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Sample records for algal nutrient limitation

  1. Nutrient limitation of algal periphyton in streams along an acid mine drainage gradient.

    PubMed

    DeNicola, Dean M; Lellock, Amber J

    2015-08-01

    Metal oxyhydroxide precipitates that form from acid mine drainage (AMD) may indirectly limit periphyton by sorbing nutrients, particularly P. We examined effects of nutrient addition on periphytic algal biomass (chl a), community structure, and carbon and nitrogen content along an AMD gradient. Nutrient diffusing substrata with treatments of +P, +NP and control were placed at seven stream sites. Conductivity and SO4 concentration ranged over an order of magnitude among sites and were used to define the AMD gradient, as they best indicate mine discharge sources of metals that create oxyhydroxide precipitates. Aqueous total phosphorous (TP) ranged from 2 to 23 μg · L(-1) and significantly decreased with increasing SO4 . Mean chl a concentrations at sites ranged from 0.2 to 8.1 μg · cm(-2) . Across all sites, algal biomass was significantly higher on +NP than control treatments (Co), and significantly increased with +NP. The degree of nutrient limitation was determined by the increase in chl a concentration on +NP relative to Co (response ratio), which ranged from 0.6 to 9.7. Response to nutrient addition significantly declined with increasing aqueous TP, and significantly increased with increasing SO4 . Thus, nutrient limitation of algal biomass increased with AMD impact, indicating metal oxyhydroxides associated with AMD likely decreased P availability. Algal species composition was significantly affected by site but not nutrient treatment. Percent carbon content of periphyton on the Co significantly increased with AMD impact and corresponded to an increase in the relative abundance of Chlorophytes. Changes in periphyton biomass and cellular nutrient content associated with nutrient limitation in AMD streams may affect higher trophic levels. PMID:26986794

  2. Gastropod grazers and nutrients, but not light, interact in determining periphytic algal diversity.

    PubMed

    Liess, Antonia; Kahlert, Maria

    2007-05-01

    The potential interactions of grazing, nutrients and light in influencing autotroph species diversity have not previously been considered. Earlier studies have shown that grazing and nutrients interact in determining autotroph species diversity, since grazing decreases species diversity when nutrients (i.e. N or P) limit autotroph growth, but increases it when nutrients are replete. We hypothesized that increased light intensities would intensify the interactions between grazing and nutrients on algal species diversity, resulting in even stronger reductions in algal species diversity through grazing under nutrient-poor conditions, and to even stronger increases of algal species diversity through grazing under nutrient-rich conditions. We studied the effects of grazing (absent, present), nutrients (ambient, N + P enriched) and light (low light, high light) on benthic algal diversity and periphyton C:nutrient ratios (which can indicate algal nutrient limitation) in a factorial laboratory experiment, using the gastropod grazer Viviparus viviparus. Grazing decreased algal biomass and algal diversity, but increased C:P and N:P ratios of periphyton. Grazing also affected periphyton species composition, by decreasing the proportion of Spirogyra sp. and increasing the proportion of species in the Chaetophorales. Grazing effects on diversity as well as on periphyton N:P ratios were weakened when nutrients were added (interaction between grazing and nutrients). Chlorophyll a (Chl a) per area increased with nutrient addition and decreased with high light intensities. Light did not increase the strength of the interaction between grazing and nutrients on periphytic algal diversity. This study shows that nutrient addition substantially reduced the negative effects of grazing on periphytic algal diversity, whereas light did not interact with grazing or nutrient enrichment in determining periphytic algal diversity. PMID:17285319

  3. Algal remediation of CO₂ and nutrient discharges: A review.

    PubMed

    Judd, Simon; van den Broeke, Leo J P; Shurair, Mohamed; Kuti, Yussuf; Znad, Hussein

    2015-12-15

    The recent literature pertaining to the application of algal photobioreactors (PBRs) to both carbon dioxide mitigation and nutrient abatement is reviewed and the reported data analysed. The review appraises the influence of key system parameters on performance with reference to (a) the absorption and biological fixation of CO2 from gaseous effluent streams, and (b) the removal of nutrients from wastewaters. Key parameters appraised individually with reference to CO2 removal comprise algal speciation, light intensity, mass transfer, gas and hydraulic residence time, pollutant (CO2 and nutrient) loading, biochemical and chemical stoichiometry (including pH), and temperature. Nutrient removal has been assessed with reference to hydraulic residence time and reactor configuration, along with C:nutrient ratios and other factors affecting carbon fixation, and outcomes compared with those reported for classical biological nutrient removal (BNR). Outcomes of the review indicate there has been a disproportionate increase in algal PBR research outputs over the past 5-8 years, with a significant number of studies based on small, bench-scale systems. The quantitative impacts of light intensity and loading on CO2 uptake are highly dependent on the algal species, and also affected by solution chemical conditions such as temperature and pH. Calculations based on available data for biomass growth rates indicate that a reactor CO2 residence time of around 4 h is required for significant CO2 removal. Nutrient removal data indicate residence times of 2-5 days are required for significant nutrient removal, compared with <12 h for a BNR plant. Moreover, the shallow depth of the simplest PBR configuration (the high rate algal pond, HRAP) means that its footprint is at least two orders of magnitude greater than a classical BNR plant. It is concluded that the combined carbon capture/nutrient removal process relies on optimisation of a number of process parameters acting synergistically

  4. Efficacy of algal metrics for assessing nutrient and organic enrichment in flowing waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, S.D.; Mueller, D.K.; Spahr, N.E.; Munn, M.D.; Dubrovsky, N.M.

    2008-01-01

    4. Although algal species tolerance to nutrient and organic enrichment is well documented, additional taxonomic and autecological research on sensitive, endemic algal species would further enhance water-quality assessments.

  5. Response of an algal assemblage to nutrient enrichment and shading in a Hawaiian stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, S.H.; Brasher, A.M.D.; Smith, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of nitrate enrichment, phosphate enrichment, and light availability on benthic algae, nutrient-diffusing clay flowerpots were colonized with algae at two sites in a Hawaiian stream during spring and autumn 2002 using a randomized factorial design. The algal assemblage that developed under the experimental conditions was investigated by determining biomass (ash-free dry mass and chlorophyll a concentrations) and composition of the diatom assemblage. In situ pulse amplitude-modulated fluorometry was also used to model photosynthetic rate of the algal assemblage. Algal biomass and maximum photosynthetic rate were significantly higher at the unshaded site than at the shaded site. These parameters were higher at the unshaded site with either nitrate, or to a lesser degree, nitrate plus phosphate enrichment. Analysis of similarity of diatom assemblages showed significant differences between shaded and unshaded sites, as well as between spring and autumn experiments, but not between nutrient treatments. However, several individual species of diatoms responded significantly to nitrate enrichment. These results demonstrate that light availability (shaded vs. unshaded) is the primary limiting factor to algal growth in this stream, with nitrogen as a secondary limiting factor. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  6. Response of algal metrics to nutrients and physical factors and identification of nutrient thresholds in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, R.W.; Moran, P.W.; Frankforter, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Many streams within the United States are impaired due to nutrient enrichment, particularly in agricultural settings. The present study examines the response of benthic algal communities in agricultural and minimally disturbed sites from across the western United States to a suite of environmental factors, including nutrients, collected at multiple scales. The first objective was to identify the relative importance of nutrients, habitat and watershed features, and macroinvertebrate trophic structure to explain algal metrics derived from deposition and erosion habitats. The second objective was to determine if thresholds in total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) related to algal metrics could be identified and how these thresholds varied across metrics and habitats. Nutrient concentrations within the agricultural areas were elevated and greater than published threshold values. All algal metrics examined responded to nutrients as hypothesized. Although nutrients typically were the most important variables in explaining the variation in each of the algal metrics, environmental factors operating at multiple scales also were important. Calculated thresholds for TN or TP based on the algal metrics generated from samples collected from erosion and deposition habitats were not significantly different. Little variability in threshold values for each metric for TN and TP was observed. The consistency of the threshold values measured across multiple metrics and habitats suggest that the thresholds identified in this study are ecologically relevant. Additional work to characterize the relationship between algal metrics, physical and chemical features, and nuisance algal growth would be of benefit to the development of nutrient thresholds and criteria. ?? 2010 The Author(s).

  7. Harmful algal blooms: How strong is the evidence that nutrient ratios and forms influence their occurrence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Keith; Gowen, Richard J.; Tett, Paul; Bresnan, Eileen; Harrison, Paul J.; McKinney, April; Milligan, Stephen; Mills, David K.; Silke, Joe; Crooks, Anne-Marie

    2012-12-01

    There is a perception that anthropogenically-driven changes in nutrient supply to coastal waters influences the abundance, frequency and toxicity of harmful algal blooms (HABs) through a change in the form or ratio of nutrient that limits phytoplankton growth. If nutrient concentrations are not limiting for growth, then ratios do not influence floristic composition. At non-limiting concentrations, evidence that alteration of nitrogen: phosphorus (N:P) ratios has stimulated HABs is limited, and primarily based on hypothesised relationships in relatively few locations (in particular: Tolo Harbour Hong Kong and Dutch Coastal Waters). In all cases, an unequivocal causal link between an increase in HABs (frequency, magnitude or duration) and change in N or P as the limiting nutrient is difficult to establish. The silicon (Si) limitation hypothesis is generally supported by experimental evidence and field data on the nuisance flagellate Phaeocystis. We found little evidence that high N:Si ratios preferentially promote harmful dinoflagellates over benign species. Laboratory studies demonstrate that nutrient ratios can influence toxin production, but genus and species specific differences and environmental control make extrapolation of these data to the field difficult. Studies of the role of dissolved and particulate organic nutrients in the growth of HAB species, while limited, demonstrate the potential for organic nutrients (especially organic N) to support the growth of a range of HAB species. There is a clear need for better understanding of the role of mixotrophy in the formation of HABs and for studies of HAB and non-HAB species in competition for environmentally realistic concentrations of organic nutrients.

  8. Changes in Algal Trends and Nutrient Budgets in Arctic Tundra Ponds Over the Past 40 Years in Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, C.; Lougheed, V.

    2011-12-01

    In the 1970's, Barrow, Alaska was host to a detailed ecological study, the International Biological Program (IBP), which examined physical, chemical and biological characteristics of Arctic tundra ponds. Forty years later, this area has experienced warming and potential release of nutrients from permafrost; however, there have been no follow up studies since the 1970's and biological changes in these ponds remain unknown. The 1970's IBP research suggested that algae had warmer temperature optima than ambient temperatures and that phosphorus was the limiting nutrient. The goal of this study was to understand algal growth trends during the 2010 growing season, the role of limiting nutrients, and how both these have changed through time in light of shifting climate regimes. Algae was collected and quantified weekly from periphyton (attached to sediment) and phytoplankton (free-floating algae) from several IBP ponds over the summer of 2010. Nutrient addition and release experiments with known quantities of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) were utilized to determine algal nutrient limitation. Algal biomass was significantly greater in 2010 than in the 1970s. Nutrient addition experiments showed a shift from phosphorus limitation in the 1970s to nitrogen limitation of periphyton in 2010, while phytoplankton was co-limited by nitrogen and phosphorus in 2010. These preliminary results indicate substantial changes have occurred over the past 40 years. Further studies are being completed in Summer 2011 to understand inter-annual variability in these trends and to reveal the implications of these trends in algal production and nutrient budgets in the Arctic.

  9. In situ experimental evidence of phosphorus limitation on algal growth in a lake ecosystem.

    PubMed

    An, Kwang-Guk; Park, Seok Soon

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of in situ Nutrient Stimulation Experiments (NSEs) demonstrating that phosphorus was the primary nutrient controlling algal growth in the Taechung Reservoir, Korea. Algal response in most treatments with only nitrogen added was less than or the same as in the controls, whereas the growth in treatments enriched with phosphorus increased by as much as fivefold. Phosphorus limitation was consistent over the experimental period when bioassay experiments were conducted, but the magnitude of growth response to phosphorus enrichments varied with the season. Algal yield in P-treatments was maximum when thermal stratification was strong and total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) was near the level of depletion. Regression analyses of NSEs showed that in situ algal response in P treatments, measured as log-transformed CHLf:CHLi ratios, declined (R2 = 0.995, p < 0.001) with ambient concentrations of log-transformed TDP. Also, algal response in the P treatments showed a first-order linear fit (R2 = 0.961, p < 0.001) with log-transformed DIN (dissolved inorganic nitrogen):TDP ratios. These outcomes indicate that the magnitude of in situ algal response increased with lower levels of P and higher dissolved N:P ratios in the ambient lake water. Our experimental approach employing NSEs suggests that abatement of phosphorus from the watershed seems to be an efficient management strategy to control the eutrophication of this system.

  10. Stressor-Response Models Relating Nutrient Enrichment to Algal Communities in Pacific Northwest Streams and Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobota, D. J.; Hubler, S.; Paul, M. J.; Labiosa, R.

    2015-12-01

    Excessive algal growth in streams and rivers from nutrient enrichment can cause costly human health and environmental problems. As part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Nutrient Scientific Technical Exchange Partnership and Support (N-STEPS) program, we have been developing stressor-response (S-R) models relating nutrients to attached algal (periphyton) communities to help prioritize monitoring for water quality impairments in Oregon (Pacific Northwest, USA) streams and rivers. Existing data from the state and neighboring states were compiled and standardized from the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, US Environmental Protection Agency, and the US Geological Survey. To develop S-R models, algal community and biomass metrics were compared with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentration data, including total, dissolved, and inorganic forms of these nutrients. In total, 928 paired algal-nutrient samples were compiled from the 8 Level-III Ecoregions occurring in Oregon. Relationships between algal biomass metrics and nutrient concentrations were weak, with only ash-free dry mass and standing stock of chlorophyll a showing slight positive relationships across gradients of total N and soluble reactive P concentrations, respectively. In contrast, metrics describing algal community composition, including percent diatoms and abundance of nutrient-sensitive species, showed very strong nonlinear relationships with total N or P concentrations. This suggests that data describing algal community composition can help identify specific nutrient stressors across environmentally-diverse streams and rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Future analyses will examine if nutrient-algal S-R models vary across different hydrological, physiographical, and ecological settings in the region.

  11. Turbulence and nutrient interactions that control benthic algal production in an engineered cultivation raceway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow turbulence can be a controlling factor to the growth of benthic algae, but few studies have quantified this relationship in engineered cultivation systems. Experiments were performed to understand the limiting role of turbulence to algal productivity in an algal turf scrubber for benthic algal...

  12. Assessment of factors limiting algal growth in acidic pit lakes--a case study from Western Australia, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Naresh; McCullough, Clint D; Lund, Mark A; Larranaga, Santiago A

    2016-03-01

    Open-cut mining operations can form pit lakes on mine closure. These new water bodies typically have low nutrient concentrations and may have acidic and metal-contaminated waters from acid mine drainage (AMD) causing low algal biomass and algal biodiversity. A preliminary study was carried out on an acidic coal pit lake, Lake Kepwari, in Western Australia to determine which factors limited algal biomass. Water quality was monitored to obtain baseline data. pH ranged between 3.7 and 4.1, and solute concentrations were slightly elevated to levels of brackish water. Concentrations of N were highly relative to natural lakes, although concentrations of FRP (<0.01 mg/L) and C (total C 0.7-3.7 and DOC 0.7-3.5 mg/L) were very low, and as a result, algal growth was also extremely low. Microcosm experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that nutrient enrichment will be able to stimulate algal growth regardless of water quality. Microcosms of Lake Kepwari water were amended with N, P and C nutrients with and without sediment. Nutrient amendments under microcosm conditions could not show any significant phytoplankton growth but was able to promote benthic algal growth. P amendments without sediment showed a statistically higher mean algal biomass concentration than controls or microcosms amended with phosphorus but with sediment did. Results indicated that algal biomass in acidic pit lake (Lake Kepwari) may be limited primarily by low nutrient concentrations (especially phosphorus) and not by low pH or elevated metal concentrations. Furthermore, sediment processes may also reduce the nutrient availability. PMID:26593729

  13. Assessment of factors limiting algal growth in acidic pit lakes--a case study from Western Australia, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Naresh; McCullough, Clint D; Lund, Mark A; Larranaga, Santiago A

    2016-03-01

    Open-cut mining operations can form pit lakes on mine closure. These new water bodies typically have low nutrient concentrations and may have acidic and metal-contaminated waters from acid mine drainage (AMD) causing low algal biomass and algal biodiversity. A preliminary study was carried out on an acidic coal pit lake, Lake Kepwari, in Western Australia to determine which factors limited algal biomass. Water quality was monitored to obtain baseline data. pH ranged between 3.7 and 4.1, and solute concentrations were slightly elevated to levels of brackish water. Concentrations of N were highly relative to natural lakes, although concentrations of FRP (<0.01 mg/L) and C (total C 0.7-3.7 and DOC 0.7-3.5 mg/L) were very low, and as a result, algal growth was also extremely low. Microcosm experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that nutrient enrichment will be able to stimulate algal growth regardless of water quality. Microcosms of Lake Kepwari water were amended with N, P and C nutrients with and without sediment. Nutrient amendments under microcosm conditions could not show any significant phytoplankton growth but was able to promote benthic algal growth. P amendments without sediment showed a statistically higher mean algal biomass concentration than controls or microcosms amended with phosphorus but with sediment did. Results indicated that algal biomass in acidic pit lake (Lake Kepwari) may be limited primarily by low nutrient concentrations (especially phosphorus) and not by low pH or elevated metal concentrations. Furthermore, sediment processes may also reduce the nutrient availability.

  14. Carbon and light limitation in mass algal culture

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The carbon limited kinetic responses of various fast growing algal species have been summarized. These results suggest that the growth responses of many algae used in mass culture may best be represented as a Monod fit of the specific growth rate (..mu..) to the free carbon dioxide concentration (CO/sub 2//sub f/). The environmental modifiers of primary importance appear to be light levels, temperature and the ionic strength of the growth media. The various mathematical models describing the algal biological response to limitng CO/sub 2//sub f/ concentration, the carbonate equilibrium chemistry and the physical configration of a flow-through microbial culture are combined to yield equations which predict the pH, total carbon concentration (C/sub T/) and algal cell concentration of a continuous alga culture, given a ..mu../sub max/ and K/sub SCO2/ for the alga of interest. This model is further used to illustrate the under-utilization of inorganic carbon in mass algal cultures in which the pH is uncontrolled. One method of pH control in such cultures involves the utilization of CO/sub 2/ supply from bacterial degradation of waste organics in the influent culture medium. In such a situation both the culture pH and algal cell production will often be governed by either carbon or light limitation depending primarily on the influent BOD loading, detention time and culture depth. In spite of the obvious over-simplification of considering only light and carbon limits in describing the behavior of mass algal culture, comparisons to actual field data suggest that these two parameters will be of paramount importance in controlling net algal cell production rates.

  15. WETLAND MORPHOLOGIC AND BIOGEOGRAPHIC INFLUENCES ON ALGAL RESPONSES TO NUTRIENT LOADING IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are testing the influence of wetland morphology (protected vs. riverine) and biogeography (upper vs. lower Great Lakes) on algal responses to nutrients in Great Lakes Coastal wetlands. Principal components analysis using nutrient-specific GIS data was used to select sites wit...

  16. Kinetics of phosphate limited algal growth.

    PubMed

    Nyholm, N

    1977-04-01

    The kinetics of phosphate limited growth of two green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Selenastrum capricornutum have been studied in chemostats. Several kinetic models which express the specific growth rate as a function of the intracellular phosphorus content have been examined, and one of the models was found to be significantly better than the other models. The principles of this model were described in a recent paper by Nyholm. The kinetics of phosphate uptake have been investigated by adding pulses of phosphate to the chemostats, The uptake by phosphorus deficient cells could be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics for phosphate concentrations below approximately 500 microng P/liter. Further, with the assumption of a discontinuous adjustment of the uptake rate at the onset of phosphorus deficiency, a complete kinetic model for growth and phosphate removal is proposed. The mean cell size and the contents of chlorophyll a and RNA per unit dry weight have been measured for C. pyrenoidosa as a function of the dilution rate. PMID:856323

  17. Bacteria reduction and nutrient removal in small wastewater treatment plants by an algal biofilm.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, G; Blume, T; Sekoulov, I

    2003-01-01

    Attached algae settlement is frequently observed in effluents of wastewater treatment plants at locations with sufficient sunlight. For their growth they incorporate nutrients and the surface of the algal biofilm accumulates suspended solids from the clarified wastewater. During the photosynthesis process of algal biofilms oxygen is produced while dissolved carbon dioxide is consumed. This led to an increasing pH due to the change of the carbon dioxide equilibrium in water. The high pH causes precipitation of dissolved phosphates. Furthermore an extensive removal of faecal bacteria was observed in the presence of algae, which may be caused by the activity of algae. The experimental results indicate the high potential of these attached algae for polishing secondary effluent of wastewater treatment plants. Especially for small wastewater treatment plants a post connected stage for nutrient removal and bacteria reduction can be developed with the aid of an algal biofilm. PMID:12906290

  18. Culturing Selenastrum capricornutum (Chlorophyta) in a synthetic algal nutrient medium with defined mineral particulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.; Davis, J.A.; Chang, Cecily C.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Algal nutrient studies in chemically-defined media typically employ a synthetic chelator to prevent iron hydroxide precipitation. Micronutrient-particulate interactions may, however, significantly affect chemical speciation and hence biovailability of these nutrients in natural waters. A technique is described by which Selenastrum capricornutum Printz (Chlorophyta) may be cultured in a medium where trace metal speciation (except iron) is controlled, not by organic chelation, but by sorption onto titanium dioxide. Application of this culturing protocol in conjunction with results from sorption studies of nutrient ions on mineral particles provides a means of studying biological impacts of sorptive processes in aquatic environments. ?? 1985 Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  19. Food processing wastes as nutrient sources in algal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M-H; Chan, W-C; Chu, L-M

    1983-03-01

    Utilization of food processing wastes for biological production will ease part of the disposal problem, especially the potential hazards of eutrophication, andat the same time recycle the inherently rich plant nutrients in the waste materials. The present investigation is an attempt to study the feasibility of using five food processing wastes, including carrot, coconut, eggshell, soybean, and sugarcane, for culturing Chlorella pyrenoidosa (a unicellular green alga).

  20. WERF Nutrient Challenge investigates limits of nutrient removal technologies.

    PubMed

    Neethling, J B; Clark, D; Pramanik, A; Stensel, H D; Sandino, J; Tsuchihashi, R

    2010-01-01

    The WERF Nutrient Challenge is a multi-year collaborative research initiative established in 2007 to develop and provide current information about wastewater treatment nutrients (specifically nitrogen and phosphorus in wastewater), their characteristics, and bioavailability in aquatic environments to help regulators make informed decisions. The Nutrient Challenge will also provide data on nutrient removal so that treatment facilities can select sustainable, cost-effective methods and technologies to meet permit limits. To meet these goals, the Nutrient Challenge has teamed with a wide array of utilities, agencies, consultants, universities and other researchers and practitioners to collaborate on projects that advance these goals. The Nutrient Challenge is focusing on a different approach to collaborating and leveraging resources (financial and intellectual) on research projects by targeting existing projects and research that correspond with its goals and funding those aspects that the Nutrient Challenge identified as a priority. Because the Nutrient Challenge is focused on collaboration, outreach is an absolutely necessary component of its effectiveness. Through workshops, webinars, a web portal and online compendium, published papers, and conference lectures, the Nutrient Challenge is both presenting important new information, and soliciting new partnerships.

  1. Nutrient Loading and Algal Response in West Thompson Lake, Thompson, Connecticut, 2003-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, Jonathan; Colombo, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Water quality and nutrient loads were characterized for parts of the Quinebaug River and West Thompson Lake in northeastern Connecticut during 2003 to 2005. The West Thompson Lake watershed is a mainly forested watershed that receives treated municipal wastewater from several point sources in Massachusetts. The lake is a flood-control reservoir formed in 1966 by impoundment of the Quinebaug River. Median concentrations of total phosphorus in two inflow (upstream) and one outflow (downstream) sampling stations on the Quinebaug River were higher than the nutrient criteria recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for rivers and streams in aggregate Ecoregion XIV. In general, concentrations of total phosphorus in West Thompson Lake also were above the nutrient criteria recommended by USEPA for lakes and impoundments in aggregate Ecoregion XIV. The trophic status of West Thompson Lake has changed since 1995 from a hypereutrophic lake to a eutrophic lake; however, the lake still has large algal blooms. These blooms are predominated by blue-green algae, with chlorophyll-a concentrations of more than 30 micrograms per liter and algal cell counts as high as 73,000 cells/mL. Water samples collected during the summer of 2005 identified phosphorus as the primary limiting nutrient early in the season, but algal growth is probably co-limited by phosphorus and nitrogen later in the season. Lake-bottom sediments were collected from several areas throughout the lake and ranged in thickness from less than 1 foot (ft) to more than 3 ft. Concentrations of phosphorus in sediments differed throughout the lake; the highest values were found in the middle of the lake. Concentrations of total phosphorus also increased from an average 1,800 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) in the upper layers of sediment to more than 6,000 mg/kg at depth in the sediment. Annual, seasonal, and monthly loads and yields of nutrients were calculated for the three sampling locations on the

  2. Hydraulic retention time effects on wastewater nutrient removal and bioproduct production via rotating algal biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Iman Shayan, Sahand; Agblevor, Foster A; Bertin, Lorenzo; Sims, Ronald C

    2016-07-01

    Rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) technology was successfully employed in an effective strategy to couple the removal of wastewater nutrients with accumulation of valuable bioproducts by grown algae. A secondary stage municipal wastewater was fed to the developed system and the effects of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) parameter on both nutrient removal and bioproduct production were evaluated under fed-batch operation mode. Two sets of bench scale RABRs were designed and operated with HRTs of 2 and 6days in order to provide competitive environment for algal growth. The HRT significantly affected nitrogen and phosphorus uptakes along with lipid and starch accumulations by microalgae in harvested biofilms. Domination of nitrogen removal in 2-day HRT with higher lipid accumulation (20% on dried weight basis) and phosphorus removal in 6-day HRT with higher starch production (27% on dried weight basis) was observed by comparing the performances of the RABRs in duplicate runs. PMID:27038261

  3. Algal biofuels from urban wastewaters: maximizing biomass yield using nutrients recycled from hydrothermal processing of biomass.

    PubMed

    Selvaratnam, T; Pegallapati, A K; Reddy, H; Kanapathipillai, N; Nirmalakhandan, N; Deng, S; Lammers, P J

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have proposed algal cultivation in urban wastewaters for the dual purpose of waste treatment and bioenergy production from the resulting biomass. This study proposes an enhancement to this approach that integrates cultivation of an acidophilic strain, Galdieria sulphuraria 5587.1, in a closed photobioreactor (PBR); hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of the wet algal biomass; and recirculation of the nutrient-rich aqueous product (AP) of HTL to the PBR to achieve higher biomass productivity than that could be achieved with raw wastewater. The premise is that recycling nutrients in the AP can maintain optimal C, N and P levels in the PBR to maximize biomass growth to increase energy returns. Growth studies on the test species validated growth on AP derived from HTL at temperatures from 180 to 300°C. Doubling N and P concentrations over normal levels in wastewater resulted in biomass productivity gains of 20-25% while N and P removal rates also doubled.

  4. Grassland productivity limited by multiple nutrients.

    PubMed

    Fay, Philip A; Prober, Suzanne M; Harpole, W Stanley; Knops, Johannes M H; Bakker, Jonathan D; Borer, Elizabeth T; Lind, Eric M; MacDougall, Andrew S; Seabloom, Eric W; Wragg, Peter D; Adler, Peter B; Blumenthal, Dana M; Buckley, Yvonne M; Chu, Chengjin; Cleland, Elsa E; Collins, Scott L; Davies, Kendi F; Du, Guozhen; Feng, Xiaohui; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S; Hagenah, Nicole; Hautier, Yann; Heckman, Robert W; Jin, Virginia L; Kirkman, Kevin P; Klein, Julia; Ladwig, Laura M; Li, Qi; McCulley, Rebecca L; Melbourne, Brett A; Mitchell, Charles E; Moore, Joslin L; Morgan, John W; Risch, Anita C; Schütz, Martin; Stevens, Carly J; Wedin, David A; Yang, Louie H

    2015-07-06

    Terrestrial ecosystem productivity is widely accepted to be nutrient limited(1). Although nitrogen (N) is deemed a key determinant of aboveground net primary production (ANPP)(2,3), the prevalence of co-limitation by N and phosphorus (P) is increasingly recognized(4-8). However, the extent to which terrestrial productivity is co-limited by nutrients other than N and P has remained unclear. Here, we report results from a standardized factorial nutrient addition experiment, in which we added N, P and potassium (K) combined with a selection of micronutrients (K+μ), alone or in concert, to 42 grassland sites spanning five continents, and monitored ANPP. Nutrient availability limited productivity at 31 of the 42 grassland sites. And pairwise combinations of N, P, and K+μ co-limited ANPP at 29 of the sites. Nitrogen limitation peaked in cool, high latitude sites. Our findings highlight the importance of less studied nutrients, such as K and micronutrients, for grassland productivity, and point to significant variations in the type and degree of nutrient limitation. We suggest that multiple-nutrient constraints must be considered when assessing the ecosystem-scale consequences of nutrient enrichment.

  5. Processes and patterns of oceanic nutrient limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. M.; Mills, M. M.; Arrigo, K. R.; Berman-Frank, I.; Bopp, L.; Boyd, P. W.; Galbraith, E. D.; Geider, R. J.; Guieu, C.; Jaccard, S. L.; Jickells, T. D.; La Roche, J.; Lenton, T. M.; Mahowald, N. M.; Marañón, E.; Marinov, I.; Moore, J. K.; Nakatsuka, T.; Oschlies, A.; Saito, M. A.; Thingstad, T. F.; Tsuda, A.; Ulloa, O.

    2013-09-01

    Microbial activity is a fundamental component of oceanic nutrient cycles. Photosynthetic microbes, collectively termed phytoplankton, are responsible for the vast majority of primary production in marine waters. The availability of nutrients in the upper ocean frequently limits the activity and abundance of these organisms. Experimental data have revealed two broad regimes of phytoplankton nutrient limitation in the modern upper ocean. Nitrogen availability tends to limit productivity throughout much of the surface low-latitude ocean, where the supply of nutrients from the subsurface is relatively slow. In contrast, iron often limits productivity where subsurface nutrient supply is enhanced, including within the main oceanic upwelling regions of the Southern Ocean and the eastern equatorial Pacific. Phosphorus, vitamins and micronutrients other than iron may also (co-)limit marine phytoplankton. The spatial patterns and importance of co-limitation, however, remain unclear. Variability in the stoichiometries of nutrient supply and biological demand are key determinants of oceanic nutrient limitation. Deciphering the mechanisms that underpin this variability, and the consequences for marine microbes, will be a challenge. But such knowledge will be crucial for accurately predicting the consequences of ongoing anthropogenic perturbations to oceanic nutrient biogeochemistry.

  6. Coupled nutrient removal and biomass production with mixed algal culture: impact of biotic and abiotic factors.

    PubMed

    Su, Yanyan; Mennerich, Artur; Urban, Brigitte

    2012-08-01

    The influence of biotic (algal inoculum concentration) and abiotic factors (illumination cycle, mixing velocity and nutrient strength) on the treatment efficiency, biomass generation and settleability were investigated with selected mixed algal culture. Dark condition led to poor nutrient removal efficiency. No significant difference in the N, P removal and biomass settleability between continuous and alternating illumination was observed, but a higher biomass generation capability for the continuous illumination was obtained. Different mixing velocity led to similar phosphorus removal efficiencies (above 98%) with different retention times. The reactor with 300 rpm mixing velocity had the best N removal capability. For the low strength wastewater, the N rates were 5.4±0.2, 9.1±0.3 and 10.8±0.3 mg/l/d and P removal rates were 0.57±0.03, 0.56±0.03 and 0.72±0.05 mg/l/d for reactors with the algal inoculum concentration of 0.2, 0.5 and 0.8 g/l, respectively. Low nutrient removal efficiency and poor biomass settleability were obtained for high strength wastewater.

  7. [Nutrient supplements - possibilities and limitations].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Hahn, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    The consumption of micronutrient-supplements by the general public has become widespread; between 25 and more than 40% of individuals questioned in western developed nations confirm to regularly consume such products. In principle, there are two product categories for micronutrient-supplements - medicinal products (drugs) and foodstuffs. The latter are marketed as food supplements (FS) and dietary foodstuffs for particular nutritional uses including foods for special medical purposes (FSMP). FS serve the general supplementation of any consumer whilst foodstuffs for particular nutritional uses are directed at consumers with special dietary requirements; FSMP are intended for the dietary management of patients. There are clearly defined legal frameworks for those product categories. Independently of their legal product status, six areas of application can be characterised for micronutrient-supplements: general and special supplementation, primary prevention, compensation of disease-related deficits, therapeutic function and containment of diseases or avoidance of subsequent damages (secondary and tertiary function). Gauged with the mean-intake, micro nutrient supply in Germany is sufficient (exception: folic acid and vitamin D; partially also iodine). However, the intake of vitamins E, C, B1 and B2 as well as the minerals calcium, magnesium, zinc and iodine could be improved in 20-50% of the general public. Micro nutrient preparations in physiological dose could contribute to closing this gap in supply.

  8. Effect of wastewater-borne bacteria on algal growth and nutrients removal in wastewater-based algae cultivation system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaochen; Zhou, Wenguang; Fu, Zongqiang; Cheng, Yanling; Min, Min; Liu, Yuhuan; Zhang, Yunkai; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2014-09-01

    Centrate, a type of nutrient-rich municipal wastewater was used to determine the effect of wastewater-borne bacteria on algal growth and nutrients removal efficiency in this study. The characteristics of algal and bacterial growth profiles, wastewater nutrient removal and effect of initial algal inoculums were systematically examined. The results showed that initial algal concentration had apparent effect on bacterial growth, and the presence of bacteria had a significant influence on algal growth pattern, suggesting symbiotic relationship between algae and bacteria at the initial stage of algae cultivation. The maximum algal biomass of 2.01 g/L with 0.1g/L initial algal inoculums concentration can be obtained during algae cultivation in raw centrate medium. The synergistic effect of centrate-borne bacteria and microalgae on algae growth and nutrient removal performance at initial fast growth stage has great potential to be applied to pilot-scale wastewater-based algae wastewater system cultivated in continuous or semi-continuous mode.

