduced by half during the period of nitrogen limitation. More research is required to maintain algal production under near nitrogen-limiting conditions. PMID:21977667

  6. Bacilysin from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 Has Specific Bactericidal Activity against Harmful Algal Bloom Species

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liming; Wu, Huijun; Chen, Lina; Xie, Shanshan; Zang, Haoyu; Borriss, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms, caused by massive and exceptional overgrowth of microalgae and cyanobacteria, are a serious environmental problem worldwide. In the present study, we looked for Bacillus strains with sufficiently strong anticyanobacterial activity to be used as biocontrol agents. Among 24 strains, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 showed the strongest bactericidal activity against Microcystis aeruginosa, with a kill rate of 98.78%. The synthesis of the anticyanobacterial substance did not depend on Sfp, an enzyme that catalyzes a necessary processing step in the nonribosomal synthesis of lipopeptides and polyketides, but was associated with the aro gene cluster that is involved in the synthesis of the sfp-independent antibiotic bacilysin. Disruption of bacB, the gene in the cluster responsible for synthesizing bacilysin, or supplementation with the antagonist N-acetylglucosamine abolished the inhibitory effect, but this was restored when bacilysin synthesis was complemented. Bacilysin caused apparent changes in the algal cell wall and cell organelle membranes, and this resulted in cell lysis. Meanwhile, there was downregulated expression of glmS, psbA1, mcyB, and ftsZ—genes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis, photosynthesis, microcystin synthesis, and cell division, respectively. In addition, bacilysin suppressed the growth of other harmful algal species. In summary, bacilysin produced by B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42 has anticyanobacterial activity and thus could be developed as a biocontrol agent to mitigate the effects of harmful algal blooms. PMID:25261512

  7. Bacilysin from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 has specific bactericidal activity against harmful algal bloom species.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liming; Wu, Huijun; Chen, Lina; Xie, Shanshan; Zang, Haoyu; Borriss, Rainer; Gao, Xuewen

    2014-12-01

    Harmful algal blooms, caused by massive and exceptional overgrowth of microalgae and cyanobacteria, are a serious environmental problem worldwide : In the present study, we looked for Bacillus strains with sufficiently strong anticyanobacterial activity to be used as biocontrol agents. Among 24 strains, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 showed the strongest bactericidal activity against Microcystis aeruginosa, with a kill rate of 98.78%. The synthesis of the anticyanobacterial substance did not depend on Sfp, an enzyme that catalyzes a necessary processing step in the nonribosomal synthesis of lipopeptides and polyketides, but was associated with the aro gene cluster that is involved in the synthesis of the sfp-independent antibiotic bacilysin. Disruption of bacB, the gene in the cluster responsible for synthesizing bacilysin, or supplementation with the antagonist N-acetylglucosamine abolished the inhibitory effect, but this was restored when bacilysin synthesis was complemented. Bacilysin caused apparent changes in the algal cell wall and cell organelle membranes, and this resulted in cell lysis. Meanwhile, there was downregulated expression of glmS, psbA1, mcyB, and ftsZ-genes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis, photosynthesis, microcystin synthesis, and cell division, respectively. In addition, bacilysin suppressed the growth of other harmful algal species. In summary, bacilysin produced by B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42 has anticyanobacterial activity and thus could be developed as a biocontrol agent to mitigate the effects of harmful algal blooms.

  8. A Photosynthesis Lab. Response of Algal Suspensions to a Gradient of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zee, Delmar Vander

    1995-01-01

    This photosynthesis exercise is intended for introductory college biology or botany courses. It is based on the principle that a closed suspension of algal cells may be expected to produce more dissolved oxygen with a greater photon fluence rate, but within limits of the photosynthetic capacity of the system. Describes materials and methods. (LZ)

  9. Monoraphidium sp. as an algal feedstock for biodiesel: Determining optimal growth conditions in wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Zachary William

    This thesis set out to investigate different conditions for growth of the freshwater algal species Monoraphidium sp. for use as a feedstock for biodiesel. The algae was inoculated into effluent gathered from a local water treatment plant and placed into 50gal mesocosms. Cells were grown at large scale in wastewater, harvested, and run through extractions to collect lipids (26%DW). The lipids were then turned into biodiesel. The algae also removed most of the pollutants in the wastewater, lowering nitrate and phosphate levels usually to less than 1mg/L. Erlenmeyer flask cultures (1L) were used to determine optimal growth conditions for temperature (10°C), light intensity (30microE/m2/sec with a 10 hour photoperiod), and initial inoculation density (1x104cells/mL). The addition of bicarbonate during the initial or exponential growth phase had no effect on growth. It was concluded that Monoraphidium sp. grown in USDA Hardiness Zone 5 is capable of producing biodiesel.

  10. Time-response of cultured deep-sea benthic foraminifera to different algal diets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, P.; Hemleben, Ch; Kitazato, H.

    2002-03-01

    The vertical distribution of benthic foraminifera in the surface sediment is influenced by environmental factors, mainly by food and oxygen supply. An experiment of three different time series was performed to investigate the response of deep-sea benthic foraminifera to simulated phytodetritus pulses under stable oxygen concentrations. Each series was fed constantly with one distinct algal species in equivalent amounts. The temporal reactions of the benthic foraminifera with regard to the vertical distribution in the sediment, the total number, and the species composition were observed and compared within the three series. Additionally, oxygen contents and bacterial cell numbers were measured to ensure that these factors were invariable and did not influence foraminiferal communities. The addition of algae leads to higher population densities 21 days after food was added. Higher numbers of individuals were probably caused by higher organic levels, which in turn induced reproduction. A stronger response is found after feeding with Amphiprora sp. and Pyramimonas sp., compared to Dunaliella tertiolecta. At a constant high oxygen supply, no migration to upper layers was observed after food addition, and more individuals were found in deeper layers. The laboratory results thus agree with the predictions of the TROX-model. An epifaunal microhabitat preference was shown for Adercotryma glomerata. Hippocrepina sp. was spread over the entire sediment depth with a shallow infaunal maximum. Melonis barleeanum preferred a deeper infaunal habitat. Bacterial cell concentrations were stable during the laboratory experiments and showed no significant response to higher organic fluxes.

  11. Algal Toxins Alter Copepod Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A.; Waggett, Rebecca J.; Place, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod’s feeding appendages–a “sampling beating” that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration “grazing beating” that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod’s grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod’s feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  12. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A; Waggett, Rebecca J; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  13. [Optimization of high-cell-density fermentation process for S-adenosyl-L-methionine production].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiepeng; Han, Jinjun; Li, Xiaonan; Liu, Peiyi; Tan, Tianwei

    2009-04-01

    Poor stability existed in the anaphase of the high-cell-density fermentation of Saccharomyces crevisiae for S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) production in 5 L fermentor. To improve the fermentation stability, we studied the addition of diammonium hydrogen phosphate, sodium glutamate and adenosine disodium triphosphate into glucose feeding solution. Study of four fed-batch cultures showed that, after 34 h fermentation, when dry cell weight reached 100 g/L, the addition of 50 g pre-L-methionine and glucose feeding with 10 g/L adenosine disodium triphosphate was optimal for SAM production. Under this condition, after 65.7 h fermentation, both the dry cell weight and the yield of SAM reached the maximum, 180 g/L and 17.1 g/L respectively. PMID:19637627

  14. Boosting Power Density of Microbial Fuel Cells with 3D Nitrogen‐Doped Graphene Aerogel Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Tianyu; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Dingding; Liao, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    A 3D nitrogen‐doped graphene aerogel (N‐GA) as an anode material for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is reported. Electron microscopy images reveal that the N‐GA possesses hierarchical porous structure that allows efficient diffusion of both bacterial cells and electron mediators in the interior space of 3D electrode, and thus, the colonization of bacterial communities. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements further show that nitrogen doping considerably reduces the charge transfer resistance and internal resistance of GA, which helps to enhance the MFC power density. Importantly, the dual‐chamber milliliter‐scale MFC with N‐GA anode yields an outstanding volumetric power density of 225 ± 12 W m−3 normalized to the total volume of the anodic chamber (750 ± 40 W m−3 normalized to the volume of the anode). These power densities are the highest values report for milliliter‐scale MFCs with similar chamber size (25 mL) under the similar measurement conditions. The 3D N‐GA electrode shows great promise for improving the power generation of MFC devices.

  15. Estimating the neutrally buoyant energy density of a Rankine-cycle/fuel-cell underwater propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Daniel F.; Cadou, Christopher P.

    2014-02-01

    A unique requirement of underwater vehicles' power/energy systems is that they remain neutrally buoyant over the course of a mission. Previous work published in the Journal of Power Sources reported gross as opposed to neutrally-buoyant energy densities of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell/Rankine-cycle based power system based on the exothermic reaction of aluminum with seawater. This paper corrects this shortcoming by presenting a model for estimating system mass and using it to update the key findings of the original paper in the context of the neutral buoyancy requirement. It also presents an expanded sensitivity analysis to illustrate the influence of various design and modeling assumptions. While energy density is very sensitive to turbine efficiency (sensitivity coefficient in excess of 0.60), it is relatively insensitive to all other major design parameters (sensitivity coefficients < 0.15) like compressor efficiency, inlet water temperature, scaling methodology, etc. The neutral buoyancy requirement introduces a significant (∼15%) energy density penalty but overall the system still appears to offer factors of five to eight improvements in energy density (i.e., vehicle range/endurance) over present battery-based technologies.

  16. Combinational effect of matrix elasticity and alendronate density on differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pengfei; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2015-06-01

    Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is regulated by multivariate physical and chemical signals in a complicated microenvironment. In this study, polymerizable double bonds (GelMA) and osteo-inductive alendronate (Aln) (Aln-GelMA) were sequentially grafted onto gelatin molecules. The biocompatible hydrogels with defined stiffness in the range of 4-40 kPa were prepared by using polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) as additional crosslinker. The Aln density was adjusted from 0 to 4 μM by controlling the ratio between the GelMA and Aln-GelMA. The combinational effects of stiffness and Aln density on osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were then studied in terms of ALP activity, collagen type I and osteocalcin expression, and calcium deposition. The results indicated that the stiffness and Aln density could synergistically improve the expression of all these osteogenesis markers. Their osteo-inductive effects are comparable to some extent, and high Aln density could be more effective than the stiffness.

