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Sample records for algal extracellular products

  1. Temperature and Light Effects on Extracellular Superoxide Production by Algal and Bacterial Symbionts in Corals: Implications for Coral Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brighi, C.; Diaz, J. M.; Apprill, A.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Increased surface seawater temperature due to global warming is one of the main causes of coral bleaching, a phenomenon in which corals lose their photosynthetic algae. Light and temperature induced production of superoxide and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) by these symbiotic algae has been implicated in the breakdown of their symbiotic association with the coral host and subsequent coral bleaching. Nevertheless, a direct link between Symbiodinium ROS production and coral bleaching has not been demonstrated. In fact, given the abundance and diversity of microorganisms within the coral holobiont, the concentration and fluxes of ROS within corals may involve several microbial sources and sinks. Here, we explore the role of increased light and temperature on superoxide production by coral-derived cultures of Symbiodinium algae and Oceanospirillales bacteria of the genus Endozoicomonas, which are globally common and abundant associates of corals. Using a high sensitivity chemiluminescent technique, we find that heat stress (exposure to 34°C vs. 23°C for 2hr or 24hr) has no significant effect on extracellular superoxide production by Symbiodinium isolates within clades B and C, regardless of the level of light exposure. Exposure to high light, however, increased superoxide production by these organisms at both 34°C and 23°C. On the other hand, extracellular superoxide production by Endozoicomonas bacteria tested under the same conditions was stimulated by the combined effects of thermal and light stress. The results of this research suggest that the sources and physical triggers for biological superoxide production within corals are more complex than currently assumed. Thus, further investigations into the biological processes controlling ROS dynamics within corals are required to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning coral bleaching and to aid in the development of mitigation strategies.

  2. Air pollutant production by algal cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The production of phytotoxic air pollutants by cultures of Chlorella vulgaris and Euglena gracilis is considered. Algal and plant culture systems, a fumigation system, and ethylene, ethane, cyanide, and nitrogen oxides assays are discussed. Bean, tobacco, mustard green, cantaloupe and wheat plants all showed injury when fumigated with algal gases for 4 hours. Only coleus plants showed any resistance to the gases. It is found that a closed or recycled air effluent system does not produce plant injury from algal air pollutants.

  3. Sustainable Algal Energy Production and Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, William E.

    2012-07-14

    Overall, our results confirm that wild algal species sequester a wide range of organic and metal contaminants and excess nutrients (PAHs, trace metals, and nutrients) from natural waters, and suggest parameters that could be useful in predicting uptake rates for algae growing on an algal floway or other algal growth systems in the environment or in industrial processes. The implication for various fuel production processes differ with the detailed unit operations involved, and these results will be of use in the developing of scaling experiments for various types of engineering process designs.

  4. Coupling of Algal Biofuel Production with Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Amit; Bisht, Tara Singh; Tamta, Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae have gained enormous consideration from scientific community worldwide emerging as a viable feedstock for a renewable energy source virtually being carbon neutral, high lipid content, and comparatively more advantageous to other sources of biofuels. Although microalgae are seen as a valuable source in majority part of the world for production of biofuels and bioproducts, still they are unable to accomplish sustainable large-scale algal biofuel production. Wastewater has organic and inorganic supplements required for algal growth. The coupling of microalgae with wastewater is an effective way of waste remediation and a cost-effective microalgal biofuel production. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the possibilities and current scenario regarding coupling of microalgal cultivation with biofuel production emphasizing recent progress in this area. PMID:24982930

  5. Coupling of algal biofuel production with wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Neha Chamoli; Panwar, Amit; Bisht, Tara Singh; Tamta, Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae have gained enormous consideration from scientific community worldwide emerging as a viable feedstock for a renewable energy source virtually being carbon neutral, high lipid content, and comparatively more advantageous to other sources of biofuels. Although microalgae are seen as a valuable source in majority part of the world for production of biofuels and bioproducts, still they are unable to accomplish sustainable large-scale algal biofuel production. Wastewater has organic and inorganic supplements required for algal growth. The coupling of microalgae with wastewater is an effective way of waste remediation and a cost-effective microalgal biofuel production. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the possibilities and current scenario regarding coupling of microalgal cultivation with biofuel production emphasizing recent progress in this area.

  6. Probing green algal hydrogen production.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Melis, Anastasios

    2002-01-01

    The recently developed two-stage photosynthesis and H(2)-production protocol with green algae is further investigated in this work. The method employs S deprivation as a tool for the metabolic regulation of photosynthesis. In the presence of S, green algae perform normal photosynthesis, carbohydrate accumulation and oxygen production. In the absence of S, normal photosynthesis stops and the algae slip into the H(2)-production mode. For the first time, to our knowledge, significant amounts of H(2) gas were generated, essentially from sunlight and water. Rates of H(2) production could be sustained continuously for ca. 80 h in the light, but gradually declined thereafter. This work examines biochemical and physiological aspects of this process in the absence or presence of limiting amounts of S nutrients. Moreover, the effects of salinity and of uncouplers of phosphorylation are investigated. It is shown that limiting levels of S can sustain intermediate levels of oxygenic photosynthesis, in essence raising the prospect of a calibration of the rate of photosynthesis by the S content in the growth medium of the algae. It is concluded that careful titration of the supply of S nutrients in the green alga medium might permit the development of a continuous H(2)-production process. PMID:12437889

  7. Assessing the potential of polyculture to accelerate algal biofuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Deborah T.; Mathews, Teresa J.; Pate, Ron C.; Huesemann, Michael H.; Lane, Todd W.; Wahlen, Bradley D.; Mandal, Shovon; Engler, Robert K.; Feris, Kevin P.; Shurin, Jon B.

    2016-10-24

    To date, the algal biofuel industry has focused on the cultivation of monocultures of highly productive algal strains, but scaling up production remains challenging. However, algal monocultures are difficult to maintain because they are easily contaminated by wild algal strains, grazers, and pathogens. In contrast, theory suggests that polycultures (multispecies assemblages) can promote both ecosystem stability and productivity. A greater understanding of species interactions and how communities change with time will need to be developed before polycultures can be successfully applied to large-scale algal production efforts. Here in this paper we review the agricultural and ecological literature to explore opportunities for increased annual biomass production through the use of algal polycultures. We discuss case studies where algal polycultures have been successfully maintained for industries other than the biofuel industry, as well as the few studies that have compared biomass production of algal polycultures to that of monocultures. Assemblages that include species with complementary traits are of particular promise. These assemblages have the potential not only to increase crop productivity and stability, but they may also be capable of utilizing natural resources (e.g. light, nutrients, water) more efficiently via tighter niche packing. Therefore, algal polycultures show promise for enhancing biomass productivity, enabling sustainable production and reducing overall production costs.

  8. Assessing the potential of polyculture to accelerate algal biofuel production

    DOE PAGES

    Newby, Deborah T.; Mathews, Teresa J.; Pate, Ron C.; ...

    2016-10-24

    To date, the algal biofuel industry has focused on the cultivation of monocultures of highly productive algal strains, but scaling up production remains challenging. However, algal monocultures are difficult to maintain because they are easily contaminated by wild algal strains, grazers, and pathogens. In contrast, theory suggests that polycultures (multispecies assemblages) can promote both ecosystem stability and productivity. A greater understanding of species interactions and how communities change with time will need to be developed before polycultures can be successfully applied to large-scale algal production efforts. Here in this paper we review the agricultural and ecological literature to explore opportunitiesmore » for increased annual biomass production through the use of algal polycultures. We discuss case studies where algal polycultures have been successfully maintained for industries other than the biofuel industry, as well as the few studies that have compared biomass production of algal polycultures to that of monocultures. Assemblages that include species with complementary traits are of particular promise. These assemblages have the potential not only to increase crop productivity and stability, but they may also be capable of utilizing natural resources (e.g. light, nutrients, water) more efficiently via tighter niche packing. Therefore, algal polycultures show promise for enhancing biomass productivity, enabling sustainable production and reducing overall production costs.« less

  9. Wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2011-01-01

    While research and development of algal biofuels are currently receiving much interest and funding, they are still not commercially viable at today's fossil fuel prices. However, a niche opportunity may exist where algae are grown as a by-product of high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) operated for wastewater treatment. In addition to significantly better economics, algal biofuel production from wastewater treatment HRAPs has a much smaller environmental footprint compared to commercial algal production HRAPs which consume freshwater and fertilisers. In this paper the critical parameters that limit algal cultivation, production and harvest are reviewed and practical options that may enhance the net harvestable algal production from wastewater treatment HRAPs including CO(2) addition, species control, control of grazers and parasites and bioflocculation are discussed.

  10. The ecology of algal biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Smith, Val H; Sturm, Belinda S M; Denoyelles, Frank J; Billings, Sharon A

    2010-05-01

    Sustainable energy production represents one of the most formidable problems of the 21st century, and plant-based biofuels offer significant promise. We summarize the potential advantages of using pond-grown microalgae as feedstocks relative to conventional terrestrial biofuel crop production. We show how pond-based algal biofuel production, which requires significantly less land area than agricultural crop-based biofuel systems, can offer additional ecological benefits by reducing anthropogenic pollutant releases to the environment and by requiring much lower water subsidies. We also demonstrate how key principles drawn from the science of ecology can be used to design efficient pond-based microalgal systems for the production of biodiesel fuels.

  11. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Cyd E.

    2014-03-25

    This white paper briefly reviews the research literature exploring complex algal communities as a means of increasing algal biomass production via increased tolerance, resilience, and resistance to a variety of abiotic and biotic perturbations occurring within harvesting timescales. This paper identifies what data are available and whether more research utilizing complex communities is needed to explore the potential of complex algal community stability (CACS) approach as a plausible means to increase biomass yields regardless of ecological context and resulting in decreased algal-based fuel prices by reducing operations costs. By reviewing the literature for what we do and do not know, in terms of CACS methodologies, this report will provide guidance for future research addressing pond crash phenomena.

  12. Algal recycling enhances algal productivity and settleability in Pediastrum boryanum pure cultures.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason B K; Craggs, Rupert J; Shilton, Andy N

    2015-12-15

    Recycling a portion of gravity harvested algae (i.e. algae and associated bacteria biomass) has been shown to improve both algal biomass productivity and harvest efficiency by maintaining the dominance of a rapidly-settleable colonial alga, Pediastrum boryanum in both pilot-scale wastewater treatment High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAP) and outdoor mesocosms. While algal recycling did not change the relative proportions of algae and bacteria in the HRAP culture, the contribution of the wastewater bacteria to the improved algal biomass productivity and settleability with the recycling was not certain and still required investigation. P. boryanum was therefore isolated from the HRAP and grown in pure culture on synthetic wastewater growth media under laboratory conditions. The influence of recycling on the productivity and settleability of the pure P. boryanum culture was then determined without wastewater bacteria present. Six 1 L P. boryanum cultures were grown over 30 days in a laboratory growth chamber simulating New Zealand summer conditions either with (Pr) or without (Pc) recycling of 10% of gravity harvested algae. The cultures with recycling (Pr) had higher algal productivity than the controls (Pc) when the cultures were operated at both 4 and 3 d hydraulic retention times by 11% and 38% respectively. Furthermore, algal recycling also improved 1 h settleability from ∼60% to ∼85% by increasing the average P. boryanum colony size due to the extended mean cell residence time and promoted formation of large algal bio-flocs (>500 μm diameter). These results demonstrate that the presence of wastewater bacteria was not necessary to improve algal productivity and settleability with algal recycling.

  13. Algal production in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for potential biofuel use.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J

    2011-01-01

    Wastewater treatment High Rate Algal Ponds with CO2 addition could provide cost-effective and efficient tertiary-level wastewater treatment with the co-benefit of algal biomass production for biofuel use. Wastewater grown algal biomass can have a lipid content of 10-30% of dry weight, which could be used to make biodiesel. This research investigated algal biomass and total lipid production by two pilot-scale wastewater treatment HRAP(S) (4-day HRT) with and without CO2 addition under New Zealand mid summer (Nov-Jan) conditions. The influence of CO2 addition on wastewater treatment performance was also determined. CO2 was added to one of the HRAPs (the HRAP(E)) by maintaining the maximum pH of the pond below 8. Measurements of HRAP influent and effluent water qualities, total lipid content and algal biomass production were made twice a week over the experimental period. Both HRAP(S) achieved high levels of organic compound and nutrient removal, with >85% SBOD5, >92 NH4(+)-N and >70% DRP removal. Algal/bacterial biomass production in the HRAP(E) (15.2 g/m2/d) was improved by CO2 addition by approximately 30% compared with that of the control HRAP(W) (10.6 g/m2/d). Total lipid content of the biomass grown on both HRAP(S) was slightly reduced (from 25% to 20%) with CO2 addition and the maximum total lipid content of approximately 40% was observed in the HRAP(W) when low NH4(+)-N concentration (<0.5 mg/L) and high maximum pH (>10.0) occurred. Total lipid content of the biomass increased by approximately 15% under nitrogen limiting conditions, however, overall algal/bacterial biomass production was reduced by half during the period of nitrogen limitation. More research is required to maintain algal production under near nitrogen-limiting conditions.

  14. Investigating why recycling gravity harvested algae increases harvestability and productivity in high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2013-09-15

    It has previously been shown that recycling gravity harvested algae promotes Pediastrum boryanum dominance and improves harvestability and biomass production in pilot-scale High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs) treating domestic wastewater. In order to confirm the reproducibility of these findings and investigate the mechanisms responsible, this study utilized twelve 20 L outdoor HRAP mesocosms operated with and without algal recycling. It then compared the recycling of separated solid and liquid components of the harvested biomass against un-separated biomass. The work confirmed that algal recycling promoted P. boryanum dominance, improved 1 h-settleability by >20% and increased biomass productivity by >25% compared with controls that had no recycling. With regard to the improved harvestability, of particular interest was that recycling the liquid fraction alone caused a similar improvement in settleability as recycling the solid fraction. This may be due to the presence of extracellular polymeric substances in the liquid fraction. While there are many possible mechanisms that could account for the increased productivity with algal recycling, all but two were systematically eliminated: (i) the mean cell residence time was extended thereby increasing the algal concentration and more fully utilizing the incident sunlight and, (ii) the relative proportions of algal growth stages (which have different specific growth rates) was changed, resulting in a net increase in the overall growth rate of the culture.

  15. Algal Cell Response to Pulsed Waved Stimulation and Its Application to Increase Algal Lipid Production

    PubMed Central

    Savchenko, Oleksandra; Xing, Jida; Yang, Xiaoyan; Gu, Quanrong; Shaheen, Mohamed; Huang, Min; Yu, Xiaojian; Burrell, Robert; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Generating renewable energy while sequestering CO2 using algae has recently attracted significant research attention, mostly directing towards biological methods such as systems biology, genetic engineering and bio-refining for optimizing algae strains. Other approaches focus on chemical screening to adjust culture conditions or culture media. We report for the first time the physiological changes of algal cells in response to a novel form of mechanical stimulation, or a pulsed wave at the frequency of 1.5 MHz and the duty cycle of 20%. We studied how the pulsed wave can further increase algal lipid production on top of existing biological and chemical methods. Two commonly used algal strains, fresh-water Chlorella vulgaris and seawater Tetraselmis chuii, were selected. We have performed the tests in shake flasks and 1 L spinner-flask bioreactors. Conventional Gravimetric measurements show that up to 20% increase for algal lipid could be achieved after 8 days of stimulation. The total electricity cost needed for the stimulations in a one-liter bioreactor is only one-tenth of a US penny. Gas liquid chromatography shows that the fatty acid composition remains unchanged after pulsed-wave stimulation. Scanning electron microscope results also suggest that pulsed wave stimulation induces shear stress and thus increases algal lipid production. PMID:28186124

  16. Algal Cell Response to Pulsed Waved Stimulation and Its Application to Increase Algal Lipid Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, Oleksandra; Xing, Jida; Yang, Xiaoyan; Gu, Quanrong; Shaheen, Mohamed; Huang, Min; Yu, Xiaojian; Burrell, Robert; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Generating renewable energy while sequestering CO2 using algae has recently attracted significant research attention, mostly directing towards biological methods such as systems biology, genetic engineering and bio-refining for optimizing algae strains. Other approaches focus on chemical screening to adjust culture conditions or culture media. We report for the first time the physiological changes of algal cells in response to a novel form of mechanical stimulation, or a pulsed wave at the frequency of 1.5 MHz and the duty cycle of 20%. We studied how the pulsed wave can further increase algal lipid production on top of existing biological and chemical methods. Two commonly used algal strains, fresh-water Chlorella vulgaris and seawater Tetraselmis chuii, were selected. We have performed the tests in shake flasks and 1 L spinner-flask bioreactors. Conventional Gravimetric measurements show that up to 20% increase for algal lipid could be achieved after 8 days of stimulation. The total electricity cost needed for the stimulations in a one-liter bioreactor is only one-tenth of a US penny. Gas liquid chromatography shows that the fatty acid composition remains unchanged after pulsed-wave stimulation. Scanning electron microscope results also suggest that pulsed wave stimulation induces shear stress and thus increases algal lipid production.

  17. Algal Cell Response to Pulsed Waved Stimulation and Its Application to Increase Algal Lipid Production.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Oleksandra; Xing, Jida; Yang, Xiaoyan; Gu, Quanrong; Shaheen, Mohamed; Huang, Min; Yu, Xiaojian; Burrell, Robert; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2017-02-10

    Generating renewable energy while sequestering CO2 using algae has recently attracted significant research attention, mostly directing towards biological methods such as systems biology, genetic engineering and bio-refining for optimizing algae strains. Other approaches focus on chemical screening to adjust culture conditions or culture media. We report for the first time the physiological changes of algal cells in response to a novel form of mechanical stimulation, or a pulsed wave at the frequency of 1.5 MHz and the duty cycle of 20%. We studied how the pulsed wave can further increase algal lipid production on top of existing biological and chemical methods. Two commonly used algal strains, fresh-water Chlorella vulgaris and seawater Tetraselmis chuii, were selected. We have performed the tests in shake flasks and 1 L spinner-flask bioreactors. Conventional Gravimetric measurements show that up to 20% increase for algal lipid could be achieved after 8 days of stimulation. The total electricity cost needed for the stimulations in a one-liter bioreactor is only one-tenth of a US penny. Gas liquid chromatography shows that the fatty acid composition remains unchanged after pulsed-wave stimulation. Scanning electron microscope results also suggest that pulsed wave stimulation induces shear stress and thus increases algal lipid production.

  18. Addressing the challenges for sustainable production of algal biofuels: I. Algal strains and nutrient supply.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Ahmed E M; Leite, Gustavo B; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2013-01-01

    Microalgae hold promise for the production of sustainable replacement of fossil fuels due to their high growth rates, ability to grow on non-arable land and their high content, under the proper conditions, of high energy compounds that can be relatively easily chemically converted to fuels using existing technology. However, projected large-scale algal production raises a number of sustainability concerns concerning land use, net energy return, water use and nutrient supply. The state-of-the-art of algal production of biofuels is presented with emphasis on some possible avenues to provide answers to the sustainability questions that have been raised. Here, issues concerning algal strains and supply of nutrients for large-scale production are discussed. Since sustainability concerns necessitate the use of wastewaters for supply of bulk nutrients, emphasis is placed on the composition and suitability of different wastewater streams. At the same time, algal cultivation has proven useful in waste treatment processes, and thus this aspect is also treated in some detail.

  19. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Samson, R.; LeDuy, A.

    1982-08-01

    The photosynthetic spectrum of solar energy could be exploited for the production of chemical energy of methane through the combined algal-bacterial process. In this process, the algae are mass produced from light and from carbon in the first step. The algal biomass is then used as a nutrient for feeding the anaerobic digester, in the second step, for the production of methane by anaerobic bacteria. The carbon source for the production of algal biomass could be either organic carbon from wastewaters (for eucaryotic algae), or carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or from the combustion exhaust gases (for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae). The technical feasibility data on the anaerobic digestion of algal biomass have been reported for many species of algae including macroscopic algae and microscopic algae. Research being conducted in the authors' laboratory consists of using the semimicroscopic blue-green alga Spirulina maxima as the sole substrate for this combined algal-bacterial process. This species of alga is very attractive for the process because of its capability of using the atmospheric carbon dioxide as carbon source and its simple harvesting methods. Furthermore, it appeared that the fermentability of S. maxima is significantly higher than other microscopic algae. This communication presents the results on the anaerobic inoculum development by the adaptation technique. This inoculum was then used for the semicontinuous anaerobic digestion of S. maxima algal biomass. The evolutions of biogas production and composition, biogas yield, total volatile fatty acids, alkalinity, ammonia nitrogen, pH, and electrode potential were followed.

  20. Algal productivity modeling: a step toward accurate assessments of full-scale algal cultivation.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Quentin; Chambonnière, Paul; Shilton, Andy; Guizard, Guillaume; Guieysse, Benoit

    2015-05-01

    A new biomass productivity model was parameterized for Chlorella vulgaris using short-term (<30 min) oxygen productivities from algal microcosms exposed to 6 light intensities (20-420 W/m(2)) and 6 temperatures (5-42 °C). The model was then validated against experimental biomass productivities recorded in bench-scale photobioreactors operated under 4 light intensities (30.6-74.3 W/m(2)) and 4 temperatures (10-30 °C), yielding an accuracy of ± 15% over 163 days of cultivation. This modeling approach addresses major challenges associated with the accurate prediction of algal productivity at full-scale. Firstly, while most prior modeling approaches have only considered the impact of light intensity on algal productivity, the model herein validated also accounts for the critical impact of temperature. Secondly, this study validates a theoretical approach to convert short-term oxygen productivities into long-term biomass productivities. Thirdly, the experimental methodology used has the practical advantage of only requiring one day of experimental work for complete model parameterization. The validation of this new modeling approach is therefore an important step for refining feasibility assessments of algae biotechnologies.

  1. Full-scale validation of a model of algal productivity.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Quentin; Shilton, Andy; Guieysse, Benoit

    2014-12-02

    While modeling algal productivity outdoors is crucial to assess the economic and environmental performance of full-scale cultivation, most of the models hitherto developed for this purpose have not been validated under fully relevant conditions, especially with regard to temperature variations. The objective of this study was to independently validate a model of algal biomass productivity accounting for both light and temperature and constructed using parameters experimentally derived using short-term indoor experiments. To do this, the accuracy of a model developed for Chlorella vulgaris was assessed against data collected from photobioreactors operated outdoor (New Zealand) over different seasons, years, and operating conditions (temperature-control/no temperature-control, batch, and fed-batch regimes). The model accurately predicted experimental productivities under all conditions tested, yielding an overall accuracy of ±8.4% over 148 days of cultivation. For the purpose of assessing the feasibility of full-scale algal cultivation, the use of the productivity model was therefore shown to markedly reduce uncertainty in cost of biofuel production while also eliminating uncertainties in water demand, a critical element of environmental impact assessments. Simulations at five climatic locations demonstrated that temperature-control in outdoor photobioreactors would require tremendous amounts of energy without considerable increase of algal biomass. Prior assessments neglecting the impact of temperature variations on algal productivity in photobioreactors may therefore be erroneous.

  2. Carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection by-product formation from algal organic matter.

    PubMed

    Goslan, Emma H; Seigle, Céline; Purcell, Diane; Henderson, Rita; Parsons, Simon A; Jefferson, Bruce; Judd, Simon J

    2017-03-01

    Seasonal algal blooms in drinking water sources release intracellular and extracellular algal organic matter (AOM) in significant concentrations into the water. This organic matter provides precursors for disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed when the water is subsequently chlorinated at the final disinfection stage of the potable water treatment process. This paper presents results of AOM characterisation from five algal species (three cyanobacteria, one diatom and one green) alongside the measurement of the DBP formation potential from the AOM of six algal species (an additional diatom). The character was explored in terms of hydrophilicity, charge and protein and carbohydrate content. 18 DBPs were measured following chlorination of the AOM samples: the four trihalomethanes (THMs), nine haloacetic acids (HAAs), four haloacetonitriles (HANs) and one halonitromethane (HNM). The AOM was found to be mainly hydrophilic (52 and 81%) in nature. Yields of up to 92.4 μg mg(-1) C carbonaceous DBPs were measured, with few consistent trends between DBP formation propensity and either the specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) or the chemical characteristics. The AOM from diatomaceous algae formed significant amounts of nitrogenous DBPs (up to 1.7 μg mg(-1) C). The weak trends in DBPFP may be attributable to the hydrophilic nature of AOM, which also makes it more challenging to remove by conventional water treatment processes.

  3. Hybrid life-cycle assessment of algal biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Malik, Arunima; Lenzen, Manfred; Ralph, Peter J; Tamburic, Bojan

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work is to establish whether algal bio-crude production is environmentally, economically and socially sustainable. To this end, an economic multi-regional input-output model of Australia was complemented with engineering process data on algal bio-crude production. This model was used to undertake hybrid life-cycle assessment for measuring the direct, as well as indirect impacts of producing bio-crude. Overall, the supply chain of bio-crude is more sustainable than that of conventional crude oil. The results indicate that producing 1 million tonnes of bio-crude will generate almost 13,000 new jobs and 4 billion dollars' worth of economic stimulus. Furthermore, bio-crude production will offer carbon sequestration opportunities as the production process is net carbon-negative.

  4. Recent progress and future challenges in algal biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    Shurin, Jonathan B.; Burkart, Michael D.; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Modern society is fueled by fossil energy produced millions of years ago by photosynthetic organisms. Cultivating contemporary photosynthetic producers to generate energy and capture carbon from the atmosphere is one potential approach to sustaining society without disrupting the climate. Algae, photosynthetic aquatic microorganisms, are the fastest growing primary producers in the world and can therefore produce more energy with less land, water, and nutrients than terrestrial plant crops. We review recent progress and challenges in developing bioenergy technology based on algae. A variety of high-value products in addition to biofuels can be harvested from algal biomass, and these may be key to developing algal biotechnology and realizing the commercial potential of these organisms. Aspects of algal biology that differentiate them from plants demand an integrative approach based on genetics, cell biology, ecology, and evolution. We call for a systems approach to research on algal biotechnology rooted in understanding their biology, from the level of genes to ecosystems, and integrating perspectives from physical, chemical, and social sciences to solve one of the most critical outstanding technological problems. PMID:27781084

  5. Ultrasound pretreatment of filamentous algal biomass for enhanced biogas production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwanyong; Chantrasakdakul, Phrompol; Kim, Daegi; Kong, Mingeun; Park, Ki Young

    2014-06-01

    The filamentous alga Hydrodictyon reticulatum harvested from a bench-scale wastewater treatment pond was used to evaluate biogas production after ultrasound pretreatment. The effects of ultrasound pretreatment at a range of 10-5000 J/mL were tested with harvested H. reticulatum. Cell disruption by ultrasound was successful and showed a higher degree of disintegration at a higher applied energy. The range of 10-5000 J/mL ultrasound was able to disintegrated H. reticulatum and the soluble COD was increased from 250 mg/L to 1000 mg/L at 2500 J/mL. The disintegrated algal biomass was digested for biogas production in batch experiments. Both cumulative gas generation and volatile solids reduction data were obtained during the digestion. Cell disintegration due to ultrasound pretreatment increased the specific biogas production and degradation rates. Using the ultrasound approach, the specific methane production at a dose of 40 J/mL increased up to 384 mL/g-VS fed that was 2.3 times higher than the untreated sample. For disintegrated samples, the volatile solids reduction was greater with increased energy input, and the degradation increased slightly to 67% at a dose of 50 J/mL. The results also indicate that disintegration of the algal cells is the essential step for efficient anaerobic digestion of algal biomass.

  6. Immobilized algal cells used for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, John J.; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Jacoby, William A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper explores the use of the photosynthetic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii bound to solid support particles to produce hydrogen in a two-step cycle. Bound cells are more easily cycled between growth mode and hydrogen production mode. The data indicate that the presence of silica particles does not inhibit the growth of the algae in the sulfur rich growth media. Filtration experiments reveal that the algae effectively bind to the silica particles, as high removal efficiencies are observed. The silica particles appear to approach saturation algae at a mass-loading ratio of about 0.035. In hydrogen production mode, the bound algae perform about as well as free-floating algae in terms of cumulative hydrogen production. A full-factorial experiment is described in which algae concentration was deemed to have a significant effect on cumulative hydrogen production.

  7. Fermentation of de-oiled algal biomass by Lactobacillus casei for production of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Overbeck, Tom; Steele, James L; Broadbent, Jeff R

    2016-12-01

    De-oiled algal biomass (algal cake) generated as waste byproduct during algal biodiesel production is a promising fermentable substrate for co-production of value-added chemicals in biorefinery systems. We explored the ability of Lactobacillus casei 12A to ferment algal cake for co-production of lactic acid. Carbohydrate and amino acid availability were determined to be limiting nutritional requirements for growth and lactic acid production by L. casei. These nutritional requirements were effectively addressed through enzymatic hydrolysis of the algal cake material using α-amylase, cellulase (endo-1,4-β-D-glucanase), and pepsin. Results confirm fermentation of algal cake for production of value-added chemicals is a promising avenue for increasing the overall cost competiveness of the algal biodiesel production process.

  8. The potential of sustainable algal biofuel production using wastewater resources.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Jon K; Dean, Andrew P; Osundeko, Olumayowa

    2011-01-01

    The potential of microalgae as a source of renewable energy has received considerable interest, but if microalgal biofuel production is to be economically viable and sustainable, further optimization of mass culture conditions are needed. Wastewaters derived from municipal, agricultural and industrial activities potentially provide cost-effective and sustainable means of algal growth for biofuels. In addition, there is also potential for combining wastewater treatment by algae, such as nutrient removal, with biofuel production. Here we will review the current research on this topic and discuss the potential benefits and limitations of using wastewaters as resources for cost-effective microalgal biofuel production.

  9. Turbulence and nutrient interactions that control benthic algal production in an engineered cultivation raceway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow turbulence can be a controlling factor to the growth of benthic algae, but few studies have quantified this relationship in engineered cultivation systems. Experiments were performed to understand the limiting role of turbulence to algal productivity in an algal turf scrubber for benthic algal...

  10. Energetic potential of algal biomass from high-rate algal ponds for the production of solid biofuels.

    PubMed

    Costa, Taynan de Oliveira; Calijuri, Maria Lúcia; Avelar, Nayara Vilela; Carneiro, Angélica de Cássia de Oliveira; de Assis, Letícia Rodrigues

    2016-10-17

    In this investigation, chemical characteristics, higher, lower and net heating value, bulk and energy density, and thermogravimetric analysis were applied to study the thermal characteristics of three algal biomasses. These biomasses, grown as by-products of wastewater treatment in high-rate algal ponds (HRAPs), were: (i) biomass produced in domestic effluent and collected directly from an HRAP (PO); (ii) biomass produced in domestic effluent in a mixed pond-panel system and collected from the panels (PA); and (iii) biomass originating from the treatment effluent from the meat processing industry and collected directly from an HRAP (IN). The biomass IN was the best alternative for thermal power generation. Subsequently, a mixture of the algal biomasses and Jatropha epicarp was used to produce briquettes containing 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of algal biomass, and their properties were evaluated. In general, the addition of algal biomass to briquettes decreased both the hygroscopicity and fixed carbon content and increased the bulk density, ash content, and energy density. A 50% proportion of biomass IN was found to be the best raw material for producing briquettes. Therefore, the production of briquettes consisting of algal biomass and Jatropha epicarp at a laboratory scale was shown to be technically feasible.

  11. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Rejean Samson; Anh LeDuy

    1982-08-01

    Spirulina maxima algal biomass could be used as the sole nutrient for the production of biogas by anaerobic digestion process. It is relatively simple to adapt the municipal sewage sludge to this new substrate. The adapted sludge is very stable. Under nonoptimal conditions, the methane yield and productivity obtained were 0.26 m/sup 3//(kg VS added day) and 0.26 m/sup 3//(kg VS added day), respectively, with the semicontinuous, daily fed, anaerobic digestion having loading rate of 0.97 kg VS/(m/sup 3/ day), retention time of 33 days and temperature of 30/sup 0/C.

  12. Design of algal film photobioreactors: material surface energy effects on algal film productivity, colonization and lipid content.

    PubMed

    Genin, Scott N; Stewart Aitchison, J; Grant Allen, D

    2014-03-01

    A parallel plate air lift reactor was used to examine the growth kinetics of mixed culture algal biofilms grown on various materials (acrylic, glass, polycarbonate, polystyrene and cellulose acetate). The growth kinetics of the algal biofilms were non-linear overall and their overall productivities ranged from 1.10-2.08g/m(2)day, with those grown on cellulose acetate having the highest productivity. Overall algal biofilm productivity was largely explained by differences in the colonization time which in turn was strongly correlated to the polar surface energy of the material, but weakly correlated to water-material contact angle. When colonization time was taken into account, the productivity for all materials except acrylic was not significantly different at approximately 2g/m(2)/day. Lipid content of the algal biofilms ranged from 6% to 8% (w/w) and was not correlated to water-material contact angle or polar surface energy. The results have potential application for selecting appropriate materials for algal film photobioreactors.

  13. Extracellular recombinant protein production from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ye; Chen, Rachel

    2009-11-01

    Escherichia coli is the most commonly used host for recombinant protein production and metabolic engineering. Extracellular production of enzymes and proteins is advantageous as it could greatly reduce the complexity of a bioprocess and improve product quality. Extracellular production of proteins is necessary for metabolic engineering applications in which substrates are polymers such as lignocelluloses or xenobiotics since adequate uptake of these substrates is often an issue. The dogma that E. coli secretes no protein has been challenged by the recognition of both its natural ability to secrete protein in common laboratory strains and increased ability to secrete proteins in engineered cells. The very existence of this review dedicated to extracellular production is a testimony for outstanding achievements made collectively by the community in this regard. Four strategies have emerged to engineer E. coli cells to secrete recombinant proteins. In some cases, impressive secretion levels, several grams per liter, were reached. This secretion level is on par with other eukaryotic expression systems. Amid the optimism, it is important to recognize that significant challenges remain, especially when considering the success cannot be predicted a priori and involves much trials and errors. This review provides an overview of recent developments in engineering E. coli for extracellular production of recombinant proteins and an analysis of pros and cons of each strategy.

  14. Effect of centrifugation on water recycling and algal growth to enable algae biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Igou, Thomas; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Penalver-Argueso, Patricia; Fu, Hao; Doi, Shusuke; Narode, Asmita; Cheruvu, Sarasija; Zhang, Qian; Hassan, Fariha; Woodruff, Frazier; Chen, Yongsheng

    2014-12-01

    The latest research shows that algal biofuels, at the production levels mandated in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, will place significant demands on water and compete with agriculture meant for food production. Thus, there is a great need to recycle water while producing algal biofuels. This study shows that when using a synthetic medium, soluble algal products, bacteria, and other inhibitors can be removed by centrifugation and enable water recycling. Average water recovery reached 84% and water could be recycled at least 10 times without reducing algal growth.

  15. Energy-efficient photobioreactor configuration for algal biomass production.

    PubMed

    Pegallapati, Ambica Koushik; Arudchelvam, Yalini; Nirmalakhandan, Nagamany

    2012-12-01

    An internally illuminated photobioreactor (IIPBR) design is proposed for energy-efficient biomass production. Theoretical rationale of the IIPBR design and its advantages over the traditional bubble column photobioreactors (PBRs) are presented, followed by experimental results from prototype scale cultivation of freshwater and marine algal strains in an 18L IIPBR. Based on theoretical considerations, the proposed IIPBR design has the potential to support 160% higher biomass density and higher biomass productivity per unit energy input, B/E, than a bubble column PBR of equal incident area per unit culture volume. Experimental B/E values recorded in this study with fresh water algae and marine algae (1.42 and 0.37 gW(-1)d(-1), respectively) are at least twice as those reported in the literature for comparable species cultivated in bubble column and airlift PBRs.

  16. Oxygen sensitivity of algal H{sub 2}-production

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, M.L.; Seibert, M.; Togasaki, R.K.

    1997-12-31

    Photoproduction of H{sub 2} by green algae utilizes electrons originating from the photosynthetic oxidation of water and does not require metabolic intermediates. However, algal hydrogenases are extremely sensitive to O{sub 2}, which limits their usefulness in future commercial H{sub 2}-production systems. We designed an experimental technique for the selection of O{sub 2}tolerant, H{sub 2}-producing variants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on the ability of wild-type cells to survive a short (20 min) exposure to metronidazole in the presence of controlled concentrations of O{sub 2}. The number of survivors depends on the metronidazole concentration, light intensity, preinduction of the hydrogenase, and the presence or absence of O{sub 2}. Finally, we demonstrate that some of the selected survivors in fact exhibit H{sub 2}-production capacity that is less sensitive to O{sub 2} than the original wild-type population. 17 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Strategies for optimizing algal biology for enhanced biomass production

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Amanda N.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Sayre, Richard T.

    2015-02-02

    One of the most environmentally sustainable ways to produce high-energy density (oils) feed stocks for the production of liquid transportation fuels is from biomass. Photosynthetic carbon capture combined with biomass combustion (point source) and subsequent carbon capture and sequestration has also been proposed in the intergovernmental panel on climate change report as one of the most effective and economical strategies to remediate atmospheric greenhouse gases. To maximize photosynthetic carbon capture efficiency and energy-return-on-investment, we must develop biomass production systems that achieve the greatest yields with the lowest inputs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that microalgae have among the greatest potentials for biomass production. This is in part due to the fact that all alga cells are photoautotrophic, they have active carbon concentrating mechanisms to increase photosynthetic productivity, and all the biomass is harvestable unlike plants. All photosynthetic organisms, however, convert only a fraction of the solar energy they capture into chemical energy (reduced carbon or biomass). To increase aerial carbon capture rates and biomass productivity, it will be necessary to identify the most robust algal strains and increase their biomass production efficiency often by genetic manipulation. We review recent large-scale efforts to identify the best biomass producing strains and metabolic engineering strategies to improve aerial productivity. In addition, these strategies include optimization of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna size to increase energy capture and conversion efficiency and the potential development of advanced molecular breeding techniques. To date, these strategies have resulted in up to twofold increases in biomass productivity.

  18. In vivo Reconstitution of Algal Triacylglycerol Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chun-Hsien; Kanehara, Kazue; Nakamura, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    The current fascination with algal biofuel production stems from a high lipid biosynthetic capacity and little conflict with land plant cultivation. However, the mechanisms which enable algae to accumulate massive oil remain elusive. An enzyme for triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CrDGTT2, can produce a large amount of TAG when expressed in yeast or higher plants, suggesting a unique ability of CrDGTT2 to enhance oil production in a heterologous system. Here, we performed metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by taking advantage of CrDGTT2. We suppressed membrane phospholipid biosynthesis at the log phase by mutating OPI3, enhanced TAG biosynthetic pathway at the stationary phase by overexpressing PAH1 and CrDGTT2, and suppressed TAG hydrolysis on growth resumption from the stationary phase by knocking out DGK1. The resulting engineered yeast cells accumulated about 70-fold of TAG compared with wild type cells. Moreover, TAG production was sustainable. Our results demonstrated the enhanced and sustainable TAG production in the yeast synthetic platform. PMID:26913021

  19. Effective extracellular trehalose production by Cellulosimicrobium cellulans.

    PubMed

    Seto, A; Yoshijima, H; Toyomasu, K; Ogawa, H-O; Kakuta, H; Hosono, K; Ueda, K; Beppu, T

    2004-06-01

    A bacterium isolated from a petal of Casa Blanca Lily (ST26 strain) produced a marked amount of extracellular trehalose (alpha- d-glucopyranosyl-[1,1]-alpha- d-glucopyranose) in culture medium containing glucose. 16S rDNA-based phylogeny showed that ST26 belongs to, or is related to, Cellulosimicrobium cellulans, a close relative of Cellulomonas spp. Various Cellulomonas strains obtained from culture collections also showed extracellular trehalose productivity, suggesting that trehalose production is a common property of this bacterial genus. ST26 accumulated trehalose in medium supplied with glucose but not with sucrose, glycerol or maltose. Effective extracellular trehalose production by ST26 was achieved by supplying 0.5-1% ammonium sulfate and 0.5-1% CaCO(3). The addition of CaCO(3) adjusted the pH of the culture to around 5.0. The optimized culture conditions yielded trehalose from glucose at a conversion rate of 61%. The addition of ammonium sulfate greatly reduced the dry cell weight of ST26 and intracellular content of trehalose, which suggests that the addition of ammonium sulfate makes ST26 cells leak trehalose into the medium. ST26 effectively propagated in minimal medium containing trehalose as a sole carbon source, which suggests that trehalose serves as a carbohydrate reserve of this organism.

  20. Effect of ozone on algal organic matters as precursors for disinfection by-products production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    The effect of ozone dose on algae (Microcystic aeruginosa), algal extracellular organic matters (EOM), humic acids (HA) and four model compounds: bovine serum albumin (BSA), starch, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and fish oil as precursors for disinfection by-products (DBPs) production was investigated. Algae showed the highest DBPs formation (71.8 microg mg-1 total organic carbon (TOC)) than other samples. Only BSA showed lower chloroform yield (5.9 microg mg-1 TOC) than haloacetic acids, HAAs (11.2 microg mg-1 TOC). Algae, EOM, starch, DNA, fish oil and HA all showed higher chloroform yields (46.1, 23.8, 8.9, 37.1, 44.0 and 33.7 microg mg-1 TOC, respectively) than HAAs (25.7, 20.2, 6.3, 10.0, 13.1 and 18.4 microg mg-1 TOC, respectively). Pre-ozonation increased DBPs, especially chloroform, formation from algae and DNA significantly. With the increase in ozone doses, DBPs yields of algae and DNA increased 19.0 and 34.5 microg mg-1 TOC, chloroform yields of algae and DNA increased 15.3 and 30.4 microg mg-1 TOC, respectively. However, pre-ozonation decreased DBPs formation from starch, fish oil and HA, and the corresponding decrease amount was 2.4, 26.9 and 9.5 microg mg-1 TOC, respectively. There are no regular change trends of DBPs formation from EOM and BSA with the increase in ozone doses.

  1. Strategies for optimizing algal biology for enhanced biomass production

    DOE PAGES

    Barry, Amanda N.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Sayre, Richard T.

    2015-02-02

    One of the most environmentally sustainable ways to produce high-energy density (oils) feed stocks for the production of liquid transportation fuels is from biomass. Photosynthetic carbon capture combined with biomass combustion (point source) and subsequent carbon capture and sequestration has also been proposed in the intergovernmental panel on climate change report as one of the most effective and economical strategies to remediate atmospheric greenhouse gases. To maximize photosynthetic carbon capture efficiency and energy-return-on-investment, we must develop biomass production systems that achieve the greatest yields with the lowest inputs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that microalgae have among the greatest potentials formore » biomass production. This is in part due to the fact that all alga cells are photoautotrophic, they have active carbon concentrating mechanisms to increase photosynthetic productivity, and all the biomass is harvestable unlike plants. All photosynthetic organisms, however, convert only a fraction of the solar energy they capture into chemical energy (reduced carbon or biomass). To increase aerial carbon capture rates and biomass productivity, it will be necessary to identify the most robust algal strains and increase their biomass production efficiency often by genetic manipulation. We review recent large-scale efforts to identify the best biomass producing strains and metabolic engineering strategies to improve aerial productivity. In addition, these strategies include optimization of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna size to increase energy capture and conversion efficiency and the potential development of advanced molecular breeding techniques. To date, these strategies have resulted in up to twofold increases in biomass productivity.« less

  2. Production of biofuel using molluscan pseudofeces derived from algal cells

    DOEpatents

    Das, Keshav C.; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Shelton, James; Wilde, Susan B.; Haynie, Rebecca S.; Herrin, James A.

    2012-08-28

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for novel strategies to harvest algal lipids using mollusks which after feeding algae from the growth medium can convert algal lipids into their biomass or excrete lipids in their pseudofeces which makes algae harvesting energy efficient and cost effective. The bioconverter, filter-feeding mollusks and their pseudofeces can be harvested and converted to biocrude using an advanced thermochemical liquefaction technology. Methods, systems, and materials are disclosed for the harvest and isolation of algal lipids from the mollusks, molluscan feces and molluscan pseudofeces.

  3. Mass cultivation of various algal species and their evaluation as a potential candidate for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Nadia; Munir, Neelma; Saleem, Faiza; Aslam, Farheen; Naz, Shagufta

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have been proposed as a promising source for biodiesel production. Focusing on algal strains for biodiesel production, efforts should be made to search new strains. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of growth parameters (nutrients, pH, light, aeration and temperature) and the oil percentage of eight algal strains (Chlorella sp., Cladophora sp., Hydrodictylium sp., Oedogonium sp., Oscillatoria sp., Spirogyra sp., Stigeocolonium sp., Ulothrix sp.). Results show that 6.5-7.5 is the optimum pH for the growth of all algal species. Temperature showed a greater variation (25°40°C). Ulothrix sp. gave more biomass productivity and is the most suitable strain for biodiesel production due to higher oil percentage (62%). Least biomass production was observed for Stigeocolonium sp. and least oil content was obtained from Hydrodictylium sp. It was observed that among these eight algal strains for biodiesel production, Ulothrix and Chlorella are the most promising algae species.

  4. Enhancement of algal growth and productivity by grazing zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Porter, K G

    1976-06-25

    Colonies of the common planktonic green alga, Sphaerocystis schroeteri, are only partially disrupted and assimilated by Daphnia magna, a natural predator. The Daphnia break up the outer protective gelatinous sheath that surrounds Sphaerocystis colonies, but most of the algal cells emerge from Daphnia guts intact and in viable condition. During gut passage, these viable cells take up nutrients, such as phosphorus, both from algal remains and from Daphnia metabolites. This nutrient supply stimulates algal carbon fixation and cell division. Enhanced algal growth, observed after gut passage, can compensate for the minor losses to the population caused by grazing. Nutrients regenerated by grazers may produce the summer bloom of gelatinous green algae during the seasonal succession of lake phytoplankton.

  5. Impact of Microalgae-Bacteria Interactions on the Production of Algal Biomass and Associated Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Juan Luis; Garbayo, Inés; Cuaresma, María; Montero, Zaida; González-del-Valle, Manuel; Vílchez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    A greater insight on the control of the interactions between microalgae and other microorganisms, particularly bacteria, should be useful for enhancing the efficiency of microalgal biomass production and associated valuable compounds. Little attention has been paid to the controlled utilization of microalgae-bacteria consortia. However, the studies of microalgal-bacterial interactions have revealed a significant impact of the mutualistic or parasitic relationships on algal growth. The algal growth, for instance, has been shown to be enhanced by growth promoting factors produced by bacteria, such as indole-3-acetic acid. Vitamin B12 produced by bacteria in algal cultures and bacterial siderophores are also known to be involved in promoting faster microalgal growth. More interestingly, enhancement in the intracellular levels of carbohydrates, lipids and pigments of microalgae coupled with algal growth stimulation has also been reported. In this sense, massive algal production might occur in the presence of bacteria, and microalgae-bacteria interactions can be beneficial to the massive production of microalgae and algal products. This manuscript reviews the recent knowledge on the impact of the microalgae-bacteria interactions on the production of microalgae and accumulation of valuable compounds, with an emphasis on algal species having application in aquaculture. PMID:27213407

  6. Impact of Microalgae-Bacteria Interactions on the Production of Algal Biomass and Associated Compounds.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Juan Luis; Garbayo, Inés; Cuaresma, María; Montero, Zaida; González-Del-Valle, Manuel; Vílchez, Carlos

    2016-05-19

    A greater insight on the control of the interactions between microalgae and other microorganisms, particularly bacteria, should be useful for enhancing the efficiency of microalgal biomass production and associated valuable compounds. Little attention has been paid to the controlled utilization of microalgae-bacteria consortia. However, the studies of microalgal-bacterial interactions have revealed a significant impact of the mutualistic or parasitic relationships on algal growth. The algal growth, for instance, has been shown to be enhanced by growth promoting factors produced by bacteria, such as indole-3-acetic acid. Vitamin B12 produced by bacteria in algal cultures and bacterial siderophores are also known to be involved in promoting faster microalgal growth. More interestingly, enhancement in the intracellular levels of carbohydrates, lipids and pigments of microalgae coupled with algal growth stimulation has also been reported. In this sense, massive algal production might occur in the presence of bacteria, and microalgae-bacteria interactions can be beneficial to the massive production of microalgae and algal products. This manuscript reviews the recent knowledge on the impact of the microalgae-bacteria interactions on the production of microalgae and accumulation of valuable compounds, with an emphasis on algal species having application in aquaculture.

  7. Bioreactor technology for production of valuable algal products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guo-Cai; Cao, Ying

    1998-03-01

    Bioreactor technology has long been employed for the production of various (mostly cheap) food and pharmaceutical products. More recently, research has been mainly focused on the development of novel bioreactor technology for the production of high—value products. This paper reports the employment of novel bioreactor technology for the production of high-value biomass and metabolites by microalgae. These high-value products include microalgal biomass as health foods, pigments including phycocyanin and carotenoids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. The processes involved include heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultures using organic substrates as the carbon source. We have demonstrated that these bioreactor cultivation systems are particularly suitable for the production of high-value products from various microalgae. These cultivation systems can be further modified to improve cell densities and productivities by using high cell density techniques such as fed-batch and membrane cell recycle systems. For most of the microalgae investigated, the maximum cell concentrations obtained using these bioreactor systems in our laboratories are much higher than any so far reported in the literature.

  8. Environmental indicators for sustainable production of algal biofuels

    DOE PAGES

    Efroymson, Rebecca A.; Dale, Virginia H.

    2014-10-01

    For analyzing sustainability of algal biofuels, we identify 16 environmental indicators that fall into six categories: soil quality, water quality and quantity, air quality, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, and productivity. Indicators are selected to be practical, widely applicable, predictable in response, anticipatory of future changes, independent of scale, and responsive to management. Major differences between algae and terrestrial plant feedstocks, as well as their supply chains for biofuel, are highlighted, for they influence the choice of appropriate sustainability indicators. Algae strain selection characteristics do not generally affect which indicators are selected. The use of water instead of soil as themore » growth medium for algae determines the higher priority of water- over soil-related indicators. The proposed set of environmental indicators provides an initial checklist for measures of biofuel sustainability but may need to be modified for particular contexts depending on data availability, goals of the stakeholders, and financial constraints. Ultimately, use of these indicators entails defining sustainability goals and targets in relation to stakeholder values in a particular context and can lead to improved management practices.« less

  9. Environmental indicators for sustainable production of algal biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, Rebecca A.; Dale, Virginia H.

    2014-10-01

    For analyzing sustainability of algal biofuels, we identify 16 environmental indicators that fall into six categories: soil quality, water quality and quantity, air quality, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, and productivity. Indicators are selected to be practical, widely applicable, predictable in response, anticipatory of future changes, independent of scale, and responsive to management. Major differences between algae and terrestrial plant feedstocks, as well as their supply chains for biofuel, are highlighted, for they influence the choice of appropriate sustainability indicators. Algae strain selection characteristics do not generally affect which indicators are selected. The use of water instead of soil as the growth medium for algae determines the higher priority of water- over soil-related indicators. The proposed set of environmental indicators provides an initial checklist for measures of biofuel sustainability but may need to be modified for particular contexts depending on data availability, goals of the stakeholders, and financial constraints. Ultimately, use of these indicators entails defining sustainability goals and targets in relation to stakeholder values in a particular context and can lead to improved management practices.

  10. Enhanced Production of Green Tide Algal Biomass through Additional Carbon Supply

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Silva, Pedro H.; Paul, Nicholas A.; de Nys, Rocky; Mata, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Intensive algal cultivation usually requires a high flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (Ci) to support productivity, particularly for high density algal cultures. Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment can be used to overcome Ci limitation and enhance productivity of algae in intensive culture, however, it is unclear whether algal species with the ability to utilise bicarbonate (HCO3−) as a carbon source for photosynthesis will benefit from CO2 enrichment. This study quantified the HCO3− affinity of three green tide algal species, Cladophora coelothrix, Cladophora patentiramea and Chaetomorpha linum, targeted for biomass and bioenergy production. Subsequently, we quantified productivity and carbon, nitrogen and ash content in response to CO2 enrichment. All three species had similar high pH compensation points (9.7–9.9), and grew at similar rates up to pH 9, demonstrating HCO3− utilization. Algal cultures enriched with CO2 as a carbon source had 30% more total Ci available, supplying twenty five times more CO2 than the control. This higher Ci significantly enhanced the productivity of Cladophora coelothrix (26%), Chaetomorpha linum (24%) and to a lesser extent for Cladophora patentiramea (11%), compared to controls. We demonstrated that supplying carbon as CO2 can enhance the productivity of targeted green tide algal species under intensive culture, despite their clear ability to utilise HCO3−. PMID:24324672

  11. Enhanced production of green tide algal biomass through additional carbon supply.

    PubMed

    de Paula Silva, Pedro H; Paul, Nicholas A; de Nys, Rocky; Mata, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Intensive algal cultivation usually requires a high flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (Ci) to support productivity, particularly for high density algal cultures. Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment can be used to overcome Ci limitation and enhance productivity of algae in intensive culture, however, it is unclear whether algal species with the ability to utilise bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)) as a carbon source for photosynthesis will benefit from CO2 enrichment. This study quantified the HCO3 (-) affinity of three green tide algal species, Cladophora coelothrix, Cladophora patentiramea and Chaetomorpha linum, targeted for biomass and bioenergy production. Subsequently, we quantified productivity and carbon, nitrogen and ash content in response to CO2 enrichment. All three species had similar high pH compensation points (9.7-9.9), and grew at similar rates up to pH 9, demonstrating HCO3 (-) utilization. Algal cultures enriched with CO2 as a carbon source had 30% more total Ci available, supplying twenty five times more CO2 than the control. This higher Ci significantly enhanced the productivity of Cladophora coelothrix (26%), Chaetomorpha linum (24%) and to a lesser extent for Cladophora patentiramea (11%), compared to controls. We demonstrated that supplying carbon as CO2 can enhance the productivity of targeted green tide algal species under intensive culture, despite their clear ability to utilise HCO3 (-).

  12. Advancing Commercialization of Algal Biofuels Through Increased Biomass Productivity and Technology Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xuemei; Sabarsky, Martin

    2013-09-30

    Cellana is a leading developer of algae-based bioproducts, and its pre-commercial production of marine microalgae takes place at Cellana?s Kona Demonstration Facility (KDF) in Hawaii. KDF is housing more than 70 high-performing algal strains for different bioproducts, of which over 30 have been grown outside at scale. So far, Cellana has produced more than 10 metric tons of algal biomass for the development of biofuels, animal feed, and high-value nutraceuticals. Cellana?s ALDUO algal cultivation technology allows Cellana to grow non-extremophile algal strains at large scale with no contamination disruptions. Cellana?s research and production at KDF have addressed three major areas that are crucial for the commercialization of algal biofuels: yield improvement, cost reduction, and the overall economics. Commercially acceptable solutions have been developed and tested for major factors limiting areal productivity of algal biomass and lipids based on years of R&D work conducted at KDF. Improved biomass and lipid productivity were achieved through strain improvement, culture management strategies (e.g., alleviation of self-shading, de-oxygenation, and efficient CO2 delivery), and technical advancement in downstream harvesting technology. Cost reduction was achieved through optimized CO2 delivery system, flue gas utilization technology, and energy-efficient harvesting technology. Improved overall economics was achieved through a holistic approach by integration of high-value co-products in the process, in addition to yield improvements and cost reductions.

  13. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Biofuels: Algal Biomass Fractionation to Lipid- and Carbohydrate-Derived Fuel Products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.; Kinchin, C.; Markham, J.; Tan, E.; Laurens, L.; Sexton, D.; Knorr, D.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.

    2014-09-01

    Beginning in 2013, NREL began transitioning from the singular focus on ethanol to a broad slate of products and conversion pathways, ultimately to establish similar benchmarking and targeting efforts. One of these pathways is the conversion of algal biomass to fuels via extraction of lipids (and potentially other components), termed the 'algal lipid upgrading' or ALU pathway. This report describes in detail one potential ALU approach based on a biochemical processing strategy to selectively recover and convert select algal biomass components to fuels, namely carbohydrates to ethanol and lipids to a renewable diesel blendstock (RDB) product. The overarching process design converts algal biomass delivered from upstream cultivation and dewatering (outside the present scope) to ethanol, RDB, and minor coproducts, using dilute-acid pretreatment, fermentation, lipid extraction, and hydrotreating.

  14. In situ ethyl ester production from wet algal biomass under microwave-mediated supercritical ethanol conditions.

    PubMed

    Patil, Prafulla D; Reddy, Harvind; Muppaneni, Tapaswy; Schaub, Tanner; Holguin, F Omar; Cooke, Peter; Lammers, Peter; Nirmalakhandan, Nagamany; Li, Yin; Lu, Xiuyang; Deng, Shuguang

    2013-07-01

    An in situ transesterification approach was demonstrated for converting lipid-rich wet algae (Nannochloropsis salina) into fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) under microwave-mediated supercritical ethanol conditions, while preserving the nutrients and other valuable components in the algae. This single-step process can simultaneously and effectively extract the lipids from wet algae and transesterify them into crude biodiesel. Experimental runs were designed to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate their effects on algal biodiesel yield. The algal biomass characterization and algal biodiesel analysis were carried out by using various analytical instruments such as FTIR, SEM-EDS, TLC, GC-MS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) under nitrogen and oxygen environments was also performed to examine the thermal and oxidative stability of ethyl esters produced from wet algae. This simple in situ transesterification process using a green solvent and catalyst-free approach can be a potentially efficient route for algal biodiesel production.

  15. Geographic analysis of the feasibility of collocating algal biomass production with wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Marie-Odile P; Sturm, Belinda S M

    2012-10-16

    Resource demand analyses indicate that algal biodiesel production would require unsustainable amounts of freshwater and fertilizer supplies. Alternatively, municipal wastewater effluent can be used, but this restricts production of algae to areas near wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), and to date, there has been no geospatial analysis of the feasibility of collocating large algal ponds with WWTPs. The goals of this analysis were to determine the available areas by land cover type within radial extents (REs) up to 1.5 miles from WWTPs; to determine the limiting factor for algal production using wastewater; and to investigate the potential algal biomass production at urban, near-urban, and rural WWTPs in Kansas. Over 50% and 87% of the land around urban and rural WWTPs, respectively, was found to be potentially available for algal production. The analysis highlights a trade-off between urban WWTPs, which are generally land-limited but have excess wastewater effluent, and rural WWTPs, which are generally water-limited but have 96% of the total available land. Overall, commercial-scale algae production collocated with WWTPs is feasible; 29% of the Kansas liquid fuel demand could be met with implementation of ponds within 1 mile of all WWTPs and supplementation of water and nutrients when these are limited.

  16. Research, development, and demonstration of algal production raceway (APR) systems for the production of hydrocarbon resources

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, E.A.

    1984-02-01

    A fractional factorial experimental design was used to determine the maximum production and photosynthetic efficiency that could be achieved in shallow algal mass culture systems (SAMCS) of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Dilution rate and CO/sub 2/ supply were found to be the most important system parameters. Maximum production was found to be about 25 g dry wt m/sup -2/d/sup -1/. This production corresponded to a photosynthetic efficiency of 5.6%. These figures are 50 to 100% better than the production rates achieved in earlier P. tricornutum cultures using conventional culture techniques. The results are consistent with a theoretical model of the impact of the flashing light effect on algal mass culture production. This model predicts that at the typical irradiances in Hawaii, full utilization of the flashing light effect should enhance production by 70% to over 200%. It was concluded that the use of foil arrays in the experimental flume creates systematic vertical mixing on a time scale suitable for utilizing the flashing light effect. Production of P. tricornutum culture is probably limited by temperature. P. tricornutum cannot survive at temperatures in excess of 25/sup 0/C in outdoor mass cultures. Growth of mesophilic species in the temperature range 30 to 35/sup 0/C may well result in even higher production than that achieved with P. tricornutum.

  17. Wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds (WWT HRAP) for low-cost biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Abbas; Craggs, Rupert; Farid, Mohammed M

    2015-05-01

    Growing energy demand and water consumption have increased concerns about energy security and efficient wastewater treatment and reuse. Wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds (WWT HRAPs) are a promising technology that could help solve these challenges concurrently where climate is favorable. WWT HRAPs have great potential for biofuel production as a by-product of WWT, since the costs of algal cultivation and harvest for biofuel production are covered by the wastewater treatment function. Generally, 800-1400 GJ/ha/year energy (average biomass energy content: 20 GJ/ton; HRAP biomass productivity: 40-70 tons/ha/year) can be produced in the form of harvestable biomass from WWT HRAP which can be used to provide community-level energy supply. In this paper the benefits of WWT HRAPs are compared with conventional mass algal culture systems. Moreover, parameters to effectively increase algal energy content and overall energy production from WWT HRAP are discussed including selection of appropriate algal biomass biofuel conversion pathways.

  18. Phycoremediation coupled production of algal biomass, harvesting and anaerobic digestion: possibilities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Sanjeev Kumar; Kaushik, Prachi; Malik, Anushree; Vijay, Virendra Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Biogas produced from anaerobic digestion is a versatile and environment friendly fuel which traditionally utilizes cattle dung as the substrate. In the recent years, owing to its high content of biodegradable compounds, algal biomass has emerged as a potential feedstock for biogas production. Moreover, the ability of algae to treat wastewater and fix CO2 from waste gas streams makes it an environmental friendly and economically feasible feedstock. The present review focuses on the possibility of utilizing wastewater as the nutrient and waste gases as the CO2 source for algal biomass production and subsequent biogas generation. Studies describing the various harvesting methods of algal biomass as well as its anaerobic digestion have been compiled and discussed. Studies targeting the most recent advancements on biogas enrichment by algae have been discussed. Apart from highlighting the various advantages of utilizing algal biomass for biogas production, limitations of the process such as cell wall resistivity towards digestion and inhibitions caused due to ammonia toxicity and the possible strategies for overcoming the same have been reviewed. The studies compiled in the present review indicate that if the challenges posed in translating the lab scale studies on phycoremediation and biogas production to pilot scale are overcome, algal biogas could become the sustainable and economically feasible source of renewable energy.

  19. Virus infection of Chlorella variabilis and enzymatic saccharification of algal biomass for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Shen; Zheng, Yi; Labavitch, John M; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2013-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the application of virus infection and amylolytic enzyme treatment on sugar release from Chlorella variabilis NC64A and bioethanol production from released sugars via Escherichia coli KO11 fermentation. Chlorella variabilis NC64A accumulated starch when it was cultured in a nitrogen-limited medium. The accumulated starch was not consumed during viral infection based on analysis of sugars released during infection. Both amylolytic enzyme addition and virus infection increased the hydrolysis of carbohydrates. Addition of amylolytic enzymes increased the release of glucose from algal biomass while virus addition increased the release of non-glucose neutral sugars. The combination of enzyme addition and virus infection also resulted in the highest ethanol production after fermentation. Acetic acid was generated as a co-product during fermentation in all sets of experiments. This study demonstrated that infection of microalgae with an algal virus resulted in disruption and hydrolysis of algal biomass to generate fermentable sugars.

  20. Process Design and Economics for the Production of Algal Biomass: Algal Biomass Production in Open Pond Systems and Processing Through Dewatering for Downstream Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Ryan; Markham, Jennifer; Kinchin, Christopher; Grundl, Nicholas; Tan, Eric C.D.; Humbird, David

    2016-02-17

    This report describes in detail a set of aspirational design and process targets to better understand the realistic economic potential for the production of algal biomass for subsequent conversion to biofuels and/or coproducts, based on the use of open pond cultivation systems and a series of dewatering operations to concentrate the biomass up to 20 wt% solids (ash-free dry weight basis).

  1. Enhancing microalgal photosynthesis and productivity in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Howard-Williams, Clive; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2015-05-01

    With microalgal biofuels currently receiving much attention, there has been renewed interest in the combined use of high rate algal ponds (HRAP) for wastewater treatment and biofuel production. This combined use of HRAPs is considered to be an economically feasible option for biofuel production, however, increased microalgal productivity and nutrient removal together with reduced capital costs are needed before it can be commercially viable. Despite HRAPs being an established technology, microalgal photosynthesis and productivity is still limited in these ponds and is well below the theoretical maximum. This paper critically evaluates the parameters that limit microalgal light absorption and photosynthesis in wastewater HRAPs and examines biological, chemical and physical options for improving light absorption and utilisation, with the view of enhancing biomass production and nutrient removal.

  2. Production of Algal-based Biofuel from Non-fresh Water Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, A. C.; Reno, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    A system dynamics model is developed to assess the availability and feasibility of non-traditional water sources from dairy wastewater, produced water from crude oil production and from coal-bed methane gas extraction for the production of algal-based biofuel. The conceptual framework is based on two locales within New Mexico, the San Juan basin in the northwest and the Permian basin in the southeast, where oil and gas drilling have increased considerably in the last ten years. The simulation framework contains an algal growth module, a dairy module, an oil production module, and a gas production module. Our preliminary investigation indicates a cyclical demand for non-fresh water due to the cyclical nature of algal biomass production and crop evapotranspiration. The wastewater from the dairy industry is not a feasible non-fresh water source because the agricultural water demand for cow's dry feed far exceeds the amount generated at the dairy. The uncertainty associated with the water demand for cow's dry matter intake is the greatest in this model. The oil and gas produced water, ignoring the quality, provides ample supply for water demand in algal biomass production. There remains work to address technical challenges associated with coupling the appropriate non-fresh water source to the local demand.

  3. Primary production of edaphic algal communities in a Mississippi salt marsh

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.J.; Moncreiff, C.A.

    1988-03-01

    Primary production rates of edaphic algae associated with the sediments beneath four monospecific canopies of vascular plants were determined over an annual cycle in a Mississippi salt marsh. The edaphic algal flora was dominated by small, motile pennate diatoms. Algal production (as measured by /sup 14/C uptake) was generally highest in spring-early summer and lowest in fall. Hourly rates ranged from a low of 1.4 mg C/m/sup 2/ in Juncus roemerianus Scheele to a high of 163 mg C/m/sup 2/ beneath the Scirpus olneyi Gray canopy. Stepwise multiple regressions identified a soil moisture index and chlorophyll a as the best environmental predictors of hourly production; light energy reaching the marsh surface and sediment and air temperature proved of little value. Adding the relative abundances of 33 diatom taxa to the set of independent variables only slightly increased R/sup 2/; however, virtually all variables selected were diatom taxa. R/sup 2/ was only 0.38 for the Spartina alterniflora Loisel. habitat but ranged from 0.70 to 0.87 for the remaining three vascular plant zones. Annual rates of algal production (g C/m/sup 2/) were estimated as follows: Juncus (28), Spartina (57), Distichlis spicata (L.) Greene (88), and Scirpus (151). The ratio of annual edaphic algal production to vascular plant net aerial production (EAP/VPP) was 10-12% for the first three habitats and 61% for Scirpus. Chlorophyll a concentrations, annual algal production rates, and EAP/VPP values were comparable to those determined in Texas, Delaware, and Massachusetts salt marshes but lower than those reported for Georgia and particularly California marshes.