  9. Chemolithotrophy and physiology of bacterial nutrient limitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matin, A.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the physiology of chemolithotrophic bacteria, particularly the thiobacilli, was presented. In these bacteria unique physiological traits are expressed during nutrient limited growth. Different physiological types of chemolithotrophs, pathways of sulfur oxidation, and electron transport in the thiobacilli, problems encountered by chemolithotrophs in the generation of reducing power, and some explanations of the phenomenon of obligate chemolithotrophy were considered. Mixotrophy in the thiobacilli has been studied extensively both under nutrient excess and limitation. In nature, bacteria usually grow under nutrient limitation. Yet the bulk of our knowledge of microbial metabolic function is derived from bacteria grown in laboratory batch cultures containing a great abundance of nutrients. Microbial behavior in these two types of environments can be very different, indicating the need for basing an understanding of microbial ecology on studies that rely on cultivation of microorganisms under nutrient limitation. Nutrient limited bacteria differ in several ways from those growing in large quantities of nutrients. They have different surface structures and make a much fuller use of their metabolic potential, especially by the synthesis of unique pathways of catabolic enzymes.

  10. Nutrient removal and biofuel production in high rate algal pond using real municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Kang, Zion; Ramanan, Rishiram; Choi, Jong-Eun; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the growth and nutrient removal ability of an indigenous algal consortium on real untreated municipal wastewater in a high rate algal pond (HRAP). The HRAP was operated semicontinuously under different hydraulic retention times (HRT: 2, 4, 6, and 8 days). The average removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand, and total nitrogen and phosphate of real municipal wastewater were maintained at 85.44 ± 5.10%, 92.74 ± 5.82%, and 82.85 ± 8.63%, respectively, in 2 day HRT. Algae dominated the consortium and showed high settling efficiency (99%), and biomass and lipid productivity of 0.500 ± 0.03 g/l/day and 0.103 ± 0.0083 g/l/day (2 day HRT), respectively. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis revealed a predominance of palmitate (C16:0), palmitoleate (C16:1), linoleate (C18:2), and linolenate (C18:3). Microalgal diversity analyses determined the presence of Chlorella, Scenedesmus, and Stigeoclonium as the dominant microalgae. The algal consortium provides significant value not only in terms of energy savings and nutrient removal but also because of its bioenergy potential as indicated by the lipid content (20-23%) and FAME profiling. PMID:24759425

  11. Nutrient removal and biofuel production in high rate algal pond using real municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Kang, Zion; Ramanan, Rishiram; Choi, Jong-Eun; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the growth and nutrient removal ability of an indigenous algal consortium on real untreated municipal wastewater in a high rate algal pond (HRAP). The HRAP was operated semicontinuously under different hydraulic retention times (HRT: 2, 4, 6, and 8 days). The average removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand, and total nitrogen and phosphate of real municipal wastewater were maintained at 85.44 ± 5.10%, 92.74 ± 5.82%, and 82.85 ± 8.63%, respectively, in 2 day HRT. Algae dominated the consortium and showed high settling efficiency (99%), and biomass and lipid productivity of 0.500 ± 0.03 g/l/day and 0.103 ± 0.0083 g/l/day (2 day HRT), respectively. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis revealed a predominance of palmitate (C16:0), palmitoleate (C16:1), linoleate (C18:2), and linolenate (C18:3). Microalgal diversity analyses determined the presence of Chlorella, Scenedesmus, and Stigeoclonium as the dominant microalgae. The algal consortium provides significant value not only in terms of energy savings and nutrient removal but also because of its bioenergy potential as indicated by the lipid content (20-23%) and FAME profiling.

  12. The relative importance of light and nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth: A simple index of coastal ecosystem sensitivity to nutrient enrichment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Anthropogenic nutrient enrichment of the coastal zone is now a well-established fact. However, there is still uncertainty about the mechanisms through which nutrient enrichment can disrupt biological communities and ecosystem processes in the coastal zone. For example, while some estuaries exhibit classic symptoms of acute eutrophication, including enhanced production of algal biomass, other nutrient-rich estuaries maintain low algal biomass and primary production. This implies that large differences exist among coastal ecosystems in the rates and patterns of nutrient assimilation and cycling. Part of this variability comes from differences among ecosystems in the other resource that can limit algal growth and production - the light energy required for photosynthesis. Complete understanding of the eutrophication process requires consideration of the interacting effects of light and nutrients, including the role of light availability as a regulator of the expression of eutrophication. A simple index of the relative strength of light and nutrient limitation of algal growth can be derived from models that describe growth rate as a function of these resources. This index can then be used as one diagnostic to classify the sensitivity of coastal ecosystems to the harmful effects of eutrophication. Here I illustrate the application of this diagnostic with light and nutrient measurements made in three California estuaries and two Dutch estuaries.

  13. Relating Nearshore Algal Blooms Determined Using Satellite Imagery to Nutrient Loading, Watershed Land Use, and Storm Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, R. J.; Hyndman, D. W.; Qi, J.; Esselman, P.; Novitski, L.; Kendall, A. D.; Martin, S. L.; Lin, S.

    2014-12-01

    The overarching goal of our project was to relate algal biomass in the coastal zone of the Great Lakes, nutrient concentrations, watershed land use, and storm events. Algal biomass was determined using MODIS and Landsat remote sensing images. Nutrient loading from rivers into coastal zones was estimated with watershed land use, soils, geology, size and precipitation records. Our models of chlorophyll a based on remote sensing images (RS inferred chl a) and nutrient loading in coastal zones were validated with measured chlorophyll concentrations in the Great Lakes and nutrients in rivers. RS-inferred chl a was related to nutrient loading from rivers, which was dependent upon recent storm events and land use in watersheds. RS-inferred chl a was more related to nutrient loads during the week preceeding measurement of chl a than other periods before or during chl measurement. This lag time is presumably related to algal growth following nutrient loading, and was non-linearly related to nutrient loading. Our results indicate that these tools will improve understanding of land use effects on algal blooms in coastal zones of the Great Lakes and will help identify priority watersheds for restoration.

  14. Nutrient limitation and stoichiometry of carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Ellison, A M

    2006-11-01

    The cost-benefit model for the evolution of carnivorous plants posits a trade-off between photosynthetic costs associated with carnivorous structures and photosynthetic benefits accrued through additional nutrient acquisition. The model predicts that carnivory is expected to evolve if its marginal benefits exceed its marginal costs. Further, the model predicts that when nutrients are scarce but neither light nor water is limiting, carnivorous plants should have an energetic advantage in competition with non-carnivorous plants. Since the publication of the cost-benefit model over 20 years ago, marginal photosynthetic costs of carnivory have been demonstrated but marginal photosynthetic benefits have not. A review of published data and results of ongoing research show that nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium often (co-)limit growth of carnivorous plants and that photosynthetic nutrient use efficiency is 20 - 50 % of that of non-carnivorous plants. Assessments of stoichiometric relationships among limiting nutrients, scaling of leaf mass with photosynthesis and nutrient content, and photosynthetic nutrient use efficiency all suggest that carnivorous plants are at an energetic disadvantage relative to non-carnivorous plants in similar habitats. Overall, current data support some of the predictions of the cost-benefit model, fail to support others, and still others remain untested and merit future research. Rather than being an optimal solution to an adaptive problem, botanical carnivory may represent a set of limited responses constrained by both phylogenetic history and environmental stress.

  15. Nutrient limitation and stoichiometry of carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Ellison, A M

    2006-11-01

    The cost-benefit model for the evolution of carnivorous plants posits a trade-off between photosynthetic costs associated with carnivorous structures and photosynthetic benefits accrued through additional nutrient acquisition. The model predicts that carnivory is expected to evolve if its marginal benefits exceed its marginal costs. Further, the model predicts that when nutrients are scarce but neither light nor water is limiting, carnivorous plants should have an energetic advantage in competition with non-carnivorous plants. Since the publication of the cost-benefit model over 20 years ago, marginal photosynthetic costs of carnivory have been demonstrated but marginal photosynthetic benefits have not. A review of published data and results of ongoing research show that nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium often (co-)limit growth of carnivorous plants and that photosynthetic nutrient use efficiency is 20 - 50 % of that of non-carnivorous plants. Assessments of stoichiometric relationships among limiting nutrients, scaling of leaf mass with photosynthesis and nutrient content, and photosynthetic nutrient use efficiency all suggest that carnivorous plants are at an energetic disadvantage relative to non-carnivorous plants in similar habitats. Overall, current data support some of the predictions of the cost-benefit model, fail to support others, and still others remain untested and merit future research. Rather than being an optimal solution to an adaptive problem, botanical carnivory may represent a set of limited responses constrained by both phylogenetic history and environmental stress. PMID:17203429

  16. Influence of algal bloom degradation on nutrient release at the sediment-water interface in Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengyuan; Zhu, Guangwei; Zhao, Linlin; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Yunlin; Gao, Guang; Qin, Boqiang

    2013-03-01

    Algal bloom could drastically influence the nutrient cycling in lakes. To understand how the internal nutrient release responds to algal bloom decay, water and sediment columns were sampled at 22 sites from four distinct regions of China's eutrophic Lake Taihu and incubated in the laboratory to examine the influence of massive algal bloom decay on nutrient release from sediment. The column experiment involved three treatments: (1) water and sediment (WS); (2) water and algal bloom (WA); and (3) water, sediment, and algal bloom (WSA). Concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), ammonium (NH (4) (+) -N), and orthophosphate (PO (4) (3-) -P) were recorded during incubation. The decay of algal material caused a more rapid decrease in DO than in the algae-free controls and led to significant increases in NH (4) (+) -N and PO (4) (3-) -P in the water. The presence of algae during the incubation had a regionally variable effect on sediment nutrient profiles. In the absence of decaying algae (treatment WS), sediment nutrient concentrations decreased during the incubation. In the presence of blooms (WSA), sediments from the river mouth released P to the overlying water, while sediments from other regions absorbed surplus P from the water. This experiment showed that large-scale algal decay will dramatically affect nutrient cycling at the sediment-water interface and would potentially transfer the function of sediment as "container" or "supplier" in Taihu, although oxygen exchange with atmosphere in lake water was stronger than in columns. The magnitude of the effect depends on the physical-chemical character of the sediments. PMID:22825639

  17. Influence of algal bloom degradation on nutrient release at the sediment-water interface in Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengyuan; Zhu, Guangwei; Zhao, Linlin; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Yunlin; Gao, Guang; Qin, Boqiang

    2013-03-01

    Algal bloom could drastically influence the nutrient cycling in lakes. To understand how the internal nutrient release responds to algal bloom decay, water and sediment columns were sampled at 22 sites from four distinct regions of China's eutrophic Lake Taihu and incubated in the laboratory to examine the influence of massive algal bloom decay on nutrient release from sediment. The column experiment involved three treatments: (1) water and sediment (WS); (2) water and algal bloom (WA); and (3) water, sediment, and algal bloom (WSA). Concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), ammonium (NH (4) (+) -N), and orthophosphate (PO (4) (3-) -P) were recorded during incubation. The decay of algal material caused a more rapid decrease in DO than in the algae-free controls and led to significant increases in NH (4) (+) -N and PO (4) (3-) -P in the water. The presence of algae during the incubation had a regionally variable effect on sediment nutrient profiles. In the absence of decaying algae (treatment WS), sediment nutrient concentrations decreased during the incubation. In the presence of blooms (WSA), sediments from the river mouth released P to the overlying water, while sediments from other regions absorbed surplus P from the water. This experiment showed that large-scale algal decay will dramatically affect nutrient cycling at the sediment-water interface and would potentially transfer the function of sediment as "container" or "supplier" in Taihu, although oxygen exchange with atmosphere in lake water was stronger than in columns. The magnitude of the effect depends on the physical-chemical character of the sediments.

  18. Grassland productivity limited by multiple nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limitation of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) by nitrogen (N) is widely accepted, but the roles of phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and their combinations remain unclear. Thus we may underestimate nutrient limitation of primary productivity. We conducted standardized sampling of ANPP and ...

  19. A resin-buffered nutrient solution for controlling metal speciation in the algal bottle assay.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, L; Merckx, R; Smolders, E

    2012-06-15

    Metal speciation in solution is uncontrolled during algal growth in the traditional algal bottle assay. A resin-buffered nutrient solution was developed to overcome this problem and this was applied to test the effect of chloride (Cl⁻) on cadmium (Cd) uptake. Standard nutrient solution was enriched with 40 mM of either NaNO₃ or NaCl, and was prepared to contain equal Cd²⁺ but varying dissolved Cd due to the presence of CdCl(n)(2-n) complexes. Both solutions were subsequently used in an algal assay in 100 mL beakers that contained only the solution (designated "-R") or contained the solution together with a cation exchange sulfonate resin (2 g L⁻¹, designated "+R") as a deposit on the bottom of the beaker. Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata was grown for 72 h (1.4 × 10⁵-1.4 × 10⁶ cells mL⁻¹) in stagnant solution and shaken three times a day. Growth was unaffected by the presence of the resin (p>0.05). The Cd concentrations in solution of the -R devices decreased with 50-58% of initial values due to Cd uptake. No such changes were found in the +R devices or in abiotic controls. Cd uptake was unaffected by either NaNO₃ or NaCl treatment in the +R device, confirming that Cd²⁺ is the preferred Cd species in line with the general concept of metal bioavailability. In contrast, Cd uptake in the -R devices was two-fold larger in the NaCl treatment than in the NaNO₃ treatment (p<0.001), suggesting that CdCl(n)(2-n) complexes are bioavailable in this traditional set-up. However this bioavailability is partially, but not completely, an apparent one, because of the considerable depletion of solution ¹⁰⁹Cd in this set-up. Resin-buffered solutions are advocated in the algal bottle assay to control trace metal supply and to better identify the role of metal complexes on bioavailability.

  20. Nutrient limitations to secondary forest regrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Eric A.; Martinelli, Luiz A.

    The old, highly weathered soils of the lowland forest within the Amazon Basin generally exhibit conservative P cycles and leaky N cycles. This generalization applies to mature forests, but accelerating land use change is altering Amazonian landscapes. About 16% of the original forest area has been cleared, and about 160,000 km2 is in secondary forest cover. Secondary forests are common in agricultural regions, but few persist in one place for much more than 5 years. The nutrients within ephemeral forests are important for smallholder traditional slash-and-burn agriculture and in alternatives developed to conserve nutrients. Forest clearing causes an initial loss of nutrients through timber harvesting, fire, erosion, soil gaseous emissions, and hydrologic leaching, with N losses exceeding P losses. In contrast, the Ca, Mg, and K present in woody biomass are largely conserved as ash following fire, redistributing these nutrients to the soil. After the initial postclearing pulse of nutrient availability, rates of N cycling and loss consistently decline as cattle pastures age. Fertilization experiments have demonstrated that growth of young forests in abandoned agricultural land is nutrient limited. Several N cycling indicators in a secondary forest chronosequence study also demonstrated a conservative N cycle in young forests. Variable N limitation in young forests helps explain a negative relationship observed between the burn frequency during previous agricultural phases and the rate of forest regrowth. Recuperation of the N cycle gradually occurs during decades of secondary forest succession, such that mature lowland forests eventually recover abundant N relative to a conservative P cycle.

  1. Recycling of manure nutrients: use of algal biomass from dairy manure treatment as a slow release fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Mulbry, Walter; Westhead, Elizabeth Kebede; Pizarro, Carolina; Sikora, Lawrence

    2005-03-01

    An alternative to land spreading of manure is to grow crops of algae on the N and P present in the manure and convert manure N and P into algal biomass. The objective of this study was to evaluate the fertilizer value of dried algal biomass that had been grown using anaerobically digested dairy manure. Results from a flask study using two soils amended with algal biomass showed that 3% of total algal nitrogen (N) was present as plant available N at day 0. Approximately 33% of algal N was converted to plant available N within 21 days at 25 degrees C in both soils. Levels of Mehlich-3 extractable phosphorus (P) in the two soils rose with increasing levels of algal amendment but were also influenced by existing soil P levels. Results from plant growth experiments showed that 20-day old cucumber and corn seedlings grown in algae-amended potting mix contained 15-20% of applied N, 46-60% of available N, and 38-60% of the applied P. Seedlings grown in algae-amended potting mixes were equivalent to those grown with comparable levels of fertilizer amended potting mixes with respect to seedling dry weight and nutrient content. These results suggest that dried algal biomass produced from treatment of anaerobically digested dairy manure can substitute for commercial fertilizers used for potting systems. PMID:15491826

  2. Inhibition of nitrification in municipal wastewater-treating photobioreactors: Effect on algal growth and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Krustok, I; Odlare, M; Truu, J; Nehrenheim, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of inhibiting nitrification on algal growth and nutrient uptake was studied in photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater. As previous studies have indicated that algae prefer certain nitrogen species to others, and because nitrifying bacteria are inhibited by microalgae, it is important to shed more light on these interactions. In this study allylthiourea (ATU) was used to inhibit nitrification in wastewater-treating photobioreactors. The nitrification-inhibited reactors were compared to control reactors with no ATU added. Microalgae had higher growth in the inhibited reactors, resulting in a higher chlorophyll a concentration. The species mix also differed, with Chlorella and Scenedesmus being the dominant genera in the control reactors and Cryptomonas and Chlorella dominating in the inhibited reactors. The nitrogen speciation in the reactors after 8 days incubation was also different in the two setups, with N existing mostly as NH4-N in the inhibited reactors and as NO3-N in the control reactors. PMID:26716890

  3. Treatment of dairy manure effluent using freshwater algae: algal productivity and recovery of manure nutrients using pilot-scale algal turf scrubbers.

    PubMed

    Mulbry, Walter; Kondrad, Shannon; Pizarro, Carolina; Kebede-Westhead, Elizabeth

    2008-11-01

    Cultivating algae on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in animal manure effluents presents an alternative to the current practice of land application. The objective of this study was to determine values for productivity, nutrient content, and nutrient recovery using filamentous green algae grown in outdoor raceways at different loading rates of raw and anaerobically digested dairy manure effluent. Algal turf scrubber raceways (30m2 each) were operated in central Maryland for approximately 270 days each year (roughly April 1-December 31) from 2003 to 2006. Algal biomass was harvested every 4-12 days from the raceways after daily additions of manure effluent corresponding to loading rates of 0.3 to 2.5g total N (TN) and 0.08 to 0.42g total P (TP) m(-2)d(-1). Mean algal productivity values increased from approximately 2.5g DW m(-2)d(-1) at the lowest loading rate (0.3g TN m(-2)d(-1)) to 25g DW m(-2)d(-1) at the highest loading rate (2.5g TN m(-2)d(-1)). Mean N and P contents in the dried biomass increased 1.5-2.0-fold with increasing loading rate up to maximums of 7% N and 1% P (dry weight basis). Although variable, algal N and P accounted for roughly 70-90% of input N and P at loading rates below 1g TN, 0.15g TP m(-2)d(-1). N and P recovery rates decreased to 50-80% at higher loading rates. There were no significant differences in algal productivity, algal N and P content, or N and P recovery values from raceways with carbon dioxide supplementation compared to values from raceways without added carbon dioxide. Projected annual operational costs are very high on a per animal basis ($780 per cow). However, within the context of reducing nutrient inputs in sensitive watersheds such as the Chesapeake Bay, projected operational costs of $11 per kgN are well below the costs cited for upgrading existing water treatment plants. PMID:18487042

  4. Measuring Cellular-scale Nutrient Distribution in Algal Biofilms with Synchrotron Confocal Infrared Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    J Murdock; W Dodds; J Reffner; D Wetzel

    2011-12-31

    -dwelling) algae, for example, grow in a three-dimensional matrix (biofilm) composed of different cell sizes, shapes, and configurations. The optical and ecological challenge of studying algae is apparent from Figure 1, which shows a photomicrograph of algal chlorophyll fluorescence on a rock. Several issues make it difficult to obtain single species measurements with standard techniques: cell sizes can vary over an order of magnitude; species can occur as single cells, long filaments, or globular colonies; a number of different species can be found within a few square millimeters; and fluorescence can vary across cells (that is, the physiological state varies across cells). Synchrotron IMS is a tool that can be used to begin to overcome these spatially related challenges by giving a species- and location-specific measurement of an individual alga's relative chemical composition and distribution. This technique enables algal ecologists to focus on new, ecologically relevant questions such as what level (that is, cell, colony, and population) best defines a species' response to environmental change. For instance, many species occur as single cells and thus can be measured as individual organisms. However, the variety of growth forms and sizes can make it difficult to define the best unit to measure multicellular groups in terms of its functional role such as primary productivity (that is, carbon incorporation) and nutrient cycling. Understanding how individual algal species within a diverse community respond to environmental changes can help predict how changes in assemblage structure will impact overall assemblage function.

  5. Mapping of nutrient-induced biochemical changes in living algal cells using synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Heraud, Philip; Wood, Bayden R; Tobin, Mark J; Beardall, John; McNaughton, Don

    2005-08-15

    High quality Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were acquired from living Micrasterias hardyi cells maintained in an IR transparent flow-through cell using a FTIR microscope coupled to a synchrotron light source. Spectral maps of living, nutrient-replete cells showed band intensities consistent with the known location of the nucleus and the chloroplasts. These were very similar to maps acquired from fixed, air-dried cells. Bands due to lipids were lowest in absorbance in the region of the nucleus and highest in the chloroplast region and this trend was reversed for the absorbance of bands attributed to protein. Spectra acquired in 10 microm steps across living phosphorus-starved (P-starved) cells, repeated approximately every 30 min, were consistent over time, and bands correlated well with the known position of the nucleus and the observed chloroplasts, corroborating the observations with replete cells. Experiments in which missing nutrients were re-supplied to starved cells showed that cells could be maintained in a functional state in the flow-through cell for up to one day. Nitrogen-starved cells re-supplied with N showed an increase in lipid in all positions measured across the cell over a 23 h period of re-supply, with the largest increases occurring in positions where the chloroplasts were observed. Re-supply of phosphorus to P-starved cells produced no changes in bands attributable to lipid or protein. Due to their thin cell body ( approximately 12 microm) and large diameter ( approximately 300 microm) Micrasterias sp. make an ideal spectroscopic model to study nutrient kinetics in algal cells.

  6. Relation of nutrient concentrations, nutrient loading, and algal production to changes in water levels in Kabetogama Lake, Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Maki, Ryan P.; Kiesling, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment has led to excessive algal growth in Kabetogama Lake, Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota. Water- and sediment-quality data were collected during 2008-09 to assess internal and external nutrient loading. Data collection was focused in Kabetogama Lake and its inflows, the area of greatest concern for eutrophication among the lakes of Voyageurs National Park. Nutrient and algal data were used to determine trophic status and were evaluated in relation to changes in Kabetogama Lake water levels following changes to dam operation starting in 2000. Analyses were used to estimate external nutrient loading at inflows and assess the potential contribution of internal phosphorus loading. Kabetogama Lake often was mixed vertically, except for a few occasionally stratified areas, including Lost Bay in the northeastern part of Kabetogama Lake. Stratification, combined with larger bottom-water nutrient concentrations, larger sediment phosphorus concentrations, and estimated phosphorus release rates from sediment cores indicate that Lost Bay may be one of several areas that may be contributing substantially to internal loading. Internal loading is a concern because nutrients may cause excessive algal growth including potentially toxic cyanobacteria. The cyanobacterial hepatotoxin, microcystin, was detected in 7 of 14 cyanobacterial bloom samples, with total concentrations exceeding 1.0 microgram per liter, the World Health Organization's guideline for finished drinking water for the congener, microcystin-LR. Comparisons of the results of this study to previous studies indicate that chlorophyll-a concentrations and trophic state indices have improved since 2000, when the rules governing dam operation changed. However, total-phosphorus concentrations have not changed significantly since 2000.

  7. Nutrient limitation in tropical savannas across multiple scales and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Adam F A

    2016-02-01

    Nutrients have been hypothesized to influence the distribution of the savanna biome through two possible mechanisms. Low nutrient availability may restrict growth rates of trees, thereby allowing for intermittent fires to maintain low tree cover; alternatively, nutrient deficiency may even place an absolute constraint on the ability of forests to form, independent of fire. However, we have little understanding of the scales at which nutrient limitation operates, what nutrients are limiting, and the mechanisms that influence how nutrient limitation regulates savanna-forest transitions. Here, I review literature, synthesize existing data, and present a simple calculation of nutrient demand to evaluate how nutrient limitation may regulate the distribution of the savanna biome. The literature primarily supports the hypothesis that nutrients may interact dynamically with fire to restrict the transition of savanna into forest. A compilation of indirect metrics of nutrient limitation suggest that nitrogen and phosphorus are both in short supply and may limit plants. Nutrient demand calculations provided a number of insights. First, trees required high rates of nitrogen and phosphorus supply relative to empirically determined inputs. Second, nutrient demand increased as landscapes approached the transition point between savanna and forest. Third, the potential for fire-driven nutrient losses remained high throughout transitions, which may exaggerate limitation and could be a key feedback stabilizing the savanna biome. Fourth, nutrient limitation varied between functional groups, with fast-growing forest species having substantially greater nutrient demand and a higher susceptibility to fire-driven nutrient losses. Finally, African savanna trees required substantially larger amounts of nutrients supplied at greater rates, although this varied across plant functional groups. In summary, the ability of nutrients to control transitions emerges at individual and landscape

  8. Nutrient limitation in tropical savannas across multiple scales and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Adam F A

    2016-02-01

    Nutrients have been hypothesized to influence the distribution of the savanna biome through two possible mechanisms. Low nutrient availability may restrict growth rates of trees, thereby allowing for intermittent fires to maintain low tree cover; alternatively, nutrient deficiency may even place an absolute constraint on the ability of forests to form, independent of fire. However, we have little understanding of the scales at which nutrient limitation operates, what nutrients are limiting, and the mechanisms that influence how nutrient limitation regulates savanna-forest transitions. Here, I review literature, synthesize existing data, and present a simple calculation of nutrient demand to evaluate how nutrient limitation may regulate the distribution of the savanna biome. The literature primarily supports the hypothesis that nutrients may interact dynamically with fire to restrict the transition of savanna into forest. A compilation of indirect metrics of nutrient limitation suggest that nitrogen and phosphorus are both in short supply and may limit plants. Nutrient demand calculations provided a number of insights. First, trees required high rates of nitrogen and phosphorus supply relative to empirically determined inputs. Second, nutrient demand increased as landscapes approached the transition point between savanna and forest. Third, the potential for fire-driven nutrient losses remained high throughout transitions, which may exaggerate limitation and could be a key feedback stabilizing the savanna biome. Fourth, nutrient limitation varied between functional groups, with fast-growing forest species having substantially greater nutrient demand and a higher susceptibility to fire-driven nutrient losses. Finally, African savanna trees required substantially larger amounts of nutrients supplied at greater rates, although this varied across plant functional groups. In summary, the ability of nutrients to control transitions emerges at individual and landscape

  9. Using Algal Metrics and Biomass to Evaluate Multiple Ways of Defining Concentration-Based Nutrient Criteria in Streams and their Ecological Relevance

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the utility of nutrient criteria derived solely from total phosphorus (TP) concentrations in streams (regression models and percentile distributions) and evaluated their ecological relevance to diatom and algal biomass responses. We used a variety of statistics to cha...

  10. Baseline nutrient dynamics in shallow well mixed coastal lagoon with seasonal harmful algal blooms and hypoxia formation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Evan L; Paudel, Bhanu; Montagna, Paul A

    2015-07-15

    Weekly inorganic nutrient and chlorophyll-a concentrations were measured to establish baseline conditions in Corpus Christi Bay, Texas during seasonal hypoxia and harmful algal bloom (HAB) formation. Two fixed stations along the southern shoreline were sampled weekly for a continuous year at the same time each day. Weekly shoreline observations were found to be statistically similar to quarterly observations in the bay center, but with a greater power to detect seasonal trends. Dissolved Oxygen (DO)<4 mg/L was measured in June, 2012 along the southern shoreline of Corpus Christi Bay, which places lower DO conditions west of previous estimates. During a bay-wide HAB event in November of 2011 no changes were observed in any of the nutrient or chlorophyll-a observations. This study documents a baseline of nutrients and chlorophyll-a in Corpus Christi Bay during a dry (average salinity>36 PSU) year.

  11. Effects of herbivory, nutrients, and reef protection on algal proliferation and coral growth on a tropical reef.

    PubMed

    Rasher, Douglas B; Engel, Sebastian; Bonito, Victor; Fraser, Gareth J; Montoya, Joseph P; Hay, Mark E

    2012-05-01

    Maintaining coral reef resilience against increasing anthropogenic disturbance is critical for effective reef management. Resilience is partially determined by how processes, such as herbivory and nutrient supply, affect coral recovery versus macroalgal proliferation following disturbances. However, the relative effects of herbivory versus nutrient enrichment on algal proliferation remain debated. Here, we manipulated herbivory and nutrients on a coral-dominated reef protected from fishing, and on an adjacent macroalgal-dominated reef subject to fishing and riverine discharge, over 152 days. On both reefs, herbivore exclusion increased total and upright macroalgal cover by 9-46 times, upright macroalgal biomass by 23-84 times, and cyanobacteria cover by 0-27 times, but decreased cover of encrusting coralline algae by 46-100% and short turf algae by 14-39%. In contrast, nutrient enrichment had no effect on algal proliferation, but suppressed cover of total macroalgae (by 33-42%) and cyanobacteria (by 71% on the protected reef) when herbivores were excluded. Herbivore exclusion, but not nutrient enrichment, also increased sediment accumulation, suggesting a strong link between herbivory, macroalgal growth, and sediment retention. Growth rates of the corals Porites cylindrica and Acropora millepora were 30-35% greater on the protected versus fished reef, but nutrient and herbivore manipulations within a site did not affect coral growth. Cumulatively, these data suggest that herbivory rather than eutrophication plays the dominant role in mediating macroalgal proliferation, that macroalgae trap sediments that may further suppress herbivory and enhance macroalgal dominance, and that corals are relatively resistant to damage from some macroalgae but are significantly impacted by ambient reef condition.

  12. A comparison of algal, macroinvertebrate, and fish assemblage indices for assessing low-level nutrient enrichment in wadeable Ozark streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justus, B.G.; Petersen, J.C.; Femmer, S.R.; Davis, J.V.; Wallace, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Biotic indices for algae, macroinvertebrates, and fish assemblages can be effective for monitoring stream enrichment, but little is known regarding the value of the three assemblages for detecting perturbance as a consequence of low-level nutrient enrichment. In the summer of 2006, we collected nutrient and biotic samples from 30 wadeable Ozark streams that spanned a nutrient-concentration gradient from reference to moderately enriched conditions. Seventy-three algal metrics, 62 macroinvertebrate metrics, and 60 fish metrics were evaluated for each of the three biotic indices. After a group of candidate metrics had been identified with multivariate analysis, correlation procedures and scatter plots were used to identify the four metrics having strongest relations to a nutrient index calculated from log transformed and normalized total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations. The four metrics selected for each of the three biotic indices were: algae-the relative abundance of most tolerant diatoms, the combined relative abundance of three species of Cymbella, mesosaprobic algae percent taxa richness, and the relative abundance of diatoms that are obligate nitrogen heterotrophs; macroinvertebrate-the relative abundance of intolerant organisms, Baetidae relative abundance, moderately tolerant taxa richness, and insect biomass; fish-herbivore and detritivore taxa richness, pool species relative abundance, fish catch per unit effort, and black bass (Micropterus spp.) relative abundance. All three biotic indices were negatively correlated to nutrient concentrations but the algal index had a higher correlation (rho = -0.89) than did the macroinvertebrate and fish indices (rho = -0.63 and -0.58, respectively). Biotic index scores were lowest and nutrient concentrations were highest for streams with basins having the highest poultry and cattle production. Because of the availability of litter for fertilizer and associated increases in grass and hay production, cattle

  13. Quantitative Nutrient Limitation Analysis of Global Forests by Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, A. M.; Badgley, G. M.; Field, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient availability in terrestrial ecosystems may be the primary determinant of the long-term carbon storage capacity of vegetation. Both nutrient availability and carbon storage capacity are highly uncertain and limit our ability to predict atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Terrestrial vegetation, especially forests, play a critical role in regulating the global carbon cycle and Earth's climate by sequestering carbon from the atmosphere. The broad relationship between nutrient availability and increased biomass production can be captured using remotely-sensed spectral information. We develop an approach to estimate total nutrient availability in 848 global forest sites at 1-km spatial resolution by combining the ecological principle of functional convergence with MODIS gross primary productivity (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET) products from 2000-2013. Convergence in the relationship between maximum GPP and ET of nutrient-rich forests indicate that any sites deviating from this upper-limit are associated with a lower availability of nutrients. This method offers a way to examine the severity, as well as the spatial extent of nutrient limitation at the global scale. We find that the degree to which forests are nutrient limited range between 0% and 81% with an average limitation of 16 ± 17%. Our method agrees with regional nutrient gradients (i.e. SW-NE Amazon), but does not tightly correspond with recently published nutrient limitation classification standards (Fernandez-Martinez et al., 2014). A global terrestrial nutrient limitation map can assist in diagnosing the health of vegetation while removing the necessity for extensive field sampling or local nutrient addition experiments. Further research will expand the study sites to obtain a complete global terrestrial nutrient limitation map.

  14. An investigation of submarine groundwater-borne nutrient fluxes to the west Florida shelf and recurrent harmful algal blooms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Christopher G.; Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-shelf, water-column mass balance of radon-222 (222Rn) provided estimates of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), which were then used to quantify benthic nutrient fluxes. Surface water and groundwater were collected along a shore-normal transect that extended from Tampa Bay, Florida, across the Pinellas County peninsula, to the 10-m isobath in the Gulf of Mexico. Samples were analyzed for 222Rn and radium-223,224,226 (223,224,226Ra) activities as well as inorganic and organic nutrients. Cross-shore gradients of 222Rn and 223,224,226Ra activities indicate a nearshore source for these isotopes, which mixes with water characterized by low activities offshore. Radon-based SGD rates vary between 2.5 and 15 cm d-1 proximal to the shoreline and decrease offshore. The source of SGD is largely shallow exchange between surface and pore waters, although deeper groundwater cycling may also be important. Enrichment of total dissolved nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus in pore water combined with SGD rates results in specific nutrient fluxes comparable to or greater than estuarine fluxes from Tampa Bay. The significance of these fluxes to nearshore blooms of Karenia brevis is highlighted by comparison with prescribed nutrient demands for bloom maintenance and growth. Whereas our flux estimates do not indicate SGD and benthic fluxes as the dominant nutrient source to the harmful algal blooms, SGD-derived loads do narrow the deficit between documented nutrient supplies and bloom demands.

  15. Effects of two different nutrient loads on microalgal production, nutrient removal and photosynthetic efficiency in pilot-scale wastewater high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2014-12-01

    When wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds (HRAP) are coupled with resource recovery processes, such as biofuel production, short hydraulic retention times (HRTs) are often favoured to increase the microalgal biomass productivity. However, short HRT can result in increased nutrient load to the HRAP which may negatively impact on the performance of the microalgae. This paper investigate the effects of high (NH4-N mean concentration 39.7 ± 17.9 g m(-3)) and moderate ((NH4-N mean concentration 19.9 ± 8.9 g m(-3)) nutrient loads and short HRT on the performance of microalgae with respect to light absorption, photosynthesis, biomass production and nutrient removal in pilot-scale (total volume 8 m(3)) wastewater treatment HRAPs. Microalgal biomass productivity was significantly higher under high nutrient loads, with a 133% and 126% increase in the chlorophyll-a and VSS areal productivities, respectively. Microalgae were more efficient at assimilating NH4-N from the wastewater under higher nutrient loads compared to moderate loads. Higher microalgal biomass with increased nutrient load resulted in increased light attenuation in the HRAP and lower light absorption efficiency by the microalgae. High nutrient loads also resulted in improved photosynthetic performance with significantly higher maximum rates of electron transport, oxygen production and quantum yield. This experiment demonstrated that microalgal productivity and nutrient removal efficiency were not inhibited by high nutrient loads, however, higher loads resulted in lower water quality in effluent discharge.