  17. Cell membrane damage is involved in the impaired survival of bone marrow stem cells by oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Xiao, Yuan; Cui, Yuqi; Tan, Tao; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala A; Hao, Hong; Liu, Lingjuan; Zhang, Jia; He, Guanglong; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Lei, Minxiang; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Ma, Jianjie; Zhu, Hua; Liu, Zhenguo

    2014-12-01

    Cell therapy with bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) remains a viable option for tissue repair and regeneration. A major challenge for cell therapy is the limited cell survival after implantation. This study was to investigate the effect of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL, naturally present in human blood) on BMSC injury and the effect of MG53, a tissue repair protein, for the improvement of stem cell survival. Rat bone marrow multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) were treated with ox-LDL, which caused significant cell death as reflected by the increased LDH release to the media. Exposure of MAPCs to ox-LDL led to entry of fluorescent dye FM1-43 measured under confocal microscope, suggesting damage to the plasma membrane. Ox-LDL also generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) as measured with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. While antioxidant N-acetylcysteine completely blocked ROS production from ox-LDL, it failed to prevent ox-LDL-induced cell death. When MAPCs were treated with the recombinant human MG53 protein (rhMG53) ox-LDL induced LDH release and FM1-43 dye entry were significantly reduced. In the presence of rhMG53, the MAPCs showed enhanced cell survival and proliferation. Our data suggest that membrane damage induced by ox-LDL contributed to the impaired survival of MAPCs. rhMG53 treatment protected MAPCs against membrane damage and enhanced their survival which might represent a novel means for improving efficacy for stem cell-based therapy for treatment of diseases, especially in setting of hyperlipidemia.

  18. Optimization of the cell seeding density and modeling of cell growth and metabolism using the modified Gompertz model for microencapsulated animal cell culture.

    PubMed

    Wen-tao, Qi; Ying, Zhang; Juan, Ma; Xin, Guo; Yu-bing, Xie; Wei, Wang; Xiaojun, Ma

    2006-04-01

    Cell microencapsulation is one of the promising strategies for the in vitro production of proteins or in vivo delivery of therapeutic products. In order to design and fabricate the optimized microencapsulated cell system, the Gompertz model was applied and modified to describe the growth and metabolism of microencapsulated cell, including substrate consumption and product formation. The Gompertz model successfully described the cell growth kinetics and the modified Gompertz models fitted the substrate consumption and product formation well. It was demonstrated that the optimal initial cell seeding density was about 4-5 x 10(6) cells/mL of microcapsule, in terms of the maximum specific growth rate, the glucose consumption potential and the product formation potential calculated by the Gompertz and modified Gompertz models. Modeling of cell growth and metabolism in microcapsules provides a guideline for optimizing the culture of microencapsulated cells.

  19. High-Density Cell Systems Incorporating Polymer Microspheres as Microenvironmental Regulators in Engineered Cartilage Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Loran D.; Vieregge, Eran L.; Dhami, Chirag D.

    2013-01-01

    To address the significant clinical need for tissue-engineered therapies for the repair and regeneration of articular cartilage, many systems have recently been developed using bioactive polymer microspheres as regulators of the chondrogenic microenvironment within high-density cell cultures. In this review, we highlight various densely cellular systems utilizing polymer microspheres as three-dimensional (3D) structural elements within developing engineered cartilage tissue, carriers for cell expansion and delivery, vehicles for spatiotemporally controlled growth factor delivery, and directors of cell behavior via regulation of cell–biomaterial interactions. The diverse systems described herein represent a shift from the more traditional tissue engineering approach of combining cells and growth factors within a biomaterial scaffold, to the design of modular systems that rely on the assembly of cells and bioactive polymer microspheres as building blocks to guide the creation of articular cartilage. Cell-based assembly of 3D microsphere-incorporated structures represents a promising avenue for the future of tissue engineering. PMID:23126333

  20. Cellular uptake of a dexamethasone palmitate-low density lipoprotein complex by macrophages and foam cells.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Yoshihiko; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of a dexamethasone palmitate (DP)-low density lipoprotein (LDL) complex to transport drug into foam cells, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by macrophages and foam cells was examined. The DP-LDL complex was prepared by incubation with DP and LDL, and the DP-LDL complex and murine macrophages were incubated. No cellular uptake of the DP-LDL complex by macrophages was found until 6 h after the start of incubation, but this gradually increased from 12 to 48 h. On the other hand, the cellular uptake of the oxidized DP-LDL complex was already apparent at 3 h after the start incubation, and then markedly increased until 48 h incubation along with that of the lipid emulsion (LE) containing DP (DP-LE). The cellular uptake of DP-LE by foam cells was significantly lower than that by macrophages. However, the cellular uptake of DP-LDL complex by foam cells was similar to that by macrophages. These findings suggest that the DP-LDL complex is oxidatively modified, and then incorporated into macrophages and foam cells through the scavenger receptor pathway. Since selective delivery of drugs into foam cells in the early stage of atherosclerosis is a useful protocol for antiatherosclerosis treatment, the DP-LDL complex appears to be a potentially useful drug-carrier complex for future antiatherosclerotic therapy.

  1. Non-invasive optoacoustic probing of the density and stiffness of single biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehoux, T.; Audoin, B.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the coherent generation of GHz acoustic waves using ultrashort laser pulses has demonstrated the ability to probe the sound velocity in vegetal cells and in cell-mimicking soft micro-objects with micrometer resolution, opening tremendous potentialities for single-cell biology. However, manipulating biological media in physiological conditions is often a technical challenge when using a laser-based setup. In this article, we present a new opto-acoustic bio-transducer composed of a thin metal film sputtered on a transparent heat sink that allows reducing importantly the laser-induced cellular stresses, and offers a wide variety of optical configurations. In particular, by exploiting the acoustic reflection coefficient at the sample-transducer interface and the photoacoustic interaction inside the transparent sample, the density and compressibility of the sample can be probed simultaneously. Using an ad hoc signal analysis based on Hilbert and wavelet transforms, these quantities are measured accurately for a reference fluid. Similar analysis performed in a single vegetal cell also suggests high sensitivity to the state of the transducer-cell interface, and notably to the presence of the plasma membrane that encloses the cell vacuole.

  2. Nutrient enrichment, phytoplankton algal growth, and estimated rates of instream metabolic processes in the Quinebaug River Basin, Connecticut, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colombo, Michael J.; Grady, Stephen J.; Todd Trench, Elaine C.

    2004-01-01

    A consistent and pervasive pattern of nutrient enrichment was substantiated by water-quality sampling in the Quinebaug River and its tributaries in eastern Connecticut during water years 2000 and 2001. Median total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s recently recommended regional ambient water-qual-ity criteria for streams (0.71 and 0.031 milligrams per liter, respectively). Maximum total phosphorus concentrations exceeded 0.1 milligrams per liter at nearly half the sampled locations in the Quinebaug River Basin. Elevated total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations were measured at all stations on the mainstem of the Quinebaug River, the French River, and the Little River. Nutrient enrichment was related to municipal wastewater point sources at the sites on the mainstem of the Quinebaug River and French River, and to agricultural nonpoint nutrient sources in the Little River Basin. Nutrient enrichment and favorable physical factors have resulted in excessive, nuisance algal blooms during summer months, particularly in the numerous impoundments in the Quinebaug River system. Phytoplankton algal density as high as 85,000 cells per milliliter was measured during such nuisance blooms in water years 2000 and 2001. Different hydrologic conditions during the summers of 2000 and 2001 produced very different seston algal populations. Larger amounts of precipitation sustained higher streamflows in the summer of 2000 (than in 2001), which resulted in lower total algal abundance and inhibited the typical algal succession from diatoms to cyanobacteria. Despite this, nearly half of all seston chlorophyll-a concentrations measured during this study exceeded the recommended regional ambient stream-water-quality criterion (3.75 micrograms per liter), and seston chlorophyll-a concentrations as large as 42 micrograms per liter were observed in wastewa-ter-receiving reaches of the Quinebaug River. Estimates of primary

  3. Absolute Density Calibration Cell for Laser Induced Fluorescence Erosion Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. This work examines the suitability of the density cell as an absolute calibration source for LIF measurements, and the intrinsic error was evaluated.

  4. Iron-based cathode catalyst with enhanced power density in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Eric; Jaouen, Frédéric; Lefèvre, Michel; Larouche, Nicholas; Tian, Juan; Herranz, Juan; Dodelet, Jean-Pol

    2011-08-02

    H(2)-air polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells are electrochemical power generators with potential vehicle propulsion applications. To help reduce their cost and encourage widespread use, research has focused on replacing the expensive Pt-based electrocatalysts in polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells with a lower-cost alternative. Fe-based cathode catalysts are promising contenders, but their power density has been low compared with Pt-based cathodes, largely due to poor mass-transport properties. Here we report an iron-acetate/phenanthroline/zeolitic-imidazolate-framework-derived electrocatalyst with increased volumetric activity and enhanced mass-transport properties. The zeolitic-imidazolate-framework serves as a microporous host for phenanthroline and ferrous acetate to form a catalyst precursor that is subsequently heat treated. A cathode made with the best electrocatalyst from this work, tested in H(2)-O(2,) has a power density of 0.75 W cm(-2) at 0.6 V, a meaningful voltage for polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells operation, comparable with that of a commercial Pt-based cathode tested under identical conditions.