  4. Addressing the challenges for sustainable production of algal biofuels: II. Harvesting and conversion to biofuels.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Ahmed E M; Leite, Gustavo B; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2013-01-01

    In order to ensure the sustainability of algal biofuel production, a number of issues need to be addressed. Previously, we reviewed some of the questions in this area involving algal species and the important challenges of nutrient supply and how these might be met. Here, we take up issues involving harvesting and the conversion ofbiomass to biofuels. Advances in both these areas are required if these third-generation fuels are to have a sufficiently high net energy ratio and a sustainable footprint. A variety of harvesting technologies are under investigation and recent studies in this area are presented and discussed. A number of different energy uses are available for algal biomass, each with their own advantages as well as challenges in terms of efficiencies and yields. Recent advances in these areas are presented and some of the especially promising conversion processes are highlighted.

  5. Industrial-strength ecology: trade-offs and opportunities in algal biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Shurin, Jonathan B; Abbott, Rachel L; Deal, Michael S; Kwan, Garfield T; Litchman, Elena; McBride, Robert C; Mandal, Shovon; Smith, Val H

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae represent one of the most promising groups of candidate organisms for replacing fossil fuels with contemporary primary production as a renewable source of energy. Algae can produce many times more biomass per unit area than terrestrial crop plants, easing the competing demands for land with food crops and native ecosystems. However, several aspects of algal biology present unique challenges to the industrial-scale aquaculture of photosynthetic microorganisms. These include high susceptibility to invading aquatic consumers and weeds, as well as prodigious requirements for nutrients that may compete with the fertiliser demands of other crops. Most research on algal biofuel technologies approaches these problems from a cellular or genetic perspective, attempting either to engineer or select algal strains with particular traits. However, inherent functional trade-offs may limit the capacity of genetic selection or synthetic biology to simultaneously optimise multiple functional traits for biofuel productivity and resilience. We argue that a community engineering approach that manages microalgal diversity, species composition and environmental conditions may lead to more robust and productive biofuel ecosystems. We review evidence for trade-offs, challenges and opportunities in algal biofuel cultivation with a goal of guiding research towards intensifying bioenergy production using established principles of community and ecosystem ecology.

  6. Progress on lipid extraction from wet algal biomass for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi Naghdi, Forough; González González, Lina M; Chan, William; Schenk, Peer M

    2016-11-01

    Lipid recovery and purification from microalgal cells continues to be a significant bottleneck in biodiesel production due to high costs involved and a high energy demand. Therefore, there is a considerable necessity to develop an extraction method which meets the essential requirements of being safe, cost-effective, robust, efficient, selective, environmentally friendly, feasible for large-scale production and free of product contamination. The use of wet concentrated algal biomass as a feedstock for oil extraction is especially desirable as it would avoid the requirement for further concentration and/or drying. This would save considerable costs and circumvent at least two lengthy processes during algae-based oil production. This article provides an overview on recent progress that has been made on the extraction of lipids from wet algal biomass. The biggest contributing factors appear to be the composition of algal cell walls, pre-treatments of biomass and the use of solvents (e.g. a solvent mixture or solvent-free lipid extraction). We compare recently developed wet extraction processes for oleaginous microalgae and make recommendations towards future research to improve lipid extraction from wet algal biomass.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterococcus faecalis Strain W11 Isolated from an Algal Food Product

    PubMed Central

    Takizawa, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Enterococcus faecalis strain W11 isolated from an algal food product in Japan. This study should facilitate the identification of a novel mechanism of glycerol metabolic control in lactic acid bacteria. PMID:27688337

  8. Ameliorating effects of extracellular polymeric substances excreted by Thalassiosira pseudonana on algal toxicity of CdSe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Saijin; Jiang, Yuelu; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Creeley, Danielle; Schwehr, Kathleen A; Quigg, Antonietta; Chin, Wei-Chun; Santschi, Peter H

    2013-01-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered nanoparticles (ENs) that have found increasing applications and shown great potential in drug delivery, biological imaging and industrial products. Knowledge of their stability, fate and transport in the aquatic environment is still lacking, including details of how these nanomaterials interact with marine phytoplankton. Here, we examined the toxicity of functionalized CdSe/ZnS QDs (amine- and carboxyl-) by exposing them for five days to Thalassiosira pseudonana (marine diatom) grown under different nutrient-conditions (enriched versus nitrogen-limited media). The released polysaccharides and proteins, the major components of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured to assess their potential effects on the interactions between QDs and T. pseudonana. The partitioning of QDs was analyzed by monitoring the concentration of Cd in different size fractions of the cultures (i.e., filtrate, <0.22 μm and permeate, <3 kDa). We found that the Cd release of QDs in the T. pseudonana culture was dependent on the nutrient conditions and nature of QDs' surface coating. Both amine- and carboxyl-functionalized QDs exhibited higher rates of Cd release in N-limited cultures than in nutrient enriched cultures. The results also showed that amine-functionalized QDs aggregate with minimal Cd release, independent of nutrient conditions. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images confirmed that aggregates are composed of QDs and the culture matrix (EPS). In addition, both types of QDs showed limited toxicity to T. pseudonana. The increasing production of proteins induced by QDs suggests that extracellular proteins might be involved in the detoxification of QDs to T. pseudonana via the Cd release of QDs. Our results here demonstrated that EPS can play an ameliorating role in QD toxicity, fate and transport in the aquatic environment.

  9. Algal biomass and primary production within a temperate zone sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.A.; Sommerfeld, M.R. )

    1987-02-01

    The use of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to extract chlorophyll a and {sup 14}C-labelled photosynthate from endolithic algae of sparsely vegetated, cold temperate grasslands on the Colorado Plateau in Arizona has yielded the first estimates of biomass and photosynthesis for this unusual community. These subsurface microorganisms are found widespread in exposed Coconino Sandstone, a predominant formation in this cold temperate region. The endolithic community in Coconino Sandstone, composed primarily of coccoid blue-green and coccoid/sarcinoid green algae, yielded a biomass value (as chlorophyll a content) of 87 mg m{sup {minus}2} rock surface area and a photosynthetic rate of 0.37 mg CO{sub 2} dm{sup {minus}2} hr{sup {minus}1} or 0.48 mg CO{sub 2} mg{sup {minus}1} chl a hr{sup {minus}1}. The endolithic algal community contributes moderate biomass (5-10%) and substantial photosynthesis (20-80%) to the sparse grassland ecosystem.

  10. Hydrogen production from algal biomass via steam gasification.

    PubMed

    Duman, Gozde; Uddin, Md Azhar; Yanik, Jale

    2014-08-01

    Algal biomasses were tested as feedstock for steam gasification in a dual-bed microreactor in a two-stage process. Gasification experiments were carried out in absence and presence of catalyst. The catalysts used were 10% Fe₂O₃-90% CeO₂ and red mud (activated and natural forms). Effects of catalysts on tar formation and gasification efficiencies were comparatively investigated. It was observed that the characteristic of algae gasification was dependent on its components and the catalysts used. The main role of the catalyst was reforming of the tar derived from algae pyrolysis, besides enhancing water gas shift reaction. The tar reduction levels were in the range of 80-100% for seaweeds and of 53-70% for microalgae. Fe₂O₃-CeO₂ was found to be the most effective catalyst. The maximum hydrogen yields obtained were 1036 cc/g algae for Fucus serratus, 937 cc/g algae for Laminaria digitata and 413 cc/g algae for Nannochloropsis oculata.

  11. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Biofuels: Algal Biomass Fractionation to Lipid-and Carbohydrate-Derived Fuel Products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.; Kinchin, C.; Markham, J.; Tan, E. C. D.; Laurens, L. M. L.; Sexton, D.; Knorr, D.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.

    2014-09-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes the production of a range of liquid fuels and fuel blendstocks from biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of technology in biomass production, conversion, and sustainability. As part of its involvement in this program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) investigates the conceptual production economics of these fuels. This includes fuel pathways from lignocellulosic (terrestrial) biomass, as well as from algal (aquatic) biomass systems.

  12. Biodiesel from wastewater: lipid production in high rate algal pond receiving disinfected effluent.

    PubMed

    Assemany, Paula Peixoto; Calijuri, Maria Lucia; do Couto, Eduardo de Aguiar; Santiago, Aníbal Fonseca; Dos Reis, Alberto José Delgado

    2015-01-01

    The production of different species of microalgae in consortium with other micro-organisms from wastewaters may represent an alternative process, to reduce the costs, for obtaining biofuels. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pre-ultraviolet disinfection (UV) in the production of lipids from biomass produced in high rate ponds. Two high rate algal ponds were evaluated: a pond that received domestic sewage without disinfection and the other receiving domestic sewage previously disinfected by UV radiation (uvHRAP). The UV disinfection did not lead to significant differences in fatty acid profile and total lipid productivities, although it increased algal biomass concentration and productivity as well as lipid content. Moreover, the overall biomass concentrations and productivities decreased with the UV disinfection, mostly as a consequence of a loss in bacterial load. We thus conclude that uvHRAP disinfection may represent a potential strategy to promote the cleaner and safer growth of algal biomass when cultivated in consortium with other micro-organisms. Mainly regarding the use of wastewater as culture medium, together with a cheaper production of lipids for biodiesel, pre-disinfection may represent an advance since extraction costs could be significantly trimmed due to the increase in lipid content.

  13. Production of algal-based biofuel using non-fresh water sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Reno, Marissa Devan

    2007-09-01

    The goal of this LDRD involves development of a system dynamics model to understand the interdependencies between water resource availability and water needs for production of biofuels. Specifically, this model focuses on availability and feasibility of non-traditional water sources from dairy wastewater, produced water from crude oil production and from coal-bed methane gas extraction for the production of algal-based biofuel. The conceptual simulation framework and historical data are based on two locales within New Mexico, the San Juan basin in the northwest and the Permian basin in the southeast, where oil and gas drilling have increased considerably in the last ten years. The overall water balance ignores both transportation options and water chemistry and is broken down by county level. The resulting model contains an algal growth module, a dairy module, an oil production module, and a gas production module. A user interface is also created for controlling the adjustable parameters in the model. Our preliminary investigation indicates a cyclical demand for non-fresh water due to the cyclical nature of algal biomass production and crop evapotranspiration. The wastewater from the dairy industry is not a feasible non-fresh water source because the agricultural water demand for cow's dry feed far exceeds the amount generated at the dairy. The uncertainty associated with the water demand for cow's dry matter intake is the greatest in this model. The oil- and gas-produced water, ignoring the quality, provides ample supply for water demand in algal biomass production. There remains work to address technical challenges associated with coupling the appropriate non-fresh water source to the local demand.

  14. An energy-limited model of algal biofuel production: Toward the next generation of advanced biofuels

    DOE PAGES

    Dunlop, Eric H.; Coaldrake, A. Kimi; Silva, Cory S.; ...

    2013-10-22

    Algal biofuels are increasingly important as a source of renewable energy. The absence of reliable thermodynamic and other property data, and the large amount of kinetic data that would normally be required have created a major barrier to simulation. Additionally, the absence of a generally accepted flowsheet for biofuel production means that detailed simulation of the wrong approach is a real possibility. This model of algal biofuel production estimates the necessary data and places it into a heuristic model using a commercial simulator that back-calculates the process structure required. Furthermore, complex kinetics can be obviated for now by putting themore » simulator into energy limitation and forcing it to solve for the missing design variables, such as bioreactor surface area, productivity, and oil content. The model does not attempt to prescribe a particular approach, but provides a guide towards a sound engineering approach to this challenging and important problem.« less

  15. Energy return on investment for algal biofuel production coupled with wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Beal, Colin M; Stillwell, Ashlynn S; King, Carey W; Cohen, Stuart M; Berberoglu, Halil; Bhattarai, Rajendra P; Connelly, Rhykka L; Webber, Michael E; Hebner, Robert E

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a second-order energy return on investment analysis to evaluate the mutual benefits of combining an advanced wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (with biological nutrient removal) with algal biofuel production. With conventional, independently operated systems, algae production requires significant material inputs, which require energy directly and indirectly, and the WWTP requires significant energy inputs for treatment of the waste streams. The second-order energy return on investment values for independent operation of the WWTP and the algal biofuels production facility were determined to be 0.37 and 0.42, respectively. By combining the two, energy inputs can be reduced significantly. Consequently, the integrated system can outperform the isolated system, yielding a second-order energy return on investment of 1.44. Combining these systems transforms two energy sinks to a collective (second-order) energy source. However, these results do not include capital, labor, and other required expenses, suggesting that profitable deployment will be challenging.

  16. Production of algal biomass (Chlorella vulgaris) using sediment microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyeon Jin; Seo, Kyu-won; Lee, Sang Hyun; Yang, Yung-Hun; Kumaran, Rangarajulu Senthil; Kim, Sunghyun; Hong, Seok Won; Choi, Yong Su; Kim, Hyung Joo

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a novel algal biomass production method using a sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) system was assessed. Under the experimental conditions, CO(2) generation from the SMFC and its rate of increase were found to be dependent on the current generated from the SMFC. However, the CH(4) production rate from the SMFC was inhibited by the generation of current. When Chlorella vulgaris was inoculated into the cathode compartment of the SMFC and current was generated under 10 Ω resistance, biomass production from the anode compartment was observed to be closely associated with the rate of current generation from the SMFC. The experimental results demonstrate that 420 mg/L of algae (dry cell weight) was produced when the current from the SMFC reached 48.5 mA/m(2). Therefore, SMFC could provide a means for producing algal biomass via CO(2) generated by the oxidation of organics upon current generation.

  17. An energy-limited model of algal biofuel production: Toward the next generation of advanced biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, Eric H.; Coaldrake, A. Kimi; Silva, Cory S.; Seider, Warren D.

    2013-10-22

    Algal biofuels are increasingly important as a source of renewable energy. The absence of reliable thermodynamic and other property data, and the large amount of kinetic data that would normally be required have created a major barrier to simulation. Additionally, the absence of a generally accepted flowsheet for biofuel production means that detailed simulation of the wrong approach is a real possibility. This model of algal biofuel production estimates the necessary data and places it into a heuristic model using a commercial simulator that back-calculates the process structure required. Furthermore, complex kinetics can be obviated for now by putting the simulator into energy limitation and forcing it to solve for the missing design variables, such as bioreactor surface area, productivity, and oil content. The model does not attempt to prescribe a particular approach, but provides a guide towards a sound engineering approach to this challenging and important problem.

  18. The place of algae in agriculture: policies for algal biomass production.

    PubMed

    Trentacoste, Emily M; Martinez, Alice M; Zenk, Tim

    2015-03-01

    Algae have been used for food and nutraceuticals for thousands of years, and the large-scale cultivation of algae, or algaculture, has existed for over half a century. More recently algae have been identified and developed as renewable fuel sources, and the cultivation of algal biomass for various products is transitioning to commercial-scale systems. It is crucial during this period that institutional frameworks (i.e., policies) support and promote development and commercialization and anticipate and stimulate the evolution of the algal biomass industry as a source of renewable fuels, high value protein and carbohydrates and low-cost drugs. Large-scale cultivation of algae merges the fundamental aspects of traditional agricultural farming and aquaculture. Despite this overlap, algaculture has not yet been afforded a position within agriculture or the benefits associated with it. Various federal and state agricultural support and assistance programs are currently appropriated for crops, but their extension to algal biomass is uncertain. These programs are essential for nascent industries to encourage investment, build infrastructure, disseminate technical experience and information, and create markets. This review describes the potential agricultural policies and programs that could support algal biomass cultivation, and the barriers to the expansion of these programs to algae.

  19. Transformation of Swine Manure and Algal Consortia to Value-added Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharara, Mahmoud A.

    The swine production sector is projected to grow globally. In the past, this growth manifested itself in increased herd sizes and geographically concentrated production. Although economically sound, these trends had negative consequences on surrounding ecosystems. Over-application of manure resulted in water quality degradation, while long-term storage of manure slurries was found to promote release of potent GHG emissions. There is a need for innovative approaches for swine manure management that are compatible with current scales of production, and increasingly strict environmental regulations. This study aims to investigate the potential for incorporating gasification as part of a novel swine manure management system which utilizes liquid-solid separation and periphytic algal consortia as a phycoremediation vector for the liquid slurry. The gasification of swine manure solids, and algal biomass solids generate both a gaseous fuel product (producer gas) in addition to a biochar co-product. First, the decomposition kinetics for both feedstock, i.e., swine manure solids, and algal solids, were quantified using thermogravimetry at different heating rates (1 ~ 40°C min-1) under different atmospheres (nitrogen, and air). Pyrolysis kinetics were determined for manure solids from two farms with different manure management systems. Similarly, the pyrolysis kinetics were determined for phycoremediation algae grown on swine manure slurries. Modeling algal solids pyrolysis as first-order independent parallel reactions was sufficient to describe sample devolatilization. Combustion of swine manure solids blended with algal solids, at different ratios, showed no synergistic effects. Gasification of phycoremediation algal biomass was studied using a bench-scale auger gasification system at temperatures between 760 and 960°C. The temperature profile suggested a stratification of reaction zones common to fixed-bed reactors. The producer gas heating value ranged between 2.2 MJ m

  20. Production of extracellular fatty acid using engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As an alternative for economic biodiesel production, the microbial production of extracellular fatty acid from renewable resources is receiving more concerns recently, since the separation of fatty acid from microorganism cells is normally involved in a series of energy-intensive steps. Many attempts have been made to construct fatty acid producing strains by targeting genes in the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway, while few studies focused on the cultivation process and the mass transfer kinetics. Results In this study, both strain improvements and cultivation process strategies were applied to increase extracellular fatty acid production by engineered Escherichia coli. Our results showed overexpressing ‘TesA and the deletion of fadL in E. coli BL21 (DE3) improved extracellular fatty acid production, while deletion of fadD didn’t strengthen the extracellular fatty acid production for an undetermined mechanism. Moreover, the cultivation process controls contributed greatly to extracellular fatty acid production with respect to titer, cell growth and productivity by adjusting the temperature, adding ampicillin and employing on-line extraction. Under optimal conditions, the E. coli strain (pACY-‘tesA-ΔfadL) produced 4.8 g L−1 extracellular fatty acid, with the specific productivity of 0.02 g h−1 g−1dry cell mass, and the yield of 4.4% on glucose, while the ratios of cell-associated fatty acid versus extracellular fatty acid were kept below 0.5 after 15 h of cultivation. The fatty acids included C12:1, C12:0, C14:1, C14:0, C16:1, C16:0, C18:1, C18:0. The composition was dominated by C14 and C16 saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Using the strain pACY-‘tesA, similar results appeared under the same culture conditions and the titer was also much higher than that ever reported previously, which suggested that the supposedly superior strain did not necessarily perform best for the efficient production of desired product. The strain p

  1. Algal pigments record shifts in dominant primary productivity through the Holocene in an arctic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian, C.; Miller, G. H.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The character and magnitude of primary productivity in arctic lakes is largely controlled by climate. Organic compounds derived from pigments and preserved in lake sediments allow reconstruction of past abundances of algae that do not leave silicious microfossils. Fossil algal pigments are abundant in lake sediment and can be accurately quantified using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Several groups of algae produce unique pigments that can be used to reconstruct their past abundance. In Qivitu Highlands Lake, eastern central Baffin Island, the ratio of pigments diatoxantin and lutein exhibits coherent changes through the Holocene. Diatoxanthin is produced by diatoms and chrysophytes, whereas lutein is produced by green algae and higher plants. Because these pigments are the dominant carotenoids in the sediment, they serve as proxies for the dominant group of primary producers. During the Holocene Thermal Maximum and the past century, lutein is much more abundant than diatoxanthin. During Neoglacial cooling and into the Little Ice Age, diatoxanthin becomes the dominant carotenoid. This shift reveals that there was a change in not only the magnitude of algal production, but also the most abundant type. The adaptation of aquatic algal assemblages to changing climate suggests that gross changes in primary productivity may not be suitable to track the abundance of one type of algal microfossil (such as diatoms) without considering the other algal groups. Higher plants also produce lutein, and its abundance is additionally influenced by the presence of terrestrial organic matter as well as aquatic macrophyte plants. We hypothesize that the prevalence of lutein during warm summers is due to a longer ice-free season, allowing the development of a greater biomass of green algae and macrophyte plants as well as possible increases of terrestrial higher plant communities. This is part of a larger study where the lutein to diatoxanthin ratio is compared to organic

  2. Relationships between primary production and irradiance in coral reef algal communities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Shallow water algal turf communities are the major primary producers on coral reefs. High rates of primary production are maintained despite extremely high light intensities and exposure to ultraviolet wavelengths. The relationships between the light intensity and primary production in these assemblages are typical of algae adapted to a high light environment (low ..cap alpha.. (initial slope), high I/sub k/ (saturating light intensity), and high I/sub c/ (compensation point light intensity)). Seasonal variations in algal standing crop due to herbivory and daylength result in some characteristic photoadaptive changes in ..cap alpha.. I/sub k/, and I/sub c/ and changes in Pnet/sub max/ rates (maximum net photosynthetic rate achieved at light saturation) on both a chlorophyll ..cap alpha.. and an areal basis. Exposure to UV wavelength results in significantly higher respiration rates but no changes in ..cap alpha.., Pnet/sub max/, or I/sub k/, when compared with these parameters for the same algal communities incubated at the same light intensities without UV wavelengths. The apparent lack of photoinhibition in these algae allows calculation of the daily integrated production from the P vs. I parameters. This integrated production is highest in July (3.1 +/- 0.2 g C m/sup -2/d/sup -1/) and is reduced by 30% from this maximum in December (2.1 +/- 0.1 g C m/sup -2/d/sup -1/).

  3. An analysis of the productivity of a CELSS continuous algal culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Arnett, K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most attractive aspects of using algal cultures as plant components for a Closed Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) is the efficiency with which they can be grown. Although algae are not necessarily intrinsically more efficient than higher plants, the ease which they can be handled and manipulated (more like chemical reagents than plants), and the culturing techniques available, result in much higher growth rates than are usually attainable with higher plants. Furthermore, preliminary experiments have demonstrated that algal growth and physiology is not detectable altered in a microgravity environment, (1) whereas the response of higher plants to zero gravity is unknown. In order to rationally design and operate culture systems, it is necessary to understand how the macroparameters of a culture system, e.g., productivity, are related to the physiological aspects of the algal culture. A first principles analysis of culture system is discussed, and a mathematical model that describes the relationship of culture productivity to the cell concentration of light-limited culture is derived. The predicted productivity vs cell concentration curve agrees well with the experimental data obtained to test this model, indicating that this model permits an accurate prediction of culture productivity given the growth parameters of the system.

  4. Enzymatic Production of Extracellular Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, J. M.; Andeer, P. F.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as intermediates in a myriad of biogeochemically important processes, including cell signaling pathways, cellular oxidative stress responses, and the transformation of both nutrient and toxic metals such as iron and mercury. Abiotic reactions involving the photo-oxidation of organic matter were once considered the only important sources of ROS in the environment. However, the recent discovery of substantial biological ROS production in marine systems has fundamentally shifted this paradigm. Within the last few decades, marine phytoplankton, including diatoms of the genus Thalassiosira, were discovered to produce ample extracellular quantities of the ROS superoxide. Even more recently, we discovered widespread production of extracellular superoxide by phylogenetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria at environmentally significant levels (up to 20 amol cell-1 hr-1), which has introduced the revolutionary potential for substantial "dark" cycling of ROS. Despite the profound biogeochemical importance of extracellular biogenic ROS, the cellular mechanisms underlying the production of this ROS have remained elusive. Through the development of a gel-based assay to identify extracellular ROS-producing proteins, we have recently found that enzymes typically involved in antioxidant activity also produce superoxide when molecular oxygen is the only available electron acceptor. For example, large (~3600 amino acids) heme peroxidases are involved in extracellular superoxide production by a bacterium within the widespread Roseobacter clade. In Thalassiosira spp., extracellular superoxide is produced by flavoproteins such as glutathione reductase and ferredoxin NADP+ reductase. Thus, extracellular ROS production may occur via secreted and/or cell surface enzymes that modulate between producing and degrading ROS depending on prevailing geochemical and/or ecological conditions.

  5. Hydraulic retention time effects on wastewater nutrient removal and bioproduct production via rotating algal biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Iman Shayan, Sahand; Agblevor, Foster A; Bertin, Lorenzo; Sims, Ronald C

    2016-07-01

    Rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) technology was successfully employed in an effective strategy to couple the removal of wastewater nutrients with accumulation of valuable bioproducts by grown algae. A secondary stage municipal wastewater was fed to the developed system and the effects of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) parameter on both nutrient removal and bioproduct production were evaluated under fed-batch operation mode. Two sets of bench scale RABRs were designed and operated with HRTs of 2 and 6days in order to provide competitive environment for algal growth. The HRT significantly affected nitrogen and phosphorus uptakes along with lipid and starch accumulations by microalgae in harvested biofilms. Domination of nitrogen removal in 2-day HRT with higher lipid accumulation (20% on dried weight basis) and phosphorus removal in 6-day HRT with higher starch production (27% on dried weight basis) was observed by comparing the performances of the RABRs in duplicate runs.

  6. Experimental Protocol for Biodiesel Production with Isolation of Alkenones as Coproducts from Commercial Isochrysis Algal Biomass

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Gregory W.; Williams, John R.; Wilson-Peltier, Julia; Knothe, Gerhard; Reddy, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The need to replace petroleum fuels with alternatives from renewable and more environmentally sustainable sources is of growing importance. Biomass-derived biofuels have gained considerable attention in this regard, however first generation biofuels from edible crops like corn ethanol or soybean biodiesel have generally fallen out of favor. There is thus great interest in the development of methods for the production of liquid fuels from domestic and superior non-edible sources. Here we describe a detailed procedure for the production of a purified biodiesel from the marine microalgae Isochrysis. Additionally, a unique suite of lipids known as polyunsaturated long-chain alkenones are isolated in parallel as potentially valuable coproducts to offset the cost of biodiesel production. Multi-kilogram quantities of Isochrysis are purchased from two commercial sources, one as a wet paste (80% water) that is first dried prior to processing, and the other a dry milled powder (95% dry). Lipids are extracted with hexanes in a Soxhlet apparatus to produce an algal oil ("hexane algal oil") containing both traditional fats (i.e., triglycerides, 46-60% w/w) and alkenones (16-25% w/w). Saponification of the triglycerides in the algal oil allows for separation of the resulting free fatty acids (FFAs) from alkenone-containing neutral lipids. FFAs are then converted to biodiesel (i.e., fatty acid methyl esters, FAMEs) by acid-catalyzed esterification while alkenones are isolated and purified from the neutral lipids by crystallization. We demonstrate that biodiesel from both commercial Isochrysis biomasses have similar but not identical FAME profiles, characterized by elevated polyunsaturated fatty acid contents (approximately 40% w/w). Yields of biodiesel were consistently higher when starting from the Isochrysis wet paste (12% w/w vs. 7% w/w), which can be traced to lower amounts of hexane algal oil obtained from the powdered Isochrysis product. PMID:27404113

  7. Cost structures and life cycle impacts of algal biomass and biofuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Katrina Lea

    2011-12-01

    Development and extraction of energy sources, energy production and energy use have huge economic, environmental and geopolitical impacts. Increasing energy demands in tandem with reductions in fossil fuel production has led to significant investments in research into alternative forms of energy. One that is promising but yet not commercially established is the production of biofuel from algae. This research quantitatively assessed the potential of algae biofuel production by examining its cost and environmental impacts. First, two models developed by the RAND corporation were employed to assess Cost Growth defined as the ratio of actual costs to estimated costs, and Plant Performance defined as the ratio of actual production levels to design performance, of three algal biofuel production technologies. The three algal biofuel production technologies examined to open raceway ponds (ORPs), photobioreactors (PBRs), and a system that couples PBRs to ORPs (PBR-ORPs). Though these analyses lack precision due to uncertainty, the results highlight the risks associated with implementing algal biofuel systems, as all scenarios examined were predicted to have Cost Growth, ranging from 1.2 to 1.8, and Plant Performance was projected as less than 50% of design performance for all cases. Second, the Framework the Evaluation of Biomass Energy Feedstocks (FEBEF) was used to assess the cost and environmental impacts of biodiesel produced from three algal production technologies. When these results were compared with ethanol from corn and biodiesel from soybeans, biodiesel from algae produced from the different technologies were estimated to be more expensive, suffered from low energy gains, and did not result in lower greenhouse gas emissions. To identify likely routes to making algal biofuels more competitive, a third study was undertaken. In this case, FEBEF was employed to examine pinch-points (defined as the most costly, energy consuming, greenhouse gas producing processes), in

  8. Acid-Catalyzed Algal Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Lipid and Carbohydrate-Based Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Nagle, N.; Davis, R.; Sweeney, N.; Van Wychen, S.; Lowell, A.; Pienkos, P. T.

    2014-11-12

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. We studied the effect of harvest timing on the conversion yields, using two algal strains; Chlorella and Scenedesmus, generating biomass with distinctive compositional ratios of protein, carbohydrate, and lipids. We found that the late harvest Scenedesmus biomass had the maximum theoretical biofuel potential at 143 gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) combined fuel yield per dry ton biomass, followed by late harvest Chlorella at 128 GGE per ton. Our experimental data show a clear difference between the two strains, as Scenedesmus was more successfully converted in this process with a demonstrated 97 GGE per ton. Our measurements indicated a release of >90% of the available glucose in the hydrolysate liquors and an extraction and recovery of up to 97% of the fatty acids from wet biomass. Techno-economic analysis for the combined product yields indicates that this process exhibits the potential to improve per-gallon fuel costs by up to 33% compared to a lipids-only process for one strain, Scenedesmus, grown to the mid-point harvest condition.

  9. Algal Hydrogen Production -- Stand Alone or Integrated System?

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, Maria L.; Maness, Pin Ching; Kosourovo, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria and green algae photoproduce H2. but do so utilizing different catalysts and substrates. Green algae use reductant generate mostly by water oxidation to catalyze the reduction of protons to H2 gas, while photosynthetic bacteria catalyze H2 production from organic acids using the nitrogenase enzyme. Moreover, these two organisms utilize different regions of the solar spectrum to perform photosynthesis: green algae's light harvesting antenna is comprised of chlorophyll molecules that absorb mostly blue and red light; photosynthetic bacteria harvest blue and far-red light through their light-harvesting pigments to run its non-oxygenic photosynthetic reactions. There is thus an opportunity to increase the range of solar spectrum used to photoproduce H2 by combining the light-harvesting and catalytic properties of these two organisms in a single process. In the current manuscript, we describe an experimental system that validates this hypothesis and demonstrates quantitatively the advantages of a two organism process for production of higher amounts of H2 and thus achieving solar light conversion efficiencies.

  10. Treatment of dairy manure effluent using freshwater algae: algal productivity and recovery of manure nutrients using pilot-scale algal turf scrubbers.

    PubMed

    Mulbry, Walter; Kondrad, Shannon; Pizarro, Carolina; Kebede-Westhead, Elizabeth

    2008-11-01

    Cultivating algae on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in animal manure effluents presents an alternative to the current practice of land application. The objective of this study was to determine values for productivity, nutrient content, and nutrient recovery using filamentous green algae grown in outdoor raceways at different loading rates of raw and anaerobically digested dairy manure effluent. Algal turf scrubber raceways (30m2 each) were operated in central Maryland for approximately 270 days each year (roughly April 1-December 31) from 2003 to 2006. Algal biomass was harvested every 4-12 days from the raceways after daily additions of manure effluent corresponding to loading rates of 0.3 to 2.5g total N (TN) and 0.08 to 0.42g total P (TP) m(-2)d(-1). Mean algal productivity values increased from approximately 2.5g DW m(-2)d(-1) at the lowest loading rate (0.3g TN m(-2)d(-1)) to 25g DW m(-2)d(-1) at the highest loading rate (2.5g TN m(-2)d(-1)). Mean N and P contents in the dried biomass increased 1.5-2.0-fold with increasing loading rate up to maximums of 7% N and 1% P (dry weight basis). Although variable, algal N and P accounted for roughly 70-90% of input N and P at loading rates below 1g TN, 0.15g TP m(-2)d(-1). N and P recovery rates decreased to 50-80% at higher loading rates. There were no significant differences in algal productivity, algal N and P content, or N and P recovery values from raceways with carbon dioxide supplementation compared to values from raceways without added carbon dioxide. Projected annual operational costs are very high on a per animal basis ($780 per cow). However, within the context of reducing nutrient inputs in sensitive watersheds such as the Chesapeake Bay, projected operational costs of $11 per kgN are well below the costs cited for upgrading existing water treatment plants.

  11. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Samson, R.; LeDuy, A.

    1982-08-01

    The semimicroscopic blue-green alga Spirulina maxima makes an ideal substrate for anaerobic digestion because it is easy to harvest, it can use carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as its carbon source, and its fermentability is higher than that of other small algae. Digestion experiments demonstrated that S. maxima can serve as the sole nutrient for biogas production and that municipal sewage sludge, when adapted to this new substrate, is very stable. During semicontinuous daily-fed trials under non-optimal conditions at an 0.06 lb volatile solids (VS)/ft/sup 3/ (0.97 kg VS/m/sup 3/) loading rate, 33-day retention time, and 86/sup 0/F (30/sup 0/C) digestion temperature, the daily methane yield was 4.2 CF/lb (0.26 m/sup 3//kg) VS added, which represents 47% of the maximum theoretical yield. Studies on optimizing the process are underway.

  12. The macrophage chemotactic activity of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemoattractant capabilities of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products (ECP) were investigated from two isolates, the virulent FL6-60 parent and less virulent RET-04 mutant. Chemotaxis and chemokinesis were assayed in vitro using blind well chambers with peritoneal macrophages obtained from ...

  13. Nutrient removal and biofuel production in high rate algal pond using real municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Kang, Zion; Ramanan, Rishiram; Choi, Jong-Eun; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the growth and nutrient removal ability of an indigenous algal consortium on real untreated municipal wastewater in a high rate algal pond (HRAP). The HRAP was operated semicontinuously under different hydraulic retention times (HRT: 2, 4, 6, and 8 days). The average removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand, and total nitrogen and phosphate of real municipal wastewater were maintained at 85.44 ± 5.10%, 92.74 ± 5.82%, and 82.85 ± 8.63%, respectively, in 2 day HRT. Algae dominated the consortium and showed high settling efficiency (99%), and biomass and lipid productivity of 0.500 ± 0.03 g/l/day and 0.103 ± 0.0083 g/l/day (2 day HRT), respectively. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis revealed a predominance of palmitate (C16:0), palmitoleate (C16:1), linoleate (C18:2), and linolenate (C18:3). Microalgal diversity analyses determined the presence of Chlorella, Scenedesmus, and Stigeoclonium as the dominant microalgae. The algal consortium provides significant value not only in terms of energy savings and nutrient removal but also because of its bioenergy potential as indicated by the lipid content (20-23%) and FAME profiling.

  14. Process energy comparison for the production and harvesting of algal biomass as a biofuel feedstock.

    PubMed

    Weschler, Matthew K; Barr, William J; Harper, Willie F; Landis, Amy E

    2014-02-01

    Harvesting and drying are often described as the most energy intensive stages of microalgal biofuel production. This study analyzes two cultivation and eleven harvest technologies for the production of microalgae biomass with and without the use of drying. These technologies were combined to form 122 different production scenarios. The results of this study present a calculation methodology and optimization of total energy demand for the production of algal biomass for biofuel production. The energetic interaction between unit processes and total process energy demand are compared for each scenario. Energy requirements are shown to be highly dependent on final mass concentration, with thermal drying being the largest energy consumer. Scenarios that omit thermal drying in favor of lipid extraction from wet biomass show the most promise for energy efficient biofuel production. Scenarios which used open ponds for cultivation, followed by settling and membrane filtration were the most energy efficient.

  15. Acid-Catalyzed Algal Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Lipid and Carbohydrate-Based Biofuels Production

    DOE PAGES

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Nagle, N.; Davis, R.; ...

    2014-11-12

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. We studied the effect of harvest timing on the conversion yields, using two algal strains; Chlorella and Scenedesmus, generating biomass with distinctive compositionalmore » ratios of protein, carbohydrate, and lipids. We found that the late harvest Scenedesmus biomass had the maximum theoretical biofuel potential at 143 gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) combined fuel yield per dry ton biomass, followed by late harvest Chlorella at 128 GGE per ton. Our experimental data show a clear difference between the two strains, as Scenedesmus was more successfully converted in this process with a demonstrated 97 GGE per ton. Our measurements indicated a release of >90% of the available glucose in the hydrolysate liquors and an extraction and recovery of up to 97% of the fatty acids from wet biomass. Techno-economic analysis for the combined product yields indicates that this process exhibits the potential to improve per-gallon fuel costs by up to 33% compared to a lipids-only process for one strain, Scenedesmus, grown to the mid-point harvest condition.« less

  16. Combinatorial life cycle assessment to inform process design of industrial production of algal biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Brentner, Laura B; Eckelman, Matthew J; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2011-08-15

    The use of algae as a feedstock for biodiesel production is a rapidly growing industry, in the United States and globally. A life cycle assessment (LCA) is presented that compares various methods, either proposed or under development, for algal biodiesel to inform the most promising pathways for sustainable full-scale production. For this analysis, the system is divided into five distinct process steps: (1) microalgae cultivation, (2) harvesting and/or dewatering, (3) lipid extraction, (4) conversion (transesterification) into biodiesel, and (5) byproduct management. A number of technology options are considered for each process step and various technology combinations are assessed for their life cycle environmental impacts. The optimal option for each process step is selected yielding a best case scenario, comprised of a flat panel enclosed photobioreactor and direct transesterification of algal cells with supercritical methanol. For a functional unit of 10 GJ biodiesel, the best case production system yields a cumulative energy demand savings of more than 65 GJ, reduces water consumption by 585 m(3) and decreases greenhouse gas emissions by 86% compared to a base case scenario typical of early industrial practices, highlighting the importance of technological innovation in algae processing and providing guidance on promising production pathways.

  17. Algal productivity and nitrate assimilation in an effluent dominated concrete lined stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kent, R.; Belitz, K.; Burton, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined algal productivity and nitrate assimilation in a 2.85 km reach of Cucamonga Creek, California, a concrete lined channel receiving treated municipal wastewater. Stream nitrate concentrations observed at two stations indicated nearly continuous loss throughout the diel study. Nitrate loss in the reach was approximately 11 mg/L/d or 1.0 g/m2/d as N, most of which occurred during daylight. The peak rate of nitrate loss (1.13 mg/l/hr) occurred just prior to an afternoon total CO2 depletion. Gross primary productivity, as estimated by a model using the observed differences in dissolved oxygen between the two stations, was 228 mg/L/d, or 21 g/m2/d as O2. The observed diel variations in productivity, nitrate loss, pH, dissolved oxygen, and CO2 indicate that nitrate loss was primarily due to algal assimilation. The observed levels of productivity and nitrate assimilation were exceptionally high on a mass per volume basis compared to studies on other streams; these rates occurred because of the shallow stream depth. This study suggests that concrete-lined channels can provide an important environmental service: lowering of nitrate concentrations similar to rates observed in biological treatment systems.

  18. Electrophoretic and antigenic characterisation of Dermatophilus congolensis extracellular products.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, N C; el Jack, M A; McOrist, S; Boid, R

    1997-12-01

    Dermatophilus congolensis is the causative agent of bovine dermatophilosis and lumpy wool in sheep. Two field isolates of D. congolensis, one each from a cow in Ghana and a sheep in Scotland, were cultured for 24-72 h in a synthetic medium based on RPMI-1640. Culture filtrates were examined by SDS-PAGE and considered to contain extracellular products released by growing hyphae and filaments. Electrophoretic profiles of culture filtrates of the two isolates contained common bands and bands that were unique to each isolate. The composition of extracellular products altered with increasing culture periods indicating that specific products were released at different stages of growth. Culture filtrate prepared in the presence of serine protease and metalloprotease inhibitors contained more and better defined bands than that prepared without protease inhibitors indicating the presence of proteases in culture filtrates. Western blot analysis of extracellular products using a panel of sera showed that the two isolates from different host species and distant geographical locations contained cross-reactive antigens. Natural and experimental infections stimulated antibody responses to antigens in culture filtrates, sera from animals that were disease free but in-contact with dermatophilosis-infected animals also contained antibodies to extracellular antigens. The antigens recognised by most sera had molecular weights of 200 kDa in the bovine isolate, 170 kDa in the ovine isolate and 67, 27 and 52-55 kDa in both isolates. The number of antigenic bands of both isolates was positively correlated with the intensity of challenge and the severity of infection: antibodies in sera from disease-free cattle in Ghana recognised more antigens than sera from disease-free sheep in Scotland and more antigens were recognised by sera from chronically-infected Ghanaian cattle than by sera from experimentally-infected calves and sheep. The latter developed antibodies to antigens of 27 and 24 k

  19. Wind-driven interannual variability of sea ice algal production in the western Arctic Chukchi Borderland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, E.; Onodera, J.; Harada, N.; Aita, M. N.; Ishida, A.; Kishi, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal and interannual variability in the biogenic particle sinking flux was recorded using multi-year bottom-tethered sediment trap mooring systems in the Northwind Abyssal Plain (Station NAP: 75° N, 162° W, 1975 m water depth) of the western Arctic Chukchi Borderland. Trapped particle flux at a median depth of 184 m had an obvious peak and dominance of sea ice-related diatom assemblages in August 2011. The observed particle flux was considerably suppressed throughout summer 2012. In the present study, the response of ice algal production and biomass to wind-driven changes in the physical environment was addressed using a pan-Arctic sea ice-ocean modeling approach. A sea ice ecosystem with ice algae was newly incorporated into the lower-trophic marine ecosystem model, which was previously coupled with a high-resolution (i.e., 5 km horizontal grid size) sea ice-ocean general circulation model. Seasonal model experiments covering 2-year mooring periods indicated that primary productivity of ice algae around the Chukchi Borderland depended on basin-scale wind patterns via various processes. Easterly winds in the southern part of a distinct Beaufort High supplied nutrient-rich water for euphotic zones of the NAP region via both surface Ekman transport of Chukchi shelf water and vertical turbulent mixing with underlying nutricline water in 2011. In contrast, northwesterly winds flowing in the northern part of an extended Siberian High transported oligotrophic water within the Beaufort Gyre circulation toward the NAP region in 2012. The modeled ice algal biomass during summer reflected the differences in nutrient distribution. The modeled sinking flux of particulate organic nitrogen (PON) was comparable with the time series obtained from sediment trap data in summer 2011. In contrast, lateral advection of ice algal patches of shelf origin during a great cyclone event may have caused a modeled PON flux bias in 2012. Sensitivity experiments revealed several

  20. AlgaeSim: a model for integrated algal biofuel production and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Ivy L C; Joustra, Caryssa; Prieto, Ana; Bair, Robert; Yeh, Daniel H

    2014-02-01

    AlgaeSim, a dynamic multiple-systems (C, N, P) mass balance model, was developed to explore the potential for algae biomass production from wastewater by coupling two photobioreactors into the main treatment train at a municipal wastewater resource recovery facility (WRRF) in Tampa, Florida. The scoping model examined the synergy between algae cultivation and wastewater treatment through algal growth and substrate removal kinetics, as well as through macroeconomic analyses of biomass conversion to bioproducts. Sensitivity analyses showed that biomass production is strongly dependent on Monod variables and harvesting regime, with sensitivity changing with growth phase. Profitability was sensitive to processing costs and market prices of products. Under scenarios based on current market conditions and typical algae production, AlgaeSim shows that a WRRF can potentially generate significant profit if algae are processed for biodiesel, biogas, or fertilizer. Wastewater resource recovery facilities could similarly save on operating costs resulting from the reduction in aeration (for nitrification) and chemicals (for denitrification).

  1. Comprehensive techno-economic analysis of wastewater-based algal biofuel production: A case study.

    PubMed

    Xin, Chunhua; Addy, Min M; Zhao, Jinyu; Cheng, Yanling; Cheng, Sibo; Mu, Dongyan; Liu, Yuhuan; Ding, Rijia; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Combining algae cultivation and wastewater treatment for biofuel production is considered the feasible way for resource utilization. An updated comprehensive techno-economic analysis method that integrates resources availability into techno-economic analysis was employed to evaluate the wastewater-based algal biofuel production with the consideration of wastewater treatment improvement, greenhouse gases emissions, biofuel production costs, and coproduct utilization. An innovative approach consisting of microalgae cultivation on centrate wastewater, microalgae harvest through flocculation, solar drying of biomass, pyrolysis of biomass to bio-oil, and utilization of co-products, was analyzed and shown to yield profound positive results in comparison with others. The estimated break even selling price of biofuel ($2.23/gallon) is very close to the acceptable level. The approach would have better overall benefits and the internal rate of return would increase up to 18.7% if three critical components, namely cultivation, harvest, and downstream conversion could achieve breakthroughs.

  2. Development of an efficient algal H{sub 2}-production system

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, M.L.; Flynn, T.; Forestier, M.; Seibert, M.

    1998-08-01

    Two major problems facing the development of a commercial photobiological algal H{sub 2}-producing system are the low rates of H{sub 2} evolution and the sensitivity of the H{sub 2}-evolving enzyme system to O{sub 2}, a by-product of the photosynthetic water-splitting process. The objective of this project is to generate O{sub 2}-tolerant mutants from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that are high producers of H{sub 2} for use in a photobiological water-splitting, H{sub 2}-producing system that is cost effective, renewable, scalable, and non-polluting. The authors are currently employing a dual approach to address the O{sub 2}-sensitivity problem. The first approach, based on classical mutagenesis and selection procedures, depends on the ability of a mutagenized population of algal cells to survive under conditions that require them to either produce (H{sub 2}-production selection) or consume (photoreductive selection) H{sub 2} in the presence of controlled amounts of O{sub 2}. The second approach, based on molecular genetic strategies, involves the cloning of the hydrogenase gene from C. reinhardtii and identification of expression factors required for optimal H{sub 2}-evolution activity. The latter approach will complement the first in the future goal of generating a commercial organism suitable for use in the private sector.

  3. Wastewater treatment high rate algal pond biomass for bio-crude oil production.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Abbas; Craggs, Rupert; Farid, Mohammed M

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the production potential of bio-crude from wastewater treatment high rate algal pond (WWT HRAP) biomass in terms of yield, elemental/chemical composition and higher heating value (HHV). Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of the biomass slurry (2.2wt% solid content, 19.7kJ/g HHV) was conducted at a range of temperatures (150-300°C) for one hour. The bio-crude yield and HHV varied in range of 3.1-24.9wt% and 37.5-38.9kJ/g, respectively. The bio-crudes were comprised of 71-72.4wt% carbon, 0.9-4.8wt% nitrogen, 8.7-9.8wt% hydrogen and 12-15.7wt% oxygen. GC-MS analysis indicated that pyrroles, indoles, amides and fatty acids were the most abundant bio-crude compounds. HTL of WWT HRAP biomass resulted, also, in production of 10.5-26wt% water-soluble compounds (containing up to 293mg/L ammonia), 1.0-9.3wt% gas and 44.8-85.5wt% solid residue (12.2-18.1kJ/g). The aqueous phase has a great potential to be used as an ammonia source for further algal cultivation and the solid residue could be used as a process fuel source.

  4. Marine algal natural products with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For their various bioactivities, biomaterials derived from marine algae are important ingredients in many products, such as cosmetics and drugs for treating cancer and other diseases. This mini-review comprehensively compares the bioactivities and biological functions of biomaterials from red, green, brown, and blue-green algae. The anti-oxidative effects and bioactivities of several different crude extracts of algae have been evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Natural products derived from marine algae protect cells by modulating the effects of oxidative stress. Because oxidative stress plays important roles in inflammatory reactions and in carcinogenesis, marine algal natural products have potential for use in anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23724847

  5. Life cycle assessment of biodiesel production from algal bio-crude oils extracted under subcritical water conditions.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Sundaravadivelnathan; Reddy, Harvind Kumar; Muppaneni, Tapaswy; Downes, Cara Meghan; Deng, Shuguang

    2014-10-01

    A life cycle assessment study is performed for the energy requirements and greenhouse gas emissions in an algal biodiesel production system. Subcritical water (SCW) extraction was applied for extracting bio-crude oil from algae, and conventional transesterification method was used for converting the algal oil to biodiesel. 58MJ of energy is required to produce 1kg of biodiesel without any co-products management, of which 36% was spent on cultivation and 56% on lipid extraction. SCW extraction with thermal energy recovery reduces the energy consumption by 3-5 folds when compared to the traditional solvent extraction. It is estimated that 1kg of algal biodiesel fixes about 0.6kg of CO2. An optimized case considering the energy credits from co-products could further reduce the total energy demand. The energy demand for producing 1kg of biodiesel in the optimized case is 28.23MJ.

  6. Pretreated algal bloom as a substantial nutrient source for microalgae cultivation for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Jain, Priyanka; Arora, Neha; Mehtani, Juhi; Pruthi, Vikas; Majumder, C B

    2017-03-28

    In the present investigation, toxic algal bloom, a copious and low-cost nutrient source was deployed for cultivating Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Various pre-treatment methods using combinations of acid/alkali and autoclave/microwave were tested for preparing hydrolysates and compared with minimal media (BG-11). Acid autoclave treatment resulted in maximum carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous content which substantially boosted the growth of the microalgal cells (4.36g/L) as compared to rest of the media. The microalga grown in this media also showed enhanced lipid content (43.2%) and lipid productivity (188mg/L/d) as compared to BG-11 (19.42mg/L/d). The biochemical composition showed 1.6-fold declines in protein while 1.27 folds in carbohydrate content as compared to BG-11. The fatty acid profile revealed the presence of C14-C22 with increased amount of monounsaturated fatty acids as compared to BG-11. The results obtained showed that algal bloom can be used as a potential nutrient source for microalgae.

  7. Quantitative uncertainty analysis of Life Cycle Assessment for algal biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Sills, Deborah L; Paramita, Vidia; Franke, Michael J; Johnson, Michael C; Akabas, Tal M; Greene, Charles H; Tester, Jefferson W

    2013-01-15

    As a result of algae's promise as a renewable energy feedstock, numerous studies have used Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to quantify the environmental performance of algal biofuels, yet there is no consensus of results among them. Our work, motivated by the lack of comprehensive uncertainty analysis in previous studies, uses a Monte Carlo approach to estimate ranges of expected values of LCA metrics by incorporating parameter variability with empirically specified distribution functions. Results show that large uncertainties exist at virtually all steps of the biofuel production process. Although our findings agree with a number of earlier studies on matters such as the need for wet lipid extraction, nutrients recovered from waste streams, and high energy coproducts, the ranges of reported LCA metrics show that uncertainty analysis is crucial for developing technologies, such as algal biofuels. In addition, the ranges of energy return on (energy) invested (EROI) values resulting from our analysis help explain the high variability in EROI values from earlier studies. Reporting results from LCA models as ranges, and not single values, will more reliably inform industry and policy makers on expected energetic and environmental performance of biofuels produced from microalgae.

  8. Fish Sound Production in the Presence of Harmful Algal Blooms in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Carrie C.; Lembke, Chad; Hu, Chuanmin; Mann, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first known research to examine sound production by fishes during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Most fish sound production is species-specific and repetitive, enabling passive acoustic monitoring to identify the distribution and behavior of soniferous species. Autonomous gliders that collect passive acoustic data and environmental data concurrently can be used to establish the oceanographic conditions surrounding sound-producing organisms. Three passive acoustic glider missions were conducted off west-central Florida in October 2011, and September and October 2012. The deployment period for two missions was dictated by the presence of red tide events with the glider path specifically set to encounter toxic Karenia brevis blooms (a.k.a red tides). Oceanographic conditions measured by the glider were significantly correlated to the variation in sounds from six known or suspected species of fish across the three missions with depth consistently being the most significant factor. At the time and space scales of this study, there was no detectable effect of red tide on sound production. Sounds were still recorded within red tide-affected waters from species with overlapping depth ranges. These results suggest that the fishes studied here did not alter their sound production nor migrate out of red tide-affected areas. Although these results are preliminary because of the limited measurements, the data and methods presented here provide a proof of principle and could serve as protocol for future studies on the effects of algal blooms on the behavior of soniferous fishes. To fully capture the effects of episodic events, we suggest that stationary or vertically profiling acoustic recorders and environmental sampling be used as a complement to glider measurements. PMID:25551564

  9. Fish sound production in the presence of harmful algal blooms in the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Wall, Carrie C; Lembke, Chad; Hu, Chuanmin; Mann, David A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first known research to examine sound production by fishes during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Most fish sound production is species-specific and repetitive, enabling passive acoustic monitoring to identify the distribution and behavior of soniferous species. Autonomous gliders that collect passive acoustic data and environmental data concurrently can be used to establish the oceanographic conditions surrounding sound-producing organisms. Three passive acoustic glider missions were conducted off west-central Florida in October 2011, and September and October 2012. The deployment period for two missions was dictated by the presence of red tide events with the glider path specifically set to encounter toxic Karenia brevis blooms (a.k.a red tides). Oceanographic conditions measured by the glider were significantly correlated to the variation in sounds from six known or suspected species of fish across the three missions with depth consistently being the most significant factor. At the time and space scales of this study, there was no detectable effect of red tide on sound production. Sounds were still recorded within red tide-affected waters from species with overlapping depth ranges. These results suggest that the fishes studied here did not alter their sound production nor migrate out of red tide-affected areas. Although these results are preliminary because of the limited measurements, the data and methods presented here provide a proof of principle and could serve as protocol for future studies on the effects of algal blooms on the behavior of soniferous fishes. To fully capture the effects of episodic events, we suggest that stationary or vertically profiling acoustic recorders and environmental sampling be used as a complement to glider measurements.

  10. Extracellular matrix production in vitro in cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Lin; Duan, Li; Zhu, Weimin; Xiong, Jianyi; Wang, Daping

    2014-04-05

    Cartilage tissue engineering is arising as a technique for the repair of cartilage lesions in clinical applications. However, fibrocartilage formation weakened the mechanical functions of the articular, which compromises the clinical outcomes. Due to the low proliferation ability, dedifferentiation property and low production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) of the chondrocytes, the cartilage synthesis in vitro has been one of the major limitations for obtaining high-quality engineered cartilage constructs. This review discusses cells, biomaterial scaffolds and stimulating factors that can facilitate the cartilage-specific ECM production and accumulation in the in vitro culture system. Special emphasis has been put on the factors that affect the production of ECM macromolecules such as collagen type II and proteoglycans in the review, aiming at providing new strategies to improve the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage.

  11. Life cycle assessment and nutrient analysis of various processing pathways in algal biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Mu, Dongyan; Ruan, Roger; Addy, Min; Mack, Sarah; Chen, Paul; Zhou, Yong

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on analyzing nutrient distributions and environmental impacts of nutrient recycling, reusing, and discharging in algal biofuels production. The three biomass conversion pathways compared in this study were: hydrothermal liquefaction technology (HTL), hydrothermal hydrolysis pretreatment +HTL (HTP), and wet lipid extraction (WLE). Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous (C, N, P) flows were described in each pathway. A primary cost analysis was conducted to evaluate the economic performance. The LCA results show that the HTP reduced life cycle NOx emissions by 10% from HTL, but increased fossil fuel use, greenhouse gas emissions, and eutrophication potential by 14%, 5%, and 28% respectively. The cost of per gallon biodiesel produced in HTP was less than in HTL. To further reduce emissions, efforts should be focused on improving nutrient uptake rates in algae cultivation, increasing biomass carbon detention in hydrothermal hydrolysis, and/or enhancing biomass conversion rates in the biooil upgrading processes.

  12. Stimulation of commercial algal biomass production by the use of geothermal water for temperature control

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    The first pilot algal biomass production project to use geothermal water for the maintenance of optimal culture temperatures in Nevada is described. The project was initiated during the fall of 1982 by TAD's Enterprises, Inc., Wabuska (near Yerington), Nevada. The facility was designed to produce Spirulina under conditions that would more than meet the requirements of the United States Food and Drug Administration for sale to the health food market. As a result, the algae were grown in large plastic bags in order to prevent contamination by extraneous organisms. Although this system has not been tuned to its optimum potential, preliminary yields obtained over most of a year indicate not only the feasibility of the project but also a stimulation of daily output yields when compared to the daily growth yields for Spirulina reported by Israel.

  13. Microalgae from domestic wastewater facility's high rate algal pond: Lipids extraction, characterization and biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Drira, Neila; Piras, Alessandra; Rosa, Antonella; Porcedda, Silvia; Dhaouadi, Hatem

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the harvesting of a biomass from a high rate algal pond (HRAP) of a real-scale domestic wastewater treatment facility and its potential as a biomaterial for the production of biodiesel were investigated. Increasing the medium pH to 12 induced high flocculation efficiency of up to 96% of the biomass through both sweep flocculation and charge neutralization. Lipids extracted by ultrasounds from this biomass contained around 70% of fatty acids, with palmitic and stearic acids being the most abundant. The extract obtained by supercritical CO2 contained 86% of fatty acids. Both conventional solvents extracts contained only around 10% of unsaturated fats, whereas supercritical CO2 extract contained more than 40% of unsaturated fatty acids. This same biomass was also subject to direct extractive-transesterification in a microwave reactor to produce fatty acid methyl esters, also known as, raw biodiesel.

  14. Power of Plankton: Effects of Algal Biodiversity on Biocrude Production and Stability.

    PubMed

    Narwani, Anita; Lashaway, Aubrey R; Hietala, David C; Savage, Phillip E; Cardinale, Bradley J

    2016-12-06

    Algae-derived biocrude oil is a possible renewable energy alternative to fossil fuel based crude oil. Outdoor cultivation in raceway ponds is estimated to provide a better return on energy invested than closed photobioreactor systems. However, in these open systems, algal crops are subjected to environmental variation in temperature and irradiance, as well as biotic invasions which can cause costly crop instabilities. In this paper, we used an experimental approach to investigate the ability of species richness to maximize and stabilize biocrude production in the face of weekly temperature fluctuations between 17 and 27 °C, relative to a constant-temperature control. We hypothesized that species richness would lead to higher mean biocrude production and greater stability of biocrude production over time in the variable temperature environment. Counter to our hypothesis, species richness tended to cause a decline in mean biocrude production, regardless of environmental temperature variation. However, biodiversity did have stabilizing effects on biocrude production over time in the variable temperature environment and not in the constant temperature environment. Altogether, our results suggest that when the most productive and stable monoculture is unknown, inoculating raceway ponds with a diverse mixture of algae will tend to ensure stable harvests over time.

  15. Sea-ice algal primary production and nitrogen uptake rates off East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukaerts, Arnout; Cavagna, Anne-Julie; Fripiat, François; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M.; Dehairs, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Antarctic pack ice comprises about 90% of the sea ice in the southern hemisphere and plays an important structuring role in Antarctic marine ecosystems, yet measurements of ice algal primary production and nitrogen uptake rates remain scarce. During the early austral spring of 2012, measurements for primary production rates and uptake of two nitrogen substrates (nitrate and ammonium) were conducted at 5 stations in the East Antarctic pack ice (63-66°S, 115-125°E). Carbon uptake was low (3.52 mg C m-2 d-1) but a trend of increased production was observed towards the end of the voyage suggesting pre-bloom conditions. Significant snow covers reaching, up to 0.8 m, induced strong light limitation. Two different regimes were observed in the ice with primarily nitrate based 'new' production (f-ratio: 0.80-0.95) at the bottom of the ice cover, due to nutrient-replete conditions at the ice-water interface, and common for pre-bloom conditions. In the sea-ice interior, POC:PN ratios (20-70) and higher POC:Chl a ratios suggested the presence of large amounts of detrital material trapped in the ice and here ammonium was the prevailing nitrogen substrate. This suggests that most primary production in the sea-ice interior was regenerated and supported by a microbial food web, recycling detritus.

  16. Characterization of Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum, an algal parasite new to the cryptomycota isolated from an outdoor algal pond used for the production of biofuel.

    PubMed

    Letcher, Peter M; Lopez, Salvador; Schmieder, Robert; Lee, Philip A; Behnke, Craig; Powell, Martha J; McBride, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Mass culture of algae for the production of biofuels is a developing technology designed to offset the depletion of fossil fuel reserves. However, large scale culture of algae in open ponds can be challenging because of incidences of infestation with algal parasites. Without knowledge of the identity of the specific parasite and how to control these pests, algal-based biofuel production will be limited. We have characterized a eukaryotic parasite of Scenedesmus dimorphus growing in outdoor ponds used for biofuel production. We demonstrated that as the genomic DNA of parasite FD01 increases, the concentration of S. dimorphus cells decreases; consequently, this is a highly destructive pathogen. Techniques for culture of the parasite and host were developed, and the endoparasite was identified as the Aphelidea, Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum. Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal sequences revealed that parasite FD01 placed within the recently described Cryptomycota, a poorly known phylum based on two species of Rozella and environmental samples. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that aplanospores of the parasite produced filose pseudopodia, which contained fine fibers the diameter of actin microfilaments. Multiple lipid globules clustered and were associated with microbodies, mitochondria and a membrane cisternae, an arrangement characteristic of the microbody-lipid globule complex of chytrid zoospores. After encystment and attachment to the host cells, the parasite injected its protoplast into the host between the host cell wall and plasma membrane. At maturity the unwalled parasite occupied the entire host cell. After cleavage of the protoplast into aplanospores, a vacuole and lipids remained in the host cell. Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum isolate FD01 is characteristic of the original description of this species and is different from strain X-5 recently characterized. Our results help put a face on the Cryptomycota, revealing that the phylum is more

  17. Characterization of Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum, an Algal Parasite New to the Cryptomycota Isolated from an Outdoor Algal Pond Used for the Production of Biofuel

    PubMed Central

    Letcher, Peter M.; Lopez, Salvador; Schmieder, Robert; Lee, Philip A.; Behnke, Craig; Powell, Martha J.; McBride, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Mass culture of algae for the production of biofuels is a developing technology designed to offset the depletion of fossil fuel reserves. However, large scale culture of algae in open ponds can be challenging because of incidences of infestation with algal parasites. Without knowledge of the identity of the specific parasite and how to control these pests, algal-based biofuel production will be limited. We have characterized a eukaryotic parasite of Scenedesmus dimorphus growing in outdoor ponds used for biofuel production. We demonstrated that as the genomic DNA of parasite FD01 increases, the concentration of S. dimorphus cells decreases; consequently, this is a highly destructive pathogen. Techniques for culture of the parasite and host were developed, and the endoparasite was identified as the Aphelidea, Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum. Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal sequences revealed that parasite FD01 placed within the recently described Cryptomycota, a poorly known phylum based on two species of Rozella and environmental samples. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that aplanospores of the parasite produced filose pseudopodia, which contained fine fibers the diameter of actin microfilaments. Multiple lipid globules clustered and were associated with microbodies, mitochondria and a membrane cisternae, an arrangement characteristic of the microbody-lipid globule complex of chytrid zoospores. After encystment and attachment to the host cells, the parasite injected its protoplast into the host between the host cell wall and plasma membrane. At maturity the unwalled parasite occupied the entire host cell. After cleavage of the protoplast into aplanospores, a vacuole and lipids remained in the host cell. Amoeboaphelidium protococcarum isolate FD01 is characteristic of the original description of this species and is different from strain X-5 recently characterized. Our results help put a face on the Cryptomycota, revealing that the phylum is more

  18. Simplifying biodiesel production: the direct or 'in situ' transesterification of algal biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ‘in situ’ esterification/transesterification of algal biomass lipids to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), for potential use as biodiesel, was investigated. Commercial algal biomass was employed, containing 20.9 wt percent hexane extractable oil. This consisted of 35.1 wt percent free fa...

  19. Renewable sustainable biocatalyzed electricity production in a photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell (PAMFC).

    PubMed

    Strik, David P B T B; Terlouw, Hilde; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2008-12-01

    Electricity production via solar energy capturing by living higher plants and microalgae in combination with microbial fuel cells are attractive because these systems promise to generate useful energy in a renewable, sustainable, and efficient manner. This study describes the proof of principle of a photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell (PAMFC) based on naturally selected algae and electrochemically active microorganisms in an open system and without addition of instable or toxic mediators. The developed solar-powered PAMFC produced continuously over 100 days renewable biocatalyzed electricity. The sustainable performance of the PAMFC resulted in a maximum current density of 539 mA/m2 projected anode surface area and a maximum power production of 110 mW/m2 surface area photobioreactor. The energy recovery of the PAMFC can be increased by optimization of the photobioreactor, by reducing the competition from non-electrochemically active microorganisms, by increasing the electrode surface and establishment of a further-enriched biofilm. Since the objective is to produce net renewable energy with algae, future research should also focus on the development of low energy input PAMFCs. This is because current algae production systems have energy inputs similar to the energy present in the outcoming valuable products.

  20. Production of extracellular water-insoluble polysaccharide from Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian-Dong; Qiu, Ji Qing

    2012-05-16

    Curdlan is a microbial polysaccharide composed exclusively of β-(1,3)-linked glucose residues. Until now only bacteria belonging to the Alcaligenes and Agrobacterium species have been reported to produce Curdlan. In this study, a bacterium capable of producing extracellular Curdlan, identified as Pseudomonas sp. on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequencing, was isolated from soil samples. From the HPLC, permethylation linkage analysis, (13)C NMR, and FT-IR analytical data, the polysaccharide consisted exclusively of glucose; the most prominent sugar was 1,3-linked glucose, and most glycosidic bonds joining these sugar residues were of the β-type. This also supported that the exopolysaccharide produced by Pseudomonas sp. was actually Curdlan. In addition, the Pseudomonas sp. was studied for the production of Curdlan by conventional "one-factor-at-a-time technique" and response surface methodology (RSM). It was observed that glucose and yeast extract were the most suitable carbon source and nitrogen source for Curdlan production, respectively. By using RSM, Curdlan production was increased significantly by 188%, from 1.25 to 2.35 g/L, when the strain was cultivated in the optimal condition developed by RSM, and the highest Curdlan production rate of 0.81 g/(L h) was obtained. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on Curdlan production by Pseudomonas sp.

  1. Rotating algal biofilm reactor and spool harvester for wastewater treatment with biofuels by-products.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Logan B; Sims, Ronald C

    2012-07-01

    Maximizing algae production in a wastewater treatment process can aid in the reduction of soluble nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in the wastewater. If harvested, the algae-based biomass offers the added benefit as feedstock for the production of biofuels and bioproducts. However, difficulties in harvesting, concentrating, and dewatering the algae-based biomass have limited the development of an economically feasible treatment and production process. When algae-based biomass is grown as a surface attached biofilm as opposed to a suspended culture, the biomass is naturally concentrated and more easily harvested. This can lead to less expensive removal of the biomass from wastewater, and less expensive downstream processing in the production of biofuels and bioproducts. In this study, a novel rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) was designed, built, and tested at bench (8 L), medium (535 L), and pilot (8,000 L) scales. The RABR was designed to operate in the photoautotrophic conditions of open tertiary wastewater treatment, producing mixed culture biofilms made up of algae and bacteria. Growth substrata were evaluated for attachment and biofilm formation, and an effective substratum was discovered. The RABR achieved effective nutrient reduction, with average removal rates of 2.1 and 14.1 g m(-2) day(-1) for total dissolved phosphorus and total dissolved nitrogen, respectively. Biomass production ranged from 5.5 g m(-2) day(-1) at bench scale to as high as 31 g m(-2) day(-1) at pilot scale. An efficient spool harvesting technique was also developed at bench and medium scales to obtain a concentrated product (12-16% solids) suitable for further processing in the production of biofuels and bioproducts.