  16. Effects of two different nutrient loads on microalgal production, nutrient removal and photosynthetic efficiency in pilot-scale wastewater high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2014-12-01

    When wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds (HRAP) are coupled with resource recovery processes, such as biofuel production, short hydraulic retention times (HRTs) are often favoured to increase the microalgal biomass productivity. However, short HRT can result in increased nutrient load to the HRAP which may negatively impact on the performance of the microalgae. This paper investigate the effects of high (NH4-N mean concentration 39.7 ± 17.9 g m(-3)) and moderate ((NH4-N mean concentration 19.9 ± 8.9 g m(-3)) nutrient loads and short HRT on the performance of microalgae with respect to light absorption, photosynthesis, biomass production and nutrient removal in pilot-scale (total volume 8 m(3)) wastewater treatment HRAPs. Microalgal biomass productivity was significantly higher under high nutrient loads, with a 133% and 126% increase in the chlorophyll-a and VSS areal productivities, respectively. Microalgae were more efficient at assimilating NH4-N from the wastewater under higher nutrient loads compared to moderate loads. Higher microalgal biomass with increased nutrient load resulted in increased light attenuation in the HRAP and lower light absorption efficiency by the microalgae. High nutrient loads also resulted in improved photosynthetic performance with significantly higher maximum rates of electron transport, oxygen production and quantum yield. This experiment demonstrated that microalgal productivity and nutrient removal efficiency were not inhibited by high nutrient loads, however, higher loads resulted in lower water quality in effluent discharge. PMID:25189477

  17. Riverine nutrients fluxes to the North Sea and harmful algal blooms, what changed since 1984 ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passy, Paul; Gypens, Nathalie; Billen, Gilles; Garnier, Josette; Thieu, Vincent; Rousseau, Véronique; Callens, Julie; Parent, Jean-Yves; Lancelot, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    Nutrients fluxes delivered to the coastal zones reflect human activities taking place within watersheds. Silica (Si) fluxes mainly originate from soils and rocks weathering, so they are few impacted by human activities. On the contrary, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fluxes are dramatically impacted by human activities. N originates from urban waste water but mainly from agricultural activities. P originates mostly from urban and industrial waste waters. The enrichment of the hydrosystems in N and P leads to an imbalance between N and P in one hand and Si in the other hand. This imbalance leads to harmful algal blooms, which are damaging aquatic ecosystems, fishing activities and touristic activities. In 1992, the OSPAR convention was signed by 15 European States and targets to decrease the N and P fluxes delivered to the European coastal zones by 50 % with respect to the reference year of 1985. Focusing on the Seine, Somme and Scheldt watersheds (France and Belgium) and the adjacent coastal zone of the North Sea, we developed a retrospective modelling from 1984 to 2007 calculating nutrients fluxes from watersheds and Phaeocystis blooms occurring in the coastal zone. We coupled the biogeochemical deterministic model Seneque/Riverstrahler depicting processes occurring within hydrological networks with the marine model MIRO simulating Phaeocystis blooms in the coastal zone. The evolution of N and P fluxes were highly dissimilar. Indeed, P mainly originates from point sources. Thereby the banishment of P from the washing powders during the nineties, the development of sewage and the improvement of WWTP in terms of waste water treatment lead to a decrease of P fluxes delivered to the coastal zone. This decrease can be observed for the three watersheds. The P OSPAR objective is achieved since the middle of the 2000's years. On the other side, N, mostly originating from agricultural diffuse sources, did not decrease over the period. The fluxes even increased at the

  18. Nutrient removal in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds with carbon dioxide addition.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J

    2011-01-01

    The influence of CO2 addition to high rate algal ponds (HRAPS) on nitrogen removal was investigated using two pilot-scale HRAPs operated with different hydraulic retention times (HRT: 4 and 8 days), and was compared to the nitrogen removal by the 8-day HRT pond before CO2 addition was installed. Nitrogen balances were calculated by partitioning total nitrogen into organic and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+-N and NO3--N), and by separation of the organic nitrogen into particulate (PON) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). PON was further divided into algal organic nitrogen (AON) and bacteria organic nitrogen (BON) to investigate nitrogen mass flow in the HRAPS. This research shows that the proportion of algae in the algal/bacterial biomass in the longer 8-day HRT HRAP8d (55.6%) was appreciably lower than that in the shorter 4-day HRT HRAP4d (80.5%) when CO2 was added to control the maximum pH to <8.0 during the summer. Higher bacterial biomass in the longer 8-day HRT HRAP corresponded with higher nitrification rates, indicating that the longer 8-day HRT in the summer was detrimental for two reasons: lower algal productivity and increased nitrogen loss through nitrification/denitrification. Overall nitrogen removal of approximately 60% in the HRAPS with CO2 addition was mainly achieved by algal assimilation followed by sedimentation in the settling unit.

  19. Controlling cyanobacterial blooms by managing nutrient ratio and limitation in a large hyper-eutrophic lake: Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianrong; Qin, Boqiang; Wu, Pan; Zhou, Jian; Niu, Cheng; Deng, Jianming; Niu, Hailin

    2015-01-01

    Excessive nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loading of aquatic ecosystems is a leading cause of eutrophication and harmful algal blooms worldwide, and reducing nutrient levels in water has been a primary management objective. To provide a rational protection strategy and predict future trends of eutrophication in eutrophic lakes, we need to understand the relationships between nutrient ratios and nutrient limitations. We conducted a set of outdoor bioassays at the shore of Lake Taihu. It showed that N only additions induced phytoplankton growth but adding only P did not. Combined N plus P additions promoted higher phytoplankton biomass than N only additions, which suggested that both N and P were deficient for maximum phytoplankton growth in this lake (TN:TP=18.9). When nutrients are present at less than 7.75-13.95 mg/L TN and 0.41-0.74 mg/L TP, the deficiency of either N or P or both limits the growth of phytoplankton. N limitation then takes place when the TN:TP ratio is less than 21.5-24.7 (TDN:TDP was 34.2-44.3), and P limitation occurs above this. Therefore, according to this ratio, controlling N when N limitation exists and controlling P when P deficiency is present will prevent algal blooms effectively in the short term. But for the long term, a persistent dual nutrient (N and P) management strategy is necessary.

  20. Seasonal patterns in nutrients, carbon, and algal responses in wadeable streams within three geographically distinct areas of the United States, 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Kathy E.; Lorenz, David L.; Petersen, James C.; Greene, John B.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey determined seasonal variability in nutrients, carbon, and algal biomass in 22 wadeable streams over a 1-year period during 2007 or 2008 within three geographically distinct areas in the United States. The three areas are the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMIS) in Minnesota, the Ozark Plateaus (ORZK) in southern Missouri and northern Arkansas, and the Upper Snake River Basin (USNK) in southern Idaho. Seasonal patterns in some constituent concentrations and algal responses were distinct. Nitrate concentrations were greatest during the winter in all study areas potentially because of a reduction in denitrification rates and algal uptake during the winter, along with reduced surface runoff. Decreases in nitrate concentrations during the spring and summer at most stream sites coincided with increased streamflow during the snowmelt runoff or spring storms indicating dilution. The continued decrease in nitrate concentrations during summer potentially is because of a reduction in nitrate inputs (from decreased surface runoff) or increases in biological uptake. In contrast to nitrate concentrations, ammonia concentrations varied among study areas. Ammonia concentration trends were similar at UMIS and USNK sampling sites with winter peak concentrations and rapid decreases in ammonia concentrations by spring or early summer. In contrast, ammonia concentrations at OZRK sampling sites were more variable with peak concentrations later in the year. Ammonia may accumulate in stream water in the winter under ice and snow cover at the UMIS and USNK sites because of limited algal metabolism and increased mineralization of decaying organic matter under reducing conditions within stream bottom sediments. Phosphorus concentration patterns and the type of phosphorus present changes with changing hydrologic conditions and seasons and varied among study areas. Orthophosphate concentrations tended to be greater in the summer at UMIS sites, whereas total

  1. Algal uptake of hydrophobic and hydrophilic dissolved organic nitrogen in effluent from biological nutrient removal municipal wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haizhou; Jeong, Joonseon; Gray, Holly; Smith, Scott; Sedlak, David L

    2012-01-17

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) accounts for a large fraction of the total nitrogen discharged to surface waters by municipal wastewater treatment plants designed for biological nutrient removal (BNR). Previous research indicates that some but not all of the DON in wastewater effluent is available to bacteria and algae over time scales that are relevant to rivers and estuaries. To separate bioavailable DON from nitrate and less reactive DON species, an XAD-8 resin coupled with an anion exchange treatment was employed prior to chemical analysis and algal bioassays. Analysis of effluent samples from a range of municipal BNR plants (total DON concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 1.8 mg N/L) employing a range of technologies indicated that hydrophilic DON, which typically accounted for approximately 80% of the total DON, stimulated algal growth, whereas hydrophobic DON, which accounted for the remaining DON, remained at nearly constant concentrations and had little or no effect on algal growth during a 14-day incubation period. The hydrophobic DON exhibits characteristics of humic substances, and is likely to persist for long periods in the aquatic environment. The distinct differences between these two classes of DON may provide a basis for considering them separately in water quality models and effluent discharge regulations. PMID:22206266

  2. A comparison of algal, macroinvertebrate, and fish assemblage indices for assessing low-level nutrient enrichment in wadeable Ozark streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justus, B.G.; Femmer, Suzanne R.; Davis, Jerri V.; Petersen, James C.; Wallace, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    All three biotic indices were negatively correlated to nutrient concentrations but the algal index had a higher correlation (rho = −0.89) than did the macroinvertebrate and fish indices (rho = −0.63 and −0.58, respectively). Biotic index scores were lowest and nutrient concentrations were highest for streams with basins having the highest poultry and cattle production. Because of the availability of litter for fertilizer and associated increases in grass and hay production, cattle feeding capacity increases with poultry production. Studies are needed that address the synergistic effect of poultry and cattle production on Ozark streams in high production areas before ecological risks can be adequately addressed.

  3. Meteorological influences on algal bloom potential in a nutrient-rich blackwater river

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of variability in rainfall on the potential for algal blooms was examined for the St. Johns River in northeast Florida. Water chemistry and phytoplankton data were collected at selected sites monthly from 1993 through 2003. Information on rainfall and estimates ofw at...

  4. An Energy-limited Model of Algal Biofuels Production: Towards the Next Generation of Advanced Biofuels

    DOE PAGES

    Dunlop, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Algal biofuels are increasingly important as a source of renewable energy. The absence of reliable thermodynamic and other property data, and the large amount of kinetic data that would normally be required have created a major barrier to simulation. Additionally, the absence of a generally accepted flowsheet for biofuel production means that detailed simulation of the wrong approach is a real possibility. This model of algal biofuel production estimates the necessary data and places it into a heuristic model using a commercial simulator that back-calculates the process structure required. Furthermore, complex kinetics can be obviated for now by putting themore » simulator into energy limitation and forcing it to solve for the missing design variables, such as bioreactor surface area, productivity, and oil content. The model does not attempt to prescribe a particular approach, but provides a guide towards a sound engineering approach to this challenging and important problem.« less

  5. An energy-limited model of algal biofuel production: Toward the next generation of advanced biofuels

    DOE PAGES

    Dunlop, Eric H.; Coaldrake, A. Kimi; Silva, Cory S.; Seider, Warren D.

    2013-10-22

    Algal biofuels are increasingly important as a source of renewable energy. The absence of reliable thermodynamic and other property data, and the large amount of kinetic data that would normally be required have created a major barrier to simulation. Additionally, the absence of a generally accepted flowsheet for biofuel production means that detailed simulation of the wrong approach is a real possibility. This model of algal biofuel production estimates the necessary data and places it into a heuristic model using a commercial simulator that back-calculates the process structure required. Furthermore, complex kinetics can be obviated for now by putting themore » simulator into energy limitation and forcing it to solve for the missing design variables, such as bioreactor surface area, productivity, and oil content. The model does not attempt to prescribe a particular approach, but provides a guide towards a sound engineering approach to this challenging and important problem.« less

  6. An energy-limited model of algal biofuel production: Toward the next generation of advanced biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, Eric H.; Coaldrake, A. Kimi; Silva, Cory S.; Seider, Warren D.

    2013-10-22

    Algal biofuels are increasingly important as a source of renewable energy. The absence of reliable thermodynamic and other property data, and the large amount of kinetic data that would normally be required have created a major barrier to simulation. Additionally, the absence of a generally accepted flowsheet for biofuel production means that detailed simulation of the wrong approach is a real possibility. This model of algal biofuel production estimates the necessary data and places it into a heuristic model using a commercial simulator that back-calculates the process structure required. Furthermore, complex kinetics can be obviated for now by putting the simulator into energy limitation and forcing it to solve for the missing design variables, such as bioreactor surface area, productivity, and oil content. The model does not attempt to prescribe a particular approach, but provides a guide towards a sound engineering approach to this challenging and important problem.

  7. Occurrence and distribution of algal biomass and Its relation to nutrients and selected basin characteristics in Indiana streams, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowe, B. Scott; Leer, Donald R.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Caskey, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    The seasonal values for nutrients (nitrate, TKN, TN, and TP) and algal biomass (periphyton CHLa, AFDM, seston CHLa, and POC) were compared to published U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) values for their respective ecoregions. Algal biomass values either were greater than the 25th percentile published USEPA values or extended the range of data in Aggregate Nutrient Ecoregions VI, VII, IX and USEPA Level III Ecoregions 54, 55, 56, 71, and 72. If the values for the 25th percentile proposed by the USEPA were adopted as nutrient water-quality criteria, then about 71 percent of the nutrient samples and 57 percent of the CHLa samples within the eight study basins would be considered nutrient enriched.

  8. Substrate and nutrient limitation regulating microbial growth in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Microbial activity and growth in soil is regulated by several abiotic factors, including temperature, moisture and pH as the most important ones. At the same time nutrient conditions and substrate availability will also determine microbial growth. Amount of substrate will not only affect overall microbial growth, but also affect the balance of fungal and bacterial growth. The type of substrate will also affect the latter. Furthermore, according to Liebig law of limiting factors, we would expect one nutrient to be the main limiting one for microbial growth in soil. When this nutrient is added, the initial second liming factor will become the main one, adding complexity to the microbial response after adding different substrates. I will initially describe different ways of determining limiting factors for bacterial growth in soil, especially a rapid method estimating bacterial growth, using the leucine incorporation technique, after adding C (as glucose), N (as ammonium nitrate) and P (as phosphate). Scenarios of different limitations will be covered, with the bacterial growth response compared with fungal growth and total activity (respiration). The "degree of limitation", as well as the main limiting nutrient, can be altered by adding substrate of different stoichiometric composition. However, the organism group responding after alleviating the nutrient limitation can differ depending on the type of substrate added. There will also be situations, where fungi and bacteria appear to be limited by different nutrients. Finally, I will describe interactions between abiotic factors and the response of the soil microbiota to alleviation of limiting factors.

  9. Context-dependent effects of nutrient loading on the coral-algal mutualism.

    PubMed

    Shantz, Andrew A; Burkepile, Deron E

    2014-07-01

    Human-mediated increases in nutrient availability alter patterns of primary production, impact species diversity, and threaten ecosystem function. Nutrients can also alter community structure by disrupting the relationships between nutrient-sharing mutualists that form the foundation of communities. Given their oligotrophic nature and the dependence of reef-building corals on symbiotic relationships, coral reefs may be particularly vulnerable to excess nutrients. However, individual studies suggest complex, even contradictory, relationships among nutrient availability, coral physiology, and coral growth. Here, we used meta-analysis to establish general patterns of the impact of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) on coral growth and photobiology. Overall, we found that over a wide range of concentrations, N reduced coral calcification 11%, on average, but enhanced metrics of coral photobiology, such as photosynthetic rate. In contrast, P enrichment increased average calcification rates by 9%, likely through direct impacts on the calcification process, but minimally impacted coral photobiology. There were few synergistic impacts of combined N and P on corals, as the nutrients impact corals via different pathways. Additionally, the response of corals to increasing nutrient availability was context dependent, varying with coral taxa and morphology, enrichment source, and nutrient identity. For example, naturally occurring enrichment from fish excretion increased coral growth, while human-mediated enrichment tended to decrease coral growth. Understanding the nuances of the relationship between nutrients and corals may allow for more targeted remediation strategies and suggest how other global change drivers such as overfishing and climate change will shape how nutrient availability impacts corals.

  10. Seasonal changes in nutrient limitation and nitrate sources in the green macroalga Ulva lactuca at sites with and without green tides in a northeastern Pacific embayment.

    PubMed

    Van Alstyne, Kathryn L

    2016-02-15

    In Penn Cove, ulvoid green algal mats occur annually. To examine seasonal variation in their causes, nitrogen and carbon were measured in Ulva lactuca in May, July, and September and stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios were quantified in U. lactuca, Penn Cove seawater, upwelled water from Saratoga Passage, water near the Skagit River outflow, and effluents from wastewater treatment facilities. Ulvoid growth was nitrogen limited and the sources of nitrogen used by the algae changed during the growing season. Algal nitrogen concentrations were 0.85-4.55% and were highest in September and at sites where algae were abundant. Upwelled waters were the primary nitrogen source for the algae, but anthropogenic sources also contributed to algal growth towards the end of the growing season. This study suggests that small nitrogen inputs can result in crossing a "tipping point", causing the release of nutrient limitation and localized increases in algal growth. PMID:26725866

  11. Context-dependent effects of nutrient loading on the coral-algal mutualism.

    PubMed

    Shantz, Andrew A; Burkepile, Deron E

    2014-07-01

    Human-mediated increases in nutrient availability alter patterns of primary production, impact species diversity, and threaten ecosystem function. Nutrients can also alter community structure by disrupting the relationships between nutrient-sharing mutualists that form the foundation of communities. Given their oligotrophic nature and the dependence of reef-building corals on symbiotic relationships, coral reefs may be particularly vulnerable to excess nutrients. However, individual studies suggest complex, even contradictory, relationships among nutrient availability, coral physiology, and coral growth. Here, we used meta-analysis to establish general patterns of the impact of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) on coral growth and photobiology. Overall, we found that over a wide range of concentrations, N reduced coral calcification 11%, on average, but enhanced metrics of coral photobiology, such as photosynthetic rate. In contrast, P enrichment increased average calcification rates by 9%, likely through direct impacts on the calcification process, but minimally impacted coral photobiology. There were few synergistic impacts of combined N and P on corals, as the nutrients impact corals via different pathways. Additionally, the response of corals to increasing nutrient availability was context dependent, varying with coral taxa and morphology, enrichment source, and nutrient identity. For example, naturally occurring enrichment from fish excretion increased coral growth, while human-mediated enrichment tended to decrease coral growth. Understanding the nuances of the relationship between nutrients and corals may allow for more targeted remediation strategies and suggest how other global change drivers such as overfishing and climate change will shape how nutrient availability impacts corals. PMID:25163130

  12. A hetero-photoautotrophic two-stage cultivation process to improve wastewater nutrient removal and enhance algal lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Li, Yecong; Hu, Bing; Ma, Xiaochen; Cheng, Yanling; Liu, Yuhuan; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2012-04-01

    A hetero-photoautotrophic algal growth model was studied for improved wastewater treatment and low cost algal biofuel feedstock production. The microalga, Auxenochlorella protothecoides UMN280, was grown heterotrophically on concentrated municipal wastewater and then autotrophically with CO(2) supplementation (air, 1% and 5%, respectively). Strain UMN280 was harvested by self-sedimentation after the heterotrophic stage and the supernatant was aerated with different levels of CO(2) to facilitate autotrophic growth in the second stage. The maximal biomass concentration and lipid content at the first and second stages reached 1.12g/L and 28.90%, and 1.16g/L and 33.22%, respectively. The nutrient removal efficiencies for total phosphorus, ammonia, nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand at the end of the two-stage cultivation were 98.48%, 100%, 90.60% and 79.10%, respectively. The above process can be used to treat organic-rich wastewaters (e.g. industrial and animal manure wastewaters) to achieve the dual purpose of low-cost wastewater treatment and biofuel feedstock production. PMID:22326332

  13. Herbivores and nutrients control grassland plant diversity via light limitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; Gruner, Daniel S.; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M.; Alder, Peter B.; Alberti, Juan; Anderson, T. Michael; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Biederman, Lori; Blumenthal, Dana; Brown, Cynthia S.; Brudvig, Lars A.; Buckley, Yvonne M.; Cadotte, Marc; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Cleland, Elsa E.; Crawley, Michael J.; Daleo, Pedro; Damschen, Ellen Ingman; Davies, Kendi F.; DeCrappeo, Nicole M.; Du, Guozhen; Firn, Jennifer; Hautier, Yann; Heckman, Robert W.; Hector, Andy; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Iribarne, Oscar; Klein, Julia A.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Li, Wei; MacDougall, Andrew S.; McCulley, Rebecca L.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Mitchell, Charles E.; Moore, Joslin L.; Mortensen, Brent; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Orrock, John L.; Pascual, Jesús; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Risch, Anita C.; Schuetz, Martin; Smith, Melinda D.; Stevens, Carly J.; Sullivan, Lauren L.; Williams, Ryan J.; Wragg, Peter D.; Wright, Justin P.; Yang, Louie H.

    2014-01-01

    Human alterations to nutrient cycles and herbivore communities are affecting global biodiversity dramatically. Ecological theory predicts these changes should be strongly counteractive: nutrient addition drives plant species loss through intensified competition for light, whereas herbivores prevent competitive exclusion by increasing ground-level light, particularly in productive systems. Here we use experimental data spanning a globally relevant range of conditions to test the hypothesis that herbaceous plant species losses caused by eutrophication may be offset by increased light availability due to herbivory. This experiment, replicated in 40 grasslands on 6 continents, demonstrates that nutrients and herbivores can serve as counteracting forces to control local plant diversity through light limitation, independent of site productivity, soil nitrogen, herbivore type and climate. Nutrient addition consistently reduced local diversity through light limitation, and herbivory rescued diversity at sites where it alleviated light limitation. Thus, species loss from anthropogenic eutrophication can be ameliorated in grasslands where herbivory increases ground-level light.

  14. Herbivores and nutrients control grassland plant diversity via light limitation.

    PubMed

    Borer, Elizabeth T; Seabloom, Eric W; Gruner, Daniel S; Harpole, W Stanley; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M; Adler, Peter B; Alberti, Juan; Anderson, T Michael; Bakker, Jonathan D; Biederman, Lori; Blumenthal, Dana; Brown, Cynthia S; Brudvig, Lars A; Buckley, Yvonne M; Cadotte, Marc; Chu, Chengjin; Cleland, Elsa E; Crawley, Michael J; Daleo, Pedro; Damschen, Ellen I; Davies, Kendi F; DeCrappeo, Nicole M; Du, Guozhen; Firn, Jennifer; Hautier, Yann; Heckman, Robert W; Hector, Andy; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Iribarne, Oscar; Klein, Julia A; Knops, Johannes M H; La Pierre, Kimberly J; Leakey, Andrew D B; Li, Wei; MacDougall, Andrew S; McCulley, Rebecca L; Melbourne, Brett A; Mitchell, Charles E; Moore, Joslin L; Mortensen, Brent; O'Halloran, Lydia R; Orrock, John L; Pascual, Jesús; Prober, Suzanne M; Pyke, David A; Risch, Anita C; Schuetz, Martin; Smith, Melinda D; Stevens, Carly J; Sullivan, Lauren L; Williams, Ryan J; Wragg, Peter D; Wright, Justin P; Yang, Louie H

    2014-04-24

    Human alterations to nutrient cycles and herbivore communities are affecting global biodiversity dramatically. Ecological theory predicts these changes should be strongly counteractive: nutrient addition drives plant species loss through intensified competition for light, whereas herbivores prevent competitive exclusion by increasing ground-level light, particularly in productive systems. Here we use experimental data spanning a globally relevant range of conditions to test the hypothesis that herbaceous plant species losses caused by eutrophication may be offset by increased light availability due to herbivory. This experiment, replicated in 40 grasslands on 6 continents, demonstrates that nutrients and herbivores can serve as counteracting forces to control local plant diversity through light limitation, independent of site productivity, soil nitrogen, herbivore type and climate. Nutrient addition consistently reduced local diversity through light limitation, and herbivory rescued diversity at sites where it alleviated light limitation. Thus, species loss from anthropogenic eutrophication can be ameliorated in grasslands where herbivory increases ground-level light.

  15. Herbivores and nutrients control grassland plant diversity via light limitation.

    PubMed

    Borer, Elizabeth T; Seabloom, Eric W; Gruner, Daniel S; Harpole, W Stanley; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M; Adler, Peter B; Alberti, Juan; Anderson, T Michael; Bakker, Jonathan D; Biederman, Lori; Blumenthal, Dana; Brown, Cynthia S; Brudvig, Lars A; Buckley, Yvonne M; Cadotte, Marc; Chu, Chengjin; Cleland, Elsa E; Crawley, Michael J; Daleo, Pedro; Damschen, Ellen I; Davies, Kendi F; DeCrappeo, Nicole M; Du, Guozhen; Firn, Jennifer; Hautier, Yann; Heckman, Robert W; Hector, Andy; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Iribarne, Oscar; Klein, Julia A; Knops, Johannes M H; La Pierre, Kimberly J; Leakey, Andrew D B; Li, Wei; MacDougall, Andrew S; McCulley, Rebecca L; Melbourne, Brett A; Mitchell, Charles E; Moore, Joslin L; Mortensen, Brent; O'Halloran, Lydia R; Orrock, John L; Pascual, Jesús; Prober, Suzanne M; Pyke, David A; Risch, Anita C; Schuetz, Martin; Smith, Melinda D; Stevens, Carly J; Sullivan, Lauren L; Williams, Ryan J; Wragg, Peter D; Wright, Justin P; Yang, Louie H

    2014-04-24

    Human alterations to nutrient cycles and herbivore communities are affecting global biodiversity dramatically. Ecological theory predicts these changes should be strongly counteractive: nutrient addition drives plant species loss through intensified competition for light, whereas herbivores prevent competitive exclusion by increasing ground-level light, particularly in productive systems. Here we use experimental data spanning a globally relevant range of conditions to test the hypothesis that herbaceous plant species losses caused by eutrophication may be offset by increased light availability due to herbivory. This experiment, replicated in 40 grasslands on 6 continents, demonstrates that nutrients and herbivores can serve as counteracting forces to control local plant diversity through light limitation, independent of site productivity, soil nitrogen, herbivore type and climate. Nutrient addition consistently reduced local diversity through light limitation, and herbivory rescued diversity at sites where it alleviated light limitation. Thus, species loss from anthropogenic eutrophication can be ameliorated in grasslands where herbivory increases ground-level light. PMID:24670649

  16. Profiles of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP), algal pigments, nutrients, and salinity in the fast ice of Prydz Bay, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevena, Anne J.; Jones, Graham B.; Wright, Simon W.; van den Enden, Rick L.

    2003-05-01

    Total dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSPt), chlorophyll a (Chl a), and algal marker pigments were measured in 12 fast ice cores collected from Prydz Bay, eastern Antarctica (68°-69°S, 77°-79°E) in October 1997 and November 1998. Patterns of DMSPt distribution through the ice were similar on spatial scales of meters to tens of kilometers within ice sheets grouped according to growth history. This reflects the association of DMSP in fast ice with autotrophic biomass distribution, which is intrinsically linked with ice growth and differed between the ice sheets. The 12 fast ice cores were divided into three groups on the basis of ice thickness and year. Concentrations of DMSPt ranged widely from 9 to 1478 nM with marked peaks occurring within each core. Mean DMSPt concentrations were higher (200 nM) in the medium first-year ice (0.7-1.2 m) than in the thick (>1.2 m) first-year ice (90 nM), mainly because of a local surface algal assemblage that may be atypical. The fast ice algal assemblages in surface, interior, and bottom ice were dominated by diatoms (Fucoxanthin:Chl a concentrations >80%). Dinoflagellates and haptophytes were generally small and variable components of the assemblages (Peridinin:Chl a 2-11% and 19'-hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin:Chl a 2-4%, respectively). Our data support the important contribution of diatoms to DMSP production in sea ice. Nutrient (nitrate, silicate, phosphate) concentrations were measured for one group of cores. Silicate and Chl a concentrations were significantly correlated (r = 0.30, P < 0.02, Pearson), implying that silicate availability may have regulated algal growth. The Si:P:N ratio in interior ice (27:1:10) was different to that in surface and bottom ice (46:1:23). We have summarized DMSP data reported from six Antarctic sea ice studies to investigate whether comparisons within the growing database need to consider differences in sea ice type, thickness, location, or season. Although concentrations from individual samples

  17. Nutrient removal of agricultural drainage water using algal turf scrubbers and solar power

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restoration of the Chesapeake Bay poses significant challenges because of increasing population pressure, conversion of farmland to urban/suburban development, and the expense of infrastructure needed to achieve significant and sustained nutrient reductions from agricultural and urban sources. One ...

  18. Oxygen Consumption Rates of Bacteria under Nutrient-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Finkel, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Many environments on Earth experience nutrient limitation and as a result have nongrowing or very slowly growing bacterial populations. To better understand bacterial respiration under environmentally relevant conditions, the effect of nutrient limitation on respiration rates of heterotrophic bacteria was measured. The oxygen consumption and population density of batch cultures of Escherichia coli K-12, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 were tracked for up to 200 days. The oxygen consumption per CFU (QO2) declined by more than 2 orders of magnitude for all three strains as they transitioned from nutrient-abundant log-phase growth to the nutrient-limited early stationary phase. The large reduction in QO2 from growth to stationary phase suggests that nutrient availability is an important factor in considering environmental respiration rates. Following the death phase, during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP), QO2 values of the surviving population increased with time and more cells were respiring than formed colonies. Within the respiring population, a subpopulation of highly respiring cells increased in abundance with time. Apparently, as cells enter LTSP, there is a viable but not culturable population whose bulk community and per cell respiration rates are dynamic. This result has a bearing on how minimal energy requirements are met, especially in nutrient-limited environments. The minimal QO2 rates support the extension of Kleiber's law to the mass of a bacterium (100-fg range). PMID:23770901

  19. Assessment of nutrient enrichment by use of algal-, invertebrate-, and fish-community attributes in wadeable streams in ecoregions surrounding the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frey, Jeffrey W.; Bell, Amanda H.; Hambrook Berkman, Julie A.; Lorenz, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The algal, invertebrate, and fish taxa and community attributes that best reflect the effects of nutrients along a gradient of low to high nutrient concentrations in wadeable, primarily midwestern streams were determined as part of the U.S. Geological Suvey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Nutrient data collected from 64 sampling sites that reflected reference, agricultural, and urban influences between 1993 and 2006 were used to represent the nutrient gradient within Nutrient Ecoregion VI (Cornbelt and Northern Great Plains), VII (Mostly Glaciated Dairy Region), and VIII (Nutrient Poor Largely Glaciated Upper Midwest and Northeast). Nutrient Ecoregions VII and VIII comprise the Glacial North diatom ecoregion (GNE) and Nutrient Ecoregion VI represents the Central and Western Plains diatom ecoregion (CWPE). The diatom-ecoregion groupings were used chiefly for data analysis. The total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) data from 64 sites, where at least 6 nutrient samples were collected within a year at each site, were used to classify the sites into low-, medium-, and high-nutrient categories based upon the 10th and 75th percentiles of for sites within each Nutrient Ecoregion. In general, TN and TP concentrations were 3-5 times greater in Nutrient Ecoregion VI than in Nutrient Ecoregions VII and VIII. A subgroup of 54 of these 64 sites had algal-, invertebrate-, and fish-community data that were collected within the same year as the nutrients; these sites were used to assess the effects of nutrients on the biological communities. Multidimensional scaling was used to determine whether the entire region could be assessed together or whether there were regional differences between the algal, invertebrate, and fish communities. The biological communities were significantly different between the northern sites, primarily in the GNE and the southern sites, primarily in the CWPE. In the higher nutrient concentration gradient in the streams of the

  20. Phosphorus: a limiting nutrient for humanity?

    PubMed

    Elser, James J

    2012-12-01

    Phosphorus is a chemical element that is essential to life because of its role in numerous key molecules, including DNA and RNA; indeed, organisms require large amounts of P to grow rapidly. However, the supply of P from the environment is often limiting to production, including to crops. Thus, large amounts of P are mined annually to produce fertilizer that is applied in support of the 'Green Revolution.' However, much of this fertilizer eventually ends up in rivers, lakes and oceans where it causes costly eutrophication. Furthermore, given increasing human population, expanding meat consumption, and proliferating bioenergy pressures, concerns have recently been raised about the long-term geological, economic, and geopolitical viability of mined P for fertilizer production. Together, these issues highlight the non-sustainable nature of current human P use. To achieve P sustainability, farms need to become more efficient in how they use P while society as a whole must develop technologies and practices to recycle P from the food chain. Such large-scale changes will probably require a radical restructuring of the entire food system, highlighting the need for prompt but sustained action.

  1. Deciphering the Interconnections between Nutrient Supply, Demand, and Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covino, T. P.; Heffernan, J. B.; Bernhardt, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    Studies of stream nutrient dynamics have often focused on the influence of a single potentially limiting nutrient; however, it has become increasingly evident that ecosystems are constrained by the supply of numerous limiting resources. These resources may vary seasonally as a function of temperature, sunlight, and input of carbon and nutrients from upstream or terrestrial sources. We used multiple approaches, including plateau and TASCC nutrient additions, as well as analysis of diel nitrate dynamics as three different and complementary measures of nutrient demand/limitation in New Hope Creek, a third order stream in the Duke Forest of North Carolina over the course of one year. Nitrate-N concentrations were relatively high during the winter, spring, and summer months ranging from 105 - 518 and averaging 383 µg/L between January - August. During this time frame there was low demand for and limited uptake of added nitrate during plateau or TASCC additions (i.e., addition of N did not stimulate increased N uptake) although there was processing of background N evident from diel N and oxygen analyses. During autumn litterfall ecosystem respiration increased strongly and nitrate-N concentrations dropped precipitously, ranging from 9 - 34 and averaging 23 µg/L between September - December. During this period of low in-stream nitrate-N, demand for and uptake of added nitrate was high with maximum uptake rates of 560 µg/m2/min. This highlights the importance of understanding the relationship between nutrient supply and demand and the need to determine multiple resource controls over system processing. We also suggest that nutrient addition experiments need to be interpreted within the context of the supply and demand of multiple potentially limiting resources and the that the temporal dynamics of these relationships should be considered.