  5. Acetate metabolism by Escherichia coli in high-cell-density fermentation.

    PubMed Central

    Kleman, G L; Strohl, W R

    1994-01-01

    Little is known about the cellular physiology of Escherichia coli at high cell densities (e.g., greater than 50 g [dry cell weight] per liter), particularly in relation to the cellular response to different growth conditions. E. coli W3100 cultures were grown under identical physical and nutritional conditions, by using a computer-controlled fermentation system which maintains the glucose concentration at 0.5 g/liter, to high cell densities at pH values of 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, and 7.5. The data suggest a relationship between the pH of the environment and the amount of acetate excreted by the organism during growth. At pH values of 6.0 and 6.5, the acetate reached a concentration of 6 g/liter, whereas at pH 7.5, the acetate reached a concentration of 12 g/liter. Furthermore, at pH values of 6.0 to 7.0, the E. coli culture undergoes a dramatic metabolic switch in which oxygen and glucose consumption and CO2 evolution all temporarily decreased by 50 to 80%, with a concomitant initiation of acetate utilization. After a 30-min pause in which approximately 50% of the available acetate is consumed, the culture recovers and resumes consuming glucose and oxygen and producing acetate and CO2 at preswitch levels. During the switch period, the specific activity of isocitrate lyase typically increases approximately fourfold. PMID:7993084

  6. Maintenance of algal endosymbionts in Paramecium bursaria: a simple model based on population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Sosuke; Fujiwara, Kenji; Tamura, Takuro

    2016-09-01

    Algal endosymbiosis is widely distributed in eukaryotes including many protists and metazoans, and plays important roles in aquatic ecosystems, combining phagotrophy and phototrophy. To maintain a stable symbiotic relationship, endosymbiont population size in the host must be properly regulated and maintained at a constant level; however, the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of algal endosymbionts are still largely unknown. Here we investigate the population dynamics of the unicellular ciliate Paramecium bursaria and its Chlorella-like algal endosymbiont under various experimental conditions in a simple culture system. Our results suggest that endosymbiont population size in P. bursaria was not regulated by active processes such as cell division coupling between the two organisms, or partitioning of the endosymbionts at host cell division. Regardless, endosymbiont population size was eventually adjusted to a nearly constant level once cells were grown with light and nutrients. To explain this apparent regulation of population size, we propose a simple mechanism based on the different growth properties (specifically the nutrient requirements) of the two organisms, and based from this develop a mathematical model to describe the population dynamics of host and endosymbiont. The proposed mechanism and model may provide a basis for understanding the maintenance of algal endosymbionts. PMID:26625979

  7. Maintenance of algal endosymbionts in Paramecium bursaria: a simple model based on population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Sosuke; Fujiwara, Kenji; Tamura, Takuro

    2016-09-01

    Algal endosymbiosis is widely distributed in eukaryotes including many protists and metazoans, and plays important roles in aquatic ecosystems, combining phagotrophy and phototrophy. To maintain a stable symbiotic relationship, endosymbiont population size in the host must be properly regulated and maintained at a constant level; however, the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of algal endosymbionts are still largely unknown. Here we investigate the population dynamics of the unicellular ciliate Paramecium bursaria and its Chlorella-like algal endosymbiont under various experimental conditions in a simple culture system. Our results suggest that endosymbiont population size in P. bursaria was not regulated by active processes such as cell division coupling between the two organisms, or partitioning of the endosymbionts at host cell division. Regardless, endosymbiont population size was eventually adjusted to a nearly constant level once cells were grown with light and nutrients. To explain this apparent regulation of population size, we propose a simple mechanism based on the different growth properties (specifically the nutrient requirements) of the two organisms, and based from this develop a mathematical model to describe the population dynamics of host and endosymbiont. The proposed mechanism and model may provide a basis for understanding the maintenance of algal endosymbionts.

  8. Overexpression of LOXIN Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells From Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Veas, Carlos; Jara, Casandra; Willis, Naomi D; Pérez-Contreras, Karen; Gutierrez, Nicolas; Toledo, Jorge; Fernandez, Paulina; Radojkovic, Claudia; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Escudero, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC) are adult stem cells located in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Studies have indicated that hEPC play an important role in the recovery and repair of injured endothelium, however, their quantity and functional capacity is reduced in several diseases including hypercholesterolemia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that hEPC express lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and its activation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induces cellular dysfunction and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate whether overexpression of LOXIN, a truncated isoform of LOX-1 that acts as a dominant negative, plays a protective role against ox-LDL-induced apoptosis in hEPC. Human endothelial progenitor cells exposed to ox-LDL showed a significant increase in LOX-1 expression, and apoptosis began at ox-LDL concentrations above 50 μg/mL. All hEPC apoptosed at 200 μg/mL ox-LDL. High LOXIN expression was generated using adenoviral systems in hEPC and SiHa cells transduced with 100 colony-forming units per cell. Transduced LOXIN localized to the plasma membrane and blocked ox-LDL uptake mediated by LOX-1. Overexpression of LOXIN protected hEPC from ox-LDL-induced apoptosis, and therefore maybe a novel way of improving hEPC function and quantity. These results suggest that adenoviral vectors of LOXIN may provide a possible treatment for diseases related to ox-LDL and vascular endothelium dysfunction, including atherosclerosis.

  9. Overexpression of LOXIN Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells From Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Veas, Carlos; Jara, Casandra; Willis, Naomi D; Pérez-Contreras, Karen; Gutierrez, Nicolas; Toledo, Jorge; Fernandez, Paulina; Radojkovic, Claudia; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Escudero, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC) are adult stem cells located in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Studies have indicated that hEPC play an important role in the recovery and repair of injured endothelium, however, their quantity and functional capacity is reduced in several diseases including hypercholesterolemia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that hEPC express lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) and its activation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induces cellular dysfunction and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate whether overexpression of LOXIN, a truncated isoform of LOX-1 that acts as a dominant negative, plays a protective role against ox-LDL-induced apoptosis in hEPC. Human endothelial progenitor cells exposed to ox-LDL showed a significant increase in LOX-1 expression, and apoptosis began at ox-LDL concentrations above 50 μg/mL. All hEPC apoptosed at 200 μg/mL ox-LDL. High LOXIN expression was generated using adenoviral systems in hEPC and SiHa cells transduced with 100 colony-forming units per cell. Transduced LOXIN localized to the plasma membrane and blocked ox-LDL uptake mediated by LOX-1. Overexpression of LOXIN protected hEPC from ox-LDL-induced apoptosis, and therefore maybe a novel way of improving hEPC function and quantity. These results suggest that adenoviral vectors of LOXIN may provide a possible treatment for diseases related to ox-LDL and vascular endothelium dysfunction, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26771151

  10. LOW-TEMPERATURE, ANODE-SUPPORTED HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS WITH NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRODES

    SciTech Connect

    Anil V. Virkar

    2001-06-21

    A simple, approximate analysis of the effect of differing cathode and anode areas on the measurement of cell performance on anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells, wherein the cathode area is smaller than the anode area, is presented. It is shown that the effect of cathode area on cathode polarization, on electrolyte contribution, and on anode resistance, as normalized on the basis of the cathode area, is negligible. There is a small but measurable effect on anode polarization, which results from concentration polarization. Effectively, it is the result of a greater amount of fuel transported to the anode/electrolyte interface in cases wherein the anode area is larger than the cathode area. Experiments were performed on cells made with differing cathode areas and geometries. Cathodic and anodic overpotentials measured using reference electrodes, and the measured ohmic area specific resistances by current interruption, were in good agreement with expectations based on the analysis presented. At 800 C, the maximum power density measured with a cathode area of {approx}1.1 cm{sup 2} was {approx}1.65 W/cm{sup 2} compared to {approx}1.45 W/cm{sup 2} for cathode area of {approx}2 cm{sup 2}, for anode thickness of {approx}1.3 mm, with hydrogen as the fuel and air as the oxidant. At 750 C, the measured maximum power densities were {approx}1.3 W/cm{sup 2} for the cell with cathode area {approx}1.1 cm{sup 2}, and {approx}1.25 W/cm{sup 2} for the cell with cathode area {approx}2 cm{sup 2}.

  11. Combined effect of concentrations of algal food (Chlorella vulgaris) and salt (sodium chloride) on the population growth of Brachionus calyciflorus and Brachionus patulus (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Peredo-Alvarez, Víctor M; Sarma, S S; Nandini, S

    2003-06-01

    Salinity is an important variable influencing the density and diversity of rotifers. Studies on salt tolerance of rotifers have so far concentrated on euryhaline species while very little information is available on non-euryhaline taxa. In the present work, we have evaluated the combined effects of Chlorella vulgaris and sodium chloride on the population growth of two freshwater rotifers B. calyciflorus and B. patulus. A 24 hr acute tolerance test using NaCl revealed that B. calyciflorus was more resistant (LC50 = 3.75 +/- 0.04 g l-1) than B. patulus (2.14 +/- 0.09 g l-1). The maximal population density (mean +/- standard error) for B. calyciflorus in the control at 4.5 x 10(6) cells ml-1 (algal level) was 80 +/- 5 ind. ml-1, which was nearly a fifth of the one for B. patulus (397 +/- 7 ind. ml-1) under comparable conditions. Data on population growth revealed that regardless of salt concentration, the density of B. calyciflorus increased with increasing food levels, while for B. patulus, this trend was evident only in the controls. Regardless of salt concentration and algal food level, the day of maximal population density was lower (4 +/- 0.5 days) for B. calyciflorus than for B. patulus (11 +/- 1 day). The highest rates of population increase (r values) for B. calyciflorus and B. patulus were 0.429 +/- 0.012 and 0.367 +/- 0.004, respectively, recorded at 4.5 x 10(6) cells ml-1 of Chlorella in the controls. The protective role of algae in reducing the effect of salt stress was more evident in B. calyciflorus than B. patulus. PMID:15162733

  12. Endothelial Cell Density to Predict Endothelial Graft Failure After Penetrating Keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lass, Jonathan H.; Sugar, Alan; Benetz, Beth Ann; Beck, Roy W.; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L.; Kollman, Craig; Gross, Robert; Heck, Ellen; Holland, Edward J.; Mannis, Mark J.; Raber, Irving; Stark, Walter; Stulting, R. Doyle

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether preoperative and/or postoperative central endothelial cell density (ECD) and its rate of decline postoperatively are predictive of graft failure caused by endothelial decompensation following penetrating keratoplasty to treat a moderate-risk condition, principally, Fuchs dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema. Methods In a subset of Cornea Donor Study participants, a central reading center determined preoperative and postoperative ECD from available specular images for 17 grafts that failed because of endothelial decompensation and 483 grafts that did not fail. Results Preoperative ECD was not predictive of graft failure caused by endothelial decompensation (P = .91). However, the 6-month ECD was predictive of subsequent failure (P < .001). Among those that had not failed within the first 6 months, the 5-year cumulative incidence (±95% confidence interval) of failure was 13% (±12%) for the 33 participants with a 6-month ECD of less than 1700 cells/mm2 vs 2%(±3%) for the 137 participants with a 6-monthECDof 2500 cells/mm2 or higher. After 5 years’ follow-up, 40 of 277 participants (14%) with a clear graft had an ECD below 500 cells/mm2. Conclusions Preoperative ECD is unrelated to graft failure from endothelial decompensation, whereas there is a strong correlation of ECD at 6 months with graft failure from endothelial decompensation. A graft can remain clear after 5 years even when the ECD is below 500 cells/mm2. PMID:20065219

  13. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other.