  2. Production and characterization of an extracellular lipase from Candida guilliermondii

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Anne Caroline Defranceschi; Fernandes, Maria Luiza; Mariano, André Bellin

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular lipases from the endophytic yeast Candida guilliermondii isolated from castor leaves (Ricinus communis L.) were produced using low-cost raw materials such as agro-industrial residues and applying them in the esterification of oleic acid for evaluating their potential use in biodiesel production. After partial purification using ammonium sulfate, the enzyme was characterized and presented higher activity (26.8 ± 1.5 U mL−1) in the presence of 5 mmol L−1 NaCl at 30 °C and pH 6.5. The production through submerged fermentation was formerly performed in 150 mL erlenmeyer flasks and, once the enzyme production was verified, assays in a 14 L bioreactor were conducted, obtaining 18 ± 1.4 U mL−1. The produced enzyme was applied in the oleic acid esterification under different solvents: hexane, cyclohexane or cyclohexanone) and different acid:alcohol molar ratios. Higher ester conversion rate (81%) was obtained using hexane and the molar ratio of 1:9 was the best conditions using methanol. The results suggest the potential for development of endophytic yeast in the production of biocatalyst through submerged fermentation using agroindustrial residues as culture medium. PMID:25763060

  3. High yield production of extracellular recombinant levansucrase by Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Korneli, Claudia; Biedendieck, Rebekka; David, Florian; Jahn, Dieter; Wittmann, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a high yield production bioprocess with recombinant Bacillus megaterium for the production of the extracellular enzyme levansucrase (SacB) was developed. For basic optimization of culture parameters and nutrients, a recombinant B. megaterium reporter strain that produced green fluorescent protein under control of a vector-based xylose-inducible promoter was used. It enabled efficient microtiter plate-based screening via fluorescence analysis. A pH value of pH 6, 20 % of dissolved oxygen, 37 °C, and elevated levels of biotin (100 μg L(-1)) were found optimal with regard to high protein yield and reduced overflow metabolism. Among the different compounds tested, fructose and glycerol were identified as the preferred source of carbon. Subsequently, the settings were transferred to a B. megaterium strain recombinantly producing levansucrase SacB based on the plasmid-located xylose-inducible expression system. In shake flask culture under the optimized conditions, the novel strain already secreted the target enzyme in high amounts (14 U mL(-1) on fructose and 17.2 U mL(-1) on glycerol). This was further increased in high cell density fed-batch processes up to 55 U mL(-1), reflecting a levansucrase concentration of 0.52 g L(-1). This is 100-fold more than previous efforts for this enzyme in B. megaterium and more than 10-fold higher than reported values of other extracellular protein produced in this microorganism so far. The recombinant strain could also handle raw glycerol from biodiesel industry which provided the same amount and quality of the recombinant protein and suggests future implementation into existing biorefinery concepts.

  4. Coral–algal phase shifts alter fish communities and reduce fisheries production

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Cameron H; Mumby, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic stress has been shown to reduce coral coverage in ecosystems all over the world. A phase shift towards an algae-dominated system may accompany coral loss. In this case, the composition of the reef-associated fish assemblage will change and human communities relying on reef fisheries for income and food security may be negatively impacted. We present a case study based on the Raja Ampat Archipelago in Eastern Indonesia. Using a dynamic food web model, we simulate the loss of coral reefs with accompanied transition towards an algae-dominated state and quantify the likely change in fish populations and fisheries productivity. One set of simulations represents extreme scenarios, including 100% loss of coral. In this experiment, ecosystem changes are driven by coral loss itself and a degree of habitat dependency by reef fish is assumed. An alternative simulation is presented without assumed habitat dependency, where changes to the ecosystem are driven by historical observations of reef fish communities when coral is lost. The coral–algal phase shift results in reduced biodiversity and ecosystem maturity. Relative increases in the biomass of small-bodied fish species mean higher productivity on reefs overall, but much reduced landings of traditionally targeted species. PMID:24953835

  5. Oil crop biomass residue-based media for enhanced algal lipid production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Ma, Xiaochen; Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Cheng, Yanling; Chen, Paul; Shi, Jian; Wang, Qin; Liu, Yuhuan; Ruan, Roger

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of hydrolysates from acid hydrolysis of four different oil crop biomass residues (OCBR) as low cost culture media for algae growth. The one-factor-at-a-time method was used to design a series of experiments to optimize the acid hydrolysis conditions through examining the total nitrogen, total phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand, and ammonia nitrogen in the hydrolysates. The optimal conditions were found to be using 3% sulfuric acid and hydrolyzing residues at 90 °C for 20 h. The hydrolysates (OCBR media) produced under the optimal conditions were used to cultivate the two algae strains, namely UM258 and UM268. The results from 5 days of cultivation showed that the OCBR media supported faster algae growth with maximal algal biomass yield of 2.7 and 3 g/L, respectively. Moreover, the total lipids for UM258 and UM268 were 54 and 35%, respectively, after 5 days of cultivation, which suggested that the OCBR media allowed the algae strains to accumulate higher lipids probably due to high C/N ratio. Furthermore, over 3% of omega-3 fatty acid (EPA) was produced for the two algae strains. In conclusion, OCBR media are excellent alternative for algae growth and have a great potential for large-scale production of algae-based ingredients for biodiesel as well as high-value food and pharmaceutical products.

  6. Biodiesel production potential of wastewater treatment high rate algal pond biomass.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Abbas; Craggs, Rupert; Farid, Mohammed M

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the year-round production potential and quality of biodiesel from wastewater treatment high rate algal pond (WWT HRAP) biomass and how it is affected by CO2 addition to the culture. The mean monthly pond biomass and lipid productivities varied between 2.0±0.3 and 11.1±2.5gVSS/m(2)/d, and between 0.5±0.1 and 2.6±1.1g/m(2)/d, respectively. The biomass fatty acid methyl esters were highly complex which led to produce low-quality biodiesel so that it cannot be used directly as a transportation fuel. Overall, 0.9±0.1g/m(2)/d (3.2±0.5ton/ha/year) low-quality biodiesel could be produced from WWT HRAP biomass which could be further increased to 1.1±0.1g/m(2)/d (4.0ton/ha/year) by lowering culture pH to 6-7 during warm summer months. CO2 addition, had little effect on both the biomass lipid content and profile and consequently did not change the quality of biodiesel.

  7. Coral-algal phase shifts alter fish communities and reduce fisheries production.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Cameron H; Mumby, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic stress has been shown to reduce coral coverage in ecosystems all over the world. A phase shift towards an algae-dominated system may accompany coral loss. In this case, the composition of the reef-associated fish assemblage will change and human communities relying on reef fisheries for income and food security may be negatively impacted. We present a case study based on the Raja Ampat Archipelago in Eastern Indonesia. Using a dynamic food web model, we simulate the loss of coral reefs with accompanied transition towards an algae-dominated state and quantify the likely change in fish populations and fisheries productivity. One set of simulations represents extreme scenarios, including 100% loss of coral. In this experiment, ecosystem changes are driven by coral loss itself and a degree of habitat dependency by reef fish is assumed. An alternative simulation is presented without assumed habitat dependency, where changes to the ecosystem are driven by historical observations of reef fish communities when coral is lost. The coral-algal phase shift results in reduced biodiversity and ecosystem maturity. Relative increases in the biomass of small-bodied fish species mean higher productivity on reefs overall, but much reduced landings of traditionally targeted species.

  8. Substrate dependent production of extracellular biosurfactant by a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Das, Palashpriya; Mukherjee, Soumen; Sen, Ramkrishna

    2009-01-01

    The potential of a marine microorganism to utilize different carbon substrates for the production of an extracellular biosurfactant was evaluated. Among the several carbon substrates tested for this purpose, production of the crude biosurfactant was found to be highest with glycerol (2.9+/-0.11 g L(-1)) followed by starch (2.5+/-0.11 g L(-1)), glucose (1.16+/-0.11 g L(-1)) and sucrose (0.94+/-0.07 g L(-1)). The crude biosurfactant obtained from glycerol, starch and sucrose media had significantly higher antimicrobial action than those obtained from glucose containing medium. RP-HPLC resolved the crude biosurfactants into several fractions one of which had significant antimicrobial action. The antimicrobial fraction was found in higher concentrations in biosurfactant obtained using glycerol, starch and sucrose as compared to the biosurfactants from glucose medium, thereby explaining higher antimicrobial activity. The carbon substrate was thus found to affect biosurfactant production both in a qualitative and quantitative manner.

  9. Process development for the production of bioethanol from waste algal biomass of Gracilaria verrucosa.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Rishikesh; Kumar, Manoj; Chakraborty, Subhojit; Gupta, Rishi; Kumar, Savindra; Sahoo, Dinabandhu; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2016-11-01

    The algal biomass of different species of Gracilaria were collected from coasts of Orissa and Tamil Nadu, India and characterized biochemically. Among various species, G. verrucosa was found to be better in terms of total carbohydrate content (56.65%) and hence selected for further studies. The agar was extracted from algal biomass and the residual pulp was enzymatically hydrolyzed. The optimization of algal pulp hydrolysis for various parameters revealed a maximum sugar release of 75.8mg/ml with 63% saccharification yield. The fermentation of enzymatic hydrolysate of algal pulp was optimized and 8% (v/v) inoculum size, 12h inoculum age, pH 5.0 were found to be optimum parameters for maximum ethanol concentration (27.2g/L) after 12h. The process of enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation were successfully scaled up to 2L bioreactor scale.

  10. Maximizing Productivity and Reducing Environmental Impacts of Full-Scale Algal Production through Optimization of Open Pond Depth and Hydraulic Retention Time.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Quentin; Shilton, Andy; Guieysse, Benoit

    2016-04-05

    The ability to dynamically control algal raceway ponds to maximize biomass productivity and reduce environmental impacts (e.g., land and water use) with consideration of local constraints (e.g., water availability and climatic conditions) is an important consideration in algal biotechnology. This paper presents a novel optimization strategy that seeks to maximize growth (i.e., optimize land use), minimize respiration losses, and minimize water demand through regular adjustment of pond depth and hydraulic retention time (HRT) in response to seasonal changes. To evaluate the efficiency of this strategy, algal productivity and water demand were simulated in five different climatic regions. In comparison to the standard approach (constant and location-independent depth and HRT), dynamic control of depth and HRT was shown to increase productivity by 0.6-9.9% while decreasing water demand by 10-61% depending upon the location considered (corresponding to a decrease in the water footprint of 19-62%). Interestingly, when the fact that the water demand was limited to twice the local annual rainfall was added as a constraint, higher net productivities were predicted in temperate and tropical climates (15.7 and 16.7 g m(-2) day(-1), respectively) than in Mediterranean and subtropical climates (13.0 and 9.7 g m(-2) day(-1), respectively), while algal cultivation was not economically feasible in arid climates. Using dynamic control for a full-scale operation by adjusting for local climatic conditions and water constraints can notably affect algal productivity. It is clear that future assessments of algal cultivation feasibility should implement locally optimized dynamic process control.

  11. Direct utilization of waste water algal biomass for ethanol production by cellulolytic Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183.

    PubMed

    Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Sanitha, Mary; Kumar, Thangarathinam; Iyappan, Sellamuthu; Ramya, Mohandass

    2016-02-01

    Direct bioconversion of waste water algal biomass into ethanol using Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183 was demonstrated in this study. Fermentation of 2% (w/v) autoclaved algal biomass produced ethanol concentration of 0.52 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.19 g/g) where as fermentation of acid pretreated algal biomass (2%, w/v) produced ethanol concentration of 4.6 g L(-1) in GS2 media (solvent yield of 0.26 g/g). The control experiment with 2% (w/v) glucose in GS2 media produced ethanol concentration of 2.8 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.25 g/g). The microalgal strains from waste water algal biomass were identified as Chlamydomonas dorsoventralis, Graesiella emersonii, Coelastrum proboscideum, Scenedesmus obliquus, Micractinium sp., Desmodesmus sp., and Chlorella sp., based on ITS-2 molecular marker. The presence of glucose, galactose, xylose and rhamnose were detected by high performance liquid chromatography in the algal biomass. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of fermentation samples showed characteristic morphological changes in algal cells and bioaccessibility of C. phytofermentans.

  12. Simultaneous wastewater treatment, electricity generation and biomass production by an immobilized photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    He, Huanhuan; Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Hu, Youshuang; Zhao, Yingying

    2014-05-01

    A photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell (PAMFC) was constructed by the introduction of immobilized microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) into the cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells to fulfill electricity generation, biomass production and wastewater treatment. The immobilization conditions, including the concentration of immobilized matrix, initial inoculation concentration and cross-linking time, were investigated both for the growth of C. vulgaris and power generation. It performed the best at 5 % sodium alginate and 2 % calcium chloride as immobilization matrix, initial inoculation concentration of 10(6) cell/mL and cross-linking time of 4 h. Our findings indicated that C. vulgaris immobilization was an effective and promising approach to improve the performance of PAMFC, and after optimization the power density and Coulombic efficiency improved by 258 and 88.4 %, respectively. Important parameters such as temperature and light intensity were optimized on the performance. PAMFC could achieve a COD removal efficiency of 92.1 %, and simultaneously the maximum power density reached 2,572.8 mW/m(3) and the Coulombic efficiency was 14.1 %, under the light intensity of 5,000 lux and temperature at 25 °C.

  13. Antigenicity of Streptococcus agalactiae extracellular products and vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, D J; Evans, J J; Panangala, V S; Klesius, P H; Shelby, R A; Shoemaker, C A

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major bacterial pathogen that is the cause of serious economic losses in many species of freshwater, marine and estuarine fish worldwide. A highly efficacious S. agalactiae vaccine was developed using extracellular products (ECP) and formalin-killed whole cells of S. agalactiae. The vaccine efficacy following storage of S. agalactiae ECP and formalin-killed S. agalactiae cells at 4 degrees C for 1 year was determined. The stored ECP containing S. agalactiae formalin-killed cells failed to prevent morbidity and mortality among the vaccinated fish, and the relative percentage survival was 29. Serum antibody responses of the stored ECP and freshly prepared ECP against soluble whole cell extract of S. agalactiae indicated that significantly less antibody was produced in fish immunized with stored ECP and S. agalactiae cells than in those fish immunized with freshly prepared ECP and S. agalactiae cells at day 31 post-vaccination. Silver staining of sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gels and immunostaining of Western blots with tilapia antiserum to S. agalactiae revealed that predominant 54 and 55 kDa bands were present in the freshly prepared ECP fraction. The 55 kDa band was absent from the stored ECP and new bands below 54 kDa appeared on the Western blot. The results of this study on S. agalactiae ECP provide evidence for a correlation between protection and antibody production to ECP and for the importance of the 55 kDa ECP antigen for vaccine efficacy.

  14. Algal photosynthesis as the primary driver for a sustainable development in energy, feed, and food production.

    PubMed

    Anemaet, Ida G; Bekker, Martijn; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2010-11-01

    High oil prices and global warming that accompany the use of fossil fuels are an incentive to find alternative forms of energy supply. Photosynthetic biofuel production represents one of these since for this, one uses renewable resources. Sunlight is used for the conversion of water and CO₂ into biomass. Two strategies are used in parallel: plant-based production via sugar fermentation into ethanol and biodiesel production through transesterification. Both, however, exacerbate other problems, including regional nutrient balancing and the world's food supply, and suffer from the modest efficiency of photosynthesis. Maximizing the efficiency of natural and engineered photosynthesis is therefore of utmost importance. Algal photosynthesis is the system of choice for this particularly for energy applications. Complete conversion of CO₂ into biomass is not necessary for this. Innovative methods of synthetic biology allow one to combine photosynthetic and fermentative metabolism via the so-called Photanol approach to form biofuel directly from Calvin cycle intermediates through use of the naturally transformable cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Beyond providing transport energy and chemical feedstocks, photosynthesis will continue to be used for food and feed applications. Also for this application, arguments of efficiency will become more and more important as the size of the world population continues to increase. Photosynthetic cells can be used for food applications in various innovative forms, e.g., as a substitute for the fish proteins in the diet supplied to carnivorous fish or perhaps--after acid hydrolysis--as a complex, animal-free serum for growth of mammalian cells in vitro.

  15. Algal Photosynthesis as the Primary Driver for a Sustainable Development in Energy, Feed, and Food Production

    PubMed Central

    Anemaet, Ida G.; Bekker, Martijn

    2010-01-01

    High oil prices and global warming that accompany the use of fossil fuels are an incentive to find alternative forms of energy supply. Photosynthetic biofuel production represents one of these since for this, one uses renewable resources. Sunlight is used for the conversion of water and CO2 into biomass. Two strategies are used in parallel: plant-based production via sugar fermentation into ethanol and biodiesel production through transesterification. Both, however, exacerbate other problems, including regional nutrient balancing and the world's food supply, and suffer from the modest efficiency of photosynthesis. Maximizing the efficiency of natural and engineered photosynthesis is therefore of utmost importance. Algal photosynthesis is the system of choice for this particularly for energy applications. Complete conversion of CO2 into biomass is not necessary for this. Innovative methods of synthetic biology allow one to combine photosynthetic and fermentative metabolism via the so-called Photanol approach to form biofuel directly from Calvin cycle intermediates through use of the naturally transformable cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Beyond providing transport energy and chemical feedstocks, photosynthesis will continue to be used for food and feed applications. Also for this application, arguments of efficiency will become more and more important as the size of the world population continues to increase. Photosynthetic cells can be used for food applications in various innovative forms, e.g., as a substitute for the fish proteins in the diet supplied to carnivorous fish or perhaps—after acid hydrolysis—as a complex, animal-free serum for growth of mammalian cells in vitro. PMID:20640935

  16. Using wastewater and high-rate algal ponds for nutrient removal and the production of bioenergy and biofuels.

    PubMed

    Batten, David; Beer, Tom; Freischmidt, George; Grant, Tim; Liffman, Kurt; Paterson, David; Priestley, Tony; Rye, Lucas; Threlfall, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This paper projects a positive outcome for large-scale algal biofuel and energy production when wastewater treatment is the primary goal. Such a view arises partly from a recent change in emphasis in wastewater treatment technology, from simply oxidising the organic matter in the waste (i.e. removing the biological oxygen demand) to removing the nutrients - specifically nitrogen and phosphorus - which are the root cause of eutrophication of inland waterways and coastal zones. A growing need for nutrient removal greatly improves the prospects for using new algal ponds in wastewater treatment, since microalgae are particularly efficient in capturing and removing such nutrients. Using a spreadsheet model, four scenarios combining algae biomass production with the making of biodiesel, biogas and other products were assessed for two of Australia's largest wastewater treatment plants. The results showed that super critical water reactors and anaerobic digesters could be attractive pathway options, the latter providing significant savings in greenhouse gas emissions. Combining anaerobic digestion with oil extraction and the internal economies derived from cheap land and recycling of water and nutrients on-site could allow algal oil to be produced for less than US$1 per litre.

  17. Enhanced energy conversion efficiency from high strength synthetic organic wastewater by sequential dark fermentative hydrogen production and algal lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hong-Yu; Liu, Bing-Feng; Kong, Fanying; Zhao, Lei; Xing, Defeng; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2014-04-01

    A two-stage process of sequential dark fermentative hydrogen production and microalgal cultivation was applied to enhance the energy conversion efficiency from high strength synthetic organic wastewater. Ethanol fermentation bacterium Ethanoligenens harbinense B49 was used as hydrogen producer, and the energy conversion efficiency and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency reached 18.6% and 28.3% in dark fermentation. Acetate was the main soluble product in dark fermentative effluent, which was further utilized by microalga Scenedesmus sp. R-16. The final algal biomass concentration reached 1.98gL(-1), and the algal biomass was rich in lipid (40.9%) and low in protein (23.3%) and carbohydrate (11.9%). Compared with single dark fermentation stage, the energy conversion efficiency and COD removal efficiency of two-stage system remarkably increased 101% and 131%, respectively. This research provides a new approach for efficient energy production and wastewater treatment using a two-stage process combining dark fermentation and algal cultivation.

  18. Quercetin Attenuates Lactate Production and Extracellular Matrix Secretion in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    McKay, T. B.; Lyon, D.; Sarker-Nag, A.; Priyadarsini, S.; Asara, J. M.; Karamichos, D.

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus(KC) is an ecstatic corneal disease leading to corneal-thinning and the formation of a cone-like cornea. Elevated lactate levels, increased oxidative stress, and myofibroblast formation have all been previously reported. In the current study, we assess the role of Quercetin on collagen secretion and myofibroblast formation in KC in vitro. Human corneal fibroblasts(HCFs) and human keratoconus cells(HKCs) were treated with a stable Vitamin C derivative and cultured for 4 weeks, stimulating formation of a self-assembled extracellular matrix. All samples were analyzed using Western blots and targeted tandem mass spectrometry. Our data showed that Quercetin significantly down regulates myofibroblast differentiation and fibrotic markers, such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Collagen III (Col III), in both HCFs and HKCs. Collagen III secretion was reduced 80% in both HCFs and HKCs following Quercetin treatment. Furthermore, Quercetin reduced lactate production by HKCs to normal HCF levels. Quercetin down regulated TGF-βR2 and TGF-β2 expression in HKCs suggesting a significant link to the TGF-β pathway. These results assert that Quercetin is a key regulator of fibrotic markers and ECM assembly by modulating cellular metabolism and TGF-β signaling. Our study suggests that Quercetin is a potential therapeutic for treatment of corneal dystrophies, such as KC. PMID:25758533

  19. Effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, bound extracellular polymeric substances and microcystin production of Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Xun; Wang, Peifang; Chen, Bin; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Yang, Yangyang

    2016-10-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have occurred in various water bodies during recent decades and made serious health hazards to plants, animals and humans. Iron is an important micronutrient for algal growth and recently, the concentration of which has increased remarkably in freshwaters. In this paper, the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 was cultivated under non-iron (0μM), iron-limited (10μM) and iron-replete (100μM) conditions to investigate the effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, EPS and microcystin production. The results showed that algal cell density and chlorophyll-a content were maximal at the highest iron concentration. Antioxidant enzymes activity increased notably under all three conditions in the early stage of experiment, of which the SOD activity recovered soon from oxidative stress in 10μM group. The productions of some protein-like substances and humic acid-like substances of bound EPS were inhibited in iron-containing groups in the early stage of experiment while promoted after the adaptation period of Microcystis aeruginosa. Iron addition is a factor affecting the formation of cyanobacterial blooms through its impact on the content of LB-EPS and the composition of TB-EPS. The intracellular MC-LR concentration and the productivity potential of MC-LR were the lowest in 0μM group and highest in 10μM group. No obvious extracellular release of MC-LR was observed during the cultivation time. Therefore, iron addition can promote the physiological activities of M. aeruginosa, but a greater harm could be brought into environment under iron-limited (10μM) condition than under iron-replete (100μM) condition.

  20. Evaluating the relative impacts of operational and financial factors on the competitiveness of an algal biofuel production facility.

    PubMed

    Hise, Adam M; Characklis, Gregory W; Kern, Jordan; Gerlach, Robin; Viamajala, Sridhar; Gardner, Robert D; Vadlamani, Agasteswar

    2016-11-01

    Algal biofuels are becoming more economically competitive due to technological advances and government subsidies offering tax benefits and lower cost financing. These factors are linked, however, as the value of technical advances is affected by modeling assumptions regarding the growth conditions, process design, and financing of the production facility into which novel techniques are incorporated. Two such techniques, related to algal growth and dewatering, are evaluated in representative operating and financing scenarios using an integrated techno-economic model. Results suggest that these techniques can be valuable under specified conditions, but also that investment subsidies influence cost competitive facility design by incentivizing development of more capital intensive facilities (e.g., favoring hydrothermal liquefaction over transesterification-based facilities). Evaluating novel techniques under a variety of operational and financial scenarios highlights the set of site-specific conditions in which technical advances are most valuable, while also demonstrating the influence of subsidies linked to capital intensity.

  1. Harmful Algal Blooms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.

    2007-01-01

    What are Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)? Freshwater and marine harmful algal blooms (HABs) can occur anytime water use is impaired due to excessive accumulations of algae. HAB occurrence is affected by a complex set of physical, chemical, biological, hydrological, and meteorological conditions making it difficult to isolate specific causative environmental factors. Potential impairments include reduction in water quality, accumulation of malodorous scums in beach areas, algal production of toxins potent enough to poison both aquatic and terrestrial organisms, and algal production of taste-and-odor compounds that cause unpalatable drinking water and fish. HABs are a global problem, and toxic freshwater and (or) marine algae have been implicated in human and animal illness and death in over 45 countries worldwide and in at least 27 U.S. States (Yoo and others, 1995; Chorus and Bartram, 1999; Huisman and others, 2005).

  2. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound.

  3. Producing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich algae from biodiesel-derived crude glycerol: effects of impurities on DHA production and algal biomass composition.

    PubMed

    Pyle, Denver J; Garcia, Rafael A; Wen, Zhiyou

    2008-06-11

    Crude glycerol is the primary byproduct of the biodiesel industry. Producing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) through fermentation of the alga Schizochytrium limacinum on crude glycerol provides a unique opportunity to utilize a large quantity of this byproduct. The objective of this work is to investigate the effects of impurities contained in the crude glycerol on DHA production and algal biomass composition. Crude glycerol streams were obtained from different biodiesel refineries. All of the glycerol samples contained methanol, soaps, and various elements including calcium, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, sodium, and zinc. Both methanol and soap were found to negatively influence algal DHA production; these two impurities can be removed from culture medium by evaporation through autoclaving (for methanol) and by precipitation through pH adjustment (for soap). The glycerol-derived algal biomass contained 45-50% lipid, 14-20% protein, and 25% carbohydrate, with 8-13% ash content. Palmitic acid (C16:0) and DHA were the two major fatty acids in the algal lipid. The algal biomass was rich in lysine and cysteine, relative to many common feedstuffs. Elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma showed that boron, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, sodium, and sulfur were present in the biomass, whereas no heavy metals (such as mercury) were detected in the algal biomass. Overall, the results show that crude glycerol was a suitable carbon source for algal fermentation. The crude glycerol-derived algal biomass had a high level of DHA and a nutritional profile similar to that of commercial algal biomass, suggesting a great potential for using crude glycerol-derived algae in omega-3-fortified food or feed.

  4. Algal turf scrubbers: Periphyton production and nutrient recovery on a South Florida citrus farm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a strong need to develop strategies that reduce nutrient loading to Florida’s waters. The purpose of this study was to investigate the nutrient-removing ability and growth rate of periphyton, grown on an Algal Turf Scrubber (ATSTM) that received runoff from a citrus orchard operated by the ...

  5. Effects of algal-derived carbon on sediment methane production in a eutrophic Ohio reservoir

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient loading is known to have adverse consequences for aquatic ecosystems, particularly in the form of algal blooms that may result. These blooms pose problems for humans and wildlife, including harmful toxin release, aquatic hypoxia and increased costs for water treatment. A...

  6. Swine manure-based pilot-scale algal biomass production system for fuel production and wastewater treatment--a case study.

    PubMed

    Min, Min; Hu, Bing; Mohr, Michael J; Shi, Aimin; Ding, Jinfeng; Sun, Yong; Jiang, Yongcheng; Fu, Zongqiang; Griffith, Richard; Hussain, Fida; Mu, Dongyan; Nie, Yong; Chen, Paul; Zhou, Wenguang; Ruan, Roger

    2014-02-01

    Integration of wastewater treatment with algae cultivation is one of the promising ways to achieve an economically viable and environmentally sustainable algal biofuel production on a commercial scale. This study focused on pilot-scale algal biomass production system development, cultivation process optimization, and integration with swine manure wastewater treatment. The areal algal biomass productivity for the cultivation system that we developed ranged from 8.08 to 14.59 and 19.15-23.19 g/m(2) × day, based on ash-free dry weight and total suspended solid (TSS), respectively, which were higher than or comparable with those in literature. The harvested algal biomass had lipid content about 1.77-3.55%, which was relatively low, but could be converted to bio-oil via fast microwave-assisted pyrolysis system developed in our lab. The lipids in the harvested algal biomass had a significantly higher percentage of total unsaturated fatty acids than those grown in lab conditions, which may be attributed to the observed temperature and light fluctuations. The nutrient removal rate was highly correlated to the biomass productivity. The NH₃-N, TN, COD, and PO₄-P reduction rates for the north-located photo-bioreactor (PBR-N) in July were 2.65, 3.19, 7.21, and 0.067 g/m(2) × day, respectively, which were higher than those in other studies. The cultivation system had advantages of high mixotrophic growth rate, low operating cost, as well as reduced land footprint due to the stacked-tray bioreactor design used in the study.

  7. Salt stress represses production of extracellular proteases in Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Liu, R F; Huang, C L; Feng, H

    2015-05-11

    Bacillus pumilus is able to secrete subtilisin-like prote-ases, one of which has been purified and characterized biochemically, demonstrating great potential for use in industrial applications. In the current study, the biosynthesis and transcription of extracellular pro-teases in B. pumilus (BA06) under salt stress were investigated using various methods, including a proteolytic assay, zymogram analysis, and real-time PCR. Our results showed that total extracellular proteolytic activity, both in fermentation broth and on milk-containing agar plates, was considerably repressed by salt in a dosage-dependent manner. As Bacillus species usually secret multiple extracellular proteases, a vari-ety of individual extracellular protease encoding genes were selected for real-time PCR analysis. It was shown that proteases encoded by the aprE and aprX genes were the major proteases in the fermentation broth in terms of their transcripts in B. pumilus. Further, transcription of aprE, aprX, and epr genes was indeed repressed by salt stress. In con-trast, transcription of other genes (e.g., vpr and wprA) was not repressed or significantly affected by the salt. Conclusively, salt stress represses total extracellular proteolytic activity in B. pumilus, which can largely be ascribed to suppression of the major protease-encoding genes (aprE, aprX) at the transcriptional level. In contrast, transcription of other pro-tease-encoding genes (e.g., vpr, wprA) was not repressed by salt stress.

  8. Algal biofuels.

    PubMed

    Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-11-01

    The world is facing energy crisis and environmental issues due to the depletion of fossil fuels and increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Growing microalgae can contribute to practical solutions for these global problems because they can harvest solar energy and capture CO2 by converting it into biofuel using photosynthesis. Microalgae are robust organisms capable of rapid growth under a variety of conditions including in open ponds or closed photobioreactors. Their reduced biomass compounds can be used as the feedstock for mass production of a variety of biofuels. As another advantage, their ability to accumulate or secrete biofuels can be controlled by changing their growth conditions or metabolic engineering. This review is aimed to highlight different forms of biofuels produced by microalgae and the approaches taken to improve their biofuel productivity. The costs for industrial-scale production of algal biofuels in open ponds or closed photobioreactors are analyzed. Different strategies for photoproduction of hydrogen by the hydrogenase enzyme of green algae are discussed. Algae are also good sources of biodiesel since some species can make large quantities of lipids as their biomass. The lipid contents for some of the best oil-producing strains of algae in optimized growth conditions are reviewed. The potential of microalgae for producing petroleum related chemicals or ready-make fuels such as bioethanol, triterpenic hydrocarbons, isobutyraldehyde, isobutanol, and isoprene from their biomass are also presented.

  9. Algal biofuels from wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Craggs, R J; Heubeck, S; Lundquist, T J; Benemann, J R

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the potential of algae biofuel production in conjunction with wastewater treatment. Current technology for algal wastewater treatment uses facultative ponds, however, these ponds have low productivity (∼10 tonnes/ha.y), are not amenable to cultivating single algal species, require chemical flocculation or other expensive processes for algal harvest, and do not provide consistent nutrient removal. Shallow, paddlewheel-mixed high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) have much higher productivities (∼30 tonnes/ha.y) and promote bioflocculation settling which may provide low-cost algal harvest. Moreover, HRAP algae are carbon-limited and daytime addition of CO(2) has, under suitable climatic conditions, the potential to double production (to ∼60 tonnes/ha.y), improve bioflocculation algal harvest, and enhance wastewater nutrient removal. Algae biofuels (e.g. biogas, ethanol, biodiesel and crude bio-oil), could be produced from the algae harvested from wastewater HRAPs, The wastewater treatment function would cover the capital and operation costs of algal production, with biofuel and recovered nutrient fertilizer being by-products. Greenhouse gas abatement results from both the production of the biofuels and the savings in energy consumption compared to electromechanical treatment processes. However, to achieve these benefits, further research is required, particularly the large-scale demonstration of wastewater treatment HRAP algal production and harvest.

  10. Opportunities for Switzerland to Contribute to the Production of Algal Biofuels: the Hydrothermal Pathway to Bio-Methane.

    PubMed

    Bagnoud-Velásquez, Mariluz; Refardt, Dominik; Vuille, François; Ludwig, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have a significant potential to be a sustainable source of fuel and thus are of interest in the transition to a sustainable energy system, in particular for resource-dependent countries such as Switzerland. Independence of fossil fuels, considerable reduction of CO(2) emissions, and abandoning nuclear energy may be possible with an integrated system approach including the sourcing of biofuels from different types of biomass. Today, a full carbon-to-fuel conversion is possible, and has been recently demonstrated with an advanced hydrothermal technology. The potential to develop algal biofuels is viewed as high thanks to the possibility they offer to uncouple bioenergy from food production. Nevertheless, technological breakthroughs must take place before commercial production becomes a reality, especially to meet the necessary cost savings and efficiency gains in the algae cultivation structure. In addition, an integrated management of waste resources to promote the nutrient recovery appears today as imperative to further improve the economic viability and the environmental sustainability of algal production. We provide here a review that includes the global technological status of both algae production and their conversion into biofuels in order to understand first the added value of algal energy in general before we focus on the potential of algae to contribute specifically to the Swiss energy system to the horizon 2050. In this respect, the hydrothermal conversion pathway of microalgal biomass into synthetic natural gas (SNG) is emphasized, as research into this technology has received considerable attention in Switzerland during the last decade. In addition, SNG is a particularly relevant fuel in the Swiss context due to the existing gas grid and to the opportunity it offers to cover a wide spectrum of energy applications, in particular cogeneration of heat and electricity or use as a transport fuel in the growing gas car fleet.

  11. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John; Sarisky-Reed, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    The framework for National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap was constructed at the Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap Workshop, held December 9-10, 2008, at the University of Maryland-College Park. The Workshop was organized by the Biomass Program to discuss and identify the critical challenges currently hindering the development of a domestic, commercial-scale algal biofuels industry. This Roadmap presents information from a scientific, economic, and policy perspectives that can support and guide RD&D investment in algal biofuels. While addressing the potential economic and environmental benefits of using algal biomass for the production of liquid transportation fuels, the Roadmap describes the current status of algae RD&D. In doing so, it lays the groundwork for identifying challenges that likely need to be overcome for algal biomass to be used in the production of economically viable biofuels.

  12. Anaerobic co-digestion of pig manure and algae: impact of intracellular algal products recovery on co-digestion performance.

    PubMed

    Astals, S; Musenze, R S; Bai, X; Tannock, S; Tait, S; Pratt, S; Jensen, P D

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates anaerobic co-digestion of pig manure and algae (Scenedesmus sp.) with and without extraction of intracellular algal co-products, with views towards the development of a biorefinery concept for lipid, protein and/or biogas production. Protein and/or lipids were extracted from Scenedesmus sp. using free nitrous acid pre-treatments and solvent-based Soxhlet extraction, respectively. Processing increased algae methane yield between 29% and 37% compared to raw algae (VS basis), but reduced the amount of algae available for digestion. Co-digestion experiments showed a synergy between pig manure and raw algae that increased raw algae methane yield from 0.163 to 0.245 m(3) CH4 kg(-1)VS. No such synergy was observed when algal residues were co-digested with pig manure. Finally, experimental results were used to develop a high-level concept for an integrated biorefinery processing pig manure and onsite cultivated algae, evaluating methane production and co-product recovery per mass of pig manure entering the refinery.

  13. Advanced Algal Systems Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    Research and development (R&D) on advanced algal biofuels and bioproducts presents an opportunity to sustainably expand biomass resource potential in the United States. The Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) Advanced Algal Systems Program is carrying out a long-term, applied R&D strategy to lower the costs of algal biofuel production by working with partners to develop revolutionary technologies and conduct crosscutting analyses to better understand the potential

  14. Exploiting diversity and synthetic biology for the production of algal biofuels.

    PubMed

    Georgianna, D Ryan; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2012-08-16

    Modern life is intimately linked to the availability of fossil fuels, which continue to meet the world's growing energy needs even though their use drives climate change, exhausts finite reserves and contributes to global political strife. Biofuels made from renewable resources could be a more sustainable alternative, particularly if sourced from organisms, such as algae, that can be farmed without using valuable arable land. Strain development and process engineering are needed to make algal biofuels practical and economically viable.

  15. Growth and acid production of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 in the fermentation of algal carcass.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Zhang, G F; Mao, X; Wang, J Y; Duan, C Y; Wang, Z J; Liu, L B

    2016-06-01

    Algal carcass is a low-value byproduct of algae after its conversion to biodiesel. Dried algal carcass is rich in protein, carbohydrate, and multiple amino acids, and it is typically well suited for growth and acid production of lactic acid bacteria. In this study, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 was used to ferment different algal carcass media (ACM), including 2% ACM, 2% ACM with 1.9% glucose (ACM-G), and 2% ACM with 1.9% glucose and 2g/L amino acid mixture (ACM-GA). Concentrations of organic acids (lactic acid and acetic acid), acetyl-CoA, and ATP were analyzed by HPLC, and activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), acetokinase (ACK), pyruvate kinase (PK), and phosphofructokinase (PFK) were determined by using a chemical approach. The growth of L. bulgaricus cells in ACM-GA was close to that in the control medium (de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe). Lactic acid and acetic acid contents were greatly reduced when L. bulgaricus cells were grown in ACM compared with the control medium. Acetyl-CoA content varied with organic acid content and was increased in cells grown in different ACM compared with the control medium. The ATP content of L. bulgaricus cells in ACM was reduced compared with that of cells grown in the control medium. Activities of PFK and ACK of L. bulgaricus cells grown in ACM were higher and those of PK and LDH were lower compared with the control. Thus, ACM rich in nutrients may serve as an excellent substrate for growth by lactic acid bacteria, and addition of appropriate amounts of glucose and amino acids can improve growth and acid production.

  16. Recycled de-Oiled Algal Biomass Extract as a Feedstock for Boosting Biodiesel Production from Chlorella minutissima.

    PubMed

    Arora, Neha; Patel, Alok; Pruthi, Parul A; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-12-01

    The investigation for the first time assesses the efficacy of recycled de-oiled algal biomass extract (DABE) as a cultivation media to boost lipid productivity in Chlorella minutissima and its comparison with Bold's basal media (BBM) used as control. Presence of organic carbon (3.8 ± 0.8 g/l) in recycled DABE resulted in rapid growth with twofold increase in biomass productivity as compared to BBM. These cells expressed four folds higher lipid productivity (126 ± 5.54 mg/l/d) as compared to BBM. Cells cultivated in recycled DABE showed large sized lipid droplets accumulating 54.12 % of lipid content. Decrement in carbohydrate (17.76 %) and protein content (28.12 %) with loss of photosynthetic pigments compared to BBM grown cells were also recorded. The fatty acid profiles of cells cultivated in recycled DABE revealed the dominance of C16:0 (39.66 %), C18:1 (29.41 %) and C18:0 (15.82 %), respectively. This model is self-sustained and aims at neutralizing excessive feedstock consumption by exploiting recycled de-oiled algal biomass for cultivation of microalgae, making the process cost effective.

  17. Exploiting algal NADPH oxidase for biophotovoltaic energy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alexander; Laohavisit, Anuphon; Blaby, Ian K; Bombelli, Paolo; Howe, Christopher J; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Davies, Julia M; Smith, Alison G

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbes exhibit light-dependent electron export across the cell membrane, which can generate electricity in biological photovoltaic (BPV) devices. How electrons are exported remains to be determined; the identification of mechanisms would help selection or generation of photosynthetic microbes capable of enhanced electrical output. We show that plasma membrane NADPH oxidase activity is a significant component of light-dependent generation of electricity by the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. NADPH oxidases export electrons across the plasma membrane to form superoxide anion from oxygen. The C. reinhardtii mutant lacking the NADPH oxidase encoded by RBO1 is impaired in both extracellular superoxide anion production and current generation in a BPV device. Complementation with the wild-type gene restores both capacities, demonstrating the role of the enzyme in electron export. Monitoring light-dependent extracellular superoxide production with a colorimetric assay is shown to be an effective way of screening for electrogenic potential of candidate algal strains. The results show that algal NADPH oxidases are important for superoxide anion production and open avenues for optimizing the biological component of these devices.

  18. Heterologous production of death ligands' and death receptors' extracellular domains: structural features and efficient systems.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Michiro

    2012-08-01

    The extracellular domains of death ligands and those of death receptors are closely related to many serious human diseases through the initiation of apoptosis. Recombinant production of the extracellular domains has been investigated due to demand for a large amount of purified samples, which are a prerequisite for their biochemical characterization and constitute the fundamentals of medical applications. This review focuses on the recombinant production of extracellular domains of the major members of death ligand and death receptor families using non-mammalian expression systems with an emphasis on Fas ligand and Fas receptor. In contrast to the efficient production of the functional extracellular domains of TRAIL, TNFα and LTα by intracellular expression systems using Escherichia coli or Pichia pastoris, that of Fas ligand requires the secretory expression systems using P. pastoris or Dictyostelium discoideum, and the productivity in P. pastoris was largely dependent on tag sequence, potential N-glycosylation site and expressed protein region. On the other hand, the exploitation of insect cell systems is generally useful for the preparation of functional extracellular domains of death receptors containing many disulfide bridges in the absence of extended secondary structure, and a Bombyx mori larvae secretion system presented a superior productivity for human Fas receptor extracellular domain. Based on the results obtained so far, further efforts should be devoted to the artificial control of death ligand - death receptor interactions in order to make a contribution to medicine, represented by the development of novel biopharmaceuticals.

  19. Extracellular production of reactive oxygen species during seed germination and early seedling growth in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Kranner, Ilse; Roach, Thomas; Beckett, Richard P; Whitaker, Claire; Minibayeva, Farida V

    2010-07-01

    Extracellularly produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) play key roles in plant development, but their significance for seed germination and seedling establishment is poorly understood. Here we report on the characteristics of extracellular ROS production during seed germination and early seedling development in Pisum sativum. Extracellular superoxide (O2(.-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and the activity of extracellular peroxidases (ECPOX) were determined spectrophotometrically, and O2(.-) was identified by electron paramagnetic resonance. Cell wall fractionation of cotyledons, seed coats and radicles was used in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to investigate substrate specificity and molecular masses of O2(.-)-producing enzymes, and the forces that bind them to the cell wall. Seed imbibition was accompanied by an immediate, transient burst of redox activity that involved O2(.-) and other substances capable of oxidizing epinephrine, and also H2O2. At the final stages of germination, coinciding with radicle elongation, a second increase in O2(.-) but not H2O2 production occurred and was correlated with an increase in extracellular ECPOX activity. Electrophoretic analyses of cell wall fractions demonstrated the presence of enzymes capable of O2(.-) production. The significance of extracellular ROS production during seed germination and early seedling development, and also during seed aging, is discussed.

  20. Statistical optimization of thermal pretreatment conditions for enhanced biomethane production from defatted algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Chandra, T Sarat; Suvidha, G; Mukherji, S; Chauhan, V S; Vidyashankar, S; Krishnamurthi, K; Sarada, R; Mudliar, S N

    2014-06-01

    The present study analyzes the effect of thermal pretreatment for enhancing the biomethane potential of defatted algal biomass of Scenedesmus dimorphus through statistically guided experimental design. To this end, defatted microalgal biomass at various concentrations (1, 3 and 5 g L(-1)) was pretreated at elevated temperatures (100, 120 and 150°C) for 20, 40 and 60 min. The solubilised TOC was favourably enhanced up to 71 mg L(-1) after pretreatment at a temperature of 150°C for reaction time of 60 min. The methane yield was substantially enhanced (up to 60%) and could be correlated with an increase in organic matter solubilisation and enhanced biodegradability via thermal pretreatment. The optimisation of the integrated thermal pretreatment-biomethanation process resulted in up to 1.6-fold increase in methane yield.

  1. Algal Biofuels Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    This fact sheet provides information on algal biofuels, which are generating considerable interest around the world. They may represent a sustainable pathway for helping to meet the U.S. biofuel production targets set by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  2. Extracellular Enzyme Production and Synthetic Lignin Mineralization by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora

    PubMed Central

    Rüttimann-Johnson, Carmen; Salas, Loreto; Vicuña, Rafael; Kirk, T. Kent

    1993-01-01

    The ability of the white rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora to mineralize 14C-synthetic lignin was studied under different culture conditions, and the levels of two extracellular enzymes were monitored. The highest mineralization rates (28% after 28 days) were obtained in cultures containing a growth-limiting amount of nitrogen source (1.0 mM ammonium tartrate); under this condition, the levels of manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase present in the culture supernatant solutions were very low compared with cultures containing 10 mM of the nitrogen source. In contrast, cultures containing a limiting concentration of the carbon source (0.1% glucose) showed low levels of both enzymes and also very low mineralization rates compared with cultures containing 1% glucose. Cultures containing 11 ppm of Mn(II) showed a higher rate of mineralization than those containing 0.3 or 40 ppm of this cation. Levels of MnP and laccase were higher when 40 ppm of Mn(II) was used. Mineralization rates were slightly higher in cultures flushed daily with oxygen, whereas laccase levels were lower and MnP levels were approximately the same as in cultures maintained under an air atmosphere. The presence of 0.4 mM veratryl alcohol reduced both mineralization rates and MnP levels, without affecting laccase levels. Lignin peroxidase activity was not detected under any condition. Addition of purified lignin peroxidase to the cultures in the presence or absence of veratryl alcohol did not enhance mineralization rates significantly. PMID:16348955

  3. The effects of alternative pretreatment strategies on anaerobic digestion and methane production from different algal strains.

    PubMed

    Bohutskyi, Pavlo; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Bouwer, Edward J

    2014-03-01

    The effect of various pretreatment strategies on methane yields following anaerobic digestion (AD) of five different microalgal strains was investigated. Pavlova_cf sp., Tetraselmis sp. and Thalassiosira weissflogii exhibited substantial methane yields of 0.4-0.5L/g volatile solids (VS) without pretreatment, providing up to 75-80% of theoretical values. In contrast, methane yields from Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. were around 0.35L/g VS, or 55-60% of the theoretical values, respectively. Alkali treatment was not effective and thermal pretreatment only enhanced Nannochloropsis methane yields. Thermochemical pretreatment had the strongest impact on biomass solubilization with methane yields increasing by 30% and 40% for Chlorella and Nannochloropsis, respectively. The lipid content had a strong beneficial impact on the theoretical and observed methane yields as compared to protein and carbohydrate content. Other features such as cell-wall composition are also likely to be important factors dictating algal biodegradability and methane yields addressed in part by thermochemical pretreatment.

  4. Extracellular superoxide anion production contributes to the virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Pang, Xinyue; Zhi, Dejuan; Wang, Jinsheng; Li, Minquan; Li, Hongyu

    2009-02-01

    Endogenous superoxide anion production was determined by electron spin resonance in wild-type strains and avrXa7 mutants of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The localization of superoxide anion was carried out in the intra- and extra-cellular fractions. Results showed the presence of superoxide anion in multi-locations of X. oryzae pv. oryzae cells. The extracellular fraction was the major location of superoxide anion production. Furthermore, a positive relationship was shown between the levels of endogenous superoxide anion and the virulence of strains. These indubitable results suggested that the superoxide anion contributes to the virulence of X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  5. Importance of Vascular Plant and Algal Production to Macro-invertebrate Consumers in a Southern California Salt Marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, H. M.

    1997-12-01

    The dietary importance of marsh vascular plants (primarilySalicornia virginica), algae and upland particulate inputs to macro-invertebrate consumers was studied in Carpinteria Salt Marsh, southern California, using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. This marsh is predominantly a marine or hypersaline system and succulents are the most common vascular plant species. Of invertebrates collected from the vegetated marsh, tidal flats and channels, only detritivores from the vegetated marsh (Traskorchestia traskiana,Melampus olivaceus) had isotope values (δ13C=-20‰) that suggested some use ofSalicornia-derived carbon.T. traskianacultured in the laboratory on decomposingS. virginicaor blue-green micro-algal mat had distinctive isotopic signatures, reflecting the capability of this consumer to assimilate carbon and nitrogen derived from these sources. The δ13C values (generally -16‰ to -15‰) of species from tidal flats and channels (e.g.Cerithidea californica,Protothaca staminea,Mytilus galloprovincialis,Neotrypaea californiensis) were most similar to values for benthic algae and phytoplankton. Specimens ofM. galloprovincialisalong a gradient of presumed increase in marine influence had similar isotope values, suggesting little contribution to diet from upland runoff. The present results differ most noticeably from published values in the13C enrichment of suspension-feeders, suggesting the use of resuspended13C-enriched benthic microalgae in tidal channels by these consumers, and in the13C depletion and15N enrichment of plants and consumers along a portion of the marsh boundary receiving inputs of nutrient-enriched perched groundwater. In general, the isotopic composition of macro-invertebrates indicated the incorporation of algal production rather than ofS. virginicaor upland sources into the marsh food web.

  6. Application of low-cost algal nitrogen source feeding in fuel ethanol production using high gravity sweet potato medium.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Guo, Jin-Song; Chen, You-Peng; Zhang, Hai-Dong; Zheng, Xu-Xu; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2012-08-31

    Protein-rich bloom algae biomass was employed as nitrogen source in fuel ethanol fermentation using high gravity sweet potato medium containing 210.0 g l(-1) glucose. In batch mode, the fermentation could not accomplish even in 120 h without any feeding of nitrogen source. While, the feeding of acid-hydrolyzed bloom algae powder (AHBAP) notably promoted fermentation process but untreated bloom algae powder (UBAP) was less effective than AHBAP. The fermentation times were reduced to 96, 72, and 72 h if 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were added into medium, respectively, and the ethanol yields and productivities increased with increasing amount of feeding AHBAP. The continuous fermentations were performed in a three-stage reactor system. Final concentrations of ethanol up to 103.2 and 104.3 g l(-1) with 4.4 and 5.3 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained using the previously mentioned medium feeding with 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP, at dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1). Notably, only 78.5 g l(-1) ethanol and 41.6 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained in the comparative test without any nitrogen source feeding. Amino acids analysis showed that approximately 67% of the protein in the algal biomass was hydrolyzed and released into the medium, serving as the available nitrogen nutrition for yeast growth and metabolism. Both batch and continuous fermentations showed similar fermentation parameters when 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were fed, indicating that the level of available nitrogen in the medium should be limited, and an algal nitrogen source feeding amount higher than 20.0 g l(-1) did not further improve the fermentation performance.

  7. Extracellular superoxide production, viability and redox poise in response to desiccation in recalcitrant Castanea sativa seeds.

    PubMed

    Roach, Thomas; Beckett, Richard P; Minibayeva, Farida V; Colville, Louise; Whitaker, Claire; Chen, Hongying; Bailly, Christophe; Kranner, Ilse

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in seed death following dehydration in desiccation-intolerant 'recalcitrant' seeds. However, it is unknown if and how ROS are produced in the apoplast and if they play a role in stress signalling during desiccation. We studied intracellular damage and extracellular superoxide (O(2)(.-)) production upon desiccation in Castanea sativa seeds, mechanisms of O(2)(.-) production and the effect of exogenously supplied ROS. A transient increase in extracellular O(2)(.-) production by the embryonic axes preceded significant desiccation-induced viability loss. Thereafter, progressively more oxidizing intracellular conditions, as indicated by a significant shift in glutathione half-cell reduction potential, accompanied cell and axis death, coinciding with the disruption of nuclear membranes. Most hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-dependent O(2)(.-) production was found in a cell wall fraction that contained extracellular peroxidases (ECPOX) with molecular masses of approximately 50 kDa. Cinnamic acid was identified as a potential reductant required for ECPOX-mediated O(2)(.-) production. H(2)O(2), applied exogenously to mimic the transient ROS burst at the onset of desiccation, counteracted viability loss of sub-lethally desiccation-stressed seeds and of excised embryonic axes grown in tissue culture. Hence, extracellular ROS produced by embryonic axes appear to be important signalling components involved in wound response, regeneration and growth.

  8. Seasonal and interannual variability in algal biomass and primary production in the Mediterranean Sea, as derived from 4 years of SeaWiFS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosc, E.; Bricaud, A.; Antoine, D.

    2004-03-01

    Because the Mediterranean has been subject for several decades to increasing anthropogenic influences, monitoring algal biomass and primary production on a long-term basis is required to detect possible modifications in the biogeochemical equilibrium of the basin. This work was initiated thanks to a 4-year-long time series of SeaWiFS observations. Seasonal variations of algal biomass (estimated using a previously developed regional algorithm) and primary production were analyzed for the various regions, and compared with those estimated using the CZCS sensor (1978-1986). Also, interannual variations could be assessed for the first time. The seasonal cycles of algal biomass generally reveal a maximum in winter or spring, and a minimum in summer. Some conspicuous differences with CZCS observations (e.g., in the Northwest Basin, reduction of the deep convection zone, earlier start of the spring bloom, quasi-absence of the vernal bloom) likely result from environmental changes. Interannual variations in algal biomass are noticeable all over the basin, including in the very oligotrophic waters of the Eastern Basin. The seasonal evolution of primary production is predominantly influenced by that of algal biomass in the Western Basin (with, in particular, a spring maximum). In the Eastern Basin, the seasonal courses of PAR and biomass tend to compensate each other, and primary production varies weakly along the year. The annual values computed over the 1998-2001 period for the Western Basin (163 ± 7 gC m-2 yr-1) and the Eastern Basin (121 ± 5 gC m-2 yr-1) are lower (by 17 and 12%, respectively) than those previously derived (using the same light-photosynthesis model) from CZCS data.

  9. Algal Lipids and Omega-3 Production via Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Pathways at Cellana?s Kona Demonstration Facility, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xuemei; Knurek, Emily; Goes, Nikki; Griswold, Lynn

    2012-05-05

    Cellana?s Kona Demonstration Facility (KDF) is a 2.5 hectare facility, with 17,000 sq. ft. under roof and 1 hectare of cultivation systems. KDF is designed to execute and support all stages of the production process at pilot scale, from cultivation through extraction. Since Feb. 2009, KDF has been producing up to 0.7MT dry weight of algal biomass per month, while at the same time optimizing processes of cultivation, harvesting, dewatering and extraction. The cultivation system at KDF uses ALDUO? technology, a hybrid system of photobioreactors (PBRs) and open ponds. All fluid transfers related to KDF cultivation and harvesting processes are operated and monitored by a remote Process-Control System. Fluid transfer data, together with biochemical data, enable the mass balance calculations necessary to measure productivity. This poster summarizes methods to improve both biomass and lipids yield by 1) alleviating light limitation in open ponds, 2) de-oxygenation and 3) heterotrophic lipid production for post-harvesting cultures.

  10. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) (II. 2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile Inhibition of Motility and Stalk Production in the Marine Diatom Achnanthes longipes).

    PubMed

    Wang, Y.; Lu, J.; Mollet, J. C.; Gretz, M. R.; Hoagland, K. D.

    1997-04-01

    The cellulose synthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) and the DCB analogs 2-chloro-6-fluorobenzonitrile, 3-amino-2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, and 5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfonyl-(3-cyano-2, 4-dichloro)aniline (DCBF) inhibited extracellular adhesive production in the marine diatom Achnanthes longipes, resulting in a loss of motility and a lack of permanent adhesion. The effect was fully reversible upon removal of the inhibitor, and cell growth was not affected at concentrations of inhibitors adequate to effectively interrupt the adhesion sequence. Video microscopy revealed that the adhesion sequence was mediated by the export and assembly of polymers, and consisted of initial attachment followed by cell motility and eventual production of permanent adhesive structures in the form of stalks that elevated the diatom above the substratum. A. longipes adhesive polymers are primarily composed of noncellulosic polysaccharides (B.A. Wustman, M.R. Gretz, and K.D. Hoagland [1997] Plant Physiol 113: 1059-1069). These results, together with the discovery of DCB inhibition of extracellular matrix assembly in noncellulosic red algal unicells (S.M. Arad, O. Dubinsky, and B. Simon [1994] Phycologia 33: 158-162), indicate that DCB inhibits synthesis of noncellulosic extracellular polysaccharides. A fluorescent probe, DCBF, was synthesized and shown to inhibit adhesive polymer production in the same manner as DCB. DCBF specifically labeled an 18-kD polypeptide isolated from a membrane fraction. Inhibition of adhesion by DCB and its analogs provides evidence of a direct relationship between polysaccharide synthesis and motility and permanent adhesion.

  11. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) (II. 2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile Inhibition of Motility and Stalk Production in the Marine Diatom Achnanthes longipes).

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Lu, J.; Mollet, J. C.; Gretz, M. R.; Hoagland, K. D.

    1997-01-01

    The cellulose synthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) and the DCB analogs 2-chloro-6-fluorobenzonitrile, 3-amino-2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, and 5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfonyl-(3-cyano-2, 4-dichloro)aniline (DCBF) inhibited extracellular adhesive production in the marine diatom Achnanthes longipes, resulting in a loss of motility and a lack of permanent adhesion. The effect was fully reversible upon removal of the inhibitor, and cell growth was not affected at concentrations of inhibitors adequate to effectively interrupt the adhesion sequence. Video microscopy revealed that the adhesion sequence was mediated by the export and assembly of polymers, and consisted of initial attachment followed by cell motility and eventual production of permanent adhesive structures in the form of stalks that elevated the diatom above the substratum. A. longipes adhesive polymers are primarily composed of noncellulosic polysaccharides (B.A. Wustman, M.R. Gretz, and K.D. Hoagland [1997] Plant Physiol 113: 1059-1069). These results, together with the discovery of DCB inhibition of extracellular matrix assembly in noncellulosic red algal unicells (S.M. Arad, O. Dubinsky, and B. Simon [1994] Phycologia 33: 158-162), indicate that DCB inhibits synthesis of noncellulosic extracellular polysaccharides. A fluorescent probe, DCBF, was synthesized and shown to inhibit adhesive polymer production in the same manner as DCB. DCBF specifically labeled an 18-kD polypeptide isolated from a membrane fraction. Inhibition of adhesion by DCB and its analogs provides evidence of a direct relationship between polysaccharide synthesis and motility and permanent adhesion. PMID:12223661

  12. Benthic algal production across lake size gradients: interactions among morphometry, nutrients, and light.

    PubMed

    Vadeboncoeur, Yvonne; Peterson, Garry; Vander Zanden, M Jake; Kalff, Jacob

    2008-09-01

    Attached algae play a minor role in conceptual and empirical models of lake ecosystem function but paradoxically form the energetic base of food webs that support a wide variety of fishes. To explore the apparent mismatch between perceived limits on contributions of periphyton to whole-lake primary production and its importance to consumers, we modeled the contribution of periphyton to whole-ecosystem primary production across lake size, shape, and nutrient gradients. The distribution of available benthic habitat for periphyton is influenced by the ratio of mean depth to maximum depth (DR = z/ z(max)). We modeled total phytoplankton production from water-column nutrient availability, z, and light. Periphyton production was a function of light-saturated photosynthesis (BPmax) and light availability at depth. The model demonstrated that depth ratio (DR) and light attenuation strongly determined the maximum possible contribution of benthic algae to lake production, and the benthic proportion of whole-lake primary production (BPf) declined with increasing nutrients. Shallow lakes (z < or =5 m) were insensitive to DR and were dominated by either benthic or pelagic primary productivity depending on trophic status. Moderately deep oligotrophic lakes had substantial contributions by benthic primary productivity at low depth ratios and when maximum benthic photosynthesis was moderate or high. Extremely large, deep lakes always had low fractional contributions of benthic primary production. An analysis of the world's largest lakes showed that the shapes of natural lakes shift increasingly toward lower depth ratios with increasing depth, maximizing the potential importance of littoral primary production in large-lake food webs. The repeatedly demonstrated importance of periphyton to lake food webs may reflect the combination of low depth ratios and high light penetration characteristic of large, oligotrophic lakes that in turn lead to substantial contributions of periphyton

  13. Promotion of extracellular lignocellulolytic enzymes production by restraining the intracellular β-glucosidase in Penicillium decumbens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Qin, Yuqi; Cao, Qing; Liu, Guodong; Li, Jie; Li, Zhonghai; Zhao, Jian; Qu, Yinbo

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the functions of β-glucosidases in regulation of the lignocellulolytic enzymes production in Penicillium decumbens 114-2 were investigated. The major extracellular β-glucosidase gene bgl1 and the major intracellular β-glucosidase gene bgl2 were deleted in P. decumbens 114-2 respectively. In Δbgl2, the production of extracellular lignocellulolytic enzymes (including endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases and xylanases) on insoluble cellulose was significantly promoted, while in Δbgl1 there was no any difference compared with that of 114-2. The enhancement of the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in Δbgl2 was likely attributed to the accumulation of intracellular cellobiose. Induction experiment in Δbgl1Δbgl2 showed that cellobiose was an inducer of lignocellulolytic enzymes expression in P. decumbens 114-2, and the induction was unrelated to the formation, if any, of gentiobiose or sophorose from cellobiose.

  14. Differences in production of several extracellular virulence factors in clinical and food Aeromonas spp. strains.

    PubMed

    Pin, C; Marín, M L; Selgas, D; García, M L; Tormo, J; Casas, C

    1995-02-01

    Production of several extracellular virulence factors (lipase, protease and haemolysin) was compared in 15 Aeromonas spp. isolated from faeces of patients with Aeromonas-associated gastroenteritis and 81 strains isolated from food. Strains from food did not show differences in production of these factors when compared with strains isolated from faeces. However, if strains were considered in relation to autoagglutination (AA) character, the AA+ differed from AA- strains in lipase and protease production. Supernatant fluids of AA+ food and human strains showed 2.5-fold more protease production than that observed in AA- strains. These two characteristics of certain Aeromonas strains could be related with the more virulent capacity.

  15. Algal culture studies for CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Arnett, K.; Gladue, R.; Cox, J.; Lieberman, D.

    1987-01-01

    Microalgae are well-suited as a component of a Closed Environmental Life Support System (CELSS), since they can couple the closely related functions of food production and atmospheric regeneration. The objective was to provide a basis for predicting the response of CELSS algal cultures, and thus the food supply and air regeneration system, to changes in the culture parameters. Scenedesmus growth was measured as a function of light intensity, and the spectral dependence of light absorption by the algae as well as algal respiration in the light were determined as a function of cell concentration. These results were used to test and confirm a mathematical model that describes the productivity of an algal culture in terms of the competing processes of photosynthesis and respiration. The relationship of algal productivity to cell concentration was determined at different carbon dioxide concentrations, temperatures, and light intensities. The maximum productivity achieved by an air-grown culture was found to be within 10% of the computed maximum productivity, indicating that CO2 was very efficiently removed from the gas stream by the algal culture. Measurements of biomass productivity as a function of cell concentration at different light intensities indicated that both the productivity and efficiency of light utilization were greater at higher light intensities.

  16. Coupling a simple irradiance description to a mechanistic growth model to predict algal production in industrial-scale solar-powered photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Philip; Flynn, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Various innovative photobioreactor designs have been proposed to increase production of algae-derived biomass. Computer models are often employed to test these designs prior to construction. In the drive to optimise conversion of light energy to biomass, efforts to model the profile of irradiance levels within a microalgal culture can lead to highly complex descriptions which are computationally demanding. However, there is a risk that this effort is wasted if such optic models are coupled to overly simplified descriptions of algal physiology. Here we demonstrate that a suitable description of microalgal physiology is of primary significance for modelling algal production in photobioreactors. For the first time, we combine a new and computationally inexpensive model of irradiance to a mechanistic description of algal growth and test its applicability to modelling biofuel production in an advanced photobioreactor system. We confirm the adequacy of our approach by comparing the predictions of the model against published experimental data collected over a 2 ½-year period and demonstrate the effectiveness of the mechanistic model in predicting long-term production rates of bulk biomass and biofuel feedstock components at a commercially relevant scale. Our results suggest that much of the detail captured in more complicated irradiance models is indeed wasted as the critical limiting procedure is the physiological description of the conversion of light energy to biomass.

  17. Two-phase photoperiodic cultivation of algal-bacterial consortia for high biomass production and efficient nutrient removal from municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Soo; Oh, Hyung-Seok; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik; Ahn, Chi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the photoperiodic effects on the biomass production and nutrient removal in the algal-bacterial wastewater treatment, under the following three conditions: (1) a natural 12h:12h LD cycle, (2) a dark-elongated 12h:60h LD cycle, and (3) a two-phase photoperiodic 12h:60h LD, followed by 12h:12h LD cycles. The two-phase photoperiodic operation showed the highest dry cell weight and lipid productivity (282.6mgL(-1)day(-1), 71.4mgL(-1)day(-1)) and most efficient nutrient removals (92.3% COD, 95.8% TN, 98.1% TP). The genetic markers and sequencing analyses indicated rapid increments of bacteria, subsequent growths of Scenedesmus, and stabilized population balances between algae and bacteria. In addition, the two-phase photoperiod provided a higher potential for the algal-bacterial consortia to utilize various organic carbon substrates.