  2. Limited impact of Sargassum muticum on native algal assemblages from rocky intertidal shores.

    PubMed

    Olabarria, Celia; Rodil, Iván F; Incera, Mónica; Troncoso, Jesús S

    2009-04-01

    Invasive species represent a serious threat to natural ecosystems through a range of negative effects on native species in the region invaded. The invasive species Sargassum muticum has invaded several temperate regions worldwide including the Galician rocky shoreline (northwestern Spain) in Western Europe. The main aim of this study was to assess if colonization by S. muticum has any effect on native algal assemblages by experimental removal of S. muticum. We predicted that in those plots where S. muticum plants were removed, the structure of native algal assemblages would differ from that in plots where S. muticum plants were untouched. In addition, we predicted that the effect of Sargassum removal would be more important than other causes of variability at the small scale investigated. Results indicated limited impact of S. muticum on native assemblages. The impact was only evident on the total number of native taxa and two understory morpho-functional groups, filamentous and foliose algae, rather than on the entire macroalgal assemblages. PMID:19168211

  3. Detecting terrestrial nutrient limitation: a global meta-analysis of foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostertag, Rebecca; DiManno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    Examining foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization provides an alternative method for detecting nutrient limitation of ecosystems, which is logistically simpler to measure than biomass change. We present a meta-analysis of response ratios of foliar nitrogen and phosphorus (RRN, RRP) after addition of fertilizer of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or the two elements in combination, in relation to climate, ecosystem type, life form, family, and methodological factors. Results support other meta-analyses using biomass, and demonstrate there is strong evidence for nutrient limitation in natural communities. However, because N fertilization experiments greatly outnumber P fertilization trials, it is difficult to discern the absolute importance of N vs. P vs. co-limitation across ecosystems. Despite these caveats, it is striking that results did not follow "conventional wisdom" that temperate ecosystems are N-limited and tropical ones are P-limited. In addition, the use of ratios of N-to-P rather than response ratios also are a useful index of nutrient limitation, but due to large overlap in values, there are unlikely to be universal cutoff values for delimiting N vs. P limitation. Differences in RRN and RRP were most significant across ecosystem types, plant families, life forms, and between competitive environments, but not across climatic variables.

  4. Nutrient Limitation of Microbial Mediated Decomposition and Arctic Soil Chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melle, C. J.; Darrouzet-Nardi, A.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Soils of northern permafrost regions currently contain twice as much carbon as the entire Earth's atmosphere. Traditionally, environmental constraints have limited microbial activity resulting in restricted decomposition of soil organic matter in these systems and accumulation of massive amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC), however climate change is reducing the constraints of decomposition in arctic permafrost regions. Carbon cycling in nutrient poor, arctic ecosystems is tightly coupled to other biogeochemical cycles. Several studies have suggested strong nitrogen limitations of primary productivity and potentially warm-season microbial activity in these nutrient deficient soils. Nitrogen is required for microbial extracellular enzyme production which drives the decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM). Nitrogen limited arctic soils may also experience limitation via labile carbon availability despite the SOM rich environment due to low extracellular enzyme production. Few studies have directly addressed nutrient induced microbial limitation in SOC rich arctic tundra soils, and even less is known about the potential for nutrient co-limitation. Additionally, through the process of becoming deglaciated, sites within close proximity to one another may have experienced drastic differences in their effective soil ages due to the varied length of their active histories. Many soil properties and nutrient deficiencies are directly related to soil age, however this chronology has not previously been a focus of research on nutrient limitation of arctic soil microbial activity. Understanding of nutrient limitations, as well as potential co-limitation, on arctic soil microbial activity has important implications for carbon cycling and the ultimate fate of the current arctic SOC reservoir. Analyses of nutrient limitation on soils of a single site are not adequate for fully understanding the controls on soil microbial activity across a vast land mass with large variation in

  5. Nutrient availability and phytoplankton nutrient limitation across a gradient of atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elser, J.J.; Kyle, M.; Steuer, L.; Nydick, K.R.; Baron, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition to lakes and watersheds has been increasing steadily due to various anthropogenic activities. Because such anthropogenic N is widely distributed, even lakes relatively removed from direct human disturbance are potentially impacted. However, the effects of increased atmospheric N deposition on lakes are not well documented, We examined phytoplankton biomass, the absolute and relative abundance of limiting nutrients (N and phosphorus [P]), and phytoplankton nutrient limitation in alpine lakes of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado (USA) receiving elevated (>6 kg N??ha-1??yr-1) or low (<2 kg N??ha-1??yr-1) levels of atmospheric N deposition. Highdeposition lakes had higher NO3-N and total N concentrations and higher total N : total P ratios. Concentrations of chlorophyll and seston carbon (C) were 2-2.5 times higher in highdeposition relative to low-deposition lakes, while high-deposition lakes also had higher seston C:N and C:P (but not N:P) ratios. Short-term enrichment bioassays indicated a qualitative shift in the nature of phytoplankton nutrient limitation due to N deposition, as highdeposition lakes had an increased frequency of primary P limitation and a decreased frequency and magnitude of response to N and to combined N and P enrichment. Thus elevated atmospheric N deposition appears to have shifted nutrient supply from a relatively balanced but predominantly N-deficient regime to a more consistently P-limited regime in Colorado alpine lakes. This adds to accumulating evidence that sustained N deposition may have important effects on lake phytoplankton communities and plankton-based food webs by shifting the quantitative and qualitative nature of nutrient limitation. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  6. Herbivores and nutrients control grassland plant diversity via light limitation.

    SciTech Connect

    Borer, Elizabeth T.; et al, et al

    2014-01-01

    Human alterations to nutrient cycles1,2 and herbivore communities3–7 are affecting global biodiversity dramatically2. Ecological theory predicts these changes should be strongly counteractive: nutrient addition drives plant species loss through intensified competition for light, whereas herbivores prevent competitive exclusion by increasing ground-level light, particularly in productive systems8,9. Here we use experimental data spanning a globally relevant range of conditions to test the hypothesis that herbaceous plant species losses caused by eutrophication may be offset by increased light availability due to herbivory. This experiment, replicated in 40 grasslands on 6 continents, demonstrates that nutrients and herbivores can serve as counteracting forces to control local plant diversity through light limitation, independent of site productivity, soil nitrogen, herbivore type and climate. Nutrient addition consistently reduced local diversity through light limitation, and herbivory rescued diversity at sites where it alleviated light limitation. Thus, species loss from anthropogenic eutrophication can be ameliorated in grasslands where herbivory increases ground-level light.

  7. Nutrient limitation in Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM): phytoplankton communities and photosynthesis respond to nutrient pulse.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Quigg, Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Although the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system exports large amounts of nutrients to the Northern Gulf of Mexico annually, nutrient limitation of primary productivity still occurs offshore, acting as one of the major factors controlling local phytoplankton biomass and community structure. Bioassays were conducted for 48 hrs at two stations adjacent to the river plumes in April and August 2012. High Performance of Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) combined with ChemTax and a Fluorescence Induction and Relaxation (FIRe) system were combined to observe changes in the phytoplankton community structure and photosynthetic activity. Major fluorescence parameters (Fo, Fv/Fm) performed well to reveal the stimulating effect of the treatments with nitrogen (N-nitrate) and with nitrogen plus phosphate (+NPi). HPLC/ChemTax results showed that phytoplankton community structure shifted with nitrate addition: we observed an increase in the proportion of diatoms and prasinophytes and a decrease in cyanobacteria and prymnesiophytes. These findings are consistent with predictions from trait-based analysis which predict that phytoplankton groups with high maximum growth rates (μmax ) and high nutrient uptake rates (Vmax ) readily take advantage of the addition of limiting nutrients. Changes in phytoplankton community structure, if persistent, could trigger changes of particular organic matter fluxes and alter the micro-food web cycles and bottom oxygen consumption.

  8. Dynamic Nutrient Limitation in a Major Tributary to Eastern Lake Erie: The Role of Groundwater Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowinski, S.; Maavara, T.; Rezanezhad, F.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient silicon (Si) limited systems tend to promote more harmful algal blooms, compared with phosphorus (P) or nitrogen (N) limited systems. In this project, we studied the biogeochemical sources and sinks of Si in the Grand River watershed (GRW), a 7000 km2 basin located inthe largely agricultural region of southwestern Ontario, Canada. The river, its major tributaries, and eastern Lake Erie, into which the GRW drains, have historically been considered P limited. We collected groundwater and surface water samples at 11 locations in the lower half of the GRW at monthly to weekly intervals for one year. Samples were analyzed for dissolved and reactive particulate Si (DSi and PRSi), total dissolved P, soluble reactive P, and a suite of other macro and micronutrients including nitrate, nitrite, sulfur and iron. Results indicate that groundwater discharge to surface water provides a year-round source of DSi to surface water, with concentrations roughly equal to winter surface water concentrations. For the majority of the year, this groundwater DSi flux results in Si excess in the GRW. However, during extreme high flow events such as the spring snowmelt and long-term heavy rain events, P is flushed in high concentrations into the river, while DSi concentrations, which experience seasonal drawdown due to biological uptake, are diluted. These dynamics can lead to periods of Si limitation, which persists throughout the river and into Lake Erie.

  9. Nutrient enrichment, phytoplankton algal growth, and estimated rates of instream metabolic processes in the Quinebaug River Basin, Connecticut, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colombo, Michael J.; Grady, Stephen J.; Todd Trench, Elaine C.

    2004-01-01

    A consistent and pervasive pattern of nutrient enrichment was substantiated by water-quality sampling in the Quinebaug River and its tributaries in eastern Connecticut during water years 2000 and 2001. Median total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s recently recommended regional ambient water-qual-ity criteria for streams (0.71 and 0.031 milligrams per liter, respectively). Maximum total phosphorus concentrations exceeded 0.1 milligrams per liter at nearly half the sampled locations in the Quinebaug River Basin. Elevated total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations were measured at all stations on the mainstem of the Quinebaug River, the French River, and the Little River. Nutrient enrichment was related to municipal wastewater point sources at the sites on the mainstem of the Quinebaug River and French River, and to agricultural nonpoint nutrient sources in the Little River Basin. Nutrient enrichment and favorable physical factors have resulted in excessive, nuisance algal blooms during summer months, particularly in the numerous impoundments in the Quinebaug River system. Phytoplankton algal density as high as 85,000 cells per milliliter was measured during such nuisance blooms in water years 2000 and 2001. Different hydrologic conditions during the summers of 2000 and 2001 produced very different seston algal populations. Larger amounts of precipitation sustained higher streamflows in the summer of 2000 (than in 2001), which resulted in lower total algal abundance and inhibited the typical algal succession from diatoms to cyanobacteria. Despite this, nearly half of all seston chlorophyll-a concentrations measured during this study exceeded the recommended regional ambient stream-water-quality criterion (3.75 micrograms per liter), and seston chlorophyll-a concentrations as large as 42 micrograms per liter were observed in wastewa-ter-receiving reaches of the Quinebaug River. Estimates of primary

  10. Constraints to commercialization of algal fuels.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Yusuf

    2013-09-10

    Production of algal crude oil has been achieved in various pilot scale facilities, but whether algal fuels can be produced in sufficient quantity to meaningfully displace petroleum fuels, has been largely overlooked. Limitations to commercialization of algal fuels need to be understood and addressed for any future commercialization. This review identifies the major constraints to commercialization of transport fuels from microalgae. Algae derived fuels are expensive compared to petroleum derived fuels, but this could change. Unfortunately, improved economics of production are not sufficient for an environmentally sustainable production, or its large scale feasibility. A low-cost point supply of concentrated carbon dioxide colocated with the other essential resources is necessary for producing algal fuels. An insufficiency of concentrated carbon dioxide is actually a major impediment to any substantial production of algal fuels. Sustainability of production requires the development of an ability to almost fully recycle the phosphorous and nitrogen nutrients that are necessary for algae culture. Development of a nitrogen biofixation ability to support production of algal fuels ought to be an important long term objective. At sufficiently large scale, a limited supply of freshwater will pose a significant limitation to production even if marine algae are used. Processes for recovering energy from the algal biomass left after the extraction of oil, are required for achieving a net positive energy balance in the algal fuel oil. The near term outlook for widespread use of algal fuels appears bleak, but fuels for niche applications such as in aviation may be likely in the medium term. Genetic and metabolic engineering of microalgae to boost production of fuel oil and ease its recovery, are essential for commercialization of algal fuels. Algae will need to be genetically modified for improved photosynthetic efficiency in the long term. PMID:23886651

  11. Nutrient Limitation and Adaptation of Microbial Populations to Chemical Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David L.; Kollig, Heinz P.; Hodson, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    Using field-collected periphyton and bacterial isolates, we determined adaptation lag periods for microbial transformation of p-cresol. Lag periods were longer for periphyton samples collected from field sites that were low in dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus. Moreover, lag periods decreased in samples amended with N or P. Our data suggest that adaptation lag periods for microbial transformation of low concentrations of chemicals may correlate with limiting nutrient concentrations, and this correlation may provide a basis for predictive mathematical modeling of lag periods. PMID:16347021

  12. [Seasonal variation and spatial distribution of nutrients and their relationships with harmful algal blooms in coastal area of the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan-Song; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Shi, Xiao-Yong; Tang, Hong-Jie; Han, Xiu-Rong; Xin, Yu

    2007-11-01

    Based on the data from four cruises that carried out in the Changjiang River estuary and its adjacent areas from 2002-04 to 2003-02, the seasonal variation and spatial distribution of nutrients were analyzed, and the relationship between nutrients condition and the harmful algal blooms (HABs) was also discussed. Results showed that the annual average concentration of nutrient was (17.93 +/- 2.46) micromol x L(-1) for DIN, (0.59 +/- 0.11) micromol x L(-1) for PO4(3-) -P, (15.34 +/- 3.23) micromol x L(-1) for SiO3(2-) -Si, and the study area was in the state of eutrophication. The average concentration of nutrient showed a remarkable seasonal fluctuation with the higher value in autumn and winter and lower value in spring and summer. The spatial distribution of the nutrients was typically such that the concentrations of DIN, PO4(3-) -P and SiO3(2-) -Si decreased from inshore to offshore area, and the contours generally decreased rapidly in down-coast directions. DIN and SiO3(2-) -Si of the study area were largely contributed by Changjiang River diluted water and other terrigenous inputs, while PO4(3-) -P mainly by Changjiang River diluted water and the Taiwan Warm Current. The following HABs showed that its occurrences were usually laid in the areas with higher nutrients and lower total suspended particles (TSP). PMID:18290458

  13. [Seasonal variation and spatial distribution of nutrients and their relationships with harmful algal blooms in coastal area of the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan-Song; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Shi, Xiao-Yong; Tang, Hong-Jie; Han, Xiu-Rong; Xin, Yu

    2007-11-01

    Based on the data from four cruises that carried out in the Changjiang River estuary and its adjacent areas from 2002-04 to 2003-02, the seasonal variation and spatial distribution of nutrients were analyzed, and the relationship between nutrients condition and the harmful algal blooms (HABs) was also discussed. Results showed that the annual average concentration of nutrient was (17.93 +/- 2.46) micromol x L(-1) for DIN, (0.59 +/- 0.11) micromol x L(-1) for PO4(3-) -P, (15.34 +/- 3.23) micromol x L(-1) for SiO3(2-) -Si, and the study area was in the state of eutrophication. The average concentration of nutrient showed a remarkable seasonal fluctuation with the higher value in autumn and winter and lower value in spring and summer. The spatial distribution of the nutrients was typically such that the concentrations of DIN, PO4(3-) -P and SiO3(2-) -Si decreased from inshore to offshore area, and the contours generally decreased rapidly in down-coast directions. DIN and SiO3(2-) -Si of the study area were largely contributed by Changjiang River diluted water and other terrigenous inputs, while PO4(3-) -P mainly by Changjiang River diluted water and the Taiwan Warm Current. The following HABs showed that its occurrences were usually laid in the areas with higher nutrients and lower total suspended particles (TSP).

  14. Herbivores and nutrients control grassland plant diversity via light limitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human alterations to nutrient cycles and herbivore communities are dramatically altering global biodiversity. Theory predicts these changes to be strongly counteractive: nutrient addition drives plant species loss through intensified competition for light, whereas herbivores prevent competitive excl...

  15. Woody encroachment reduces nutrient limitation and promotes soil carbon sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Blaser, Wilma J; Shanungu, Griffin K; Edwards, Peter J; Olde Venterink, Harry

    2014-01-01

    During the past century, the biomass of woody species has increased in many grassland and savanna ecosystems. As many of these species fix nitrogen symbiotically, they may alter not only soil nitrogen (N) conditions but also those of phosphorus (P). We studied the N-fixing shrub Dichrostachys cinerea in a mesic savanna in Zambia, quantifying its effects upon pools of soil N, P, and carbon (C), and availabilities of N and P. We also evaluated whether these effects induced feedbacks upon the growth of understory vegetation and encroaching shrubs. Dichrostachys cinerea shrubs increased total N and P pools, as well as resin-adsorbed N and soil extractable P in the top 10-cm soil. Shrubs and understory grasses differed in their foliar N and P concentrations along gradients of increasing encroachment, suggesting that they obtained these nutrients in different ways. Thus, grasses probably obtained them mainly from the surface upper soil layers, whereas the shrubs may acquire N through symbiotic fixation and probably obtain some of their P from deeper soil layers. The storage of soil C increased significantly under D. cinerea and was apparently not limited by shortages of either N or P. We conclude that the shrub D. cinerea does not create a negative feedback loop by inducing P-limiting conditions, probably because it can obtain P from deeper soil layers. Furthermore, C sequestration is not limited by a shortage of N, so that mesic savanna encroached by this species could represent a C sink for several decades. We studied the effects of woody encroachment on soil N, P, and C pools, and availabilities of N and P to Dichrostachys cinerea shrubs and to the understory vegetation. Both N and P pools in the soil increased along gradients of shrub age and cover, suggesting that N fixation by D. cinerea did not reduce the P supply. This in turn suggests that continued growth and carbon sequestration in this mesic savanna ecosystems are unlikely to be constrained by nutrient

  16. NUTRIENT LIMITATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON GROWTH AND PHYSIOLOGY IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY (PENSACOLA BAY, FL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoplankton nutrient limitation was studied in a sub-estuary of lower Pensacola Bay using several techniques. Results for <5 um and . 5 um phytoplankton were similar. Nutrient-addition bioassays indicated year-round nutrient limitation, in contrast to seasonal patterns often ...

  17. Promotion of harmful algal blooms by zooplankton predatory activity.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Aditee; Flynn, Kevin J

    2006-06-22

    The relationship between algae and their zooplanktonic predators typically involves consumption of nutrients by algae, grazing of the algae by zooplankton which in turn enhances predator biomass, controls algal growth and regenerates nutrients. Eutrophication raises nutrient levels, but does not simply increase normal predator-prey activity; rather, harmful algal bloom (HAB) events develop often with serious ecological and aesthetic implications. Generally, HAB species are outwardly poor competitors for nutrients, while their development of grazing deterrents during nutrient stress ostensibly occurs too late, after the nutrients have largely been consumed already by fast-growing non-HAB species. A new mechanism is presented to explain HAB dynamics under these circumstances. Using a multi-nutrient predator-prey model, it is demonstrated that these blooms can develop through the self-propagating failure of normal predator-prey activity, resulting in the transfer of nutrients into HAB growth at the expense of competing algal species. Rate limitation of this transfer provides a continual level of nutrient stress that results in HAB species exhibiting grazing deterrents protecting them from top-down control. This process is self-stabilizing as long as nutrient demand exceeds supply, maintaining the unpalatable status of HABs; such events are most likely under eutrophic conditions with skewed nutrient ratios.

  18. A stoichiometrically derived algal growth model and its global analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiong; Wang, Hao

    2010-10-01

    Organisms are composed of multiple chemical elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus. The scarcity of any of these elements can severely restrict organismal and population growth. However, many trophic interaction models only consider carbon limitation via energy flow. In this paper, we construct an algal growth model with the explicit incorporation of light and nutrient availability to characterize both carbon and phosphorus limitations. We provide a global analysis of this model to illustrate how light and nutrient availability regulate algal dynamics. PMID:21077710

  19. Minerals as Ecosystems in the Nutrient-Limited Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. A.; Bennett, P.

    2014-12-01

    A majority of microorganisms in dark, nutrient-poor, subsurface habitats live in biofilms attached to mineral surfaces. As a result, microorganisms have likely adapted and evolved to take advantage of specific minerals that support a variety of biogeochemical processes. Using biofilm reactors inoculated with a diverse microbial biomat from a sulfidic cave, we found that specific microorganisms colonize specific minerals according to their metabolic/nutritional requirements as well as their environmental tolerances in order to increase survival in unfavorable environments. In a neutral pH, carbon (C) and phosphate (P)-limited (unfavorable) reactor, highly-buffering carbonates were colonized by nearly identical communities of neutrophilic sulfur-oxidizing (acid-generating) bacteria (SOB), which intensely corroded the carbonates. Non-buffering quartz was colonized by acid-generating acidophiles, while feldspars (containing potentially toxic aluminum) were colonized largely by aluminotolerant microbes. The SOB Thiothrix unzii demonstrated a clear affinity for basalt, and it is commonly found on basaltic rocks in mid-ocean ridge environments. In an identical reactor amended with acetate, heterotrophic sulfur-reducing bacteria (SRB) dominated on most surfaces. The metabolism of the SRB causes an increase in both alkalinity and pH, nearly eliminating the need for buffering minerals and resulting in carbonate precipitation. However, SRB were not dominant on quartz, which was again colonized by acidophiles and acid-tolerant microorganisms or basalt which hosted a complex consortium similar to those found on natural basalt outcrops. These organisms have been shown to weather basalts to access mineral nutrients, especially when provided a carbon source. In both the C&P-limited and acetate-amended reactors significantly greater biomass accumulated on minerals with high P content. When abundant P was added and the pH was buffered to 8.3, mineral selectivity was eliminated and

  20. Substrate- and nutrient-limited toluene biotransformation in sandy soil

    SciTech Connect

    Allen-King, R.M. . Dept. of Geology); Barker, J.F.; Gillham, R.W. . Waterloo Centre for Groundwater Research); Jensen, B.K. . Environmental Biotechnology Section)

    1994-05-01

    Lab microcosm tests of the rate of toluene biodegradation were performed using soil from the A, B, and C horizons of the unsaturated zone of a sandy field site. Toluene biodegradation was rapid, occurring at a time scale comparable to the rate of sorption in many of the microcosms and demonstrating the potential for bioremediation of these contaminants in unsaturated soil. In the A horizon, with an initial toluene concentration in the solution phase of 4.5 mg/L, degradation was controlled by substrate-limited growth on toluene as the primary substrate. Soil from the B and C horizons initially showed similar behavior with a lower toluene concentrations of about 2.5 mg/L. The maximum utilization rate ([mu][sub max]) for soil from all three depths was 2.0 d[sup [minus]1]. With repeated exposure to moderate to high concentrations of toluene, transformation in the B- and C-horizon soil appeared to be zero order, at a rate of 1.0 to 2.0 [mu]g toluene/g soil/d. In C-horizon soil that had been taken directly from the field, the transformation rate was almost immeasurably slow. Addition of nitrogens as either ammonium or nitrate accelerated the degradation, showing that nitrogen was the most limiting nutrient. The apparent adaptation period observed before rapid toluene removal was fit by a substrate-limited growth model. Greater numbers of toluene-degrading microorganisms were found in soil exposed to toluene than in unexposed soil, supporting biomass growth as the explanation for the adaptation period. The results of enumeration of heterotrophs compared to the numbers of toluene degraders suggested that a small proportion to the total viable microorganisms were responsible for degradation of toluene.

  1. Algal Attributes: An Autecological Classification of Algal Taxa Collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    Algae are excellent indicators of water-quality conditions, notably nutrient and organic enrichment, and also are indicators of major ion, dissolved oxygen, and pH concentrations and stream microhabitat conditions. The autecology, or physiological optima and tolerance, of algal species for various water-quality contaminants and conditions is relatively well understood for certain groups of freshwater algae, notably diatoms. However, applications of autecological information for water-quality assessments have been limited because of challenges associated with compiling autecological literature from disparate sources, tracking name changes for a large number of algal species, and creating an autecological data base from which algal-indicator metrics can be calculated. A comprehensive summary of algal autecological attributes for North American streams and rivers does not exist. This report describes a large, digital data file containing 28,182 records for 5,939 algal taxa, generally species or variety, collected by the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The data file includes 37 algal attributes classified by over 100 algal-indicator codes or metrics that can be calculated easily with readily available software. Algal attributes include qualitative classifications based on European and North American autecological literature, and semi-quantitative, weighted-average regression approaches for estimating optima using regional and national NAWQA data. Applications of algal metrics in water-quality assessments are discussed and national quartile distributions of metric scores are shown for selected indicator metrics.

  2. ANALYSIS OF PARTICULATE BOUND NUTRIENTS IN URBAN STORMWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrients are important players in the degradation of waterbodies because they are often the elements that limit primary productivity and, hence, are the key factors controlling eutrophication. Eutrophication causes unsightly algal blooms leading to oxygen depletion, stress on o...

  3. Nutrient limitation and physiology mediate the fine-scale (de)coupling of biogeochemical cycles.

    PubMed

    Appling, Alison P; Heffernan, James B

    2014-09-01

    Nutrients in the environment are coupled over broad timescales (days to seasons) when organisms add or withdraw multiple nutrients simultaneously and in ratios that are roughly constant. But at finer timescales (seconds to days), nutrients become decoupled if physiological traits such as nutrient storage limits, circadian rhythms, or enzyme kinetics cause one nutrient to be processed faster than another. To explore the interactions among these coupling and decoupling mechanisms, we introduce a model in which organisms process resources via uptake, excretion, growth, respiration, and mortality according to adjustable trait parameters. The model predicts that uptake can couple the input of one nutrient to the export of another in a ratio reflecting biological demand stoichiometry, but coupling occurs only when the input nutrient is limiting. Temporal nutrient coupling may, therefore, be a useful indicator of ecosystem limitation status. Fine-scale patterns of nutrient coupling are further modulated by, and potentially diagnostic of, physiological traits governing growth, uptake, and internal nutrient storage. Together, limitation status and physiological traits create a complex and informative relationship between nutrient inputs and exports. Understanding the mechanisms behind that relationship could enrich interpretations of fine-scale time-series data such as those now emerging from in situ solute sensors.

  4. Measurement and Modeling of Algal Biokinetics in Highly EutrophicWaters

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfellow, William T.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.

    2006-04-04

    Excessive growth of suspended algae in eutrophic surface waters can contribute to the degradation of water quality. The objective of this study was to understand the fundamental processes limiting algal growth in highly nutrient-rich agricultural drainage water. Studies examining algal biokinetics (growth rates, yields, and decay) were conducted in a twenty-eight mile long, hydraulically simple, open channel. Algae biokinetics were found to follow a growth limited model,despite monitoring data demonstrating the presence of nutrients at concentrations far in excess of those expected to be limiting. A mechanistic algal biokinetic model was written to assist in data interpretation. Results from the mechanistic model suggested that at different times, soluble phosphate, minerals, and inorganic carbon could limit growth rates, but that growth yield was most likely limited by zooplankton grazing. The implication of these finding for control of algal growth are discussed.

  5. Phytoplankton community growth in enrichment bioassays: Possible role of the nutrient intracellular pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzic, B. Le; Bertru, G.

    Examination of published experimental data showed that nutrient addition can sometimes inhibit growth rate of natural algal communities. Such reductions in algal growth might be due to toxic effects of some enrichments. This hypothesis could not however explain inhibitions following moderate additions of nitrate and phosphate. A new hypothesis is proposed to account for such "unexplained" results. It considers a limitation of algal community growth by several different resources. Experimental observations are consistent with resource competition determining the coexistence of several species competing for the same resources. Intracellular nutrient storage may reduce bioavailability of many resources involved in algal growth limitation. A simplified mathematical approach, derived from the DROOP growth model (1973) , was developed to describe possible relationships between species diversity and algal community growth. Coexistence of several species competing for different resources might provide a partial buffer against large variations in algal community growth following nutrient enrichments.

  6. Algal production in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for potential biofuel use.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J

    2011-01-01

    Wastewater treatment High Rate Algal Ponds with CO2 addition could provide cost-effective and efficient tertiary-level wastewater treatment with the co-benefit of algal biomass production for biofuel use. Wastewater grown algal biomass can have a lipid content of 10-30% of dry weight, which could be used to make biodiesel. This research investigated algal biomass and total lipid production by two pilot-scale wastewater treatment HRAP(S) (4-day HRT) with and without CO2 addition under New Zealand mid summer (Nov-Jan) conditions. The influence of CO2 addition on wastewater treatment performance was also determined. CO2 was added to one of the HRAPs (the HRAP(E)) by maintaining the maximum pH of the pond below 8. Measurements of HRAP influent and effluent water qualities, total lipid content and algal biomass production were made twice a week over the experimental period. Both HRAP(S) achieved high levels of organic compound and nutrient removal, with >85% SBOD5, >92 NH4(+)-N and >70% DRP removal. Algal/bacterial biomass production in the HRAP(E) (15.2 g/m2/d) was improved by CO2 addition by approximately 30% compared with that of the control HRAP(W) (10.6 g/m2/d). Total lipid content of the biomass grown on both HRAP(S) was slightly reduced (from 25% to 20%) with CO2 addition and the maximum total lipid content of approximately 40% was observed in the HRAP(W) when low NH4(+)-N concentration (<0.5 mg/L) and high maximum pH (>10.0) occurred. Total lipid content of the biomass increased by approximately 15% under nitrogen limiting conditions, however, overall algal/bacterial biomass production was reduced by half during the period of nitrogen limitation. More research is required to maintain algal production under near nitrogen-limiting conditions. PMID:21977667

  7. Nutrient addition differentially affects ecological processes of Avicennia germinans in nitrogen versus phosphorus limited mangrove ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feller, Ilka C.; Lovelock, C.E.; McKee, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Nutrient over-enrichment is a major threat to marine environments, but system-specific attributes of coastal ecosystems may result in differences in their sensitivity and susceptibility to eutrophication. We used fertilization experiments in nitrogen (N)- and phosphorus (P)-limited mangrove forests to test the hypothesis that alleviating different kinds of nutrient limitation may have different effects on ecosystem structure and function in natural systems. We compared a broad range of ecological processes to determine if these systems have different thresholds where shifts might occur in nutrient limitation. Growth responses indicated N limitation in Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) forests in the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), Florida, and P limitation at Twin Cays, Belize. When nutrient deficiency was relieved, A. germinans grew out of its stunted form by increasing wood relative to leaf biomass and shoot length relative to lateral growth. At the P-limited site, P enrichment (+P) increased specific leaf area, N resorption, and P uptake, but had no effect on P resorption. At the N-limited site, +N increased both N and P resorption, but did not alter biomass allocation. Herbivory was greater at the P-limited site and was unaffected by +P, whereas +N led to increased herbivory at the N-limited site. The responses to nutrient enrichment depended on the ecological process and limiting nutrient and suggested that N- versus P-limited mangroves do have different thresholds. +P had a greater effect on more ecological processes at Twin Cays than did +N at the IRL, which indicated that the P-limited site was more sensitive to nutrient loading. Because of this sensitivity, eutrophication is more likely to cause a shift in nutrient limitation at P-limited Twin Cays than N-limited IRL. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  8. Identifying nutrient reference sites in nutrient-enriched regions-Using algal, invertebrate, and fish-community measures to identify stressor-breakpoint thresholds in Indiana rivers and streams, 2005-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caskey, Brian J.; Bunch, Aubrey R.; Shoda, Megan E.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Selvaratnam, Shivi; Miltner, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Excess nutrients in aquatic ecosystems can lead to shifts in species composition, reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations, fish kills, and toxic algal blooms. In this study, nutrients, periphyton chlorophyll a (CHLa), and invertebrate- and fishcommunity data collected during 2005-9 were analyzed from 318 sites on Indiana rivers and streams. The objective of this study was to determine which invertebrate and fish-taxa attributes best reflect the conditions of streams in Indiana along a gradient of nutrient concentrations by (1) determining statistically and ecologically significant relations among the stressor (total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and periphyton CHLa) and response (invertebrate and fish community) variables; and (2) determining the levels at which invertebrate- and fish-community measures change in response to nutrients or periphyton CHLa. For water samples at the headwater sites, total nitrogen (TN) concentrations ranged from 0.343 to 21.6 milligrams per liter (mg/L) (median 2.12 mg/L), total phosphorus (TP) concentrations ranged from 0.050 to 1.44 mg/L (median 0.093 mg/L), and periphyton CHLa ranged from 0.947 to 629 mg/L (median 69.7 mg/L). At the wadable sites, TN concentrations ranged from 0.340 to 10.0 mg/L (median 2.31 mg/L), TP concentrations ranged from 0.050 to 1.24 mg/L (median 0.110 mg/L), and periphyton CHLa ranged from 0.383 to 719 mg/L (median 44.7 mg/L). Recursive partitioning identified statistically significant low and high breakpoint thresholds on invertebrate and fish measures, which demonstrated the ecological response in enriched conditions. The combined community (invertebrate and fish) mean low and high TN breakpoint thresholds were 1.03 and 2.61 mg/L, respectively. The mean low and high breakpoint thresholds for TP were 0.083 and 0.144 mg/L, respectively. The mean low and high breakpoint thresholds for periphyton CHLa were 20.9 and 98.6 milligrams per square meter (mg/m2), respectively. Additive quantile regression analysis

  9. Influence of light, nutrients, and temperature on the toxicity of atrazine to the algal species Raphidocelis subcapitata: Implications for the risk assessment of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Leilan; Brain, Richard A; Lissemore, Linda; Solomon, Keith R; Hanson, Mark L; Prosser, Ryan S

    2016-10-01

    The acute toxicity of herbicides to algae is commonly assessed under conditions (e.g., light intensity, water temperature, concentration of nutrients, pH) prescribed by standard test protocols. However, the observed toxicity may vary with changes in one or more of these parameters. This study examined variation in toxicity of the herbicide atrazine to a representative green algal species Raphidocelis subcapitata (formerly Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) with changes in light intensity, water temperature, concentrations of nutrients or combinations of these three parameters. Conditions were chosen that could be representative of the intensive corn growing Midwestern region of the United States of America where atrazine is used extensively. Varying light intensity (4-58µmol/m(2)s) resulted in no observable trend in 96-h EC50 values for growth rate. EC50 values for PSII yield generally increased with decreasing light intensity but not significantly in all cases. The 96-h EC50 values for growth rate decreased with decreases in temperature (20-5°C) from standard conditions (25°C), but EC50 values for PSII yield at lower temperatures were not significantly different from standard conditions. Finally, there was no clear trend in 96-h EC50 values for both endpoints with increases in nitrogen (4.1-20mg/L) and phosphorus (0.24-1.2mg/L). The 96-h EC50 values for both endpoints under combinations of conditions mimicking aquatic systems in the Midwestern U.S. were not significantly different from EC50 values generated under standard test conditions. This combination of decreased light intensity and temperature and increased nutrients relative to standard conditions does not appear to significantly affect the observed toxicity of atrazine to R. subcapitata. For atrazine specifically, and for perhaps other herbicides, this means current laboratory protocols are useful for extrapolating to effects on algae under realistic environmental conditions. PMID:27340884

  10. Influence of light, nutrients, and temperature on the toxicity of atrazine to the algal species Raphidocelis subcapitata: Implications for the risk assessment of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Leilan; Brain, Richard A; Lissemore, Linda; Solomon, Keith R; Hanson, Mark L; Prosser, Ryan S

    2016-10-01

    The acute toxicity of herbicides to algae is commonly assessed under conditions (e.g., light intensity, water temperature, concentration of nutrients, pH) prescribed by standard test protocols. However, the observed toxicity may vary with changes in one or more of these parameters. This study examined variation in toxicity of the herbicide atrazine to a representative green algal species Raphidocelis subcapitata (formerly Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) with changes in light intensity, water temperature, concentrations of nutrients or combinations of these three parameters. Conditions were chosen that could be representative of the intensive corn growing Midwestern region of the United States of America where atrazine is used extensively. Varying light intensity (4-58µmol/m(2)s) resulted in no observable trend in 96-h EC50 values for growth rate. EC50 values for PSII yield generally increased with decreasing light intensity but not significantly in all cases. The 96-h EC50 values for growth rate decreased with decreases in temperature (20-5°C) from standard conditions (25°C), but EC50 values for PSII yield at lower temperatures were not significantly different from standard conditions. Finally, there was no clear trend in 96-h EC50 values for both endpoints with increases in nitrogen (4.1-20mg/L) and phosphorus (0.24-1.2mg/L). The 96-h EC50 values for both endpoints under combinations of conditions mimicking aquatic systems in the Midwestern U.S. were not significantly different from EC50 values generated under standard test conditions. This combination of decreased light intensity and temperature and increased nutrients relative to standard conditions does not appear to significantly affect the observed toxicity of atrazine to R. subcapitata. For atrazine specifically, and for perhaps other herbicides, this means current laboratory protocols are useful for extrapolating to effects on algae under realistic environmental conditions.