  14. High energy density proton exchange membrane fuel cell with dry reactant gases

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, S.; Gamburzev, S.; Velev, O.A.

    1996-12-31

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) require careful control of humidity levels in the cell stack to achieve a high and stable level of performance. External humidification of the reactant gases, as in the state-of-the-art PEMFCs, increases the complexity, the weight, and the volume of the fuel cell power plant. A method for the operation of PEMFCs without external humidification (i.e., self-humidified PEMFCs) was first developed and tested by Dhar at BCS Technology. A project is underway in our Center to develop a PEMFC cell stack, which can work without external humidification and attain a performance level of a current density of 0.7 A/cm{sup 2} at a cell potential of 0.7 V, with hydrogen/air as reactants at 1 atm pressure. In this paper, the results of our efforts to design and develop a PEMFC stack requiring no external humidification will be presented. This paper focuses on determining the effects of type of electrodes, the methods of their preparation, as well as that of the membrane and electrode assembly (MEA), platinum loading and types of electrocatalyst on the performance of the PEMFC will be illustrated.

  15. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other. PMID:25010412

  16. Didymosphenia geminata: Algal blooms in oligotrophic streams and rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundareshwar, P.V.; Upadhayay, S.; Abessa, M.; Honomichl, S.; Berdanier, B.; Spaulding, S.A.; Sandvik, C.; Trennepohl, A.

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, the diatom Didymosphenia geminata has emerged as nuisance species in river systems around the world. This periphytic alga forms large "blooms" in temperate streams, presenting a counterintuitive result: the blooms occur primarily in oligotrophic streams and rivers, where phosphorus (P) availability typically limits primary production. The goal of this study is to examine how high algal biomass is formed under low P conditions. We reveal a biogeochemical process by which D. geminata mats concentrate P from flowing waters. First, the mucopolysaccaride stalks of D. geminata adsorb both iron (Fe) and P. Second, enzymatic and bacterial processes interact with Fe to increase the biological availability of P. We propose that a positive feedback between total stalk biomass and high growth rate is created, which results in abundant P for cell division. The affinity of stalks for Fe in association with iron-phosphorus biogeochemistry suggest a resolution to the paradox of algal blooms in oliogotrophic streams and rivers. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Interaction effects of cell diffusion, cell density and public goods properties on the evolution of cooperation in digital microbes.

    PubMed

    Dobay, A; Bagheri, H C; Messina, A; Kümmerli, R; Rankin, D J

    2014-09-01

    Microbial cooperation typically consists in the sharing of secreted metabolites (referred to as public goods) within the community. Although public goods generally promote population growth, they are also vulnerable to exploitation by cheating mutants, which no longer contribute, but still benefit from the public goods produced by others. Although previous studies have identified a number of key factors that prevent the spreading of cheaters, little is known about how these factors interact and jointly shape the evolution of microbial cooperation. Here, we address this issue by investigating the interaction effects of cell diffusion, cell density, public good diffusion and durability (factors known to individually influence costs and benefits of public goods production) on selection for cooperation. To be able to quantify these effects across a wide parameter space, we developed an individual-based simulation platform, consisting of digital cooperator and cheater bacteria inhabiting a finite two-dimensional continuous toroidal surface. Our simulations, which closely mimic microbial microcolony growth, revealed that: (i) either reduced cell diffusion (which keeps cooperators together) or reduced public good diffusion (which keeps the public goods closer to the producer) is not only essential but also sufficient for cooperation to be promoted; (ii) the sign of selection for or against cooperation can change as a function of cell density and in interaction with diffusion parameters; and (iii) increased public goods durability has opposing effects on the evolution of cooperation depending on the level of cell and public good diffusion. Our work highlights that interactions between key parameters of public goods cooperation give rise to complex fitness landscapes, a finding that calls for multifactorial approaches when studying microbial cooperation in natural systems.

  18. Increased density of tolerogenic dendritic cells in the small bowel mucosa of celiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Uibo, Oivi; Heilman, Kaire; Uibo, Raivo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the densities of dendritic cells (DCs) and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and their interrelations in the small bowel mucosa in untreated celiac disease (CD) patients with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D). METHODS: Seventy-four patients (45 female, 29 male, mean age 11.1 ± 6.8 years) who underwent small bowel biopsy were studied. CD without T1D was diagnosed in 18 patients, and CD with T1D was diagnosed in 15 patients. Normal small bowel mucosa was found in two T1D patients. Thirty-nine patients (mean age 12.8 ± 4.9 years) with other diagnoses (functional dyspepsia, duodenal ulcer, erosive gastritis, etc.) formed the control group. All CD patients had partial or subtotal villous atrophy according to the Marsh classification: Marsh grade IIIa in 9, grade IIIb in 21 and grade IIIc in 3 cases. Thirty-nine patients without CD and 2 with T1D had normal small bowel mucosa (Marsh grade 0). The densities of CD11c+, IDO+, CD103+, Langerin (CD207+) DCs and FOXP3+ Tregs were investigated by immunohistochemistry (on paraffin-embedded specimens) and immunofluorescence (on cryostat sections) methods using a combination of mono- and double-staining. Sixty-six serum samples were tested for IgA-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) using a fully automated EliA™ Celikey® IgA assay (Pharmacia Diagnostics, Freiburg, Germany). RESULTS: The density of CD11c+ DCs was significantly increased in CD patients compared with patients with normal mucosa (21.67 ± 2.49 vs 13.58 ± 1.51, P = 0.007). The numbers of FOXP3+ cells were significantly higher in CD patients (10.66 ± 1.50 vs 1.92 ± 0.37, P = 0.0002) and in patients with CD and coexisting T1D (8.11 ± 1.64 vs 1.92 ± 0.37, P = 0.002) compared with patients with normal mucosa. The density of FOXP3+ cells significantly correlated with the histological grade of atrophic changes in the small bowel mucosa according to the March classification (r = 0.62; P < 0.0001) and with levels of IgA antibody (r = 0.55; P < 0

  19. Ceruloplasmin enhances smooth muscle cell- and endothelial cell-mediated low density lipoprotein oxidation by a superoxide-dependent mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Ehrenwald, E.; Fox, P. L.

    1996-01-01

    Cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells (EC) stimulate low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by free radical-mediated, transition metal-dependent mechanisms. The physiological source(s) of metal ions is not known; however, purified ceruloplasmin, a plasma protein containing 7 coppers, oxidizes LDL in vitro. We now show that ceruloplasmin also increases LDL oxidation by vascular cells. In metal ion-free medium, human ceruloplasmin increased bovine aortic SMC- and EC-mediated LDL oxidation by up to 30- and 15-fold, respectively. The maximal response was at 100-300 microg ceruloplasmin/ml, a level at or below the unevoked physiological plasma concentration. Oxidant activity was dependent on protein structure as a specific proteolytic cleavage or removal of one of the seven ceruloplasmin copper atoms inhibited activity. Three lines of evidence indicated a critical role for cellular superoxide (O2.) in ceruloplasmin-stimulated oxidation. First, the rate of production of O2. by cells correlated with their rates of LDL oxidation. Second, superoxide dismutase effectively blocked ceruloplasmin-stimulated oxidation by both cell types. Finally, O2. production by SMC quantitatively accounted for the observed rate of LDL oxidation. To show this, the course of O2. production by SMC was simulated by repeated addition of xanthine and xanthine oxidase to culture medium under cell-free conditions. Neither ceruloplasmin nor O2. alone increased LDL oxidation, but together they completely reconstituted the oxidation rate of ceruloplasmin-stimulated SMC. These results are the first to show that ceruloplasmin stimulates EC- and SMC-mediated oxidation of LDL and that cell-derived O2. accounts quantitatively for metal-dependent, free radical-initiated oxidation of LDL by these cells.

  20. Studying the rapid bioconversion of lignocellulosic sugars into ethanol using high cell density fermentations with cell recycle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Rapid Bioconversion with Integrated recycle Technology (RaBIT) process reduces capital costs, processing times, and biocatalyst cost for biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to biofuels by reducing total bioprocessing time (enzymatic hydrolysis plus fermentation) to 48 h, increasing biofuel productivity (g/L/h) twofold, and recycling biocatalysts (enzymes and microbes) to the next cycle. To achieve these results, RaBIT utilizes 24-h high cell density fermentations along with cell recycling to solve the slow/incomplete xylose fermentation issue, which is critical for lignocellulosic biofuel fermentations. Previous studies utilizing similar fermentation conditions showed a decrease in xylose consumption when recycling cells into the next fermentation cycle. Eliminating this decrease is critical for RaBIT process effectiveness for high cycle counts. Results Nine different engineered microbial strains (including Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis strains, Zymomonas mobilis 8b, and Escherichia coli KO11) were tested under RaBIT platform fermentations to determine their suitability for this platform. Fermentation conditions were then optimized for S. cerevisiae GLBRCY128. Three different nutrient sources (corn steep liquor, yeast extract, and wheat germ) were evaluated to improve xylose consumption by recycled cells. Capacitance readings were used to accurately measure viable cell mass profiles over five cycles. Conclusion The results showed that not all strains are capable of effectively performing the RaBIT process. Acceptable performance is largely correlated to the specific xylose consumption rate. Corn steep liquor was found to reduce the deleterious impacts of cell recycle and improve specific xylose consumption rates. The viable cell mass profiles indicated that reduction in specific xylose consumption rate, not a drop in viable cell mass, was the main cause for decreasing xylose consumption. PMID:24847379

  1. Characterisation of algal organic matter produced by bloom-forming marine and freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Villacorte, L O; Ekowati, Y; Neu, T R; Kleijn, J M; Winters, H; Amy, G; Schippers, J C; Kennedy, M D