  18. Algal Turf Sediments and Sediment Production by Parrotfishes across the Continental Shelf of the Northern Great Barrier Reef

    PubMed Central

    Goatley, Christopher H. R.; Bellwood, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Sediments are found in the epilithic algal matrix (EAM) of all coral reefs and play important roles in ecological processes. Although we have some understanding of patterns of EAM sediments across individual reefs, our knowledge of patterns across broader spatial scales is limited. We used an underwater vacuum sampler to quantify patterns in two of the most ecologically relevant factors of EAM sediments across the Great Barrier Reef: total load and grain size distribution. We compare these patterns with rates of sediment production and reworking by parrotfishes to gain insights into the potential contribution of parrotfishes to EAM sediments. Inner-shelf reef EAMs had the highest sediment loads with a mean of 864.1 g m-2, compared to 126.8 g m-2 and 287.4 g m-2 on mid- and outer-shelf reefs, respectively. High sediment loads were expected on inner-shelf reefs due to their proximity to the mainland, however, terrigenous siliceous sediments only accounted for 13–24% of total mass. On inner-shelf reef crests parrotfishes would take three months to produce the equivalent mass of sediment found in the EAM. On the outer-shelf it would take just three days, suggesting that inner-shelf EAMs are characterised by low rates of sediment turnover. By contrast, on-reef sediment production by parrotfishes is high on outer-shelf crests. However, exposure to oceanic swells means that much of this production is likely to be lost. Hydrodynamic activity also appears to structure sediment patterns at within-reef scales, with coarser sediments (> 250 μm) typifying exposed reef crest EAMs, and finer sediments (< 250 μm) typifying sheltered back-reef EAMs. As both the load and grain size of EAM sediments mediate a number of important ecological processes on coral reefs, the observed sediment gradients are likely to play a key role in the structure and function of the associated coral reef communities. PMID:28122042

  19. Algal Turf Sediments and Sediment Production by Parrotfishes across the Continental Shelf of the Northern Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Tebbett, Sterling B; Goatley, Christopher H R; Bellwood, David R

    2017-01-01

    Sediments are found in the epilithic algal matrix (EAM) of all coral reefs and play important roles in ecological processes. Although we have some understanding of patterns of EAM sediments across individual reefs, our knowledge of patterns across broader spatial scales is limited. We used an underwater vacuum sampler to quantify patterns in two of the most ecologically relevant factors of EAM sediments across the Great Barrier Reef: total load and grain size distribution. We compare these patterns with rates of sediment production and reworking by parrotfishes to gain insights into the potential contribution of parrotfishes to EAM sediments. Inner-shelf reef EAMs had the highest sediment loads with a mean of 864.1 g m-2, compared to 126.8 g m-2 and 287.4 g m-2 on mid- and outer-shelf reefs, respectively. High sediment loads were expected on inner-shelf reefs due to their proximity to the mainland, however, terrigenous siliceous sediments only accounted for 13-24% of total mass. On inner-shelf reef crests parrotfishes would take three months to produce the equivalent mass of sediment found in the EAM. On the outer-shelf it would take just three days, suggesting that inner-shelf EAMs are characterised by low rates of sediment turnover. By contrast, on-reef sediment production by parrotfishes is high on outer-shelf crests. However, exposure to oceanic swells means that much of this production is likely to be lost. Hydrodynamic activity also appears to structure sediment patterns at within-reef scales, with coarser sediments (> 250 μm) typifying exposed reef crest EAMs, and finer sediments (< 250 μm) typifying sheltered back-reef EAMs. As both the load and grain size of EAM sediments mediate a number of important ecological processes on coral reefs, the observed sediment gradients are likely to play a key role in the structure and function of the associated coral reef communities.

  20. Fueling Future with Algal Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-07-05

    Algae constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity, play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing (http://jgi.doe.gov/Algae) and contributes of the algal genome projects worldwide (GOLD database, 2012). The sequenced algal genomes offer catalogs of genes, networks, and pathways. The sequenced first of its kind genomes of a haptophyte E.huxleyii, chlorarachniophyte B.natans, and cryptophyte G.theta fill the gaps in the eukaryotic tree of life and carry unique genes and pathways as well as molecular fossils of secondary endosymbiosis. Natural adaptation to conditions critical for industrial production is encoded in algal genomes, for example, growth of A.anophagefferens at very high cell densities during the harmful algae blooms or a global distribution across diverse environments of E.huxleyii, able to live on sparse nutrients due to its expanded pan-genome. Communications and signaling pathways can be derived from simple symbiotic systems like lichens or complex marine algae metagenomes. Collectively these datasets derived from algal genomics contribute to building a comprehensive parts list essential for algal biofuel development.

  1. Effects of cyanobacterial extracellular products and gibberellic acid on salinity tolerance in Oryza sativa L

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, AA; Stella, AM; Storni, MM; Zulpa, G; Zaccaro, MC

    2006-01-01

    Salt stress is one of the most serious factors limiting the productivity of rice, the staple diet in many countries. Gibberellic acid has been reported to reduce NaCl-induced growth inhibition in some plants including rice. Most paddy soils have a natural population of Cyanobacteria, prokaryotic photosynthethic microorganisms, which synthesize and liberate plant growth regulators such as gibberellins that could exert a natural beneficial effect on salt stressed rice plants. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the cyanobacterium Scytonema hofmanni extracellular products on the growth of rice seedlings inhibited by NaCl and to compare it with the effect of the gibberellic acid in the same stress condition. Growth (length and weight of the seedlings) and biochemical parameters (5-aminolevulinate dehydratase activity, total free porphyrin and pigments content) were evaluated. Salt exposure negatively affected all parameters measured, with the exception of chlorophyll. Chlrorophyll concentrations nearly doubled upon exposure to high salt. Gibberellic acid counteracted the effect of salt on the length and dry weight of the shoot, and on carotenoid and chlorophyll b contents. Extracellular products nullified the salt effect on shoot dry weight and carotenoid content; partially counteracted the effect on shoot length (from 54% to 38% decrease), root dry weight (from 59% to 41% decrease) and total free porphyrin (from 31 to 13% decrease); reduced by 35% the salt increase of chlorophyll a; had no effect on root length and chlorophyll b. Gibberellic acid and extracellular products increased 5-aminolevulinate dehydratase activity over the control without salt. When coincident with high salinity, exposure to either EP or GA3, resulted in a reversal of shoot-related responses to salt stress. We propose that Scytonema hofmanni extracellular products may counteract altered hormone homeostasis of rice seedlings under salt stress by producing gibberellin-like plant

  2. Luminescent photobioreactor design for improved algal growth and photosynthetic pigment production through spectral conversion of light.

    PubMed

    Mohsenpour, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Willoughby, Nik

    2013-08-01

    Growth characteristics of two strains of microalgae in bubble column photobioreactors were investigated under different cultivation conditions. Chlorella vulgaris and Gloeothece membranacea were cultivated in luminescent acrylic photobioreactors at different seed culture densities. Luminescent acrylic photobioreactors in blue, green, yellow, orange, and red colours capable of spectral conversion of light were used. The results indicated that the red luminescent photobioreactor enhanced biomass production in both strains of microalgae while pigmentation was induced under different light colours. Green light promoted chlorophyll production in C. vulgaris however chlorophyll production in G. membranacea cultures was less influenced by the light condition or culture density. Phycobiliproteins were the dominant pigments in G. membranacea and red light favoured synthesis of these pigments.

  3. Human cecum content modulates production of extracellular proteins by food and probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Borja; Ruiz, Lorena; Suárez, Adolfo; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Margolles, Abelardo

    2011-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are responsible for different types of food fermentations that provide humans with many different classes of fermented products. During the 20th century, some LAB strains as well as several members of the genus Bifidobacterium started to be extensively used in human nutrition as probiotics because of their health-promoting effects. Nowadays, the subset of extracellular proteins is being investigated as potential mediators of the process known as bacteria-host molecular crosstalk. Inclusion of human cecum extracts in laboratory culture medium modified the production of extracellular proteins by food and probiotic microorganisms. By proteomic and genetic means, the specific overproduction of two proteins was revealed to occur at transcriptional level. This work sheds light on the potential molecular effectors that food bacteria could use for interacting with the human gut and revealed that they may be produced under very specific environmental conditions.

  4. Extracellular Nucleotide Hydrolysis in Dermal and Limbal Mesenchymal Stem Cells: a Source of Adenosine Production.

    PubMed

    Naasani, Liliana I Sous; Rodrigues, Cristiano; de Campos, Rafael Paschoal; Beckenkamp, Liziane Raquel; Iser, Isabele C; Bertoni, Ana Paula Santin; Wink, Márcia R

    2017-01-24

    Human Limbal (L-MSCs) and Dermal Mesenchymal Stem Cell (D-MSCs) possess many properties that increase their therapeutic potential in ophthalmology and dermatology. It is known that purinergic signaling plays a role in many aspects of mesenchymal stem cells physiology. They release and respond to purinergic ligands, altering proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis. Therefore, more information on these processes would be crucial for establishing future clinical applications using their differentiation potential, but without undesirable side effects. This study evaluated and compared the expression of ecto-nucleotidases, the enzymatic activity of degradation of extracellular nucleotides and the metabolism of extracellular ATP in D-MSCs and L-MSCs, isolated from discard tissues of human skin and sclerocorneal rims. The D-MSCs and L-MSCs showed a differentiation potential into osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages and the expression of markers CD105(+) , CD44(+) , CD14(-) , CD34(-) , CD45(-) , as expected. Both cells hydrolyzed low levels of extracellular ATP and high levels of AMP, leading to adenosine accumulation that can regulate inflammation and tissue repair. These cells expressed mRNA for ENTPD1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 and CD73 that corresponded to the observed enzymatic activities. Thus, considering the degradation of ATP and adenosine production, limbal MSCs are very similar to dermal MSCs, indicating that from the aspect of extracellular nucleotide metabolism L-MSCs are very similar to the characterized D-MSCs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of pre-ozonation on disinfection by-product formation and speciation from chlor(am)ination of algal organic matter of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingqiu; Gao, Naiyun; Chu, Wenhai; Zhou, Shiqing; Zhang, Zhengde; Xu, Yaqun; Dai, Qi

    2015-10-01

    The increasing use of algal-impacted source waters is increasing concerns over exposure to disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water disinfection, due to the higher concentrations of DBP precursors in these waters. The impact of pre-ozonation on the formation and speciation of DBPs during subsequent chlorination and chloramination of algal organic matter (AOM), including extracellular organic matter (EOM) and intracellular organic matter (IOM), was investigated. During subsequent chlorination, ozonation pretreatment reduced the formation of haloacetonitriles from EOM, but increased the yields of trihalomethanes, dihaloacetic acid and trichloronitromethane from both EOM and IOM. While in chloramination, pre-ozonation remarkably enhanced the yields of several carbonaceous DBPs from IOM, and significantly minimized the nitrogenous DBP precursors. Also, the yield of 1,1-dichloro-2-propanone from IOM was decreased by 24.0% after pre-ozonation during chloramination. Both increases and decreases in the bromine substitution factors (BSF) of AOM were observed with ozone pretreatment at the low bromide level (50μg/L). However, pre-ozonation played little impact on the bromide substitution in DBPs at the high bromide level (500μg/L). This information was used to guide the design and practical operation of pre-ozonation in drinking water treatment plants using algae-rich waters.

  6. Optimization of pilot high rate algal ponds for simultaneous nutrient removal and lipids production.

    PubMed

    Arbib, Zouhayr; de Godos, Ignacio; Ruiz, Jesús; Perales, José A

    2017-07-01

    Special attention is required to the removal of nitrogen and phosphorous in treated wastewaters. Although, there are a wide range of techniques commercially available for nutrient up-take, these processes entail high investment and operational costs. In the other hand, microalgae growth can simultaneously remove inorganic constituents of wastewater and produce energy rich biomass. Among all the cultivation technologies, High Rate Algae Ponds (HRAPs), are accepted as the most appropriate system. However, the optimization of the operation that maximizes the productivity, nutrient removal and lipid content in the biomass generated has not been established. In this study, the effect of two levels of depth and the addition of CO2 were evaluated. Batch essays were used for the calculation of the kinetic parameters of microbial growth that determine the optimum conditions for continuous operation. Nutrient removal and lipid content of the biomass generated were analyzed. The best conditions were found at depth of 0.3m with CO2 addition (biomass productivity of 26.2gTSSm(-2)d(-1) and a lipid productivity of 6.0glipidsm(-2)d(-1)) in continuous mode. The concentration of nutrients was in all cases below discharge limits established by the most restrictive regulation for wastewater discharge.

  7. Acid precipitation effects on algal productivity and biomass in Adirondack Mountain lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrey, G.R.

    1982-12-01

    Relationships between phytoplankton communities and lake acidity in three Adirondack Mountain lakes were studied at Woods Lake (pH ca. 4.9), Sagamore Lake (pH ca. 5.5), and Panther Lake (pH ca. 7.0). Species numbers decrease with increasing acidity. Patterns of increasing biomass and productivity in Woods Lake may be atypical of similar oligotrophic lakes in that they develop rather slowly to maxima six weeks after ice-out, instead of occurring very close to ice-out. Contributions of netplankton, nannoplankton and ultraplankton to productivity per m/sup 2/ show that the smaller plankton are relatively more important in the more acid lakes. This pattern could be determined by nutrient availability (lake acidification is suspected of leading to decreased availability of phosphorus). This was consistent with a hypothesis that microbial heterotrophic activity is reduced with increasing acidity, but the smaller phytoplankton may be more leaky at low pH. 11 references, 2 tables.

  8. Effects of photoperiod on nutrient removal, biomass production, and algal-bacterial population dynamics in lab-scale photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Sang-Ah; Ko, So-Ra; Oh, Hee-Mock; Ahn, Chi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Effects of photoperiod were investigated in lab-scale photobioreactors containing algal-bacterial consortia to reduce organic nutrients from municipal wastewater. Under three photoperiod conditions (12 h:12 h, 36 h:12 h, and 60 h:12 h dark–light cycles), nutrient removals and biomass productions were measured along with monitoring microbial population dynamics. After a batch operation for 12 days, 59–80% carbon, 35–88% nitrogen, and 43–89% phosphorus were removed from influents, respectively. In this study, carbon removal was related positively to the length of dark cycles, while nitrogen and phosphorus removals inversely. On the contrast, the highest microbial biomass in terms of chlorophyll a, dry cell weight, and algal/bacterial rRNA gene markers was produced under the 12 h:12 h dark–light cycle among the three photoperiods. The results showed 1) simultaneous growths between algae and bacteria in the microbial consortia and 2) efficient nitrogen and phosphorus removals along with high microbial biomass production under prolonged light conditions. Statistical analyses indicated that carbon removal was significantly related to the ratio of bacteria to algae in the microbial consortia along with prolonged dark conditions (p < 0.05). In addition, the ratio of nitrogen removal to phosphorus removal decreased significantly under prolonged dark conditions (p < 0.001). These results indicated that the photoperiod condition has remarkable impacts on adjusting nutrient removal, producing microbial biomass, and altering algal-bacterial population dynamics. Therefore, the control of photoperiod was suggested as an important operating parameter in the algal wastewater treatment.

  9. Acid precipitation effects on algal productivity and biomass in Adirondack Lakes. Final completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrey, G.R.

    1982-12-01

    Relationships between phytoplankton communities and lake acidity in three Adirondack Mountain Lakes were studied at Woods Lake, Sagamore Lake (pH ca. 5.5), and Panther Lake (pH ca. 7.0). Numbers of phytoplankton species observed were Woods 45, Sagamore 55, and Panther 85, conforming to observations at many other sites that species numbers decrease with increasing acidity. The smaller plankton are relatively more important in the more acid lakes, Woods > Sagamore > Panther. This pattern could be determined by nutrient availability (lake acidification is suspected of leading to decreased availability of phosphorus). The amount of 14C-labelled dissolved photosynthate (14C-DOM), as a percent of total productivity, is ordered Woods > Sagamore > Panther.

  10. Catalytic effect of ultrananocrystalline Fe₃O₄ on algal bio-crude production via HTL process.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Pérez, Arnulfo; Diaz-Diestra, Daysi; Frias-Flores, Cecilia B; Beltran-Huarac, Juan; Das, K C; Weiner, Brad R; Morell, Gerardo; Díaz-Vázquez, Liz M

    2015-11-14

    We report a comprehensive quantitative study of the production of refined bio-crudes via a controlled hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) process using Ulva fasciata macroalgae (UFMA) as biomass and ultrananocrystalline Fe3O4 (UNCFO) as catalyst. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy were applied to elucidate the formation of the high-quality nanocatalysts. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and CHNS analyses showed that the bio-crude yield and carbon/oxygen ratios increase as the amount of UNCFO increases, reaching a peak value of 32% at 1.25 wt% (a 9% increase when compared to the catalyst-free yield). The bio-crude is mainly composed of fatty acids, alcohols, ketones, phenol and benzene derivatives, and hydrocarbons. Their relative abundance changes as a function of catalyst concentration. FTIR spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry revealed that the as-produced bio-crudes are free of iron species, which accumulate in the generated bio-chars. Our findings also indicate that the energy recovery values via the HTL process are sensitive to the catalyst loading, with a threshold loading of 1.25 wt%. GC-MS studies show that the UNCFO not only influences the chemical nature of the resulting bio-crudes and bio-chars, but also the amount of fixed carbons in the solid residues. The detailed molecular characterization of the bio-crudes and bio-chars catalyzed by UNCFO represents the first systematic study reported using UFMA. This study brings forth new avenues to advance the highly-pure bio-crude production employing active, heterogeneous catalyst materials that are recoverable and recyclable for continuous thermochemical reactions.

  11. Sapphire Energy - Integrated Algal Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect

    White, Rebecca L.; Tyler, Mike

    2015-07-22

    Sapphire Energy, Inc. (SEI) is a leader in large-scale photosynthetic algal biomass production, with a strongly cohesive research, development, and operations program. SEI takes a multidiscipline approach to integrate lab-based strain selection, cultivation and harvest and production scale, and extraction for the production of Green Crude oil, a drop in replacement for traditional crude oil.. SEI’s technical accomplishments since 2007 have produced a multifunctional platform that can address needs for fuel, feed, and other higher value products. Figure 1 outlines SEI’s commercialization process, including Green Crude production and refinement to drop in fuel replacements. The large scale algal biomass production facility, the SEI Integrated Algal Biorefinery (IABR), was built in Luna County near Columbus, New Mexico (see fig 2). The extraction unit was located at the existing SEI facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico, approximately 95 miles from the IABR. The IABR facility was constructed on time and on budget, and the extraction unit expansion to accommodate the biomass output from the IABR was completed in October 2012. The IABR facility uses open pond cultivation with a proprietary harvesting method to produce algal biomass; this biomass is then shipped to the extraction facility for conversion to Green Crude. The operation of the IABR and the extraction facilities has demonstrated the critical integration of traditional agricultural techniques with algae cultivation knowledge for algal biomass production, and the successful conversion of the biomass to Green Crude. All primary unit operations are de-risked, and at a scale suitable for process demonstration. The results are stable, reliable, and long-term cultivation of strains for year round algal biomass production. From June 2012 to November 2014, the IABR and extraction facilities produced 524 metric tons (MT) of biomass (on a dry weight basis), and 2,587 gallons of Green Crude. Additionally, the IABR

  12. Formation of disinfection byproducts from chlor(am)ination of algal organic matter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Guo, Wanhong; Shen, Qianqian

    2011-12-15

    Algal cells and extracellular organic matter (EOM) of two algae species, Microcystis aeruginosa (blue-green algae) and Chlorella vulgaris (green algae), were characterized. The low specific UV absorbance (SUVA) values of EOM and cells from both algae species indicated the very hydrophilic nature of algal materials. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix showed that algal EOM and cells were enriched with protein-like and soluble microbial by-product-like matters. The formation potential of a variety of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination and chloramination of algal cells and EOM were evaluated. Algal cells and EOM of Microcystis and Chlorella exhibited a high potential for DBP formation. Yields of total DBPs varied with the algae cultivation age. Cellular materials contributed more to DBP formation than EOM. The presence of bromide led to higher concentrations of total trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetonitriles (HANs), and halonitromethanes (HNMs). Bromide also shifted the DBPs to brominated ones. Bromine incorporation was higher in HNMs than in THMs and HANs. Compared to natural organic matter, algae under bloom seasons can contribute significantly to the DBP precursor pool.

  13. Research and development of shallow algal mass culture systems for the production of oils

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, E.A.

    1984-10-01

    The major accomplishment of the past nine months' work was the identification of a microalgal species which can be grown in the system on a 12-month basis without temperature control. The most promising species identified to date is a strain of platymonas sp. This strain grows rapidly at temperatures from 20/sup 0/ to 34/sup 0/C, and at salinities from 1.5 to 3.5%. Neither the lower temperature limit nor the lower salinity limit of the strain are known at this time. A factorial experiment designed to determine optimum growth conditions indicated that the optimum culture depth was 10 cm, the optimum pH about 7.5, and the optimum flow rate about 30 cm/s. A major discovery was that diluting the culture every third day greatly enhanced production. In this dilution mode daily yields averaged 46 g/m/sup 2/ ash-free dry weight (AFDW) over a one-month period, and photosynthetic efficiencies averaged 11% (based on visible light energy). The former figure is over twice the best long-term yields achieved in microalgal mass culture systems grown exclusively on inorganic nutrients.

  14. Accumulation characteristics of soluble algal products (SAP) by a freshwater microalga Scenedesmus sp. LX1 during batch cultivation for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yin; Hu, Hong-Ying; Li, Xin; Wu, Yin-Hu; Zhang, Xue; Jia, Sheng-Lan

    2012-04-01

    Algae cultivation is the essential basis for microalgal biofuel production. Soluble algal products (SAP) are significant obstacle to large-scale, high-cell-density cultivation processes. SAP accumulation during batch cultivation of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 (a unique strain accumulating lipid substantially while growing fast under low-nutrient conditions) with different initial nitrogen concentrations (7.4-34.0mgNL(-1)) was investigated. The SAP content varied in the range of 3.4-17.4mgDOCL(-1) at stationary phase, with average yield per cell of 0.5-2.5pgDOCcell(-1). High SAP accumulation up to 15.2-17.4mgDOCL(-1) were observed with initial nitrogen above 20.2mgNL(-1). The maximum SAP production rate per unit culture volume (r(SAP)) was 2.6mgDOC(Ld)(-1) and that per cell (ν(SAP)) was 1.5pgDOC(celld)(-1). The r(SAP) increased with cell growth rate and decreased with cell density linearly. The SAP accumulation was majorly due to the release of growth-associated products.

  15. The seeding and cultivation of a tropical species of filamentous Ulva for algal biomass production.

    PubMed

    Carl, Christina; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous species of Ulva are ideal for cultivation because they are robust with high growth rates and maintained across a broad range of environments. Temperate species of filamentous Ulva are commercially cultivated on nets which can be artificially 'seeded' under controlled conditions allowing for a high level of control over seeding density and consequently biomass production. This study quantified for the first time the seeding and culture cycle of a tropical species of filamentous Ulva (Ulva sp. 3) and identified seeding density and nursery period as key factors affecting growth and biomass yield. A seeding density of 621,000 swarmers m(-1) rope in combination with a nursery period of five days resulted in the highest growth rate and correspondingly the highest biomass yield. A nursery period of five days was optimal with up to six times the biomass yield compared to ropes under either shorter or longer nursery periods. These combined parameters of seeding density and nursery period resulted in a specific growth rate of more than 65% day(-1) between 7 and 10 days of outdoor cultivation post-nursery. This was followed by a decrease in growth through to 25 days. This study also demonstrated that the timing of harvest is critical as the maximum biomass yield of 23.0 ± 8.8 g dry weight m(-1) (228.7 ± 115.4 g fresh weight m(-1)) was achieved after 13 days of outdoor cultivation whereas biomass degraded to 15.5 ± 7.3 g dry weight m(-1) (120.2 ± 71.8 g fresh weight m(-1)) over a longer outdoor cultivation period of 25 days. Artificially seeded ropes of Ulva with high biomass yields over short culture cycles may therefore be an alternative to unattached cultivation in integrated pond-based aquaculture systems.

  16. The Seeding and Cultivation of a Tropical Species of Filamentous Ulva for Algal Biomass Production

    PubMed Central

    Carl, Christina; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous species of Ulva are ideal for cultivation because they are robust with high growth rates and maintained across a broad range of environments. Temperate species of filamentous Ulva are commercially cultivated on nets which can be artificially ‘seeded’ under controlled conditions allowing for a high level of control over seeding density and consequently biomass production. This study quantified for the first time the seeding and culture cycle of a tropical species of filamentous Ulva (Ulva sp. 3) and identified seeding density and nursery period as key factors affecting growth and biomass yield. A seeding density of 621,000 swarmers m-1 rope in combination with a nursery period of five days resulted in the highest growth rate and correspondingly the highest biomass yield. A nursery period of five days was optimal with up to six times the biomass yield compared to ropes under either shorter or longer nursery periods. These combined parameters of seeding density and nursery period resulted in a specific growth rate of more than 65% day−1 between 7 and 10 days of outdoor cultivation post-nursery. This was followed by a decrease in growth through to 25 days. This study also demonstrated that the timing of harvest is critical as the maximum biomass yield of 23.0±8.8 g dry weight m−1 (228.7±115.4 g fresh weight m−1) was achieved after 13 days of outdoor cultivation whereas biomass degraded to 15.5±7.3 g dry weight m−1 (120.2±71.8 g fresh weight m−1) over a longer outdoor cultivation period of 25 days. Artificially seeded ropes of Ulva with high biomass yields over short culture cycles may therefore be an alternative to unattached cultivation in integrated pond-based aquaculture systems. PMID:24897115

  17. Constraints to commercialization of algal fuels.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Yusuf

    2013-09-10

    Production of algal crude oil has been achieved in various pilot scale facilities, but whether algal fuels can be produced in sufficient quantity to meaningfully displace petroleum fuels, has been largely overlooked. Limitations to commercialization of algal fuels need to be understood and addressed for any future commercialization. This review identifies the major constraints to commercialization of transport fuels from microalgae. Algae derived fuels are expensive compared to petroleum derived fuels, but this could change. Unfortunately, improved economics of production are not sufficient for an environmentally sustainable production, or its large scale feasibility. A low-cost point supply of concentrated carbon dioxide colocated with the other essential resources is necessary for producing algal fuels. An insufficiency of concentrated carbon dioxide is actually a major impediment to any substantial production of algal fuels. Sustainability of production requires the development of an ability to almost fully recycle the phosphorous and nitrogen nutrients that are necessary for algae culture. Development of a nitrogen biofixation ability to support production of algal fuels ought to be an important long term objective. At sufficiently large scale, a limited supply of freshwater will pose a significant limitation to production even if marine algae are used. Processes for recovering energy from the algal biomass left after the extraction of oil, are required for achieving a net positive energy balance in the algal fuel oil. The near term outlook for widespread use of algal fuels appears bleak, but fuels for niche applications such as in aviation may be likely in the medium term. Genetic and metabolic engineering of microalgae to boost production of fuel oil and ease its recovery, are essential for commercialization of algal fuels. Algae will need to be genetically modified for improved photosynthetic efficiency in the long term.

  18. Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Helman, Yael; Natale, Frank; Sherrell, Robert M.; LaVigne, Michèle; Starovoytov, Valentin; Gorbunov, Maxim Y.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity in animals required the production of extracellular matrices that serve to spatially organize cells according to function. In corals, three matrices are involved in spatial organization: (i) an organic ECM, which facilitates cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion; (ii) a skeletal organic matrix (SOM), which facilitates controlled deposition of a calcium carbonate skeleton; and (iii) the calcium carbonate skeleton itself, which provides the structural support for the 3D organization of coral colonies. In this report, we examine the production of these three matrices by using an in vitro culturing system for coral cells. In this system, which significantly facilitates studies of coral cell physiology, we demonstrate in vitro excretion of ECM by primary (nondividing) tissue cultures of both soft (Xenia elongata) and hard (Montipora digitata) corals. There are structural differences between the ECM produced by X. elongata cell cultures and that of M. digitata, and ascorbic acid, a critical cofactor for proline hydroxylation, significantly increased the production of collagen in the ECM of the latter species. We further demonstrate in vitro production of SOM and extracellular mineralized particles in cell cultures of M. digitata. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of Sr/Ca ratios revealed the particles to be aragonite. De novo calcification was confirmed by following the incorporation of 45Ca into acid labile macromolecules. Our results demonstrate the ability of isolated, differentiated coral cells to undergo fundamental processes required for multicellular organization. PMID:18162537

  19. Inhibitors of Serine Proteases in Regulating the Production and Function of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Pawel; Majchrzak-Gorecka, Monika; Grygier, Beata; Skrzeczynska-Moncznik, Joanna; Osiecka, Oktawia; Cichy, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), DNA webs released into the extracellular environment by activated neutrophils, are thought to play a key role in the entrapment and eradication of microbes. However, NETs are highly cytotoxic and a likely source of autoantigens, suggesting that NET release is tightly regulated. NET formation involves the activity of neutrophil elastase (NE), which cleaves histones, leading to chromatin decondensation. We and others have recently demonstrated that inhibitors of NE, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and SerpinB1, restrict NET production in vitro and in vivo. SLPI was also identified as a NET component in the lesional skin of patients suffering from the autoinflammatory skin disease psoriasis. SLPI-competent NET-like structures (a mixture of SLPI with neutrophil DNA and NE) stimulated the synthesis of interferon type I (IFNI) in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in vitro. pDCs uniquely respond to viral or microbial DNA/RNA but also to nucleic acids of “self” origin with the production of IFNI. Although IFNIs are critical in activating the antiviral/antimicrobial functions of many cells, IFNIs also play a role in inducing autoimmunity. Thus, NETs decorated by SLPI may regulate skin immunity through enhancing IFNI production in pDCs. Here, we review key aspects of how SLPI and SerpinB1 can control NET production and immunogenic function. PMID:27446090

  20. NREL Algal Biofuels Projects and Partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-01

    This fact sheet highlights several algal biofuels research and development projects focused on improving the economics of the algal biofuels production process. These projects should serve as a foundation for the research efforts toward algae as a source of fuels and other chemicals.

  1. Production and properties of heat-stable extracellular hemolysin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M K; Boese-Marrazzo, D

    1980-01-01

    Of 12 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were found to produce heat-stable extracellular hemolysin in highly aerated peptone broth supplemented with glycerol, fructose, or mannitol. Glucose supported good hemolysin production only in medium that was highly buffered. The yield of both cells and hemolysin was lower with organic acids as supplement. Growth-limiting phosphate concentrations produced maximum hemolysin levels. Purified hemolysin preparations contained two hemolytic glycolipids. The kinetics of hemolysis at various levels of purified lysin and the effects of variation in lysin and erythrocyte concentration are described. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6776058

  2. Harmful Algal Bloom Webinar

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The problem is complex. Excessive nitrogen and phosphorous levels can cause harmful algal blooms. Different algal/cyanobacteria strains bloom under different conditions. Different strains produce different toxins at varying amounts.

  3. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps of Cynoglossus semilaevis: Production Characteristics and Antibacterial Effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming-li; Chi, Heng; Sun, Li

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are structures released by neutrophils as a cellular immune defense against microbial invasion. The process of NETs generation, netosis (NETosis), can take place via either a suicidal mechanism, during which the NETs-releasing cells became dead, or a “live” mechanism, during which the NETs-releasing cells remain vital. NETosis has been studied intensively in mammals in recent years, but very little is known about the NETosis in fish. In this study, we examined NETosis in tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis), a species of teleost with important economic values. We found that following stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and three common fish bacterial pathogens, abundant NETs structures were released by neutrophils that were most likely in a live state. The released NETs captured, but did not kill, the bacterial pathogens; however, the replication of extracellular, but not intracellular, pathogens was inhibited by NETs to significant extents. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) production were observed to be enhanced in NETosing neutrophils, and blocking the production of these factors by inhibitors significantly decreased NETs production induced by PMA and all three bacteria. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that in teleost there exists a non-cell death pathway of NETosis that produces NETs with antibacterial effects in a ROS-, NO-, and MPO-dependent manner. PMID:28382034

  4. Improvement in extracellular protease production by the marine antarctic yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa L7.

    PubMed

    Chaud, Luciana C S; Lario, Luciana D; Bonugli-Santos, Rafaella C; Sette, Lara D; Pessoa Junior, Adalberto; Felipe, Maria das Graças de A

    2016-12-25

    Microorganisms from extreme and restrictive eco systems, such as the Antarctic continent, are of great interest due to their ability to synthesize products of commercial value. Among these, enzymes from psychrotolerant and psychrophilic microorganisms offer potential economical benefits due to their high activity at low and moderate temperatures. The cold adapted yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa L7 was selected out of 97 yeasts isolated from Antarctica as having the highest extracellular proteolytic activity in preliminary tests. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of nutrient composition (peptone, rice bran extract, ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride) and physicochemical parameters (temperature and pH) on its proteolytic activity. A 2(6-2) fractional factorial design experiment followed by a central composite design (CCD 2(3)) was performed to optimize the culture conditions and improve the extracellular proteolytic activity. The results indicated that the presence of peptone in the medium was the most influential factor in protease production. Enzymatic activity was enhanced by the interaction between low glucose and peptone concentrations. The optimization of culture conditions with the aid of mathematical modeling enabled a c. 45% increase in proteolytic activity and at the same time reduced the amount of glucose and peptone required for the culture. Thus culture conditions established in this work may be employed in the biotechnological production of this protease.

  5. Extracellular production of an intact and biologically active human growth hormone by the Bacillus brevis system.

    PubMed

    Kajino, T; Saito, Y; Asami, O; Yamada, Y; Hirai, M; Udata, S

    1997-10-01

    The characteristic features of the Bacillus brevis system are very high productivity of heterologous proteins and very low extracellular protease activity. However, degradation of some heterologous proteins, especially mammalian proteins, can be observed and resulted in a lowering of protein productivity. By using a mutant expressing low levels of proteases and the addition of EDTA to the medium, intact human growth hormone (hGH) was successfully produced with the B. brevis system. Signal peptide modification with higher basicity in the amino terminal region and higher hydrophobicity in the middle region brought about a twelve-fold increase in hGH production. The hGH yield was further elevated to 240 mg L-1 by optimization of culture conditions. Thus, biologically active and mature hGH can be efficiently produced directly in the medium with the B. brevis system.

  6. Intraspecific protoplast fusion of Brettanomyces anomalus for improved production of an extracellular β-glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Zhao, Xihong; Pan, Siyi

    2014-01-01

    Improvement of production of an extracellular β-glucosidase with high activity by Brettanomyces anomalus PSY-001 was performed by using recursive protoplast fusion in a genome-shuffling format. The initial population was generated by ultraviolet irradiation, ultrasonic mutagenesis and, then, subjected to recursive protoplast fusion. Mutant strains exhibiting significantly higher β-glucosidase activities in liquid media were isolated. The best mutant strain showed increased cell growth in a flask culture, as well as increased β-glucosidase production. A recombinant strain, F3-25, was obtained after three rounds of genome shuffling and its production of β-glucosidase activity reached 4790 U L−1, which was a nearly eightfold increase compared to the original strain B. anomalus PSY-001. The subculture experiments indicated that F3-25 was genetically stable. PMID:26019572

  7. The Use of the Schizonticidal Agent Quinine Sulfate to Prevent Pond Crashes for Algal-Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chunyan; Wu, Kangyan; Van Ginkel, Steve W.; Igou, Thomas; Lee, Hwa Jong; Bhargava, Aditya; Johnston, Rachel; Snell, Terry; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Algal biofuels are investigated as a promising alternative to petroleum fuel sources to satisfy transportation demand. Despite the high growth rate of algae, predation by rotifers, ciliates, golden algae, and other predators will cause an algae in open ponds to crash. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as a model alga and the freshwater rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, as a model predator. The goal of this study was to test the selective toxicity of the chemical, quinine sulfate (QS), on both the alga and the rotifer in order to fully inhibit the rotifer while minimizing its impact on algal growth. The QS LC50 for B. calyciflorus was 17 µM while C. kessleri growth was not inhibited at concentrations <25 µM. In co-culture, complete inhibition of rotifers was observed when the QS concentration was 7.7 µM, while algal growth was not affected. QS applications to produce 1 million gallons of biodiesel in one year are estimated to be $0.04/gallon or ~1% of Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO) projected cost of $5/gge (gallon gasoline equivalent). This provides algae farmers an important tool to manage grazing predators in algae mass cultures and avoid pond crashes. PMID:26593899

  8. The Use of the Schizonticidal Agent Quinine Sulfate to Prevent Pond Crashes for Algal-Biofuel Production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunyan; Wu, Kangyan; Van Ginkel, Steve W; Igou, Thomas; Lee, Hwa Jong; Bhargava, Aditya; Johnston, Rachel; Snell, Terry; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-11-17

    Algal biofuels are investigated as a promising alternative to petroleum fuel sources to satisfy transportation demand. Despite the high growth rate of algae, predation by rotifers, ciliates, golden algae, and other predators will cause an algae in open ponds to crash. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as a model alga and the freshwater rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, as a model predator. The goal of this study was to test the selective toxicity of the chemical, quinine sulfate (QS), on both the alga and the rotifer in order to fully inhibit the rotifer while minimizing its impact on algal growth. The QS LC50 for B. calyciflorus was 17 µM while C. kessleri growth was not inhibited at concentrations <25 µM. In co-culture, complete inhibition of rotifers was observed when the QS concentration was 7.7 µM, while algal growth was not affected. QS applications to produce 1 million gallons of biodiesel in one year are estimated to be $0.04/gallon or ~1% of Bioenergy Technologies Office's (BETO) projected cost of $5/gge (gallon gasoline equivalent). This provides algae farmers an important tool to manage grazing predators in algae mass cultures and avoid pond crashes.

  9. Guidance values for microcystins in water and cyanobacterial supplement products (blue-green algal supplements): a reasonable or misguided approach?

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Daniel; Hoeger, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.hoeger@uni-konstanz.de

    2005-03-15

    This article reviews current scientific knowledge on the toxicity and carcinogenicity of microcystins and compares this to the guidance values proposed for microcystins in water by the World Health Organization, and for blue-green algal food supplements by the Oregon State Department of Health. The basis of the risk assessment underlying these guidance values is viewed as being critical due to overt deficiencies in the data used for its generation: (i) use of one microcystin congener only (microcystin-LR), while the other presently known nearly 80 congeners are largely disregarded, (ii) new knowledge regarding potential neuro and renal toxicity of microcystins in humans and (iii) the inadequacies of assessing realistic microcystin exposures in humans and especially in children via blue-green algal food supplements. In reiterating the state-of-the-art toxicology database on microcystins and in the light of new data on the high degree of toxin contamination of algal food supplements, this review clearly demonstrates the need for improved kinetic data of microcystins in humans and for discussion concerning uncertainty factors, which may result in a lowering of the present guidance values and an increased routine control of water bodies and food supplements for toxin contamination. Similar to the approach taken previously by authorities for dioxin or PCB risk assessment, the use of a toxin equivalent approach to the risk assessment of microcystins is proposed.

  10. A GIS COST MODEL TO ASSESS THE AVAILABILITY OF FRESHWATER, SEAWATER, AND SALINE GROUNDWATER FOR ALGAL BIOFUEL PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2013-03-15

    A key advantage of using microalgae for biofuel production is the ability of some algal strains to thrive in waters unsuitable for conventional crop irrigation such as saline groundwater or seawater. Nonetheless, the availability of sustainable water supplies will provide significant challenges for scale-up and development of algal biofuels. We conduct a limited techno-economic assessment based on the availability of freshwater, saline groundwater, and seawater for use in open pond algae cultivation systems. We explore water issues through GIS-based models of algae biofuel production, freshwater supply, and cost models for supplying seawater and saline groundwater. We estimate that combined, within the coterminous US these resources can support production on the order of 9.46E+7 m3 yr-1 (25 billion gallons yr-1) of renewable biodiesel. Achievement of larger targets requires the utilization of less water efficient sites and relatively expensive saline waters. Geographically, water availability is most favorable for the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida peninsula, where evaporation relative to precipitation is moderate and various saline waters are economically available. As a whole, barren and scrub lands of the southwestern US have limited freshwater supplies so accurate assessment of alternative waters is critical.

  11. Optimizing production of asperolide A, a potential anti-tumor tetranorditerpenoid originally produced by the algal-derived endophytic fungus Aspergillus wentii EN-48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Gangming; Wang, Bingui

    2016-07-01

    The marine algal-derived endophytic fungus Aspergillus wentii EN-48 produces the potential anti-tumor agent asperolide A, a tetranorlabdane diterpenoid active against lung cancer. However, the fermentation yield of asperolide A was very low and only produced in static cultures. Static fermentation conditions of A. wentii EN-48 were optimized employing response surface methodology to enhance the production of asperolide A. The optimized conditions resulted in a 13.9-fold yield enhancement, which matched the predicted value, and the optimized conditions were successfully used in scale-up fermentation for the production of asperolide A. Exogenous addition of plant hormones (especially 10 μmol/L methyl jasmonate) stimulated asperolide A production. To our knowledge, this is first optimized production of an asperolide by a marine-derived fungus. The optimization is Effective and valuable to supply material for further anti-tumor mechanism studies and preclinical evaluation of asperolide A and other norditerpenoids.

  12. Metabolic systems analysis to advance algal biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Brian J; Lin-Schmidt, Xiefan; Chamberlin, Austin; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Papin, Jason A

    2010-07-01

    Algal fuel sources promise unsurpassed yields in a carbon neutral manner that minimizes resource competition between agriculture and fuel crops. Many challenges must be addressed before algal biofuels can be accepted as a component of the fossil fuel replacement strategy. One significant challenge is that the cost of algal fuel production must become competitive with existing fuel alternatives. Algal biofuel production presents the opportunity to fine-tune microbial metabolic machinery for an optimal blend of biomass constituents and desired fuel molecules. Genome-scale model-driven algal metabolic design promises to facilitate both goals by directing the utilization of metabolites in the complex, interconnected metabolic networks to optimize production of the compounds of interest. Network analysis can direct microbial development efforts towards successful strategies and enable quantitative fine-tuning of the network for optimal product yields while maintaining the robustness of the production microbe. Metabolic modeling yields insights into microbial function, guides experiments by generating testable hypotheses, and enables the refinement of knowledge on the specific organism. While the application of such analytical approaches to algal systems is limited to date, metabolic network analysis can improve understanding of algal metabolic systems and play an important role in expediting the adoption of new biofuel technologies.

  13. Influences of environmental factors on bacterial extracellular polymeric substances production in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lu; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Xin, Jia; Peng, Tao

    2014-11-01

    Bioclogging of natural porous media occurs frequently under a wide range of conditions. It may influence the performance of permeable reactive barrier and constructed wetland. It is also one of the factors that determine the effect of artificial groundwater recharge and in situ bioremediation process. In this study, a series of percolation column experiments were conducted to simulate bioclogging process in porous media. The predominant bacteria in porous media which induced clogging were identified to be Methylobacterium, Janthinobacterium, Yersinia, Staphylococcus and Acidovorax, most of which had been shown to effectively produce viscous extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The column in which EPS production was maximized also coincided with the largest reduction in saturated hydraulic conductivity of porous media. In addition, carbon concentration was the most significant factor to affect polysaccharide, protein and EPS secretion, followed by phosphorus concentration and temperature. The coupled effect of carbon and phosphorus concentration was also very important to stimulate polysaccharide and EPS production.

  14. Extracellular superoxide production associated with secondary root growth following desiccation of Pisum sativum seedlings.

    PubMed

    Roach, Thomas; Kranner, Ilse

    2011-10-15

    The seedling stage is arguably the most vulnerable phase in the plant life cycle, where the young establishing plant is extremely sensitive to environmental stresses such as drought. Here, the production of superoxide (O(2)(-)), a molecule involved in stress signaling, was measured in response to desiccation of Pisum sativum L. seedlings. Following desiccation that was sufficient to kill the radicle meristem, viability could be retained by seedlings that grew secondary roots. Upon rehydration, secondary roots formed in a region that had displayed intense extracellular O(2)(-)production on desiccation. Treating partially desiccated seedlings with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) prevented viability loss. In summary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to participate in the signaling required for secondary root formation following desiccation stress of P. sativum seedlings.

  15. Species-Level Variability in Extracellular Production Rates of Reactive Oxygen Species by Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Robin J.; Roe, Kelly L.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2-. T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94–100% H2O2; 10–80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65–95% H2O2; 10–50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even

  16. Species-level variability in extracellular production rates of reactive oxygen species by diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Robin; Roe, Kelly; Hansel, Colleen; Voelker, Bettina

    2016-03-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O¬2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2 . T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94-100% H2O2; 10-80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65-95% H2O2; 10-50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even between those that are

  17. Enhancement of extracellular pullulanase production from recombinant Escherichia coli by combined strategy involving auto-induction and temperature control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Bo; Nie, Yao; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Rong

    2014-04-01

    Pullulanase was extracellularly produced with an engineered Escherichia coli with a combined strategy. When auto-induction instead of isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction method was implemented, we observed increased extracellular activity (4.2 U ml(-1)) and cell biomass (7.95 g DCW l(-1)). Subsequent investigation of temperature effect on fermentation showed cultivation performed at 25 °C presented the highest extracellular titer and cell biomass. In order to reduce the extended production period, we developed a two-stage temperature control strategy. Its application not only reduced the production period from 72 to 36 h, but also further enhanced the yield of extracellular pullulanase. Finally, with a view to releasing more intracellular pullulanase, we altered cell membrane permeability with various medium additives. As a result, extracellular titer was elevated to 68.23 U ml(-1), nearly 35-fold higher than that with IPTG induction method. The combined strategy developed here may be useful for the production of other extracellular proteins by recombinant E. coli.

  18. Evaluation of internal loading and water level changes: implications for phosphorus, algal production, and nuisance blooms in Kabetogama Lake, Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Maki, Ryan P.; Kiesling, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrologic manipulations have the potential to exacerbate or remediate eutrophication in productive reservoirs. Dam operations at Kabetogama Lake, Minnesota, were modified in 2000 to restore a more natural water regime and improve water quality. The US Geological Survey and National Park Service evaluated nutrient, algae, and nuisance bloom data in relation to changes in Kabetogama Lake water levels. Comparison of the results of this study to previous studies indicates that chlorophyll a concentrations have decreased, whereas total phosphorus (TP) concentrations have not changed significantly since 2000. Water and sediment quality data were collected at Voyageurs National Park during 2008–2009 to assess internal phosphorus loading and determine whether loading is a factor affecting TP concentrations and algal productivity. Kabetogama Lake often was mixed vertically, except for occasional stratification measured in certain areas, including Lost Bay in the northeastern part of Kabetogama Lake. Stratification, higher bottom water and sediment nutrient concentrations than in other parts of the lake, and phosphorus release rates estimated from sediment core incubations indicated that Lost Bay is one of several areas that may be contributing to internal loading. Internal loading of TP is a concern because increased TP may cause excessive algal growth including potentially toxic cyanobacteria.

  19. In search of actionable targets for agrigenomics and microalgal biofuel production: sequence-structural diversity studies on algal and higher plants with a focus on GPAT protein.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Panda, Prasanna Kumar

    2013-04-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) pathway provides several targets for genetic engineering to optimize microalgal lipid productivity. GPAT (glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase) is a crucial enzyme that catalyzes the initial step of TAG biosynthesis. Despite many recent biochemical studies, a comprehensive sequence-structure analysis of GPAT across diverse lipid-yielding organisms is lacking. Hence, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of plastid-located GPAT proteins from 7 microalgae and 3 higher plants species. The close evolutionary relationship observed between red algae/diatoms and green algae/plant lineages in the phylogenetic tree were further corroborated by motif and gene structure analysis. The predicted molecular weight, amino acid composition, Instability Index, and hydropathicity profile gave an overall representation of the biochemical features of GPAT protein across the species under study. Furthermore, homology models of GPAT from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Glycine max provided deep insights into the protein architecture and substrate binding sites. Despite low sequence identity found between algal and plant GPATs, the developed models exhibited strikingly conserved topology consisting of 14α helices and 9β sheets arranged in two domains. However, subtle variations in amino acids of fatty acyl binding site were identified that might influence the substrate selectivity of GPAT. Together, the results will provide useful resources to understand the functional and evolutionary relationship of GPAT and potentially benefit in development of engineered enzyme for augmenting algal biofuel production.

  20. Baicalin Down-Regulates IL-1β-Stimulated Extracellular Matrix Production in Nasal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Min; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Lee, Seoung-Ae; Park, Il-Ho; Lee, Heung-Man

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Baicalin, a Chinese herbal medicine, has anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects. The aims of present study were to investigate the effects of baicalin on the myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts and to determine the molecular mechanism of baicalin in nasal fibroblasts. Methods Nasal fibroblasts were isolated from the inferior turbinate of patients. Baicalin was used to treat IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. To evaluate cytotoxicity, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay was used. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), fibronectin, phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK), p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα were measured by western blotting, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT—PCR),or immunofluorescence staining. Fibroblast migration was analyzed with scratch assays and transwell migration assays. Total collagen was evaluated with the Sircol collagen assay. Contractile activity was measured with a collagen gel contraction assay. Results Baicalin (0–50 μM) had no significant cytotoxic effects in nasal fibroblasts. The expression of α–SMA and fibronectin were significantly down-regulated in baicalin-treated nasal fibroblasts. Migration, collagen production, and contraction of IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts were significantly inhibited by baicalin treatment. Baicalin also significantly down-regulated p-MAPK, p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. Conclusions We showed that baicalin down-regulated myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction via the MAPK and Akt/ NF-κB pathways in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. PMID:28002421

  1. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Complement C5a Production within Bacterial Extracellular Polymeric Substance

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Erin C.; Hsu, Yueh-Ya; Bortz, David M.; Younger, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Opsonization and anaphylatoxin production are early events in innate response to bacterial pathogens. Opsonization alone is frequently not lethal and production of anaphylatoxins, especially C5a, allows for recruitment of cellular defenses. Complement biochemistry is extensively studied and computational models have been previously reported. However, a critical feature of complement mediated attack is its spatial dependence: diffusion of mediators into and away from a bacterium is central to understanding C5a generation. Spatial dependence is especially important in biofilms, where diffusion limitation is crucial to bacterial counterdefense. Here we develop a model of opsonization and C5a production in the presence of a common blood borne pathogen, Staphylococcus epidermidis. Our results indicate that when complement attacks a single cell, diffusion into the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) is complete within 10 msec and that production of C5a peaks over the next 15 minutes. When longer diffusion lengths (as in an EPS-rich biofilm) are incorporated, diffusion limitation appears such that the intensity and duration of C5a production is increased. However, the amount of C5a produced under several likely clinical scenarios where single cells or sparse biofilms are present is below the kD of the C5a receptor suggesting that complement activation by a single bacterium may be difficult to detect when diffusion is taken into account. PMID:23328643

  2. Algal Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, Maria L

    2015-10-08

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under the guidance of Drs. Michael Seibert (retired, Fellow Emeritus) and Maria Ghirardi (Fellow), led 15 years of research addressing the issue of algal H2 photoproduction. This project resulted in greatly increased rates and yields of algal hydrogen production; increased understanding of the H2 metabolism in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; expanded our knowledge of other physiological aspects relevant to sustained algal photosynthetic H2 production; led to the genetic identification, cloning and manipulation of algal hydrogenase genes; and contributed to a broader, fundamental understanding of the technical and scientific challenges to improving the conversion efficiencies in order to reach the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office’s targets. Some of the tangible results are: (i) 64 publications and 6 patents, (ii) international visibility to NREL, (iii) reinvigoration of national and international biohydrogen research, and (iv) research progress that helped stimulate new funding from other DOE and non-DOE programs, including the AFOSR and the DOE Office of Science.

  3. The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae alters ambient pH, allowing extracellular protease production and activity.

    PubMed

    St Leger, R J; Nelson, J O; Screen, S E

    1999-10-01

    Ambient pH regulates the expression of virulence genes of Metarhizium anisopliae, but it was unknown if M. anisopliae can regulate ambient pH. Mutants of M. anisopliae altered in production of oxalic acid were evaluated for the interrelationship of ambient pH, buffering capacity added to media, growth, and generation of extracellular proteases and ammonia. Wild-type and acid-overproducing mutants [Acid(+)] grew almost as well at pH 8 as at pH 6, but acid-non-producing [Acid(-)] mutants showed limited growth at pH 8, indicating that acid production is linked to the ability to grow at higher pH. Production of ammonia by M. anisopliae was strongly stimulated by low levels of amino acids in the medium when cells were derepressed for nitrogen and carbon. Likewise, although Aspergillus fumigatus and Neurospora crassa produced some ammonia in minimal media, addition of low levels of amino acids enhanced production. Ammonia production by A. fumigatus, N. crassa and M. anisopliae increased the pH of the medium and allowed production of subtilisin proteases, whose activities are observed only at basic pH. In contrast, protease production by the Acid(+) mutants of M. anisopliae was greatly reduced because of the acidification of the medium. This suggests that alkalinization by ammonia production is adaptive by facilitating the utilization of proteinaceous nutrients. Collectively, the data imply that ammonia may have functions related to regulation of the microenvironment and that it represents a previously unconsidered virulence factor in diverse fungi with the potential to harm tissues and disturb the host's immune system.

  4. Algal biofuels: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Leite, Gustavo B; Abdelaziz, Ahmed E M; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2013-10-01

    Biodiesel production using microalgae is attractive in a number of respects. Here a number of pros and cons to using microalgae for biofuels production are reviewed. Algal cultivation can be carried out using non-arable land and non-potable water with simple nutrient supply. In addition, algal biomass productivities are much higher than those of vascular plants and the extractable content of lipids that can be usefully converted to biodiesel, triacylglycerols (TAGs) can be much higher than that of the oil seeds now used for first generation biodiesel. On the other hand, practical, cost-effective production of biofuels from microalgae requires that a number of obstacles be overcome. These include the development of low-cost, effective growth systems, efficient and energy saving harvesting techniques, and methods for oil extraction and conversion that are environmentally benign and cost-effective. Promising recent advances in these areas are highlighted.

  5. Membrane biofouling by extracellular polymeric substances or soluble microbial products from membrane bioreactor sludge.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, A; Lee, D J; Lai, J Y

    2007-03-01

    This study extracted the soluble microbial products and loosely bound and tightly bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from suspended sludge from a membrane bioreactor, original and aerobically/anaerobically digested, and compared their fouling potentials on a microfiltration membrane. The resistance of cake layer accounts for 95-98% of the total filtration resistances when filtering the whole sludges, with anaerobically digested sludge presenting the highest resistance among the three tested sludges. The tightly bound EPS has the highest potential to foul the membrane; however, the loosely bound EPS contribute most of the filtration resistances of the whole sludges. The foulants corresponding to the irreversible fouling have chemical fingerprints similar to those from loosely bound EPS, which have a greater predilection to proteins and humic substances than to polysaccharides.

  6. A protein disulfide isomerase gene fusion expression system that increases the extracellular productivity of Bacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Kajino, T; Ohto, C; Muramatsu, M; Obata, S; Udaka, S; Yamada, Y; Takahashi, H

    2000-02-01

    We have developed a versatile Bacillus brevis expression and secretion system based on the use of fungal protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) as a gene fusion partner. Fusion with PDI increased the extracellular production of heterologous proteins (light chain of immunoglobulin G, 8-fold; geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, 12-fold). Linkage to PDI prevented the aggregation of the secreted proteins, resulting in high-level accumulation of fusion proteins in soluble and biologically active forms. We also show that the disulfide isomerase activity of PDI in a fusion protein is responsible for the suppression of the aggregation of the protein with intradisulfide, whereas aggregation of the protein without intradisulfide was prevented even when the protein was fused to a mutant PDI whose two active sites were disrupted, suggesting that another PDI function, such as chaperone-like activity, synergistically prevented the aggregation of heterologous proteins in the PDI fusion expression system.

  7. Production, purification and application of extracellular chitinase from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans 191

    PubMed Central

    Fleuri, Luciana F.; Kawaguti, Haroldo Y.; Sato, Hélia H.

    2009-01-01

    This study concerned the production, purification and application of extracellular chitinase from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans strain 191. In shaken flasks the maximum yield of chitinase was 6.9 U/mL after 72 h of cultivation at 25°C and 200 rpm. In a 5 L fermenter with 1.5 vvm aeration, the highest yield obtained was 4.19 U/mL after 168 h of fermentation at 25°C and 200 rpm, and using 3 vvm, it was 4.38 U/mL after 144 h of fermentation. The chitinase (61 KDa) was purified about 6.65 times by Sepharose CL 4B 200 gel filtration with a yield of 46.61%. The purified enzyme was able to lyse the cell walls of some fungi and to form protoplasts. PMID:24031407

  8. Effect of herbizid and touchdown herbicides on soil fungi and on production of some extracellular enzymes.

    PubMed

    El-Said, A H M; Abdel-Hafez, S I I; Saleem, A

    2005-01-01

    Glucophilic and cellulose-decomposing fungi were significantly reduced in soil samples treated with 0.019-0.152 mg a.i./kg soil of the herbicides Herbizid and Touchdown. The decrease was regularly correlated with the doses of the two herbicides and persisted till the end of the experiment (12 weeks). The isolated fungi were found to be able to produce hydrolytic extracellular enzymes in solid media but with variable capabilities. The ability to produce enzymes was adversily affected by the incorporation of herbicides in culture media. Lower doses of herbicides were occasionally promotive to enzyme production and mycelial growth of some fungi. Incorporation of 50 ppm of Herbizid and Touchdown significantly activated amylase production and mycelial dry weight in cultures of Fusarium oxysporum, Mucor hiemalis and Penicillium chrysogenum. There was a significant increase in C1-cellulase produced by F. oxysporum and P. aurantiogriseum when cultures were treated with 50, 100 and 200 ppm of Herbizid which induced also more Cx-cellulase production by P. chrysogenum. Lipase and protease production was always lower in treated than in control fungal cultures.

  9. Dynamics of extracellular matrix production and turnover in tissue engineered cardiovascular structures.

    PubMed

    Stock, U A; Wiederschain, D; Kilroy, S M; Shum-Tim, D; Khalil, P N; Vacanti, J P; Mayer, J E; Moses, M A

    2001-03-26

    Appropriate matrix formation, turnover and remodeling in tissue-engineered small diameter vascular conduits are crucial requirements for their long-term patency and function. This complex process requires the deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix molecules as well as the remodeling of this extracellular matrix (ECM) by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs). In this study, we have investigated the dynamics of ECM production and the activity of MMPs and TIMPs in long-term tissue-engineered vascular conduits using quantitative ECM analysis, substrate gel electrophoresis, radiometric enzyme assays and Western blot analyses. Over a time period of 169 days in vivo, levels of elastin and proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans in tissue-engineered constructs came to approximate those of their native tissue counter parts. The kinetics of collagen deposition and remodeling, however, apparently require a much longer time period. Through the use of substrate gel electrophoresis, proteolytic bands whose molecular weight was consistent with their identification as the active form of MMP-2 (approximately 64--66 kDa) were detected in all native and tissue-engineered samples. Additional proteolytic bands migrating at approximately 72 kDa representing the latent form of MMP-2 were detected in tissue-engineered samples at time points from 5 throughout 55 days. Radiometric assays of MMP-1 activity demonstrated no significant differences between the native and tissue-engineered samples. This study determines the dynamics of ECM production and turnover in a long-term tissue-engineered vascular tissue and highlights the importance of ECM remodeling in the development of successful tissue-engineered vascular structures.

  10. Biodiesel production from different algal oil using immobilized pure lipase and tailor made rPichia pastoris with Cal A and Cal B genes.

    PubMed

    Bharathiraja, B; Ranjith Kumar, R; PraveenKumar, R; Chakravarthy, M; Yogendran, D; Jayamuthunagai, J

    2016-08-01

    In this investigation, oil extraction was performed in marine macroalgae Gracilaria edulis, Enteromorpha compressa and Ulva lactuca. The algal biomass was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fourier Transform-Infra Red Spectroscopy. Six different pre-treatment methods were carried out to evaluate the best method for maximum oil extraction. Optimization of extraction parameters were performed and high oil yield was obtained at temperature 55°C, time 150min, particle size 0.10mm, solvent-to-solid ratio 6:1 and agitation rate 500rpm. After optimization, 9.5%, 12.18% and 10.50 (g/g) of oil extraction yield was achieved from the respective algal biomass. The rate constant for extraction was obtained as first order kinetics, by differential method. Stable intracellular Cal A and Cal B lipase producing recombinant Pichia pastoris was constructed and used as biocatalyst for biodiesel production. Comparative analysis of lipase activity and biodiesel yield was made with immobilized Candida antarctica lipase.

  11. Neutrophil extracellular traps induce IL-1β production by macrophages in combination with lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongshuang; Murakami, Taisuke; Tamura, Hiroshi; Reich, Johannes; Kuwahara-Arai, Kyoko; Iba, Toshiaki; Tabe, Yoko; Nagaoka, Isao

    2017-01-01

    Upon exposure to invading microorganisms, neutrophils undergo NETosis, a recently identified type of programmed cell death, and release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs are described as an antimicrobial mechanism, based on the fact that NETs can trap microorganisms and exhibit bactericidal activity through the action of NET-associated components. In contrast, the components of NETs have been recognized as damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), which trigger inflammatory signals to induce cell death, inflammation and organ failure. In the present study, to clarify the effect of NETs on cytokine production by macrophages, mouse macrophage-like J774 cells were treated with NETs in combination with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a constituent of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. The results revealed that NETs significantly induced the production of interleukin (IL)-1β by J774 cells in the presence of LPS. Notably, the NET/LPS-induced IL-1β production was inhibited by both caspase-1 and caspase-8 inhibitors. Furthermore, nucleases and serine protease inhibitors but not anti-histone antibodies significantly inhibited the NET/LPS-induced IL-1β production. Moreover, we confirmed that caspase-1 and caspase-8 were activated by NETs/LPS, and the combination of LPS, DNA and neutrophil elastase induced IL-1β production in reconstitution experiments. These observations indicate that NETs induce the production of IL-1β by J774 macrophages in combination with LPS via the caspase-1 and caspase-8 pathways, and NET-associated DNA and serine proteases are involved in NET/LPS-induced IL-1β production as essential components. PMID:28204821

  12. A GIS cost model to assess the availability of freshwater, seawater, and saline groundwater for algal biofuel production in the United States.

    PubMed

    Venteris, Erik R; Skaggs, Richard L; Coleman, Andre M; Wigmosta, Mark S

    2013-05-07

    A key advantage of using microalgae for biofuel production is the ability of some algal strains to thrive in waters unsuitable for conventional crop irrigation such as saline groundwater or seawater. Nonetheless, the availability of sustainable water supplies will provide significant challenges for scale-up and development of algal biofuels. We conduct a partial techno-economic assessment based on the availability of freshwater, saline groundwater, and seawater for use in open pond algae cultivation systems. We explore water issues through GIS-based models of algae biofuel production, freshwater supply (constrained to less than 5% of mean annual flow per watershed) and costs, and cost-distance models for supplying seawater and saline groundwater. We estimate that, combined, these resources can support 9.46 × 10(7) m(3) yr(-1) (25 billion gallons yr(-1)) of renewable biodiesel production in the coterminous United States. Achievement of larger targets requires the utilization of less water efficient sites and relatively expensive saline waters. Despite the addition of freshwater supply constraints and saline water resources, the geographic conclusions are similar to our previous results. Freshwater availability and saline water delivery costs are most favorable for the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida peninsula, where evaporation relative to precipitation is moderate. As a whole, the barren and scrub lands of the southwestern U.S. have limited freshwater supplies, and large net evaporation rates greatly increase the cost of saline alternatives due to the added makeup water required to maintain pond salinity. However, this and similar analyses are particularly sensitive to knowledge gaps in algae growth/lipid production performance and the proportion of freshwater resources available, key topics for future investigation.

  13. Inhibitory effects of extracellular products from oral bacteria on human fibroblasts and stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Higerd, T B; Vesole, D H; Goust, J M

    1978-08-01

    Extracellular products of 12 strains of Streptococcus mutans and 5 additional species of oral bacteria were analyzed for their ability to inhibit proliferation of fibroblastoid cells (HeLa and AV3) and blast transformation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from normal individuals. Products from S. mutans strains AHT and BHT, Streptococcus intermedius, and Actinomyces viscosus inhibited [3H]thymidine uptake by fibroblastoid cells and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes. Products from S. mutans E49, Streptococcus salivarius, and Actinomyces naeslundii inhibited blast transformation of human lymphocytes but did not significantly inhibit the growth of fibroblastoid cells. Preparations from S. intermedius gave the greatest inhibitory activity against both target cell types; initial characterization of this preparation suggested a single factor active in both assays, in that the heat lability and Sephadex G-200 elution profile were similar for the inhibitory activity seen with the two cell types. The molecular weight of the inhibitor, estimated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 and Ultragel AcA34, was approximately 160,000. The results strongly suggest that oral bacteria produce heat-labile substances that interfere with fibroblast proliferation and alter the lymphocytic immunological response.

  14. Production of extracellular polysaccharide by Bacillus megaterium RB-05 using jute as substrate.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sougata Roy; Basak, Ratan Kumar; Sen, Ramkrishna; Adhikari, Basudam

    2011-06-01

    Bacillus megaterium RB-05 was grown on glucose and on "tossa-daisee" (Corchorus olitorius)-derived jute, and production and composition of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) were monitored. An EPS yield of 0.065 ± 0.013 and of 0.297 g ± 0.054 g(-1) substrate after 72 h was obtained for glucose and jute, respectively. EPS production in the presence of jute paralleled bacterial cellulase activity. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), matrix assisted LASER desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectroscopy, and fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy demonstrated that the EPS synthesized in jute culture (JC) differed from that synthesized in glucose mineral salts medium (GMSM). While fucose was only a minor constituent (4.9 wt.%) of EPS from GMSM, it a major component (41.9 wt.%) of EPS synthesized in JC. This study establishes jute as an effective fermentation substrate for EPS production by a cellulase-producing bacterium.

  15. Phosphatidic acid formation is required for extracellular ATP-mediated nitric oxide production in suspension-cultured tomato cells.

    PubMed

    Sueldo, Daniela J; Foresi, Noelia P; Casalongué, Claudia A; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Laxalt, Ana M

    2010-03-01

    *In animals and plants, extracellular ATP exerts its effects by regulating the second messengers Ca(2+), nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In animals, phospholipid-derived molecules, such as diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid (PA) and inositol phosphates, have been associated with the extracellular ATP signaling pathway. The involvement of phospholipids in extracellular ATP signaling in plants, as it is established in animals, is unknown. *In vivo phospholipid signaling upon extracellular ATP treatment was studied in (32)P(i)-labeled suspension-cultured tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cells. *Here, we report that, in suspension-cultured tomato cells, extracellular ATP induces the formation of the signaling lipid phosphatidic acid. Exogenous ATP at doses of 0.1 and 1 mM induce the formation of phosphatidic acid within minutes. Studies on the enzymatic sources of phosphatidic acid revealed the participation of both phospholipase D and C in concerted action with diacylglycerol kinase. *Our results suggest that extracellular ATP-mediated nitric oxide production is downstream of phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase activation.