  11. [Distribution of dissolved inorganic nutrients and dissolved oxygen in the high frequency area of harmful algal blooms in the East China Sea in spring].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Mei; Shi, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Chuan-Song

    2013-06-01

    According to two cruises in the high frequency area of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in ECS from Apr. 8th to 26th and May 7th to 14th 2010, concentrations and distributions of biogenic elements before and after HABs were analyzed, and their influenced factors were also discussed. The results showed that April was the earlier stage of HAB breaking out, and diatom was the dominant species; while Dinoflagellate became the dominant species when large-scale HAB broke out in May. The concentrations of DIN and PO4(3-) -P decreased significantly from April to May. The Mean value of DIN decreased from 18.04 to 10.80 micromol x L(-1), its decline rate was 40%. As for PO4(3-) -P, its Mean value decreased from 0.47 to 0.27 micromol x L(-1), and its decline rate was 43%. This phenomenon indicated the significant depletion of nutrients by harmful algae in the process. However, the primary species of HABs in ECS was dinoflagellates in May. Since dinoflagellates did not consume SiO3(2-) -Si during the breed, as well as the supplement from Changjiang Diluted Water, the mean value of SiO3(2-) -Si increased slightly from 16. 15 to 16.96 micromol x L(11) in the researched area. The Mean value of DO decreased from 8.76 to 6.09 mg x L(-1) from April to May, because the effect of temperature to DO was more obvious than that of phytoplankton photosynthesis. The temperature was higher in May, and the solubility of oxygen decreased with increasing temperature, therefore, the concentration of DO was lower after the Harmful algal blooms.

  12. Carbon x nutrient interactions-the limitations to productivity.

    PubMed

    Miller, H. G.

    1986-12-01

    The interaction of nutrient cycles with the production, accumulation and death of organic matter is considered, in particular the relation to changes with stand age. It is shown that, because of efficient recycling within the tree and through the litter, the demands made by forests on the soil nutrient capital fall markedly after canopy closure. Because this effect is primarily a result of the ability of the tree to conserve and reuse nutrients in the foliage, the significance of the evergreen habit is examined. Although there are many reports of a net photosynthetic contribution from foliage older than one year, the relationships examined suggest that whereas there is virtually no correlation between growth rate and total foliage carried, there is quite a good relationship with weight of current-year foliage irrespective of whether trees are deciduous or the age at which evergreen foliage is shed. It is suggested that the evergreen habit would be a nutritional disadvantage prior to canopy closure but thereafter a considerable advantage.

  13. Growth of Enterobacter aerogenes in a chemostat with double nutrient limitations.

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, C L; Wang, D I; Mateles, R I

    1976-01-01

    The behavior of Enterobacter aerogenes during growth in chemostats limited by single and double nutrient restrictions was examined. On the assumption that different essential nutrients act to limit growth in different ways, we selected pairs of nutrients likely to affect different aspects of metabolism. Results show that macromolecular cell composition can be controlled by using more than one nutrient restriction. The polysaccharide content of the cells is readily manipulated by the ratio of carbon to nitrogen in the inlet nutrients. Also, at low dilution rates, ratios of protein to ribonucleic acid are dependent on the ratio of phosphate to nitrogen in the input nutrients. An examination of both acetic acid and metabolite production (as measured by ultraviolet absorbance of culture filtrates) showed that accumulation of these products was dependent on both dilution rate and type of nutrient limitation(s). These results were examined in terms of the problems of translation of batch to continuous culture processes and the use of selected nutrient limitations to control noncellular product formation. PMID:942212

  14. Possible nutrient limiting factor in long term operation of closed aquatic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zongjie; Li, Yanhui; Cai, Wenkai; Wu, Peipei; Liu, Yongding; Wang, Gaohong

    2012-03-01

    To investigate nutrient limitation effect on the community metabolism of closed aquatic ecosystem and possible nutrient limiting factors in the experimental food chains, depletion of inorganic chemicals including carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous was tested. A closed aquatic ecosystem lab module consisting of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Daphnia magna and associated unidentified microbes was established. Closed ecological systems receive no carbon dioxide; therefore, we presumed carbon as a first limiting factor. The results showed that the algae population in the nutrient saturated group was statistically higher than that in the nutrient limited groups, and that the chlorophyll a content of algae in the phosphorus limited group was the highest among the limited groups. However, the nitrogen limited group supported the most Daphnia, followed by the carbon limited group, the nutrient saturated group and the phosphorus limited group. Redundancy analysis showed that the total phosphorus contents were correlated significantly with the population of algae, and that the amount of soluble carbohydrate as feedback of nutrient depletion was correlated with the number of Daphnia. Thus, these findings suggest that phosphorus is the limiting factor in the operation of closed aquatic ecosystem. The results presented herein have important indications for the future construction of long term closed ecological system.

  15. Proximate versus ultimate limiting nutrients in the Mississippi River Plume and Implications for Hypoxia Reductions through Nutrient Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennel, Katja; Laurent, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    A large hypoxic area (15,000 km2 on average) forms every summer over the Texas-Louisiana shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico due to decay of organic matter that is primarily derived from nutrient inputs from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River System. Efforts are underway to reduce the extent of hypoxic conditions through nutrient management in the watershed; for example, an interagency Hypoxia Task Force is developing Action Plans with input from various stakeholders that set out targets for hypoxia reduction. An open question is how far nutrient loads would have to be decreased in order to produce the desired reductions in hypoxia and when these would be measurable given significant natural variability. We have simulated a large number of multi-year nutrient load reduction scenarios with a regional biogeochemical model for the region. The model is based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), explicitly includes nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) species as inorganic nutrients, and has been shown to realistically reproduce the key processes responsible for hypoxia generation. We have quantified the effects of differential reductions in river N and P loads on hypoxic extent. An assessment of the effects of N versus P reductions is important because, thus far, nutrient management efforts have focused on N, yet P is known to limit primary production in spring and early summer. A debate is ongoing as to whether targets for P reductions should be set and whether nutrient reduction efforts should focus solely on P, which results primarily from urban and industrial point sources and is uncoupled from agricultural fertilizer application. Our results strongly indicate that N is the 'ultimate' limiting nutrient to primary production determining the areal extent and duration of hypoxic conditions in a cumulative sense, while P is temporarily limiting in spring. Although reductions in river P load would decrease hypoxic extent in early summer, they would have a much

  16. When microbes and consumers determine the limiting nutrient of autotrophs: a theoretical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cherif, Mehdi; Loreau, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Ecological stoichiometry postulates that differential nutrient recycling of elements such as nitrogen and phosphorus by consumers can shift the element that limits plant growth. However, this hypothesis has so far considered the effect of consumers, mostly herbivores, out of their food-web context. Microbial decomposers are important components of food webs, and might prove as important as consumers in changing the availability of elements for plants. In this theoretical study, we investigate how decomposers determine the nutrient that limits plants, both by feeding on nutrients and organic carbon released by plants and consumers, and by being fed upon by omnivorous consumers. We show that decomposers can greatly alter the relative availability of nutrients for plants. The type of limiting nutrient promoted by decomposers depends on their own elemental composition and, when applicable, on their ingestion by consumers. Our results highlight the limitations of previous stoichiometric theories of plant nutrient limitation control, which often ignored trophic levels other than plants and herbivores. They also suggest that detrital chains play an important role in determining plant nutrient limitation in many ecosystems. PMID:18854301

  17. Fine-root responses to fertilization reveal multiple nutrient limitation in a lowland tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Wurzburger, Nina; Wright, S Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Questions remain as to which soil nutrients limit primary production in tropical forests. Phosphorus (P) has long been considered the primary limiting element in lowland forests, but recent evidence demonstrates substantial heterogeneity in response to nutrient addition, highlighting a need to understand and diagnose nutrient limitation across diverse forests. Fine-root characteristics including their abundance, functional traits, and mycorrhizal symbionts can be highly responsive to changes in soil nutrients and may help to diagnose nutrient limitation. Here, we document the response of fine roots to long-term nitrogen (N), P, and potassium (K) fertilization in a lowland forest in Panama. Because this experiment has demonstrated that N and K together limit tree growth and P limits fine litter production, we hypothesized that fine roots would also respond to nutrient addition. Specifically we hypothesized that N, P, and K addition would reduce the biomass, diameter, tissue density, and mycorrhizal colonization of fine roots, and increase nutrient concentration in root tissue. Most morphological root traits responded to the single addition of K and the paired addition of N and P, with the greatest response to all three nutrients combined. The addition of N, P, and K together reduced fine-root biomass, length, and tissue density, and increased specific root length, whereas root diameter remained unchanged. Nitrogen addition did not alter root N concentration, but P and K addition increased root P and K concentration, respectively. Mycorrhizal colonization of fine roots declined with N, increased with P, and was unresponsive to K addition. Although plant species composition remains unchanged after 14 years of fertilization, fine-root characteristics responded to N, P, and K addition, providing some of the strongest stand-level responses in this experiment. Multiple soil nutrients regulate fine-root abundance, morphological and chemical traits, and their association

  18. Nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth in the freshwater tidal zone of a turbid, Mediterranean estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, Rita B.; Anselmo, Tânia P.; Barbosa, Ana B.; Sommer, Ulrich; Galvão, Helena M.

    2011-01-01

    Identification of the limiting nutrient(s) is a requirement for the rational management of eutrophication. Here, we present the first experimental analysis of nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth and its seasonal variation in the Guadiana estuary (SE Portugal-SW Spain). Ten microcosm experiments were performed during 2005 and 2008, using water samples collected in the freshwater tidal zone of the Guadiana estuary. Nitrate, phosphate and silicate were added in a single pulse, alone and in combinations. Experimental treatments were incubated for 4 days under controlled laboratory conditions. Phytoplankton response to nutrient enrichment was evaluated through changes in biomass (Chl a), and abundance of specific phytoplankton groups. Overall, phytoplankton growth seemed to be nitrogen-limited throughout the productive period, especially green algae in 2005 and diatoms in 2008. In the summer 2008, cyanobacteria and the harmful dinoflagellate Kryptoperidinium foliaceum responded to N enrichment in the absence of Si. Indeed, the presence of K. foliaceum was observed for the first time in the freshwater tidal reaches of the Guadiana estuary, where dinoflagellates were usually absent or rare. The significant increase on dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria growth in response to N enrichment in the absence of Si is alarming, because anthropogenic nutrient enrichments usually increase N and P, but not Si. Furthermore, relatively high N concentrations, up to 22 μM, were found to be limiting to phytoplankton growth. These results should therefore be used as a management tool when establishing nutrient criteria and nutrient loading budgets to estuarine waters.

  19. Life cycle environmental impacts of wastewater-based algal biofuels.

    PubMed

    Mu, Dongyan; Min, Min; Krohn, Brian; Mullins, Kimberley A; Ruan, Roger; Hill, Jason

    2014-10-01

    Recent research has proposed integrating wastewater treatment with algae cultivation as a way of producing algal biofuels at a commercial scale more sustainably. This study evaluates the environmental performance of wastewater-based algal biofuels with a well-to-wheel life cycle assessment (LCA). Production pathways examined include different nutrient sources (municipal wastewater influent to the activated sludge process, centrate from the sludge drying process, swine manure, and freshwater with synthetic fertilizers) combined with emerging biomass conversion technologies (microwave pyrolysis, combustion, wet lipid extraction, and hydrothermal liquefaction). Results show that the environmental performance of wastewater-based algal biofuels is generally better than freshwater-based algal biofuels, but depends on the characteristics of the wastewater and the conversion technologies. Of 16 pathways compared, only the centrate cultivation with wet lipid extraction pathway and the centrate cultivation with combustion pathway have lower impacts than petroleum diesel in all environmental categories examined (fossil fuel use, greenhouse gas emissions, eutrophication potential, and consumptive water use). The potential for large-scale implementation of centrate-based algal biofuel, however, is limited by availability of centrate. Thus, it is unlikely that algal biofuels can provide a large-scale and environmentally preferable alternative to petroleum transportation fuels without considerable improvement in current production technologies. Additionally, the cobenefit of wastewater-based algal biofuel production as an alternate means of treating various wastewaters should be further explored.

  20. Life cycle environmental impacts of wastewater-based algal biofuels.

    PubMed

    Mu, Dongyan; Min, Min; Krohn, Brian; Mullins, Kimberley A; Ruan, Roger; Hill, Jason

    2014-10-01

    Recent research has proposed integrating wastewater treatment with algae cultivation as a way of producing algal biofuels at a commercial scale more sustainably. This study evaluates the environmental performance of wastewater-based algal biofuels with a well-to-wheel life cycle assessment (LCA). Production pathways examined include different nutrient sources (municipal wastewater influent to the activated sludge process, centrate from the sludge drying process, swine manure, and freshwater with synthetic fertilizers) combined with emerging biomass conversion technologies (microwave pyrolysis, combustion, wet lipid extraction, and hydrothermal liquefaction). Results show that the environmental performance of wastewater-based algal biofuels is generally better than freshwater-based algal biofuels, but depends on the characteristics of the wastewater and the conversion technologies. Of 16 pathways compared, only the centrate cultivation with wet lipid extraction pathway and the centrate cultivation with combustion pathway have lower impacts than petroleum diesel in all environmental categories examined (fossil fuel use, greenhouse gas emissions, eutrophication potential, and consumptive water use). The potential for large-scale implementation of centrate-based algal biofuel, however, is limited by availability of centrate. Thus, it is unlikely that algal biofuels can provide a large-scale and environmentally preferable alternative to petroleum transportation fuels without considerable improvement in current production technologies. Additionally, the cobenefit of wastewater-based algal biofuel production as an alternate means of treating various wastewaters should be further explored. PMID:25220843

  1. Microbial nutrient limitation in Arctic lakes in a permafrost landscape of southwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burpee, B.; Saros, J. E.; Northington, R. M.; Simon, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Permafrost is degrading across regions of the Arctic, which can lead to increases in nutrient concentrations in surface freshwaters. The oligotrophic state of many Arctic lakes suggests that enhanced nutrient inputs may have important effects on these systems, but little is known about microbial nutrient limitation patterns in these lakes. We investigated microbial extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) to infer seasonal nutrient dynamics and limitation across 24 lakes in southwest Greenland during summer (June and July). From early to late summer, enzyme activities that indicate microbial carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) demand increased in both the epilimnia and hypolimnia by 74 % on average. Microbial investment in P acquisition was generally higher than that for N. Interactions among EEAs indicated that microbes were primarily P-limited. Dissolved organic matter (DOM, measured as dissolved organic carbon) was strongly and positively correlated with microbial P demand (R2 = 0.84 in July), while there were no relationships between DOM and microbial N demand. Microbial P limitation in June epilimnia (R2 = 0.67) and July hypolimnia (R2 = 0.57) increased with DOM concentration. The consistency of microbial P limitation from June to July was related to the amount of DOM present, with some low-DOM lakes becoming N-limited in July. Our results suggest that future changes in P or DOM inputs to these lakes are likely to alter microbial nutrient limitation patterns.

  2. Microbial nutrient limitation in arctic lakes in a permafrost landscape of southwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burpee, B.; Saros, J. E.; Northington, R. M.; Simon, K. S.

    2015-07-01

    Permafrost is degrading across regions of the Arctic, which can lead to increases in nutrient concentrations in surface freshwaters. The oligotrophic state of many arctic lakes suggests that enhanced nutrient inputs may have important effects on these systems, but little is known about microbial nutrient limitation patterns in these lakes. We investigated microbial extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) to infer seasonal nutrient dynamics and limitation across 24 lakes in southwest Greenland during summer (June and July). From early to late summer, enzyme activities that indicate microbial carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) demand increased in both the epilimnia and hypolimnia by 74 % on average. Microbial investment in P acquisition was generally higher than that for N. Interactions among EEAs indicated that bacteria were primarily P limited. Dissolved organic matter (DOM, measured as dissolved organic carbon) was strongly and positively correlated with microbial P demand (R2 = 0.84 in July), while there were no relationships between DOM and microbial N demand. Microbial P limitation in June epilimnia (R2 = 0.67) and July hypolimnia (R2 = 0.57) increased with DOM concentration. The consistency of microbial P limitation from June to July was related to the amount of DOM present, with some low DOM lakes becoming N-limited in July. Our results suggest that future changes in P or DOM inputs to these lakes are likely to alter microbial nutrient limitation patterns.

  3. Phenotypic heterogeneity driven by nutrient limitation promotes growth in fluctuating environments.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Frank; Littmann, Sten; Lavik, Gaute; Escrig, Stéphane; Meibom, Anders; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Ackermann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Most microorganisms live in environments where nutrients are limited and fluctuate over time. Cells respond to nutrient fluctuations by sensing and adapting their physiological state. Recent studies suggest phenotypic heterogeneity(1) in isogenic populations as an alternative strategy in fluctuating environments, where a subpopulation of cells express a function that allows growth under conditions that might arise in the future(2-9). It is unknown how environmental factors such as nutrient limitation shape phenotypic heterogeneity in metabolism and whether this allows cells to respond to nutrient fluctuations. Here, we show that substrate limitation increases phenotypic heterogeneity in metabolism, and this heterogeneity allows cells to cope with substrate fluctuations. We subjected the N2-fixing bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca to different levels of substrate limitation and substrate shifts, and obtained time-resolved single-cell measurements of metabolic activities using nanometre-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). We found that the level of NH4(+) limitation shapes phenotypic heterogeneity in N2 fixation. In turn, the N2 fixation rate of single cells during NH4(+) limitation correlates positively with their growth rate after a shift to NH4(+) depletion, experimentally demonstrating the benefit of heterogeneity. The results indicate that phenotypic heterogeneity is a general solution to two important ecological challenges-nutrient limitation and fluctuations-that many microorganisms face. PMID:27572840

  4. The color of mass culture: spectral characteristics of a shallow water column through shade-limited algal growth dynamics(1).

    PubMed

    Hewes, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    It is envisioned that mass algal cultivation for commercial biofuels production will entail the use of large raceway pond systems, which typically have shade-limited photosynthetic growth within depths of 20-30 cm. The attenuation of light and spectral qualities of red, green, and blue wavelengths in a 20-cm water column as a function of Chl-a concentration during exponential and linear phases of growth dynamics for the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was examined under laboratory conditions. While photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) was in excess throughout the water column during the phase of exponential growth, PAR became rate limiting differently for red, green, and blue wavelengths during the phase of linear growth. The transition from exponential to linear growth occurred at 1-2 mg Chl-a · L-1, whereby a scalar ~5 μmol photons · m-2 · s-1 at 20-cm depth was found to occur as would be anticipated having the compensation point for where rates of photosynthesis and respiration are equal. During the phase of linear growth, red wavelengths became increasingly dominant at depth as Chl-a concentrations increased, being contrary to the optical conditions for those natural bodies of water that forced the evolution of phytoplankton photosynthesis. It is hypothesized this dramatic difference in water column optics between natural and synthetic environments could influence a variety of biological reactions, importantly non-photochemical quenching capacities, which could negatively impact crop yield.

  5. Drug susceptibility and biofilm formation of Burkholderia pseudomallei in nutrient-limited condition.

    PubMed

    Anutrakunchai, C; Sermswan, R W; Wongratanacheewin, S; Puknun, A; Taweechaisupapong, S

    2015-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, which can form biofilms and microcolonies in vivo and in vitro. One of the hallmark characteristics of the biofilm-forming bacteria is that they can be up to 1,000 times more resistant to antibiotics than their free-living counterpart. Bacteria also become highly tolerant to antibiotics when nutrients are limited. One of the most important causes of starvation induced tolerance in vivo is biofilm growth. However, the effect of nutritional stress on biofilm formation and drug tolerance of B. pseudomallei has never been reported. Therefore, this study aims to determine the effect of nutrient-limited and enriched conditions on drug susceptibility of B. pseudomallei in both planktonic and biofilm forms in vitro using broth microdilution method and Calgary biofilm device, respectively. The biofilm formation of B. pseudomallei in nutrient-limited and enriched conditions was also evaluated by a modified microtiter-plate test. Six isolates of ceftazidime (CAZ)-susceptible and four isolates of CAZ-resistant B. pseudomallei were used. The results showed that the minimum bactericidal concentrations of CAZ against B. pseudomallei in nutrient-limited condition were higher than those in enriched condition. The drug susceptibilities of B. pseudomallei biofilm in both enriched and nutrient-limited conditions were more tolerant than those of planktonic cells. Moreover, the quantification of biofilm formation by B. pseudomallei in nutrient-limited condition was significantly higher than that in enriched condition. These data indicate that nutrient-limited condition could induce biofilm formation and drug tolerance of B. pseudomallei.

  6. Lake and watershed characteristics rather than climate influence nutrient limitation in shallow lakes.

    PubMed

    Kosten, Sarian; Huszar, Vera L M; Mazzeo, Néstor; Scheffer, Marten; Sternberg, Leonel da S L; Jeppesen, Erik

    2009-10-01

    Both nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) can limit primary production in shallow lakes, but it is still debated how the importance of N and P varies in time and space. We sampled 83 shallow lakes along a latitudinal gradient (5 degrees 55 degrees S) in South America and assessed the potential nutrient limitation using different methods including nutrient ratios in sediment, water, and seston, dissolved nutrient concentrations, and occurrence of N-fixing cyanobacteria. We found that local characteristics such as soil type and associated land use in the catchment, hydrology, and also the presence of abundant submerged macrophyte growth influenced N and P limitation. We found neither a consistent variation in nutrient limitation nor indications for a steady change in denitrification along the latitudinal gradient. Contrary to findings in other regions, we did not find a relationship between the occurrence of (N-fixing and non-N-fixing) cyanobacteria and the TN:TP ratio. We found N-fixing cyanobacteria (those with heterocysts) exclusively in lakes with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations of < 100 microg/L, but notably they were also often absent in lakes with low DIN concentrations. We argue that local factors such as land use and hydrology have a stronger influence on which nutrient is limiting than climate. Furthermore, our data show that in a wide range of climates N limitation does not necessarily lead to cyanobacterial dominance.

  7. N limited herbivore consumer growth and low nutrient regeneration N:P ratios in nutrient poor Swedish lakes along a gradient in DOC concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, A. K.; Karlsson, D.; Karlsson, J.; Vrede, T.

    2014-12-01

    Nutrient limitation of primary producers and their consumers can have a large influence on ecosystem productivity. The nature and strength of nutrient limitation is driven both by external factors (nutrient loading) and internal processes (consumer-driven nutrient regeneration). Here we present results from a field study in 16 unproductive headwater lakes in northern subarctic and boreal Sweden where N deposition is low. We assessed the C:N:P stoichiometry of lake water, seston and zooplankton and estimated the consumer driven nutrient regeneration N:P ratio. The elemental imbalances between seston and zooplankton indicated that zooplankton were mainly N limited and regenerated nutrients with low N:P ratios (median 9.7, atomic ratio). The N:P regeneration ratios declined with increasing DOC concentrations, suggesting that catchment release of DOC accentuates the N limitation by providing more P to the lakes. The N:P regeneration ratios were related to responses in phytoplankton bioassays in mid-summer with low N:P regeneration with N limited phytoplankton, and high N:P regeneration with P limited phytoplankton. During other seasons, increased nutrient loading from the surrounding catchments during periods of greater water throughput had stronger effects on phytoplankton nutrient limitation. Our results suggest that herbivore zooplankton are N limited and recycle nutrients with low N:P ratio in low productive lakes with low N deposition. This will, at least during seasons when in-lake processes play an important role in nutrient turn over, contribute to continued N limitation of phytoplankton in these systems. We anticipate that increased N deposition and changes in climate and hydrology may affect this feedback and result in qualitative changes in these ecosystems, changing both autotroph producers and herbivore consumers from N- to P-limitation, eventually affecting important ecosystem characteristics such as productivity and turnover of energy and nutrients.

  8. Recycling harvest water to cultivate Chlorella zofingiensis under nutrient limitation for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L D; Takala, J; Hiltunen, E; Wang, Z M

    2013-09-01

    Harvest water recycling for Chlorella zofingiensis re-cultivation under nutrient limitation was investigated. Using 100% harvest water, four cultures were prepared: Full medium, P-limited medium, N-limited medium and N- and P-limited medium, while another full medium was also prepared using 50% harvest water. The results showed that the specific growth rate and biomass productivity ranged from 0.289 to 0.403 day(-1) and 86.30 to 266.66 mg L(-1) day(-1), respectively. Nutrient-limited cultures witnessed much higher lipid content (41.21-46.21% of dry weight) than nutrient-full cultures (26% of dry weight). The N- and P-limited medium observed the highest FAME yield at 10.95% of dry weight, while the N-limited culture and P-limited culture shared the highest biodiesel productivity at 20.66 and 19.91 mg L(-1) day(-1), respectively. The experiment on harvest water recycling times demonstrated that 100% of the harvest water could be recycled twice with the addition of sufficient nutrients.

  9. Stoichiometry, Metabolism and Nutrient Limitation Across the Periodic Table in Natural Flowing-Water Chemostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. J.; Nifong, R. L.; Kurz, M. J.; Cropper, W. P.; Martin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Relative supplies of macro and micronutrients (C,N,P, various metals), along with light and water, controls ecosystem metabolism, trophic energy transfer and community structure. Here we test the hypothesis, using measurements from 41 spring-fed rivers in Florida, that tissue stoichiometry indicates autotroph nutrient limitation status. Low variation in discharge, temperature and chemical composition within springs, but large variation across springs creates an ideal setting to assess the relationship between limitation and resource supply. Molar N:P ranges from 0.4 to 90, subjecting autotrophs to dramatically different nutrient supply. Over this gradient, species-specific autotroph tissue C:N:P ratios are strictly homeostatic, and with no evidence that nutrient supply affects species composition. Expanding to include 19 metals and micronutrients revealed autotrophs are more plastic in response to micronutrient variation, particularly for iron and manganese whose supply fluxes are small compared to biotic demand. Using a Droop model modified to reflect springs conditions (benthic production, light limitation, high hydraulic turnover), we show that tissue stoichiometry transitions from homeostatic to plastic with the onset of nutrient limitation, providing a potentially powerful new tool for predicting nutrient limitation and thus eutrophication in flowing waters.

  10. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Nutrient Limitation, Plant Biomass and Productivity, and Stream Metabolism Vary in Response to Short- and Long-Term Hydrological Regime Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, N. B.; Sabo, J. L.; Dong, X.; Ruhí, A.

    2014-12-01

    Climate and hydrology are strong drivers of ecosystem structure and function in arid landscapes. Arid regions are characterized by high interannual variation in precipitation, and these climate patterns drive the overall hydrologic disturbance regime (in terms of flooding and drying), which influences geomorphic structure, biotic distributions, and nutrient status of desert stream ecosystems. We analyzed the long-term pattern of discharge in a desert stream in Arizona to identify hydrologic regime shifts, i.e., abrupt transitions between sequences of floods and droughts at periods of months to decades. We used wavelet analysis to identify time intervals over a 50-year time series that were negatively correlated with one another, reflecting a shift from wet to dry phases. We also looked with finer resolution at the most recent 10-year period, when wetlands have come to dominate the ecosystem owing to a management change, and at individual flood and drought events within years. In space, there is high site fidelity of wetland plant cover, corresponding to reliable water sources. Comparing five-year patterns of plant distribution and stream metabolism between wet and dry years suggested the primacy of geomorphic controls in drought periods. Nutrient limitation of algal production varied from moderate to very strong N limitation, with only one year when there was a (weak) suggestion of secondary P limitation. Over the longer period of record, we identified times characterized by hydrological regime shifts and asked whether ecosystem variables would have changed over that time period. We hypothesized, in particular, that the changes in nutrient status of the stream ecosystem would result from these regime shifts. We used our most complete long-term dataset on stream nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and N:P ratios as a proxy for nutrient limitation. However, N:P varied primarily at fine scales in response to individual flood events.

  11. Nutrient limitation and morphological plasticity of the carnivorous pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea in contrasting wetland environments.

    PubMed

    Bott, Terry; Meyer, Gretchen A; Young, Erica B

    2008-01-01

    * Plasticity of leaf nutrient content and morphology, and macronutrient limitation were examined in the northern pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea subsp. purpurea, in relation to soil nutrient availability in an open, neutral pH fen and a shady, acidic ombrotrophic bog, over 2 yr following reciprocal transplantation of S. purpurea between the wetlands. * In both wetlands, plants were limited by nitrogen (N) but not phosphorus (P) (N content < 2% DW(-1), N : P < 14) but photosynthetic quantum yields were high (F(V)/F(M) > 0.79). Despite carnivory, leaf N content correlated with dissolved N availability to plant roots (leaf N vs , r(2) = 0.344, P < 0.0001); carnivorous N acquisition did not apparently overcome N limitation. * Following transplantation, N content and leaf morphological traits changed in new leaves to become more similar to plants in the new environment, reflecting wetland nutrient availability. Changes in leaf morphology were faster when plants were transplanted from fen to bog than from bog to fen, possibly reflecting a more stressful environment in the bog. * Morphological plasticity observed in response to changes in nutrient supply to the roots in natural habitats complements previous observations of morphological changes with experimental nutrient addition to pitchers.

  12. Nutrient limitation on terrestrial plant growth--modeling the interaction between nitrogen and phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Agren, Göran I; Wetterstedt, J Å Martin; Billberger, Magnus F K

    2012-06-01

    Growth of plants in terrestrial ecosystems is often limited by the availability of nitrogen (N) or phosphorous (P) Liebig's law of the minimum states that the nutrient in least supply relative to the plant's requirement will limit the plant's growth. An alternative to the law of the minimum is the multiple limitation hypothesis (MLH) which states that plants adjust their growth patterns such that they are limited by several resources simultaneously. We use a simple model of plant growth and nutrient uptake to explore the consequences for the plant's relative growth rate of letting plants invest differentially in N and P uptake. We find a smooth transition between limiting elements, in contrast to the strict transition in Liebig's law of the minimum. At N : P supply ratios where the two elements simultaneously limit growth, an increase in either of the nutrients will increase the growth rate because more resources can be allocated towards the limiting element, as suggested by the multiple limitation hypothesis. However, the further the supply ratio deviates from these supply rates, the more the plants will follow the law of the minimum. Liebig's law of the minimum will in many cases be a useful first-order approximation.

  13. Invasive Fishes Generate Biogeochemical Hotspots in a Nutrient-Limited System

    PubMed Central

    Capps, Krista A.; Flecker, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    Fishes can play important functional roles in the nutrient dynamics of freshwater systems. Aggregating fishes have the potential to generate areas of increased biogeochemical activity, or hotspots, in streams and rivers. Many of the studies documenting the functional role of fishes in nutrient dynamics have focused on native fish species; however, introduced fishes may restructure nutrient storage and cycling freshwater systems as they can attain high population densities in novel environments. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a non-native catfish (Loricariidae: Pterygoplichthys) on nitrogen and phosphorus remineralization and estimate whether large aggregations of these fish generate measurable biogeochemical hotspots within nutrient-limited ecosystems. Loricariids formed large aggregations during daylight hours and dispersed throughout the stream during evening hours to graze benthic habitats. Excretion rates of phosphorus were twice as great during nighttime hours when fishes were actively feeding; however, there was no diel pattern in nitrogen excretion rates. Our results indicate that spatially heterogeneous aggregations of loricariids can significantly elevate dissolved nutrient concentrations via excretion relative to ambient nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations during daylight hours, creating biogeochemical hotspots and potentially altering nutrient dynamics in invaded systems. PMID:23342083

  14. Nitrogen limitation of growth and nutrient dynamics in a disturbed mangrove forest, Indian River Lagoon, Florida.

    PubMed

    Feller, Ilka C; Whigham, Dennis F; McKee, Karen L; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2003-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine effects of nutrient enrichment on plant growth, nutrient dynamics, and photosynthesis in a disturbed mangrove forest in an abandoned mosquito impoundment in Florida. Impounding altered the hydrology and soil chemistry of the site. In 1997, we established a factorial experiment along a tree-height gradient with three zones, i.e., fringe, transition, dwarf, and three fertilizer treatment levels, i.e., nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), control, in Mosquito Impoundment 23 on the eastern side of Indian River. Transects traversed the forest perpendicular to the shoreline, from a Rhizophora mangle-dominated fringe through an Avicennia germinans stand of intermediate height, and into a scrub or dwarf stand of A. germinans in the hinterland. Growth rates increased significantly in response to N fertilization. Our growth data indicated that this site is N-limited along the tree-height gradient. After 2 years of N addition, dwarf trees resembled vigorously growing saplings. Addition of N also affected internal dynamics of N and P and caused increases in rates of photosynthesis. These findings contrast with results for a R. mangle-dominated forest in Belize where the fringe is N-limited, but the dwarf zone is P-limited and the transition zone is co-limited by N and P. This study demonstrated that patterns of nutrient limitation in mangrove ecosystems are complex, that not all processes respond similarly to the same nutrient, and that similar habitats are not limited by the same nutrient when different mangrove forests are compared.