    2015-04-15

    Algal blooms can seriously affect the operation of water treatment processes including low pressure (micro- and ultra-filtration) and high pressure (nanofiltration and reverse osmosis) membranes mainly due to accumulation of algal-derived organic matter (AOM). In this study, the different components of AOM extracted from three common species of bloom-forming algae (Alexandrium tamarense, Chaetoceros affinis and Microcystis sp.) were characterised employing various analytical techniques, such as liquid chromatography - organic carbon detection, fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, alcian blue staining and lectin staining coupled with laser scanning microscopy to indentify its composition and force measurement using atomic force microscopy to measure its stickiness. Batch culture monitoring of the three algal species illustrated varying characteristics in terms of growth pattern, cell concentration and AOM release. The AOM produced by the three algal species comprised mainly biopolymers (e.g., polysaccharides and proteins) but some refractory compounds (e.g., humic-like substances) and other low molecular weight acid and neutral compounds were also found. Biopolymers containing fucose and sulphated functional groups were found in all AOM samples while the presence of other functional groups varied between different species. A large majority (>80%) of the acidic polysaccharide components (in terms of transparent exopolymer particles) were found in the colloidal size range (<0.4 μm). The relative stickiness of AOM substantially varied between algal species and that the cohesion between AOM-coated surfaces was much stronger than the adhesion of AOM on AOM-free surfaces. Overall, the composition as well as the physico-chemical characteristics (e.g., stickiness) of AOM will likely dictate the severity of fouling in membrane systems during algal blooms. PMID:25682049

  2. Characterisation of algal organic matter produced by bloom-forming marine and freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Villacorte, L O; Ekowati, Y; Neu, T R; Kleijn, J M; Winters, H; Amy, G; Schippers, J C; Kennedy, M D

    2015-04-15

    Algal blooms can seriously affect the operation of water treatment processes including low pressure (micro- and ultra-filtration) and high pressure (nanofiltration and reverse osmosis) membranes mainly due to accumulation of algal-derived organic matter (AOM). In this study, the different components of AOM extracted from three common species of bloom-forming algae (Alexandrium tamarense, Chaetoceros affinis and Microcystis sp.) were characterised employing various analytical techniques, such as liquid chromatography - organic carbon detection, fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, alcian blue staining and lectin staining coupled with laser scanning microscopy to indentify its composition and force measurement using atomic force microscopy to measure its stickiness. Batch culture monitoring of the three algal species illustrated varying characteristics in terms of growth pattern, cell concentration and AOM release. The AOM produced by the three algal species comprised mainly biopolymers (e.g., polysaccharides and proteins) but some refractory compounds (e.g., humic-like substances) and other low molecular weight acid and neutral compounds were also found. Biopolymers containing fucose and sulphated functional groups were found in all AOM samples while the presence of other functional groups varied between different species. A large majority (>80%) of the acidic polysaccharide components (in terms of transparent exopolymer particles) were found in the colloidal size range (<0.4 μm). The relative stickiness of AOM substantially varied between algal species and that the cohesion between AOM-coated surfaces was much stronger than the adhesion of AOM on AOM-free surfaces. Overall, the composition as well as the physico-chemical characteristics (e.g., stickiness) of AOM will likely dictate the severity of fouling in membrane systems during algal blooms.

  3. Edaravone attenuates monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijuan; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Liping

    2015-10-30

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) plays a vital role in recruitment of monocytes to endothelial cells, which is important during early stages of atherosclerosis development. Edaravone, a potent and novel scavenger of free radicals inhibiting hydroxyl radicals, has been clinically used to reduce the neuronal damage following ischemic stroke. In the present study, Edaravone was revealed to markedly reduce oxLDL-induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The inhibitory mechanism of Edaravone was associated with suppression of the chemokine MCP-1 and adhesion molecule VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression. In addition, luciferase reporter assay results revealed that administration of Edaravone attenuated the increase in NF-κB transcriptional activity induced by oxLDL. Notably, it's also shown that Edaravone treatment blocked oxLDL induced p65 nuclear translocation in HUVECs. Results indicate that Edaravone negatively regulates endothelial inflammation.

  4. High Density Crossbar Arrays with Sub- 15 nm Single Cells via Liftoff Process Only.

    PubMed

    Khiat, Ali; Ayliffe, Peter; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2016-01-01

    Emerging nano-scale technologies are pushing the fabrication boundaries at their limits, for leveraging an even higher density of nano-devices towards reaching 4F(2)/cell footprint in 3D arrays. Here, we study the liftoff process limits to achieve extreme dense nanowires while ensuring preservation of thin film quality. The proposed method is optimized for attaining a multiple layer fabrication to reliably achieve 3D nano-device stacks of 32 × 32 nanowire arrays across 6-inch wafer, using electron beam lithography at 100 kV and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resist at different thicknesses. The resist thickness and its geometric profile after development were identified to be the major limiting factors, and suggestions for addressing these issues are provided. Multiple layers were successfully achieved to fabricate arrays of 1 Ki cells that have sub- 15 nm nanowires distant by 28 nm across 6-inch wafer. PMID:27585643

  5. High Density Crossbar Arrays with Sub- 15 nm Single Cells via Liftoff Process Only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiat, Ali; Ayliffe, Peter; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2016-09-01

    Emerging nano-scale technologies are pushing the fabrication boundaries at their limits, for leveraging an even higher density of nano-devices towards reaching 4F2/cell footprint in 3D arrays. Here, we study the liftoff process limits to achieve extreme dense nanowires while ensuring preservation of thin film quality. The proposed method is optimized for attaining a multiple layer fabrication to reliably achieve 3D nano-device stacks of 32 × 32 nanowire arrays across 6-inch wafer, using electron beam lithography at 100 kV and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resist at different thicknesses. The resist thickness and its geometric profile after development were identified to be the major limiting factors, and suggestions for addressing these issues are provided. Multiple layers were successfully achieved to fabricate arrays of 1 Ki cells that have sub- 15 nm nanowires distant by 28 nm across 6-inch wafer.

  6. High Density Crossbar Arrays with Sub- 15 nm Single Cells via Liftoff Process Only

    PubMed Central

    Khiat, Ali; Ayliffe, Peter; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2016-01-01

    Emerging nano-scale technologies are pushing the fabrication boundaries at their limits, for leveraging an even higher density of nano-devices towards reaching 4F2/cell footprint in 3D arrays. Here, we study the liftoff process limits to achieve extreme dense nanowires while ensuring preservation of thin film quality. The proposed method is optimized for attaining a multiple layer fabrication to reliably achieve 3D nano-device stacks of 32 × 32 nanowire arrays across 6-inch wafer, using electron beam lithography at 100 kV and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resist at different thicknesses. The resist thickness and its geometric profile after development were identified to be the major limiting factors, and suggestions for addressing these issues are provided. Multiple layers were successfully achieved to fabricate arrays of 1 Ki cells that have sub- 15 nm nanowires distant by 28 nm across 6-inch wafer. PMID:27585643

  7. Role of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and stabilins in elimination of oxidized low-density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruomei; Oteiza, Ana; Sørensen, Karen Kristine; McCourt, Peter; Olsen, Randi; Svistounov, Dmitri

    2011-01-01

    Atherogenesis is associated with elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its oxidized form (oxLDL) in the blood. The liver is an important scavenger organ for circulating oxLDLs. The present study aimed to examine endocytosis of mildly oxLDL (the major circulating form of oxLDLs) in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and the involvement of the scavenger receptors stabilin-1 and stabilin-2 in this process. Freshly isolated LSECs, Kupffer cells (KCs), and stabilin-1- and stabilin-2-transfected human embryonic kidney cells were incubated with fluorescently labeled or radiolabeled oxLDLs [oxidized for 3 h (oxLDL3), 6 h, or 24 h (oxLDL24)] to measure endocytosis. The intracellular localization of oxLDLs and stabilins in LSECs was examined by immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy. Whereas oxLDL24 was endocytosed both by LSECs and KCs, oxLDL3 (mildly oxLDL) was taken up by LSECs only. The LSEC uptake of oxLDLs was significantly inhibited by the scavenger receptor ligand formaldehyde-treated serum albumin. Uptake of all modified LDLs was high in stabilin-1-transfected cells, whereas stabilin-2-transfected cells preferentially took up oxLDL24, suggesting that stabilin-1 is a more important receptor for mildly oxLDLs than stabilin-2. Double immunogold labeling experiments in LSECs indicated interactions of stabilin-1 and stabilin-2 with oxLDL3 on the cell surface, in coated pits, and endocytic vesicles. LSECs but not KCs endocytosed mildly oxLDL. Both stabilin-1 and stabilin-2 were involved in the LSEC endocytosis of oxLDLs, but experiments with stabilin-transfected cells pointed to stabilin-1 as the most important receptor for mildly oxLDL. PMID:21030611

  8. Synthetic High-Density Lipoprotein (sHDL) Inhibits Steroid Production in HAC15 Adrenal Cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew J; Sanjanwala, Aalok R; Morin, Emily E; Rowland-Fisher, Elizabeth; Anderson, Kyle; Schwendeman, Anna; Rainey, William E

    2016-08-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) transported cholesterol represents one of the sources of substrate for adrenal steroid production. Synthetic HDL (sHDL) particles represent a new therapeutic option to reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden by increasing cholesterol efflux from macrophage cells. The effects of the sHDL particles on steroidogenic cells have not been explored. sHDL, specifically ETC-642, was studied in HAC15 adrenocortical cells. Cells were treated with sHDL, forskolin, 22R-hydroxycholesterol, or pregnenolone. Experiments included time and concentration response curves, followed by steroid assay. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to study mRNA of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, lanosterol 14-α-methylase, cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, and steroid acute regulatory protein. Cholesterol assay was performed using cell culture media and cell lipid extracts from a dose response experiment. sHDL significantly inhibited production of cortisol. Inhibition occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and in a concentration range of 3μM-50μM. Forskolin (10μM) stimulated cortisol production was also inhibited. Incubation with 22R-hydroxycholesterol (10μM) and pregnenolone (10μM) increased cortisol production, which was unaffected by sHDL treatment. sHDL increased transcript levels for the rate-limiting cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. Extracellular cholesterol assayed in culture media showed a positive correlation with increasing concentration of sHDL, whereas intracellular cholesterol decreased after treatment with sHDL. The current study suggests that sHDL inhibits HAC15 adrenal cell steroid production by efflux of cholesterol, leading to an overall decrease in steroid production and an adaptive rise in adrenal cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:27253994

  9. Nondestructive monitoring of carotenogenesis in Haematococcus pluvialis via whole-cell optical density spectra.

    PubMed

    Solovchenko, Alexei; Aflalo, Claude; Lukyanov, Alexander; Boussiba, Sammy

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of rapid, nondestructive assay of carotenoid-to-chlorophyll (Car/Chl) ratio and total carotenoids (Car) in cell suspensions of the carotenogenic chlorophyte Haematococcus pluvialis Flotow under stressful conditions. Whole-cell spectra are characterized by variable nonlinear contributions of Car and chlorophylls (Chl), with a strong influence of Car packaging and sieve effect inherent to stressed H. pluvialis cells. Nevertheless, nondestructive assay of Car/Chl in the range of 0.55-31.2 (Car content up to 188 mg L(-1); 5.4 % of the cell dry weight) turned to be achievable with a simple spectrophotometer lacking an integrating sphere upon deposition of the cells on glass fiber filters. The scattering-corrected optical density (OD) in the blue-green region of the whole-cell spectrum, normalized to that in the red maximum of Chl absorption (OD500/OD678), was tightly related (r (2) = 0.96) with the Car/Chl ratio found in extracts. Some features such as the amplitude and position of the minimum of the normalized first-derivative OD whole-cell spectra also exhibited a strong (r (2) > 0.90) nonlinear correlation with Car/Chl. These spectral indices were also tightly related with Car, but the slope of the relationship varied with the stressor intensity. The importance of calibration over the widest possible range of pigment contents and a correct choice of biomass load per filter are emphasized. The advantages and limitations of nondestructive monitoring of carotenogenesis in H. pluvialis are discussed in view of its possible application in optical sensors for laboratory cultivation and mass production systems of the algae.