  16. Effects of fish density and river fertilization on algal standing stocks, invertebrates communities, and fish production in an Arctic River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deegan, Linda A.; Peterson, B.J.; Golden, H.; McIvor, C.C.; Miller, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the relative importance of bottom-up and top-down controls of an arctic stream food web by simultaneous manipulation of the top predator and nutrient availability. We created a two-step trophic system (algae to insects) by removal of the top predator (Arctic grayling, Thymallus arcticus) in fertilized and control stream reaches. Fish abundance was also increased 10 times to examine the effect of high fish density on stream ecosystem dynamics and fish. We measured the response of epilithic algae, benthic and drifting insects, and fish to nutrient enrichment and to changes in fish density. Insect grazers had little effect on algae and fish had little effect on insects. In both the control and fertilized reaches, fish growth, energy storage, and reproductive response of females declined with increased fish density. Fish growth and energy storage were more closely correlated with per capita insect availability than with per capita algal standing stock

  17. Changes in muscle fiber contractility and extracellular matrix production during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Christopher L; Schwartz, Andrew J; Grekin, Jeremy A; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Sugg, Kristoffer B

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle can adapt to increased mechanical loads by undergoing hypertrophy. Transient reductions in whole muscle force production have been reported during the onset of hypertrophy, but contractile changes in individual muscle fibers have not been previously studied. Additionally, the extracellular matrix (ECM) stores and transmits forces from muscle fibers to tendons and bones, and determining how the ECM changes during hypertrophy is important in understanding the adaptation of muscle tissue to mechanical loading. Using the synergist ablation model, we sought to measure changes in muscle fiber contractility, collagen content, and cross-linking, and in the expression of several genes and activation of signaling proteins that regulate critical components of myogenesis and ECM synthesis and remodeling during muscle hypertrophy. Tissues were harvested 3, 7, and 28 days after induction of hypertrophy, and nonoverloaded rats served as controls. Muscle fiber specific force (sFo), which is the maximum isometric force normalized to cross-sectional area, was reduced 3 and 7 days after the onset of mechanical overload, but returned to control levels by 28 days. Collagen abundance displayed a similar pattern of change. Nearly a quarter of the transcriptome changed over the course of overload, as well as the activation of signaling pathways related to hypertrophy and atrophy. Overall, this study provides insight into fundamental mechanisms of muscle and ECM growth, and indicates that although muscle fibers appear to have completed remodeling and regeneration 1 mo after synergist ablation, the ECM continues to be actively remodeling at this time point.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study utilized a rat synergist ablation model to integrate changes in single muscle fiber contractility, extracellular matrix composition, activation of important signaling pathways in muscle adaption, and corresponding changes in the muscle transcriptome to provide novel insight into the basic

  18. Extracellular production of beta-amylase by a halophilic isolate, Halobacillus sp. LY9.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Yu, Hui-Ying

    2011-11-01

    A moderately halophilic strain LY9 with high amylolytic activity was isolated from soil sample obtained from Yuncheng, China. Biochemical and physiological characterization along with 16S rRNA sequence analysis placed the isolate in the genus Halobacillus. Amylase production started from the post-exponential phase of bacterial growth and reached a maximum level during the early-stationary phase. The isolate LY9 was found to secrete the amylase, the production of which depended on the salinity of the growth medium. Maximum amylase production was observed in the presence of 10% KCl or 10% NaCl. Maltose was the main product of soluble starch hydrolysis, indicating a β-amylase activity. The enzyme showed optimal activity at 60°C, pH 8.0, and 10-12.5% of NaCl. It was highly active over broad temperature (50-70°C), NaCl concentration (5.0-20.0%), and pH (4.0-12.0) ranges, indicating its thermoactive and alkali-stable nature. However, activity dropped off dramatically at low NaCl concentrations, showing the amylase was halophilic. Ca(2+) was found to stimulate the β-amylase activity, whereas ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), phenylarsine oxide (PAO), and diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) strongly inhibited the enzyme, indicating it probably was a metalloenzyme with cysteine and histidine residues located in its active site. Moreover, the enzyme exhibited remarkable stability towards sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Triton X-100. This is the first report of β-amylase production from moderate halophiles. The present study indicates that the extracellular β-amylase of Halobacillus sp. LY9 may have considerable potential for industrial application owing to its properties.

  19. Production, fractionation, characterization of extracellular polysaccharide from a newly isolated Trametes gibbosa and its hypoglycemic activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuping; Mao, Duobin; Geng, Lujing; Wang, Zheng; Xu, Chunping

    2013-07-25

    The submerged fermentation for extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production from Trametes gibbosa was optimized. An optimal medium for EPS production was obtained through central composite design (CCD) as follows: 53.12 g/L maltose and 4.21 g/L polypeptone in distilled water. Furthermore, four groups of EPSs (designated as Fr-I, Fr-II, Fr-III and Fr-IV) were obtained from the culture filtrates by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), and their molecular characteristics were examined by a multiangle laser-light scattering (MALLS) and refractive index (RI) detector system. The weight-average molar mass of Fr-I was determined to be 3.872 x 10(5)g/mol and its molecular shape was revealed to be a rigid rod in an aqueous solution. Finally, the hypoglycemic effect of the EPS, investigated in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice, decreased plasma glucose, total cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations by 17.4%, 14.0% and 12.6%, respectively. The results indicate the potential of this EPS to prevent hyperglycemia in diabetic patients.

  20. Action of Group A Streptococcus Extracellular Product(s) on the Connective Tissue of the Bovine Heart Valve

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Israël; Caravano, René; Parlebas, Janine

    1974-01-01

    Group A streptococcal strains isolated from rheumatic fever patients were cultivated in the presence of bovine heart valves in a medium devoid of components from animal origin. Other group A streptococci and various bacteria were used as controls. The supernatant of these cultures was extracted and analyzed chemically and immunologically. The extracts prepared from cultures of two “rheumatogenic” strains in the presence of bovine heart valves showed fraction(s) containing proteins, oses (neutral and amined), and uronic and sialic acids. This fraction(s) was immunologically active with both anti-group A streptococcus and antisoluble connective glycoprotein antisera, with a partial identity reaction. Experiments with a diffusion chamber and attempts to precipitate a postulated enzyme from the culture of these strains by ammonium sulfate suggest that this action is due to an extracellular product of the bacteria. The meaning of these data in the physiopathology of rheumatic cardiac lesions is briefly discussed. PMID:4202889

  1. A LuxR Homolog Controls Production of Symbiotically Active Extracellular Polysaccharide II by Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Pellock, Brett J.; Teplitski, Max; Boinay, Ryan P.; Bauer, W. Dietz; Walker, Graham C.

    2002-01-01

    Production of complex extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) by the nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti is required for efficient invasion of root nodules on the host plant alfalfa. Any one of three S. meliloti polysaccharides, succinoglycan, EPS II, or K antigen, can mediate infection thread initiation and extension (root nodule invasion) on alfalfa. Of these three polysaccharides, the only symbiotically active polysaccharide produced by S. meliloti wild-type strain Rm1021 is succinoglycan. The expR101 mutation is required to turn on production of symbiotically active forms of EPS II in strain Rm1021. In this study, we have determined the nature of the expR101 mutation in S. meliloti. The expR101 mutation, a spontaneous dominant mutation, results from precise, reading frame-restoring excision of an insertion sequence from the coding region of expR, a gene whose predicted protein product is highly homologous to the Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae RhiR protein and a number of other homologs of Vibrio fischeri LuxR that function as receptors for N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) in quorum-sensing regulation of gene expression. S. meliloti ExpR activates transcription of genes involved in EPS II production in a density-dependent fashion, and it does so at much lower cell densities than many quorum-sensing systems. High-pressure liquid chromatographic fractionation of S. meliloti culture filtrate extracts revealed at least three peaks with AHL activity, one of which activated ExpR-dependent expression of the expE operon. PMID:12193623

  2. Algal Supply System Design - Harmonized Version

    SciTech Connect

    Abodeely, Jared; Stevens, Daniel; Ray, Allison; Newby, Deborah; Schaller, Kastli

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this design report is to provide an assessment of current technologies used for production, dewatering, and converting microalgae cultivated in open-pond systems to biofuel. The original draft design was created in 2011 and has subsequently been brought into agreement with the DOE harmonized model. The design report extends beyond this harmonized model to discuss some of the challenges with assessing algal production systems, including the ability to (1) quickly assess alternative algal production system designs, (2) assess spatial and temporal variability, and (3) perform large-scale assessments considering multiple scenarios for thousands of potential sites. The Algae Logistics Model (ALM) was developed to address each of these limitations of current modeling efforts to enable assessment of the economic feasibility of algal production systems across the United States. The (ALM) enables (1) dynamic assessments using spatiotemporal conditions, (2) exploration of algal production system design configurations, (3) investigation of algal production system operating assumptions, and (4) trade-off assessments with technology decisions and operating assumptions. The report discusses results from the ALM, which is used to assess the baseline design determined by harmonization efforts between U.S. DOE national laboratories. Productivity and resource assessment data is provided by coupling the ALM with the Biomass Assessment Tool developed at PNNL. This high-fidelity data is dynamically passed to the ALM and used to help better understand the impacts of spatial and temporal constraints on algal production systems by providing a cost for producing extracted algal lipids annually for each potential site.

  3. Production of Lysozyme by Staphylococci and Its Correlation with Three Other Extracellular Substances1

    PubMed Central

    Jay, James M.

    1966-01-01

    Jay, James M. (Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich.). Production of lysozyme by staphylococci and its correlation with three other extracellular substances. J. Bacteriol. 91:1804–1810. 1966.—Lysozyme production was determined on plates containing 1 mg/ml of Lysozyme Substrate in Heart Infusion Agar with incubation at 37 C for 48 hr. Its production was compared with that of α-hemolysin and sheep hemolysin and egg-yolk precipitation, by use of both coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative strains of staphylococci. Of 126 coagulase-positive strains tested, 120 or 95.2% produced lysozyme, 117 or 92.9% produced α-hemolysin, 108 or 85.7% precipitated egg yolk, and 102 or 81% produced sheep hemolysin. Of the 49 coagulase-negative strains (which included 22 pathogens), only 4 or 8.1% produced lysozyme, 14 or 28.6% produced α-hemolysin, 13 or 26.5% produced sheep hemolysins, and 5 or 10.2% precipitated egg yolk. Only two of the six coagulase-positive strains which failed to produce lysozyme showed any consistent patterns in relation to the four characteristics determined. The four coagulase-negative strains which produced lysozyme were inconsistent for the other characteristics measured. It is suggested that lysozyme production is more a property of coagulase-positive staphylococci, and therefore a better ancillary test of pathogenicity, than either production of α-hemolysin or egg-yolk precipitation, because the incidence of lysozyme producers is higher among this group than among those producing the other substances and because fewer coagulase-negative staphylococci produced lysozyme than hemolysins or egg-yolk precipitation. Of 16 other species of bacteria and yeasts tested, all were found negative except Bacillus subtilis. Lysozyme production by staphylococci in heavily contaminated foods was not inhibited on plates containing sodium azide, whereas media containing 7.5% salt and sorbic acid were unsuitable. The possible relationship of lysozyme production to

  4. Induction by lipopolysaccharide of intracellular and extracellular interleukin 1 production: analysis with synthetic models.

    PubMed

    Lasfargues, A; Ledur, A; Charon, D; Szabo, L; Chaby, R

    1987-07-15

    An attempt was made to identify the molecular structures that are present in bacterial LPS and induce the production of intracellular and extracellular pools of IL 1 by peritoneal macrophages of the mouse and by human monocytes. Activities of glycolipids and carbohydrates prepared by synthesis, and structurally related to the hydrophobic (Lipid A) and to the polysaccharide (PS) regions of LPS were compared with those induced by Bordetella pertussis endotoxin and by fragments derived therefrom. Both isolated regions of this LPS (PS and Lipid A) were able to induce IL 1 synthesis by monocytes and macrophages. Among the synthetic glycolipids employed, propyl-2-deoxy-2-[(3R)-3-hydroxytetrade-canamido]-4-O-pho sph ono-6-O-tetradecanoyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (glycolipid M9) induced IL 1 secretion more efficiently than Lipid A and LPS, whereas the amounts of intracellular IL 1 produced upon induction by these three substances were comparable. Macrophages from C3H/HeJ mice were unresponsive to Lipid A and to glycolipid M9, but produced IL 1 when incubated with PS or with a hydrophilic fragment isolated after methanolysis of the endotoxin. However, all synthetic derivatives of 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid (KDO) used in this study failed to induce IL 1 production by both mouse macrophages and human monocytes. The implications of these findings for a more precise comprehension of the molecular mechanism of LPS-induced activation of macrophages, and the relations between the molecular structures required for the induction of IL 1 production vs cytostatic activity in macrophages, are discussed.

  5. Cultural conditions on the production of extracellular enzymes by Trichoderma isolates from tobacco rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Mallikharjuna Rao, K L N; Siva Raju, K; Ravisankar, H

    2016-01-01

    Twelve isolates of Trichoderma spp. isolated from tobacco rhizosphere were evaluated for their ability to produce chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2, out of 12 isolates, produced maximum activities of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, respectively. In vitro production of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase by isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 was tested under different cultural conditions. The enzyme activities were significantly influenced by acidic pH and the optimum temperature was 30°C. The chitin and cell walls of Sclerotium rolfsii, as carbon sources, supported the maximum and significantly higher chitinase activity by both isolates. The chitinase activity of isolate ThJt1 was suppressed significantly by fructose (80.28%), followed by glucose (77.42%), whereas the β-1,3-glucanase activity of ThJt1 and both enzymes of isolate TvHt2 were significantly suppressed by fructose, followed by sucrose. Ammonium nitrate as nitrogen source supported the maximum activity of chitinase in both isolates, whereas urea was a poor nitrogen source. Production of both enzymes by the isolates was significantly influenced by the cultural conditions. Thus, the isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 showed higher levels of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase activities and were capable of hydrolyzing the mycelium of S. rolfsii infecting tobacco. These organisms can be used therefore for assessment of their synergism in biomass production and biocontrol efficacy and for their field biocontrol ability against S. rolfsii and Pythium aphanidermatum infecting tobacco.

  6. Cultural conditions on the production of extracellular enzymes by Trichoderma isolates from tobacco rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Mallikharjuna Rao, K.L.N.; Siva Raju, K.; Ravisankar, H.

    2016-01-01

    Twelve isolates of Trichoderma spp. isolated from tobacco rhizosphere were evaluated for their ability to produce chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2, out of 12 isolates, produced maximum activities of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, respectively. In vitro production of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase by isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 was tested under different cultural conditions. The enzyme activities were significantly influenced by acidic pH and the optimum temperature was 30 °C. The chitin and cell walls of Sclerotium rolfsii, as carbon sources, supported the maximum and significantly higher chitinase activity by both isolates. The chitinase activity of isolate ThJt1 was suppressed significantly by fructose (80.28%), followed by glucose (77.42%), whereas the β-1,3-glucanase activity of ThJt1 and both enzymes of isolate TvHt2 were significantly suppressed by fructose, followed by sucrose. Ammonium nitrate as nitrogen source supported the maximum activity of chitinase in both isolates, whereas urea was a poor nitrogen source. Production of both enzymes by the isolates was significantly influenced by the cultural conditions. Thus, the isolates ThJt1 and TvHt2 showed higher levels of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase activities and were capable of hydrolyzing the mycelium of S. rolfsii infecting tobacco. These organisms can be used therefore for assessment of their synergism in biomass production and biocontrol efficacy and for their field biocontrol ability against S. rolfsii and Pythium aphanidermatum infecting tobacco. PMID:26887223

  7. Extracellular production and affinity purification of recombinant proteins with Escherichia coli using the versatility of the maltose binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Benjamin; Friehs, Karl; Flaschel, Erwin; Reck, Michael; Stahl, Frank; Scheper, Thomas

    2009-03-25

    Recombinant proteins are essential products of today's industrial biotechnology. In this study we address two crucial factors in recombinant protein production: (i) product accessibility and (ii) product recovery. Escherichia coli, one of the most frequently used hosts for recombinant protein expression, does not inherently secrete proteins into the extracellular environment. The major drawback of this expression system is, therefore, to be found in the intracellular protein accumulation and hampered product accessibility. We have constructed a set of expression vectors in order to facilitate extracellular protein production and purification. The maltose binding protein from E. coli is used as fusion partner for several proteins of interest allowing an export to the bacteria's periplasm via both the Sec and the Tat pathway. Upon coexpression of a modified Cloacin DF13 bacteriocin release protein, the hybrid proteins are released into the culture medium. This essentially applies to a distinguished reporter molecule, the green fluorescent protein, for which an extracellular production was not reported so far. The sequestered proteins can be purified to approximate homogeneity by a simple, rapid and cheap procedure which utilizes the affinity of the maltose binding protein to alpha-1,4-glucans.

  8. High-yield production of extracellular type-I cellulose by the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chi; Li, Zhongkui; Li, Tao; Zhang, Yingjiao; Bryant, Donald A; Zhao, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose synthase, encoded by the cesA gene, is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose in nature. We show that the cell wall of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 naturally contains cellulose. Cellulose occurs as a possibly laminated layer between the inner and outer membrane, as well as being an important component of the extracellular glycocalyx in this cyanobacterium. Overexpression of six genes, cmc-ccp-cesAB-cesC-cesD-bgl, from Gluconacetobacter xylinus in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 resulted in very high-yield production of extracellular type-I cellulose. High-level cellulose production only occurred when the native cesA gene was inactivated and when cells were grown at low salinity. This system provides a method for the production of lignin-free cellulose from sunlight and CO2 for biofuel production and other biotechnological applications.

  9. High-yield production of extracellular type-I cellulose by the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chi; Li, Zhongkui; Li, Tao; Zhang, Yingjiao; Bryant, Donald A; Zhao, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose synthase, encoded by the cesA gene, is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose in nature. We show that the cell wall of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 naturally contains cellulose. Cellulose occurs as a possibly laminated layer between the inner and outer membrane, as well as being an important component of the extracellular glycocalyx in this cyanobacterium. Overexpression of six genes, cmc–ccp–cesAB–cesC–cesD–bgl, from Gluconacetobacter xylinus in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 resulted in very high-yield production of extracellular type-I cellulose. High-level cellulose production only occurred when the native cesA gene was inactivated and when cells were grown at low salinity. This system provides a method for the production of lignin-free cellulose from sunlight and CO2 for biofuel production and other biotechnological applications. PMID:27462405

  10. Involvement of a new enzyme, glyoxal oxidase, in extracellular H2O2 production by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, P J; Kirk, T K

    1987-01-01

    The importance of extracellular H2O2 in lignin degradation has become increasingly apparent with the recent discovery of H2O2-requiring ligninases produced by white-rot fungi. Here we describe a new H2O2-producing activity of Phanerochaete chrysosporium that involves extracellular oxidases able to use simple aldehyde, alpha-hydroxycarbonyl, or alpha-dicarbonyl compounds as substrates. The activity is expressed during secondary metabolism, when the ligninases are also expressed. Analytical isoelectric focusing of the extracellular proteins, followed by activity staining, indicated that minor proteins with broad substrate specificities are responsible for the oxidase activity. Two of the oxidase substrates, glyoxal and methylglyoxal, were also identified, as their quinoxaline derivatives, in the culture fluid as secondary metabolites. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to lignin degradation and other proposed systems for H2O2 production in P. chrysosporium. Images PMID:3553159

  11. Evaluation of the integrated hydrothermal carbonization-algal cultivation process for enhanced nitrogen utilization in Arthrospira platensis production.

    PubMed

    Yao, Changhong; Wu, Peichun; Pan, Yanfei; Lu, Hongbin; Chi, Lei; Meng, Yingying; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2016-09-01

    Sustainable microalgal cultivation at commercial scale requires nitrogen recycling. This study applied hydrothermal carbonization to recover N of hot-water extracted Arthrospira platensis biomass residue into aqueous phase (AP) under different operation conditions and evaluated the N utilization, biomass yield and quality of A. platensis cultures using AP as the sole N source. With the increase of temperature at 190-210°C or reaction time of 2-3h, the N recovery rate decreased under nitrogen-repletion (+N) cultivation, while contrarily increased under nitrogen-limitation (-N) cultivation. Under +N biomass accumulation in the cultures with AP under 190°C was enhanced by 41-67% compared with that in NaNO3, and the highest protein content of 51.5%DW achieved under 200°C-2h was also 22% higher. Carbohydrate content of 71.4%DW under -N cultivation achieved under 210°C-3h was 14% higher than that in NaNO3. HTC-algal cultivation strategy under -N mode could save 60% of conventional N.

  12. Production, purification and characterization of an extracellular alpha-amylase enzyme isolated from Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zeid, A M

    1997-01-01

    Filamentous fungi isolated from cereals were screened for their ability to produce alpha-amylase (1,4-alpha-glucan glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.1). A selected strain identified as Aspergillus flavus showed high enzymatic activity. A single extracellular alpha-amylase was purified to homogeneity by a starch adsorption method. The molecular weight (M(r)) of the A. flavus alpha-amylase was approximately 75,000 +/- 3,000 by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and that of the subunit was approximately 75,000 +/- 3000 SDS-PAGE. The optimal activity of the purified enzyme was achieved at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C. K+ ions increased the alpha-amylase activity, but Mg2+ did not greatly affect enzyme activity. Mn2+, Zn2+, Cu2+ and Fe3+ ions strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. The products of hydrolysis of native starch by the A. flavus enzyme were mainly glucose as well as unidentified oligosaccharides.

  13. Fractionation and characterization of the immunosuppressive substance in crude extracellular products released by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed Central

    Arala-Chaves, M P; Porto, M T; Arnaud, P; Saraiva, M J; Geada, H; Patrick, C C; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-01-01

    The noncytotoxic immunosuppressive substance detected in crude extracellular products of Streptococcus intermedius (CEP-SI) was fractionated by two steps of preparative isoelectric focusing in sucrose gradients using ampholytes of pH range from 3.5 to 6 and 4 to 5, respectively. The in vitro and in vivo suppressor effects of the most highly purified fraction of CEP-Si, designated fraction 3' (F3'EP-Si), corresponded well with those of the original CEP-Si. F3'EP-Si was sensitive to the effects of alpha, gamma, and delta chymotrypsin, trypsin, and heating. It contained approximately 1% of the total amount of protein found in the original CEP-Si, corresponding to a single band on analytical isoelectric focusing, stainable by Coomassie Blue and of isoelectric point of 4.25. The absorption spectrum of F3'EP-Si had a maximum at 260 nm but its biological activity was resistant to deoxyribonuclease and ribonuclease A and it did not contain material stainable by methylene blue. It was also resistant to neuraminidase and did not contain material stainable by periodic acid schiff. We conclude that the substance responsible for the suppressor activity of CEP-Si is a protein of molecular weight approximately 90,000, which adheres to Sephadex of cellulose acetate and forms complexes with other, nonactive constituents of CEP-Si. Images PMID:6454698

  14. Lipolytic Potential of Aspergillus japonicus LAB01: Production, Partial Purification, and Characterisation of an Extracellular Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Lívia Tereza Andrade; Oliveira, Jamil S.; dos Santos, Vera L.; Regis, Wiliam C. B.; Santoro, Marcelo M.; Resende, Rodrigo R.

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic potential of Aspergillus japonicus LAB01 was investigated by describing the catalytic properties and stability of a secreted extracellular lipase. Enzyme production was considered high under room temperature after 4 days using sunflower oil and a combination of casein with sodium nitrate. Lipase was partially purified by 3.9-fold, resulting in a 44.2% yield using ammonium sulphate precipitation (60%) quantified with Superose 12 HR gel filtration chromatography. The activity of the enzyme was maximised at pH 8.5, and the enzyme demonstrated stability under alkaline conditions. The optimum temperature was found to be 45°C, and the enzyme was stable for up to 100 minutes, with more than 80% of initial activity remaining after incubation at this temperature. Partially purified enzyme showed reasonable stability with triton X-100 and was activated in the presence of organic solvents (toluene, hexane, and methanol). Among the tested ions, only Cu2+, Ni2+, and Al3+ showed inhibitory effects. Substrate specificity of the lipase was higher for C14 among various p-nitrophenyl esters assayed. The KM and Vmax values of the purified enzyme for p-nitrophenyl palmitate were 0.13 mM and 12.58 umol/(L·min), respectively. These features render a novel biocatalyst for industrial applications. PMID:25530954

  15. Virulence determinants and production of extracellular enzymes in Enterococcus spp. from surface water sources.

    PubMed

    Molale, Lesego Gertrude; Bezuidenhout, Cornelius Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Virulence factors in Enterococcus may be indicative of potential pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of clinically relevant virulence genes, in Enterococcus spp. from environmental water, and their in vitro expression. One hundred and twenty-four Enterococcus isolates (seven species), from five surface water systems in the North West Province, South Africa, were screened for the presence of asa1, cylA, esp, gelE and hyl using polymerase chain reaction. The expression of cylA, hyl and gelE was determined by phenotypic assessments. Sixty-five percent of the isolates were positive for one virulence gene and 13% for two or more. Most frequently detected genes were gelE (32%) and cylA (28%). Enterococcal surface protein was absent in all isolates screened. The presence of virulence genes was correlated with their extracellular enzyme production. The results show that a large percentage of these environmental Enterococcus spp. possess virulence factors that could be expressed in vitro. This is a cause for concern and could have implications for individuals using this water for recreational and cultural purposes. Further investigation is required into the sources of these potential pathogenic Enterococcus isolates and measures to minimize their presence in water sources.

  16. Environmental performance of algal biofuel technology options.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Venkatesh; Stratton, Russell W; Pearlson, Matthew N; Jersey, Gilbert R; Beyene, Abraham G; Weissman, Joseph C; Rubino, Michele; Hileman, James I

    2012-02-21

    Considerable research and development is underway to produce fuels from microalgae, one of several options being explored for increasing transportation fuel supplies and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). This work models life-cycle GHG and on-site freshwater consumption for algal biofuels over a wide technology space, spanning both near- and long-term options. The environmental performance of algal biofuel production can vary considerably and is influenced by engineering, biological, siting, and land-use considerations. We have examined these considerations for open pond systems, to identify variables that have a strong influence on GHG and freshwater consumption. We conclude that algal biofuels can yield GHG reductions relative to fossil and other biobased fuels with the use of appropriate technology options. Further, freshwater consumption for algal biofuels produced using saline pond systems can be comparable to that of petroleum-derived fuels.

  17. Recent Advances in Algal Genetic Tool Development

    SciTech Connect

    R. Dahlin, Lukas; T. Guarnieri, Michael

    2016-06-24

    The goal of achieving cost-effective biofuels and bioproducts derived from algal biomass will require improvements along the entire value chain, including identification of robust, high-productivity strains and development of advanced genetic tools. Though there have been modest advances in development of genetic systems for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, progress in development of algal genetic tools, especially as applied to non-model algae, has generally lagged behind that of more commonly utilized laboratory and industrial microbes. This is in part due to the complex organellar structure of algae, including robust cell walls and intricate compartmentalization of target loci, as well as prevalent gene silencing mechanisms, which hinder facile utilization of conventional genetic engineering tools and methodologies. However, recent progress in global tool development has opened the door for implementation of strain-engineering strategies in industrially-relevant algal strains. Here, we review recent advances in algal genetic tool development and applications in eukaryotic microalgae.

  18. Effects of iron and phytic acid on production of extracellular radicals by Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Danny R; Kotake, Yashige; Huycke, Mark M

    2004-12-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a human intestinal commensal that produces extracellular superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical while colonizing the intestinal tract. To determine whether dietary factors implicated in colorectal cancer affect oxidant production by E. faecalis, radicals were measured in rats colonized with this microorganism while on diets supplemented with iron or phytic acid. Hydroxyl radical activity was measured by assaying for aromatic hydroxylation products of D-phenylalanine using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection. In vitro, as expected, iron enhanced, and phytic acid decreased, hydroxyl radical formation by E. faecalis. For rats colonized with E. faecalis given supplemental dietary iron (740 mg elemental iron as ferric phosphate per kg diet) or phytic acid (1.2% w/w), no differences were found in concentrations of urinary ortho- or meta- isomers of D-phenylalanine compared to rats on a basal diet. Aqueous radicals in colonic contents were further assessed ex vivo by electron spin resonance using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide as a spin trap. Mixtures of thiyl (sulfur-centered) and oxygen-centered radicals were detected across all diets. In vitro, similar spectra were observed when E. faecalis was incubated with hydrogen sulfide, air-oxidized cysteine, or an alkylsulfide, as typical sulfur-containing compounds that might occur in colonic contents. In conclusion, intestinal colonization with E. faecalis in a rat model generates both thiyl and oxygen-centered radicals in colonic contents. Radical formation, however, was not significantly altered by short-term dietary supplementation with iron or phytic acid.

  19. Extracellular Microvesicle Production by Human Eosinophils Activated by “Inflammatory” Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Akuthota, Praveen; Carmo, Lívia A. S.; Bonjour, Kennedy; Murphy, Ryann O.; Silva, Thiago P.; Gamalier, Juliana P.; Capron, Kelsey L.; Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vasilis; Camacho, Virginia; Ghiran, Ionita; Ueki, Shigeharu; Weller, Peter F.; Melo, Rossana C. N.

    2016-01-01

    A key function of human eosinophils is to secrete cytokines, chemokines and cationic proteins, trafficking, and releasing these mediators for roles in inflammation and other immune responses. Eosinophil activation leads to secretion of pre-synthesized granule-stored mediators through different mechanisms, but the ability of eosinophils to secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs), very small vesicles with preserved membrane topology, is still poorly understood. In the present work, we sought to identify and characterize EVs released from human eosinophils during different conditions: after a culturing period or after isolation and stimulation with inflammatory stimuli, which are known to induce eosinophil activation and secretion: CCL11 (eotaxin-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). EV production was investigated by nanoscale flow cytometry, conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and pre-embedding immunonanogold EM. The tetraspanins CD63 and CD9 were used as EV biomarkers for both flow cytometry and ultrastructural immunolabeling. Nanoscale flow cytometry showed that human eosinophils produce EVs in culture and that a population of EVs expressed detectable CD9, while CD63 was not consistently detected. When eosinophils were stimulated immediately after isolation and analyzed by TEM, EVs were clearly identified as microvesicles (MVs) outwardly budding off the plasma membrane. Both CCL11 and TNF-α induced significant increases of MVs compared to unstimulated cells. TNF-α induced amplified release of MVs more than CCL11. Eosinophil MV diameters varied from 20 to 1000 nm. Immunonanogold EM revealed clear immunolabeling for CD63 and CD9 on eosinophil MVs, although not all MVs were labeled. Altogether, we identified, for the first time, that human eosinophils secrete MVs and that this production increases in response to inflammatory stimuli. This is important to understand the complex secretory activities of eosinophils underlying immune responses. The

  20. Extracellular expression of natural cytosolic arginine deiminase from Pseudomonas putida and its application in the production of L-citrulline.

    PubMed

    Su, Lingqia; Ma, Yue; Wu, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The Pseudomonas putida arginine deiminase (ADI), a natural cytosolic enzyme, and Thermobifida fusca cutinase were co-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the optimized cutinase gene was used for increasing its expression level. 90.9% of the total ADI protein was released into culture medium probably through a nonspecific leaking mechanism caused by the co-expressed cutinase. The enzymatic properties of the extracellular ADI were found to be similar to those of ADI prepared by conventional cytosolic expression. Extracellular production of ADI was further scaled up in a 3-L fermentor. When the protein expression was induced by IPTG (25.0μM) and lactose (0.1gL(-1)h(-1)) at 30°C, the extracellular ADI activity reached 101.2UmL(-1), which represented the highest ADI production ever reported. In addition, the enzymatic synthesis of l-citrulline was performed using the extracellularly expressed ADI, and the conversion rate reached 100% with high substrate concentration at 650gL(-1).

  1. Mechanism and challenges in commercialisation of algal biofuels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anoop; Nigam, Poonam Singh; Murphy, Jerry D

    2011-01-01

    Biofuels made from algal biomass are being considered as the most suitable alternative energy in current global and economical scenario. Microalgae are known to produce and accumulate lipids within their cell mass which is similar to those found in many vegetable oils. The efficient lipid producer algae cell mass has been reported to contain more than 30% of their cell weight as lipids. According to US DOE microalgae have the potential to produce 100 times more oil per acre land than any terrestrial plants. This article reviews up to date literature on the composition of algae, mechanism of oil droplets, triacylglycerol (TAG) production in algal biomass, research and development made in the cultivation of algal biomass, harvesting strategies, and recovery of lipids from algal mass. The economical challenges in the production of biofuels from algal biomass have been discussed in view of the future prospects in the commercialisation of algal fuels.

  2. Hydrothermal liquefaction of harvested high-ash low-lipid algal biomass from Dianchi Lake: effects of operational parameters and relations of products.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunyan; Liu, Zhidan; Zhang, Yuanhui; Li, Baoming; Cao, Wei; Lu, Haifeng; Duan, Na; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Tingting

    2015-05-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) allows a direct conversion of algal biomass into biocrude oil, not only solving the environmental issues caused by the over-growing algae but also producing renewable energy. This study reports HTL of algae after separation from eutrophicated Dianchi Lake in China. Conversion efficiency was studied under different operational conditions via an orthogonal design, including holding temperature (HT) (260-340 °C), retention time (RT) (30-90 min) and total solid (TS) (10-20%). A highest biocrude oil yield (18.4%, dry ash-free basis, daf) was achieved at 300 °C, 60 min, and 20% (TS), due to the low contents of lipids (1.9%, daf) and proteins (24.8%, daf), and high contents of ash (41.6%, dry basis) and carbohydrates (71.8%, daf). Operational parameters significantly affected the biocrude yields, and chemical distribution of HTL products. The biocrude production also related to other HTL products, and involved chemical reactions, such as deoxygenation and/or denitrogenation.

  3. Effects of two different nutrient loads on microalgal production, nutrient removal and photosynthetic efficiency in pilot-scale wastewater high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2014-12-01

    When wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds (HRAP) are coupled with resource recovery processes, such as biofuel production, short hydraulic retention times (HRTs) are often favoured to increase the microalgal biomass productivity. However, short HRT can result in increased nutrient load to the HRAP which may negatively impact on the performance of the microalgae. This paper investigate the effects of high (NH4-N mean concentration 39.7 ± 17.9 g m(-3)) and moderate ((NH4-N mean concentration 19.9 ± 8.9 g m(-3)) nutrient loads and short HRT on the performance of microalgae with respect to light absorption, photosynthesis, biomass production and nutrient removal in pilot-scale (total volume 8 m(3)) wastewater treatment HRAPs. Microalgal biomass productivity was significantly higher under high nutrient loads, with a 133% and 126% increase in the chlorophyll-a and VSS areal productivities, respectively. Microalgae were more efficient at assimilating NH4-N from the wastewater under higher nutrient loads compared to moderate loads. Higher microalgal biomass with increased nutrient load resulted in increased light attenuation in the HRAP and lower light absorption efficiency by the microalgae. High nutrient loads also resulted in improved photosynthetic performance with significantly higher maximum rates of electron transport, oxygen production and quantum yield. This experiment demonstrated that microalgal productivity and nutrient removal efficiency were not inhibited by high nutrient loads, however, higher loads resulted in lower water quality in effluent discharge.

  4. Indicators: Algal Toxins (microcystin)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Algal toxins are toxic substances released by some types of algae (phytoplankton) when they are present in large quantities (blooms) and decay or degrade. High nutrient levels and warm temperatures often result in favorable conditions for algae blooms.

  5. Extracellular heat shock protein 90 binding to TGFβ receptor I participates in TGFβ-mediated collagen production in myocardial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    García, Raquel; Merino, David; Gómez, Jenny M; Nistal, J Francisco; Hurlé, María A; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Villar, Ana V

    2016-10-01

    The pathological remodeling heart shows an increase in left ventricular mass and an excess of extracellular matrix deposition that can over time cause heart failure. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is the main cytokine controlling this process. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been shown to play a critical role in TGFβ signaling by stabilizing the TGFβ signaling cascade. We detected extracellular Hsp90 in complex with TGFβ receptor I (TGFβRI) in fibroblasts and determined a close proximity between both proteins suggesting a potential physical interaction between the two at the plasma membrane. This was supported by in silico studies predicting Hsp90 dimers and TGFβRI extracellular domain interaction. Both, Hsp90aa1 and Hsp90ab1 isoforms participate in TGFβRI complex. Extracellular Hsp90 inhibition lessened the yield of collagen production as well as the canonical TGFβ signaling cascade, and collagen protein synthesis was drastically reduced in Hsp90aa1 KO mice. These observations together with the significant increase in activity of Hsp90 at the plasma membrane pointed to a functional cooperative partnership between Hsp90 and TGFβRI in the fibrotic process. We propose that a surface population of Hsp90 extracellularly binds TGFβRI and this complex behaves as an active participant in collagen production in TGFβ-activated fibroblasts. We also offer an in vivo insight into the role of Hsp90 and its isoforms during cardiac remodeling in murine aortic banding model suffering from pathological cardiac remodeling and detect circulating Hsp90 overexpressed in remodeling mice.

  6. Extracellular Histones Induce Chemokine Production in Whole Blood Ex Vivo and Leukocyte Recruitment In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Westman, Johannes; Papareddy, Praveen; Dahlgren, Madelene W; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Smeds, Emanuel; Linder, Adam; Mörgelin, Matthias; Johansson-Lindbom, Bengt; Egesten, Arne; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-12-01

    The innate immune system relies to a great deal on the interaction of pattern recognition receptors with pathogen- or damage-associated molecular pattern molecules. Extracellular histones belong to the latter group and their release has been described to contribute to the induction of systemic inflammatory reactions. However, little is known about their functions in the early immune response to an invading pathogen. Here we show that extracellular histones specifically target monocytes in human blood and this evokes the mobilization of the chemotactic chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 from these cells. The chemokine induction involves the toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex on monocytes, and is under the control of interferon-γ. Consequently, subcutaneous challenge with extracellular histones results in elevated levels of CXCL10 in a murine air pouch model and an influx of leukocytes to the site of injection in a TLR4 dependent manner. When analyzing tissue biopsies from patients with necrotizing fasciitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, extracellular histone H4 and CXCL10 are immunostained in necrotic, but not healthy tissue. Collectively, these results show for the first time that extracellular histones have an important function as chemoattractants as their local release triggers the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection.

  7. Regulation of the pigment optical density of an algal cell: filling the gap between photosynthetic productivity in the laboratory and in mass culture.

    PubMed

    Formighieri, Cinzia; Franck, Fabrice; Bassi, Roberto

    2012-11-30

    An increasing number of investors is looking at algae as a viable source of biofuels, beside cultivation for human/animal feeding or to extract high-value chemicals and pharmaceuticals. However, present biomass productivities are far below theoretical estimations implying that a large part of the available photosynthetically active radiation is not used in photosynthesis. Light utilisation inefficiency and rapid light attenuation within a mass culture due to high pigment optical density of wild type strains have been proposed as major limiting factors reducing solar-to-biomass conversion efficiency. Analysis of growth yields of mutants with reduced light-harvesting antennae and/or reduced overall pigment concentration per cell, generated by either mutagenesis or genetic engineering, could help understanding limiting factors for biomass accumulation in photobioreactor. Meanwhile, studies on photo-acclimation can provide additional information on the average status of algal cells in a photobioreactor to be used in modelling-based predictions. Identifying limiting factors in solar-to-biomass conversion efficiency is the first step for planning strategies of genetic improvement and domestication of algae to finally fill the gap between theoretical and industrial photosynthetic productivity.

  8. Using life cycle assessment and techno-economic analysis in a real options framework to inform the design of algal biofuel production facilities.

    PubMed

    Kern, Jordan D; Hise, Adam M; Characklis, Greg W; Gerlach, Robin; Viamajala, Sridhar; Gardner, Robert D

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the use of "real options analysis" (ROA) to quantify the value of greater product flexibility at algal biofuel production facilities. A deterministic optimization framework is integrated with a combined life cycle assessment/techno-economic analysis model and subjected to an ensemble of 30-year commodity price trajectories. Profits are maximized for two competing plant configurations: 1) one that sells lipid-extracted algae as animal feed only; and 2) one that can sell lipid-extracted algae as feed or use it to recover nutrients and energy, due to an up-front investment in anaerobic digestion/combined heat and power. Results show that added investment in plant flexibility does not result in an improvement in net present value, because current feed meal prices discourage use of lipid-extracted algae for nutrient and energy recovery. However, this study demonstrates that ROA provides many useful insights regarding plant design that cannot be captured via traditional techno-economic modeling.

  9. Enhanced extracellular production of aspartyl proteinase, a virulence factor, by Candida albicans isolates following growth in subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Wu, T; Wright, K; Hurst, S F; Morrison, C J

    2000-05-01

    We examined the production of secreted aspartyl proteinase (Sap), a putative virulence factor of Candida albicans, by a series of 17 isolates representing a single strain obtained from the oral cavity of an AIDS patient before and after the development of clinical and in vitro resistance to fluconazole. Isolates were grown in Sap-inducing yeast carbon base-bovine serum albumin medium containing 0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1 MIC of fluconazole, and cultures were sampled daily for 14 days to determine extracellular Sap activity by enzymatic degradation of bovine serum albumin. Extracellular Sap activity was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner for the most fluconazole-susceptible isolate (MIC, 1.0 microg/ml) and significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner for the most fluconazole-resistant isolate (MIC, >64 microg/ml). Enhanced extracellular Sap production could not be attributed to cell death or nonspecific release of Sap, because there was no reduction in the number of CFU and no significant release of enolase, a constitutive enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. Conversely, intracellular Sap concentrations were significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner in the most fluconazole-susceptible isolate and decreased in the most fluconazole-resistant isolate. Enhanced Sap production correlated with the overexpression of a gene encoding a multidrug resistance (MDR1) efflux pump occurring in these isolates. These data indicate that exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole can result in enhanced extracellular production of Sap by isolates with the capacity to overexpress MDR1 and imply that patients infected with these isolates and subsequently treated with suboptimal doses of fluconazole may experience enhanced C. albicans virulence in vivo.

  10. Macromolecularly crowded in vitro microenvironments accelerate the production of extracellular matrix-rich supramolecular assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Fan, Xingliang; Collin, Estelle; Rochev, Yury; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Gorelov, Alexander; Dillon, Simon; Joshi, Lokesh; Raghunath, Michael; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering by self-assembly put forward the notion that functional regeneration can be achieved by utilising the inherent capacity of cells to create highly sophisticated supramolecular assemblies. However, in dilute ex vivo microenvironments, prolonged culture time is required to develop an extracellular matrix-rich implantable device. Herein, we assessed the influence of macromolecular crowding, a biophysical phenomenon that regulates intra- and extra-cellular activities in multicellular organisms, in human corneal fibroblast culture. In the presence of macromolecules, abundant extracellular matrix deposition was evidenced as fast as 48 h in culture, even at low serum concentration. Temperature responsive copolymers allowed the detachment of dense and cohesive supramolecularly assembled living substitutes within 6 days in culture. Morphological, histological, gene and protein analysis assays demonstrated maintenance of tissue-specific function. Macromolecular crowding opens new avenues for a more rational design in engineering of clinically relevant tissue modules in vitro. PMID:25736020

  11. Characterization of algal organic matter and formation of DBPs from chlor(am)ination.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jingyun; Yang, Xin; Ma, Jun; Shang, Chii; Zhao, Quan

    2010-12-01

    The frequent occurrence of algal blooms in drinking water reservoirs causes problems to water supply, one of which is the release of algal organic matter in high concentrations to affect drinking water quality. Algal organic matter, including extracellular organic matter (EOM) and intracellular organic matter (IOM), was characterized. The formation of a variety of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in chlorination and chloramination of EOM, IOM and algal cells was evaluated. Natural organic matter (NOM) isolated from Suwannee River was also studied for comparison. EOM and IOM were rich in organic nitrogen, which consisted of high (over 10 kDa) and low (70-1000 Da) molecular weight (MW) organic matter, whilst the MW of organic carbon in EOM and IOM was relatively lower. IOM had a higher fraction of total organic nitrogen, with larger proportions of higher MW and more hydrophobic contents than did EOM. IOM also contained higher fractions of free amino acids but lower fractions of aliphatic amines than did EOM. During chlorination of EOM and IOM, organic chloramines were first formed and then became undetectable after 1 d. Chlorination of EOM and IOM produced more nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs) and haloaldehydes and less carbonaceous DBPs (C-DBPs) than did chlorination of NOM. Organic chloramines were found after 3-d chloramination of EOM and IOM. The amounts of N-DBPs and C-DBPs formed from chloramination of EOM or IOM were much less than that from NOM. EOM produced less DBPs (except for trichloronitromethane) than did IOM and algal cells in chlorination and chloramination.

  12. Effects of lead(II) on the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and colony formation of cultured Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Shu-lin; Dai, Wei; Xing, Ke-zhing; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of lead(II) on the production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), including bound extracellular polysaccharides (bEPS) and soluble extracellular polysaccharides (sEPS), and the colony formation of Microcystis aeruginosa, cultures of M. aeruginosa were exposed to four concentrations (5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L) of lead(II) for 10 d under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that 5.0 and 10.0 mg/L lead(II) stimulated M. aeruginosa growth throughout the experiment while 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth in the first 2 d exposure and then stimulated it. As compared to the control group, significant increases in the bEPS and sEPS production were observed in 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) treatments (P < 0.05). Large colony formations were not observed throughout the experiment. However, four tested concentrations of lead(II) could significantly promote the formation of small and middle colonies after 10 d exposure (P < 0.05), and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) had the best stimulatory effect. Lead(II) could stimulate bEPS production, which conversely promoted colony formation, suggesting that heavy metals might be contributing to the bloom-forming of M. aeruginosa in natural conditions.

  13. Biodiesel production from lipids in wet microalgae with microwave irradiation and bio-crude production from algal residue through hydrothermal liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Huang, Rui; Yu, Tao; Li, Tao; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2014-01-01

    A cogeneration process of biodiesel and bio-crude was proposed to make full use of wet microalgae biomass. High-grade biodiesel was first produced from lipids in wet microalgae through extraction and transesterification with microwave irradiation. Then, low-grade bio-crude was produced from proteins and carbohydrates in the algal residue through hydrothermal liquefaction. The total yield (40.19%) and the total energy recovery (67.73%) of the cogenerated biodiesel and bio-crude were almost equal to those of the bio-oil obtained from raw microalgae through direct hydrothermal liquefaction. Upon microwave irradiation, proteins were partially hydrolyzed and the hydrolysates were apt for deaminization under the hydrothermal condition of the algal residue. Hence, the total remaining nitrogen (16.02%) in the cogenerated biodiesel and bio-crude was lower than that (27.06%) in the bio-oil. The cogeneration process prevented lipids and proteins from reacting to produce low-grade amides and other long-chain nitrogen compounds during the direct hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae.

  14. The contribution of bacteria to algal growth by carbon cycling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Lant, Paul; Pratt, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Algal mass production in open systems is often limited by the availability of inorganic carbon substrate. In this paper, we evaluate how bacterial driven carbon cycling mitigates carbon limitation in open algal culture systems. The contribution of bacteria to carbon cycling was determined by quantifying algae growth with and without supplementation of bacteria. It was found that adding heterotrophic bacteria to an open algal culture dramatically enhanced algae productivity. Increases in algal productivity due to supplementation of bacteria of 4.8 and 3.4 times were observed in two batch tests operating at two different pH values over 7 days. A kinetic model is proposed which describes carbon limited algal growth, and how the limitation could be overcome by bacterial activity to re-mineralize photosynthetic end products.

  15. Algal swimming velocities signal fatty acid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Travis J; Hondzo, Miki; Mashek, Mara T; Mashek, Douglas G; Lefebvre, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The use of microalgae for biofuel production will be beneficial to society if we can produce biofuels at large scales with minimal mechanical energy input in the production process. Understanding micro-algal physiological responses under variable environmental conditions in bioreactors is essential for the optimization of biofuel production. We demonstrate that measuring micro-algal swimming speed provides information on culture health and total fatty acid accumulation. Three strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were grown heterotrophically on acetate and subjected to various levels of nitrogen starvation. Other nutrient levels were explored to determine their effect on micro-algal kinetics. Swimming velocities were measured with two-dimensional micro-particle tracking velocimetry. The results show an inverse linear relationship between normalized total fatty acid mass versus swimming speed of micro-algal cells. Analysis of RNA sequencing data confirms these results by demonstrating that the biological processes of cell motion and the generation of energy precursors are significantly down-regulated. Experiments demonstrate that changes in nutrient concentration in the surrounding media also affect swimming speed. The findings have the potential for the in situ and indirect assessment of lipid content by measuring micro-algal swimming kinetics.

  16. Effect of algal recycling rate on the performance of Pediastrum boryanum dominated wastewater treatment high rate algal pond.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J

    2014-01-01

    Recycling a portion of gravity harvested algae promoted the dominance of a rapidly settling colonial alga, Pediastrum boryanum (P. boryanum) and improved both biomass productivity and settleability in High Rate Algal Pond (HRAP) treating domestic wastewater. The effect of algal recycling rate on HRAP performance was investigated using 12 replicate mesocosms (18 L) that were operated semi-continuously under ambient conditions. Three experiments were conducted during different seasons with each experiment lasting up to 36 days. Recycling 10%, 25%, and 50% of the 'mass' of daily algal production all increased total biomass concentration in the mesocosms. However, recycling >10% reduced the organic content (volatile suspended solids (VSS)) of the mesocosm biomass from 83% to 68% and did not further increase biomass productivity (based on VSS). This indicates that if a HRAP is operated with a low algal concentration and does not utilise all the available sunlight, algal recycling increases the algal concentration up to an optimum level, resulting in higher algal biomass productivity. Recycling 10% of the daily algal production not only increased biomass productivity by ∼40%, but increased biomass settleability by ∼25%, which was probably a consequence of the ∼30% increase in P. boryanum dominance in the mesocosms compared with controls without recycling.

  17. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  18. Adhesive properties, extracellular protein production, and metabolism in the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain when grown in the presence of mucin.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Borja; Saad, Naima; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Bressollier, Philippe; Urdaci, Maria C

    2010-06-01

    This paper examines the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, and how it reacts to the presence of mucin in its extracellular milieu. Parameters studied included cell clustering, adhesion to mucin, extracellular protein production, and formation of final metabolites. L. rhamnosus GG was found to grow efficiently in the presence of glucose, N-acetylglucosamine, or mucin (partially purified or purified) as sole carbon sources. However, it was unable to grow using other mucin constituents, such as fucose or glucuronic acid. Mucin induced noticeable changes in all the parameters studied when compared with growth using glucose, including in the formation of cell clusters, which were easily disorganized with trypsin. Mucin increased adhesion of the bacterium, and modulated the production of extracellular proteins. SDS-PAGE revealed that mucin was not degraded during L. rhamnosus GG growth, suggesting that this bacterium is able to partially use the glucidic moiety of glycoprotein. This study goes some way towards developing an understanding of the metabolic and physiological changes that L. rhamnosus GG undergoes within the human gastrointestinal tract.

  19. Application of repeated aspartate tags to improving extracellular production of Escherichia coli L-asparaginase isozyme II.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Ki; Min, Won-Ki; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-11-01

    Asparaginase isozyme II from Escherichia coli is a popular enzyme that has been used as a therapeutic agent against acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, fusion tag systems consisting of the pelB signal sequence and various lengths of repeated aspartate tags were devised to highly express and to release active asparaginase isozyme II extracellularly in E. coli. Among several constructs, recombinant asparaginase isozyme II fused with the pelB signal sequence and five aspartate tag was secreted efficiently into culture medium at 34.6 U/mg cell of specific activity. By batch fermentation, recombinant E. coli produced 40.8 U/ml asparaginase isozyme II in the medium. In addition, deletion of the gspDE gene reduced extracellular production of asparaginase isozyme II, indicating that secretion of recombinant asparaginase isozyme II was partially ascribed to the recognition by the general secretion machinery. This tag system composed of the pelB signal peptide, and repeated aspartates can be applied to extracellular production of other recombinant proteins.

  20. Presence of a lethal protease in the extracellular products of Vibrio splendidus-Vibrio lentus related strains.

    PubMed

    Farto, R; Armada, S P; Montes, M; Perez, M J; Nieto, T P

    2006-12-01

    The presence of a lethal extracellular 39-kDa protease, a virulence determinant of a Listonella pelagia strain which produces vibriosis in turbot, was determined in the extracellular products (ECP) of 33 Vibrionaceae strains. Both immunological and enzymatic techniques distinguished this specific protease from other Vibrionaceae proteins. It was detected in 15% (5/33) of the ECPs assayed belonging to strains of the Vibrio splendidus-V. lentus related group isolated in Galician aquaculture systems (NW Spain). As these strains were associated with diseased octopus and cultured turbot, were able to colonize the internal organs of fish and produced a lethal ECP for fish, they are a potential risk for the health of reared aquatic organisms.

  1. Effect of clindamycin, erythromycin, lincomycin, and tetracycline on growth and extracellular lipase production by propionibacteria in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Unkles, S E; Gemmell, C G

    1982-01-01

    Two propionibacteria identified as Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum were grown anaerobically in the presence of growth subinhibitory concentrations (0.25 and 0.5 minimal inhibitory concentrations) of clindamycin, erythromycin, lincomycin, and tetracycline. Viable counts and assays of extracellular lipase were performed on samples taken at 24-h intervals over a 96-h period. The results showed that lincomycin and clindamycin could inhibit the production of the enzyme by both strains with little effect on their growth rates. Tetracycline caused inhibition of lipase production by P. granulosum only. Although production of the enzyme by P. acnes was delayed in the presence of tetracycline, the final titer was the same as the control. Erythromycin had little effect on growth and enzyme production of either strain. It is possible, therefore, that certain antibiotics used in acne therapy may act not only as bactericidal agents but also as inhibitors of enzyme production under non-growth-limiting conditions. PMID:7081974

  2. Proteolytic activity of extracellular products from Arthrobotrys musiformis and their effect in vitro against Haemonchus contortus infective larvae

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Ramírez, Perla María del Carmen; Figueroa-Castillo, Juan Antonio; Ulloa-Arvizú, Raúl; Martínez-García, Luz Gisela; Guevara-Flores, Alberto; Rendón, Juan Luis; Valero-Coss, Rosa Ofelia; Mendoza-de Gives, Pedro; Quiroz-Romero, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    Arthrobotrys musiformis is a nematophagous fungus with potential for the biological control of Haemonchus contortus larvae. This study aimed to identify and demonstrate the proteolytic activity of extracellular products from A musiformis cultured in a liquid medium against H contortus infective larvae. A musiformis was cultured on a solid medium and further grown in a liquid medium, which was then processed through ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The proteolytic activity of the purified fraction was assayed with either gelatin or bovine serum albumin as substrate. Optimum proteolytic activity was observed at pH 8 and a temperature of 37°C. Results obtained with specific inhibitors suggest the enzyme belongs to the serine-dependent protease family. The purified fraction concentrate from A musiformis was tested against H contortus infective larvae. A time-dependent effect was observed with 77 per cent immobility after 48 hours incubation, with alteration of the sheath. It is concluded that A musiformis is a potential candidate for biological control because of its resistant structures and also because of its excretion of extracellular products such as proteases. The present study contributes to the identification of one of the in vitro mechanisms of action of Amusiformis, namely the extracellular production of proteases against H contortus infective larvae. More investigations should be undertaken into how these products could be used to decrease the nematode population in sheep flocks under field conditions, thereby improving animal health while simultaneously diminishing the human and environmental impact of chemical-based drugs. PMID:26392902

  3. Development of a mixed mode adsorption process for the direct product sequestration of an extracellular protease from microbial batch cultures.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, G E; Luechau, F; Burton, S C; Lyddiatt, A

    2000-04-28

    Direct product sequestration of extracellular proteins from microbial batch cultures can be achieved by continuous or intermittent broth recycle through an external extractive loop. Here, we describe the development of a fluidisable, mixed mode adsorbent, designed to tolerate increasing ionic strength (synonymous with extended productive batch cultures). This facilitated operations for the integrated recovery of an extracellular acid protease from cultures of Yarrowia lipolytica. Mixed mode adsorbents were prepared using chemistries containing hydrophobic and ionic groups. Matrix hydrophobicity and titration ranges were matched to the requirements of integrated protease adsorption. A single expanded bed was able to service the productive phase of growth without recourse to the pH adjustment of the broth previously required for ion exchange adsorption. This resulted in increased yields of product, accompanied by further increases in enzyme specific activity. A step change from pH 4.5 to 2.6, across the isoelectric point of the protease, enabled high resolution fixed bed elution induced by electrostatic repulsion. The generic application of mixed mode chemistries, which combine the physical robustness of ion-exchange ligands in sanitisation and sterilisation procedures with a selectivity, which approaches that of affinity interactions, is discussed.

  4. Accelerating Commercialization of Algal Biofuels Through Partnerships (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure describes National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) algal biofuels research capabilities and partnership opportunities. NREL is accelerating algal biofuels commercialization through: (1) Advances in applied biology; (2) Algal strain development; (3) Development of fuel conversion pathways; (4) Techno-economic analysis; and (5) Development of high-throughput lipid analysis methodologies. NREL scientists and engineers are addressing challenges across the algal biofuels value chain, including algal biology, cultivation, harvesting and extraction, and fuel conversion. Through partnerships, NREL can share knowledge and capabilities in the following areas: (1) Algal Biology - A fundamental understanding of algal biology is key to developing cost-effective algal biofuels processes. NREL scientists are experts in the isolation and characterization of microalgal species. They are identifying genes and pathways involved in biofuel production. In addition, they have developed a high-throughput, non-destructive technique for assessing lipid production in microalgae. (2) Cultivation - NREL researchers study algal growth capabilities and perform compositional analysis of algal biomass. Laboratory-scale photobioreactors and 1-m2 open raceway ponds in an on-site greenhouse allow for year-round cultivation of algae under a variety of conditions. A bioenergy-focused algal strain collection is being established at NREL, and our laboratory houses a cryopreservation system for long-term maintenance of algal cultures and preservation of intellectual property. (3) Harvesting and Extraction - NREL is investigating cost-effective harvesting and extraction methods suitable for a variety of species and conditions. Areas of expertise include cell wall analysis and deconstruction and identification and utilization of co-products. (4) Fuel Conversion - NREL's excellent capabilities and facilities for biochemical and thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels are being

  5. Regional Algal Biofuel Production Potential in the Coterminous United States as Affected by Resource Availability Trade-offs

    SciTech Connect

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-15

    The warm sunny climate and unoccupied arid lands in the American southwest are favorable factors for algae cultivation. However, additional resources affect the overall viability of specific sites and regions. We investigated the tradeoffs between growth rate, water, and CO2 availability and costs for two strains: N. salina and Chlorella sp. We conducted site selection exercises (~88,000 US sites) to produce 21 billion gallons yr-1 (BGY) of renewable diesel (RD). Experimental trials from the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-Products (NAABB) team informed the growth model of our Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT). We simulated RD production by both lipid extraction and hydrothermal liquefaction. Sites were prioritized by the net value of biofuel minus water and flue gas costs. Water cost models for N. salina were based on seawater and high salinity groundwater and for Chlorella, fresh and brackish groundwater. CO2 costs were based on a flue gas delivery model. Selections constrained by production and water were concentrated along the Gulf of Mexico and southeast Atlantic coasts due to high growth rates and low water costs. Adding flue gas constraints increased the spatial distribution, but the majority of sites remained in the southeast. The 21 BGY target required ~3.8 million hectares of mainly forest (41.3%) and pasture (35.7%). Exclusion in favor of barren and scrub lands forced most production to the southwestern US, but with increased water consumption (5.7 times) and decreased economic efficiency (-38%).

  6. Harmful Algal Blooms Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project represents the Agency’s first effort to unify harmful algal blooms (HABs) research that had been previously carried out in isolation within various laboratories. A unified program is the most efficient way generate useful results for the Agency’s decision...

  7. Extracellular Lipase and Protease Production from a Model Drinking Water Bacterial Community Is Functionally Robust to Absence of Individual Members.

    PubMed

    Willsey, Graham G; Wargo, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria secrete enzymes into the extracellular space to hydrolyze macromolecules into constituents that can be imported for microbial nutrition. In bacterial communities, these enzymes and their resultant products can be modeled as community property. Our goal was to investigate the impact of individual community member absence on the resulting community production of exoenzymes (extracellular enzymes) involved in lipid and protein hydrolysis. Our model community contained nine bacteria isolated from the potable water system of the International Space Station. Bacteria were grown in static conditions individually, all together, or in all combinations of eight species and exoproduct production was measured by colorimetric or fluorometric reagents to assess short chain and long chain lipases, choline-specific phospholipases C, and proteases. The exoenzyme production of each species grown alone varied widely, however, the enzyme activity levels of the mixed communities were functionally robust to absence of any single species, with the exception of phospholipase C production in one community. For phospholipase C, absence of Chryseobacterium gleum led to increased choline-specific phospholipase C production, correlated with increased growth of Burkholderia cepacia and Sphingomonas sanguinis. Because each individual species produced different enzyme activity levels in isolation, we calculated an expected activity value for each bacterial mixture using input levels or known final composition. This analysis suggested that robustness of each exoenzyme activity is not solely mediated by community composition, but possibly influenced by bacterial communication, which is known to regulate such pathways in many bacteria. We conclude that in this simplified model of a drinking water bacterial community, community structure imposes constraints on production and/or secretion of exoenzymes to generate a level appropriate to exploit a given nutrient environment.

  8. Extracellular Lipase and Protease Production from a Model Drinking Water Bacterial Community Is Functionally Robust to Absence of Individual Members

    PubMed Central

    Willsey, Graham G.; Wargo, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria secrete enzymes into the extracellular space to hydrolyze macromolecules into constituents that can be imported for microbial nutrition. In bacterial communities, these enzymes and their resultant products can be modeled as community property. Our goal was to investigate the impact of individual community member absence on the resulting community production of exoenzymes (extracellular enzymes) involved in lipid and protein hydrolysis. Our model community contained nine bacteria isolated from the potable water system of the International Space Station. Bacteria were grown in static conditions individually, all together, or in all combinations of eight species and exoproduct production was measured by colorimetric or fluorometric reagents to assess short chain and long chain lipases, choline-specific phospholipases C, and proteases. The exoenzyme production of each species grown alone varied widely, however, the enzyme activity levels of the mixed communities were functionally robust to absence of any single species, with the exception of phospholipase C production in one community. For phospholipase C, absence of Chryseobacterium gleum led to increased choline-specific phospholipase C production, correlated with increased growth of Burkholderia cepacia and Sphingomonas sanguinis. Because each individual species produced different enzyme activity levels in isolation, we calculated an expected activity value for each bacterial mixture using input levels or known final composition. This analysis suggested that robustness of each exoenzyme activity is not solely mediated by community composition, but possibly influenced by bacterial communication, which is known to regulate such pathways in many bacteria. We conclude that in this simplified model of a drinking water bacterial community, community structure imposes constraints on production and/or secretion of exoenzymes to generate a level appropriate to exploit a given nutrient environment. PMID:26599415

  9. Extracellular acidic polysaccharide production by a two-membered bacterial coculture.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Shinya; Yamada, Kazutaka; Takatsu, Kyoko; Hanada, Satoshi; Koyama, Osamu; Yokomaku, Toyokazu; Kamagata, Yoichi; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Kurane, Ryuichiro

    2003-01-01

    A two-membered coculture of strains KYM-7 and KYM-8, identified as Cellulomonas cellulans and Agrobacterium tumefaciens, respectively, produced a large amount of an extracellular polysaccharide, designated APK-78, from starch. Each strain in pure culture produced only very little amount of polysaccharide from starch; the coexistence of the two strains from the early stage of cultivation was indispensable for a large amount of polysaccharide to be produced. The polysaccharide APK-78 was acidic and composed of glucose, galactose, succinic acid, and pyruvic acid with a molar ratio of 8.1:1.0:1.7:1.0, indicating that it is a succinoglycan type of polysaccharide.

  10. Algal Bloom Detection from HICO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Ruhul; Gould, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Ocean color satellites provide daily, global views of marine bio-optical properties in the upper ocean at various spatial scales. The most productive area of the global ocean is the coastal zone which is heavily impacted by urban and agricultural runoff, transportation, recreation, and oil and gas production. In recent years, harmful algal blooms (HABs) have become one of the serious environmental problems in the coastal areas on a global scale. The global nature of the problem has expanded in its frequency, severity, and extent over the last several decades. Human activities and population increases have contributed to an increase in various toxic and noxious algal species in the coastal regions worldwide. Eutrophication in estuaries and coastal waters is believed to be the major factor causing HABs. In this study, we assess the applicability of the Red Band Difference (RBD) HAB detection algorithm on data from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO). Our preliminary results show that due to various uncertainties such as atmospheric correction, calibration and possibly also the relatively low signal-to-noise ratio of HICO for fluorescence detection, it is difficult to extract the fluorescence portion of the reflectance spectrum that RBD uses for bloom detection. We propose an improved bloom detection technique for HICO using red and NIR bands. Our results are validated using other space-borne and ground based measurements.

  11. Algal pigment distribution and primary production in the eastern Mediterranean as derived from coastal zone color scanner observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, David; Morel, André; André, Jean-Michel

    1995-08-01

    About 300 coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) scenes, gathered over the eastern Mediterranean basin mostly during the years 1979-1981, have been processed from level 1 by using improved pixel-by-pixel procedures for the atmospheric correction and pigment retrieval. The seasonal evolution of the upper ocean pigment concentration is described and analyzed within the whole basin and its subbasins. From the chlorophyll concentration in the top layer, and by using statistical relationships, the depth-integrated pigment content is estimated and used in conjunction with a light-photosynthesis model to estimate the carbon fixation. The model relies on a set of physiological parameters, selected after the validation of the light-photosynthesis model and not on locally measured parameters. Additional information needed in the modeling are the photosynthetically available radiation (computed from astronomic and atmospheric parameters, combined with a cloud climatology), sea temperature and mixed-layer depth (taken from Levitus (1982)). Actually, the model is used to generate look-up tables in such a way that all possible situations (concerning available radiation, chlorophyll concentration, and temperature) are covered. The appropriate situation associated with any pixel is selected from these tables to generate primary production maps. Despite a relatively good spatial coverage, studying the interannual variability of the pigment distribution and primary production appeared to be impossible. Therefore 12 "climatological" monthly chlorophyll maps have been produced by merging the data corresponding to several years. The carbon fixation rates in each of the subbasins have been computed on a monthly basis, and annual mean values derived thereafter. The primary production values are compared with sparse field determinations. They are also compared with those previously derived for the Western basin, also by using CZCS data (Morel and André, 1991). When put together, these

  12. Purification and characterization of solvent tolerant lipase from Bacillus sp. for methyl ester production from algal oil.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Ramachandran; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2016-05-01

    Lipase from Bacillus sp. isolated from the oil contaminated soil was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography with a 5.1-fold purification and 10.5% yield. SDS-PAGE analysis of the enzyme revealed the molecular mass of 24 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature for lipase activity were 6.5 and 37°C, respectively. The isolated lipase was stimulated by pretreatment with methanol and ethanol as well as by divalent metal ions Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Mn(2+). The enzyme showed high activity towards oleic rich oils. The enzyme immobilized on celite could retain 90% lipase activity after eight cycles. Transesterification of Botryococcus sp. oil using the immobilized enzyme for 40 h resulted in 80% yield of fatty acid methyl esters which had good properties for use as biodiesel. Overall results suggested that the solvent tolerant Bacillus lipase can be a potential biocatalyst for methyl ester production.

  13. Catalytic effect of ultrananocrystalline Fe3O4 on algal bio-crude production via HTL process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Pérez, Arnulfo; Diaz-Diestra, Daysi; Frias-Flores, Cecilia B.; Beltran-Huarac, Juan; Das, K. C.; Weiner, Brad R.; Morell, Gerardo; Díaz-Vázquez, Liz M.