  15. Nitrogen limitation of growth and nutrient dynamics in a disturbed mangrove forest, Indian River Lagoon, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feller, Ilka C.; Whigham, D.F.; McKee, K.L.; Lovelock, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine effects of nutrient enrichment on plant growth, nutrient dynamics, and photosynthesis in a disturbed mangrove forest in an abandoned mosquito impoundment in Florida. Impounding altered the hydrology and soil chemistry of the site. In 1997, we established a factorial experiment along a tree-height gradient with three zones, i.e., fringe, transition, dwarf, and three fertilizer treatment levels, i.e., nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), control, in Mosquito Impoundment 23 on the eastern side of Indian River. Transects traversed the forest perpendicular to the shoreline, from a Rhizophora mangle-dominated fringe through an Avicennia germinans stand of intermediate height, and into a scrub or dwarf stand of A. germinans in the hinterland. Growth rates increased significantly in response to N fertilization. Our growth data indicated that this site is N-limited along the tree-height gradient. After 2 years of N addition, dwarf trees resembled vigorously growing saplings. Addition of N also affected internal dynamics of N and P and caused increases in rates of photosynthesis. These findings contrast with results for a R. mangle-dominated forest in Belize where the fringe is N-limited, but the dwarf zone is P-limited and the transition zone is co-limited by N and P. This study demonstrated that patterns of nutrient limitation in mangrove ecosystems are complex, that not all processes respond similarly to the same nutrient, and that similar habitats are not limited by the same nutrient when different mangrove forests are compared.

  16. Eco-physiological adaptation shapes the response of calcifying algae to nutrient limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šupraha, Luka; Gerecht, Andrea C.; Probert, Ian; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2015-11-01

    The steady increase in global ocean temperature will most likely lead to nutrient limitation in the photic zone. This will impact the physiology of marine algae, including the globally important calcifying coccolithophores. Understanding their adaptive patterns is essential for modelling carbon production in a low-nutrient ocean. We investigated the physiology of Helicosphaera carteri, a representative of the abundant but under-investigated flagellated functional group of coccolithophores. Two strains isolated from contrasting nutrient regimes (South Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea) were grown in phosphorus-replete and phosphorus-limited batch cultures. While growing exponentially in a phosphorus-replete medium, the Mediterranean strain exhibited on average 24% lower growth rate, 36% larger coccosphere volume and 21% lower particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) production than the Atlantic strain. Under phosphorus limitation, the same strain was capable of reaching a 2.6 times higher cell density than the Atlantic strain due to lower phosphorus requirements. These results suggest that local physiological adaptation can define the performance of this species under nutrient limitation.

  17. Eco-physiological adaptation shapes the response of calcifying algae to nutrient limitation

    PubMed Central

    Šupraha, Luka; Gerecht, Andrea C.; Probert, Ian; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2015-01-01

    The steady increase in global ocean temperature will most likely lead to nutrient limitation in the photic zone. This will impact the physiology of marine algae, including the globally important calcifying coccolithophores. Understanding their adaptive patterns is essential for modelling carbon production in a low-nutrient ocean. We investigated the physiology of Helicosphaera carteri, a representative of the abundant but under-investigated flagellated functional group of coccolithophores. Two strains isolated from contrasting nutrient regimes (South Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea) were grown in phosphorus-replete and phosphorus-limited batch cultures. While growing exponentially in a phosphorus-replete medium, the Mediterranean strain exhibited on average 24% lower growth rate, 36% larger coccosphere volume and 21% lower particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) production than the Atlantic strain. Under phosphorus limitation, the same strain was capable of reaching a 2.6 times higher cell density than the Atlantic strain due to lower phosphorus requirements. These results suggest that local physiological adaptation can define the performance of this species under nutrient limitation. PMID:26560531

  18. Are Tropical Forest Responses to Rising Atmospheric CO2 Nutrient-Limited?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. S.; Wright, S. J.; Turner, B. L.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical forests are responsible for a large proportion of terrestrial gross primary production and are thought to be especially sensitive to climate change, suggesting that their responses and subsequent feedbacks to the global climate system are likely to be large. However, a critical gap in our knowledge is the extent to which nutrients limit the ability of tropical forest vegetation to increase carbon gain from increasing atmospheric CO2 (the concentration-carbon feedback). We present data from the only long-term nutrient addition experiment in a lowland tropical forest to anticipate tropical forest responses to changes in climate and atmospheric chemistry and the corresponding vegetation feedback to climate. We investigated the consequences of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium limitation of forest productivity, microbial biomass and tree growth, in a full factorial fertilization experiment at the Barro Colorado Nature Monument in Panama. The 16 years of nutrient addition at have taught us important lessons regarding the function of tropical forest. We now know that fine root biomass decreases by up to 50% with K addition. We have also learned that tree growth is most enhanced by N and K addition, and that litterfall and microbial biomass were most enhanced by P addition. Different components of the ecosystem are limited by contrasting elements. Overall, the results demonstrate the potential for nutrients to limit the responses of tropical forests to rising atmospheric CO2.

  19. Eco-physiological adaptation shapes the response of calcifying algae to nutrient limitation.

    PubMed

    Šupraha, Luka; Gerecht, Andrea C; Probert, Ian; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2015-11-12

    The steady increase in global ocean temperature will most likely lead to nutrient limitation in the photic zone. This will impact the physiology of marine algae, including the globally important calcifying coccolithophores. Understanding their adaptive patterns is essential for modelling carbon production in a low-nutrient ocean. We investigated the physiology of Helicosphaera carteri, a representative of the abundant but under-investigated flagellated functional group of coccolithophores. Two strains isolated from contrasting nutrient regimes (South Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea) were grown in phosphorus-replete and phosphorus-limited batch cultures. While growing exponentially in a phosphorus-replete medium, the Mediterranean strain exhibited on average 24% lower growth rate, 36% larger coccosphere volume and 21% lower particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) production than the Atlantic strain. Under phosphorus limitation, the same strain was capable of reaching a 2.6 times higher cell density than the Atlantic strain due to lower phosphorus requirements. These results suggest that local physiological adaptation can define the performance of this species under nutrient limitation.

  20. Unravelling the limits to tree height: a major role for water and nutrient trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Michael D

    2012-05-01

    Competition for light has driven forest trees to grow exceedingly tall, but the lack of a single universal limit to tree height indicates multiple interacting environmental limitations. Because soil nutrient availability is determined by both nutrient concentrations and soil water, water and nutrient availabilities may interact in determining realised nutrient availability and consequently tree height. In SW Australia, which is characterised by nutrient impoverished soils that support some of the world's tallest forests, total [P] and water availability were independently correlated with tree height (r = 0.42 and 0.39, respectively). However, interactions between water availability and each of total [P], pH and [Mg] contributed to a multiple linear regression model of tree height (r = 0.72). A boosted regression tree model showed that maximum tree height was correlated with water availability (24%), followed by soil properties including total P (11%), Mg (10%) and total N (9%), amongst others, and that there was an interaction between water availability and total [P] in determining maximum tree height. These interactions indicated a trade-off between water and P availability in determining maximum tree height in SW Australia. This is enabled by a species assemblage capable of growing tall and surviving (some) disturbances. The mechanism for this trade-off is suggested to be through water enabling mass-flow and diffusive mobility of P, particularly of relatively mobile organic P, although water interactions with microbial activity could also play a role.

  1. Quantitative proteomics of nutrient limitation in the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Methanogenic Archaea play key metabolic roles in anaerobic ecosystems, where they use H2 and other substrates to produce methane. Methanococcus maripaludis is a model for studies of the global response to nutrient limitations. Results We used high-coverage quantitative proteomics to determine the response of M. maripaludis to growth-limiting levels of H2, nitrogen, and phosphate. Six to ten percent of the proteome changed significantly with each nutrient limitation. H2 limitation increased the abundance of a wide variety of proteins involved in methanogenesis. However, one protein involved in methanogenesis decreased: a low-affinity [Fe] hydrogenase, which may dominate over a higher-affinity mechanism when H2 is abundant. Nitrogen limitation increased known nitrogen assimilation proteins. In addition, the increased abundance of molybdate transport proteins suggested they function for nitrogen fixation. An apparent regulon governed by the euryarchaeal nitrogen regulator NrpR is discussed. Phosphate limitation increased the abundance of three different sets of proteins, suggesting that all three function in phosphate transport. Conclusion The global proteomic response of M. maripaludis to each nutrient limitation suggests a wider response than previously appreciated. The results give new insight into the function of several proteins, as well as providing information that should contribute to the formulation of a regulatory network model. PMID:19627604

  2. A high resolution estimate of the inorganic nitrogen flux from the Scheldt estuary to the coastal North Sea during a nitrogen-limited algal bloom, spring 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Regnier, P. |; Steefel, C.I.

    1999-05-01

    Massive short-term (4--8 wk) blooms of Phaeocystis have been observed in coastal North Sea waters in the spring for a number of years now. Researchers have shown that these algal blooms, which lead to eutrophication of the local water mass, are limited by the supply of inorganic nitrogen from the various bordering estuaries. The authors demonstrate using the case of a typical heavily polluted macrotidal estuary, the Scheldt in Belgium and the Netherlands, that the short duration of the algal blooms requires estuarine flux estimation methods with a high temporal resolution. They use the fully transient, multicomponent reactive transport model CONTRASTE to compute inorganic nitrogen fluxes through the mouth of the Scheldt estuary into the North Sea. The model simulations use a detailed dataset of upstream river discharges and solute concentrations along with tidal forcings for a 210 day period between December 1, 1994 and June 30, 1995. The temporally resolved estimate shows that widely used estuarine flux estimation methods which rely on a steady-state approximation underestimate the inorganic nitrogen loading available to sustain primary production in the North Sea during the period of the algal bloom by 100%.

  3. Planetary Bioresources and Astroecology. 1. Planetary Microcosm Bioassays of Martian and Carbonaceous Chondrite Materials: Nutrients, Electrolyte Solutions, and Algal and Plant Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.

    2002-07-01

    The biological fertilities of planetary materials can be assessed using microcosms based on meteorites. This study applies microcosm tests to martian meteorites and analogues and to carbonaceous chondrites. The biological fertilities of these materials are rated based on the soluble electrolyte nutrients, the growth of mesophile and cold-tolerant algae, and plant tissue cultures. The results show that the meteorites, in particular the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite and DaG 476 martian shergottite, contain high levels of water-extractable Ca, Mg, and SO 4-S. The martian meteorites DaG 476 and EETA 79001 also contain higher levels of extractable essential nutrients NO 3-N (0.013-0.017 g kg -1) and PO 4-P (0.019-0.046 g kg -1) than the terrestrial analogues. The yields of most of the water-extractable electrolytes vary only by factors of 2-3 under a wide range of planetary conditions. However, the long-term extractable phosphate increases significantly under a CO 2 atmosphere. The biological yields of algae and plant tissue cultures correlate with extractable NO 3-N and PO 4-P, identifying these as the limiting nutrients. Mesophilic algae and Asparagus officinalis cultures are identified as useful bioassay agents. A fertility rating system based on microcosm tests is proposed. The results rate the fertilities in the order martian basalts > terrestrial basalt, agricultural soil > carbonaceous chondrites, lava ash > cumulate igneous rock. The results demonstrate the application of planetary microcosms in experimental astroecology to rate planetary materials as targets for astrobiology exploration and as potential space bioresources. For example, the extractable materials in Murchison suggest that concentrated internal solutions in carbonaceous asteroids (3.8 mol L -1 electrolytes and 10 g L -1 organics) can support and disperse microorganisms introduced by natural or directed panspermia in early solar systems. The results also suggest that carbonaceous asteroids

  4. Biocorrosion and biofilm formation in a nutrient limited heating system subjected to alternating microaerophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kjellerup, B V; Kjeldsen, K U; Lopes, F; Abildgaard, L; Ingvorsen, K; Frølund, B; Sowers, K R; Nielsen, P H

    2009-11-01

    Severe biofilm formation and biocorrosion have been observed in heating systems even when the water quality complied with existing standards. The coupling between water chemistry, biofilm formation, species composition, and biocorrosion in a heating system was investigated by adding low concentrations of nutrients and oxygen under continuous and alternating dosing regimes. Molecular analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments demonstrated that the amendments did not cause changes in the overall bacterial community composition. The combined alternating dosing of nutrients and oxygen caused increased rates of pitting (bio-) corrosion. Detection of bacteria involved in sulfide production and oxidation by retrieval of the functional dsrAB and apsA genes revealed the presence of Gram-positive sulfate- and sulfite-reducers and an unknown sulfur-oxidizer. Therefore, to control biocorrosion, sources of oxygen and nutrients must be limited, since the effect of the alternating operational conditions apparently is more important than the presence of potentially corrosive biofilm bacteria.

  5. Springs as Model Systems for Aquatic Ecosystems Ecology: Stoichiometry, Metabolism and Nutrient Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. J.; Nifong, R. L.; Kurz, M. J.; Martin, J. B.; Cropper, W. P.; Korhnak, L. V.

    2013-12-01

    Springs have been called nature's chemostats, where low variation in discharge, temperature and chemistry creates a natural laboratory in which to address basic questions about aquatic ecosystems. Ecological stoichiometry posits that patterns of metabolism, trophic energy transfer and community structure arise in response to coupled elemental cycles. In this work we synthesize several recent studies in Florida's iconic springs to explore the overarching hypothesis that stoichiometry can be used to indicate the nutrient limitation status of autotrophs and ecosystem metabolism. Of foremost importance is that the chemically stable conditions observed in springs ensures that autotroph tissue elemental composition, which is thought to vary with environmental supply, is near steady state. Moreover, the elemental ratios of discharging water vary dramatically across our study springs (for example, molar N:P ranges from 0.4:1 to 400:1), subjecting the communities of autotrophs, which are largely conserved across systems, to dramatically different nutrient supply. At the scale of whole ecosystem metabolism, we show that C:N:P ratios are strongly conserved across a wide gradient of environmental supplies, counter to the prediction of stoichiometric plasticity. Moreover, the absence of a relationship between gross primary production and nutrient concentrations or stoichiometry suggests that metabolic homeostasis may be a diagnostic symptom of nutrient saturation. At the scale of individual autotrophs, both submerged vascular plants and filamentous algae, this finding is strongly reinforced, with remarkable within-species tissue C:N:P homeostasis over large gradients, and no statistically significant evidence that gradients in nutrient supply affect autotroph composition. Expanding the suite of elements for which contemporaneous environment and tissue measurements are available to include 19 metals and micronutrients revealed that, while plants were homeostatic across large N

  6. Nutrients Limiting Soybean (glycine max l) Growth in Acrisols and Ferralsols of Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Keino, Ludy; Baijukya, Frederick; Ng’etich, Wilson; Otinga, Abigael N.; Okalebo, John R.; Njoroge, Ruth; Mukalama, John

    2015-01-01

    Low soybean yields in western Kenya have been attributed to low soil fertility despite much work done on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) nutrition leading to suspicion of other nutrient limitations. To investigate this, a nutrient omission trial was set up in the greenhouse at the University of Eldoret-Kenya to diagnose the nutrients limiting soybean production in Acrisols from Masaba central and Butere sub-Counties, and Ferralsols from Kakamega (Shikhulu and Khwisero sub-locations) and Butula sub-Counties and to assess the effect of liming on soil pH and soybean growth. The experiment was laid out in a completely randomized design with ten treatments viz; positive control (complete), negative control (distilled water), complete with lime, complete with N, minus macronutrients P, potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and sulphur (S) and with, micro-nutrients boron (B), molybdenum (Mo), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) omitted. Visual deficiency symptoms observed included interveinal leaf yellowing in Mg omission and N addition and dark green leaves in P omission. Nutrients omission resulted in their significantly low concentration in plant tissues than the complete treatment. Significantly (P≤ 0.05) lower shoot dry weights (SDWs) than the complete treatment were obtained in different treatments; omission of K and Mg in Masaba and Shikhulu, Mg in Khwisero, K in Butere and, P, Mg and K in Butula. Nitrogen significantly improved SDWs in soils from Kakamega and Butula. Liming significantly raised soil pH by 9, 13 and 11% from 4.65, 4.91 and 4.99 in soils from Masaba, Butere and Butula respectively and soybean SDWs in soils from Butere. The results show that, poor soybean growth was due to K, Mg and P limitation and low pH in some soils. The results also signify necessity of application of small quantities of N for initial soybean use. PMID:26716825

  7. Nutrients Limiting Soybean (glycine max l) Growth in Acrisols and Ferralsols of Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Keino, Ludy; Baijukya, Frederick; Ng'etich, Wilson; Otinga, Abigael N; Okalebo, John R; Njoroge, Ruth; Mukalama, John

    2015-01-01

    Low soybean yields in western Kenya have been attributed to low soil fertility despite much work done on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) nutrition leading to suspicion of other nutrient limitations. To investigate this, a nutrient omission trial was set up in the greenhouse at the University of Eldoret-Kenya to diagnose the nutrients limiting soybean production in Acrisols from Masaba central and Butere sub-Counties, and Ferralsols from Kakamega (Shikhulu and Khwisero sub-locations) and Butula sub-Counties and to assess the effect of liming on soil pH and soybean growth. The experiment was laid out in a completely randomized design with ten treatments viz; positive control (complete), negative control (distilled water), complete with lime, complete with N, minus macronutrients P, potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and sulphur (S) and with, micro-nutrients boron (B), molybdenum (Mo), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) omitted. Visual deficiency symptoms observed included interveinal leaf yellowing in Mg omission and N addition and dark green leaves in P omission. Nutrients omission resulted in their significantly low concentration in plant tissues than the complete treatment. Significantly (P≤ 0.05) lower shoot dry weights (SDWs) than the complete treatment were obtained in different treatments; omission of K and Mg in Masaba and Shikhulu, Mg in Khwisero, K in Butere and, P, Mg and K in Butula. Nitrogen significantly improved SDWs in soils from Kakamega and Butula. Liming significantly raised soil pH by 9, 13 and 11% from 4.65, 4.91 and 4.99 in soils from Masaba, Butere and Butula respectively and soybean SDWs in soils from Butere. The results show that, poor soybean growth was due to K, Mg and P limitation and low pH in some soils. The results also signify necessity of application of small quantities of N for initial soybean use. PMID:26716825

  8. Analogous nutrient limitations in unicellular diazotrophs and Prochlorococcus in the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Moisander, Pia H; Zhang, Ruifeng; Boyle, Edward A; Hewson, Ian; Montoya, Joseph P; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2012-04-01

    Growth limitation of phytoplankton and unicellular nitrogen (N(2)) fixers (diazotrophs) were investigated in the oligotrophic Western South Pacific Ocean. Based on change in abundances of nifH or 23S rRNA gene copies during nutrient-enrichment experiments, the factors limiting net growth of the unicellular diazotrophs UCYN-A (Group A), Crocosphaera watsonii, γ-Proteobacterium 24774A11, and the non-diazotrophic picocyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, varied within the region. At the westernmost stations, numbers were enhanced by organic carbon added as simple sugars, a combination of iron and an organic chelator, or iron added with phosphate. At stations nearest the equator, the nutrient-limiting growth was not apparent. Maximum net growth rates for UCYN-A, C. watsonii and γ-24774A11 were 0.19, 0.61 and 0.52 d(-1), respectively, which are the first known empirical growth rates reported for the uncultivated UCYN-A and the γ-24774A11. The addition of N enhanced total phytoplankton biomass up to 5-fold, and the non-N(2)-fixing Synechococcus was among the groups that responded favorably to N addition. Nitrogen was the major nutrient-limiting phytoplankton biomass in the Western South Pacific Ocean, while availability of organic carbon or iron and organic chelator appear to limit abundances of unicellular diazotrophs. Lack of phytoplankton response to nutrient additions in the Pacific warm pool waters suggests diazotroph growth in this area is controlled by different factors than in the higher latitudes, which may partially explain previously observed variability in community composition in the region. PMID:22094348

  9. Eutrophication and nutrient limitation in the aquatic zones around Huainan coal mine subsidence areas, Anhui, China.

    PubMed

    Yi, Qitao; Wang, Xiaomeng; Wang, Tingting; Qu, Xijie; Xie, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The eutrophication of three small lakes in the aquatic zones at the Huainan coal mine subsidence areas, designated as east site (ES), central site (CS), and west site (WS), were studied. Nutrient content, species, and nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) ratios were obtained through water quality analyses. Nutrient limitation was evaluated by nutrient enrichment bioassays (NEBs) in the autumn of 2012 and spring of 2013. Average annual concentrations of total phosphorus (TP) were 0.05, 0.08, and 0.10 mg/L, and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations were 0.77, 1.95, and 2.06 mg/L in the water column at CS, ES, and WS, respectively. All of the three lakes exhibited 'meso-eutrophic' states and the TN:TP ratio ranged from 25:1 to 74:1 with variability between seasons and sites. NEBs verified that primary productivity in the lakes at ES and WS were mainly limited by P, while N limitation or N and P co-limitation was present in the aquatic zones at CS due to unavailable dissolved inorganic nitrogen. In the studied lakes, the blue-green algae, which comprised 70% of all identified species, was the predominant taxa, while the micro-zooplankton taxa was dominant, indicating a typical trophic structure of eutrophic lakes.

  10. Effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on aerobic granulation of algal-bacterial symbiosis system and nutrients removal from synthetic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Huang, Wenli; Zhang, Chao; Feng, Sisi; Zhang, Zhenya; Lei, Zhongfang; Sugiura, Norio

    2015-01-01

    The influence of TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) (10-50mg/L) on aerobic granulation of algal-bacterial symbiosis system was investigated by using two identical sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Although little adverse effect was observed on their nitritation efficiency (98-100% in both reactors), algal-bacterial granules in the control SBR (Rc) gradually lost stability mainly brought about by algae growth. TiO2-NPs addition to RT was found to enhance the granulation process achieving stable and compact algal-bacterial granules with remarkably improved nitratation thus little nitrite accumulation in RT when influent TiO2-NPs⩾30mg/L. Despite almost similar organics and phosphorus removals obtained in both reactors, the stably high nitratation efficiency in addition to much stable granular structure in RT suggests that TiO2-NPs addition might be a promising remedy for the long-term operation of algal-bacterial granular system, most probably attributable to the stimulated excretion of extracellular polymeric substances and less filamentous TM7.

  11. Sea lamprey carcasses exert local and variable food web effects in a nutrient-limited Atlantic coastal stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, Daniel M.; Coghlan Jr., Stephen M.; Zydlewski, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Resource flows from adjacent ecosystems are critical in maintaining structure and function of freshwater food webs. Migrating sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) deliver a pulsed marine-derived nutrient subsidy to rivers in spring when the metabolic demand of producers and consumers are increasing. However, the spatial and temporal dynamics of these nutrient subsidies are not well characterized. We used sea lamprey carcass additions in a small stream to examine changes in nutrients, primary productivity, and nutrient assimilation among consumers. Algal biomass increased 57%–71% immediately adjacent to carcasses; however, broader spatial changes from multiple-site carcass addition may have been influenced by canopy cover. We detected assimilation of nutrients (via δ13C and δ15N) among several macroinvertebrate families including Heptageniidae, Hydropsychidae, and Perlidae. Our research suggests that subsidies may evoke localized patch-scale effects on food webs, and the pathways of assimilation in streams are likely coupled to adjacent terrestrial systems. This research underscores the importance of connectivity in streams, which may influence sea lamprey spawning and elicit varying food web responses from carcass subsidies due to fine-scale habitat variables.

  12. Determination of Bacterial Weathering Ability in Nutrient Limited Conditions on Biotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, M. R.; Harsh, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial and fungal communities facilitate the weathering of minerals in oligotrophic soils. The bacterial communities reside in biofilms, consisting of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) such as lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, and nuclei acids. Biotite, a 2:1 aluminosilicate mica, is a common primary mineral found in these low nutrient soils and is a source of potassium, magnesium and iron for both microorganisms and plants. Studies show that bacteria, when incubated with biotite flakes, can remove iron, potassium, and magnesium at higher quantities and increased rates compared to abiotic controls (Balogh-Brunstad et al., 2008; Calvaruso et al., 2006; Hopf et al. 2008; Uroz et al., 2007 and 2009). How this happens mechanistically is still unclear and this study seeks to shed light on this issue. We hypothesize that weathering by bacteria is selective; i.e., that the mechanism will depend on the limiting nutrient. Using a drip flow biofilm reactor, biofilms are grown on biotite coupons under non-turbulent, low sheer flow, with four different nutrient treatments. The nutrient treatments include a complete nutrient solution and the same solution without K, Mg, or Fe. In each treatment, we determine the concentration and cumulative release of each cation in the effluent. Congruent dissolution of biotite indicates that weathering is nonselective whereas incongruent dissolution suggests that the bacteria alter the weathering mechanism for a specific nutrient. The bacteria are selected from a bacterial inoculum collected from the roots of young White Pine (Pinus strobus) trees in the Saint Joseph National Forest, Idaho. The bacteria are isolated on plates and the best weathering species are selected using a microplate bioassay technique to determine the concentrations of K, Ca, Mg, and protons colorimetrically.

  13. Active starvation responses mediate antibiotic tolerance in biofilms and nutrient-limited bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dao; Joshi-Datar, Amruta; Lepine, Francois; Bauerle, Elizabeth; Olakanmi, Oyebode; Beer, Karlyn; McKay, Geoffrey; Siehnel, Richard; Schafhauser, James; Wang, Yun; Britigan, Bradley E; Singh, Pradeep K

    2011-11-18

    Bacteria become highly tolerant to antibiotics when nutrients are limited. The inactivity of antibiotic targets caused by starvation-induced growth arrest is thought to be a key mechanism producing tolerance. Here we show that the antibiotic tolerance of nutrient-limited and biofilm Pseudomonas aeruginosa is mediated by active responses to starvation, rather than by the passive effects of growth arrest. The protective mechanism is controlled by the starvation-signaling stringent response (SR), and our experiments link SR-mediated tolerance to reduced levels of oxidant stress in bacterial cells. Furthermore, inactivating this protective mechanism sensitized biofilms by several orders of magnitude to four different classes of antibiotics and markedly enhanced the efficacy of antibiotic treatment in experimental infections. PMID:22096200

  14. Seasonal variation of a snow algal community on an Alaskan glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, N.

    2003-12-01

    There are cold tolerant algae (snow algae) growing on the surface of glaciers. Several species of snow algae have been reported on Alaskan glaciers. Seasonal variation of the snow algal community was investigated on Gulkana Glacier in the Alaska Range from May to September, 2001. Chlorophyll, nutrients, and stable isotope for carbon and nitrogen (particulate organic matter) were also measured. The snow algal community on this glacier varied with time, in particular changed with snow melting and nutrients in the snow. When the glacier is covered with snow (May), the algal community consisted of mainly only one species of alga (Chlamydomonas nivalis, alga of red snow). The algal biomass and chlorophyll concentration increased with snow melting in early summer. When the glacial ice surface appeared, the community structure changed drastically. The community on the ice consisted of some of different species. The community structure and biomass kept almost constant after the ice surface appeared. Nutrients measurements showed that nitrogen was likely limited on the algal growth rather than phosphate. Especially, the nitrate was depleted from August to September. Results of stable isotope measurements also support the nitrogen limitation of the snow algae in late summer.

  15. Relations of Principal Components Analysis Site Scores to Algal-Biomass, Habitat, Basin-Characteristics, Nutrient, and Biological-Community Data in the Whitewater River and East Fork White River Basins, Indiana, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caskey, Brian J.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Lowe, B. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Data were gathered from May through September 2002 at 76 randomly selected sites in the Whitewater River and East Fork White River Basins, Indiana, for algal biomass, habitat, nutrients, and biological communities (fish and invertebrates). Basin characteristics (land use and drainage area) and biolog-ical-community attributes and metric scores were determined for the basin of each sampling site. Yearly Principal Compo-nents Analysis site scores were calculated for algal biomass (periphyton and seston). The yearly Principal Components Analysis site scores for the first axis (PC1) were related using Spearman's rho to the seasonal algal-biomass, basin-charac-teristics, habitat, seasonal nutrient, and biological-community attribute and metric score data. The periphyton PC1 site score was not significantly related to the nine habitat or 12 nutrient variables examined. One land-use variable, drainage area, was negatively related to the periphyton PC1. Of the 43 fish-community attributes and metrics examined, the periphyton PC1 was negatively related to one attribute (large-river percent) and one metric score (car-nivore percent metric score). It was positively related to three fish-community attributes (headwater percent, pioneer percent, and simple lithophil percent). The periphyton PC1 was not statistically related to any of the 21 invertebrate-community attributes or metric scores examined. Of the 12 nutrient variables examined two were nega-tively related to the seston PC1 site score in two seasons: total Kjeldahl nitrogen (July and September), and TP (May and September). There were no statistically significant relations between the seston PC1 and the five basin-characteristics or nine habitat variables examined. Of the 43 fish-community attributes and metrics examined, the seston PC1 was positively related to one attribute (headwater percent) and negatively related to one metric score (large-river percent metric score) . Of the 21 invertebrate-community attributes

  16. Relations of Principal Components Analysis Site Scores to Algal-Biomass, Habitat, Basin-Characteristics, Nutrient, and Biological-Community Data in the West Fork White River Basin, Indiana, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frey, Jeffrey W.; Caskey, Brian J.; Lowe, B. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Data were gathered from July through September 2001 at 34 randomly selected sites in the West Fork White River Basin, Indiana for algal biomass, habitat, nutrients, and biological communities (fish and invertebrates). Basin characteristics (drainage area and land use) and biological-community attributes and metric scores were determined for the basin of each sampling site. Yearly Principal Components Analysis site scores were calculated for algal biomass (periphyton and seston). The yearly Principal Components Analysis site scores for the first axis (PC1) were related, using Spearman's rho, to the seasonal algal-biomass, basin-characteristics, habitat, seasonal nutrient, biological-community attribute and metric score data. The periphyton PC1 site score, which was most influenced by ash-free dry mass, was negatively related to one (percent closed canopy) of nine habitat variables examined. Of the 43 fish-community attributes and metric scores examined, the periphyton PC1 was positively related to one fish-community attribute (percent tolerant). Of the 21 invertebrate-community attributes and metric scores examined, the periphyton PC1 was positively related to one attribute (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) index) and one metric score (EPT index metric score). The periphyton PC1 was not related to the five basin-characteristic or 12 nutrient variables examined. The seston PC1 site score, which was most influenced by particulate organic carbon, was negatively related to two of the 12 nutrient variables examined: total Kjeldahl nitrogen (July) and total phosphorus (July). Of the 43 fish-community attributes and metric scores examined, the seston PC1 was negatively related to one attribute (large-river percent). Of the 21 invertebrate-community attributes and metric scores examined, the seston PC1 was negatively related to one attribute (EPT-to-total ratio). The seston PC1 was not related to the five basin-characteristics or nine habitat variables

  17. Are patterns in nutrient limitation belowground consistent with those aboveground: Results from a 4 million year chronosequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, S.C.; Vitousek, P.M.; Cleveland, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Accurately predicting the effects of global change on net carbon (C) exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere requires a more complete understanding of how nutrient availability regulates both plant growth and heterotrophic soil respiration. Models of soil development suggest that the nature of nutrient limitation changes over the course of ecosystem development, transitioning from nitrogen (N) limitation in 'young' sites to phosphorus (P) limitation in 'old' sites. However, previous research has focused primarily on plant responses to added nutrients, and the applicability of nutrient limitation-soil development models to belowground processes has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we assessed the effects of nutrients on soil C cycling in three different forests that occupy a 4 million year substrate age chronosequence where tree growth is N limited at the youngest site, co-limited by N and P at the intermediate-aged site, and P limited at the oldest site. Our goal was to use short-term laboratory soil C manipulations (using 14C-labeled substrates) and longer-term intact soil core incubations to compare belowground responses to fertilization with aboveground patterns. When nutrients were applied with labile C (sucrose), patterns of microbial nutrient limitation were similar to plant patterns: microbial activity was limited more by N than by P in the young site, and P was more limiting than N in the old site. However, in the absence of C additions, increased respiration of native soil organic matter only occurred with simultaneous additions of N and P. Taken together, these data suggest that altered nutrient inputs into ecosystems could have dissimilar effects on C cycling above- and belowground, that nutrients may differentially affect of the fate of different soil C pools, and that future changes to the net C balance of terrestrial ecosystems will be partially regulated by soil nutrient status. ?? 2010 US Government.

  18. Circadian control of oscillations in mitochondrial rate-limiting enzymes and nutrient utilization by PERIOD proteins.

    PubMed

    Neufeld-Cohen, Adi; Robles, Maria S; Aviram, Rona; Manella, Gal; Adamovich, Yaarit; Ladeuix, Benjamin; Nir, Dana; Rousso-Noori, Liat; Kuperman, Yael; Golik, Marina; Mann, Matthias; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-22

    Mitochondria are major suppliers of cellular energy through nutrients oxidation. Little is known about the mechanisms that enable mitochondria to cope with changes in nutrient supply and energy demand that naturally occur throughout the day. To address this question, we applied MS-based quantitative proteomics on isolated mitochondria from mice killed throughout the day and identified extensive oscillations in the mitochondrial proteome. Remarkably, the majority of cycling mitochondrial proteins peaked during the early light phase. We found that rate-limiting mitochondrial enzymes that process lipids and carbohydrates accumulate in a diurnal manner and are dependent on the clock proteins PER1/2. In this conjuncture, we uncovered daily oscillations in mitochondrial respiration that peak during different times of the day in response to different nutrients. Notably, the diurnal regulation of mitochondrial respiration was blunted in mice lacking PER1/2 or on a high-fat diet. We propose that PERIOD proteins optimize mitochondrial metabolism to daily changes in energy supply/demand and thereby, serve as a rheostat for mitochondrial nutrient utilization. PMID:26862173

  19. Circadian control of oscillations in mitochondrial rate-limiting enzymes and nutrient utilization by PERIOD proteins

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld-Cohen, Adi; Robles, Maria S.; Aviram, Rona; Manella, Gal; Adamovich, Yaarit; Ladeuix, Benjamin; Nir, Dana; Rousso-Noori, Liat; Kuperman, Yael; Golik, Marina; Mann, Matthias; Asher, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are major suppliers of cellular energy through nutrients oxidation. Little is known about the mechanisms that enable mitochondria to cope with changes in nutrient supply and energy demand that naturally occur throughout the day. To address this question, we applied MS-based quantitative proteomics on isolated mitochondria from mice killed throughout the day and identified extensive oscillations in the mitochondrial proteome. Remarkably, the majority of cycling mitochondrial proteins peaked during the early light phase. We found that rate-limiting mitochondrial enzymes that process lipids and carbohydrates accumulate in a diurnal manner and are dependent on the clock proteins PER1/2. In this conjuncture, we uncovered daily oscillations in mitochondrial respiration that peak during different times of the day in response to different nutrients. Notably, the diurnal regulation of mitochondrial respiration was blunted in mice lacking PER1/2 or on a high-fat diet. We propose that PERIOD proteins optimize mitochondrial metabolism to daily changes in energy supply/demand and thereby, serve as a rheostat for mitochondrial nutrient utilization. PMID:26862173

  20. [Nutrient distributions and their limitation on phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Wang, Baodong

    2003-07-01

    Based on field observations during 1997 to 1999, the distributions of micronutrients and their limitation on the growth of phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea were discussed in this paper. The results showed that there were abundant nutrients in the area of the east and northern-east of the Changjiang River estuary, and the nutrients came from the extension of the Changjiang River diluted water and the transportation of the Subei Coastal water. Besides, the maximum extension range of the nutrients in the Changjiang River diluted water was observed during the catastrophic flooding period of the Changjiang River in the summer of 1998. Based on the Redfield ratio (Si:N:P = 16:16:1) in which, three essential nutrients were utilized by marine phytoplankton, the Si/N/P ratios were calculated and studied for the upper water of the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea. The results indicated that Si/N ratios were very high, which suggested that silicate was not the limiting factor for the growth of phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea. However, under the influence of terrestrial runoff, especially the Changjiang River runoff which was rich in combined nitrogen and had very high N/P ratios, high N/P ratios occurred in the Changjiang River estuary and its adjacent areas such as the south and southwest of the Yellow Sea, the inshore area of the East China Sea and the area east of the Changjiang River estuary in spring and summer. As a result, in contrast to general open marine systems, the systems in these areas resembled estuarine ones rather than typical marine ones. The primary production in a considerable portion of the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea might be limited by phosphate rather than nitrogen.