  10. Influence of zeta potential on the flocculation of cyanobacteria cells using chitosan modified soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Zhang, Honggang; Pan, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Using chitosan modified soil to flocculate and sediment algal cells has been considered as a promising strategy to combat cyanobacteria blooms in natural waters. However, the flocculation efficiency often varies with algal cells with different zeta potential (ZP) attributed to different growth phases or water conditions. This article investigated the relationship between ZP of Microcystis aeruginosa and its influence to the flocculation efficiency using chitosan modified soil. Results suggested that the optimal removal efficiency was obtained when the ZP was between -20.7 and -6.7 mV with a removal efficiency of more than 80% in 30 min and large floc size of >350 μm. When the algal cells were more negatively charged than -20.7 mV, the effect of chitosan modified soil was depressed (<60%) due to the insufficient charge density of chitosan to neutralize and destabilize the algal suspension. When the algal cells were less negative than -6.7 mV or even positively charged, a small floc size (<120 μm) was formed, which may be difficult to sink under natural water conditions. Therefore, manipulation of ZP provided a viable tool to improve the flocculation efficiency of chitosan modified soil and an important guidance for practical engineering of cyanobacteria bloom control.

  11. Glial cell morphological and density changes through the lifespan of rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Katelyn N; Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; MacLean, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    How aging impacts the central nervous system (CNS) is an area of intense interest. Glial morphology is known to affect neuronal and immune function as well as metabolic and homeostatic balance. Activation of glia, both astrocytes and microglia, occurs at several stages during development and aging. The present study analyzed changes in glial morphology and density through the entire lifespan of rhesus macaques, which are physiologically and anatomically similar to humans. We observed apparent increases in gray matter astrocytic process length and process complexity as rhesus macaques matured from juveniles through adulthood. These changes were not attributed to cell enlargement because they were not accompanied by proportional changes in soma or process volume. There was a decrease in white matter microglial process length as rhesus macaques aged. Aging was shown to have a significant effect on gray matter microglial density, with a significant increase in aged macaques compared with adults. Overall, we observed significant changes in glial morphology as macaques age indicative of astrocytic activation with subsequent increase in microglial density in aged macaques. PMID:26851132

  12. A high power density miniaturized microbial fuel cell having carbon nanotube anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao; Pyo, Soonjae; Lee, Jae-Ik; Park, Tae-Jin; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Leung, Frederick C. C.; Kim, Jongbaeg; Taylor, André D.; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology capable of directly converting the abundant biomass on the planet into electricity. Prior studies have adopted a variety of nanostructured materials with high surface area to volume ratio (SAV), yet the current and power density of these nanostructured materials do not deliver a significant leap over conventional MFCs. This study presents a novel approach to implement a miniaturized MFC with a high SAV of 4000 m-1 using three different CNT-based electrode materials: Vertically Aligned CNT (VACNT), Randomly Aligned CNT (RACNT), and Spin-Spray Layer-by-Layer (SSLbL) CNT. These CNT-based electrodes show unique biofilm morphology and thickness. The study of performance parameters of miniaturized MFCs with these CNT-electrodes are conducted with respect to a control bare gold electrode. The results show that CNT-based materials attract more exoelectrogens, Geobacter sp., than bare gold, yielding thicker biofilm formation. Among CNT-based electrodes, low sheet resistance electrodes result in thick biofilm generation and high current/power density. The miniaturized MFC having an SSLbL CNT anode exhibits a high volumetric power density of 3320 W m-3. This research may help lay the foundation for future research involving the optimization of MFCS with 2D and 3D nanostructured electrodes.

  13. Coupling of algal biofuel production with wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Neha Chamoli; Panwar, Amit; Bisht, Tara Singh; Tamta, Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae have gained enormous consideration from scientific community worldwide emerging as a viable feedstock for a renewable energy source virtually being carbon neutral, high lipid content, and comparatively more advantageous to other sources of biofuels. Although microalgae are seen as a valuable source in majority part of the world for production of biofuels and bioproducts, still they are unable to accomplish sustainable large-scale algal biofuel production. Wastewater has organic and inorganic supplements required for algal growth. The coupling of microalgae with wastewater is an effective way of waste remediation and a cost-effective microalgal biofuel production. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the possibilities and current scenario regarding coupling of microalgal cultivation with biofuel production emphasizing recent progress in this area.

  14. Improved algal harvesting using suspended air flotation.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Patrick E; Brenneman, Kristine J; Jacobson, Arne E

    2009-07-01

    Current methods to remove algae from a liquid medium are energy intensive and expensive. This study characterized algae contained within a wastewater oxidation pond and sought to identify a more efficient harvesting technique. Analysis of oxidation pond wastewater revealed that algae, consisting primarily of Chlorella and Scenedesmus, composed approximately 80% of the solids inventory during the study period. Results demonstrated that suspended air flotation (SAF) could harvest algae with a lower air:solids (A/S) ratio, lower energy requirements, and higher loading rates compared to dissolved air flotation (DAF) (P < 0.001). Identification of a more efficient algal harvesting system may benefit wastewater treatment plants by enabling cost effective means to reduce solids content of the final effluent. Furthermore, use of SAF to harvest commercially grown Chlorella and Scenedesmus may reduce manufacturing costs of algal-based products such as fuel, fertilizer, and fish food.

  15. Coupling of Algal Biofuel Production with Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Amit; Bisht, Tara Singh; Tamta, Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae have gained enormous consideration from scientific community worldwide emerging as a viable feedstock for a renewable energy source virtually being carbon neutral, high lipid content, and comparatively more advantageous to other sources of biofuels. Although microalgae are seen as a valuable source in majority part of the world for production of biofuels and bioproducts, still they are unable to accomplish sustainable large-scale algal biofuel production. Wastewater has organic and inorganic supplements required for algal growth. The coupling of microalgae with wastewater is an effective way of waste remediation and a cost-effective microalgal biofuel production. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the possibilities and current scenario regarding coupling of microalgal cultivation with biofuel production emphasizing recent progress in this area. PMID:24982930

  16. Algal diseases: spotlight on a black box.

    PubMed

    Gachon, Claire M M; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Strittmatter, Martina; Chambouvet, Aurélie; Kim, Gwang Hoon

    2010-11-01

    Like any other living organisms, algae are plagued by diseases caused by fungi, protists, bacteria or viruses. As aquaculture continues to rise worldwide, pathogens of nori or biofuel sources are becoming a significant economic burden. Parasites are also increasingly being considered of equal importance with predators for ecosystem functioning. Altered disease patterns in disturbed environments are blamed for sudden extinctions, regime shifts, and spreading of alien species. Here we review the biodiversity and impact of pathogens and parasites of aquatic primary producers in freshwater and marine systems. We also cover recent advances on algal defence reactions, and discuss how emerging technologies can be used to reassess the profound, multi-faceted, and so far broadly-overlooked influence of algal diseases on ecosystem properties.

  17. Modeling the impact of awareness on the mitigation of algal bloom in a lake.

    PubMed

    Misra, A K; Tiwari, P K; Venturino, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of algal bloom in water bodies due to the enhanced concentration of nutrient inflow is becoming a global issue. A prime reason behind this aquatic catastrophe is agricultural runoff, which carries a large amount of nutrients that make the lakes more fertile and cause algal blooms. The only solution to this problem is curtailing the nutrient loading through agricultural runoff. This could be achieved by raising awareness among farmers to minimize the use of fertilizers in their farms. In view of this, in this paper, we propose a mathematical model to study the effect of awareness among the farmers of the mitigation of algal bloom in a lake. The growth rate of awareness among the farmers is assumed to be proportional to the density of algae in the lake. It is further assumed that the presence of awareness among the farmers reduces the inflow rate of nutrients through agricultural runoff and helps to remove the detritus by cleaning the bottom of the lake. The results evoke that raising awareness among farmers may be a plausible factor for the mitigation of algal bloom in the lake. Numerical simulations identify the most critical parameters that influence the blooms and provide indications to possibly mitigate it.