    2015-10-01

    We report a comprehensive quantitative study of the production of refined bio-crudes via a controlled hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) process using Ulva fasciata macroalgae (UFMA) as biomass and ultrananocrystalline Fe3O4 (UNCFO) as catalyst. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy were applied to elucidate the formation of the high-quality nanocatalysts. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and CHNS analyses showed that the bio-crude yield and carbon/oxygen ratios increase as the amount of UNCFO increases, reaching a peak value of 32% at 1.25 wt% (a 9% increase when compared to the catalyst-free yield). The bio-crude is mainly composed of fatty acids, alcohols, ketones, phenol and benzene derivatives, and hydrocarbons. Their relative abundance changes as a function of catalyst concentration. FTIR spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry revealed that the as-produced bio-crudes are free of iron species, which accumulate in the generated bio-chars. Our findings also indicate that the energy recovery values via the HTL process are sensitive to the catalyst loading, with a threshold loading of 1.25 wt%. GC-MS studies show that the UNCFO not only influences the chemical nature of the resulting bio-crudes and bio-chars, but also the amount of fixed carbons in the solid residues. The detailed molecular characterization of the bio-crudes and bio-chars catalyzed by UNCFO represents the first systematic study reported using UFMA. This study brings forth new avenues to advance the highly-pure bio-crude production employing active, heterogeneous catalyst materials that are recoverable and recyclable for continuous thermochemical reactions.We report a comprehensive quantitative study of the production of refined bio-crudes via a controlled hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) process using Ulva fasciata macroalgae (UFMA) as biomass and ultrananocrystalline Fe3O4 (UNCFO) as catalyst. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy were applied to elucidate the formation of

  14. Differential lipid and fatty acid profiles of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic Chlorella zofingiensis: assessment of algal oils for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Junchao; Sun, Zheng; Zhong, Yujuan; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document and compare the lipid class and fatty acid composition of the green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis cultivated under photoautotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, a 900% increase in lipid yield was achieved in heterotrophic cells fed with 30 g L(-1) of glucose. Furthermore heterotrophic cells accumulated predominantly neutral lipids (NL) that accounted for 79.5% of total lipids with 88.7% being triacylglycerol (TAG); whereas photoautotrophic cells contained mainly the membrane lipids glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL). Together with the much higher content of oleic acid (C18:1) (35.2% of total fatty acids), oils from heterotrophic C. zofingiensis appear to be more feasible for biodiesel production. Our study highlights the possibility of using heterotrophic algae for producing high quality biodiesel.

  15. Effects of Silver Sulphadiazine on Production of Extracellular Proteins by Strains of Staphylococcus Aureus Isolated from Burns Wound.

    PubMed

    Javid Khojasteh, Vahideh; Alfakhri, Souad; Foster, Howard Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies had shown that sub-inhibitory concentrations of silver sulphadiazine (AgSD) stimulated the production of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 in certain strains (responder strains) of Staphylococcus aureus and that protease production was also affected. No changes were detected in other strains (non-responders). Extracellular proteins from eleven responder and non-responder strains grown with and without AgSD were separated by SDS PAGE. There were three classes of response, responder strains that showed enhancement of synthesis of certain proteins, non-responder strains that showed no change and responder strains that showed a general decrease in exoprotein production in the early stages of growth. The results showed that the effects of AgSD were complex and that S. aureus strains were heterogenous with respect to their response to sub-inhibitory concentrations of AgSD.

  16. Application of a novel enzymatic pretreatment using crude hydrolytic extracellular enzyme solution to microalgal biomass for dark fermentative hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yeo-Myeong; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Oh, You-Kwan; Shin, Hang-Sik; Jung, Kyung-Won

    2014-05-01

    In this study, a novel enzymatic pretreatment of Chlorella vulgaris for dark fermentative hydrogen production (DFHP) was performed using crude hydrolytic extracellular enzyme solution (CHEES) extracted from the H2 fermented effluent of food waste. It was found that the enzyme extracted at 52 h had the highest hydrolysis efficiency of microalgal biomass, resulting in the highest H2 yield of 43.1 mL H2/g dry cell weight along with shorter lag periods. Even though a high amount of VFAs was accumulated in CHEES, especially butyrate, the fermentative bacteria on the DFHP was not affected from product inhibition. It also appears that the presence of organic acids, especially lactate and acetate, contained in the CHEES facilitated enhancement of H2 production acted as a co-substrate. Therefore, all of the experimental results suggest that the enhancement of DFHP performance caused by CHEES has a dual role as the hydrolysis enhancer and the co-substrate supplier.

  17. Effects of algal-derived carbon on sediment methane ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nutrient loading is known to have adverse consequences for aquatic ecosystems, particularly in the form of algal blooms that may result. These blooms pose problems for humans and wildlife, including harmful toxin release, aquatic hypoxia and increased costs for water treatment. Another potential disservice resulting from algal blooms is the enhanced production of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, in aquatic sediments. Laboratory experiments have shown that algal biomass additions to sediment cores increase rates of CH4 production, but it is unclear whether or not this effect occurs at the ecosystem scale. The goal of this research was to explore the link between algal-derived carbon and methane production in the sediment of a eutrophic reservoir located in southwest Ohio, using a sampling design that capitalized on spatial and temporal gradients in autochthonous carbon input to sediments. Specifically, we aimed to determine if the within-reservoir gradient of sediment algal-derived organic matter and sediment CH4 production rates correlate. This was done by retrieving sediment cores from 15 sites within the reservoir along a known gradient of methane emission rates, at two separate time points in 2016: late spring before the sediments had received large amounts of algal input and mid-summer after algal blooms had been prevalent in the reservoir. Potential CH4 production rates, sediment organic matter source, and microbial community composition were charac

  18. Extraction of extracellular lipids from chemoautotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. ISTD04 for production of biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Randhir K; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-08-01

    A CO2 sequestering bacterial strain, Serratia sp. ISTD04, that produces a significant amount of extracellular lipids was isolated from marble mine rocks. (14)C labeling analysis revealed that the rate of assimilation of CO2 by the strain is 0.756×10(-9)μmolCO2fixedcell(-1)h(-1). It was found to produce 466mg/l of extracellular lipid which was characterized using (1)H NMR. After transesterification of lipids, the total saturated and unsaturated FAME was found to be 51% and 49% respectively. The major FAME contained in the biodiesel were palmitic acid methyl ester (C16:0), oleic acid methyl ester (C18:1) and 10-nonadecenoic acid methyl ester (C19:1). Biodiesel produced by Serratia sp. ISTD04 is balanced in terms of FAME composition of good quality. It also contained higher proportion of oleic acid (35%) which makes it suitable for utilization in existing engines. Thus, the strain can be harnessed commercially to sequester CO2 into biodiesel.

  19. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation, extracellular polysaccharide production, and virulence by an oxazole derivative.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lulu; Ren, Zhi; Zhou, Xuedong; Zeng, Jumei; Zou, Jing; Li, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries, a biofilm-related oral disease, is a result of disruption of the microbial ecological balance in the oral environment. Streptococcus mutans, which is one of the primary cariogenic bacteria, produces glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) that synthesize extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs). The EPSs, especially water-insoluble glucans, contribute to the formation of dental plaque, biofilm stability, and structural integrity, by allowing bacteria to adhere to tooth surfaces and supplying the bacteria with protection against noxious stimuli and other environmental attacks. The identification of novel alternatives that selectively inhibit cariogenic organisms without suppressing oral microbial residents is required. The goal of the current study is to investigate the influence of an oxazole derivative on S. mutans biofilm formation and the development of dental caries in rats, given that oxazole and its derivatives often exhibit extensive and pharmacologically important biological activities. Our data shows that one particular oxazole derivative, named 5H6, inhibited the formation of S. mutans biofilms and prevented synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides by antagonizing Gtfs in vitro, without affecting the growth of the bacteria. In addition, topical applications with the inhibitor resulted in diminished incidence and severity of both smooth and sulcal surface caries in vivo with a lower percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Our results showed that this oxazole derivative has the capacity to inhibit biofilm formation and cariogenicity of S. mutans.

  20. Extracellular enzyme production and phylogenetic distribution of yeasts in wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingxiang; Zhang, Hao; Li, Xueling; Wang, Zhe; Xu, Ying; Ren, Siwei; Chen, Xuanyu; Xu, Yuanyuan; Hao, Hongxin; Wang, Hailei

    2013-02-01

    The abilities of yeasts to produce different extracellular enzymes and their distribution characteristics were studied in municipal, inosine fermentation, papermaking, antibiotic fermentation, and printing and dyeing wastewater treatment systems. The results indicated that of the 257 yeasts, 16, 14, 55, and 11 produced lipase, protease, manganese dependant peroxidase (MnP), and lignin peroxidase (LiP), respectively. They were distributed in 12 identified and four unidentified genera, in which Candida rugosa (AA-M17) and an unidentified Saccharomycetales (AA-Y5), Pseudozyma sp. (PH-M15), Candida sp. (MO-Y11), and Trichosporon montevideense (MO-M16) were shown to have the highest activity of lipase, protease, Mnp, and LiP, respectively. No yeast had amylase, cellulose, phytase, or laccase activity. Although only 60 isolates produced ligninolytic enzymes, 249 of the 257 yeasts could decolorize different dyes through the mechanism of biodegradation (222 isolates) or bio-sorption. The types of extracellular enzymes that the yeasts produced were significantly shaped by the types of wastewater treated.

  1. Enhanced extracellular production of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera suspension cultured cells by using cyclodextrins and methyljasmonate.

    PubMed

    Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Almagro, Lorena; Lijavetzky, Diego; Bru, Roque; Pedreño, María A

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the effect of different inducing factors on trans-resveratrol extracellular production in Monastrell grapevine suspension cultured cells is evaluated. A detailed analysis provides the optimal concentrations of cyclodextrins, methyljasmonate and UV irradiation dosage, optimal cell density, elicitation time and sucrose content in the culture media. The results indicate that trans-resveratrol production decreases as the initial cell density increases for a constant elicitor concentration in Monastrell suspension cultured cells treated with cyclodextrins individually or in combination with methyljasmonate; the decrease observed in cell cultures elicited with cyclodextrins alone is far more drastic than those observed in the combined treatment. trans-Resveratrol extracellular production observed by the joint use of cyclodextrins and methyljasmonate (1,447.8 ± 60.4 μmol trans-resveratrol g(-1) dry weight) is lower when these chemical compounds are combined with UV light short exposure (669.9 ± 45.2 μmol trans-resveratrol g(-1) dry weight). Likewise, trans-resveratrol production is dependent on levels of sucrose in the elicitation medium with the maximal levels observed with 20 g l(-1) sucrose and the joint action of cyclodextrins and 100 μM methyljasmonate. The sucrose concentration did not seem to limit the process although it affects significantly the specific productivity since the lowest sucrose concentration is 10 g l(-1), the highest productivity is reached (100.7 ± 5.8 μmol trans-resveratrol g(-1) dry weight g(-1) sucrose) using cyclodextrins and 25 μM methyljasmonate.

  2. Assessment of a Novel Algal Strain Chlamydomonas debaryana NIREMACC03 for Mass Cultivation, Biofuels Production and Kinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sanjeev; Singh, Neetu; Sarma, Anil Kumar

    2015-08-01

    A novel microalgae strain Chlamydomonas debaryana (KJ210856) was isolated from a freshwater lake of Punjab, India, and cultivated considering climatic sustainability and inherent adaptability concern. C. debaryana was grown in a 30-L indoor photobioreactor to study the mass cultivation prospect and biofuel potential. Physicochemical characterization of biomass and the lipid was performed with effect to nitrogen stress. It showed a higher biomass yield (1.58 ± 0.02 g L(-1), dry weight) and twofold increase in lipid yield (552.78 ± 9 mg L(-1)) with 34.2 ± 0.19 % lipid content under nitrogen deficient condition. Strikingly, increase in triglycerides achieved with nitrogen depletion containing over 96 % of total fatty acids (C 14, C 16, and C 18). Proximate and ultimate analysis suggested the presence of relatively higher volatile matter and carbon-hydrogen ratio. Furthermore, lower moisture and ash content signified C. debaryana biomass has promising features towards biofuel applications. The pyrolytic behavior of the whole biomass was also studied using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and kinetic parameters were estimated using different methods. Promising growth rate and lipid yield leading to feasible biofuel feed stock production in indoor photobioreactor along with autosediment potential of cells validates C. debaryana NIREMACC03, a potential strain for mass cultivation.

  3. Production of extracellular protease and glucose uptake in Bacillus clausii in steady-state and transient continuous cultures.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Torben; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-08-28

    The production of the extracellular alkaline protease Savinase (EC 3.4.21.62) and glucose uptake in a non-sporulating strain of Bacillus clausii were investigated by analysing steady-state and transients during continuous cultivations. The specific production rate was found to have an optimum at a dilution rate between 0.14 and 0.17 h(-1), whereas the yield of Savinase on glucose was found to increase with decreasing specific growth rate. A linear relationship between the ribosomal RNA content and the specific production rate was found, indicating that the translational capacity may be limiting for product formation. The dynamics of the production of Savinase were studied during step changes in the dilution rate. During a step down in the dilution rate the specific production rate decreased immediately until it reached a new steady value. During a step-up an initial cease in the production rate was observed, but when glucose stopped to accumulate the production rate was regained. The glucose uptake was further investigated when chemostat cultures growing at different dilution rates were exposed to glucose pulses. The maximal glucose uptake capacity was found to be dependent on the initial specific growth rate. Furthermore, the adaptation to high glucose concentrations was faster at high dilution rates than at low dilution rates.

  4. Production of cryoprotectant extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) by the marine psychrophilic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Marx, Joseph G; Carpenter, Shelly D; Deming, Jody W

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) play critical roles in microbial ecology, including the colonization of extreme environments in the ocean, from sea ice to the deep sea. After first developing a sugar-free growth medium, we examined the relative effects of temperature, pressure, and salinity on EPS production (on a per cell basis) by the obligately marine and psychrophilic gamma-proteobacterium, Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H. Over growth-permissive temperatures of approximately 10 to -4 degrees C, EPS production did not change, but from -8 to -14 degrees C when samples froze, EPS production rose dramatically. Similarly, at growth-permissive hydrostatic pressures of 1-200 atm (1 atm = 101.325 kPa) (at -1 and 8 degrees C), EPS production was unchanged, but at higher pressures of 400 and 600 atm EPS production rose markedly. In salinity tests at 10-100 parts per million (and -1 and 5 degrees C), EPS production increased at the freshest salinity tested. Extreme environmental conditions thus appear to stimulate EPS production by this strain. Furthermore, strain 34H recovered best from deep-freezing to -80 degrees C (not found for Earthly environments) if first supplemented with a preparation of its own EPS, rather than other cryoprotectants like glycerol, suggesting EPS production as both a survival strategy and source of compounds with potentially novel properties for biotechnological and other applications.

  5. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Komachi, Mayumi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Dobashi, Kunio; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki; Mori, Masatomo; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  6. Distribution, behavior, and condition of herbivorous fishes on coral reefs track algal resources.

    PubMed

    Tootell, Jesse S; Steele, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Herbivore distribution can impact community structure and ecosystem function. On coral reefs, herbivores are thought to play an important role in promoting coral dominance, but how they are distributed relative to algae is not well known. Here, we evaluated whether the distribution, behavior, and condition of herbivorous fishes correlated with algal resource availability at six sites in the back reef environment of Moorea, French Polynesia. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that increased algal turf availability would coincide with (1) increased biomass, (2) altered foraging behavior, and (3) increased energy reserves of herbivorous fishes. Fish biomass and algal cover were visually estimated along underwater transects; behavior of herbivorous fishes was quantified by observations of focal individuals; fish were collected to assess their condition; and algal turf production rates were measured on standardized tiles. The best predictor of herbivorous fish biomass was algal turf production, with fish biomass increasing with algal production. Biomass of herbivorous fishes was also negatively related to sea urchin density, suggesting competition for limited resources. Regression models including both algal turf production and urchin density explained 94 % of the variation in herbivorous fish biomass among sites spread over ~20 km. Behavioral observations of the parrotfish Chlorurus sordidus revealed that foraging area increased as algal turf cover decreased. Additionally, energy reserves increased with algal turf production, but declined with herbivorous fish density, implying that algal turf is a limited resource for this species. Our findings support the hypothesis that herbivorous fishes can spatially track algal resources on coral reefs.

  7. Activin A suppresses osteoblast mineralization capacity by altering extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and impairing matrix vesicle (MV) production.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rodrigo D A M; Eijken, Marco; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen A A; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2013-10-01

    During bone formation, osteoblasts deposit an extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mineralized via a process involving production and secretion of highly specialized matrix vesicles (MVs). Activin A, a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily member, was previously shown to have inhibitory effects in human bone formation models through unclear mechanisms. We investigated these mechanisms elicited by activin A during in vitro osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Activin A inhibition of ECM mineralization coincided with a strong decline in alkaline phosphatase (ALP(1)) activity in extracellular compartments, ECM and matrix vesicles. SILAC-based quantitative proteomics disclosed intricate protein composition alterations in the activin A ECM, including changed expression of collagen XII, osteonectin and several cytoskeleton-binding proteins. Moreover, in activin A osteoblasts matrix vesicle production was deficient containing very low expression of annexin proteins. ECM enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic development and mineralization. This osteogenic enhancement was significantly decreased when human mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on ECM produced under activin A treatment. These findings demonstrate that activin A targets the ECM maturation phase of osteoblast differentiation resulting ultimately in the inhibition of mineralization. ECM proteins modulated by activin A are not only determinant for bone mineralization but also possess osteoinductive properties that are relevant for bone tissue regeneration.

  8. Characterization of Co-Cultivation of Cyanobacteria on Growth, Productions of Polysaccharides and Extracellular Proteins, Nitrogenase Activity, and Photosynthetic Activity.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chuizhao; Wang, Libo; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Shiping; Tang, Tao; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Quanyu; Sun, Yuhan

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria as biofertilizers are benefit to reduce the use of chemical fertilizers and reestablish the ecological system in soil. In general, several strains of cyanobacteria were involved in the biofertilizers. The co-cultivation of cyanobacteria were characterized on growth profile, production of polysaccharides and extracellular proteins, nitrogenase activity, and photosynthetic activity for three selected N2-fixing cyanobacteria, Anabaena cylindrica (B1611 and F243) and Nostoc sp. (F280). After eight-day culture, the highest dry weights were obtained in F280 pure culture and co-cultivation of B1611 and F280. Higher production of extracellular proteins and cell-bonding polysaccharides (CPS) were observed in co-cultivations compared with pure culture. The highest released polysaccharides (RPS) contents were obtained in pure culture of F280 and co-cultivation of F280 and F243. Galactose and glucose were major components of CPS and RPS in all samples. Trehalose was a specific component of RPS in F280 pure culture. Based on the monosaccharide contents of CPS and RPS, F280 was the dominant species in the related treatments of co-cultivation. The nitrogenase activities in all treatments exhibited a sharp rise at the late stage while a significant decrease existed when three cyanobacteria strains were mixed. Photosynthetic activities for all treatments were determined with rapid light curve, and the related parameters were estimated.

  9. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG

  10. Screening, mutagenesis and protoplast fusion of Aspergillus niger for the enhancement of extracellular glucose oxidase production.

    PubMed

    Khattab, A A; Bazaraa, W A

    2005-07-01

    Various strains of Aspergillus niger were screened for extracellular glucose oxidase (GOD) activity. The most effective producer, strain FS-3 (15.9 U mL(-1)), was mutagenized using UV-irradiation or ethyl methane sulfonate. Of the 400 mutants obtained, 32 were found to be resistant to 2-deoxy D: -glucose, and 17 of these exhibited higher GOD activities (from 114.5 to 332.1%) than the original FS-3 strain. Following determination of antifungal resistance of the highest producing mutants, four mutants were selected and used in protoplast fusions in three different intraspecific crosses. All fusants showed higher activities (from 285.5 to 394.2%) than the original strain. Moreover, of the 30 fusants isolated, 19 showed higher GOD activity than their corresponding higher-producing parent strain.

  11. Dynamic metabolic exchange governs a marine algal-bacterial interaction

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Einat; Wyche, Thomas P; Kim, Ki Hyun; Petersen, Jörn; Ellebrandt, Claire; Vlamakis, Hera; Barteneva, Natasha; Paulson, Joseph N; Chai, Liraz; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Emiliania huxleyi is a model coccolithophore micro-alga that generates vast blooms in the ocean. Bacteria are not considered among the major factors influencing coccolithophore physiology. Here we show through a laboratory model system that the bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens, a well-studied member of the Roseobacter group, intimately interacts with E. huxleyi. While attached to the algal cell, bacteria initially promote algal growth but ultimately kill their algal host. Both algal growth enhancement and algal death are driven by the bacterially-produced phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid. Bacterial production of indole-3-acetic acid and attachment to algae are significantly increased by tryptophan, which is exuded from the algal cell. Algal death triggered by bacteria involves activation of pathways unique to oxidative stress response and programmed cell death. Our observations suggest that bacteria greatly influence the physiology and metabolism of E. huxleyi. Coccolithophore-bacteria interactions should be further studied in the environment to determine whether they impact micro-algal population dynamics on a global scale. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17473.001 PMID:27855786

  12. Abiotic factors in colony formation: effects of nutrition and light on extracellular polysaccharide production and cell aggregates of Microcystis aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang

    2013-07-01

    Colony morphology is important for Microcystis to sustain a competitive advantage in eutrophic lakes. The mechanism of colony formation in Microcystis is currently unclear. Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has been reported to play an important role in cell aggregate formation of some phytoplankton. Microcystis aeruginosa was cultivated under varied abiotic conditions, including different nutrient, light, and temperature conditions, to investigate their effects on EPS production and morphological change. The results show that nutrient concentration and light intensity have great effects on EPS productionin M. aeruginosa. There was a considerable increase in EPS production after M. aeruginosa was cultivated in adjusted culture conditions similar to those present in the field (28.9 mg C/L, 1.98 mg N/L, 0.65 mg P/L, light intensity: 100 μmol/(m2 · s)). These results indicate that abiotic factors might be one of the triggers for colony formation in Microcystis.

  13. Integrin-mediated Ras–Extracellular Regulated Kinase (ERK) Signaling Regulates Interferon γ Production in Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mainiero, Fabrizio; Gismondi, Angela; Soriani, Alessandra; Cippitelli, Marco; Palmieri, Gabriella; Jacobelli, Jordan; Piccoli, Mario; Frati, Luigi; Santoni, Angela

    1998-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that integrin engagement results in the activation of biochemical signaling events important for regulating different cell functions, such as migration, adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and specific gene expression. Here, we report that β1 integrin ligation on human natural killer (NK) cells results in the activation of Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Formation of Shc–growth factor receptor–bound protein 2 (Grb2) and Shc–proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2–Grb2 complexes are the receptor-proximal events accompanying the β1 integrin–mediated Ras activation. In addition, we demonstrate that ligation of β1 integrins results in the stimulation of interferon γ (IFN-γ) production, which is under the control of extracellular signal–regulated kinase 2 activation. Overall, our data indicate that β1 integrins, by delivering signals capable of triggering IFN-γ production, may function as NK-activating receptors. PMID:9763606

  14. Life cycle environmental impacts of wastewater-based algal biofuels.

    PubMed

    Mu, Dongyan; Min, Min; Krohn, Brian; Mullins, Kimberley A; Ruan, Roger; Hill, Jason

    2014-10-07

    Recent research has proposed integrating wastewater treatment with algae cultivation as a way of producing algal biofuels at a commercial scale more sustainably. This study evaluates the environmental performance of wastewater-based algal biofuels with a well-to-wheel life cycle assessment (LCA). Production pathways examined include different nutrient sources (municipal wastewater influent to the activated sludge process, centrate from the sludge drying process, swine manure, and freshwater with synthetic fertilizers) combined with emerging biomass conversion technologies (microwave pyrolysis, combustion, wet lipid extraction, and hydrothermal liquefaction). Results show that the environmental performance of wastewater-based algal biofuels is generally better than freshwater-based algal biofuels, but depends on the characteristics of the wastewater and the conversion technologies. Of 16 pathways compared, only the centrate cultivation with wet lipid extraction pathway and the centrate cultivation with combustion pathway have lower impacts than petroleum diesel in all environmental categories examined (fossil fuel use, greenhouse gas emissions, eutrophication potential, and consumptive water use). The potential for large-scale implementation of centrate-based algal biofuel, however, is limited by availability of centrate. Thus, it is unlikely that algal biofuels can provide a large-scale and environmentally preferable alternative to petroleum transportation fuels without considerable improvement in current production technologies. Additionally, the cobenefit of wastewater-based algal biofuel production as an alternate means of treating various wastewaters should be further explored.

  15. Cell wall peroxidases in the liverwort Dumortiera hirsuta are responsible for extracellular superoxide production, and can display tyrosinase activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jackson L Y; Sulaiman, Mariam; Beckett, Richard P; Minibayeva, Farida V

    2010-04-01

    In our earlier work, we showed that the liverwort Dumortiera hirsuta produces an extracellular oxidative burst of superoxide radicals during rehydration following desiccation stress. The oxidative burst is a common early response of organisms to biotic and abiotic stresses, with suggested roles in signal transduction, formation of protective substances such as suberin, melanin and lignin and defense against pathogens. To discover which enzymes are responsible for the extracellular superoxide production, we isolated apoplastic fractions from D. hirsuta, surveyed for the presence of potential redox enzymes, and performed non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis activity stains. Various isoforms of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) and tyrosinase (o-diphenolase) (EC 1.10.3.1) were present at significant levels in the apoplast. In-gel activity staining revealed that some peroxidases isoforms could produce superoxide, while tryosinases could readily metabolize 3,4-dihydroxy phenyl l-alanine (l-dopa) into melanins. Interestingly, some peroxidase isoforms could oxidize the native tyrosinase substrate l-dopa at significant levels, even in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, while others could do so only in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In D. hirsuta, peroxidases may play an important role in melanin formation. Possible functions for these diverse oxidases in liverwort biology are discussed.

  16. Zoospore density-dependent behaviors of Phytophthora nicotianae are autoregulated by extracellular products.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ping; Hong, Chuanxue

    2010-07-01

    Phytophthora species are destructive fungus-like plant pathogens that use asexual single-celled flagellate zoospores for dispersal and plant infection. Many of the zoospore behaviors are density-dependent although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we use P. nicotianae as a model and demonstrate autoregulation of some zoospore behaviors using signal molecules that zoospores release into the environment. Specifically, zoospore aggregation, plant targeting, and infection required or were enhanced by threshold concentrations of these signal molecules. Below the threshold concentration, zoospores did not aggregate and move toward a cauline leaf of Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0) and failed to individually attack annual vinca (Catharanthus roseus cv. Little Bright Eye). These processes were reversed when supplemented with zoospore-free fluid (ZFF) prepared from a zoospore suspension above threshold densities but not with calcium chloride at a concentration equivalent to extracellular Ca(2+) in ZFF. These results suggest that Ca(2+) is not a primary signal molecule regulating these communal behaviors. Zoospores coordinated their communal behaviors by releasing, detecting, and responding to signal molecules. This chemical communication mechanism raises the possibility that Phytophthora plant infection may not depend solely on zoospore number in the real world. Single zoospore infection may take place if it is signaled by a common molecule available in the environment which contributes to the destructiveness of these plant pathogens.

  17. Expression of human extracellular superoxide dismutase in Chinese hamster ovary cells and characterization of the product

    SciTech Connect

    Tibell, L.; Hjalmarsson, K.; Edlund, T.; Skogman, G.; Engstroem, A.; Marklund, S.L.

    1987-10-01

    A complementary DNA clone from human placenta, encoding human extracellular superoxide dismutase, has recently been isolated and characterized. An expression plasmid, based on the EC-SOD complementary DNA, was transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). The transfected cells secreted human EC-SOD to the culture medium. The secreted recombinant (r) EC-SOD was isolated in high yield with a three-step procedure beginning with immobilized monoclonal anti-EC-SOD antibodies. The properties of the rEC-SOD were compared with native (n) EC-SOD isolated from human umbilical cords. The specific activities and amino-terminal amino acid sequences were identical. The amino acid compositions were virtually identical and very similar to the composition deduced from the complementary DNA sequence. Both rEC-SOD and nEC-SOD contained 4 Cu and 4 Zn atoms per molecule, and the presence of Zn in EC-SOD is thus now established. The rEC-SOD produced is type C, since its affinity for heparin-Sepharose was identical to that of nEC-SOD type C. Both enzymes bound to concanavalin A, lentil lectin, and wheat germ lectin and are thus glycoproteins. rEC-SOD and nEC-SOD seem to have the same subunit structure and composition as analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel chromatography.

  18. Regulation of extracellular N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase production in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Bidochka, M J; Khachatourians, G G

    1993-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana produces two extracellular N-acetylglucosaminidases (NAGase) in liquid medium containing colloidal chitin as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. To study the regulation of NAGase synthesis, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), glucose NH4NO3, or amino acids were added to the colloidal chitin medium and NAGase activity was measured. NAGase synthesis was (i) induced with GlcNAc, and no repression was observed with GlcNAc provided at 2% (w/v); (ii) repressed in the presence of glucose plus NH4NO3; (iii) partially repressed when glucose or NH4NO3 was provided; and (iv) repressed to levels that were < 40% of the control levels when glutamic acid, tyrosine, arginine, proline, valine, and histidine were provided to the colloidal chitin medium. Total NAGase activity levels were > 60% of the control activity when alanine, glycine, isoleucine, aspartic acid, and leucine were tested. It appears that synthesis of NAGase is sensitive to cell energy and the carbon and nitrogen requirements.

  19. Production of an Extracellular Matrix as an Isotropic Growth Phase of Penicillium rubens on Gypsum

    PubMed Central

    Bekker, M.; Adan, O. C. G.; Samson, R. A.; Wyatt, T.; Dijksterhuis, J.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor mold represents an important environmental concern, but a fundamental knowledge of fungal growth stages is needed to limit indoor fungal proliferation on finishing materials used in buildings. The present study focused on the succession of germination stages of the common indoor fungus Penicillium rubens on a gypsum substrate. This substrate is used as a model system representing porous materials that are widely used in indoor environments. Imaging with cryo-scanning electron microscopy showed that the formation of an extracellular matrix (ECM) is a phase of the isotropic growth of P. rubens that is uniquely related to germinating conidia. Furthermore, the ECM is observed only when a dry-state inoculation of the surface is applied, i.e., applying conidia directly from a 7-day-old colony, mimicking airborne contamination of the surface. When inoculation is done by spraying an aqueous conidial suspension, no ECM is observed. Moreover, it is concluded that the formation of an ECM requires active processes in the fungal cell. The porosity of the substrate proved that the ECM substance has high-viscosity characteristics. The present results stress that studies of indoor fungal growth should consider the method of inoculation, knowing that the common aqueous suspension may obscure specific stages in the initial phases of germination. PMID:22843536

  20. Buckling Reduces eNOS Production and Stimulates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Arteries in Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yangming; Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-09-01

    Artery buckling alters the fluid shear stress and wall stress in the artery but its temporal effect on vascular wall remodeling is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the early effect of artery buckling on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and extracellular matrix remodeling. Bilateral porcine carotid arteries were maintained in an ex vivo organ culture system with and without buckling while under the same physiological pressure and flow rate for 3-7 days. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III and IV, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), and eNOS were determined using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that MMP-2 expression level was significantly higher in buckled arteries than in the controls and higher at the inner curve than at the outer curve of buckled arteries, while collagen IV content showed an opposite trend, suggesting that artery buckling increased MMP-2 expression and collagen IV degradation in a site-specific fashion. However, no differences for MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III, and TIMP-2 were observed among the outer and inner curve sides of buckled arteries and straight controls. Additionally, eNOS expression was significantly decreased in buckled arteries. These results suggest that artery buckling triggers uneven wall remodeling that could lead to development of tortuous arteries.

  1. Extracellular haem peroxidases mediate Mn(II) oxidation in a marine Roseobacter bacterium via superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Andeer, Peter F; Learman, Deric R; McIlvin, Matt; Dunn, James A; Hansel, Colleen M

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in environmental systems. A number of biotic and abiotic pathways induce the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn oxides. Here, we use a combination of proteomic analyses and activity assays, to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for extracellular superoxide-mediated Mn oxide formation by a bacterium within the ubiquitous Roseobacter clade. We show that animal haem peroxidases (AHPs) located on the outer membrane and within the secretome are responsible for Mn(II) oxidation. These novel peroxidases have previously been implicated in direct Mn(II) oxidation by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Yet, we show that in this Roseobacter species, AHPs mediate Mn(II) oxidation not through a direct reaction but by producing superoxide and likely also by degrading hydrogen peroxide. These findings point to a eukaryotic-like oscillatory oxidative-peroxidative enzymatic cycle by these AHPs that leads to Mn oxide formation by this organism. AHP expression appears unaffected by Mn(II), yet the large energetic investment required to produce and secrete these enzymes points to an as yet unknown physiological function. These findings are further evidence that bacterial peroxidases and secreted enzymes, in general, are unappreciated controls on the cycling of metals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and by extension carbon, in natural systems.

  2. Extracellular chitin deacetylase production in solid state fermentation by native soil isolates of Penicillium monoverticillium and Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Suresh, P V; Sakhare, P Z; Sachindra, N M; Halami, P M

    2014-08-01

    Extracellular chitin deacetylase production by native soil isolates of Penicillium monoverticillium CFR 2 and Fusarium oxysporum CFR 8 in solid state fermentation (SSF) using commercial wheat bran (CWB) and shrimp processing by-products (SPP) as solid substrate has been studied. P. monoverticillium produced maximum chitin deacetylase activity of 547.7 ± 45 and 390.2 ± 31 units/g initial dry substrate (U/g IDS) at 96 h of incubation in CWB and SPP media, respectively. While, F. oxysporum produced maximum chitin deacetylase activity of 306.4 ± 22 U/g IDS at 72 h of incubation in CWB medium and 220.1 ± 20 U/g IDS at 120 h of incubation in SPP medium. Along with chitin deacetylase, P. monoverticillium and F. oxysporum produced other chitin degrading enzymes such as endo-chitinase and β-N-acetylhexosaminidase. P. monoverticillium produced maximum activity (U/g IDS) of endo-chitinase 4.6 ± 0.20 at 120 h incubation and β-N-acetylhexosaminidase 82.6 ± 03 at 120 h incubation in CWB medium. While, F. oxysporum produced maximum activity (U/g IDS) of endo-chitinase 7.8 ± 0.20 at 144 h incubation and β-N-acetylhexosaminidase 38.3 ± 02 at 120 h incubation in CWB medium. Production of extracellular chitin deacetylase by P. monoverticillium CFR 2 and F. oxysporum CFR 8 in SSF is being reported for the first time.

  3. Characterization of the Natural History of Extracellular Matrix Production in Tissue-Engineered Vascular Grafts during Neovessel Formation

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuji; Williams-Fritze, Misty; Duncan, Daniel R.; Church, Spencer N.; Hibino, Narutoshi; Madri, Joseph A.; Humphrey, Jay D.; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2011-01-01

    Background The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical determinant of neovessel integrity. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six (polyglycolic acid + polycaprolactone and poly lactic acid) tissue-engineered vascular grafts seeded with syngeneic bone marrow mononuclear cells were implanted as inferior vena cava interposition grafts in C57BL/6 mice. Specimens were characterized using immunohistochemical staining and qPCR for representative ECM components in addition to matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Total collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) contents were determined. MMP activity was measured using zymography. Results Collagen production on histology demonstrated an initial increase in type III at 1 week followed by type I production at 2 weeks and type IV at 4 weeks. Gene expression of both type I and type III peaked at 2 weeks, whereas type IV continued to increase over the 4-week period. Histology demonstrated fibrillin-1 deposition at 1 week followed by elastin production at 4 weeks. Elastin gene expression significantly increased at 4 weeks, whereas fibrillin-1 decreased at 4 weeks. GAG demonstrated abundant production at each time point on histology. Gene expression of decorin significantly increased at 4 weeks, whereas versican decreased over time. Biochemical analysis showed that total collagen production was greatest at 2 weeks, and there was a significant increase in elastin and GAG production at 4 weeks. Histological characterization of MMPs showed abundant production of MMP-2 at each time point, while MMP-9 decreased over the 4-week period. Gene expression of MMP-2 significantly increased at 4 weeks, whereas MMP-9 significantly decreased at 4 weeks. Conclusions ECM production during neovessel formation is characterized by early ECM deposition followed by extensive remodeling. PMID:21996715

  4. Influence of protoplast fusion between two Trichoderma spp. on extracellular enzymes production and antagonistic activity

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed M.

    2014-01-01

    mycoparasitism effect of the extracellular enzymes. PMID:26019588

  5. Recent Advances in Algal Genetic Tool Development

    DOE PAGES

    R. Dahlin, Lukas; T. Guarnieri, Michael

    2016-06-24

    The goal of achieving cost-effective biofuels and bioproducts derived from algal biomass will require improvements along the entire value chain, including identification of robust, high-productivity strains and development of advanced genetic tools. Though there have been modest advances in development of genetic systems for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, progress in development of algal genetic tools, especially as applied to non-model algae, has generally lagged behind that of more commonly utilized laboratory and industrial microbes. This is in part due to the complex organellar structure of algae, including robust cell walls and intricate compartmentalization of target loci, as well asmore » prevalent gene silencing mechanisms, which hinder facile utilization of conventional genetic engineering tools and methodologies. However, recent progress in global tool development has opened the door for implementation of strain-engineering strategies in industrially-relevant algal strains. Here, we review recent advances in algal genetic tool development and applications in eukaryotic microalgae.« less

  6. A Two-Component Regulatory System Impacts Extracellular Membrane-Derived Vesicle Production in Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Ulrike; Tsatsaronis, James Anthony; Le Rhun, Anaïs; Stübiger, Gerald; Rohde, Manfred; Kasvandik, Sergo; Holzmeister, Susanne; Tinnefeld, Philip; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Export of macromolecules via extracellular membrane-derived vesicles (MVs) plays an important role in the biology of Gram-negative bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria have also recently been reported to produce MVs; however, the composition and mechanisms governing vesiculogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria remain undefined. Here, we describe MV production in the Gram-positive human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS), the etiological agent of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. M1 serotype GAS isolates in culture exhibit MV structures both on the cell wall surface and in the near vicinity of bacterial cells. A comprehensive analysis of MV proteins identified both virulence-associated protein substrates of the general secretory pathway in addition to “anchorless surface proteins.” Characteristic differences in the contents, distributions, and fatty acid compositions of specific lipids between MVs and GAS cell membrane were also observed. Furthermore, deep RNA sequencing of vesicular RNAs revealed that GAS MVs contained differentially abundant RNA species relative to bacterial cellular RNA. MV production by GAS strains varied in a manner dependent on an intact two-component system, CovRS, with MV production negatively regulated by the system. Modulation of MV production through CovRS was found to be independent of both GAS cysteine protease SpeB and capsule biosynthesis. Our data provide an explanation for GAS secretion of macromolecules, including RNAs, lipids, and proteins, and illustrate a regulatory mechanism coordinating this secretory response. PMID:27803183

  7. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  8. High-level extracellular production of alkaline polygalacturonate lyase in Bacillus subtilis with optimized regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjiao; Kang, Zhen; Ling, Zhenmin; Cao, Wenlong; Liu, Long; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-10-01

    The present work aims to construct a robust recombinant Bacillus subtilis to achieve secretory production of alkaline polygalacturonate lyase (PGL). First, 6 signal peptides (amyX, bpr, vpr, yvgO, wapA and nprE) were screened with a semi-rational approach and comparatively investigated their effects on the production of PGL. The signal peptide bpr directed efficient PGL secretory expression and increased PGL titer to 313.7 U mL(-1). By optimizing and applying strong promoter P43 and Shine-Dalgarno sequence, higher titer of 446.3 U mL(-1) PGL was achieved. Finally, the capacity of the recombinant B. subtilis WB43CB was evaluated with a fed-batch strategy in 3 L fermentor. The PGL titer reached 632.6 U mL(-1) with a productivity of 17.6 U mL(-1) h(-1), which was the highest secretory production of PGL by the B. subtilis system. The recombinant B. subtilis strain WB43CB constructed in the present work has great potential in production of alkaline PGL.

  9. Optimization of pretreatment and fermentation conditions for production of extracellular cellulase complex using sugarcane bagasse

    PubMed Central

    Ashfaque, Mohammad; Solomon, Sushil; Pathak, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse (SCB), a lignocellulosic byproduct of juice extraction from sugarcane, is rich in cellulose (40-42%). This could be used as a substrate for the production of cellulase complex. Fermentation conditions were optimized for production of cellulase complex (CMCase, Cellulobiase and FPase) by wild type Trichoderma sp. using sugarcane bagasse as sole carbon source. Alkaline treatment (2% NaOH) of bagasse (AlSCB) was found suitable for the production of reducing sugar over the acidic pretreatment method. After 5 days of incubation period, 5% substrate concentration at pH 5.0 and 400C resulted in maximum production of CMCase (0.622 U), while maximum (3.388 U) production of cellulobiase was obtained at 300C. The CMCase was precipitated and purified to the extent of 59.06 fold by affinity chromatography with 49.09% recovery. On 12% SDS-PAGE, a single band corresponding to 33 kDa was observed. The Km and Vmax for CMCase from Trichoderma was found 507.04 mg/ml and 65.32 mM/min, respectively. The enzyme exhibited maximum activity at 300C at pH-5.0 (0.363 U) and was stable over range of 20-60°C and pH 5.0-7.5. PMID:25489168

  10. Production of extracellular exoinulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus YS-1 using root tubers of Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Singh, R S; Bhermi, H K

    2008-10-01

    Root tubers of Asparagus officinalis were used as a source of raw inulin for the production of exoinulinase (EC 3.2.1.7) from Kluyveromyces marxianus YS-1. Root extract prepared at 10kg/cm2 pressure for 10min showed maximum inulinase production. Medium components and process parameters were standardized to improve the enzyme production. Inulinase yield of 40.2IU/mL in a medium containing raw inulin (3.5%), beef extract (2%), SDS (0.001%), Mn2+ (2.0mM), Mg2+ (1.5mM), Co2+ (2mM) and pH 6.5 has been obtained under agitation (150rpm) after 60h of incubation at 30 degrees C at shake flask level. After optimization, the enzyme production was 4.8 times more than the basal medium. To test the feasibility of raw inulin from A. officinalis for the production of inulinase, trials were also made in a bioreactor (1.5L). Inulinase activity of 50.2IU/mL was obtained from raw inulin (4.0%) under agitation (200rpm) and aeration (0.75vvm) at 30 degrees C after 60h of fermentation. Inulinase yield in bioreactor was almost six times higher than the basal medium used initially in shake flask.

  11. Biodegradation of shrimp biowaste by marine Exiguobacterium sp. CFR26M and concomitant production of extracellular protease and antioxidant materials: production and process optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Anil Kumar, P K; Suresh, P V

    2014-04-01

    Twelve marine bacterial cultures were screened for extracellular protease activity, and the bacterium CFR26M which exhibited the highest activity on caseinate agar plate was identified as an Exiguobacterium sp. Significant amount of extracellular protease (5.9 ± 0.3 U/ml) and antioxidant materials, measured as 2,2'-diphenyl picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (44.4 ± 0.5 %), was produced by CFR26M in submerged fermentation using a shrimp biowaste medium. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the process variables for maximum production of protease and antioxidant materials by CFR26M. Among the seven variables screened by two-level 2**(7-2) fractional factorial design, the concentration of shrimp biowaste, sugar, and phosphate was found to be significant (p ≤ 0.05). The optimum levels of these variables were determined by employing the central composite design (CCD) of RSM. The coefficient of determination (R (2)) values of 0.9039 and 0.8924 for protease and antioxidant, respectively, indicates the accuracy of the CCD models. The optimum levels of shrimp biowaste, sugar, and phosphate were 21.2, 10.5, and 2.3 % (w/v) for production of protease and 28.8, 12, and 0.32 % (w/v) for production of antioxidant material, respectively. The concentration of shrimp biowaste, sugar, and phosphate had linear and quadratic effect on both protease and antioxidant productions. RSM optimization yielded 6.3-fold increases in protease activity and 1.6-fold in antioxidant material production. The crude protease of CFR26M had a maximum activity at 32 ± 2 °C with pH 7.6. This is the first report on the use of marine Exiguobacterium sp. for concomitant production of protease and antioxidant materials from shrimp biowaste.

  12. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation is increased in psoriasis and induces human β-defensin-2 production in epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Stephen Chu-Sung; Yu, Hsin-Su; Yen, Feng-Lin; Lin, Chi-Ling; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Lan, Cheng-Che E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been implicated in the development of certain immune-mediated diseases, but their role in psoriasis has not been clearly defined. Human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2) is an important antimicrobial peptide overexpressed in psoriasis epidermis. We evaluated whether the amount of NETs is increased in psoriasis and determined the effect of NETs on HBD-2 production in epidermal keratinocytes. Using fluorescent microscopy, we found that patients with psoriasis (n = 48) had higher amount of NETotic cells in their peripheral blood compared to healthy controls (n = 48) and patients with eczema (n = 35). Psoriasis sera showed increased ability to induce NET formation in control neutrophils but normal NET degradation ability. The amount of NETs in the peripheral blood correlated with psoriasis disease severity. NETosis was also observed in the majority (18 of 20) of psoriasis skin specimens. Furthermore, NETs induced HBD-2 mRNA and protein production in keratinocytes, and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed strong expression of HBD-2 in psoriasis lesional skin. In summary, NET formation is increased in peripheral blood and lesional skin of psoriasis patients and correlates with disease severity. Additionally, NET-induced HBD-2 production may provide a novel mechanism for the decreased susceptibility of psoriasis plaques to microbial infections. PMID:27493143

  13. Production and cytotoxicity of extracellular insoluble and droplets of soluble melanin by Streptomyces lusitanus DMZ-3.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, D N; Mazhari, Bi Bi Zainab; Dastager, Syed G; Agsar, Dayanand

    2014-01-01

    A Streptomyces lusitanus DMZ-3 strain with potential to synthesize both insoluble and soluble melanins was detected. Melanins are quite distinguished based on their solubility for varied biotechnological applications. The present investigation reveals the enhanced production of insoluble and soluble melanins in tyrosine medium by a single culture. Streptomyces lusitanus DMZ-3 was characterized by 16S rRNA gene analysis. An enhanced production of 5.29 g/L insoluble melanin was achieved in a submerged bioprocess following response surface methodology. Combined interactive effect of temperature (50°C), pH (8.5), tyrosine (2.0 g/L), and beef extract (0.5 g/L) were found to be critical variables for enhanced production in central composite design analysis. An optimized indigenous slant culture system was an innovative approach for the successful production (264 mg/L) of pure soluble melanin from the droplets formed on the surface of the culture. Both insoluble and soluble melanins were confirmed and characterized by Chemical, reactions, UV, FTIR, and TLC analysis. First time, cytotoxic study of melanin using brine shrimps was reported. Maximum cytotoxic activity of soluble melanin was Lc50-0.40 µg/mL and insoluble melanin was Lc50-0.80 µg/mL.

  14. Collection and conversion of algal lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Chieh

    Sustainable economic activities mandate a significant replacement of fossil energy by renewable forms. Algae-derived biofuels are increasingly seen as an alternative source of energy with potential to supplement the world's ever increasing demand. Our primary objective is, once the algae were cultivated, to eliminate or make more efficient energy-intensive processing steps of collection, drying, grinding, and solvent extraction prior to conversion. To overcome the processing barrier, we propose to streamline from cultivated algae to biodiesel via algal biomass collection by sand filtration, cell rupturing with ozone, and immediate transesterification. To collect the algal biomass, the specific Chlorococcum aquaticum suspension was acidified to pH 3.3 to promote agglomeration prior to sand filtration. The algae-loaded filter bed was drained of free water and added with methanol and ozonated for 2 min to rupture cell membrane to accelerate release of the cellular contents. The methanol solution now containing the dissolved lipid product was collected by draining, while the filter bed was regenerated by further ozonation when needed. The results showed 95% collection of the algal biomass from the suspension and a 16% yield of lipid from the algae, as well as restoration of filtration velocity of the sand bed via ozonation. The results further showed increased lipid yield upon cell rupturing and transesterified products composed entirely of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) compounds, demonstrating that the rupture and transesterification processes could proceed consecutively in the same medium, requiring no separate steps of drying, extraction, and conversion. The FAME products from algae without exposure to ozone were mainly of 16 to 18 carbons containing up to 3 double bonds, while those from algae having been ozonated were smaller, highly saturated hydrocarbons. The new technique streamlines individual steps from cultivated algal lipid to transesterified products and

  15. Relation of nutrient concentrations, nutrient loading, and algal production to changes in water levels in Kabetogama Lake, Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Maki, Ryan P.; Kiesling, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment has led to excessive algal growth in Kabetogama Lake, Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota. Water- and sediment-quality data were collected during 2008-09 to assess internal and external nutrient loading. Data collection was focused in Kabetogama Lake and its inflows, the area of greatest concern for eutrophication among the lakes of Voyageurs National Park. Nutrient and algal data were used to determine trophic status and were evaluated in relation to changes in Kabetogama Lake water levels following changes to dam operation starting in 2000. Analyses were used to estimate external nutrient loading at inflows and assess the potential contribution of internal phosphorus loading. Kabetogama Lake often was mixed vertically, except for a few occasionally stratified areas, including Lost Bay in the northeastern part of Kabetogama Lake. Stratification, combined with larger bottom-water nutrient concentrations, larger sediment phosphorus concentrations, and estimated phosphorus release rates from sediment cores indicate that Lost Bay may be one of several areas that may be contributing substantially to internal loading. Internal loading is a concern because nutrients may cause excessive algal growth including potentially toxic cyanobacteria. The cyanobacterial hepatotoxin, microcystin, was detected in 7 of 14 cyanobacterial bloom samples, with total concentrations exceeding 1.0 microgram per liter, the World Health Organization's guideline for finished drinking water for the congener, microcystin-LR. Comparisons of the results of this study to previous studies indicate that chlorophyll-a concentrations and trophic state indices have improved since 2000, when the rules governing dam operation changed. However, total-phosphorus concentrations have not changed significantly since 2000.

  16. Production and characterization of a novel yeast extracellular invertase activity towards improved dibenzothiophene biodesulfurization.

    PubMed

    Arez, Bruno F; Alves, Luís; Paixão, Susana M

    2014-11-01

    The main goal of this work was the production and characterization of a novel invertase activity from Zygosaccharomyces bailii strain Talf1 for further application to biodesulfurization (BDS) in order to expand the exploitable alternative carbon sources to renewable sucrose-rich feedstock. The maximum invertase activity (163 U ml(-1)) was achieved after 7 days of Z. bailii strain Talf1 cultivation at pH 5.5-6.0, 25 °C, and 150 rpm in Yeast Malt Broth with 25 % Jerusalem artichoke pulp as inducer substrate. The optimum pH and temperature for the crude enzyme activity were 5.5 and 50 °C, respectively, and moreover, high stability was observed at 30 °C for pH 5.5-6.5. The application of Talf1 crude invertase extract (1 %) to a BDS process by Gordonia alkanivorans strain 1B at 30 °C and pH 7.5 was carried out through a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) approach in which 10 g l(-1) sucrose and 250 μM dibenzothiophene were used as sole carbon and sulfur sources, respectively. Growth and desulfurization profiles were evaluated and compared with those of BDS without invertase addition. Despite its lower stability at pH 7.5 (loss of activity within 24 h), Talf1 invertase was able to catalyze the full hydrolysis of 10 g l(-1) sucrose in culture medium into invert sugar, contributing to a faster uptake of the monosaccharides by strain 1B during BDS. In SSF approach, the desulfurizing bacterium increased its μmax from 0.035 to 0.070 h(-1) and attained a 2-hydroxybiphenyl productivity of 5.80 μM/h in about 3 days instead of 7 days, corresponding to an improvement of 2.6-fold in relation to the productivity obtained in BDS process without invertase addition.

  17. CCN2 (Connective Tissue Growth Factor) is essential for extracellular matrix production and integrin signaling in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Takashi; Kawaki, Harumi; Baxter, Ruth M.; DeYoung, R. Andrea; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2007-01-01

    The matricellular protein CCN2 (Connective Tissue Growth Factor; CTGF) is an essential mediator of ECM composition, as revealed through analysis of Ccn2 deficient mice. These die at birth due to complications arising from impaired endochondral ossification. However, the mechanism(s) by which CCN2 mediates its effects in cartilage are unclear. We investigated these mechanisms using Ccn2−/− chondrocytes. Expression of type II collagen and aggrecan were decreased in Ccn2−/− chondrocytes, confirming a defect in ECM production. Ccn2−/− chondrocytes also exhibited impaired DNA synthesis and reduced adhesion to fibronectin. This latter defect is associated with decreased expression of α5 integrin. Moreover, CCN2 can bind to integrin α5β1 in chondrocytes and can stimulate increased expression of integrin α5. Consistent with an essential role for CCN2 as a ligand for integrins, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis revealed that levels of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation were reduced in Ccn2−/− chondrocytes. These findings argue that CCN2 exerts major effects in chondrocytes through its ability to (1) regulate ECM production and integrin α5 expression, (2) engage integrins and (3) activate integrin-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:18481209

  18. Phytolacca americana inhibits the high glucose-induced mesangial proliferation via suppressing extracellular matrix accumulation and TGF-beta production.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Il; Kim, Kang Ju; Choo, Yong Kug; Keum, Kyung Soo; Choi, Bong Kyu; Jung, Kyu Yong

    2004-02-01

    This study describes a potential of Phytolaccaceae (Phytolacca americana var.) as an inhibitor of high glucose-stimulated production of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and TGF-beta in cultured glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Raising the ambient glucose concentration for 24 hrs caused a dose-dependent increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation of GMCs, and the maximal response was achieved at 20 mM. Phytolaccaceae extracts (2.5-20 microg/ml) inhibited the high glucose-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation in a dose-dependent manner, and the concentrations tested here did not affect to the cell viability. Exposure of the GMCs to 20 mM glucose caused both ECM (collagen and fibronectin) accumulation and TGF-beta secretion, and these changes were significantly diminished by treatment of GMCs with Phytolaccaceae (10 microg/ml). Taken together, these results indicate that Phytolaccaceae inhibits the high glucose-induced GMCs proliferation partially through suppressing accumulation of ECM components and TGF-beta production, suggesting that Phytolaccaceae may be a promising agent for treating the development and progression of diabetic glomerulopathy.

  19. Optimization of critical medium components using response surface methodology for biomass and extracellular polysaccharide production by Agaricus blazei.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gao-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Ling

    2007-02-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the critical medium ingredients of Agaricus blazei. A three-level Box-Behnken factorial design was employed to determine the maximum biomass and extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) yields at optimum levels for glucose, yeast extract (YE), and peptone. A mathematical model was then developed to show the effect of each medium composition and its interactions on the production of mycelial biomass and EPS. The model predicted the maximum biomass yield of 10.86 g/l that appeared at glucose, YE, peptone of 26.3, 6.84, and 6.62 g/l, respectively, while a maximum EPS yield of 348.4 mg/l appeared at glucose, YE, peptone of 28.4, 4.96, 5.60 g/l, respectively. These predicted values were also verified by validation experiments. The excellent correlation between predicted and measured values of each model justifies the validity of both the response models. The results of bioreactor fermentation also show that the optimized culture medium enhanced both biomass (13.91 +/- 0.71 g/l) and EPS (363 +/- 4.1 mg/l) production by Agaricus blazei in a large-scale fermentation process.

  20. Two thiadiazole compounds promote rice defence against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae by suppressing the bacterium's production of extracellular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Xiaoyue; Dong, Wenxia; Guo, Shijian; Xu, Shu; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Mingguo

    2015-10-01

    Thiazole, isothiazole, thiadiazole, and their derivatives are used to control various human, animal and plant diseases. In addition to having direct anti-microbial and anti-fungal properties, these compounds are thought to induce host defences, but the mechanism of defence induction remains poorly understood. This article reports that the thiadiazoles of zinc thiazole and bismerthiazol induce H2 O2 accumulation, up-regulation of defence-related genes, callose deposition and hypersensitive response-like cell death in rice leaves infected with Xanthomonas oryaze pv. oryzae (Xoo) strain ZJ173, but not in non-infected leaves. These defence responses in Xoo-infected leaves were suppressed by the exogenous application of catalase, which reduces H2 O2 accumulation. The application of extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) extracted from strain ZJ173 significantly compromised rice defence against ZJ173 with or without thiadiazole treatment. The EPS-deficient Xoo mutant ∆gumH triggered a stronger defence than its parent strain ZJ173. The thiadiazole treatments reduced EPS production by strain ZJ173, but not by the thiadiazole-resistant strain 2-1-1, which is thiadiazole resistant in vivo, but not in vitro; moreover, enhanced defence was not detected in thiadiazole-treated rice inoculated with 2-1-1. Based on these data, we infer that zinc thiazole and bismerthiazol promote rice defence against Xoo by inhibiting the production of bacterial EPS.

  1. Purification and characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus extracellular chitinase and chitin oligosaccharide deacetylase involved in the production of heterodisaccharide from chitin.

    PubMed

    Kadokura, K; Rokutani, A; Yamamoto, M; Ikegami, T; Sugita, H; Itoi, S; Hakamata, W; Oku, T; Nishio, T

    2007-05-01

    A chitin-degrading bacterial strain, KN1699, isolated from Yatsu dry beach (Narashino, Chiba Prefecture, Japan), was identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Treatment of powdered chitin with crude enzyme solution prepared from the supernatant of KN1699 cultures yielded a disaccharide, beta-D-N-acetylglucosaminyl-(1,4)-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc-GlcN), as the primary chitin degradation product. The extracellular enzymes involved in the production of this heterodisaccharide, chitinase (Pa-Chi; molecular mass, 92 kDa) and chitin oligosaccharide deacetylase (Pa-COD; molecular mass, 46 kDa), were isolated from the crude enzyme solution, and their hydrolysis specificities were elucidated. These studies confirmed that (1) Pa-Chi hydrolyzes chitin to produce (GlcNAc)(2) and (2) Pa-COD hydrolyzes the acetamide group of reducing end GlcNAc residue of (GlcNAc)(2). These findings indicate that GlcNAc-GlcN is produced from chitin by the cooperative hydrolytic reactions of both Pa-Chi and Pa-COD.

  2. Butyrate production from oligofructose fermentation by the human faecal flora: what is the contribution of extracellular acetate and lactate?

    PubMed

    Morrison, Douglas J; Mackay, William G; Edwards, Christine A; Preston, Tom; Dodson, Brian; Weaver, Lawrence T

    2006-09-01

    Butyrate is an important substrate for maintenance of colonic health and oligofructose fermentation by human faecal bacteria can increase butyrate production in vitro. However, oligofructose appears to be fermented by mainly acetate and lactate-producing bacteria rather than butyrate-producing bacteria. Isotope labelling studies using [U-(13)C(6)]glucose were used to show that (13)C(2) and (13)C(4) were the major labelled butyrate species produced from glucose fermentation, via [(13)C(2)]acetate-acetyl CoA as intermediate. Bacterial interconversion reactions were quantified and acetate conversion to butyrate and lactate conversion to acetate, propionate and butyrate were observed. Addition of oligofructose to faecal batch cultures significantly increased butyrate production. Of the newly synthesised butyrate from oligofructose fermentation, 80 % was derived from interconversion of extracellular acetate and lactate, with acetate being quantitatively more significant. Carbohydrates, such as oligofructose, have prebiotic properties. In addition, oligofructose selectively stimulates the bacterial conversion of acetate and lactate to butyrate. Carbohydrates with similar properties represent a refinement of the prebiotic definition, termed butyrogenic prebiotics, because of their additional functionality.

  3. Extracellular protease derived from lactic acid bacteria stimulates the fermentative lactic acid production from the by-products of rice as a biomass refinery function.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanori; Techapun, Charin; Kuntiya, Ampin; Leksawasdi, Noppol; Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Chaiyaso, Thanongsak; Takenaka, Shinji; Maeda, Isamu; Koyama, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kozo

    2017-02-01

    A lactic acid producing bacterium, Lactobacillus rhamnosus M-23, newly isolated from a rice washing drainage storage tank was found to produce l-(+)-lactic acid from a non-sterilized mixture of rice washing drainage and rice bran without any additions of nutrients under the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process. This strain has the ability to utilize the non-sterilized rice washing drainage and rice bran as a source of carbohydrate, saccharifying enzymes and nutrients for lactic acid production. Observation of extracellular protease activity in SSF culture broth showed that a higher protease activity was present in strain M-23 than in other isolated lactic acid producing bacteria (LABs). To investigate the structural changes of solid particles of rice washing drainage throughout LAB cultivation, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation and Fourier transform infrared-spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis were performed. The results of the SEM observation showed that the surface material could be removed from solid particles of rice washing drainage treated by culture broth (supernatant) of strain M-23, thus exposing the crystal structure of the starch particle surface. The results of the FT-IR analysis revealed that the specific transmittance decrease of the CC and CO stretching and OH group of the solid particles of the rice washing drainage were highly correlated with the produced lactic acid concentration and extracellular protease activity, respectively. These results demonstrate the high lactic acid producing ability of strain M-23 from a non-sterilized mixture of rice washing drainage and rice bran under the SSF condition due to the removal of proteinaceous material and exposure of the starch particle surface by extracellular protease.

  4. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Evades Calprotectin-Mediated Nutritional Immunity and Survives Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Production of TdfH

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Sophonie; Juneau, Richard A.; Criss, Alison K.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae successfully overcomes host strategies to limit essential nutrients, termed nutritional immunity, by production of TonB-dependent transporters (TdTs)—outer membrane proteins that facilitate nutrient transport in an energy-dependent manner. Four gonococcal TdTs facilitate utilization of iron or iron chelates from host-derived proteins, including transferrin (TbpA), lactoferrin (LbpA), and hemoglobin (HpuB), in addition to xenosiderophores from other bacteria (FetA). The roles of the remaining four uncharacterized TdTs (TdfF, TdfG, TdfH, and TdfJ) remain elusive. Regulatory data demonstrating that production of gonococcal TdfH and TdfJ are unresponsive to or upregulated under iron-replete conditions led us to evaluate the role of these TdTs in the acquisition of nutrients other than iron. In this study, we found that production of gonococcal TdfH is both Zn and Zur repressed. We also found that TdfH confers resistance to calprotectin, an immune effector protein highly produced in neutrophils that has antimicrobial activity due to its ability to sequester Zn and Mn. We found that TdfH directly binds calprotectin, which enables gonococcal Zn accumulation in a TdfH-dependent manner and enhances bacterial survival after exposure to neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These studies highlight Zn sequestration by calprotectin as a key functional arm of NET-mediated killing of gonococci. We demonstrate for the first time that N. gonorrhoeae exploits this host strategy in a novel defense mechanism, in which TdfH production hijacks and directly utilizes the host protein calprotectin as a zinc source and thereby evades nutritional immunity. PMID:27481245

  5. Regulation of extracellular polygalacturonase production in Pseudomonas solanacearum. Progress report, [May 1, 1992--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.

    1994-06-01

    Pseudomonas solanacearum is an economically important plant pathogen that causes bacterial wilt disease of diverse crops. The bacterium produces at least three isozymes of polygalacturonase, which degrade plant cell walls and contribute substantially to bacterial wilt disease development. The central objective of this research project is to determine how expression of these enzymes is regulated. To this end, we isolated a positive trans-acting regulator of polygalacturonase production (pehR). We have focused on further characterization of the pehR mutant pheonotype, and studies of pehR expression. Preliminary results suggest pehR also regulates bacterial motility. An investigation of two unusual tyrosine phosphoproteins in P. solanacearum is also described.

  6. Production of Extracellular Laccase from Bacillus subtilis MTCC 2414 Using Agroresidues as a Potential Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumarasamy, Narayanan P.; Jackson, Beenie; Joseph Raj, Antony; Sevanan, Murugan

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are the model enzymes for multicopper oxidases and participate in several applications such as bioremediation, biopulping, textile, and food industries. Laccase producing bacterium, Bacillus subtilis MTCC 2414, was subjected to optimization by conventional techniques and was partially purified using ammonium salt precipitation method. The agroresidue substrates used for higher yield of laccase were rice bran and wheat bran. Maximum production was achieved at temperature 30°C (270 ± 2.78 U/mL), pH 7.0 (345 ± 3.14 U/mL), and 96 h (267 ± 2.64 U/mL) of incubation. The carbon and nitrogen sources resulted in high enzyme yield at 3% sucrose (275 ± 3.11 U/mL) and 3% peptone (352.2 ± 4.32 U/mL) for rice bran and 3% sucrose (247.4 ± 3.51 U/mL) and 3% peptone (328 ± 3.33 U/mL) for wheat bran, respectively. The molecular weights of partially purified laccase were 52 kDa for rice bran and 55 kDa for wheat bran. The laccase exhibited optimal activity at 70°C (260.3 ± 6.15 U/mL), pH 9.0 (266 ± 4.02 U/mL), and metal ion CuSO4 (141.4 ± 6.64) was found to increase the production. This is the first report that delivers the higher yield of laccase produced from B. subtilis MTCC 2414 using agroresidues as a potential substrate. PMID:26451255

  7. High-level extracellular production of D-Psicose-3-epimerase with recombinant Escherichia coli by a two-stage glycerol feeding approach.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lei; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Baihong; Wu, Chongde; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study is to achieve high-level extracellular production of D-Psicose-3-epimerase (DPE) with recombinant Escherichia coli. High-level production of DPE is one of the key factors in D-Psicose production. In the present study, the gene AAL45544.1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens str. C58 was modified by artificial synthesis for overexpression in E. coli. The total DPE activity reached 3.96 U mL(-1) after optimization of the media composition, induction temperature, and concentration of inducer. Furthermore, it was found that addition of glycine had a positive effect on the extracellular production of DPE, which reached 3.5 U mL(-1). Finally, a two-stage glycerol feeding strategy based on both the specific growth rate before induction and the amount of glycerol residues after induction was applied in a 3-L fermenter. After a series of optimal strategies in the 3-L fermenter, the total and extracellular DPE activity were 5.08- and 3.11-fold higher than that noted in the shake flask. The extracellular and intracellular DPE activity reached 10.9 and 13.2 U mL(-1), achieving 25.5 and 31.1 % conversion of D-fructose to D-psicose, respectively. The systemic strategies presented in this study provide valuable novel information for the industrial application of DPE.

  8. Algal Energy Conversion and Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazendonk, P.

    2015-12-01

    We address the potential for energy conversions and capture for: energy generation; reduction in energy use; reduction in greenhouse gas emissions; remediation of water and air pollution; protection and enhancement of soil fertility. These processes have the potential to sequester carbon at scales that may have global impact. Energy conversion and capture strategies evaluate energy use and production from agriculture, urban areas and industries, and apply existing and emerging technologies to reduce and recapture energy embedded in waste products. The basis of biocrude production from Micro-algal feedstocks: 1) The nutrients from the liquid fraction of waste streams are concentrated and fed into photo bioreactors (essentially large vessels in which microalgae are grown) along with CO2 from flue gasses from down stream processes. 2) The algae are processed to remove high value products such as proteins and beta-carotenes. The advantage of algae feedstocks is the high biomass productivity is 30-50 times that of land based crops and the remaining biomass contains minimal components that are difficult to convert to biocrude. 3) The remaining biomass undergoes hydrothermal liquefaction to produces biocrude and biochar. The flue gasses of this process can be used to produce electricity (fuel cell) and subsequently fed back into the photobioreactor. The thermal energy required for this process is small, hence readily obtained from solar-thermal sources, and furthermore no drying or preprocessing is required keeping the energy overhead extremely small. 4) The biocrude can be upgraded and refined as conventional crude oil, creating a range of liquid fuels. In principle this process can be applied on the farm scale to the municipal scale. Overall, our primary food production is too dependent on fossil fuels. Energy conversion and capture can make food production sustainable.