  1. A landscape-scale assessment of nutrient limitation in the tropical forests of Luquillo, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, C. A.; Goldsmith, S. T.; Porder, S.

    2013-12-01

    The nature and extent of nutrient limitation in tropical forest primary production has been explored for decades, but empirical data of growth responses to nutrient additions remains sparse. Forest fertilization, while appropriate for exploring plot-scale limitation, has only been implemented in a few sites, and does not lend itself to assessment of the multiple gradients in soil fertility and forest community composition that typify most tropical landscapes. For this reason, little is known about how nutrient limitation varies across tropical landscapes, or how biotic and abiotic factors influence this variation. Here we report on the results of a fertilized root ingrowth core experiment deployed across contrasts in soil parent material and topographic position in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico. In June 2012, we placed 480 fertilized ingrowth cores filled with a mixture of silica sand and perlite in 8 sub-watersheds in El Yunque National Forest--4 underlain by quartz diorite and 4 by volcaniclastic bedrock. We selected sites to control for forest community type and mean annual precipitation. Fertilizer was supplied by adding pre-loaded weak anion and cation resin beads loaded with NH4+ or PO43- to each core. This technique produced elevated levels of available N and P after two months in the field, and avoided the problem of adding a counter ion (typically Na or K) with the P fertilizer treatment. Within each sub-watershed, we placed 10 cores each of control and both nutrient treatments at each topographic position. We retrieved the cores in January 2013 and quantified the mass of roots (<2mm) that grew into each core. Our data show no significant root growth response to either nutrient relative to control. There are three possible interpretations of our results. First, root ingrowth in Luquillo may only be stimulated by the addition of N and P together. Second, addition of some other nutrient (K, Ca, etc.) might promote root ingrowth, but not N or

  2. Characterization of the Kootenai River Algae Community and Primary Productivity Before and After Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2004–2007 [Chapter 2, Kootenai River Algal Community Characterization, 2009 KTOI REPORT].

    SciTech Connect

    Holderman, Charlie; Anders, Paul; Shafii, Bahman

    2009-07-01

    The Kootenai River ecosystem (spelled Kootenay in Canada) has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam on the river near Libby Montana, completed in 1972. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel downstream in Idaho and British Columbia (B.C.) severely reducing natural biological productivity and habitat diversity crucial to large river-floodplain ecosystem function. Libby Dam greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches, and dam operations cause large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows. These and other changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to large scale loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the North Arm of Kootenay Lake in 1992, in the South Arm of Kootenay Lake in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes baseline chlorophyll concentration and accrual (primary productivity) rates and diatom and algal community composition and ecological metrics in the Kootenai River for four years, one (2004) before, and three (2005 through 2007) after nutrient addition. The study area encompassed a 325 km river reach from the upper Kootenay River at Wardner, B.C. (river kilometer (rkm) 445) downstream through Montana and Idaho to Kootenay Lake in B.C. (rkm 120). Sampling reaches included an unimpounded reach furthest upstream and four reaches downstream from Libby Dam affected by impoundment: two in the canyon reach (one with and one without nutrient addition), a braided reach

  3. Nitrogen deposition effects on subalpine grassland: The role of nutrient limitations and changes in mycorrhizal abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanke, Verena; Bassin, Seraina; Volk, Matthias; Fuhrer, Jürg

    2012-11-01

    To better understand how increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition may affect subalpine grassland, we carried out a nutrient addition experiment in the Swiss Alps. N addition (+N) was combined with phosphorus (P) addition (+P) to determine nutrient limitations in plant functional groups. To examine responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and AMF effects on plant growth, in-growth cores containing local plant species (phytometers) were inserted, and in half of them the external mycelium was disrupted weekly to impede mycorrhizal functioning. At harvest, aboveground biomass and element concentrations of the established vegetation were measured, as well as phytometer shoot and root mass, and the percentage of root length colonized (%RLC) by AMF. Only productivity of grasses increased under +N and +P, while other groups showed no or negative growth responses. +P decreased %RLC in all phytometers, whereas +N increased %RLC in the most abundant grass species, and reduced the relative abundance of arbuscules to total intraradical mycelium in the other species. Weekly destruction of the external mycelium reduced %RLC in most species, but did not affect plant biomass. The results suggest that increased N deposition in such N- and P-co-limited grassland will lead to shifts in plant functional group composition due to differences in the plants' nutrient demand, that +N will affect AMF abundance and mutualistic functioning, but that changes in AMF abundance may not considerably affect plant growth.

  4. Nutrient limitation in soils and trees of a treeline ecotone in Rolwaling Himal, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drollinger, Simon; Müller, Michael; Schickhoff, Udo; Böhner, Jürgen; Scholten, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    At a global scale, tree growth and thus the position of natural alpine treelines is limited by low temperatures. At landscape and local scales, however, the treeline position depends on multiple interactions of influencing factors and mechanisms. The aim of our research is to understand local scale effects of soil properties and nutrient cycling on tree growth limitation, and their interactions with other abiotic and biotic factors, in a near-natural alpine treeline ecotone of Rolwaling Himal, Nepal. In total 48 plots (20 m x 20 m) were investigated. Three north-facing slopes were separated in four different altitudinal zones with the characteristic vegetation of tree species Rhododendron campanulatum, Abies spectabilis, Betula utilis, Sorbus microphylla and Acer spec. We collected 151 soil horizon samples (Ah, Ae, Bh, Bs), 146 litter layer samples (L), and 146 decomposition layer samples (Of) in 2013, as well as 251 leaves from standing biomass (SB) in 2013 and 2014. All samples were analysed for exchangeable cations or nutrient concentrations of C, N, P, K, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe and Al. Soil moisture, soil and surface air temperatures were measured by 34 installed sensors. Precipitation and air temperatures were measured by three climate stations. The main pedogenic process is leaching of dissolved organic carbon, aluminium and iron from topsoil to subsoil. Soil types are classified as podzols with generally low nutrient concentrations. Soil acidity is extremely high and humus quality of mineral soils is poor. Our results indicate multilateral interactions and a great spatial variability of essential nutrients within the treeline ecotone. Both, soil nutrients and leave macronutrient concentrations of nitrogen (N), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K) decrease significantly with elevation in the treeline ecotone. Besides, phosphorus (P) foliar concentrations decrease significantly with elevation. Based on regression analyses, low soil temperatures and malnutrition most likely

  5. Plant-driven mineral weathering: Hydrochemical effects of nutrient limitation and rhizosphere microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z.; Keller, C. K.; Grant, M.; Harsh, J. B.; Balogh-Brunstad, Z.; Thomashow, L.

    2011-12-01

    Vascular plant growth builds soils and ecosystem nutrient capital. Root-system functions - respiration, and nutrient mobilization and uptake - also affect long-term (geochemical) element cycles by mediating mineral weathering processes and the solution chemistry of soil water and groundwater. However, the mechanisms by which plants drive mineral weathering are poorly understood. We hypothesize that these mechanisms are adaptive functions of ecosystem state. Our objective is to explore how varying degrees of nutrient limitation (i.e. the need to extract base cations from mineral sources) influence weathering/uptake functions in the plant-root-mineral system. We are studying mineral weathering in column experiments with red pine (Pinus resinosa) trees growing under different nutrient treatment and rhizosphere biologic regimes. The columns contain quartz sand amended with biotite and anorthite. Half of the seedlings were inoculated with Suillus tomentosus fungi and soil bacteria, while the other half were not inoculated. Columns without biology served as controls. To assess mineral weathering and denudation (loss) rates, column drainage water was collected periodically to analyze cation concentrations and pH. Pore water samples were collected using a micro-sampler installed in the columns to study the solution phase that may directly mediate weathering and nutrient uptake. Comparison of drainage and pore water chemical compositions will help us to develop quantitative models to link micron-scale cation mass transfer processes to column-scale patterns. In the early stage of the experiment, there are no significant differences among different nutrient and biology treatments. This suggests minimal short term effects of the plant and associated microbes on mineral weathering, which is consistent with limited root development of pine seedlings in the columns after one month. The cation concentrations and pH in the pore water are consistently lower than in the drainage

  6. Demonstrating Compliance with Stringent Nitrogen Limits Using a Biological Nutrient Removal Process in California's Central Valley.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Rion; Witzgall, Bob; Yu, William; Ohlinger, Kurt; Ramberg, Steve; De Las Casas, Carla; Henneman, Seppi; Parker, Denny

    2015-12-01

    The Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District (District) must be compliant with stringent nitrogen limits by 2021 that the existing treatment facilities cannot meet. An 11-month pilot study was conducted to confirm that these limits could be met with an air activated sludge biological nutrient removal (BNR) process. The pilot BNR treated an average flow of 946 m(3)/d and demonstrated that it could reliably meet the ammonia limit, but that external carbon addition may be necessary to satisfy the nitrate limit. The BNR process performed well throughout the 11 months of operation with good settleability, minimal nocardioform content, and high quality secondary effluent. The BNR process was operated at a minimum pH of 6.4 with no noticeable impact to nitrification rates. Increased secondary sludge production was observed during rainfall events and is attributed to a change in wastewater influent characteristics.

  7. Effect of Nutrient-limitation on the Microbial S-isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, M.; Bosak, T.; Ono, S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) utilizes sulfate as an electron acceptor and produces sulfide that is depleted in heavy isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. This process controls much of the distribution of sulfur isotopes in sedimentary sulfides and sulfates, but the magnitude of S-isotope fractionations in natural environments often exceeds those in laboratory cultures. This difference may be due to many factors and environmental stresses, including the limitation by essential nutrients. However, none of the studies to date investigated the effect of nutrients such as nitrogen, iron, or phosphate, on sulfur isotope fractionation by sulfate reducing microbes. Here, we examine the influence of N and Fe limitation on multiple-S isotope fractionation by a marine sulfate reducing bacterium by reducing the concentrations of N and Fe in a defined medium by 10 to 1000 times. Nitrogen limitation reduces the growth rate and the cellular yield, but increases the respiration rate without altering the magnitude of isotope fractionation. In contrast, S-isotope fractionation was up to 40% larger in iron-limited than in iron-replete cultures. This increase in sulfur isotope fractionation is accompanied by a decrease in the growth rate, the cellular yield, the respiration rate, and the cytochrome c content. Thus, iron limitation increases the reversibility of microbial sulfate reduction pathway, possibly by affecting iron-containing respiratory complexes such as cytochromes and iron-sulfur proteins. The apparent influence of iron limitation on S-isotope fractionation is relevant to the interpretations of sulfur isotope data in modern and ancient environments. Some areas where iron limitation may lead to large observed S-isotope effects include iron-limited deep open ocean sediments, whereas smaller S-isotope effects would be expected where Fe is more bioavailable (e.g., in anoxic basins, where Fe enrichment occurs due to Fe shuttling).

  8. Fueling Future with Algal Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-07-05

    Algae constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity, play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing (http://jgi.doe.gov/Algae) and contributes of the algal genome projects worldwide (GOLD database, 2012). The sequenced algal genomes offer catalogs of genes, networks, and pathways. The sequenced first of its kind genomes of a haptophyte E.huxleyii, chlorarachniophyte B.natans, and cryptophyte G.theta fill the gaps in the eukaryotic tree of life and carry unique genes and pathways as well as molecular fossils of secondary endosymbiosis. Natural adaptation to conditions critical for industrial production is encoded in algal genomes, for example, growth of A.anophagefferens at very high cell densities during the harmful algae blooms or a global distribution across diverse environments of E.huxleyii, able to live on sparse nutrients due to its expanded pan-genome. Communications and signaling pathways can be derived from simple symbiotic systems like lichens or complex marine algae metagenomes. Collectively these datasets derived from algal genomics contribute to building a comprehensive parts list essential for algal biofuel development.

  9. GRAZING AND NUTRIENT LIMITATION STUDIES IN PENSACOLA BAY: THE ROLE OF TOP-DOWN VERSUS BOTTOM-UP CONTROLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand the causes and consequences of nutrient over-enrichment (eutrophication) in Gulf of Mexico estuaries, we examined the roles of grazing and nutrient limitation in Pensacola Bay. One consequence of eutrophication is altering the function of plankton food webs; ...

  10. Less is more: Nutrient limitation induces cross-talk of nutrient sensing pathways with NAD+ homeostasis and contributes to longevity

    PubMed Central

    TSANG, Felicia; LIN, Su-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient sensing pathways and their regulation grant cells control over their metabolism and growth in response to changing nutrients. Factors that regulate nutrient sensing can also modulate longevity. Reduced activity of nutrient sensing pathways such as glucose-sensing PKA, nitrogen-sensing TOR and S6 kinase homolog Sch9 have been linked to increased life span in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and higher eukaryotes. Recently, reduced activity of amino acid sensing SPS pathway was also shown to increase yeast life span. Life span extension by reduced SPS activity requires enhanced NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form) and nicotinamide riboside (NR, a NAD+ precursor) homeostasis. Maintaining adequate NAD+ pools has been shown to play key roles in life span extension, but factors regulating NAD+ metabolism and homeostasis are not completely understood. Recently, NAD+ metabolism was also linked to the phosphate (Pi)-sensing PHO pathway in yeast. Canonical PHO activation requires Pi-starvation. Interestingly, NAD+ depletion without Pi-starvation was sufficient to induce PHO activation, increasing NR production and mobilization. Moreover, SPS signaling appears to function in parallel with PHO signaling components to regulate NR/NAD+ homeostasis. These studies suggest that NAD+ metabolism is likely controlled by and/or coordinated with multiple nutrient sensing pathways. Indeed, cross-regulation of PHO, PKA, TOR and Sch9 pathways was reported to potentially affect NAD+ metabolism; though detailed mechanisms remain unclear. This review discusses yeast longevity-related nutrient sensing pathways and possible mechanisms of life span extension, regulation of NAD+ homeostasis, and cross-talk among nutrient sensing pathways and NAD+ homeostasis.

  11. Less is more: Nutrient limitation induces cross-talk of nutrient sensing pathways with NAD+ homeostasis and contributes to longevity

    PubMed Central

    TSANG, Felicia; LIN, Su-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient sensing pathways and their regulation grant cells control over their metabolism and growth in response to changing nutrients. Factors that regulate nutrient sensing can also modulate longevity. Reduced activity of nutrient sensing pathways such as glucose-sensing PKA, nitrogen-sensing TOR and S6 kinase homolog Sch9 have been linked to increased life span in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and higher eukaryotes. Recently, reduced activity of amino acid sensing SPS pathway was also shown to increase yeast life span. Life span extension by reduced SPS activity requires enhanced NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form) and nicotinamide riboside (NR, a NAD+ precursor) homeostasis. Maintaining adequate NAD+ pools has been shown to play key roles in life span extension, but factors regulating NAD+ metabolism and homeostasis are not completely understood. Recently, NAD+ metabolism was also linked to the phosphate (Pi)-sensing PHO pathway in yeast. Canonical PHO activation requires Pi-starvation. Interestingly, NAD+ depletion without Pi-starvation was sufficient to induce PHO activation, increasing NR production and mobilization. Moreover, SPS signaling appears to function in parallel with PHO signaling components to regulate NR/NAD+ homeostasis. These studies suggest that NAD+ metabolism is likely controlled by and/or coordinated with multiple nutrient sensing pathways. Indeed, cross-regulation of PHO, PKA, TOR and Sch9 pathways was reported to potentially affect NAD+ metabolism; though detailed mechanisms remain unclear. This review discusses yeast longevity-related nutrient sensing pathways and possible mechanisms of life span extension, regulation of NAD+ homeostasis, and cross-talk among nutrient sensing pathways and NAD+ homeostasis. PMID:27683589

  12. Ethnic disparities among food sources of energy and nutrients of public health concern and nutrients to limit in adults in the United States: NHANES 2003–2006

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Carol E.; Nicklas, Theresa A.; Keast, Debra R.; Fulgoni, Victor L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identification of current food sources of energy and nutrients among US non-Hispanic whites (NHW), non-Hispanic blacks (NHB), and Mexican American (MA) adults is needed to help with public health efforts in implementing culturally sensitive and feasible dietary recommendations. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the food sources of energy and nutrients to limit [saturated fatty acids (SFA), added sugars, and sodium] and nutrients of public health concern (dietary fiber, vitamin D, calcium, and potassium) by NHW, NHB, and MA adults. Design This was a cross-sectional analysis of a nationally representative sample of NWH (n=4,811), NHB (2,062), and MA (n=1,950) adults 19+ years. The 2003–2006 NHANES 24-h recall (Day 1) dietary intake data were analyzed. An updated USDA Dietary Source Nutrient Database was developed using current food composition databases. Food grouping included ingredients from disaggregated mixtures. Mean energy and nutrient intakes from food sources were sample-weighted. Percentages of total dietary intake contributed from food sources were ranked. Results Multiple differences in intake among ethnic groups were seen for energy and all nutrients examined. For example, energy intake was higher in MA as compared to NHB; SFA, added sugars, and sodium intakes were higher in NHW than NHB; dietary fiber was highest in MA and lowest in NHB; vitamin D was highest in NHW; calcium was lowest in NHB; and potassium was higher in NHW as compared to NHB. Food sources of these nutrients also varied. Conclusion Identification of intake of nutrients to limit and of public health concern can help health professionals implement appropriate dietary recommendations and plan interventions that are ethnically appropriate. PMID:25413643

  13. Nutrient Limitation of Native and Invasive N2-Fixing Plants in Northwest Prairies

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Andrea S.; Perakis, Steven; Catricala, Christina; Kaye, Thomas N.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient rich conditions often promote plant invasions, yet additions of non-nitrogen (N) nutrients may provide a novel approach for conserving native symbiotic N-fixing plants in otherwise N-limited ecosystems. Lupinus oreganus is a threatened N-fixing plant endemic to prairies in western Oregon and southwest Washington (USA). We tested the effect of non-N fertilizers on the growth, reproduction, tissue N content, and stable isotope δ15N composition of Lupinus at three sites that differed in soil phosphorus (P) and N availability. We also examined changes in other Fabaceae (primarily Vicia sativa and V. hirsuta) and cover of all plant species. Variation in background soil P and N availability shaped patterns of nutrient limitation across sites. Where soil P and N were low, P additions increased Lupinus tissue N and altered foliar δ15N, suggesting P limitation of N fixation. Where soil P was low but N was high, P addition stimulated growth and reproduction in Lupinus. At a third site, with higher soil P, only micro- and macronutrient fertilization without N and P increased Lupinus growth and tissue N. Lupinus foliar δ15N averaged −0.010‰ across all treatments and varied little with tissue N, suggesting consistent use of fixed N. In contrast, foliar δ15N of Vicia spp. shifted towards 0‰ as tissue N increased, suggesting that conditions fostering N fixation may benefit these exotic species. Fertilization increased cover, N fixation, and tissue N of non-target, exotic Fabaceae, but overall plant community structure shifted at only one site, and only after the dominant Lupinus was excluded from analyses. Our finding that non-N fertilization increased the performance of Lupinus with few community effects suggests a potential strategy to aid populations of threatened legume species. The increase in exotic Fabaceae species that occurred with fertilization further suggests that monitoring and adaptive management should accompany any large scale applications. PMID

  14. Nutrient limitation of native and invasive N2-fixing plants in northwest prairies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, Andrea S.; Perakis, Steven S.; Catricala, Christina; Kaye, Thomas N.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient rich conditions often promote plant invasions, yet additions of non-nitrogen (N) nutrients may provide a novel approach for conserving native symbiotic N-fixing plants in otherwise N-limited ecosystems. Lupinus oreganus is a threatened N-fixing plant endemic to prairies in western Oregon and southwest Washington (USA). We tested the effect of non-N fertilizers on the growth, reproduction, tissue N content, and stable isotope δ15N composition of Lupinus at three sites that differed in soil phosphorus (P) and N availability. We also examined changes in other Fabaceae (primarily Vicia sativa and V. hirsuta) and cover of all plant species. Variation in background soil P and N availability shaped patterns of nutrient limitation across sites. Where soil P and N were low, P additions increased Lupinus tissue N and altered foliar δ15N, suggesting P limitation of N fixation. Where soil P was low but N was high, P addition stimulated growth and reproduction in Lupinus. At a third site, with higher soil P, only micro- and macronutrient fertilization without N and P increased Lupinus growth and tissue N. Lupinus foliar δ15N averaged −0.010‰ across all treatments and varied little with tissue N, suggesting consistent use of fixed N. In contrast, foliar δ15N of Vicia spp. shifted towards 0‰ as tissue N increased, suggesting that conditions fostering N fixation may benefit these exotic species. Fertilization increased cover, N fixation, and tissue N of non-target, exotic Fabaceae, but overall plant community structure shifted at only one site, and only after the dominant Lupinus was excluded from analyses. Our finding that non-N fertilization increased the performance of Lupinus with few community effects suggests a potential strategy to aid populations of threatened legume species. The increase in exotic Fabaceae species that occurred with fertilization further suggests that monitoring and adaptive management should accompany any large scale applications.

  15. Shifts in lake N: P stoichiometry and nutrient limitation driven by atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elser, J.J.; Andersen, T.; Baron, J.S.; Bergstrom, A.-K.; Jansson, M.; Kyle, M.; Nydick, K.R.; Steger, L.; Hessen, D.O.

    2009-01-01

    Human activities have more than doubled the amount of nitrogen (N) circulating in the biosphere. One major pathway of this anthropogenic N input into ecosystems has been increased regional deposition from the atmosphere. Here we show that atmospheric N deposition increased the stoichiometric ratio of N and phosphorus (P) in lakes in Norway, Sweden, and Colorado, United States, and, as a result, patterns of ecological nutrient limitation were shifted. Under low N deposition, phytoplankton growth is generally N-limited; however, in high-N deposition lakes, phytoplankton growth is consistently P-limited. Continued anthropogenic amplification of the global N cycle will further alter ecological processes, such as biogeochemical cycling, trophic dynamics, and biological diversity, in the world's lakes, even in lakes far from direct human disturbance.

  16. Shifts in lake N:P stoichiometry and nutrient limitation driven by atmospheric nitrogen deposition.

    PubMed

    Elser, James J; Andersen, Tom; Baron, Jill S; Bergström, Ann-Kristin; Jansson, Mats; Kyle, Marcia; Nydick, Koren R; Steger, Laura; Hessen, Dag O

    2009-11-01

    Human activities have more than doubled the amount of nitrogen (N) circulating in the biosphere. One major pathway of this anthropogenic N input into ecosystems has been increased regional deposition from the atmosphere. Here we show that atmospheric N deposition increased the stoichiometric ratio of N and phosphorus (P) in lakes in Norway, Sweden, and Colorado, United States, and, as a result, patterns of ecological nutrient limitation were shifted. Under low N deposition, phytoplankton growth is generally N-limited; however, in high-N deposition lakes, phytoplankton growth is consistently P-limited. Continued anthropogenic amplification of the global N cycle will further alter ecological processes, such as biogeochemical cycling, trophic dynamics, and biological diversity, in the world's lakes, even in lakes far from direct human disturbance.

  17. Environmental variability drives rapid and dramatic changes in nutrient limitation of tropical macroalgae with different ecological strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausing, Rachel J.; Fong, Peggy

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) or phosphorus (P) limits primary productivity in nearly every ecosystem worldwide, yet how limitation changes over time, particularly in connection to variation in environmental drivers, remains understudied. We evaluated temporal and species-specific variability in the relative importance of N and P limitation among tropical macroalgae in two-factor experiments conducted twice after rains and twice after dry conditions to explore potential linkages to environmental drivers. We studied three common macroalgal species with varying ecological strategies: a fast-growing opportunist, Dictyota bartayresiana; and two calcifying species likely to be slower growing, Galaxaura fasciculata and Padina boryana. On the scale of days to weeks, nutrient responses ranged among and within species from no limitation to increases in growth by 20 and 40 % over controls in 3 d with N and P addition, respectively. After light rain or dry conditions, Dictyota grew rapidly (up to ~60 % in 3 d) with little indication of nutrient limitation, while Padina and Galaxaura shifted between N, P, or no limitation. All species grew slowly or lost mass after a large storm, presumably due to unfavorable conditions on the reef prior to the experiment that limited nutrient uptake. Padina and Galaxaura both became nutrient limited 3 d post-storm, while Dictyota did not. These results suggest that differing capabilities for nutrient uptake and storage dictate the influence of nutrient history and thus drive nutrient responses and, in doing so, may allow species with differing ecological strategies to coexist in a fluctuating environment. Moreover, the great variability in species' responses indicates that patterns of nutrient limitation are more complex than previously recognized, and generalizations about N versus P limitation of a given system may not convey the inherent complexity in governing conditions and processes.

  18. Effect of elevated CO2 on photosynthesis in non-nutrient limited Pinus taeda plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.D.; Tissue, D.T.; Strain, B.R. )

    1994-06-01

    We examined the effect of elevated CO2 on photosynthetic capacity in non-nutrient limited Pinus taeda plants. Plants were grown in open-top chambers maintained at either ambient or ambient +30 Pa CO2. Leaf nitrogen levels indicated that no plants were N limited. Photosynthesis at the growth CO2 was significantly higher in plants grown at elevated CO2. However, elevated CO2 did not significantly affect rubisco activity and activation state, chlorophyll content, electron transport capacity or phosphate regeneration capacity. All parameters were significantly greater during the growing season than during the winter. Additionally, photosynthesis declined approximately 75% in elevated CO2-grown plants from May to January, but only 50% in ambient CO2-grown plants. These results indicate that elevated CO2 will not effect photosynthetic capacity grown plants. These results indicate that elevated CO2 will not affect photosynthetic capacity grown plants. These results indicate that elevated CO2 will not affect photosynthetic capacity in non-nutrient limited P. taeda, but will increase seasonal fluctuations in photosynthesis.

  19. Regulation Systems of Bacteria such as Escherichia coli in Response to Nutrient Limitation and Environmental Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    An overview was made to understand the regulation system of a bacterial cell such as Escherichia coli in response to nutrient limitation such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, sulfur, ion sources, and environmental stresses such as oxidative stress, acid shock, heat shock, and solvent stresses. It is quite important to understand how the cell detects environmental signals, integrate such information, and how the cell system is regulated. As for catabolite regulation, F1,6B P (FDP), PEP, and PYR play important roles in enzyme level regulation together with transcriptional regulation by such transcription factors as Cra, Fis, CsrA, and cAMP-Crp. αKG plays an important role in the coordinated control between carbon (C)- and nitrogen (N)-limitations, where αKG inhibits enzyme I (EI) of phosphotransferase system (PTS), thus regulating the glucose uptake rate in accordance with N level. As such, multiple regulation systems are co-ordinated for the cell synthesis and energy generation against nutrient limitations and environmental stresses. As for oxidative stress, the TCA cycle both generates and scavenges the reactive oxygen species (ROSs), where NADPH produced at ICDH and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathways play an important role in coping with oxidative stress. Solvent resistant mechanism was also considered for the stresses caused by biofuels and biochemicals production in the cell. PMID:24958385

  20. Nutrient Limitation in Surface Waters of the Oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean Sea: an Enrichment Microcosm Experiment.

    PubMed

    Tsiola, A; Pitta, P; Fodelianakis, S; Pete, R; Magiopoulos, I; Mara, P; Psarra, S; Tanaka, T; Mostajir, B

    2016-04-01

    The growth rates of planktonic microbes in the pelagic zone of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea are nutrient limited, but the type of limitation is still uncertain. During this study, we investigated the occurrence of N and P limitation among different groups of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic (pico-, nano-, and micro-) plankton using a microcosm experiment during stratified water column conditions in the Cretan Sea (Eastern Mediterranean). Microcosms were enriched with N and P (either solely or simultaneously), and the PO4 turnover time, prokaryotic heterotrophic activity, primary production, and the abundance of the different microbial components were measured. Flow cytometric and molecular fingerprint analyses showed that different heterotrophic prokaryotic groups were limited by different nutrients; total heterotrophic prokaryotic growth was limited by P, but only when both N and P were added, changes in community structure and cell size were detected. Phytoplankton were N and P co-limited, with autotrophic pico-eukaryotes being the exception as they increased even when only P was added after a 2-day time lag. The populations of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus were highly competitive with each other; Prochlorococcus abundance increased during the first 2 days of P addition but kept increasing only when both N and P were added, whereas Synechococcus exhibited higher pigment content and increased in abundance 3 days after simultaneous N and P additions. Dinoflagellates also showed opportunistic behavior at simultaneous N and P additions, in contrast to diatoms and coccolithophores, which diminished in all incubations. High DNA content viruses, selective grazing, and the exhaustion of N sources probably controlled the populations of diatoms and coccolithophores. PMID:26626911

  1. PHYTOPLANKTON DYNAMICS IN A GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARY: THE POTENTIAL USE OF PHOTO-PHYSIOLOGY AND ALGAL PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY TO PREDICT NUTRIENT STATUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of rapid techniques to determine in situ phytoplankton nutrient status could facilitate understanding of phytoplankton growth and species succession. Variable fluorescence parameters of phytoplankton communities can be easily and rapidly measured, and changes in param...

  2. Effect of nutrient limitation of cyanobacteria on protease inhibitor production and fitness of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Anke; Sadler, Thomas; Von Elert, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Herbivore-plant interactions have been well studied in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems as they are crucial for the trophic transfer of energy and matter. In nutrient-rich freshwater ecosystems, the interaction between primary producers and herbivores is to a large extent represented by Daphnia and cyanobacteria. The occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in lakes and ponds has, at least partly, been attributed to cyanotoxins, which negatively affect the major grazer of planktonic cyanobacteria, i.e. Daphnia. Among these cyanotoxins are the widespread protease inhibitors. These inhibitors have been shown (both in vitro and in situ) to inhibit the most important group of digestive proteases in the gut of Daphnia, i.e. trypsins and chymotrypsins, and to reduce Daphnia growth. In this study we grew cultures of the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp. strain BM25 on nutrient-replete, N-depleted or P-depleted medium. We identified three different micropeptins to be the cause for the inhibitory activity of BM25 against chymotrypsins. The micropeptin content depended on nutrient availability: whereas N limitation led to a lower concentration of micropeptins per biomass, P limitation resulted in a higher production of these chymotrypsin inhibitors. The altered micropeptin content of BM25 was accompanied by changed effects on the fitness of Daphnia magna: a higher content of micropeptins led to lower IC50 values for D. magna gut proteases and vice versa. Following expectations, the lower micropeptin content in the N-depleted BM25 caused higher somatic growth of D. magna. Therefore, protease inhibitors can be regarded as a nutrient-dependent defence against grazers. Interestingly, although the P limitation of the cyanobacterium led to a higher micropeptin content, high growth of D. magna was observed when they were fed with P-depleted BM25. This might be due to reduced digestibility of P-depleted cells with putatively thick mucilaginous sheaths. These findings indicate that

  3. Effect of nutrient limitation of cyanobacteria on protease inhibitor production and fitness of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Anke; Sadler, Thomas; Von Elert, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Herbivore-plant interactions have been well studied in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems as they are crucial for the trophic transfer of energy and matter. In nutrient-rich freshwater ecosystems, the interaction between primary producers and herbivores is to a large extent represented by Daphnia and cyanobacteria. The occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in lakes and ponds has, at least partly, been attributed to cyanotoxins, which negatively affect the major grazer of planktonic cyanobacteria, i.e. Daphnia. Among these cyanotoxins are the widespread protease inhibitors. These inhibitors have been shown (both in vitro and in situ) to inhibit the most important group of digestive proteases in the gut of Daphnia, i.e. trypsins and chymotrypsins, and to reduce Daphnia growth. In this study we grew cultures of the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp. strain BM25 on nutrient-replete, N-depleted or P-depleted medium. We identified three different micropeptins to be the cause for the inhibitory activity of BM25 against chymotrypsins. The micropeptin content depended on nutrient availability: whereas N limitation led to a lower concentration of micropeptins per biomass, P limitation resulted in a higher production of these chymotrypsin inhibitors. The altered micropeptin content of BM25 was accompanied by changed effects on the fitness of Daphnia magna: a higher content of micropeptins led to lower IC50 values for D. magna gut proteases and vice versa. Following expectations, the lower micropeptin content in the N-depleted BM25 caused higher somatic growth of D. magna. Therefore, protease inhibitors can be regarded as a nutrient-dependent defence against grazers. Interestingly, although the P limitation of the cyanobacterium led to a higher micropeptin content, high growth of D. magna was observed when they were fed with P-depleted BM25. This might be due to reduced digestibility of P-depleted cells with putatively thick mucilaginous sheaths. These findings indicate that

  4. Growth rate and nutrient limitation affect the transport of Rhodococcus sp. strain DN22 through sand.

    PubMed

    Priestley, James T; Coleman, Nicholas V; Duxbury, Trevor

    2006-12-01

    Rhodococcus strain DN22 grows on the nitramine explosive RDX as a sole nitrogen source, and is potentially useful for bioremediation of explosives-contaminated soil. In order for strain DN22 to be effectively applied in situ, inoculum cells must reach zones of RDX contamination via passive transport, a process that is difficult to predict at field-scale. We examined the effect of growth conditions on the transport of DN22 cells through sand columns, using chemostat-grown cultures. Strain DN22 formed smaller coccoid cells at low dilution rate (0.02 h(-1)) and larger rods at high dilution rate (0.1 h(-1)). Under all nutrient limitation conditions studied, smaller cells grown at low dilution rate were retained more strongly by sand columns than larger cells grown at high dilution rate. At a dilution rate of 0.05, cells from nitrate-limited cultures were retained more strongly than cells from RDX-limited or succinate-limited cultures. Breakthrough concentrations (C/C (0)) from sand columns ranged from 0.04 (nitrate-limited, D=0.02 h(-1)) to 0.98 (succinate-limited, D=0.1 h(-1)). The observed strong effect of culture conditions on transport of DN22 cells emphasizes the importance of physiology studies in guiding the development of bioremediation technologies.