  18. Modeling the impact of awareness on the mitigation of algal bloom in a lake.

    PubMed

    Misra, A K; Tiwari, P K; Venturino, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of algal bloom in water bodies due to the enhanced concentration of nutrient inflow is becoming a global issue. A prime reason behind this aquatic catastrophe is agricultural runoff, which carries a large amount of nutrients that make the lakes more fertile and cause algal blooms. The only solution to this problem is curtailing the nutrient loading through agricultural runoff. This could be achieved by raising awareness among farmers to minimize the use of fertilizers in their farms. In view of this, in this paper, we propose a mathematical model to study the effect of awareness among the farmers of the mitigation of algal bloom in a lake. The growth rate of awareness among the farmers is assumed to be proportional to the density of algae in the lake. It is further assumed that the presence of awareness among the farmers reduces the inflow rate of nutrients through agricultural runoff and helps to remove the detritus by cleaning the bottom of the lake. The results evoke that raising awareness among farmers may be a plausible factor for the mitigation of algal bloom in the lake. Numerical simulations identify the most critical parameters that influence the blooms and provide indications to possibly mitigate it. PMID:26411559

  19. Control of algal production in a high rate algal pond: investigation through batch and continuous experiments.

    PubMed

    Derabe Maobe, H; Onodera, M; Takahashi, M; Satoh, H; Fukazawa, T

    2014-01-01

    For decades, arid and semi-arid regions in Africa have faced issues related to water availability for drinking, irrigation and livestock purposes. To tackle these issues, a laboratory scale greywater treatment system based on high rate algal pond (HRAP) technology was investigated in order to guide the operation of the pilot plant implemented in the 2iE campus in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso). Because of the high suspended solids concentration generally found in effluents of this system, the aim of this study is to improve the performance of HRAPs in term of algal productivity and removal. To determine the selection mechanism of self-flocculated algae, three sets of sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) and three sets of continuous flow reactors (CFRs) were operated. Despite operation with the same solids retention time and the similarity of the algal growth rate found in these reactors, the algal productivity was higher in the SBRs owing to the short hydraulic retention time of 10 days in these reactors. By using a volume of CFR with twice the volume of our experimental CFRs, the algal concentration can be controlled during operation under similar physical conditions in both reactors. PMID:24960016

  20. Higher-Density Culture in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Results in DNA Damage and Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kurt; Zambelli, Filippo; Mertzanidou, Afroditi; Smolders, Ilse; Geens, Mieke; Nguyen, Ha Thi; Barbé, Lise; Sermon, Karen; Spits, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) show great promise for clinical and research applications, but their well-known proneness to genomic instability hampers the development to their full potential. Here, we demonstrate that medium acidification linked to culture density is the main cause of DNA damage and genomic alterations in hESC grown on feeder layers, and this even in the short time span of a single passage. In line with this, we show that increasing the frequency of the medium refreshments minimizes the levels of DNA damage and genetic instability. Also, we show that cells cultured on laminin-521 do not present this increase in DNA damage when grown at high density, although the (long-term) impact on their genomic stability remains to be elucidated. Our results explain the high levels of genome instability observed over the years by many laboratories worldwide, and show that the development of optimal culture conditions is key to solving this problem. PMID:26923824

  1. Durability of Low Platinum Fuel Cells Operating at High Power Density

    SciTech Connect

    Polevaya, Olga; Blanchet, Scott; Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Borup, Rod; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2014-03-19

    Understanding and improving the durability of cost-competitive fuel cell stacks is imperative to successful deployment of the technology. Stacks will need to operate well beyond today’s state-of-the-art rated power density with very low platinum loading in order to achieve the cost targets set forth by DOE ($15/kW) and ultimately be competitive with incumbent technologies. An accelerated cost-reduction path presented by Nuvera focused on substantially increasing power density to address non-PGM material costs as well as platinum. The study developed a practical understanding of the degradation mechanisms impacting durability of fuel cells with low platinum loading (≤0.2mg/cm2) operating at high power density (≥1.0W/cm2) and worked out approaches for improving the durability of low-loaded, high-power stack designs. Of specific interest is the impact of combining low platinum loading with high power density operation, as this offers the best chance of achieving long-term cost targets. A design-of-experiments approach was utilized to reveal and quantify the sensitivity of durability-critical material properties to high current density at two levels of platinum loading (the more conventional 0.45 mgPt.cm–1 and the much lower 0.2 mgPt.cm–2) across several cell architectures. We studied the relevance of selected component accelerated stress tests (AST) to fuel cell operation in power producing mode. New stress tests (NST) were designed to investigate the sensitivity to the addition of electrical current on the ASTs, along with combined humidity and load cycles and, eventually, relate to the combined city/highway drive cycle. Changes in the cathode electrochemical surface area (ECSA) and average oxygen partial pressure on the catalyst layer with aging under AST and NST protocols were compared based on the number of completed cycles. Studies showed elevated sensitivity of Pt growth to the potential limits and the initial particle size distribution. The ECSA loss

  2. Stimulated arachidonate metabolism during foam cell transformation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Yokode, M; Kita, T; Kikawa, Y; Ogorochi, T; Narumiya, S; Kawai, C

    1988-01-01

    Changes in arachidonate metabolism were examined in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with various types of lipoproteins. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) was incorporated by macrophages and stimulated macrophage prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene C4 syntheses, respectively, 10.8- and 10.7-fold higher than by the control. Production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin, was also stimulated. No stimulation was found with native LDL, which was minimally incorporated by the cells. Acetylated LDL and beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), though incorporated more efficiently than oxidized LDL, also had no stimulatory effect. When oxidized LDL was separated into the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex and free lipid peroxides, most of the stimulatory activity was found in the former fraction, indicating that stimulation of arachidonate metabolism in the cell is associated with uptake of the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex. These results suggest that peroxidative modification of LDL could contribute to the progression of atheroma by stimulating arachidonate metabolism during incorporation into macrophages. Images PMID:3125226

  3. [A Modified Procedure to Isolate Synchronous Cells from Yeasts with Continuous Percoll Density Gradient and Their Raman Discrimination].

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-shi; Lai, Jun-zhuo; Lu, Ming-qian; Cheng, Qin; Liao, Wei; Chen, Li-mei

    2015-08-01

    A modified procedure of Percoll density gradient centrifugation was developed to isolate and fractionate synchronous cells from stationary phase (sp) cultures of different yeast strains, as well as Raman spectra discrimination of single yeast cells was reported. About 1.75 mL Percoll solution in 2 mL polypropylene centrifugal tube was centrifuged at 19,320 g, 20 °C with an angle rotor for 15 min to form continuous densities gradient (1.00~1.31 g · mL(-1)), approximately 100 μL sample was overlaid onto the preformed continuous density gradient carefully, subsequently, centrifuged at 400 g for 60 min in a tabletop centrifuge equipped with a angle rotor at 25 °C. Yeast samples could be observed that the suspensions were separated into two cell fractions obviously. Both fractions of different yeast strains were respectively determined by differential interference contrast (DIC), phase contrast microscope and synchronous culture to distinguish their morphological and growth trait. The results showed that the lower fraction cells were unbudded, mostly unicellular, highly refractive, homogeneous and uniform in size, and represented growth characteristic synchronously; Their protoplasm had relatively high density, and contained significant concentrations of glycogen; all of which were accordant with description of quiescent yeast cells and G0 cells in previously published paper. It was shown that lower fraction was quiescent cells, synchronous G0 cells as well. A Raman tweezers setup was used to investigate the differences between two fractions, G0 cells and non G0 cells, at a single cell level. The result showed that both G0 cells and the non G0 cells had the same characteristic peaks corresponding biological macromolecules including proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids, but all characteristic peak intensities of G0 cells were higher than that of non G0 cells, implied that the macromolecular substance content of G0 cells was more higher. Principal component

  4. Liquid transportation fuels from algal oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daichuan

    Liquid transportation fuels from renewable sources are becoming more prominent and important in modem society. Processing of hydrocarbon oils from algae has not been studied in detail in the past, so components which have been proposed for incorporation in algal oils via genetic engineering, such as cuparene, farnesene, phytol and squalene, have been subjected to processing via catalytic cracking in a pulse reactor at different temperatures. The cracking results showed that liquid products contained numerous high octane molecules which make it feasible for use in automobiles. Additionally, canola oil, chosen as an algal oil model compound, was studied as a feed for catalytic cracking in a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure over different types of zeolites. The results showed that MFI catalysts gave the highest yield of gasoline range products and lowest coke formation. Gallium loaded MFI zeolites increased the total aromatics yield for the canola oil cracking relative to the acid form of the zeolite. Finally, algal oils were cracked on several selected zeolites, and the results showed the same trend as canola oil cracking. MFI gave the highest gasoline yield (43.8 wt%) and lowest coke (4.7 wt%). The total aromatics yield from algae oil cracking is improved 7.8 wt% when MFI is loaded with gallium.

  5. Feeding strategies enhance high cell density cultivation and protein expression in milliliter scale bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Faust, Georg; Janzen, Nils H; Bendig, Christoph; Römer, Lin; Kaufmann, Klaus; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Miniature bioreactors under parallel fed-batch operations are not only useful screening tools for bioprocess development but also provide a suitable basis for eventual scale-up. In this study, three feeding strategies were investigated: besides the established intermittent feeding by a liquid handler, an optimized microfluidic device and a new enzymatic release system were applied for parallel fed-batch cultivation of Escherichia coli HMS174(DE3) and BL21(DE3) strains in stirred-tank bioreactors on a 10 mL scale. Lower fluctuation in dissolved oxygen (DO) and higher optical densities were measured in fed-batch processes applying the microfluidic device or the enzymatic glucose/fructose release system (conversion of intermittently added sucrose by an invertase), but no difference in dry cell weights (DCW) were observed. With all three feeding strategies high cell densities were realized on a milliliter scale with final optical density measured at 600 nm (OD600 ) of 114-133 and final DCW concentrations of 69-70 g L(-1) . The effect of feeding strategies on the expression of two heterologous proteins was investigated. Whereas no impact was observed on the expression of the spider silk protein eADF4(C16), the fluorescence of enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) was reproducibly lower, if an intermittent glucose feed was applied. Thus, the impact of feeding strategy on expression is strongly dependent on the E. coli strain and/or expressed protein. As a completely continuous feed supply is difficult to realize in miniature bioreactors, the enzymatic release approach from this study can be easily applied in all microfluidic system to reduce fluctuations of glucose supply and DO concentrations.

  6. Diethylstilbestrol increases the density of prolactin cells in male mouse pituitary by inducing proliferation of prolactin cells and transdifferentiation of gonadotropic cells.