  9. An efficient protocol to enhance the extracellular production of recombinant protein from Escherichia coli by the synergistic effects of sucrose, glycine, and Triton X-100.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ru-Meng; Yang, Hong-Ming; Yu, Chang-Mei; Zhang, Wei-Fen; Tang, Jin-Bao

    2016-10-01

    Targeting recombinant proteins at highly extracellular production in the culture medium of Escherichia coli presents a significant advantage over cytoplasmic or periplasmic expression. In this work, a recombinant protein between ZZ protein and alkaline phosphatase (rZZ-AP) was constructed. Because rZZ-AP has the IgG-binding capacity and enzymatic activity, it can serve as an immunoreagent in immunoassays. However, only a very small portion of rZZ-AP is generally secreted into the aqueous medium under conventional cultivation procedure. Hence, we emphasized on the optimization of the culture procedures and attempted to dramatically enhance the yield of extracellular rZZ-AP from E. coli HB101 host cells by adding sucrose, glycine, and Triton X-100 in the culture medium. Results showed that the extracellular production of rZZ-AP in the culture medium containing 5% sucrose, 1% glycine, and 1% Triton X-100 was 18.6 mg/l, which was 18.6-fold higher than that without the three chemicals. And the β-galactosidase activity test showed that the increased extracellular rZZ-AP was not due to cell lysis. Further analysis suggested a significant interaction effect among the three chemicals for the enhancement of extracellular production. Ultrastructural analysis indicated that the enhancement may be due to the influence of sucrose, glycine, and Triton X-100 on the periplasmic osmolality, permeability, or integrity of the cell wall, respectively. This proposed approach presents a simple strategy to enhance the extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins in the E. coli system at the process of cell cultivation.

  10. System development for linked-fermentation production of solvents from algal biomass. [Dunaliella tertiolecta, D. primolecta, D. parva, D. bardawil, D. salina

    SciTech Connect

    Nakas, J.P.; Schaedele, M.; Parkinsan, C.M.; Coonley, C.E.; Tanenbaum, S.W.

    1983-11-01

    Five species of the genus Dunaliella (D. tertiolecta, D. primolecta, D. parva, D. bardawil, and D. salina) were examined for glycerol accumulation, growth rate, cell density, and protein and chlorophyll content. The suitability of each algal species for use as a fermentation substrate was judged according to glycerol accumulation and quantities of neutral solvents produced after sequential bacterial fermentations. When grown in 2 M NaCl, with 24 mM NaHCO3 or 3% CO2 at 28 degrees C and with 10,000 to 15,000 lx of incident light on two sides of a glass aquarium, four of the five species tested produced ca. 10 to 20 mg of glycerol per liter of culture. Clostridium pasteurianum was found to convert an algal biomass mixture supplemented with 4% glycerol to ca. 16 g of mixed solvents (n-butanol, 1,3-propanediol, and ethanol) per liter. Acetone was not detected. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that Dunaliella concentrates of up to 300-fold can be directly fermented to an identical pattern of mixed solvents. Overall solvent yields were reduced by more than 50% when fermentations were performed in the presence of 2% NaCl. These results are discussed in terms of practical application in tropical coastal zones.

  11. Improving photosynthesis for algal biofuels: toward a green revolution.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Patrick G; Moore, C Mark; Terry, Matthew J; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Bibby, Thomas S

    2011-12-01

    Biofuels derived from marine algae are a potential source of sustainable energy that can contribute to future global demands. The realisation of this potential will require manipulation of the fundamental biology of algal physiology to increase the efficiency with which solar energy is ultimately converted into usable biomass. This 'photosynthetic solar energy conversion efficiency' sets an upper limit on the potential of algal-derived biofuels. In this review, we outline photosynthetic molecular targets that could be manipulated to increase the efficiency and yield of algal biofuel production. We also highlight modern 'omic' and high-throughput technologies that might enable identification, selection and improvement of algal cell lines on timescales relevant for achieving significant contributions to future energy solutions.

  12. Extracellular production of riboflavin-binding protein, a potential bitter inhibitor, by Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Maehashi, Kenji; Matano, Mami; Saito, Makiko; Udaka, Shigezo

    2010-05-01

    Riboflavin-binding protein (RBP) is a glycophosphoprotein found in hen eggs. We previously identified the extraordinary characteristic of RBP in reducing bitterness. For a more detailed study on the mode of action and industrial application of this characteristic, we investigated the microbial production of recombinant RBP (rRBP). We constructed a chicken RBP gene expression vector by inserting the RBP cDNA in pNCMO2, the Escherichia coli-Brevibacillus choshinensis shuttle vector. B. choshinensis HPD31 transformants produced 0.8g/l of processed and unglycosylated RBP in a soluble form in the culture supernatant. However, the expressed RBP was partially dimerized and monomeric RBP was purified by two step anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatographies. The purified rRBP elicited bitterness reduction against quinine and caffeine, although it largely lost its riboflavin-binding ability. These results indicated that glycosylation and riboflavin-binding ability are not essential for the bitterness reduction of RBP. In addition, we assessed the usefulness of the Brevibacillus system for the expression and secretion of RBP as a new type of bitterness inhibitor.

  13. Production of extracellular biopolymers and identification of intracellular proteins and Rhizobium tropici.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, José; Figueiredo, Marcia; Silva, Marcia; Malta, Marília; Vendruscolo, Claire; Almeida, Hélio

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify species of rhizobia (from the IPA 403 and IPA 49 isolates), to assess the physico-chemical characteristics of the biopolymers produced by these rhizobia and to determine the soluble intracellular proteins that are present in these rhizobia. The polysaccharides containing acetyl and pyruvic acid groups that were produced by different strains that had been cultivated in yeast extract mannitol (YEM) medium for 132, 144, and 168 h were evaluated for yield, viscosity, and concentration. Based on the analysis of their partial 16S rDNA sequences, both isolates were identified as Rhizobium tropici. The polymers produced in liquid YEM medium were recovered, dried and weighed to determine culture yield. Soluble intracellular proteins were identified through the techniques of 2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry for cultures that were cultivated for 168 h. The largest biopolymer yield and the highest viscosity and concentration of acetyl and pyruvic acids were obtained from the IPA 403 isolate after 168 h of culture. The proteins that were identified for the CIAT 899 isolate included elongation factor TU, a chaperone; GroE/GroEs and a putative glycosyltransferase, all of which catalyze the production of polysaccharides. For the IPA 403 strain, dinitrogenase and nitrogenase iron proteins were found. In the IPA 49 strain, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was found along with two other proteins, the beta subunit of an electron-transferring flavoprotein and a dehydrogenase.

  14. A novel extracellular protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa MCM B-327: enzyme production and its partial characterization.

    PubMed

    Zambare, Vasudeo; Nilegaonkar, Smita; Kanekar, Pradnya

    2011-02-28

    The focus of this study was on production, purification and characterization of dehairing protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa MCM B-327, isolated from vermicompost pit soil. Optimum protease activity, 395 U mL(-1), was observed in the medium containing soybean meal and tryptone, at pH 7 and 30 °C. The crude enzyme exhibited dehairing activity. As compared to chemical method, enzymatic method of dehairing showed reduction in COD, TDS and TSS by 34.28%, 37.32% and 51.58%, respectively. Zymogram of crude enzyme on native-PAGE presented two bands with protease activity of molecular weights of 56 and 67 kDa. Both proteases showed dehairing activity. Out of these, 56kDa protease (PA02) was purified 3.05-folds with 2.71% recovery. The enzyme was active in pH range 7-9 and temperature 20-50 °C with optimum pH of 8 and temperature 35°C. Moreover, the enzyme activity of PA02 protease was not strongly inhibited by specific inhibitor showing the novel nature of enzyme compared to serine, cysteine, aspartyl and metalloproteases. Kinetic studies indicated that substrate specificity of PA02 protease was towards various natural and synthetic proteolytic substrates but inactive against collagen and keratin. These findings suggest protease secreted by P. aeruginosa MCM B-327 may have application in dehairing for environment-friendly leather processing.

  15. Extracellular bio-production and characterization of small monodispersed CdSe quantum dot nanocrystallites.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Anil K

    2014-09-15

    Engineered nanoparticles of diverse forms are being profoundly used for various applications and demand ecologically benign synthesis processes. Conventional chemical methods employed for the syntheses of nanoparticles are environmentally unfriendly and energy intensive. Biologically inspired biofabrication approaches that utilize naturally existing microorganisms or plant extracts or biomaterials might overcome these issues. The present investigation for the first time shows the synthesis of small and monodispersed cadmium selenide nanoparticles utilizing the plant pathogenic fungus, Helminthosporum solani upon incubating with an aqueous solution of CdCl2 and SeCl4 under ambient conditions. Multiple physical characterizations involving ultraviolet-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the production, purity, optical and surface characteristics, crystalline nature, size and shape distributions, and elemental composition of the nanoparticles. Pluralities of the particles are monodisperse spheres with a mean diameter of 5.5±2 nm, are hydrophilic, highly stable with a broad photoluminescence and 1% quantum yield. This approach provides an alternative facile route for the biofabrication of quantum dot that is reliable, environmentally friendly, and lends itself directly for the creation of fluorescent biological labels.

  16. Extracellular bio-production and characterization of small monodispersed CdSe quantum dot nanocrystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Anil K.

    2014-09-01

    Engineered nanoparticles of diverse forms are being profoundly used for various applications and demand ecologically benign synthesis processes. Conventional chemical methods employed for the syntheses of nanoparticles are environmentally unfriendly and energy intensive. Biologically inspired biofabrication approaches that utilize naturally existing microorganisms or plant extracts or biomaterials might overcome these issues. The present investigation for the first time shows the synthesis of small and monodispersed cadmium selenide nanoparticles utilizing the plant pathogenic fungus, Helminthosporum solani upon incubating with an aqueous solution of CdCl2 and SeCl4 under ambient conditions. Multiple physical characterizations involving ultraviolet-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the production, purity, optical and surface characteristics, crystalline nature, size and shape distributions, and elemental composition of the nanoparticles. Pluralities of the particles are monodisperse spheres with a mean diameter of 5.5 ± 2 nm, are hydrophilic, highly stable with a broad photoluminescence and 1% quantum yield. This approach provides an alternative facile route for the biofabrication of quantum dot that is reliable, environmentally friendly, and lends itself directly for the creation of fluorescent biological labels.

  17. Isolation and identification of actinomycetes for production of novel extracellular glutaminase free L-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Akansha; Upadhyay, Ramraj; Kango, Naveen

    2015-12-01

    Over the recent years glutaminase free L-asparaginase has gained more importance due to better therapeutic properties for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Actinomycetes are known for L-asparaginase activity. In the current study, 80 actinomycetes were isolated from various soil habitats by serial dilution technique. Presence of L-asparaginase was investigated in a total of 240 actinomycetes by tubed agar method using modified M-9 medium. A total of 165 actinomycetes were found positive for L-asparaginase activity. Among these, 57 actinomycetes producing larger zones of L-asparagine hydrolysis were further screened for their capacity to produce glutaminase-free L-asparaginase. Four L-glutaminase-free actinomycetes were found to be potential L-asparaginase producers. These actinomycetes were identified as Streptomyces cyaneus (SAP 1287, CFS 1560), S. exfoliates (CFS 1557) and S. phaeochromogenes (GS 1573) on the basis of morphological and biochemical identification studies. Maximum L-asparaginase activity (19.2 Uml(-1)) was observed in culture filtrate of S. phaeochromogenes under submerged fermentation. Results indicate that S. phaeochromogenes could be a potential source of glutaminase free L-asparaginase for commercial purpose. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on production of glutaminase free L-asparaginase from S. cyaneus, S. exfoliatus and S. phaeochromogenes.

  18. Switching cultivation for enhancing biomass and lipid production with extracellular polymeric substance as co-products in Heynigia riparia SX01.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guodong; Miao, Xiaoling

    2017-03-01

    Switching cultivation (mixotrophic-heterotrophic, 12h:12h) of Heynigia riparia SX01 was studied, the maximum biomass concentration of 3.55gL(-1) and lipid yield of 1.45gL(-1) were achieved after 8days cultivation. The extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) was developed as co-product. Addition of MgSO4 could enhance the production of EPS. The highest amount of 0.60gL(-1) EPS was obtained with the addition of 2gL(-1) MgSO4, the self-flocculation efficiency was as high as 83% at this condition. The total lipid and lipid fractions did not show differences with extra MgSO4. Based on the above results, a new biodiesel production model was proposed: culturing Heynigia riparia SX01 with extra 2gL(-1) MgSO4 by switching cultivation and using self flocculation to collect microalgae for biodiesel production, while EPS was collected as valuable co-products.

  19. Production of multiple extracellular enzyme activities by novel submerged culture of Aspergillus kawachii for ethanol production from raw cassava flour.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Toshikazu; Makita, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Koutaro; Shoji, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Cassava is a starch-containing root crop that is widely used as a raw material in a variety of industrial applications, most recently in the production of fuel ethanol. In the present study, ethanol production from raw (uncooked) cassava flour by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using a preparation consisting of multiple enzyme activities from Aspergillus kawachii FS005 was investigated. The multi-activity preparation was obtained from a novel submerged fermentation broth of A. kawachii FS005 grown on unmilled crude barley as a carbon source. The preparation was found to consist of glucoamylase, acid-stable α-amylase, acid carboxypeptidase, acid protease, cellulase and xylanase activities, and exhibited glucose and free amino nitrogen (FAN) production rates of 37.7 and 118.7 mg/l/h, respectively, during A. kawachii FS005-mediated saccharification of uncooked raw cassava flour. Ethanol production from 18.2% (w/v) dry uncooked solids of raw cassava flour by SSF with the multi-activity enzyme preparation yielded 9.0% (v/v) of ethanol and 92.3% fermentation efficiency. A feasibility study for ethanol production by SSF with a two-step mash using raw cassava flour and the multi-activity enzyme preparation manufactured on-site was verified on a pilot plant scale. The enzyme preparation obtained from the A. kawachii FS005 culture broth exhibited glucose and FAN production rates of 41.1 and 135.5 mg/l/h, respectively. SSF performed in a mash volume of about 1,612 l containing 20.6% (w/v) dry raw cassava solids and 106 l of on-site manufactured A. kawachii FS005 culture broth yielded 10.3% (v/v) ethanol and a fermentation efficiency of 92.7%.

  20. Large strain stimulation promotes extracellular matrix production and stiffness in an elastomeric scaffold model.

    PubMed

    D׳Amore, Antonio; Soares, Joao S; Stella, John A; Zhang, Will; Amoroso, Nicholas J; Mayer, John E; Wagner, William R; Sacks, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical conditioning of engineered tissue constructs is widely recognized as one of the most relevant methods to enhance tissue accretion and microstructure, leading to improved mechanical behaviors. The understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains rather limited, restricting the development of in silico models of these phenomena, and the translation of engineered tissues into clinical application. In the present study, we examined the role of large strip-biaxial strains (up to 50%) on ECM synthesis by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) micro-integrated into electrospun polyester urethane urea (PEUU) constructs over the course of 3 weeks. Experimental results indicated that VSMC biosynthetic behavior was quite sensitive to tissue strain maximum level, and that collagen was the primary ECM component synthesized. Moreover, we found that while a 30% peak strain level achieved maximum ECM synthesis rate, further increases in strain level lead to a reduction in ECM biosynthesis. Subsequent mechanical analysis of the formed collagen fiber network was performed by removing the scaffold mechanical responses using a strain-energy based approach, showing that the denovo collagen also demonstrated mechanical behaviors substantially better than previously obtained with small strain training and comparable to mature collagenous tissues. We conclude that the application of large deformations can play a critical role not only in the quantity of ECM synthesis (i.e. the rate of mass production), but also on the modulation of the stiffness of the newly formed ECM constituents. The improved understanding of the process of growth and development of ECM in these mechano-sensitive cell-scaffold systems will lead to more rational design and manufacturing of engineered tissues operating under highly demanding mechanical environments.

  1. Liquid transportation fuels from algal oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daichuan

    Liquid transportation fuels from renewable sources are becoming more prominent and important in modem society. Processing of hydrocarbon oils from algae has not been studied in detail in the past, so components which have been proposed for incorporation in algal oils via genetic engineering, such as cuparene, farnesene, phytol and squalene, have been subjected to processing via catalytic cracking in a pulse reactor at different temperatures. The cracking results showed that liquid products contained numerous high octane molecules which make it feasible for use in automobiles. Additionally, canola oil, chosen as an algal oil model compound, was studied as a feed for catalytic cracking in a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure over different types of zeolites. The results showed that MFI catalysts gave the highest yield of gasoline range products and lowest coke formation. Gallium loaded MFI zeolites increased the total aromatics yield for the canola oil cracking relative to the acid form of the zeolite. Finally, algal oils were cracked on several selected zeolites, and the results showed the same trend as canola oil cracking. MFI gave the highest gasoline yield (43.8 wt%) and lowest coke (4.7 wt%). The total aromatics yield from algae oil cracking is improved 7.8 wt% when MFI is loaded with gallium.

  2. Algal Biofuels; Algal Biofuels R&D at NREL (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    An overview of NREL's algal biofuels projects, including U.S. Department of Energy-funded work, projects with U.S. and international partners, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects.

  3. The combined luminol/isoluminol chemiluminescence method for differentiating between extracellular and intracellular oxidant production by neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Jancinová, Viera; Drábiková, Katarína; Nosál, Radomír; Racková, Lucia; Májeková, Magdaléna; Holománová, Dagmar

    2006-01-01

    To address the question why isoluminol, but not luminol, failed to detect oxidants produced intracellularly, differences between these luminophores were investigated with respect to physicochemical parameters and the character of chemiluminescence signal. Our results showed the isoluminol molecule to be more polar, more hydrophilic and possessing lower ability to form intramolecular bonds than the luminol molecule. Therefore, isoluminol: (i) only slightly pervaded biological membranes; (ii) depended essentially on extracellular peroxidase; (iii) did not produce chemiluminescence in the presence of extracellular scavengers; and (iv) it could be considered a specific detector of extracellular radicals. On the other hand, the physicochemical parameters of luminol and partial resistance of its chemiluminescence to the effect of extracellular inhibitors proved the lipo/hydrophilic character of this luminophore and thus its ability to interact with radicals both outside and inside of cells. The luminol chemiluminescence measured in the presence of extracellular scavengers and the isoluminol chemiluminescence were used with the intention to differentiate the effects of two antihistamine drugs on intra- and extracellular radical formation. In activated human neutrophils, brompheniramine inhibited the extracellular and potentiated the intracellular part of chemiluminescence signal, whereas a reducing effect of loratadine was observed in both compartments.

  4. N-acetyl-L-cysteine affects growth, extracellular polysaccharide production, and bacterial biofilm formation on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Ann-Cathrin; Hermansson, Malte; Elwing, Hans

    2003-08-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and prevent biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in environments typical of paper mill plants. Using 10 different bacterial strains isolated from a paper mill, we found that the mode of action of NAC is chemical, as well as biological, in the case of bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces. The initial adhesion of bacteria is dependent on the wettability of the substratum. NAC was shown to bind to stainless steel, increasing the wettability of the surface. Moreover, NAC decreased bacterial adhesion and even detached bacteria that were adhering to stainless steel surfaces. Growth of various bacteria, as monocultures or in a multispecies community, was inhibited at different concentrations of NAC. We also found that there was no detectable degradation of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by NAC, indicating that NAC reduced the production of EPS, in most bacteria tested, even at concentrations at which growth was not affected. Altogether, the presence of NAC changes the texture of the biofilm formed and makes NAC an interesting candidate for use as a general inhibitor of formation of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel surfaces.

  5. Mutation of rpoS gene decreased resistance to environmental stresses, synthesis of extracellular products and virulence of Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Chen, Jixiang; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Jiang, Ying-An

    2009-11-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is a gram-negative halophilic bacterium that causes vibriosis in marine fish, freshwater fish and other aquatic animals. Bacteria have developed strategies to survive in harsh environments. The alternative sigma factor, RpoS (sigma(S)), plays a key role in surviving under stress conditions in some gram-negative bacteria. An rpoS mutant of pathogenic V. anguillarum W-1 was constructed by homologous recombination. The sensitivity of the rpoS mutant to osmotic stress [2.4 M NaCl in artificial seawater (ASW)] did not change obviously, but the sensitivity of the rpoS mutant to high temperature (45 degrees C in ASW), UV-irradiation and oxidative stress (5 mM H(2)O(2) in ASW) increased 33-fold, sixfold and 10-fold, respectively. The production of extracellular phospholipase, diastase, lipase, caseinase, hemolysin, catalase and protease of the rpoS mutant decreased markedly compared with those of the wild-type strain. Virulence of the rpoS mutant strain was also decreased when it was inoculated intraperitoneally into zebra fish; the lethal dose 50% of the wild type and the mutant was 8.66 x 10(4) and 2.55 x 10(6) CFU per fish, respectively. These results indicated that the RpoS of V. anguillarum plays important roles in bacterial adaptation to environmental stresses and its pathogenicity.

  6. An adenosine kinase exists in Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris and is involved in extracellular polysaccharide production, cell motility, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Yong-Qin; Li, Cai-Yue; Li, Rui-Fang; An, Shi-Qi; Feng, Jia-Xun; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Dong-Jie; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2009-06-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK) is a purine salvage enzyme and a typical housekeeping enzyme in eukaryotes which catalyzes the phosphorylation of adenosine to form AMP. Since prokaryotes synthesize purines de novo and no endogenous ADK activity is detectable in Escherichia coli, ADK has long been considered to be rare in bacteria. To date, only two prokaryotes, both of which are gram-positive bacteria, have been reported to contain ADK. Here we report that the gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris, the causal agent of black rot of crucifers, possesses a gene (designated adk(Xcc)) encoding an ADK (named ADK(Xcc)), and we demonstrate genetically that the ADK(Xcc) is involved in extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production, cell motility, and pathogenicity of X. campestris pv. campestris. adk(Xcc) was overexpressed as a His(6)-tagged protein in E. coli, and the purified His(6)-tagged protein exhibited ADK activity. Mutation of adk(Xcc) did not affect bacterial growth in rich and minimal media but led to an accumulation of intracellular adenosine and diminutions of intracellular ADK activity and ATP level, as well as EPS. The adk(Xcc) mutant displayed significant reductions in bacterial growth and virulence in the host plant.

  7. Enhanced extracellular production of L-asparaginase from Bacillus subtilis 168 by B. subtilis WB600 through a combined strategy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yue; Liu, Song; Jiao, Yun; Gao, Hui; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2017-02-01

    L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1, ASN) exhibits great commercial value due to its uses in the food and medicine industry. In this study, we reported the enhanced expression of type II ASN from Bacillus subtilis 168 in B. subtilis WB600 through a combined strategy. First, eight signal peptides (the signal peptide of the ASN, ywbN, yvgO, amyE, oppA, vpr, lipA, and wapA) were used for ASN secretion in B. subtilis by using Hpa II promoter, respectively. The signal peptide wapA achieved the highest extracellular ASN activity (28.91 U/mL). Second, Hpa II promoter was replaced by a strong promoter, P43 promoter, resulting in 38.1 % enhanced ASN activity. By two rounds of error-prone PCR mutation, the P43 promoter variants with remarkably enhanced strength (D7, E2, H6, B2, and F3) were identified. B2 (-28: A → G, -13: A → G) achieved ASN activity up to 51.13 U/mL. Third, after deletion of the N-terminal 25-residues, ASN activity reached 102.41 U/mL, which was 100 % higher than that of the intact ASN. At last, the extracellular ASN of the B. subtilis arrived at 407.6 U/mL (2.5 g/L of ASN protein) in a 3-L bioreactor by using a fed-batch strategy. The purified ASN showed maximal activity at 65 °C and its half-life at 65 °C was 61 min. The K m and k cat of the ASN were 5.29 mM and 54.4 s(-1), respectively. To the best of our knowledge, we obtained the highest yield of ASN in a food-grade host ever reported, which may benefit the industrial production and application of ASN.

  8. The Different Roles of Penicillium oxalicum LaeA in the Production of Extracellular Cellulase and β-xylosidase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanan; Zheng, Xiaoju; Zhang, Xiujun; Bao, Longfei; Zhu, Yingying; Qu, Yinbo; Zhao, Jian; Qin, Yuqi

    2016-01-01

    Cellulolytic enzyme hydrolysis of lignocellulose biomass to release fermentable sugars is one of the key steps in biofuel refining. Gene expression of fungal cellulolytic enzymes is tightly controlled at the transcriptional level. Key transcription factors such as activator ClrB/CLR2 and XlnR/XYR1, as well as repressor CreA/CRE1 play crucial roles in this process. The putative protein methyltransferase LaeA/LAE1 has also been reported to regulate the gene expression of the cellulolytic enzyme. The formation and gene expression of the cellulolytic enzyme was compared among Penicillium oxalicum wild type (WT) and seven mutants, including ΔlaeA (deletion of laeA), OEclrB (clrB overexpression), OEclrBΔlaeA (clrB overexpression with deletion of laeA), OExlnR (xlnR overexpression), OExlnRΔlaeA (xlnR overexpression with deletion of laeA), ΔcreA (deletion of creA), and ΔcreAΔlaeA (double deletion of creA and laeA). Results revealed that LaeA extensively affected the expression of glycoside hydrolase genes. The expression of genes that encoded the top 10 glycoside hydrolases assayed in secretome was remarkably downregulated especially in later phases of prolonged batch cultures by the deletion of laeA. Cellulase synthesis of four mutants ΔlaeA, OEclrBΔlaeA, OExlnRΔlaeA, and ΔcreAΔlaeA was repressed remarkably compared with their parent strains WT, OEclrB, OExlnR, and ΔcreA, respectively. The overexpression of clrB or xlnR could not rescue the impairment of cellulolytic enzyme gene expression and cellulase synthesis when LaeA was absent, suggesting that LaeA was necessary for the expression of cellulolytic enzyme gene activated by ClrB or XlnR. In contrast to LaeA positive roles in regulating prominent cellulase and hemicellulase, the extracellular β-xylosidase formation was negatively regulated by LaeA. The extracellular β-xylosidase activities improved over 5-fold in the OExlnRΔlaeA mutant compared with that of WT, and the expression of prominent

  9. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A.; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC. PMID:26053483

  10. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC.

  11. Aberrant production of extracellular matrix proteins and dysfunction in kidney endothelial cells with a short duration of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Grutzmacher, Cathy; Park, SunYoung; Zhao, Yun; Morrison, Margaret E.; Sheibani, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In the United States, microvascular complications during diabetic nephropathy contribute to high morbidity and mortality rates. However, the cell-autonomous impact of diabetes on kidney endothelial cell function requires further investigation. Male Akita/+ [autosomal dominant mutation in the insulin II gene (Ins2)] mice reproducibly develop diabetes by 4 wk of age. Here, we examined the impact a short duration of diabetes had on kidney endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells were prepared from nondiabetic and diabetic mice (4 wk of diabetes) to delineate the early changes in endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice following 4 wk of diabetes demonstrated aberrant expression of extracellular matrix proteins including decreased osteopontin and increased fibronectin expression which correlated with increased α5-integrin expression. These changes were associated with the attenuation of migration and capillary morphogenesis. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice had decreased VEGF levels but increased levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) and NO, suggesting uncoupling of VEGF-mediated NO production. Knocking down eNOS expression in Akita/+ kidney endothelial cells increased VEGF expression, endothelial cell migration, and capillary morphogenesis. Furthermore, attenuation of sprouting angiogenesis of aortas from Akita/+ mice with 8 wk of diabetes was restored in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. These studies demonstrate that aberrant endothelial cell function with a short duration of diabetes may set the stage for vascular dysfunction and rarefaction at later stages of diabetes. PMID:23077100

  12. Production, properties and application to biocatalysis of a novel extracellular alkaline phenol oxidase from the thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Ogel, Z B; Yüzügüllü, Y; Mete, S; Bakir, U; Kaptan, Y; Sutay, D; Demir, A S

    2006-08-01

    Scytalidium thermophilum produces an extracellular phenol oxidase on glucose-containing medium. Certain phenolic acids, specifically gallic acid and tannic acid, induce the expression of the enzyme. Production at 45 degrees C in batch cultures is growth-associated and is enhanced in the presence of 160 microM CuSO4 x 5 H2O and 3 mM gallic acid. The highest enzyme activity is observed at pH 7.5 and 65 degrees C, on catechol. When incubated for 1 h at pH 7 and pH 8, 95% and 86% of the activity is retained. Thermostability decreases gradually from 40 degrees C to 80 degrees C. Estimated molecular mass is c. 83 kDa, and pI is acidic at c. 5.4. Substrate specificity and inhibition analysis in culture supernatants suggest that the enzyme has unique properties showing activity towards catechol; 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA); 4-amino-N, N-diethylaniline (ADA); p-hydroquinone; gallic acid; tannic acid and caffeic acid, and no activity towards L-tyrosine, guaiacol, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) and syringaldazine. Inhibition is observed in the presence of salicyl hydroxamic acid (SHAM) and p-coumaric acid. Enzyme activity is enhanced by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and the organic solvents dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol. No inhibition is observed in the presence of carbon monoxide. Benzoin, benzoyl benzoin and hydrobenzoin are converted into benzil, and stereoselective oxidation is observed on hydrobenzoin. The reported enzyme is novel due to its catalytic properties resembling mainly catechol oxidases, but displaying some features of laccases at the same time.

  13. Advanced Glycation End Products in Extracellular Matrix Proteins Contribute to the Failure of Sensory Nerve Regeneration in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Jimenez, Beatriz; Dobler, Darin; Moffatt, Sarah; Rabbani, Naila; Streuli, Charles H.; Thornalley, Paul J.; Tomlinson, David R.; Gardiner, Natalie J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to characterize glycation adducts formed in both in vivo extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins of endoneurium from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and in vitro by glycation of laminin and fibronectin with methylglyoxal and glucose. We also investigated the impact of advanced glycation end product (AGE) residue content of ECM on neurite outgrowth from sensory neurons. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Glycation, oxidation, and nitration adducts of ECM proteins extracted from the endoneurium of control and STZ-induced diabetic rat sciatic nerve (3–24 weeks post-STZ) and of laminin and fibronectin that had been glycated using glucose or methylglyoxal were examined by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Methylglyoxal-glycated or unmodified ECM proteins were used as substrata for dissociated rat sensory neurons as in vitro models of regeneration. RESULTS STZ-induced diabetes produced a significant increase in early glycation Nε-fructosyl-lysine and AGE residue contents of endoneurial ECM. Glycation of laminin and fibronectin by methylglyoxal and glucose increased glycation adduct residue contents with methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone and Nε-fructosyl-lysine, respectively, of greatest quantitative importance. Glycation of laminin caused a significant decrease in both neurotrophin-stimulated and preconditioned sensory neurite outgrowth. This decrease was prevented by aminoguanidine. Glycation of fibronectin also decreased preconditioned neurite outgrowth, which was prevented by aminoguanidine and nerve growth factor. CONCLUSIONS Early glycation and AGE residue content of endoneurial ECM proteins increase markedly in STZ-induced diabetes. Glycation of laminin and fibronectin causes a reduction in neurotrophin-stimulated neurite outgrowth and preconditioned neurite outgrowth. This may provide a mechanism for the failure of collateral sprouting and axonal regeneration in diabetic neuropathy. PMID:19720799

  14. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  15. Detection of surface algal blooms using the newly developed algorithm surface algal bloom index (SABI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawadi, Fahad

    2010-10-01

    Quantifying ocean colour properties has evolved over the past two decades from being able to merely detect their biological activity to the ability to estimate chlorophyll concentration using optical satellite sensors like MODIS and MERIS. The production of chlorophyll spatial distribution maps is a good indicator of plankton biomass (primary production) and is useful for the tracing of oceanographic currents, jets and blooms, including harmful algal blooms (HABs). Depending on the type of HABs involved and the environmental conditions, if their concentration rises above a critical threshold, it can impact the flora and fauna of the aquatic habitat through the introduction of the so called "red tide" phenomenon. The estimation of chlorophyll concentration is derived from quantifying the spectral relationship between the blue and the green bands reflected from the water column. This spectral relationship is employed in the standard ocean colour chlorophyll-a (Chlor-a) product, but is incapable of detecting certain macro-algal species that float near to or at the water surface in the form of dense filaments or mats. The ability to accurately identify algal formations that sometimes appear as oil spill look-alikes in satellite imagery, contributes towards the reduction of false-positive incidents arising from oil spill monitoring operations. Such algal formations that occur in relatively high concentrations may experience, as in land vegetation, what is known as the "red-edge" effect. This phenomena occurs at the highest reflectance slope between the maximum absorption in the red due to the surrounding ocean water and the maximum reflectance in the infra-red due to the photosynthetic pigments present in the surface algae. A new algorithm termed the surface algal bloom index (SABI), has been proposed to delineate the spatial distributions of floating micro-algal species like for example cyanobacteria or exposed inter-tidal vegetation like seagrass. This algorithm was

  16. Extracellular phosphates enhance activities of voltage-gated proton channels and production of reactive oxygen species in murine osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangshuai; Miura, Katsuyuki; Kuno, Miyuki

    2017-02-01

    Osteoclasts are highly differentiated bone-resorbing cells and play a significant role in bone remodelling. In the resorption pit, inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations increase because of degradation of hydroxyapatite. We studied effects of extracellular Pi on voltage-gated H(+) channels in osteoclast-like cells derived from a macrophage cell line (RAW264). Extracellular Pi (1.25-20 mM) increased the H(+) channel currents dose dependently and reversibly. The Pi-induced increases were attenuated by removal of extracellular Na(+) and by phosphonoformic acid, a blocker of Na(+)-dependent Pi transporters. Pi increased the maximal conductance, decreased activation time constant, increased deactivation time constant, and shifted the conductance-voltage relationship to more negative voltages. The most marked change was enhanced gating which was mainly caused by elevation of intracellular Pi levels. The Pi-induced enhanced gating was partially inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, GF109203X and staurosporine, indicating that PKC-mediated phosphorylation was involved in part. The increase in the maximal conductance was mainly due to accompanying decrease in intracellular pH. These effects of Pi were not affected by intracellular Mg(2+), bafilomycin A1 (V-ATPase inhibitor) and removal of intracellular ATP. Extracellular Pi also upregulated reactive oxygen species (ROS). Diphenyleneiodonium chloride, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, decreased ROS production and partially attenuated the enhanced gating. In the cells during later passages where osteoclastogenesis declined, H(+) channel activities and ROS production were both modest. These results suggest that, in osteoclasts, ambient Pi is a common enhancer for H(+) channels and ROS production and that potentiation of H(+) channels may help ROS production.

  17. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Li, Junying

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  18. Luminescent Solar Concentrators in the Algal Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellier, Katie; Corrado, Carley; Carter, Sue; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    Today's industry for renewable energy sources and highly efficient energy management systems is rapidly increasing. Development of increased efficiency Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) has brought about new applications for commercial interests, including greenhouses for agricultural crops. This project is taking first steps to explore the potential of LSCs to enhance production and reduce costs for algae and cyanobacteria used in biofuels and nutraceuticals. This pilot phase uses LSC filtered light for algal growth trials in greenhouses and laboratory experiments, creating specific wavelength combinations to determine effects of discrete solar light regimes on algal growth and the reduction of heating and water loss in the system. Enhancing the optimal spectra for specific algae will not only increase production, but has the potential to lessen contamination of large scale production due to competition from other algae and bacteria. Providing LSC filtered light will reduce evaporation and heating in regions with limited water supply, while the increased energy output from photovoltaic cells will reduce costs of heating and mixing cultures, thus creating a more efficient and cost effective production system.

  19. Improvement of Aspergillus oryzae NRRL 3484 by mutagenesis and optimization of culture conditions in solid-state fermentation for the hyper-production of extracellular cellulase.

    PubMed

    El-Ghonemy, Dina Helmy; Ali, Thanaa Hamed; El-Bondkly, Ahmed Mohamed; Moharam, Maysa El-Sayed; Talkhan, Fatma Nabeeh

    2014-11-01

    Spore suspensions of Aspergillus oryzae NRRL 3484 were subjected to mutagenesis using ultraviolet-irradiation followed by chemical treatments to improve the biosynthesis of cellulase. Ten mutant strains namely UEAC7, UEAR5, UNAC4, UNAC16, UNAR19, UNBC7, UNBR3, UNBR10, UNBR23 and UNBR25 were selected and their extracellular cellulase activities were assayed. Mutant UNAC4 gave the highest cellulase production [2,455 ± 28 U/g-dry substrate (ds) for filter paper-ase (FP-ase)] in a yield 4-fold exceeding that of the wild type strain (578 ± 5.0 U/g-ds for FP-ase). Rice straw (RS) was used as a sole carbon source for the enzyme production at a concentration of 10 % (w/v). Maximum cellulase production was achieved at initial medium pH 5.5, initial moisture content 77 % and an incubation temperature 28 °C on the fifth day of growth. NH4Cl proved to be the suitable added nitrogen source for maximum enzyme production followed by peptone. These results clearly indicate the cost-effectiveness of solid state fermentation technology in the economic production of extracellular cellulase. The hyper-production of cellulase by mutant strain UNAC4 has potential for industrial processes that convert lignocellulosic material (e.g. RS) into products of commercial value such as glucose and biofuels.

  20. Releasing Stored Solar Energy within Pond Scum: Biodiesel from Algal Lipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatti, Jillian L.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae have emerged as an attractive feedstock for the mass production of renewable transportation fuels due to their fast growth rate, flexible habitat preferences, and substantial oil yields. As an educational tool, a laboratory was developed that mimics emerging algal biofuel technology, including the extraction of algal lipids and…

  1. Will biodiesel derived from algal oils live up to its promise? A fuel property assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Algae have been attracting considerable attention as a source of biodiesel recently. This attention is largely due to the claimed high production potential of algal oils while circumventing the food vs. fuel issue. However, the properties of biodiesel fuels derived from algal oils have been only spa...

  2. Algal culture studies related to a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R. O.; Ollinger, O.; Venables, A.; Fernandez, E.

    1982-01-01

    Studies with algal cultures which relate to closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) are discussed. A description of a constant cell density apparatus for continuous culture of algae is included. Excretion of algal by-products, and nitrogen utilization and excretion are discussed.

  3. Extracellular polysaccharide production by a strain of Pleurotus djamor isolated in the south of Brazil and antitumor activity on Sarcoma 180

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Gisele Martini; De Barba, Fabiana Figueredo Molin; Schiebelbein, Ana Paula; Pereira, Bruna Parmezzani; Chaves, Mariane Bonatti; Silveira, Marcia Luciane Lange; Pinho, Mauro Souza Leite; Furlan, Sandra Aparecida; Wisbeck, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Polysaccharides with medicinal properties can be obtained from fruiting bodies, mycelium and culture broth of several fungus species. This work was carried out in batch culture using a stirred tank reactor with two different initial glucose concentrations (40–50 g/L) and pH values (3.0–4.0) to enhance extracellular polysaccharides production by Pleurotus djamor UNIVILLE 001 and evaluate antitumor effect of intraperitonial administration of Pleurotus djamor extract on sarcoma 180 animal model. According to factorial design, the low pH value (pH 3.0) led to a gain of 1.6 g/L on the extracellular polysaccharide concentration, while glucose concentration in the tested range had no significant effect on the concentration of polysaccharide. With 40 g/L initial glucose concentration and pH 3.0, it was observed that yield factor of extracellular polysaccharide on substrate (YP/S = 0.072) and maximum extracellular polysaccharide productivity (QPmax = 11.26 mg/L.h) were about 188% and 321% respectively higher than those obtained in the experiment performed at pH 4.0. Under these conditions, the highest values of the yield factor of biomass on substrate (YX/S = 0.24) and maximal biomass productivity (QXmax = 32.2 mg/L.h) were also reached. In tumor response study, mean tumor volume on the 21th day was 35.3 cm3 in untreated group and 1.6 cm3 in treated group (p = 0.05) with a tumor inhibition rate of 94%. These impressive results suggests an inhibitory effect of P.djamor extract on cancer cells. PMID:24688493

  4. Microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in fresh water sediments.

    PubMed

    Gerbersdorf, Sabine Ulrike; Westrich, Bernhard; Paterson, David M

    2009-08-01

    Microbially produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have been linked with many important ecological functions in natural sediments; yet, most information has been derived from marine systems. The present paper is the first comprehensive study on EPS (i.e., carbohydrates and proteins) dynamics in riverine sediments addressing spatial (six reservoirs and four groyne fields across three European rivers), temporal (all seasons in 2003-2005), and vertical (over a 50-cm sediment depth transect) pattern. The variation in hydrodynamic regime found in the reservoirs and groyne fields was reflected in the biomass and composition of the benthic microorganisms that produce EPS. The microphytobenthic communities consisted mainly of diatoms and a higher algal biomass (up to 248 microg g(-1) dry weight, DW) seemed to be indicative for higher amounts of secreted colloidal carbohydrates. Consequently, the model proposed by Underwood and Smith (1998) for the relation chlorophyll-colloidal carbohydrates was also applicable for upper riverine sediment layers. The close relation between algal biomass and bacterial cell counts (10(8)-10(9) cells g(-1) DW) supports the idea of bacterial use of the secreted EPS. However, the data also suggest a contribution to the EPS pool through bacterial secretion of proteins/extracellular enzymes and possibly carbohydrates. Over depth, the relationships between microorganisms and EPS became increasingly decoupled along with increasing ratios of bound (refractory) to colloidal (labile) EPS. These data suggest fresh production of polymeric substances in upper sediment layers and mainly accumulation of refractory, biodegraded material in deeper layers. The high contents of EPS colloidal and bound carbohydrates (0.1-1.8 and 1.3-6.7 mg g(-1) DW, respectively) and EPS proteins (0.4-12.9 mg g(-1) DW) at the freshwater study sites might indicate an important role in sediment ecology.

  5. The role of the intracellular and extracellular serotonin in the regulation of melatonin production in rat pinealocytes.

    PubMed

    Miguez, J M; Simonneaux, V; Pevet, P

    1997-09-01

    This study investigated whether the activation of pinealocyte beta-adrenergic receptors is involved in the regulation of serotonin (5-HT) synthesis and release, as it is for melatonin production. In addition, the role of the intra- and extra-cellular 5-HT in modulating the synthesis of melatonin induced by the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (ISO) was also studied. The incubation of dissociated pinealocytes with 0.1-10 microM ISO resulted in a concentration-dependent increase of melatonin synthesis. 5-HT release and intracellular 5-HT content were increased by 0.1 and 1 microM ISO but they were reduced after ISO 10 microM. Moreover, when incubated with the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), the secretion of 5-HT as well as the intracellular 5-HT levels were markedly reduced in both ISO-stimulated and unstimulated conditions. Melatonin release was also inhibited by PCPA, although it responded in the expected manner to increasing concentrations of ISO. These data indicate that the release of 5-HT from pinealocytes depends on the availability of cytoplasmic 5-HT, which in turn is highly dependent on the tryptophan hydroxylase activity. In cells stimulated with moderate ISO concentrations, 5-HT release may be an important regulatory process of pineal 5-HT. After a large stimulation of N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity by ISO, the synthesis of melatonin prevails on 5-HT release, whose decrease is associated to a deficit of intracellular 5-HT. On the other hand, the present study shows that the incubation of pineal cells with high concentrations of 5-HT or with a selective 5-HT2 receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, reverses partially the inhibitory effect of PCPA on the ISO-stimulated melatonin synthesis. In contrast the 5-HT2 antagonist, ketanserin, results in an inhibiton of the release of melatonin following ISO stimulation. These results suggest that released 5-HT may have a role in the full expression of the beta

  6. Increasing Superoxide Production and the Labile Iron Pool in Tumor Cells may Sensitize Them to Extracellular Ascorbate.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark Frederick; Contreras, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Low millimolar concentrations of ascorbate are capable of inflicting lethal damage on a high proportion of cancer cells lines, yet leave non-transformed cell lines unscathed. Extracellular generation of hydrogen peroxide, reflecting reduction of molecular oxygen by ascorbate, has been shown to mediate this effect. Although some cancer cell lines express low catalase activity, this cannot fully explain the selective sensitivity of cancer cells to hydrogen peroxide. Ranzato and colleagues have presented evidence for a plausible new explanation of this sensitivity - a high proportion of cancers, via NADPH oxidase complexes or dysfunctional mitochondria, produce elevated amounts of superoxide. This superoxide, via a transition metal-catalyzed transfer of an electron to the hydrogen peroxide produced by ascorbate, can generate deadly hydroxyl radical (Haber-Weiss reaction). It thus can be predicted that concurrent measures which somewhat selectively boost superoxide production in cancers will enhance their sensitivity to i.v. ascorbate therapy. One way to achieve this is to increase the provision of substrate to cancer mitochondria. Measures which inhibit the constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activity in cancers (such as salsalate and mTORC1 inhibitors, or an improvement of tumor oxygenation), or that inhibit the HIF-1-inducible pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (such as dichloroacetate), can be expected to increase pyruvate oxidation. A ketogenic diet should provide more lipid substrate for tumor mitochondria. The cancer-killing activity of 42°C hyperthermia is to some degree contingent on an increase in oxidative stress, likely of mitochondrial origin; reports that hydrogen peroxide synergizes with hyperthermia in killing cancer cells suggest that hyperthermia and i.v. ascorbate could potentiate each other's efficacy. A concurrent enhancement of tumor oxygenation might improve results by decreasing HIF-1 activity while increasing the interaction of ascorbic

  7. Providencia stuartii genes activated by cell-to-cell signaling and identification of a gene required for production or activity of an extracellular factor.

    PubMed

    Rather, P N; Ding, X; Baca-DeLancey, R R; Siddiqui, S

    1999-12-01

    By utilizing reporter transposons, five Providencia stuartii genes that are activated by the accumulation of self-produced extracellular signals have been identified. These genes have been designated cma for conditioned medium activated. The presence of conditioned medium from stationary-phase cultures grown in rich media resulted in the premature activation of each gene in cells at early log phase, with activation values ranging from 6- to 26-fold. Preparation of conditioned medium from an M9 salts medium and fractionation by gel filtration chromatography resulted in fractions within the included volume which activated three of the cma fusions. In addition, depending on the reporter fusion, peak activity was found in different fractions. The partially purified factors activated in a dose-dependent manner. Characterization of the factors activating the cma fusions indicated that they were stable to heat, alkali, and acid. Furthermore, for each cma fusion, factor activity was not reproduced by the addition of homoserine lactone, homocysteine thiolactone, pyruvate, Casamino Acids, or alpha-ketoglutarate. The identities of three cma genes have been determined and revealed physiological roles in amino acid biosynthesis and nutrient import. To begin to address the pathways for production of or response to the extracellular factors, we have identified a locus, aarA, that is required for the activation of four cma fusions. The AarA product was required for factor activity in extracellular supernatants, indicating a possible role in biosynthesis or export.

  8. Potential of carbon nanotubes in algal biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lambreva, Maya Dimova; Lavecchia, Teresa; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Antal, Taras Kornelievich; Orlanducci, Silvia; Margonelli, Andrea; Rea, Giuseppina

    2015-09-01

    A critical mass of knowledge is emerging on the interactions between plant cells and engineered nanomaterials, revealing the potential of plant nanobiotechnology to promote and support novel solutions for the development of a competitive bioeconomy. This knowledge can foster the adoption of new methodological strategies to empower the large-scale production of biomass from commercially important microalgae. The present review focuses on the potential of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance photosynthetic performance of microalgae by (i) widening the spectral region available for the energy conversion reactions and (ii) increasing the tolerance of microalgae towards unfavourable conditions occurring in mass production. To this end, current understanding on the mechanisms of uptake and localization of CNTs in plant cells is discussed. The available ecotoxicological data were used in an attempt to assess the feasibility of CNT-based applications in algal biotechnology, by critically correlating the experimental conditions with the observed adverse effects. Furthermore, main structural and physicochemical properties of single- and multi-walled CNTs and common approaches for the functionalization and characterization of CNTs in biological environment are presented. Here, we explore the potential that nanotechnology can offer to enhance functions of algae, paving the way for a more efficient use of photosynthetic algal systems in the sustainable production of energy, biomass and high-value compounds.

  9. Algal taxonomy forum: Algal Taxonomist, Let Serendipity Reign!

    PubMed

    Druehl, Louis

    2013-04-01

    The publication of a mini-review by Olivier De Clerck et al. in this issue of the Journal of Phycology presented an opportunity to open a dialogue on challenges faced by contemporary algal taxonomists. The Editorial Office solicited the following two additional contributions in response to De Clerck et al.'s paper; the responses were edited solely for clarity, space and format.

  10. Microbial products (biosurfactant and extracellular chromate reductase) of marine microorganism are the potential agents reduce the oxidative stress induced by toxic heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Gnanamani, A; Kavitha, V; Radhakrishnan, N; Suseela Rajakumar, G; Sekaran, G; Mandal, A B

    2010-09-01

    The present study demonstrates hexavalent chromium reduction and trivalent chromium tolerance behavior of marine Bacillus sp., MTCC 5514 through its extracellular enzyme reductase and biosurfactants production. The isolate reduces 10-2000 mg/L of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium with in 24-96 h respectively and the release of extracellular chromium reductase, found responsible for the reduction. Upon reduction, the concentration of trivalent chromium in the medium found comparatively less. Experimental results reveal, biosurfactants activity found responsible for the less concentration of Cr(III). Hypothetically, trivalent chromium upon formation get entrapped in the micelle of biosurfactants, prevents microbial cells from exposure towards trivalent chromium. Thus, the chosen isolate exhibit tolerance and growth with the increasing concentration of chromium.

  11. The dynamics of heterotrophic algal cultures.

    PubMed

    De la Hoz Siegler, H; Ben-Zvi, A; Burrell, R E; McCaffrey, W C

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the time varying characteristics of microalgal cultures are investigated. Microalgae are a promising source of biofuels and other valuable chemicals; a better understanding of their dynamic behavior is, however, required to facilitate process scale-up, optimization and control. Growth and oil production rates are evaluated as a function of carbon and nitrogen sources concentration. It is found that nitrogen has a major role in controlling the productivity of microalgae. Moreover, it is shown that there exists a nitrogen source concentration at which biomass and oil production can be maximized. A mathematical model that describes the effect of nitrogen and carbon source on growth and oil production is proposed. The model considers the uncoupling between nutrient uptake and growth, a characteristic of algal cells. Validity of the proposed model is tested on fed-batch cultures.

  12. Interactions of microbial biofilms with toxic trace metals; 1: Observation and modeling of cell growth, attachment, and production of extracellular polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, K.M.; Murgel, G.A.; Lion, L.W.; Shuler, M.L. )

    1994-06-20

    Adsorbent surfaces in natural and engineered systems are frequently modified by bacterial attachment, growth of a biofilm, and bacterial production of extracellular polymer. Attached cells or sorbed polymers may alter the metal-binding characteristics of the supporting substratum and influence metal partitioning. The interdependent behavior of toxic trace metal partitioning and biofilm development requires description of the interaction between cell growth with its accompanying polymer production and metal speciation. In this article, the first of a two part series, a mechanistic model is developed to describe the growth of a film-forming bacterium which adheres to a substratum through the production of extracellular biopolymers. Each bacterial cell was modeled as a two-component structure consisting of active cell mass and biopolymer. The biopolymer component was further divided into cell-associated and dissolved categories to distinguish biopolymer which remained naturally bound to cell surfaces from that which did not. Use of this structured model permitted independent description of the dynamics of cell growth, and polymer production, both of which may influence trace metal behavior. Employing parameters obtained from independent experiments as well as published values, the model satisfactorily predicts experimental observations of bacterial growth, attachment and detachment, biopolymer production, and adsorption of polymer onto solid (glass) surfaces. The model simulated transient and steady-state biofilm systems equally well.

  13. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix and Developmental Dysregulation in the Pancreas by Transgenic Production of Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung-Shik; Gu, Danling; Feng, Lili; Curriden, Scott; Arnush, Marc; Krahl, Troy; Gurushanthaiah, Deepak; Wilson, Curtis; Loskutoff, David L.; Fox, Howard; Sarvetnick, Nora

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the pancreatic β-islet cells directed by human insulin promoter were produced to study in vivo effects of TGF-β1. Fibroblast proliferation and abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix were observed from birth onward, finally replacing almost all the exocrine pancreas. Cellular infiltrates comprising macrophages and neutrophils were also observed. Plasminogen activator inhibitor was induced in the transgenic pancreas as well as fibronectin and laminin, partly explaining accumulation of extracellular matrix. TGF-β1 inhibited proliferation of acinar cells in vivo as evidenced by decreased bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Development of pancreatic islets was dysregulated, resulting in small islet cell clusters without formation of normal adult islets; however, the overall islet cell mass was not signfifcantly diminished. Additional transgenic lines with less pronounced phenotypes had less expression of TGF-β1 transgene. These findings suggest that TGF-β1 might be a mediator of diseases associated with extracellular matrix deposition such as chronic pancreatitis, and this mouse model will be useful for further analysis of the in vivo effects of TGF-β1, including its potential for immunosuppression. Imagesp43-aFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7604884

  14. Antimicrobial activity of neutralized extracellular culture filtrates of lactic acid bacteria isolated from a cultured Indian milk product ('dahi').

    PubMed

    Varadaraj, M C; Devi, N; Keshava, N; Manjrekar, S P

    1993-12-01

    Neutralized extracellular culture filtrate obtained from isolates of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus delbruecki ssp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis from 'dahi' showed weak to moderate inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus brevis, Bacillus circulans, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus laterosporus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa when tested by the diffusion agar well assay method. The effective minimum quantity of lactic culture filtrates required to obtain complete inhibition of an inoculum of 10(3) cfu/ml of the bacteria tested was between 20 and 26% (vol/vol), as determined by the agar incorporation method. Neutralized extracellular culture filtrate of these lactic cultures added at a level of 10% in sterile, 10% reconstituted non-fat dry milk was able to either suppress or retard growth of selected bacterial cultures when incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h. This study indicated the antimicrobial activity of dahi and the potential of using neutralized extracellular culture filtrate of lactic acid bacteria in the biopreservation of foods.

  15. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases.

  16. Algal cell disruption using microbubbles to localize ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Krehbiel, Joel D; Schideman, Lance C; King, Daniel A; Freund, Jonathan B

    2014-12-01

    Microbubbles were added to an algal solution with the goal of improving cell disruption efficiency and the net energy balance for algal biofuel production. Experimental results showed that disruption increases with increasing peak rarefaction ultrasound pressure over the range studied: 1.90 to 3.07 MPa. Additionally, ultrasound cell disruption increased by up to 58% by adding microbubbles, with peak disruption occurring in the range of 10(8)microbubbles/ml. The localization of energy in space and time provided by the bubbles improve efficiency: energy requirements for such a process were estimated to be one-fourth of the available heat of combustion of algal biomass and one-fifth of currently used cell disruption methods. This increase in energy efficiency could make microbubble enhanced ultrasound viable for bioenergy applications and is expected to integrate well with current cell harvesting methods based upon dissolved air flotation.

  17. Energy evaluation of algal cell disruption by high pressure homogenisation.

    PubMed

    Yap, Benjamin H J; Dumsday, Geoff J; Scales, Peter J; Martin, Gregory J O

    2015-05-01

    The energy consumption of high pressure homogenisation (HPH) was analysed to determine the feasibility of rupturing algal cells for biodiesel production. Experimentally, the processing capacity (i.e. flow rate), power draw and cell disruption efficiency of HPH were independent of feed concentration (for Nannochloropsis sp. up to 25%w/w solids). Depending on the homogenisation pressure (60-150 MPa), the solids concentration (0.25-25%w/w), and triacylglyceride (TAG) content of the harvested algal biomass (10-30%), the energy consumed by HPH represented between 6% and 110-times the energy density of the resulting biodiesel. Provided the right species (weak cell wall and high TAG content) is selected and the biomass is processed at a sufficiently high solids concentration, HPH can consume a small fraction of the energy content of the biodiesel produced. This study demonstrates the feasibility of process-scale algal cell disruption by HPH based on its energy requirement.

  18. Characterization of the Kootenai River Algae Community and Primary Productivity Before and After Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2004–2007 [Chapter 2, Kootenai River Algal Community Characterization, 2009 KTOI REPORT].

    SciTech Connect

    Holderman, Charlie; Anders, Paul; Shafii, Bahman

    2009-07-01

    The Kootenai River ecosystem (spelled Kootenay in Canada) has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam on the river near Libby Montana, completed in 1972. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel downstream in Idaho and British Columbia (B.C.) severely reducing natural biological productivity and habitat diversity crucial to large river-floodplain ecosystem function. Libby Dam greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches, and dam operations cause large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows. These and other changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to large scale loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the North Arm of Kootenay Lake in 1992, in the South Arm of Kootenay Lake in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes baseline chlorophyll concentration and accrual (primary productivity) rates and diatom and algal community composition and ecological metrics in the Kootenai River for four years, one (2004) before, and three (2005 through 2007) after nutrient addition. The study area encompassed a 325 km river reach from the upper Kootenay River at Wardner, B.C. (river kilometer (rkm) 445) downstream through Montana and Idaho to Kootenay Lake in B.C. (rkm 120). Sampling reaches included an unimpounded reach furthest upstream and four reaches downstream from Libby Dam affected by impoundment: two in the canyon reach (one with and one without nutrient addition), a braided reach

  19. Improved Production of Thermostable Cellulase from Thermoascus aurantiacus RCKK by Fermentation Bioprocessing and Its Application in the Hydrolysis of Office Waste Paper, Algal Pulp, and Biologically Treated Wheat Straw.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kavish Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Deswal, Deepa; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2017-02-01

    Thermostable cellulases have wide variety of applications and distinctive advantages, but their low titer becomes the hurdle in their commercialization. In the present work, an assessment of optimum levels of significant factors (temperature, moisture ratio, inoculum size, and ammonium sulfate) and the effect of their interactions on production of thermostable CMCase, FPase, and β-glucosidase by Thermoascus aurantiacus RCKK under solid-state fermentation (SSF) was carried out using central composite design (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM). The study revealed 33, 13, and 8 % improvement in FPase, CMCase, and β-glucosidase production, respectively. Moreover, crude cellulase from T. aurantiacus RCKK efficiently hydrolyzed office waste paper, algal pulp (Gracillaria verulosa), and biologically treated wheat straw at 60 °C with sugar release of about 830 mg/ml, 285 mg/g, and 260 mg/g of the substrate, respectively. The thermostable enzyme from T. aurantiacus RCKK holds potential to be used in biofuel industry.

  20. Autonomous benthic algal cultivator under feedback control of ecosystem metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An autonomous and internally-controlled techno-ecological hybrid was developed that controls primary production of algae in a laboratory-scale cultivator. The technoecosystem is based on an algal turf scrubber (ATS) system that combines engineered feedback control programming with internal feedback...

  1. Extracellular production of a novel endo-β-agarase AgaA from Pseudomonas vesicularis MA103 that cleaves agarose into neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Pang-Hung; Wei, Chien-Han; Lu, Wen-Jung; Shen, Fen; Pan, Chorng-Liang; Lin, Hong-Ting Victor

    2015-03-11

    The gene agaA, of the isolated marine bacterium Pseudomonas vesicularis MA103, comprised 2958-bp nucleotides encoding a putative agarase AgaA of 985 amino acids, which was predicted to contain a signal peptide of 29 amino acids in the N-terminus, a catalytic domain of glycoside hydrolase 16 (GH16) family, a bacterial immunoglobulin group 2 (Big 2), and three carbohydrate binding modules 6 (CBM 6). The gene agaA was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the optimum temperatures for AgaA overexpression were 16, 20 and 24 °C. The agaA was cloned without its signal peptide for cytosolic production overexpression, whereas it was cloned with the heterologous signal peptide PelB and its endogenous signal peptide for periplasmic and extracellular productions, respectively. Extracellular and periplasmic rAgaA showed greater activity than that of cytosolic rAgaA, indicating that membrane translocation of AgaA may encourage proper protein folding. Time-course hydrolysis of agarose by rAgaA was accomplished and the products were analyzed using thin layer chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption inoization-time of flight mass spectrometry, indicating that AgaA from P. vesicularis was an endo-type β-1,4 agarase that cleaved agarose into neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose as the final products.

  2. Extracellular Production of a Novel Endo-β-Agarase AgaA from Pseudomonas vesicularis MA103 that Cleaves Agarose into Neoagarotetraose and Neoagarohexaose

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pang-Hung; Wei, Chien-Han; Lu, Wen-Jung; Shen, Fen; Pan, Chorng-Liang; Lin, Hong-Ting Victor

    2015-01-01

    The gene agaA, of the isolated marine bacterium Pseudomonas vesicularis MA103, comprised 2958-bp nucleotides encoding a putative agarase AgaA of 985 amino acids, which was predicted to contain a signal peptide of 29 amino acids in the N-terminus, a catalytic domain of glycoside hydrolase 16 (GH16) family, a bacterial immunoglobulin group 2 (Big 2), and three carbohydrate binding modules 6 (CBM 6). The gene agaA was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the optimum temperatures for AgaA overexpression were 16, 20 and 24 °C. The agaA was cloned without its signal peptide for cytosolic production overexpression, whereas it was cloned with the heterologous signal peptide PelB and its endogenous signal peptide for periplasmic and extracellular productions, respectively. Extracellular and periplasmic rAgaA showed greater activity than that of cytosolic rAgaA, indicating that membrane translocation of AgaA may encourage proper protein folding. Time-course hydrolysis of agarose by rAgaA was accomplished and the products were analyzed using thin layer chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption inoization-time of flight mass spectrometry, indicating that AgaA from P. vesicularis was an endo-type β-1,4 agarase that cleaved agarose into neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose as the final products. PMID:25768342

  3. Involvement of a new enzyme, glyoxal oxidase, in extracellular H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Kersten, P.J.; Kirk, K.

    1987-05-01

    The importance of extracellular H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in lignin degradation has become increasingly apparent with the recent discovery of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-requiring ligninases produced by white-rot fungi. Here the authors describe a new H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-producing activity of Phanerochaete chrysosporium that involves extracellular oxidases able to use simple aldehyde, ..cap alpha..-hydroxycarbonyl, or..cap alpha..-dicarbonyl compounds as substrates. The activity is expressed during secondary metabolism, when the ligninases are also expressed. Analytical isoelectric focusing of the extracellular proteins, followed by activity staining, indicated that minor proteins with broad substrate specificities are responsible for the oxidase activity. Two of the oxidase substrates, glyoxal and methylglyoxal, were also identified, as their quinoxaline derivatives, in the culture fluid as secondary metabolites. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to lignin degradation and other proposed systems for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production in P. chrysosporium.

  4. Quorum sensing in marine snow and its possible influence on production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes in marine snow bacterium Pantoea ananatis B9.

    PubMed

    Jatt, Abdul Nabi; Tang, Kaihao; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Zenghu; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Marine snow is a continuous shower of organic and inorganic detritus, and plays a crucial role in transporting materials from the sea surface to the deep ocean. The aims of the current study were to identify N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) signaling molecules directly from marine snow particles and to investigate the possible regulatory link between QS signals and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes produced by marine snow bacteria. The marine snow samples were collected from the surface water of China marginal seas. Two AHLs, i.e. 3OC6-HSL and C8-HSL, were identified directly from marine snow particles, while six different AHL signals, i.e. C4-HSL, 3OC6-HSL, C6-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL and C14-HSL were produced by Pantoea ananatis B9 inhabiting natural marine snow particles. Of the extracellular hydrolytic enzymes produced by P. ananatis B9, alkaline phosphatase activity was highly enhanced in growth medium supplemented with exogenous AHL (C10-HSL), while quorum quenching enzyme (AiiA) drastically reduced the enzyme activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report revealing six different AHL signals produced by P. ananatis B9 and AHL-based QS system enhanced the extracellular hydrolytic enzyme in P. ananatis B9. Furthermore, this study first time revealing 3OC6-HSL production by Paracoccus carotinifaciens affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria.

  5. Influence of Extracellular Cellulose and Colanic Acid Production on the Survival of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli on Spinach and Lettuce after Chlorine Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Ching; Chen, Jinru; Frank, Joseph F

    2016-04-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains produce extracellular cellulose and colanic acid, which may influence stress tolerance. This study investigates the role of these extracellular polymers on the tolerance of STEC to chlorine treatment after attachment to lettuce and spinach. Four STEC strains, two wild-type cellulose-producing and their cellulose-deficient derivatives, were used. One strain pair produced colanic acid in addition to cellulose. Spinach and lettuce with attached cells were treated with chlorinated water (50 and 150 ppm of free chlorine). The production of the extracellular polymers by the planktonic cells had small, but significant, effects on the survival of the attached pathogen when subjected to chlorine treatment. On the lettuce surface, the colanic acid-producing, cellulose-negative mutant (49d) was most susceptible to the treatment, declining significantly (P < 0.05) in population by 0.9 and 1.4 log units after treatment with 50 and 150 ppm of chlorine, respectively. Chlorine treatment reduced populations of cellulose-deficient cells on the intact spinach surface 1.2 log units more than the wild type when treated with 150 ppm of chlorine (P < 0.05). However, populations of cellulose-producing cells were reduced by 1.5 log units more than their mutant counterparts when the cells also produced colanic acid (P < 0.05). A greater proportion of cells attached to the spinach leaf edge were injured by chlorine treatment compared with attached to the leaf surface. These results indicate that extracellular polymers do not generally increase the ability of STEC to survive chlorine treatment and that any effects on survival are influenced by location of attachment, type of leafy green, and concentration of chlorine.

  6. Influences of two antibiotic contaminants on the production, release and toxicity of microcystins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Guan, Yuntao; Wang, Yan; Huang, Lihui

    2012-03-01

    The influences of spiramycin and amoxicillin on the algal growth, production and release of target microcystins (MCs), MC-LR, MC-RR and MC-YR, in Microcystis aeruginosa were investigated through the seven-day exposure test. Spiramycin were more toxic to M. aeruginosa than amoxicillin according to their 50 percent effective concentrations (EC(50)) in algal growth, which were 1.15 and 8.03 μg/l, respectively. At environmentally relevant concentrations of 100 ng/l-1 μg/l, spiramycin reduced the total MC content per algal cell and inhibited the algal growth, while exposure to amoxicillin led to increases in the total MC content per algal cell and the percentage of extracellular MCs, without affecting the algal growth. Toxicity of MCs in combination with each antibiotic was assessed in the luminescent bacteria test using the toxic unit (TU) approach. The 50 percent effective concentrations for the mixtures (EC(50mix)) were 0.56 TU and 0.48 TU for MCs in combination with spiramycin and amoxicillin, respectively, indicating a synergistic interaction between MCs and each antibiotic (EC(50mix)<1TU). After seven-day exposure to 100 ng/l-1 μg/l of antibiotics, spiramycin-treated algal media and amoxicillin-treated algal media showed significantly lower (p<0.05) and higher (p<0.05) inhibition on the luminescence of Photobacterium phosphoreum, respectively, compared with the untreated algal medium. These results indicated that the toxicity of MCs were alleviated by spiramycin and enhanced by amoxicillin, and the latter effect would increase threats to the aquatic environment.