    PubMed

    Shukuwa, Keiko; Izumi, Shin-Ichi; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Ejima, Kuniaki; Inoue, Satoshi; Muramatsu, Masami; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Kitaoka, Takashi; Koji, Takehiko

    2006-07-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) has been implicated in mammalian abnormalities. We examined the effects of DES on follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and prolactin (PRL) cells in the pituitaries of male mice treated with various doses of DES for 20 days. DES reduced the density of FSH and LH cells in a dose-dependent manner, but increased that of PRL cells. When the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta was assessed, an induction of ERbeta by DES was found predominantly in PRL cells. However, since these effects were abolished in ERalpha knockout mice, DES appears to act primarily through ERalpha. When the expression of Ki-67 and Pit-1 in PRL cells was examined at various time-points after DES treatment, some PRL cells became Ki-67 positive at 10-15 days, and Pit-1-positive cells were increased at 5-15 days. Furthermore, some FSH and LH cells became Pit-1 positive, and co-localized with PRL at 5-10 days. Our results indicate that DES increases PRL cells by inducing proliferation of PRL cells and transdifferentiation of FSH/LH cells to PRL cells. PMID:16468032

  7. Enhanced current and power density of micro-scale microbial fuel cells with ultramicroelectrode anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao; Rangaswami, Sriram; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2016-09-01

    We present a micro-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an ultramicroelectrode (UME) anode, with the aim of creating a miniaturized high-current/power-density converter using carbon-neutral and renewable energy sources. Micro-scale MFCs have been studied for more than a decade, yet their current and power densities are still an order of magnitude lower than those of their macro-scale counterparts. In order to enhance the current/power densities, we engineer a concentric ring-shaped UME, with a width of 20 μm, to facilitate the diffusion of ions in the vicinity of the micro-organisms that form biofilm on the UME. The biofilm extends approximately 15 μm from the edge of the UME, suggesting the effective biofilm area increases. Measured current/power densities per the effective area and the original anode area are 7.08  ±  0.01 A m‑2 & 3.09  ±  0.04 W m‑2 and 17.7  ±  0.03 A m‑2 & 7.72  ±  0.09 W m‑2, respectively. This is substantially higher than any prior work in micro-scale MFCs, and very close, or even higher, to that of macro-scale MFCs. A Coulombic efficiency, a measure of how efficiently an MFC harvests electrons from donor substrate, of 70%, and an energy conversion efficiency of 17% are marked, highlighting the micro-scale MFC as an attractive alternative within the existing energy conversion portfolio.

  8. Enhanced current and power density of micro-scale microbial fuel cells with ultramicroelectrode anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao; Rangaswami, Sriram; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2016-09-01

    We present a micro-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an ultramicroelectrode (UME) anode, with the aim of creating a miniaturized high-current/power-density converter using carbon-neutral and renewable energy sources. Micro-scale MFCs have been studied for more than a decade, yet their current and power densities are still an order of magnitude lower than those of their macro-scale counterparts. In order to enhance the current/power densities, we engineer a concentric ring-shaped UME, with a width of 20 μm, to facilitate the diffusion of ions in the vicinity of the micro-organisms that form biofilm on the UME. The biofilm extends approximately 15 μm from the edge of the UME, suggesting the effective biofilm area increases. Measured current/power densities per the effective area and the original anode area are 7.08  ±  0.01 A m-2 & 3.09  ±  0.04 W m-2 and 17.7  ±  0.03 A m-2 & 7.72  ±  0.09 W m-2, respectively. This is substantially higher than any prior work in micro-scale MFCs, and very close, or even higher, to that of macro-scale MFCs. A Coulombic efficiency, a measure of how efficiently an MFC harvests electrons from donor substrate, of 70%, and an energy conversion efficiency of 17% are marked, highlighting the micro-scale MFC as an attractive alternative within the existing energy conversion portfolio.

  9. Removal of algal blooms from freshwater by the coagulation-magnetic separation method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Wang, Peng; Wei, Guanran; Dong, Wenbo; Hui, Franck

    2013-01-01

    This research investigated the feasibility of changing waste into useful materials for water treatment and proposed a coagulation-magnetic separation technique. This technique was rapid and highly effective for clearing up harmful algal blooms in freshwater and mitigating lake eutrophication. A magnetic coagulant was synthesized by compounding acid-modified fly ash with magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). Its removal effects on algal cells and dissolved organics in water were studied. After mixing, coagulation, and magnetic separation, the flocs obtained from the magnet surface were examined by SEM. Treated samples were withdrawn for the content determination of chlorophyll-a, turbidity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen, and total phosphorus. More than 99 % of algal cells were removed within 5 min after the addition of magnetic coagulant at optimal loadings (200 mg L(-1)). The removal efficiencies of COD, total nitrogen, and phosphorus were 93, 91, and 94 %, respectively. The mechanism of algal removal explored preliminarily showed that the magnetic coagulant played multiple roles in mesoporous adsorption, netting and bridging, as well as high magnetic responsiveness to a magnetic field. The magnetic-coagulation separation method can rapidly and effectively remove algae from water bodies and greatly mitigate eutrophication of freshwater using a new magnetic coagulant. The method has good performance, is low cost, can turn waste into something valuable, and provides reference and directions for future pilot and production scale-ups.

  10. Simultaneous removal of harmful algal blooms and microcystins using microorganism- and chitosan-modified local soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Pan, Gang

    2015-05-19

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyano-HAB) and microcystins (MCs) can cause a potential threat to public health. Here, a method for simultaneous removal of cyano-HAB and MCs was developed using chitosan-modified local soil (MLS) flocculation plus microorganism-modified soil capping. The experiment was conducted in simulated columns containing algal water collected from Lake Taihu (China). More than 90% of algal cells and intracellular MCs were flocculated and removed from water using chitosan-MLS and the sunken flocs were treated by different capping materials including Pseudomonas sp. An18 modified local soil. During 40 days of incubation, dissolved MC-LR and MC-RR showed 10-fold increase in the flocculation-only system. The increase of MC-LR and MC-RR in water was reduced by 30 and 70% in soil capping treatments; however, the total content of MCs in the sediment-water column remained similar to that in the control and flocculation only systems. In contrast, both dissolved MCs and total MCs were reduced by 90% in Pseudomonas sp. An18 modified soil capping treatment. The high performance of toxin decomposition was due to the combined effects of flocculation and MC-degrading bacteria that embedded in the capping material, which prevents dilution of bacteria biomass, concentrates algal cells, confines released toxins, and enhances toxin biodegradation.

  11. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Meizhi; Li, Hui; Han, Zhiwu

    2015-10-01

    Oleanolic acid (3β-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, OA) is a naturally-occurring triterpenoid with various promising pharmacological properties. The present study was conducted to determine the protective effects of OA against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced endothelial cell apoptosis and the possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that ox-LDL significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OA in the co-treatment showed a protective effect against ox-LDL induced loss in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, which was associated with the modulating effect of OA on ox-LDL induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α(HIF-1α) expression. Moreover, our results showed that the modulating effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HIF-1α expression was obtained via inhibition of lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Collectively, we suggested that the protective effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HUVEC apoptosis might, at least in part, be obtained via inhibition of the LOX-1/ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathway. PMID:26559024

  12. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Meizhi; Li, Hui; Han, Zhiwu

    2015-10-01

    Oleanolic acid (3β-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, OA) is a naturally-occurring triterpenoid with various promising pharmacological properties. The present study was conducted to determine the protective effects of OA against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced endothelial cell apoptosis and the possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that ox-LDL significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OA in the co-treatment showed a protective effect against ox-LDL induced loss in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, which was associated with the modulating effect of OA on ox-LDL induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α(HIF-1α) expression. Moreover, our results showed that the modulating effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HIF-1α expression was obtained via inhibition of lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Collectively, we suggested that the protective effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HUVEC apoptosis might, at least in part, be obtained via inhibition of the LOX-1/ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathway.

  13. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosikhin, Ahmad Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  14. Photodynamic targeting of human retinoblastoma cells using covalent low-density lipoprotein conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Erfurth, U.; Diddens, H.; Birngruber, R.; Hasan, T.

    1997-01-01

    Combination of photosensitizers with carrier molecules has been shown to enhance the efficiency of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Owing to an increased expression of their receptors on some malignant and proliferating cells, low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) are potential endogenous carriers. A photosensitizer, chlorin e6 (Ce6), was covalently bound to LDL via carbodiimide activation. The Ce6-LDL conjugate was evaluated on a fibroblast cell line with defined LDL receptor expression and a retinoblastoma cell line (Y79). Uptake of free Ce6 and Ce6 either covalently bound to or complexed with LDL was measured by spectrofluorimetry. Phototoxicity after irradiation at 660 nm was determined by a mitochondrial activity assay (MTT). Covalent binding to LDL significantly increased the uptake of Ce6 for both cell lines by a factor of 4-5. A Ce6: LDL binding ratio of 50:1 was optimal. A receptor-mediated uptake was demonstrated by saturability and competitive inhibition by free LDL. Binding also occurred at 2 degrees C and was attributed to non-specific associations. Irradiation with 10 J cm-2 of 660 nm light after treatment of cells with Ce6-LDL conjugate reduced the MTT activity by 80%, while free or mixed Ce6 induced a maximum of 10% reduction in the MTT activity following identical treatment conditions. These data suggest that targeting of LDL receptor-bearing cells using covalently bound carriers, such as LDL, might increase the efficiency and selectivity of PDT. Intraocular tumours such as retinoblastomas could be appropriate targets for such an approach owing to the ease of access of light sources and the need for non-invasive approaches in sensitive ocular sites. PMID:9000598

  15. T Lymphocyte Density and Distribution in Human Colorectal Mucosa, and Inefficiency of Current Cell Isolation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Preza, Gloria Cuevas; Yang, Otto O.; Elliott, Julie; Anton, Peter A.; Ochoa, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal tissues are critical immune effector sites containing complex populations of leukocytes in a tissue microenvironment that remains incompletely understood. We identify and quantify in human distal colorectal tissue absolute mucosal CD3+ lymphocytes, including CD4+ and CD8+ subsets, by direct visualization using immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF), and an automated counting protocol (r2=0.90). Sigmoid and rectal mucosal tissues are both densely packed with T lymphocytes in the mucosal compartment. Both compartments had similar densities of CD3+ T lymphocytes with 37,400 ± 2,801 cells/mm3 and 33,700 ± 4,324 cell/mm3, respectively. Sigmoid mucosa contained 57% CD3+CD4+ and 40% CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes which calculates to 21,300 ± 1,476/mm3 and 15,000 ± 275/mm3 T lymphocytes, respectively. Rectal mucosa had 57% CD3+CD4+ and 42% CD3+CD8+ or 21,577 ± 332, and 17,090 ± 1,206 cells/mm3, respectively. By comparison, sigmoid mucosal biopsies subjected to conventional collagenase digestion, mononuclear cell (MMC) isolation and staining for flow cytometry yielded 4,549 ± 381/mm3 and 2,708 ± 245/mm3 CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. These data suggest only ~20.7% recovery compared to IHC results for these markers. Further studies will determine if this reflects a selective bias in only CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells or can be generalized to all flow-analyzed cells from mucosal tissues for phenotyping and functional testing. PMID:25856343