  7. Effects of solar ultraviolet radiation on tropical algal communities

    SciTech Connect

    Santas, R.

    1989-01-01

    This study assessed some of the effects of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation ion coral reef algal assemblages. The first part of the investigation was carried out under controlled laboratory conditions in the coral reef microcosm at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., while a field counterpart was completed at the Smithsonian Institution's marine station on Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands, in the eastern Caribbean. The study attempted to separate the effects of UV-A from those of UV-B. In the laboratory, algal turf assemblages exposed to simulated solar UV radiation produced 55.1% less biomass than assemblages that were not exposed to UV. Assemblages not exposed to UV were dominated by Ectocarpus rhodochondroides, whereas in the assemblage developing under high UV radiation, Enteromorpha prolifera and eventually Schizothrix calcicola dominated. Lower UV-B irradiances caused a proportional reduction in biomass production and had less pronounced effects on species composition. UV-A did not have any significant effects on either algal turf productivity or community structure. In the field, assemblages exposed to naturally occurring solar UV supported a biomass 40% lower than that of assemblages protected from UV-B exposure. Once again, UV-A did not inhibit algal turf productivity.

  8. High level extracellular production of a recombinant alkaline catalase in E. coli BL21 under ethanol stress and its application in hydrogen peroxide removal after cotton fabrics bleaching.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenxiao; Zheng, Hongchen; Zhao, Xingya; Li, Shufang; Xu, Jianyong; Song, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The effects of induction parameters, osmolytes and ethanol stress on the productivity of the recombinant alkaline catalase (KatA) in Escherichia coli BL21 (pET26b-KatA) were investigated. The yield of soluble KatA was significantly enhanced by 2% ethanol stress. And a certain amount of Triton X-100 supplementation could markedly improved extracellular ratio of KatA. A total soluble catalase activity of 78,762U/mL with the extracellular ratio of 92.5% was achieved by fed-batch fermentation in a 10L fermentor, which was the highest yield so far. The purified KatA showed high stability at 50°C and pH 6-10. Application of KatA for elimination of H2O2 after cotton fabrics bleaching led to less consumption of water, steam and electric power by 25%, 12% and 16.7% respectively without productivity and quality losing of cotton fabrics. Thus, the recombinant KatA is a promising candidate for industrial production and applications.

  9. Microbial short-chain fatty acid production and extracellular enzymes activities during in vitro fermentation of polysaccharides from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. treated with microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie-Lun; Nie, Shao-Ping; Li, Chang; Fu, Zhi-Hong; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2013-06-26

    Effects of microwave irradiation on microbial short-chain fatty acid production and the activites of extracellular enzymes during in vitro fermentation of the polysaccharide from Plantago asiatica L. were investigated in this study. It was found that the apparent viscosity, average molecular weight, and particle size of the polysaccharide decreased after microwave irradiation. Reducing sugar amount increased with molecular weight decrease, suggesting the degradation may derive from glycosidic bond rupture. The polysaccharide surface topography was changed from large flakelike structure to smaller chips. FT-IR showed that microwave irradiation did not alter the primary functional groups in the polysaccharide. However, short-chain fatty acid productions of the polysaccharide during in vitro fermentation significantly increased after microwave irradiation. Activities of microbial extracellular enzymes xylanase, arabinofuranosidase, xylosidase, and glucuronidase in fermentation cultures supplemented with microwave irradiation treated polysaccharide were also generally higher than those of untreated polysaccharide. This showed that microwave irradiation could be a promising degradation method for the production of value-added polysaccharides.

  10. Algal Pretreatment Improves Biofuels Yield and Value; Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-15

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. This research has been highlighted in the Green Chemistry journal article mentioned above and a milestone report, and is based on the work the researchers are doing for the AOP projects Algal Biomass Conversion and Algal Biofuels Techno-economic Analysis. That work has demonstrated an advanced process for algal biofuel production that captures the value of both the algal lipids and carbohydrates for conversion to biofuels.  With this process, as much as 150 GGE/ton of biomass can be produced, 2-3X more than can be produced by terrestrial feedstocks.  This can also reduce the cost of biofuel production by as much as 40%. This also represents the first ever design case for the algal lipid upgrading pathway.

  11. pigB determines a diffusible factor needed for extracellular polysaccharide slime and xanthomonadin production in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed Central

    Poplawsky, A R; Chun, W

    1997-01-01

    Seven xanthomonadin transcriptional units (pigA through pigG) were identified by transposon saturation mutagenesis within an 18.6-kbp portion of the previously identified 25.4-kbp pig region from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (strain B-24). Since marker exchange mutant strains with insertions in one 3.7-kbp portion of pig could not be obtained, mutations in this region may be lethal to the bacterium. Complementation analyses with different insertion mutations further defined and confirmed the seven transcriptional units. Insertional inactivation of one of the transcriptional units, pigB, resulted in greatly reduced levels of both xanthomonadins and extracellular polysaccharide slime, and a pigB-encoding plasmid restored both traits to these strains. pigB mutant strains could also be restored extracellularly by growth adjacent to strains with insertion mutations in any of the other six xanthomonadin transcriptional units, the parent strain (B-24), or strains of five different species of Xanthomonas. Strain B-24 produced a nontransforming diffusible factor (DF), which could be restored to pigB mutants by the pigB-encoding plasmid. Several lines of evidence indicate that DF is a novel bacterial pheromone, different from the known signal molecules of Vibrio, Agrobacterium, Erwinia, Pseudomonas, and Burkholderia spp. PMID:8990296

  12. Algal blooms and public health

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, P.R. . Harvard Medical School)

    1993-06-01

    Alterations in coastal ecology are expanding the geographic extent, frequency, magnitude, and species complexity'' of algal blooms throughout the world, increasing the threat of fish and shellfish poisonings, anoxia in marine nurseries, and of cholera. The World Health Organization and members of the medical profession have described the potential health effects of global climate change. They warn of the consequences of increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) rays and of warming: the possible damage to agriculture and nutrition, and the impact on habitats which may alter the distribution of vector-borne and water-based infectious diseases. Algal growth due to increased nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and warming are already affecting marine microflora and aquatic plants; and there is now clear evidence that marine organisms are a reservoir for enteric pathogens. The pattern of cholera in the Western Hemisphere suggests that environmental changes have already begun to influence the epidemiology of this infectious disease. 106 refs.

  13. Algal Biofuels Factsheet: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-04

    Algal biofuels are generating considerable interest around the world. In the United States, they represent promising pathways for helping to meet the biofuel production targets set by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  14. Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

    DOE PAGES

    Unkefer, Clifford Jay; Sayre, Richard Thomas; Magnuson, Jon K.; ...

    2016-06-21

    In 2010,when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortium began, little was known about the molecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very few algal genome sequences were available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played by metabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass and oilmore » yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. Our review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.« less

  15. Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, Clifford Jay; Sayre, Richard Thomas; Magnuson, Jon K.; Anderson, Daniel B.; Baxter, Ivan; Blaby, Ian K.; Brown, Judith K.; Carleton, Michael; Cattolico, Rose Ann; Dale, Taraka T.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Downes, C. Meghan; Dutcher, Susan K.; Fox, David Thomas; Goodenough, Ursula; Jaworski, Jan; Holladay, Jonathan E.; Kramer, David M.; Koppisch, Andrew Thomas; Lipton, Mary S.; Marrone, Babetta Louise; McCormick, Margaret; Molnar, Istvan; Mott, John Blaine; Ogden, Kimberly L.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Polle, Juergen; Richardson, James W.; Sabarsky, Martin; Starkenburg, Shawn Robert; Stormo, Gary D.; Teshima, Munehiro; Twary, Scott Nicholas; Unkefer, Pat J.; Yuan, Joshua S.; Olivares, Jose Antonio

    2016-06-21

    In 2010,when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortium began, little was known about the molecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very few algal genome sequences were available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played by metabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass and oil yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. Our review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.

  16. Mechanism of Algal Aggregation by Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting. PMID:24771029

  17. Mechanism of algal aggregation by Bacillus sp. strain RP1137.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ryan J; Hill, Russell T

    2014-07-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting.

  18. A simple strategy for extracellular production of CotA laccase in Escherichia coli and decolorization of simulated textile effluent by recombinant laccase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Nyu; Zhao, Min

    2017-01-01

    Laccases are green oxidases with a number of potential industrial applications. In this study, recombinant Bacillus subtilis CotA laccase was secreted by Escherichia coli via both the α-hemolysin secretion system and the YebF secretion system after microaerobic induction. Meanwhile, we discovered a much simpler approach for extracellular production of recombinant CotA laccase from E. coli, involving alternation of induction conditions to release recombinant CotA following intracellular expression. By optimizing the induction parameters, the extracellular yield of recombinant CotA laccase was improved from 157.4 to 2401.3 U/L after 24 h of induction. This strategy could be suitable for large-scale production of CotA laccase for industrial use. Recombinant CotA laccase was purified by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography in a single step and showed similar biochemical properties to wild-type laccase. Purified as well as crude recombinant CotA laccase efficiently decolorized seven structurally different dyes. The decolorization capability of recombinant CotA laccase under harsh conditions was investigated by incubation of the enzyme with a simulated textile effluent (STE) with pH 11.6, 3.5 % salinity and peak absorbance of 10.42. Recombinant CotA laccase efficiently decolorized 77.0 % of STE after 48 h reaction, demonstrating the potential of this enzyme for industrial dye effluent treatment.

  19. Enhanced production of functional extracellular single chain variable fragment against HIV-1 matrix protein from Escherichia coli by sequential simplex optimization.

    PubMed

    Intachai, Kannaporn; Singboottra, Panthong; Leksawasdi, Noppol; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Butr-Indr, Bordin

    2015-01-01

    The optimal culture condition for extracellular recombinant single chain variable fragment anti HIV-1 p17 protein (scFv anti-p17) production in Escherichia coli HB2151 was investigated by the sequential simplex optimization (SS) method. Five variable parameters were submitted in the fermentation process. The most favorable condition obtained from 19 independent experiments was as followed: 58 µM of IPTG induction to 1.7 OD600 nm at 25.5°C for 16 h with 202 rpm agitation rate. The amount of secreted scFv anti-p17 at the optimal condition was 38% higher than under the control condition. The binding activity of soluble extracellular scFv anti-p17 protein increased 95.5% and 73.2% in comparison with the control condition and non-optimized condition respectively. The soluble scFv anti-p17 from crude HB2151 lysated was subsequently purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) with His-tag. The purified scFv anti-p17 was intact and retained its antigen-binding affinity against HIV-1 p17. We demonstrated that the sequential simplex optimization method was a key for exertion of high yield with fewer experimental requirements for acquiring of large scale secretory protein production.

  20. Identification of naturally isolated southern Louisiana's algal strains and the effect of higher Co2 content on fatty acid profiles for biodiesel production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four naturally isolated microalgae were evaluated for their potential use in the production of biodiesel, and were identified using genomic DNA, and 16S or 18S rRNA gene amplification followed by sequencing. High correlation was found with known nucleotide sequence identities at 98 % with Sellaphora...

  1. Shallow Algal Mass Culture Systems for the Production of Oils: Final Report on Work Carried Out 8/16/84 - 6/15/85

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project was to improve the technology of outdoor mass culture of microa1gae for oil production by investigation of species/strains, optimization of culture conditions and development of strategies that increase efficiency and improve yield.

  2. Tubular photobioreactor design for algal cultures.

    PubMed

    Molina, E; Fernández, J; Acién, F G; Chisti, Y

    2001-12-28

    Principles of fluid mechanics, gas-liquid mass transfer, and irradiance controlled algal growth are integrated into a method for designing tubular photobioreactors in which the culture is circulated by an airlift pump. A 0.2 m(3) photobioreactor designed using the proposed approach was proved in continuous outdoor culture of the microalga Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The culture performance was assessed under various conditions of irradiance, dilution rates and liquid velocities through the tubular solar collector. A biomass productivity of 1.90 g l(-1) d(-1) (or 32 g m(-2) d(-1)) could be obtained at a dilution rate of 0.04 h(-1). Photoinhibition was observed during hours of peak irradiance; the photosynthetic activity of the cells recovered a few hours later. Linear liquid velocities of 0.50 and 0.35 m s(-1) in the solar collector gave similar biomass productivities, but the culture collapsed at lower velocities. The effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on productivity was quantified in indoor conditions; dissolved oxygen levels higher or lower than air saturation values reduced productivity. Under outdoor conditions, for given levels of oxygen supersaturation, the productivity decline was greater outdoors than indoors, suggesting that under intense outdoor illumination photooxidation contributed to loss of productivity in comparison with productivity loss due to oxygen inhibition alone. Dissolved oxygen values at the outlet of solar collector tube were up to 400% of air saturation.

  3. Yearlong evaluation of performance and durability of a pilot-scale Revolving Algal Biofilm (RAB) cultivation system.

    PubMed

    Gross, Martin; Wen, Zhiyou

    2014-11-01

    Current algal cultivation has been mainly performed in open ponds or photobioreactors in which algal cells are suspended and harvested through flocculation and centrifugation. A unique attachment based Revolving Algal Biofilm (RAB) cultivation system was recently developed for easy biomass harvest with enhanced biomass productivity. The objective of this research was to evaluate the performance (durability, algal growth, and the geometry) of the RAB system at pilot-scale. A yearlong test of the RAB system was successfully conducted at a greenhouse facility at Boone, Iowa, USA. The RAB resulted in an average of 302% increase in biomass productivity compared to a standard raceway pond, with a maximum biomass productivity (ash free) of 18.9 g/m(2)-day being achieved. The RAB with a vertical configuration generated higher productivity than the triangular RAB. Collectively, the research shows that the RAB as an efficient algal culture system has great potential for being deployed at commercial scale.

  4. Harmful algal toxins of the Florida red tide (Karenia brevis): natural chemical stressors in South Florida coastal ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Henry, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    The Florida red tide is a descriptive name for high concentrations of the harmful marine alga, Karenia brevis. Although most prevalent along the south-west Florida coast, periodic blooms have occurred throughout the entire US and Mexico Gulf coasts and the Atlantic coast to North Carolina. This dinoflagellate produces a suite of polyether neurotoxins, called brevetoxins, that cause severe impacts to natural resources, as well as public health. These naturally produced biotoxins may represent one of the most common chemical stressors impacting South Florida coastal and marine ecosystems. Impacts include massive fish kills, marine mammal, sea turtle and sea bird mortalities, benthic community die-off and public health effects from shellfish contamination and inhalation of air-borne toxins. The primary mode of action is binding to voltage-gated sodium channels causing depolarization of nerve cells, thus interfering with nerve transmission. Other effects include immune depression, bronchial constriction and haemolysis. Parent algal toxins are synthesized within the unicellular organism, others are produced as metabolic products. Recent studies into the composition of brevetoxins in cells, water, air and organisms have shown PbTx-2 to be the primary intracellular brevetoxin that is converted over time to PbTx-3 when the cells are ruptured, releasing extracellular brevetoxins into the environment. Brevetoxins become aerosolized by bubble-mediated transport of extracellular toxins, the composition of which varies depending on the composition in the source water. Bivalved molluscs rapidly accumulate brevetoxins as they filter feed on K. brevis cells. However, the parent algal toxins are rapidly metabolized to other compounds, some of which are responsible for neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). These results provide new insight into the distribution, persistence and impacts of red tide toxins to south-west Florida ecosystems. PMID:18758951

  5. Mechanical algal disruption for efficient biodiesel extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, Joel David

    sensitivity to the viscosity of the interior fluid than the average areal strain. Overall, the dissertation lays the groundwork for more efficient algal disruption through the judicious use of microbubbles. Separation of bubble generation and bubble growth provides the ability to improve the efficiency of each process and localize energy. Results suggest that effective disruption can occur by pulsing high-pressure ultrasound waves to a solution of cells co-suspended with microbubbles. The models are thought to represent basic phenomenological mechanisms of disruption that could be exploited to improve the overall energy efficiency of schemes. Analysis suggests that extensional flow alone cannot be the cause of cell disruption near an expanding microbubble. Additionally, this work provides an estimate of the areal strain required disrupt an algal cell membrane. This research suggests a couple routes toward reducing the energy required for production of algal biodiesel.

  6. Harmful Algal Blooms and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Grattan, Lynn M.; Holobaugh, Sailor; Morris, J. Glenn

    2015-01-01

    The five most commonly recognized Harmful Algal Bloom related illnesses include Ciguatera poisoning, Paralytic Shellfish poisoning, Neurotoxin Shellfish poisoning, Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning and Amnesic Shellfish poisoning. Although they are each the product of different toxins, toxin assemblages or HAB precursors these clinical syndromes have much in common. Exposure occurs through the consumption of fish or shellfish; routine clinical tests are not available for diagnosis; there is no known antidote for exposure; and the risk of these illnesses can negatively impact local fishing and tourism industries. Thus, illness prevention is of paramount importance to minimize human and public health risks. To accomplish this, close communication and collaboration is needed among HAB scientists, public health researchers and local, state and tribal health departments at academic, community outreach, and policy levels. PMID:27616971

  7. Harmful Algal Blooms and Public Health.

    PubMed

    Grattan, Lynn M; Holobaugh, Sailor; Morris, J Glenn

    2016-07-01

    The five most commonly recognized Harmful Algal Bloom related illnesses include Ciguatera poisoning, Paralytic Shellfish poisoning, Neurotoxin Shellfish poisoning, Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning and Amnesic Shellfish poisoning. Although they are each the product of different toxins, toxin assemblages or HAB precursors these clinical syndromes have much in common. Exposure occurs through the consumption of fish or shellfish; routine clinical tests are not available for diagnosis; there is no known antidote for exposure; and the risk of these illnesses can negatively impact local fishing and tourism industries. Thus, illness prevention is of paramount importance to minimize human and public health risks. To accomplish this, close communication and collaboration is needed among HAB scientists, public health researchers and local, state and tribal health departments at academic, community outreach, and policy levels.

  8. Methods for removing contaminants from algal oil

    SciTech Connect

    Lupton, Francis Stephen

    2016-09-27

    Methods for removing contaminants from algal oil are provided. In an embodiment, a method comprises the steps of combining a sulfuric acid-aqueous solution that has a pH of about 1 or less with a contaminant-containing algal oil at treatment conditions effective to form an effluent. The effluent comprises a treated algal oil phase and contaminants in an acidic aqueous phase. The contaminants comprise metals, phosphorus, or combinations thereof. The acidic aqueous phase is removed from the effluent to form a contaminant-depleted algal oil.

  9. Growth and fatty acid characterization of microalgae isolated from municipal waste-treatment systems and the potential role of algal-associated bacteria in feedstock production

    PubMed Central

    Stemmler, Kevin; Massimi, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Much research has focused on growing microalgae for biofuel feedstock, yet there remain concerns about the feasibility of freshwater feedstock systems. To reduce cost and improve environmental sustainability, an ideal microalgal feedstock system would be fed by municipal, agricultural or industrial wastewater as a main source of water and nutrients. Nonetheless, the microalgae must also be tolerant of fluctuating wastewater quality, while still producing adequate biomass and lipid yields. To address this problem, our study focused on isolating and characterizing microalgal strains from three municipal wastewater treatment systems (two activated sludge and one aerated-stabilization basin systems) for their potential use in biofuel feedstock production. Most of the 19 isolates from wastewater grew faster than two culture collection strains under mixotrophic conditions, particularly with glucose. The fastest growing wastewater strains included the genera Chlorella and Dictyochloris. The fastest growing microalgal strains were not necessarily the best lipid producers. Under photoautotrophic and mixotrophic growth conditions, single strains of Chlorella and Scenedesmus each produced the highest lipid yields, including those most relevant to biodiesel production. A comparison of axenic and non-axenic versions of wastewater strains showed a notable effect of commensal bacteria on fatty acid composition. Strains grown with bacteria tended to produce relatively equal proportions of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, which is an ideal lipid blend for biodiesel production. These results not only show the potential for using microalgae isolated from wastewater for growth in wastewater-fed feedstock systems, but also the important role that commensal bacteria may have in impacting the fatty acid profiles of microalgal feedstock. PMID:26989618

  10. Urban wastewater treatment by seven species of microalgae and an algal bloom: Biomass production, N and P removal kinetics and harvestability.

    PubMed

    Mennaa, Fatima Zahra; Arbib, Zouhayr; Perales, José Antonio

    2015-10-15

    This study evaluates the capacity of seven species and a Bloom of microalgae to grow in urban wastewater. Nutrient removal kinetics and biomass harvesting by means of centrifugation and coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation have been also tested. Results show that the best biomass productivities ranged from between 118 and 108 mgSS L(-1) d(-1) for the Bloom (Bl) and Scenedesmus obliquus (Sco). Regarding nutrient removal, microalgae were able to remove the total dissolved phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations by more than 80% and 87% respectively, depending on the species tested. The final total dissolved concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in the culture media complies with the European Commission Directive 98/15/CE on urban wastewater treatment. Regarding harvesting, the results of coagulation-flocculation sedimentation using a 60 mg L(-1) dose of Ferric chloride were similar between species, exceeding the biomass removal efficiency by more than 90%. The results of centrifugation (time required to remove 90% of solids at 1000 rpm) were not similar between species, with the shortest time being 2.9 min for Sco, followed by the bloom (7.25 min). An overall analysis suggested that the natural bloom and Scenedesmus obliquus seem to be the best candidates to grow in pre-treated wastewater, according to their biomass production, nutrient removal capability and harvestability.

  11. Production of Ca(2+)-Independent and Acidstable Recombinant α-Amylase of Bacillus acidicola Extracellularly and its Applicability in Generating Maltooligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Deepak; Satyanarayana, T

    2016-11-01

    The recombinant acidstable α-amylase (Ba-amy) of acidophilic bacterium Bacillus acidicola TSAS1 has been produced extracellularly using a combination of cloning (E. coli and P. pastoris) and physico-chemical treatment strategies. A total of 150,000 U/L of Ba-amy were attained under constitutive promoter in P. pastoris, which is 15-fold higher than that of the wild strain B. acidicola (10,000 U/L). The recombinant P. pastoris integrated two copies of Ba-amy under GAP promoter. The pure Ba-amy expressed in P. pastoris is a glycoprotein of 66 kDa, which is optimally active at pH 4.0 and 60 °C with a T 1/2 of 25 min at 70 °C. The K m, V max and K cat values of the recombinant Ba-amy are 1.66 mg/mL, 53.6 µmol/mg/min and 106.8/s, respectively. The enzyme generates maltose (30 %), maltotriose (20 %) and other higher maltooligosaccharides from starch, thus, useful in baking as an antistale. This is the first report on the optimization of extracellular production of recombinant acidic α-amylase of an acidophilic bacterium.

  12. Phycoremediation and biogas potential of native algal isolates from soil and wastewater.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Sanjeev Kumar; Kaushik, Prachi; Malik, Anushree; Vijay, Virendra Kumar

    2013-05-01

    The present study is a novel attempt to integrate phycoremediation and biogas production from algal biomass. Algal isolates, sp. 1 and sp. 2, obtained from wastewater and soil were evaluated for phycoremediation potential and mass production. The estimated yield was 58.4 sp. 1 and 54.75 sp. 2 tons ha(-1) y(-1). The algal isolates reduced COD by >70% and NH3-N by 100% in unsterile drain wastewater. Higher productivities of sp. 1 (1.05 g L(-1)) and sp. 2 (0.95 g L(-1)) grown in wastewater compared to that grown in nutrient media (0.89 g L(-1) for sp. 1 and 0.85 g L(-1) for sp. 2) indicate the potential of algal isolates in biogas production through low cost mass cultivation. Biogas yield of 0.401-0.487 m(3) kg(-1) VS added with 52-54.9% (v/v) methane content was obtained for algal isolates. These results indicate the possibilities of developing an integrated process for phycoremediation and biogas production using algal isolates.

  13. Algal Biomass Analysis by Laser-Based Analytical Techniques—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pořízka, Pavel; Prochazková, Petra; Prochazka, David; Sládková, Lucia; Novotný, Jan; Petrilak, Michal; Brada, Michal; Samek, Ota; Pilát, Zdeněk; Zemánek, Pavel; Adam, Vojtěch; Kizek, René; Novotný, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Algal biomass that is represented mainly by commercially grown algal strains has recently found many potential applications in various fields of interest. Its utilization has been found advantageous in the fields of bioremediation, biofuel production and the food industry. This paper reviews recent developments in the analysis of algal biomass with the main focus on the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and partly Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma techniques. The advantages of the selected laser-based analytical techniques are revealed and their fields of use are discussed in detail. PMID:25251409

  14. Developmental regulation and extracellular release of a VSG expression-site-associated gene product from Trypanosoma brucei bloodstream forms.

    PubMed

    Barnwell, Eleanor M; van Deursen, Frederick J; Jeacock, Laura; Smith, Katherine A; Maizels, Rick M; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Matthews, Keith

    2010-10-01

    Trypanosomes evade host immunity by exchanging variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coats. VSG genes are transcribed from telomeric expression sites, which contain a diverse family of expression-site-associated genes (ESAGs). We have discovered that the mRNAs for one ESAG family, ESAG9, are strongly developmentally regulated, being enriched in stumpy forms, a life-cycle stage in the mammalian bloodstream that is important for the maintenance of chronic parasite infections and for tsetse transmission. ESAG9 gene sequences are highly diverse in the genome and encode proteins with weak similarity to the massively diverse MASP proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi. We demonstrate that ESAG9 proteins are modified by N-glycosylation and can be shed to the external milieu, this being dependent upon coexpression with at least one other family member. The expression profile and extracellular release of ESAG9 proteins represents a novel and unexpected aspect of the transmission biology of trypanosomes in their mammalian host. We suggest that these molecules might interact with the external environment, with possible implications for infection chronicity or parasite transmission.

  15. Self-assembling peptide hydrogel fosters chondrocyte extracellular matrix production and cell division: Implications for cartilage tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiday, J.; Jin, M.; Kurz, B.; Hung, H.; Semino, C.; Zhang, S.; Grodzinsky, A. J.

    2002-07-01

    Emerging medical technologies for effective and lasting repair of articular cartilage include delivery of cells or cell-seeded scaffolds to a defect site to initiate de novo tissue regeneration. Biocompatible scaffolds assist in providing a template for cell distribution and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in a three-dimensional geometry. A major challenge in choosing an appropriate scaffold for cartilage repair is the identification of a material that can simultaneously stimulate high rates of cell division and high rates of cell synthesis of phenotypically specific ECM macromolecules until repair evolves into steady-state tissue maintenance. We have devised a self-assembling peptide hydrogel scaffold for cartilage repair and developed a method to encapsulate chondrocytes within the peptide hydrogel. During 4 weeks of culture in vitro, chondrocytes seeded within the peptide hydrogel retained their morphology and developed a cartilage-like ECM rich in proteoglycans and type II collagen, indicative of a stable chondrocyte phenotype. Time-dependent accumulation of this ECM was paralleled by increases in material stiffness, indicative of deposition of mechanically functional neo-tissue. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of a self-assembling peptide hydrogel as a scaffold for the synthesis and accumulation of a true cartilage-like ECM within a three-dimensional cell culture for cartilage tissue repair.

  16. Toxicity induced enhanced extracellular matrix production in osteoblastic cells cultured on single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutak, Wojtek; Park, Ki Ho; Vasilov, Anatoly; Starovoytov, Valentin; Fanchini, Giovanni; Cai, Shi-Qing; Partridge, Nicola C.; Sesti, Federico; Chhowalla, Manish

    2009-06-01

    A central effort in biomedical research concerns the development of materials for sustaining and controlling cell growth. Carbon nanotube based substrates have been shown to support the growth of different kinds of cells (Hu et al 2004 Nano Lett. 4 507-11 Kalbacova et al 2006 Phys. Status Solidi b 13 243; Zanello et al 2006 Nano Lett. 6 562-7) however the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly defined. To address the fundamental question of mechanisms by which nanotubes promote bone mitosis and histogenesis, primary calvariae osteoblastic cells were grown on single-walled carbon nanotube thin film (SWNT) substrates. Using a combination of biochemical and optical techniques we demonstrate here that SWNT networks promote cell development through two distinct steps. Initially, SWNTs are absorbed in a process that resembles endocytosis, inducing acute toxicity. Nanotube-mediated cell destruction, however, induces a release of endogenous factors that act to boost the activity of the surviving cells by stimulating the synthesis of extracellular matrix.

  17. Melanin production through novel processing of proopiomelanocortin in the extracellular compartment of the auricular skin of C57BL/6 mice after UV-irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Yamane, Tomohiro; Iguchi, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Iddamalgoda, Arunasiri; Unno, Keiko; Hoshino, Minoru; Takeda, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The production of melanin is regulated by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), which is produced from proopiomelanocortin (POMC). Keratinocytes release POMC along with lower levels of α-MSH and ACTH. To clarify the mechanism of melanogenesis after ultraviolet (UV)-irradiation, this study focused on the expression of POMC and POMC-derived peptides after UV-irradiation. Western blot analysis and immunoassays indicated that both POMC and α-MSH-like immunoreactivity (α-MSH-LI) increased after UV-irradiation. However, other POMC-derived products were very low. In hypophysectomized mice, α-MSH-LI increased to the same level as in control mice after UV-irradiation. Structural analysis revealed that the major α-MSH-LI product was ACTH(1–8). Furthermore, ACTH(1–8) competed with [125I]-α-MSH for receptor binding and increased melanin production via a melanocortin-1 receptor. These results suggested that melanin was produced through ACTH(1–8) after UV-irradiation. Trypsin-like enzymatic activity, which is responsible for POMC activation, increased after UV-irradiation and was identified as tryptase. In mast cell-deficient mice, which do not produce tryptase, α-MSH-LI levels were unchanged after UV-irradiation. The present study demonstrates the production of ACTH(1–8) from POMC by tryptase, which is a novel peptide-processing mechanism in the extracellular compartment of the skin. PMID:26417724

  18. Hydrogen sulfide potentiates interleukin-1{beta}-induced nitric oxide production via enhancement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Sun-Oh; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Oh, Gi-Su; Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Lee, Bok-Soo; Lee, Seoul; Kim, Du Yong; Rhew, Hyun Yul; Lee, Kang-Min; Chung, Hun-Taeg . E-mail: htchung@wonkwang.ac.kr

    2006-07-07

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and nitric oxide (NO) are endogenously synthesized from L-cysteine and L-arginine, respectively. They might constitute a cooperative network to regulate their effects. In this study, we investigated whether H{sub 2}S could affect NO production in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated with interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}). Although H{sub 2}S by itself showed no effect on NO production, it augmented IL-{beta}-induced NO production and this effect was associated with increased expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B. IL-1{beta} activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and this activation was also enhanced by H{sub 2}S. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by the selective inhibitor U0126 inhibited IL-1{beta}-induced NF-{kappa}B activation, iNOS expression, and NO production either in the absence or presence of H{sub 2}S. Our findings suggest that H{sub 2}S enhances NO production and iNOS expression by potentiating IL-1{beta}-induced NF-{kappa}B activation through a mechanism involving ERK1/2 signaling cascade in rat VSMCs.

  19. Irradiation by pulsed Nd:YAG laser induces the production of extracellular matrix molecules by cells of the connective tissues: a tool for tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monici, Monica; Basile, Venere; Cialdai, Francesca; Romano, Giovanni; Fusi, Franco; Conti, Antonio

    2008-04-01

    Many studies demonstrated that mechanical stress is a key factor for tissue homeostasis, while unloading induce loss of mass and impairment of function. Because of their physiological function, muscle, connective tissue, bone and cartilage dynamically interact with mechanical and gravitational stress, modifying their properties through the continuous modification of their composition. Indeed, it is known that mechanical stress increases the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) components by cells, but the mechanotransduction mechanisms and the optimal loading conditions required for an optimal tissue homeostasis are still unknown. Considering the importance of cell activation and ECM production in tissue regeneration, a proper use of mechanical stimulation could be a powerful tool in tissue repair and tissue engineering. Studies exploring advanced modalities for supplying mechanical stimuli are needed to increase our knowledge on mechanobiology and to develop effective clinical applications. Here we describe the effect of photomechanical stress, supplied by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on ECM production by cells of connective tissues. Cell morphology, production of ECM molecules (collagens, fibronectin, mucopolysaccharides), cell adhesion and cell energy metabolism have been studied by using immunofluorescence and autofluorescence microscopy. The results show that photomechanical stress induces cytoskeleton remodelling, redistribution of membrane integrins, increase in production of ECM molecules. These results could be of consequence for developing clinical protocols for the treatment of connective tissue dideases by pulsed Nd:YAG laser.

  20. Removal of Zn(II) from simulated wastewater using an algal biofilm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuixia; Hu, Zhiquan; Zuo, Jiaolan; Hu, Mian; Xiao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    An algal biofilm was employed as a novel kind of adsorbing material to remove Zn(II) from simulated wastewater. The algal biofilm system formed by Oedogonium sp. was operated in a dynamic mode for a period of 14 days with an initial Zn(II) concentration of 10 mg/L. The average effluent Zn(II) concentration was 0.247 mg/L and the average removal efficiency reached 97.7%. The effects of Zn(II) on key algal physiological and biochemical indices such as chlorophyll content, nitrate reductase and superoxide dismutase activity, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), and soluble protein levels were studied. Our results showed that the algal biofilm could adapt to the simulated wastewater containing Zn(II). Scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses of algal biofilm revealed the presence of carboxyl, amino, and sulphonate groups, which were the main functional groups of EPS and proteins, and these were likely responsible for biosorption of the Zn(II) ions.

  1. Effects of ozone and peroxone on algal separation via dispersed air flotation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Truc Linh; Lee, D J; Chang, J S; Liu, J C

    2013-05-01

    Effects of pre-oxidation on algal separation by dispersed air flotation were examined. Ozone (O3) and peroxone (O3 and H2O2) could induce cell lysis, release of intracellular organic matter (IOM), and mineralization of organic substances. Separation efficiency of algal cells improved when pre-oxidized. Total of 76.4% algal cells was separated at 40 mg/L of N-cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), while 95% were separated after 30-min ozonation. Pre-oxidation by ozone and peroxone also enhanced flotation separation efficiency of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), polysaccharide, and protein, in which peroxone process exerted more significantly than O3. Two main mechanisms were involved in flotation separation of unoxidized algal suspension, namely hydrophobic cell surface and cell flocculation resulting from CTAB adsorption. However, flocculation by CTAB was hindered for pre-oxidized algal suspensions. It implied that the compositional changes in extracellular organic matter (EOM) by pre-oxidation were more determined for flotation separation of pre-oxidized cells.

  2. Effect of light intensity on algal biomass accumulation and biodiesel production for mixotrophic strains Chlorella kessleri and Chlorella protothecoide cultivated in highly concentrated municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Yecong; Zhou, Wenguang; Hu, Bing; Min, Min; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger R

    2012-09-01

    In this research, the effect of light intensity on biomass accumulation, wastewater nutrient removal through algae cultivation, and biodiesel productivity was investigated with algae species Chlorella kessleri and Chlorella protothecoide. The light intensities studied were 0, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1). The results showed that light intensity had profound impact on tested responses for both strains, and the dependence of these responses on light intensity varied with different algae strains. For C. kessleri, the optimum light intensity was 120 µmol m(-2) S(-1) for all responses except for COD removal. For C. protothecoide, the optimum light intensity was 30 µmol m(-2) S(-1). The major components of the biodiesel produced from algae biomass were 16-C and 18-C FAME, and the highest biodiesel contents were 24.19% and 19.48% of dried biomass for C. kessleri and C. protothecoide, respectively. Both species were capable of wastewater nutrients removal under all lighting conditions with high removal efficiencies.

  3. Growth Differentiation Factor-15–Induced Contractile Activity and Extracellular Matrix Production in Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Maddala, Rupalatha; Skiba, Nikolai P.; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role and regulation of growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), a TGF-β–related cytokine in human trabecular meshwork (TM) cells in the context of aqueous humor (AH) outflow and IOP. Methods Regulation of expression by external cues, and the distribution and secretion of GDF-15 by human TM primary cell cultures, and the effects of recombinant (r) GDF-15 on TM cell contractile characteristics, actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix (ECM), α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), SMAD signaling, and gene expression were determined by immunoblot, immunofluorescence, mass spectrometry, cDNA microarray, and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analyses. Results Growth differentiation factor-15, a common constituent of ECM derived from the human TM cells, was confirmed to be distributed throughout the conventional aqueous humor outflow pathway of the human eye. Growth differentiation factor-15 protein levels were significantly increased in human TM cells in response to TGF-β2, dexamethasone, endothelin-1, lysophosphatidic acid, TNF-α, IL-1β treatment, and by cyclic mechanical stretch. Stimulation of human TM cells with rGDF-15 caused a significant increase in the formation of actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, myosin light chain phosphorylation, SMAD signaling, gene expression, and the levels of αSMA and ECM proteins. Conclusions The results of this study, including a robust induction of GDF-15 expression by several external factors known to elevate IOP, and rGDF-15–induced increase in contractility, cell adhesion, and the levels of ECM proteins and αSMA in TM cells, collectively suggest a potential role for GDF-15 in homeostasis and dysregulation of AH outflow and IOP in normal and glaucomatous eyes, respectively. PMID:27918822

  4. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and endothelin-1 production in human endothelial cells exposed to vibration

    PubMed Central

    White, Charles R; Haidekker, Mark A; Stevens, Hazel Y; Frangos, John A

    2004-01-01

    Hand–arm vibration syndrome is a vascular disease of occupational origin and a form of secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. Chronic exposure to hand-held vibrating tools may cause endothelial injury. This study investigates the biomechanical forces involved in the transduction of fluid vibration in the endothelium. Human endothelial cells were exposed to direct vibration and rapid low-volume fluid oscillation. Rapid low-volume fluid oscillation was used to simulate the effects of vibration by generating defined temporal gradients in fluid shear stress across an endothelial monolayer. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and endothelin-1 (ET-1) release were monitored as specific biochemical markers for temporal gradients and endothelial response, respectively. Both vibrational methods were found to phosphorylate ERK1/2 in a similar pattern. At a fixed frequency of fluid oscillation where the duration of each pulse cycle remained constant, ERK1/2 phosphorylation increased with the increasing magnitude of the applied temporal gradient. However, when the frequency of flow oscillation was increased (thus decreasing the duration of each pulse cycle), ERK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated across all temporal gradient flow profiles. Fluid oscillation significantly stimulated ET-1 release compared to steady flow, and endothelin-1 was also attenuated with the increase in oscillation frequency. Taken together, these results show that both the absolute magnitude of the temporal gradient and the frequency/duration of each pulse cycle play a role in the biomechanical transduction of fluid vibrational forces in endothelial cells. Furthermore, this study reports for the first time a link between the ERK1/2 signal transduction pathway and transmission of vibrational forces in the endothelium. PMID:14724194

  5. Isolation of insoluble secretory product from bovine thyroid: extracellular storage of thyroglobulin in covalently cross-linked form

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular storage of thyroglobulin (TG) is an important prerequisite for maintaining constant levels of thyroid hormones in vertebrates. Storage of large amounts is made possible by compactation of TG in the follicle lumen with concentrations of at least 100-400 mg/ml. We recently observed that the luminal content from bovine thyroids can be isolated in an intact state and be separated from soluble TG. For this purpose, bovine thyroid tissue was homogenized and subjected to various steps of purification. This procedure resulted in a pellet of single globules measuring 20-120 microns in diameter. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a unique cobblestone-like surface pattern of isolated globules, showing in detail the impressions of the apical plasma membranes of thyrocytes which had formerly surrounded the luminal content before tissue homogenization. Isolated thyroid globules were rapidly digested by trypsin but extremely resistant to various protein solubilization procedures. Homogenization of isolated globules resulted in the release of approximately 3% of total protein, showing that only a minor proportion of TG was loosely incorporated in thyroid globules whereas approximately 22% appeared to be interconnected with the globule matrix by disulfide bridges. Analysis by SDS-gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting confirmed that the protein released by this procedure consisted of TG. The vast majority (approximately 75%) of the globule matrix protein was found to be covalently cross- linked by non-disulfide bonds. TG in isolated globules was highly iodinated (approximately 55 iodine atoms per 12-S TG subunit) suggesting that the covalent nondisulfide cross-linking occurs in part during the iodination of TG and that this process involves the formation of intermolecular dityrosine bridges. Mechanisms must exist which solubilize or disperse the insoluble luminal content prior to endocytosis of TG. PMID:1512290

  6. Review of Water Consumption and Water Conservation Technologies in the Algal Biofuel Process.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qingshi; Lu, Mingming; Thiansathit, Worrarat; Keener, Tim C

    2016-01-01

    Although water is one of the most critical factors affecting the sustainable development of algal biofuels, it is much less studied as compared to the extensive research on algal biofuel production technologies. This paper provides a review of the recent studies on water consumption of the algae biofuel process and presents the water conservation technologies applicable at different stages of the algal biofuel process. Open ponds tend to have much higher water consumption (216 to 2000 gal/gal) than photobioreactors (25 to 72 gal/gal). Algae growth accounts for the highest water consumption (165 to 2000 gal/gal) in the open pond system. Water consumption during harvesting, oil extraction, and biofuel conversion are much less compared with the growth stage. Potential water conservation opportunities include technology innovations and better management practices at different stages of algal biofuel production.

  7. Fungicides affect the production of extracellular mucilaginous material (ECMM) and the peripheral growth unit (PGU) in two wood-rotting basidiomycetes.

    PubMed

    Vesentini, Damiano; Dickinson, David J; Murphy, Richard J

    2006-10-01

    This study shows the effect of two fungicides on the production of extracellular mucilaginous material (ECMM) in two wood-rotting basidiomycetes and identifies a mechanism that might be responsible for the variation observed. Increasing concentrations of the fungicides copper sulphate (CuSO4) and cyproconazole in the growth medium increased the proportion of ECMM in the biomass of Trametes versicolor and Gloeophyllum trabeum. These fungicides also caused a reduction in the length of the peripheral growth unit (PGU) of the mycelia leading to a more highly branched morphology and a larger number of hyphal tips, the sites for active secretion of ECMM, per unit length of mycelium. It is postulated that both in T. versicolor and G. trabeum this change in growth leads to the increases observed in the proportion of ECMM in the total biomass. The implications of these results are discussed with a view to a potential protective role of ECMM against stress and toxic environments.

  8. Spatial variation in the effects of grazing on epilithic algal turfs on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaldo, R. M.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2011-06-01

    Of all benthic components on tropical reefs, algal turfs are the most widespread and the main source of primary productivity. We compared the importance of grazing by herbivores on algal turfs on two zones with marked differences in terms of benthic composition, herbivore biomass and grazing pressure, the inner flat and crest, of an inshore reef on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. A combination of herbivore exclusion cages and transplants of coral rubble covered by algal turfs between reef zones was used to examine changes in algal turfs over a 4-day experimental period. In situ crest turfs had lower algal height, sediment loads and particulate content than reef flat turfs. Caged samples on the crest exhibited an increase in all three variables. In contrast, in situ and caged treatments on the flat presented algal turfs with similar values for the three analysed variables, with high algal height and heavy particulate and sediment loads. In the absence of cages, reef flat turfs transplanted to the crest had decreased algal height, total particulate material and particulate inorganic content, while the opposite was found in crest turf samples transplanted to the flat. Our results highlight the dynamic nature of algal turfs and the clear differences in the relative importance of herbivory in shaping turf length and sediment load between the reef crest and inner flat.

  9. The role of light availability and herbivory on algal responses to nutrient enrichment in a riparian wetland, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Rober, Allison R; Stevenson, R Jan; Wyatt, Kevin H

    2015-06-01

    We investigated how the relative availability of solar radiation in the presence or absence of grazing alters the ability of benthic algae to respond to nutrient enrichment in an Alaskan marsh. We used a factorial mesocosm experiment that included nutrient enrichment (enriched or control), grazing (grazed or ungrazed), and light (unshaded or shaded) to simulate shading by macrophytes early and late in the growing season, respectively. We found stronger effects of grazers and nutrients compared to light on benthic algal biomass and taxonomic composition. Algal biomass increased in nutrient-enriched treatments and was reduced by grazing. Shading did not have an effect on algal biomass or taxonomic composition, but the concentration of chl a per algal biovolume increased with shading, demonstrating the ability of algae to compensate for changes in light availability. Algal taxonomic composition was more affected by grazer presence than nutrients or light. Grazer-resistant taxa (basal filaments of Stigeoclonium) were replaced by diatoms (Nitzschia) and filamentous green algae (Ulothrix) when herbivores were removed. The interacting and opposing influences of nutrients and grazing indicate that the algal community is under dual control from the bottom-up (nutrient limitation) and from the top-down (consumption by herbivores), although grazers had a stronger influence on algal biomass and taxonomic composition than nutrient enrichment. Our results suggest that low light availability will not inhibit the algal response to elevated nutrient concentrations expected with ongoing climate change, but grazers rapidly consume algae following enrichment, masking the effects of elevated nutrients on algal production.

  10. The extended Kalman filter for forecast of algal bloom dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mao, J Q; Lee, Joseph H W; Choi, K W

    2009-09-01

    A deterministic ecosystem model is combined with an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to produce short term forecasts of algal bloom and dissolved oxygen dynamics in a marine fish culture zone (FCZ). The weakly flushed FCZ is modelled as a well-mixed system; the tidal exchange with the outer bay is lumped into a flushing rate that is numerically determined from a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The ecosystem model incorporates phytoplankton growth kinetics, nutrient uptake, photosynthetic production, nutrient sources from organic fish farm loads, and nutrient exchange with a sediment bed layer. High frequency field observations of chlorophyll, dissolved oxygen (DO) and hydro-meteorological parameters (sampling interval Deltat=1 day, 2h, 1h, respectively) and bi-weekly nutrient data are assimilated into the model to produce the combined state estimate accounting for the uncertainties. In addition to the water quality state variables, the EKF incorporates dynamic estimation of algal growth rate and settling velocity. The effectiveness of the EKF data assimilation is studied for a wide range of sampling intervals and prediction lead-times. The chlorophyll and dissolved oxygen estimated by the EKF are compared with field data of seven algal bloom events observed at Lamma Island, Hong Kong. The results show that the EKF estimate well captures the nonlinear error evolution in time; the chlorophyll level can be satisfactorily predicted by the filtered model estimate with a mean absolute error of around 1-2 microg/L. Predictions with 1-2 day lead-time are highly correlated with the observations (r=0.7-0.9); the correlation stays at a high level for a lead-time of 3 days (r=0.6-0.7). Estimated algal growth and settling rates are in accord with field observations; the more frequent DO data can compensate for less frequent algal biomass measurements. The present study is the first time the EKF is successfully applied to forecast an entire algal bloom cycle, suggesting the

  11. Production of Extracellular Traps against Aspergillus fumigatus In Vitro and in Infected Lung Tissue Is Dependent on Invading Neutrophils and Influenced by Hydrophobin RodA

    PubMed Central

    Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Nietzsche, Sandor; Thywißen, Andreas; Jeron, Andreas; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Brakhage, Axel A.; Gunzer, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important airborne fungal pathogen causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. Macrophages and neutrophils are known to kill conidia, whereas hyphae are killed mainly by neutrophils. Since hyphae are too large to be engulfed, neutrophils possess an array of extracellular killing mechanisms including the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of nuclear DNA decorated with fungicidal proteins. However, until now NET formation in response to A. fumigatus has only been demonstrated in vitro, the importance of neutrophils for their production in vivo is unclear and the molecular mechanisms of the fungus to defend against NET formation are unknown. Here, we show that human neutrophils produce NETs in vitro when encountering A. fumigatus. In time-lapse movies NET production was a highly dynamic process which, however, was only exhibited by a sub-population of cells. NETosis was maximal against hyphae, but reduced against resting and swollen conidia. In a newly developed mouse model we could then demonstrate the existence and measure the kinetics of NET formation in vivo by 2-photon microscopy of Aspergillus-infected lungs. We also observed the enormous dynamics of neutrophils within the lung and their ability to interact with and phagocytose fungal elements in situ. Furthermore, systemic neutrophil depletion in mice almost completely inhibited NET formation in lungs, thus directly linking the immigration of neutrophils with NET formation in vivo. By using fungal mutants and purified proteins we demonstrate that hydrophobin RodA, a surface protein making conidia immunologically inert, led to reduced NET formation of neutrophils encountering Aspergillus fungal elements. NET-dependent killing of Aspergillus-hyphae could be demonstrated at later time-points, but was only moderate. Thus, these data establish that NET formation occurs in vivo during host defence against A. fumigatus, but suggest

  12. Improving production of extracellular proteases by random mutagenesis and biochemical characterization of a serine protease in Bacillus subtilis S1-4.

    PubMed

    Wang, X C; Zhao, H Y; Liu, G; Cheng, X J; Feng, H

    2016-06-17

    The feather is a valuable by-product with a huge annual yield produced by the poultry industry. Degradation of feathers by microorganisms is a prerequisite to utilize this insoluble protein resource. To improve the degrading efficiency of feathers, mutagenesis of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis S1-4 was performed. By combining ultraviolet irradiation and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine treatment for mutagenesis, a high protease-producing mutant (UMU4) of B. subtilis S1-4 was selected, which exhibited 2.5-fold higher extracellular caseinolytic activity than did the wild-type strain. UMU4 degraded chicken feathers more efficiently, particularly for the release of soluble proteins from the feathers, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, an extracellular protease with a molecular weight of 45 kDa, as determined by SDS-PAGE, was purified from UMU4. Biochemical characterization indicated that the caseinolytic activity of the protease was largely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, suggesting that the purified enzyme is a serine protease. This protease was highly active over a wide range of pHs (6.0 to 12.0) and temperatures (50° to 75°C) with an optimal pH and temperature of 8.0 and 65°C, respectively. The purified enzyme exhibited good thermostability with a 72.2 min half-life of thermal denaturation at 60°C. In addition, this protease was not sensitive to heavy metal ions, surfactants, or oxidative reagents. In conclusion, strain improvement for protease production can serve as an alternative strategy to promote feather degradation. The UMU4 mutant of B. subtilis and its serine protease could be potentially used in various industries.

  13. Production of extracellular traps against Aspergillus fumigatus in vitro and in infected lung tissue is dependent on invading neutrophils and influenced by hydrophobin RodA.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Sandra; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Hasenberg, Mike; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Nietzsche, Sandor; Thywissen, Andreas; Jeron, Andreas; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Brakhage, Axel A; Gunzer, Matthias

    2010-04-29

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important airborne fungal pathogen causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. Macrophages and neutrophils are known to kill conidia, whereas hyphae are killed mainly by neutrophils. Since hyphae are too large to be engulfed, neutrophils possess an array of extracellular killing mechanisms including the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of nuclear DNA decorated with fungicidal proteins. However, until now NET formation in response to A. fumigatus has only been demonstrated in vitro, the importance of neutrophils for their production in vivo is unclear and the molecular mechanisms of the fungus to defend against NET formation are unknown. Here, we show that human neutrophils produce NETs in vitro when encountering A. fumigatus. In time-lapse movies NET production was a highly dynamic process which, however, was only exhibited by a sub-population of cells. NETosis was maximal against hyphae, but reduced against resting and swollen conidia. In a newly developed mouse model we could then demonstrate the existence and measure the kinetics of NET formation in vivo by 2-photon microscopy of Aspergillus-infected lungs. We also observed the enormous dynamics of neutrophils within the lung and their ability to interact with and phagocytose fungal elements in situ. Furthermore, systemic neutrophil depletion in mice almost completely inhibited NET formation in lungs, thus directly linking the immigration of neutrophils with NET formation in vivo. By using fungal mutants and purified proteins we demonstrate that hydrophobin RodA, a surface protein making conidia immunologically inert, led to reduced NET formation of neutrophils encountering Aspergillus fungal elements. NET-dependent killing of Aspergillus-hyphae could be demonstrated at later time-points, but was only moderate. Thus, these data establish that NET formation occurs in vivo during host defence against A. fumigatus, but suggest

  14. Export of algal biomass from the melting Arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Boetius, Antje; Albrecht, Sebastian; Bakker, Karel; Bienhold, Christina; Felden, Janine; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Hendricks, Stefan; Katlein, Christian; Lalande, Catherine; Krumpen, Thomas; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Rabe, Benjamin; Rogacheva, Antonina; Rybakova, Elena; Somavilla, Raquel; Wenzhöfer, Frank

    2013-03-22

    In the Arctic, under-ice primary production is limited to summer months and is restricted not only by ice thickness and snow cover but also by the stratification of the water column, which constrains nutrient supply for algal growth. Research Vessel Polarstern visited the ice-covered eastern-central basins between 82° to 89°N and 30° to 130°E in summer 2012, when Arctic sea ice declined to a record minimum. During this cruise, we observed a widespread deposition of ice algal biomass of on average 9 grams of carbon per square meter to the deep-sea floor of the central Arctic basins. Data from this cruise will contribute to assessing the effect of current climate change on Arctic productivity, biodiversity, and ecological function.

  15. Algal polycultures enhance coproduct recycling from hydrothermal liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Casey M; Hietala, David C; Lashaway, Aubrey R; Narwani, Anita; Savage, Phillip E; Cardinale, Bradley J

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if polycultures of algae could enhance tolerance to aqueous-phase coproduct (ACP) from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of algal biomass to produce biocrude. The growth of algal monocultures and polycultures was characterized across a range ACP concentrations and sources. All of the monocultures were either killed or inhibited by 2% ACP, but polycultures of the same species were viable at up to 10%. The addition of ACP increased the growth rate (up to 25%) and biomass production (53%) of polycultures, several of which were more productive in ACP than any monoculture was in the presence or absence of ACP. These results suggest that a cultivation process that applies biodiversity to nutrient recycling could produce more algae with less fertilizer consumption.

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of Geobacter sulfurreducens KN400, a strain with enhanced capacity for extracellular electron transfer and electricity production

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A new strain of Geobacter sulfurreducens, strain KN400, produces more electrical current in microbial fuel cells and reduces insoluble Fe(III) oxides much faster than the wildtype strain, PCA. The genome of KN400 was compared to wildtype with the goal of discovering how the network for extracellular electron transfer has changed and how these two strains evolved. Results Both genomes were re-annotated, resulting in 14 fewer genes (net) in the PCA genome; 28 fewer (net) in the KN400 genome; and ca. 400 gene start and stop sites moved. 96% of genes in KN400 had clear orthologs with conserved synteny in PCA. Most of the remaining genes were in regions of genomic mobility and were strain-specific or conserved in other Geobacteraceae, indicating that the changes occurred post-divergence. There were 27,270 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) between the genomes. There was significant enrichment for SNP locations in non-coding or synonymous amino acid sites, indicating significant selective pressure since the divergence. 25% of orthologs had sequence differences, and this set was enriched in phosphorylation and ATP-dependent enzymes. Substantial sequence differences (at least 12 non-synonymous SNP/kb) were found in 3.6% of the orthologs, and this set was enriched in cytochromes and integral membrane proteins. Genes known to be involved in electron transport, those used in the metabolic cell model, and those that exhibit changes in expression during growth in microbial fuel cells were examined in detail. Conclusions The improvement in external electron transfer in the KN400 strain does not appear to be due to novel gene acquisition, but rather to changes in the common metabolic network. The increase in electron transfer rate and yield in KN400 may be due to changes in carbon flux towards oxidation pathways and to changes in ATP metabolism, both of which indicate that the overall energy state of the cell may be different. The electrically conductive pili appear

  17. Beneficial Effects of Marine Algal Compounds in Cosmeceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Noel Vinay; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    The name “cosmeceuticals” is derived from “cosmetics and pharmaceuticals”, indicating that a specific product contains active ingredients. Marine algae have gained much importance in cosmeceutical product development due to their rich bioactive compounds. In the present review, marine algal compounds (phlorotannins, sulfated polysaccharides and tyrosinase inhibitors) have been discussed toward cosmeceutical application. In addition, atopic dermatitis and the possible role of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) in skin-related diseases have been explored extensively for cosmeceutical products. The proper development of marine algae compounds will be helpful in cosmeceutical product development and in the development of the cosmeceutical industry. PMID:23344156

  18. Citrus peel influences the production of an extracellular naringinase by Staphylococcus xylosus MAK2 in a stirred tank reactor.

    PubMed

    Puri, Munish; Kaur, Aneet; Barrow, Colin J; Singh, Ram Sarup

    2011-02-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus MAK2, Gram-positive coccus, a nonpathogenic member of the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus family was isolated from soil and used to produce naringinase in a stirred tank reactor. An initial medium at pH 5.5 and a cultivation temperature of 30°C was found to be optimal for enzyme production. The addition of Ca(+)² caused stimulation of enzyme activity. The effect of various physico-chemical parameters, such as pH, temperature, agitation, and inducer concentration was studied. The enzyme production was enhanced by the addition of citrus peel powder (CPP) in the optimized medium. A twofold increase in naringinase production was achieved using different technological combinations. The process optimization using technological combinations allowed rapid optimization of large number of variables, which significantly improved enzyme production in a 5-l reactor in 34 h. An increase in sugar concentration (15 g l⁻¹) in the fermentation medium further increased naringinase production (8.9 IU ml⁻¹) in the bioreactor. Thus, availability of naringinase renders it attractive for potential biotechnological applications in citrus processing industry.

  19. Development of a rotating algal biofilm growth system for attached microalgae growth with in situ biomass harvest.

    PubMed

    Gross, Martin; Henry, Wesley; Michael, Clayton; Wen, Zhiyou

    2013-12-01

    This work aimed to develop a rotating algal biofilm (RAB) cultivation system that can be widely adopted by microalgae producers for easy biomass harvest. Algal cells were grown on the surface of a material rotating between nutrient-rich liquid and CO2-rich gaseous phase. Scrapping biomass from the attached surface avoided the expensive harvest operations such as centrifugation. Among various attachment materials, cotton sheet resulted in best algal growth, durability, and cost effectiveness. A lab-scale RAB system was further optimized with harvest frequency, rotation speed, and CO2 levels. The algal biomass from the RAB system had a similar water content as that in centrifuged biomass. An open pond raceway retrofitted with a pilot-scale RAB system resulted in a much higher biomass productivity when compared to a control open pond. Collectively, the research shows that the RAB system is an efficient algal culture system for easy biomass harvest with enhanced biomass productivity.

  20. Tris-sucrose buffer system: a new specially designed medium for extracellular invertase production by immobilized cells of isolated yeast Cryptococcus laurentii MT-61.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri; Taskin, Mesut; Canli, Ozden; Arslan, Nazli Pinar; Ortucu, Serkan

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to isolate new yeasts with high extracellular (exo) invertase activity and to investigate the usability of buffer systems as invertase production media by immobilized yeast cells. Among 70 yeast isolates, Cryptococcus laurentii MT-61 had the highest exo-invertase activity. Immobilization of yeast cells was performed using sodium alginate. Higher exo-invertase activity for immobilized cells was achieved in tris-sucrose buffer system (TSBS) compared to sodium acetate buffer system and potassium phosphate buffer system. TSBS was prepared by dissolving 30 g of sucrose in 1 L of tris buffer solution. The optimum pH, temperature, and incubation time for invertase production with immobilized cells were determined as 8.0, 35 °C and 36 h in TSBS, respectively. Under optimized conditions, maximum exo-invertase activity was found to be 28.4 U/mL in sterile and nonsterile TSBS. Immobilized cells could be reused in 14 and 12 successive cycles in sterile and nonsterile TSBS without any loss in the maximum invertase activity, respectively. This is the first report which showed that immobilized microbial cells could be used as a biocatalyst for exo-invertase production in buffer system. As an additional contribution, a new yeast strain with high invertase activity was isolated.

  1. CorA, the magnesium/nickel/cobalt transporter, affects virulence and extracellular enzyme production in the soft rot pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum.

    PubMed

    Kersey, Caleb M; Agyemang, Paul A; Dumenyo, C Korsi

    2012-01-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum (formerly Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora) is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes soft rot disease, characterized by water-soaked soft decay, resulting from the action of cell wall-degrading exoenzymes secreted by the pathogen. Virulence in soft rot bacteria is regulated by environmental factors, host and bacterial chemical signals, and a network of global and gene-specific bacterial regulators. We isolated a mini-Tn5 mutant of P. carotovorum that is reduced in the production of extracellular pectate lyase, protease, polygalacturonase and cellulase. The mutant is also decreased in virulence as it macerates less host tissues than its parent and is severely impaired in multiplication in planta. The inactivated gene responsible for the reduced virulent phenotype was identified as corA. CorA, a magnesium/nickel/cobalt membrane transporter, is the primary magnesium transporter for many bacteria. Compared with the parent, the CorA(-) mutant is cobalt resistant. The mutant phenotype was confirmed in parental strain P. carotovorum by marker exchange inactivation of corA. A functional corA(+) DNA from P. carotovorum restored exoenzyme production and pathogenicity to the mutants. The P. carotovorum corA(+) clone also restored motility and cobalt sensitivity to a CorA(-) mutant of Salmonella enterica. These data indicate that CorA is required for exoenzyme production and virulence in P. carotovorum.

  2. AepA of Pectobacterium is not involved in the regulation of extracellular plant cell wall degrading enzymes production.

    PubMed

    Kõiv, Viia; Andresen, Liis; Mäe, Andres

    2010-06-01

    Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDE) are the major virulence determinants in phytopathogenic Pectobacterium, and their production is controlled by many regulatory factors. In this study, we focus on the role of the AepA protein, which was previously described to be a global regulator of PCWDE production in Pectobacterium carotovorum (Murata et al. in Mol Plant Microbe Interact 4:239-246, 1991). Our results show that neither inactivation nor overexpression of aepA affects PCWDE production in either Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 or Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum SCC3193. The previously published observation based on the overexpression of aepA could be explained by the presence of the adjacent regulatory rsmB gene in the constructs used. Our database searches indicated that AepA belongs to the YtcJ subfamily of amidohydrolases. YtcJ-like amidohydrolases are present in bacteria, archaea, plants and some fungi. Although AepA has 28% identity with the formamide deformylase NfdA in Arthrobacter pascens F164, AepA was unable to catalyze the degradation of NdfA-specific N-substituted formamides. We conclude that AepA is a putative aminohydrolase not involved in regulation of PCWDE production.

  3. Algal Cell Factories: Approaches, Applications, and Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Weiqi; Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Khraiwesh, Basel; Nelson, David R.; Al-Khairy, Dina; Mystikou, Alexandra; Alzahmi, Amnah; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of modern biotechnology, microorganisms from diverse lineages have been used to produce bio-based feedstocks and bioactive compounds. Many of these compounds are currently commodities of interest, in a variety of markets and their utility warrants investigation into improving their production through strain development. In this review, we address the issue of strain improvement in a group of organisms with strong potential to be productive “cell factories”: the photosynthetic microalgae. Microalgae are a diverse group of phytoplankton, involving polyphyletic lineage such as green algae and diatoms that are commonly used in the industry. The photosynthetic microalgae have been under intense investigation recently for their ability to produce commercial compounds using only light, CO2, and basic nutrients. However, their strain improvement is still a relatively recent area of work that is under development. Importantly, it is only through appropriate engineering methods that we may see the full biotechnological potential of microalgae come to fruition. Thus, in this review, we address past and present endeavors towards the aim of creating productive algal cell factories and describe possible advantageous future directions for the field. PMID:27983586

  4. Algal Cell Factories: Approaches, Applications, and Potentials.

    PubMed

    Fu, Weiqi; Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Khraiwesh, Basel; Nelson, David R; Al-Khairy, Dina; Mystikou, Alexandra; Alzahmi, Amnah; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh

    2016-12-13

    With the advent of modern biotechnology, microorganisms from diverse lineages have been used to produce bio-based feedstocks and bioactive compounds. Many of these compounds are currently commodities of interest, in a variety of markets and their utility warrants investigation into improving their production through strain development. In this review, we address the issue of strain improvement in a group of organisms with strong potential to be productive "cell factories": the photosynthetic microalgae. Microalgae are a diverse group of phytoplankton, involving polyphyletic lineage such as green algae and diatoms that are commonly used in the industry. The photosynthetic microalgae have been under intense investigation recently for their ability to produce commercial compounds using only light, CO₂, and basic nutrients. However, their strain improvement is still a relatively recent area of work that is under development. Importantly, it is only through appropriate engineering methods that we may see the full biotechnological potential of microalgae come to fruition. Thus, in this review, we address past and present endeavors towards the aim of creating productive algal cell factories and describe possible advantageous future directions for the field.

  5. Expression and Characterization of the Extracellular Domain of Human HER2 from Escherichia Coli, and Production of Polyclonal Antibodies Against the Recombinant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Feng, Xue; Qu, Jiao; Han, Wenqi; Liu, Zi; Li, Xu; Zou, Ming; Zhen, Yuhong; Zhu, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. In this study, the whole extracellular domain gene of HER2 was amplified by RT-PCR from human breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3. The genes of membrane-distal region (A) and membrane proximal region (B) of HER2 extracellular domain were amplified from the cloned template, and then inserted into the expression vector pET-28a and pET-30a, respectively. The recombinant expression vectors were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and induced by isopropyl-b-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for expression of proteins His-A and His-B. The expressed proteins were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blot. The optimization of culture conditions led us to accomplish the recombinant protein induction with 1.0 mM IPTG at 37 °C for 8 h, and both proteins were expressed in the insoluble form. Both proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using Ni-NTA sepharose column. Balb/c mice were immunized with the purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by ELISA testing and had good specificity by western blot detection. The HER2 ECD proteins His-A and His-B could be expressed in E. coli and were suitable for production of high titer antibodies against HER2 ECD.

  6. Elevated expression of transforming growth factor-beta and proteoglycan production in experimental glomerulonephritis. Possible role in expansion of the mesangial extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, S; Languino, L R; Ruoslahti, E; Border, W A

    1990-01-01

    Glomerular accumulation of extracellular matrix is a prominent feature of progressive glomerulonephritis. Previously, we have shown that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is unique among growth factors in regulating the production of the proteoglycans biglycan and decorin by glomerular mesangial cells in vitro. We now provide evidence of an elevated expression of TGF-beta, proteoglycans, and fibronectin in glomerulonephritis induced in rats by injection of anti-thymocyte serum (ATS). Glomeruli were cultured from rat kidneys at 1, 4, 7, 14, and 28 d after ATS administration. Increased proteoglycan synthesis was detected beginning on day 4, which peaked at a 4,900% increase compared with control on day 7, and returned toward control levels by day 28. The increased proteoglycan synthesis by cultured nephritic glomeruli, as well as that of fibronectin, were greatly reduced by addition of antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide from TGF-beta. Conditioned media from ATS glomerular cultures, when added to normal cultured mesangial cells, induced elevated proteoglycan synthesis that also peaked on day 7 and that mimicked the response to added exogenous TGF-beta. The stimulatory activity of the conditioned media was blocked by addition of TGF-beta antiserum. Prior addition of the immunizing peptide to the antiserum abolished the blocking effect. The main induced proteoglycans were identified as biglycan and decorin by immunoprecipitation with antiserum made against synthetic peptides from the proteoglycan core proteins. Glomerular histology showed mesangial matrix expansion in a time course that roughly paralleled both the elevated proteoglycan synthesis by