  5. Effects of pH Limitation on Population Growth,Nutrient Uptake and Photosynthesis Physiological Processes of Karenia mikimotoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, W.

    2014-12-01

    with the acidification and increased pH caused by the outbreak of red tides in coastal water, the effects of pH on the marine algae physiological and ecological impact have caused human's concern gradually. In this experiment,the East China Sea common algae- Karenia mikimotoi as research object,different pH effects on the physiological state have been studied. The results showed that pH significantly affect the growth of algae Karenia mikimotoi, nutrient absorption, chlorophyll, photosynthetic rate and affinity for inorganic carbon. When pH = 6.2, the cell growth was inhibited.Growth rate, nutrient absorption, maximum photosynthetic rate and affinity for inorganic carbon are the lowest; When pH = 8.2, the growth of cells ,absorption of nutrients and highest maximum photosynthetic rate are the fastest; pH = 7.2 and 9.2, the algal cells can still maintain higher growth and higher affinity for inorganic carbon is larger than those in pH = 8.2. In short, high or low pH stress can cause adverse changes in the physiological state of the algae Karenia mikimotoi, especially when the pH is too low.

  6. The Expression of stlA in Photorhabdus luminescens Is Controlled by Nutrient Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Lango-Scholey, Lea; Brachmann, Alexander O.; Bode, Helge B.; Clarke, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Photorhabdus is a genus of Gram-negative entomopathogenic bacteria that also maintain a mutualistic association with nematodes from the family Heterorhabditis. Photorhabdus has an extensive secondary metabolism that is required for the interaction between the bacteria and the nematode. A major component of this secondary metabolism is a stilbene molecule, called ST. The first step in ST biosynthesis is the non-oxidative deamination of phenylalanine resulting in the production of cinnamic acid. This reaction is catalyzed by phenylalanine-ammonium lyase, an enzyme encoded by the stlA gene. In this study we show, using a stlA-gfp transcriptional fusion, that the expression of stlA is regulated by nutrient limitation through a regulatory network that involves at least 3 regulators. We show that TyrR, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator that regulates gene expression in response to aromatic amino acids in E. coli, is absolutely required for stlA expression. We also show that stlA expression is modulated by σS and Lrp, regulators that are implicated in the regulation of the response to nutrient limitation in other bacteria. This work is the first that describes pathway-specific regulation of secondary metabolism in Photorhabdus and, therefore, our study provides an initial insight into the complex regulatory network that controls secondary metabolism, and therefore mutualism, in this model organism. PMID:24278476

  7. Nutrient pools, transformations, ratios, and limitation in the Gulf of Riga, the Baltic Sea, during four successional stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamminen, T.; Seppälä, J.

    1999-12-01

    Basin-wide spatial distribution of different nutrient (N, P) fractions, chlorophyll a and basic hydrography in the Gulf of Riga was studied on five cruises during four stages of the annual succession, in 1993-1995. On the basis of the spatial distributions of the nutrient fractions, a general hypothesis was depicted of the annual transformations in nutrient pools, and their consequences for the nutrient limitation of planktonic production. Total nutrient pools indicate a degree of eutrophication comparable to the middle and eastern Gulf of Finland. In contrast to previous evidence, the Gulf of Riga seems not to be P-limited during the productive season. Our results suggest that the basin is basically N-limited, with hydrographically mediated P-limited phases potentially emerging during the annual succession. In early stages of the productive season, N limitation seems to predominate, with possible P limitation only in the SE parts of the Gulf, affected by the River Daugava spring runoff. During the late summer/early autumn periods when mineralization processes in the water column cumulatively liberate especially ammonium, the depth of the mixed surface layers seems to affect the limitation pattern. Thin or moderate mixed layer favors N limitation and deep mixing favors P limitation, the conditions thus resembling those previously observed in the estuarine eastern Gulf of Finland. With deep mixing, it seems also likely that phytoplankton is not able to fully utilize available nutrients due to the shallow euphotic zone. Therefore, strongly heterotrophic late summer/early autumn stages are likely to emerge. As the simple and exposed topography of the basin makes it exceptionally prone to physical forcing, it is obvious that episodic mixing events can cause considerable interannual and within-season variability in the production preconditions and nutrient limitation of the planktonic community, especially towards late summer and early autumn.

  8. Sediment Microbial Enzyme Activity as an Indicator of Nutrient Limitation in the Great Rivers of the Upper Mississippi River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three conclusions are evident from our comparison of approaches for estimating nutrient limitation in these large floodplain rivers: 1) water chemistry and enzymes indicate that P-limitation is more prevalent than N-limitation; 2) the Ohio River reaches are more extensively P-lim...

  9. Multiple independent constraints help resolve net ecosystem carbon exchange under nutrient limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, P. E.; Metcalfe, D.; Oren, R.; Ricciuto, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnitude, spatial distribution, and variability of land net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) are important determinants of the trajectory of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Independent observational constraints provide important clues regarding NEE and its component fluxes, with information available at multiple spatial scales: from cells, to leaves, to entire organisms and collections of organisms, to complex landscapes and up to continental and global scales. Experimental manipulations, ecosystem observations, and process modeling all suggest that the components of NEE (photosynthetic gains, and respiration and other losses) are controlled in part by the availability of mineral nutrients, and that nutrient limitation is a common condition in many biomes. Experimental and observational constraints at different spatial scales provide a complex and sometimes puzzling picture of the nature and degree of influence of nutrient availability on carbon cycle processes. Photosynthetic rates assessed at the cellular and leaf scales are often higher than the observed accumulation of carbon in plant and soil pools would suggest. We infer that a down-regulation process intervenes between carbon uptake and plant growth under conditions of nutrient limitation, and several down-regulation mechanisms have been hypothesized and tested. A recent evaluation of two alternative hypotheses for down-regulation in the light of whole-plant level flux estimates indicates that some plants take up and store extra carbon, releasing it to the environment again on short time scales. The mechanism of release, either as additional autotrophic respiration or as exudation belowground is unclear, but has important consequences for long-term ecosystem state and response to climate change signals. Global-scale constraints from atmospheric concentration and isotopic composition data help to resolve this question, ultimately focusing attention on land use fluxes as the most uncertain

  10. 12 Years of NPK Addition Diminishes Carbon Sink Potential of a Nutrient Limited Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larmola, T.; Bubier, J. L.; Juutinen, S.; Moore, T. R.

    2011-12-01

    Peatlands store about a third of global soil carbon. Our aim was to study whether the vegetation feedbacks of nitrogen (N) deposition lead to stronger carbon sink or source in a nutrient limited peatland ecosystem. We investigated vegetation structure and ecosystem CO2 exchange at Mer Bleue Bog, Canada, that has been fertilized for 7-12 years. We have applied 5 and 20 times ambient annual wet N deposition (0.8 g N m-2) with or without phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). Gross photosynthesis, ecosystem respiration and net CO2 exchange (NEE) were measured weekly during the growing season using chamber technique. Under the highest N(PK) treatments, the light saturated photosynthesis (PSmax) was reduced by 20-30% compared to the control treatment, whereas under moderate N and PK additions PSmax slightly increased or was similar to the control. The ecosystem respiration showed similar trends among the treatments, but changes in the rates were less pronounced. High nutrient additions led to up to 65% lower net CO2 uptake than that in the control: In the NPK plots with cumulative N additions of 70, 19, and 0 g N m-2, the daytime NEE in May-July 2011 averaged 0.8 (se. 0.3), 2.0 (se. 0.4), and 2.4 (se. 0.3) μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. In the N only plots with cumulative N additions of 45, 19, and 0 g N m-2, the daytime NEE in May-July 2011 averaged 0.8 (se. 0.2), 2.6 (se. 0.4), and 1.8 (se. 0.3) μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The reduced plant photosynthetic capacity and diminished carbon sink potential in the highest nutrient treatments correlated with the loss of peat mosses and were not compensated for by the increased vascular plant biomass that has mainly been allocated to woody shrub stems.

  11. Imbalanced atmospheric nitrogen and phosphorus depositions in China: Implications for nutrient limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianxing; Wang, Qiufeng; He, Nianpeng; Smith, Melinda D.; Elser, James J.; Du, Jiaqiang; Yuan, Guofu; Yu, Guirui; Yu, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric wet nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) depositions are important sources of bioavailable N and P, and the input of N and P and their ratios significantly influences nutrient availability and balance in terrestrial as well as aquatic ecosystems. Here we monitored atmospheric P depositions by measuring monthly dissolved P concentration in rainfall at 41 field stations in China. Average deposition fluxes of N and P were 13.69 ± 8.69 kg N ha-1 a-1 (our previous study) and 0.21 ± 0.17 kg P ha-1 a-1, respectively. Central and southern China had higher N and P deposition rates than northwest China, northeast China, Inner Mongolia, or Qinghai-Tibet. Atmospheric N and P depositions showed strong seasonal patterns and were dependent upon seasonal precipitation. Fertilizer and energy consumption were significantly correlated with N deposition but less correlated with P deposition. The N:P ratios of atmospheric wet deposition (with the average of 77 ± 40, by mass) were negatively correlated with current soil N:P ratios in different ecological regions, suggesting that the imbalanced atmospheric N and P deposition will alter nutrient availability and strengthen P limitation, which may further influence the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. The findings provide the assessments of both wet N and P deposition and their N:P ratio across China and indicate potential for strong impacts of atmospheric deposition on broad range of terrestrial ecosystems.

  12. Nutrients and Oxygen Limitation for the Biodegradation of Exxon Valdez Oil in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Y.; Boufadel, M. C.

    2009-12-01

    Twenty years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, the oil is still lingering in beaches of Prince William Sound, Alaska. We conducted measurements of water level, salinity, nutrients, and dissolved oxygen in a beach on Eleanor Island heavily contaminated in 1989. The measurements were conducted in two transects: One transect contained Heavy Oil Residue (HOR) and the other was clean. Six pits were dug in each transect, and they ranged in depth from 0.9 m to 1.5 m. In each pit, a multiport sampling well and two sampling boxes (each around 200 ml in volume) were placed for collecting water samples at various depths. Nutrients measurements revealed that nitrate-N was around 0.2 mg/L at oiled pits, which is an order of magnitude lower than the concentration needed for optimal degradation of oil by micro-organisms. The dissolved oxygen was less than 0.6 mg/L in the oiled pits while it was, on the average, larger than 4.0 mg/L in the clean pits. This suggests that oxygen limitation could have played a major role in the persistence of oil in beaches of Prince William Sound.

  13. Physiological strategies of co-occurring oaks in a water- and nutrient-limited ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Renninger, Heidi J; Carlo, Nicholas; Clark, Kenneth L; Schäfer, Karina V R

    2014-02-01

    Oak species are well suited to water-limited conditions by either avoiding water stress through deep rooting or tolerating water stress through tight stomatal control. In co-occurring species where resources are limited, species may either partition resources in space and/or time or exhibit differing efficiencies in the use of limited resources. Therefore, this study seeks to determine whether two co-occurring oak species (Quercus prinus L. and Quercus velutina Lam.) differ in physiological parameters including photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, water-use (WUE) and nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE), as well as to characterize transpiration and average canopy stomatal responses to climatic variables in a sandy, well-drained and nutrient-limited ecosystem. The study was conducted in the New Jersey Pinelands and we measured sap flux over a 3-year period, as well as leaf gas exchange, leaf nitrogen and carbon isotope concentrations. Both oak species showed relatively steep increases in leaf-specific transpiration at low vapor pressure deficit (VPD) values before maximum transpiration rates were achieved, which were sustained over a broad range in VPD. This suggests tight stomatal control over transpiration in both species, although Q. velutina showed significantly higher leaf-level and canopy-level stomatal conductance than Q. prinus. Average daytime stomatal conductance was positively correlated with soil moisture and both oak species maintained at least 75% of their maximum canopy stomatal conductance at soil moistures in the upper soil layer (0-0.3 m) as low as 0.03 m(3) m(3)(-3). Quercus velutina had significantly higher photosynthetic rates, maximum Rubisco-limited and electron-transport-limited carboxylation rates, dark respiration rates and nitrogen concentration per unit leaf area than Q. prinus. However, both species exhibited similar WUEs and NUEs. Therefore, Q. prinus has a more conservative resource-use strategy, while Q. velutina may need to exploit niches

  14. Numerical simulation of water quality response to nutrient loading and sediment resuspension in Mikawa Bay, central Japan: quantitative evaluation of the effects of nutrient-reduction measures on algal blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggara Kasih, G. A.; Kitada, T.

    2004-11-01

    Eutrophication is caused by large influxes of nutrient into closed or semi-closed water bodies due to agricultural runoff, urban waste disposal, and resuspension from the sediment itself. The objective of this study is to examine how effectively various nutrient-reduction measures can improve water quality in Mikawa Bay, central Japan. Both hydrodynamic and water quality variables were simulated using a model which includes a series of hydrodynamic equations and 13 mass conservation equations related to water quality, such as chlorophyll-a, dissolved oxygen, etc. The calculated spatial distribution and temporal variations of the chlorophyll-a, nutrient, dissolved oxygen, as well as temperature and salinity, showed generally good agreement with field observations. Analysis of various nutrient-reduction measures suggested that nutrient reduction from sediment resuspension can more effectively reduce chlorophyll-a compared with nutrient loading reduction through rivers from land areas. For suppression of alga growth in Mikawa Bay, control of inorganic nitrogen, especially that of NH4, was a key factor. That is why a decrease in nutrient resuspension from sediment was more effective for reducing chlorophyll-a, since nitrogen resuspension occurred mostly in the form of NH4.

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon enhanced growth, nutrient uptake, and lipid accumulation in wastewater grown microalgal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kesaano, Maureen; Gardner, Robert D; Moll, Karen; Lauchnor, Ellen; Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M; Sims, Ronald C

    2015-03-01

    Microalgal biofilms grown to evaluate potential nutrient removal options for wastewaters and feedstock for biofuels production were studied to determine the influence of bicarbonate amendment on their growth, nutrient uptake capacity, and lipid accumulation after nitrogen starvation. No significant differences in growth rates, nutrient removal, or lipid accumulation were observed in the algal biofilms with or without bicarbonate amendment. The biofilms possibly did not experience carbon-limited conditions because of the large reservoir of dissolved inorganic carbon in the medium. However, an increase in photosynthetic rates was observed in algal biofilms amended with bicarbonate. The influence of bicarbonate on photosynthetic and respiration rates was especially noticeable in biofilms that experienced nitrogen stress. Medium nitrogen depletion was not a suitable stimulant for lipid production in the algal biofilms and as such, focus should be directed toward optimizing growth and biomass productivities to compensate for the low lipid yields and increase nutrient uptake. PMID:25585252

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon enhanced growth, nutrient uptake, and lipid accumulation in wastewater grown microalgal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kesaano, Maureen; Gardner, Robert D; Moll, Karen; Lauchnor, Ellen; Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M; Sims, Ronald C

    2015-03-01

    Microalgal biofilms grown to evaluate potential nutrient removal options for wastewaters and feedstock for biofuels production were studied to determine the influence of bicarbonate amendment on their growth, nutrient uptake capacity, and lipid accumulation after nitrogen starvation. No significant differences in growth rates, nutrient removal, or lipid accumulation were observed in the algal biofilms with or without bicarbonate amendment. The biofilms possibly did not experience carbon-limited conditions because of the large reservoir of dissolved inorganic carbon in the medium. However, an increase in photosynthetic rates was observed in algal biofilms amended with bicarbonate. The influence of bicarbonate on photosynthetic and respiration rates was especially noticeable in biofilms that experienced nitrogen stress. Medium nitrogen depletion was not a suitable stimulant for lipid production in the algal biofilms and as such, focus should be directed toward optimizing growth and biomass productivities to compensate for the low lipid yields and increase nutrient uptake.

  17. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG

  18. Algal functional annotation tool

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations tomore » interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on

  19. [Analysis of algal blooms in Da-Ning River of Three Gorges Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bing-Hui; Cao, Cheng-Jin; Zhang, Jia-Lei; Huang, Min-Sheng; Chen, Zhen-Lou

    2009-11-01

    According to the survey conducted from Apr. to Jun. 2007 and from Apr. to May. 2008, the changes of water quality, forms and distributions of nutrient salts and characters of algal blooms in Da-ning River of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) were studied. The results indicated that the concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient were abundant during sensitive period of algal blooms in Da-ning River. Total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) values are 0.84-3.21 mg/L and 0.011-0.531 mg/L respectively, and the nutrients concentrations become high gradually from upstream to downstream. Total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) is the major form of TN accounting for 84%, and total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) is dominant (TDP/TP = 60%). Algal blooms bring phosphorus nutrient bio-concentration. The rates of TN and TP are all in excess of 16, which show eutrophication is limited by phosphorus. Potassium permanganate index and dissolved oxygen (DO) are at low levels and change stably. But chlorophyll a (Chl-a) becomes frequently, the value is 1.41-219.04 mg x m(-3). Significant positive correlations are all observed by correlation analysis between Chl-a and the main parameters (r(Chla-TP) = 0.453, r(Chla-potassium permanganate index) = 0.641, r(Chla-DO) = 0.584, r(Chla-pH) = 0.409, p < 0.01), but significant negative correlations are observed between Chl-a and Secchi depth (SD) (r(Chla-SD) = - 0.392, p < 0.01). The pH is fluctuated by multiparameter esp. in algal blooms. Widespread algae are observed by microscope during sensitive period of algal blooms in Da-ning River accounting for 8 phylum 82 genus 124 species, which Bacillariophyta and Chlorophyta are dominant, and then Cyanophyta and Pyrrophyta. Three whole watershed algal blooms break out in Da-ning River during the period, and the highest values of algal density are 14-1 427 times as many as the normal values. The dominant species of algal blooms are mostly involved with O. borgei, C. microporum, Chlorococcum humicola, P

  20. Algal conditions in the Caloosahatchee River (1975-79), Lake Okeechobee to Franklin Lock, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Benjamin F.; La Rose, Henry R.

    1982-01-01

    Maximum numbers of suspended algae occurred in late spring and early summer, in each of the years 1975-79, in the Caloosahatchee River. Numbers exceeded 100,000 cells per milliliter at all stations sometime during the study. Concentrations decreased during late summer and autumn and were low during winter, except in January 1979 when numbers at most sites exceeded 100,000 cells per milliliter. The January 1979 bloom coincided with large discharges from Lake Okeechobee. During previous winters, discharges and algal numbers were lower. During other seasons, algal blooms occurred most frequently under low-flow or stagnant conditions. The upstream site at Moore Haven, which had the least discharge and was most stagnant, had consistently higher algal concentrations than downstream sites. Blue-green algae were dominant in the river during the summer at the upstream site throughout the year. The percentage of blue-green algae decreased downstream. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen were inversely correlated with concentrations of algae and decreased to near zero during algal blooms. The low concentrations of these forms of inorganic nitrogen relative to other major nutrients probably favor blue-green algae and limit growth of other algae. Contributions by the basin tributaries to the nutritive condition of the river were small because concentrations of nutrients, algal growth potential, and algae in the tributaries were generally less than those in the river. (USGS)

  1. Geographic analysis of the feasibility of collocating algal biomass production with wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Marie-Odile P; Sturm, Belinda S M

    2012-10-16

    Resource demand analyses indicate that algal biodiesel production would require unsustainable amounts of freshwater and fertilizer supplies. Alternatively, municipal wastewater effluent can be used, but this restricts production of algae to areas near wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), and to date, there has been no geospatial analysis of the feasibility of collocating large algal ponds with WWTPs. The goals of this analysis were to determine the available areas by land cover type within radial extents (REs) up to 1.5 miles from WWTPs; to determine the limiting factor for algal production using wastewater; and to investigate the potential algal biomass production at urban, near-urban, and rural WWTPs in Kansas. Over 50% and 87% of the land around urban and rural WWTPs, respectively, was found to be potentially available for algal production. The analysis highlights a trade-off between urban WWTPs, which are generally land-limited but have excess wastewater effluent, and rural WWTPs, which are generally water-limited but have 96% of the total available land. Overall, commercial-scale algae production collocated with WWTPs is feasible; 29% of the Kansas liquid fuel demand could be met with implementation of ponds within 1 mile of all WWTPs and supplementation of water and nutrients when these are limited. PMID:22970803

  2. Export of algal biomass from the melting Arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Boetius, Antje; Albrecht, Sebastian; Bakker, Karel; Bienhold, Christina; Felden, Janine; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Hendricks, Stefan; Katlein, Christian; Lalande, Catherine; Krumpen, Thomas; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Rabe, Benjamin; Rogacheva, Antonina; Rybakova, Elena; Somavilla, Raquel; Wenzhöfer, Frank

    2013-03-22

    In the Arctic, under-ice primary production is limited to summer months and is restricted not only by ice thickness and snow cover but also by the stratification of the water column, which constrains nutrient supply for algal growth. Research Vessel Polarstern visited the ice-covered eastern-central basins between 82° to 89°N and 30° to 130°E in summer 2012, when Arctic sea ice declined to a record minimum. During this cruise, we observed a widespread deposition of ice algal biomass of on average 9 grams of carbon per square meter to the deep-sea floor of the central Arctic basins. Data from this cruise will contribute to assessing the effect of current climate change on Arctic productivity, biodiversity, and ecological function.

  3. Nutrient removal from horticultural wastewater by benthic filamentous algae Klebsormidium sp., Stigeoclonium spp. and their communities: From laboratory flask to outdoor Algal Turf Scrubber (ATS).

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzhuo; Danneels, Bram; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Benthic filamentous algae have evident advantages in wastewater treatment over unicellular microalgae, including the ease in harvesting and resistance to predation. To assess the potentials of benthic filamentous algae in treating horticultural wastewater under natural conditions in Belgium, three strains and their mixture with naturally wastewater-borne microalgae were cultivated in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks in laboratory as well as in 1 m(2) scale outdoor Algal Turf Scrubber (ATS) with different flow rates. Stigeoclonium competed well with the natural wastewater-borne microalgae and contributed to most of the biomass production both in Erlenmeyer flasks and outdoor ATS at flow rates of 2-6 L min(-1) (water velocity 3-9 cm s(-1)), while Klebsormidium was not suitable for growing in horticultural wastewater under the tested conditions. Flow rate had great effects on biomass production and nitrogen removal, while phosphorus removal was less influenced by flow rate due to other mechanisms than assimilation by algae. PMID:26841229

  4. Nutrient removal from horticultural wastewater by benthic filamentous algae Klebsormidium sp., Stigeoclonium spp. and their communities: From laboratory flask to outdoor Algal Turf Scrubber (ATS).

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzhuo; Danneels, Bram; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Benthic filamentous algae have evident advantages in wastewater treatment over unicellular microalgae, including the ease in harvesting and resistance to predation. To assess the potentials of benthic filamentous algae in treating horticultural wastewater under natural conditions in Belgium, three strains and their mixture with naturally wastewater-borne microalgae were cultivated in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks in laboratory as well as in 1 m(2) scale outdoor Algal Turf Scrubber (ATS) with different flow rates. Stigeoclonium competed well with the natural wastewater-borne microalgae and contributed to most of the biomass production both in Erlenmeyer flasks and outdoor ATS at flow rates of 2-6 L min(-1) (water velocity 3-9 cm s(-1)), while Klebsormidium was not suitable for growing in horticultural wastewater under the tested conditions. Flow rate had great effects on biomass production and nitrogen removal, while phosphorus removal was less influenced by flow rate due to other mechanisms than assimilation by algae.

  5. Elemental Economy: microbial strategies for optimizing growth in the face of nutrient limitation

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Helmann, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms play a dominant role in the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients. They are rightly praised for their facility at fixing both carbon and nitrogen into organic matter, and microbial driven processes have tangibly altered the chemical composition of the biosphere and its surrounding atmosphere. Despite their prodigious capacity for molecular transformations, microorganisms are powerless in the face of the immutability of the elements. Limitations for specific elements, either fleeting or persisting over eons, have left an indelible trace on microbial genomes, physiology, and their very atomic composition. We here review the impact of elemental limitation on microbes, with a focus on selected genetic model systems and representative microbes from the ocean ecosystem. Evolutionary adaptations that enhance growth in the face of persistent or recurrent elemental limitations are evident from genome and proteome analyses. These range from the extreme (such as dispensing with a requirement for a hard to obtain element) to the extremely subtle (changes in protein amino acid sequences that slightly, but significantly, reduce cellular carbon, nitrogen, or sulfur demand). One near universal adaptation is the development of sophisticated acclimation programs by which cells adjust their chemical composition in response to a changing environment. When specific elements become limiting, acclimation typically begins with an increased commitment to acquisition and a concomitant mobilization of stored resources. If elemental limitation persists, the cell implements austerity measures including elemental-sparing and elemental-recycling. Insights into these fundamental cellular properties have emerged from studies at many different levels; including ecology, biological oceanography, biogeochemistry, molecular genetics, genomics, and microbial physiology. Here, we present a synthesis of these diverse studies and attempt to discern some overarching themes. PMID:22633059

  6. Do external resource ratios matter?: Implications for modelling eutrophication events and controlling harmful algal blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Kevin J.

    2010-11-01

    Relationships between nutrient N:P ratio and P-limitation in phytoplankton are explored using a multi-nutrient photoacclimative quota-based model. The relationship depends on concentrations of input and residual nutrients, and also on variable phytoplankton C:N:P stoichiometry. In reality, usually only the residual nutrient concentrations and their ratios are known. However, the total amount of nutrient present in the system affects biomass growth potential through self-shading, and thence the potential for variation in organismal N:P. The critical external N:P resource ratio above which P becomes limiting increases as residual concentrations of nutrients increase to saturate transport kinetics; oligotrophic waters require a lower nutrient N:P to avoid P-limitation than do eutrophic waters. In eutrophic systems, which may support harmful algal blooms (HABs), and/or in systems in which light is rapidly attenuated (sediment loading, gelbstoff), P-limitation may not develop even in high resource N:P situations due to light limitation. This is more likely in high washout systems, where phytoplankton growth rates must remain elevated. The only diagnostics for nutrient stress are cellular functions (C-fixation, C:N:P), and the only nutrient parameters of consequence are concentrations and not ratios of them. Control of resource ratios alone should not be considered as a tool for mitigating HABs.

  7. Inverse dependency of particle residence times in ponds to the concentration of phosphate, the limiting nutrient.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kimberly A; Santschi, Peter H

    2004-01-01

    234Th, a commonly used short-lived particle-reactive tracer in marine systems, was measured in three different holding pond series at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Colorado, along with its parent nuclide 238U, to determine steady-state residence times of particle-reactive actinides such as Pu, and of particles. Series B ponds, which received industrial effluent that includes ortho-phosphate (PO4) and actinides, differed from series A and C ponds, which did not. This difference was also evident in the calculated particle residence times, which were <1 day for the ponds B4 and B5, where PO4 concentrations were higher (1.4 and 1.8 mg/l), and 3 and 3.4 days for ponds A3 and C2, respectively, where ortho-phosphate concentrations were lower (<0.1 mg/l). Particle residence times thus showed an inverse relationship with the concentration of ortho-phosphate, the limiting nutrient in fresh water systems. The same relationship to the concentration of ortho-phosphate or any of the other nutrient elements was not evident for the residence times of dissolved 234Th, which ranged between 0.1 and 2 days. This can be attributed to higher concentrations of dissolved and particulate ligands with greater binding potential for actinides such as four-valent Th and Pu in ponds with higher ortho-phosphate concentrations. Regardless of actual ortho-phosphate concentration, however, at water residence (holding) times of 1 month in these ponds, particles and associated actinides would be expected to be completely removed from the pond water to sediments. PMID:15261419

  8. Inverse dependency of particle residence times in ponds to the concentration of phosphate, the limiting nutrient.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kimberly A; Santschi, Peter H

    2004-01-01

    234Th, a commonly used short-lived particle-reactive tracer in marine systems, was measured in three different holding pond series at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Colorado, along with its parent nuclide 238U, to determine steady-state residence times of particle-reactive actinides such as Pu, and of particles. Series B ponds, which received industrial effluent that includes ortho-phosphate (PO4) and actinides, differed from series A and C ponds, which did not. This difference was also evident in the calculated particle residence times, which were <1 day for the ponds B4 and B5, where PO4 concentrations were higher (1.4 and 1.8 mg/l), and 3 and 3.4 days for ponds A3 and C2, respectively, where ortho-phosphate concentrations were lower (<0.1 mg/l). Particle residence times thus showed an inverse relationship with the concentration of ortho-phosphate, the limiting nutrient in fresh water systems. The same relationship to the concentration of ortho-phosphate or any of the other nutrient elements was not evident for the residence times of dissolved 234Th, which ranged between 0.1 and 2 days. This can be attributed to higher concentrations of dissolved and particulate ligands with greater binding potential for actinides such as four-valent Th and Pu in ponds with higher ortho-phosphate concentrations. Regardless of actual ortho-phosphate concentration, however, at water residence (holding) times of 1 month in these ponds, particles and associated actinides would be expected to be completely removed from the pond water to sediments.

  9. Interspecific resource competition-combined effects of radiation and nutrient limitation on two diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Mohlin, Malin; Roleda, Michael Y; Pattanaik, Bagmi; Tenne, Stefanie-Joana; Wulff, Angela

    2012-05-01

    The cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea are dominated by diazotrophic cyanobacteria, the potentially toxic species Aphanizomenon sp. and the toxic species Nodularia spumigena. The seasonal succession with peaks of Aphanizomenon sp., followed by peaks of N. spumigena, has been explained by the species-specific niches of the two species. In a three-factorial outdoor experiment, we tested if nutrient and radiation conditions may impact physiological and biochemical responses of N. spumigena and Aphanizomenon sp. in the presence or absence of the other species. The two nutrient treatments were f/2 medium without NO (3) (-) (-N) and f/2 medium without PO (4) (3-) (-P), and the two ambient radiation treatments were photosynthetic active radiation >395 nm (PAR) and PAR + UV-A + UV-B >295 nm. The study showed that Aphanizomenon sp. was not negatively affected by the presence of N. spumigena and that N. spumigena was better adapted to both N and P limitation in interaction with ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm). In the Baltic Sea, these physical conditions are likely to prevail in the surface water during summer. Interestingly, the specific growth rate of N. spumigena was stimulated by the presence of Aphanizomenon sp. We suggest that the seasonal succession, with peaks of Aphanizomenon sp. followed by peaks of N. spumigena, is a result from species-specific preferences of environmental conditions and/or stimulation by Aphanizomenon sp. rather than an allelopathic effect of N. spumigena. The results from our study, together with a predicted stronger stratification due to effects of climate change in the Baltic Sea with increased temperature and increased precipitation and increased UV-B due to ozone losses, reflect a scenario with a continuing future dominance of the toxic N. spumigena.

  10. Effects of Savanna trees on soil nutrient limitation and carbon-sequestration potential in dry season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Joscha; Gütlein, Adrian; Sierra Cornejo, Natalia; Kiese, Ralf; Hertel, Dietrich; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Semi-arid savannah ecosystems are under strong pressure from climate and land-use changes, especially around populous areas like Mt. Kilimanjaro region. Savannah vegetation consists of grassland with isolated trees and is therefore characterized by high spatial variation of canopy cover and aboveground biomass. Both are major regulators for soil ecological parameters and soil-atmospheric trace gas exchange (CO2, N2O, CH4), especially in water limited environments. The spatial distribution of these parameters and the connection between above and belowground processes are important to understand and predict ecosystem changes and estimate its vulnerability. Our objective was to determine spatial trends and changes of soil parameters and trace-gas fluxes and relate their variability to the vegetation structure. We chose three trees from each of the two most dominant species (Acacia nilotica and Balanites aegyptiaca). For each tree, we selected transects with total nine sampling points under and outside the crown. At each sampling point we measured soil and plant biomass carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content, δ13C, microbial biomass C and N, soil respiration, available nutrients, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC) as well as belowground biomass, soil temperature and soil water content. Contents and stocks of C and N fractions, Ca2+, K+ and total CEC decreased up to 50% outside the crown. This was unaffected by the tree species, tree size or other tree characteristics. Water content was below the permanent wilting point and independent from tree cover. In all cases tree litter inputs had far a closer C:N ratio than C4-grass litter. Microbial C:N ratio and CO2 efflux was about 30% higher in open area and strongly dependent on mineral N availability. This indicates N limitation and low microbial C use efficiency in soil under open area. We conclude that the spatial structure of aboveground biomass in savanna ecosystems leads to a spatial redistribution of nutrient

  11. Responses of algal communities to gradients in herbivore biomass and water quality in Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, S.; Udy, J.; Tibbetts, I. R.

    2008-03-01

    Settlement tiles were used to characterise and quantify coral reef associated algal communities along water quality and herbivory gradients from terrestrial influenced near shore sites to oceanic passage sites in Marovo Lagoon, the Solomon Islands. After 6 months, settlement tile communities from inshore reefs were dominated by high biomass algal turfs (filamentous algae and cyanobacteria) whereas tiles located on offshore reefs were characterised by a mixed low biomass community of calcareous crustose algae, fleshy crustose algae and bare tile. The exclusion of macrograzers, via caging of tiles, on the outer reef sites resulted in the development of an algal turf community similar to that observed on inshore reefs. Caging on the inshore reef tiles had a limited impact on community composition or biomass. Water quality and herbivorous fish biomass were quantified at each site to elucidate factors that might influence algal community structure across the lagoon. Herbivore biomass was the dominant driver of algal community structure. Algal biomass on the other hand was controlled by both herbivory and water quality (particularly dissolved nutrients). This study demonstrates that algal communities on settlement tiles are an indicator capable of integrating the impacts of water quality and herbivory over a small spatial scale (kilometres) and short temporal scale (months), where other environmental drivers (current, light, regional variability) are constant.

  12. Algal biofuels.

    PubMed

    Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-11-01

    The world is facing energy crisis and environmental issues due to the depletion of fossil fuels and increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Growing microalgae can contribute to practical solutions for these global problems because they can harvest solar energy and capture CO2 by converting it into biofuel using photosynthesis. Microalgae are robust organisms capable of rapid growth under a variety of conditions including in open ponds or closed photobioreactors. Their reduced biomass compounds can be used as the feedstock for mass production of a variety of biofuels. As another advantage, their ability to accumulate or secrete biofuels can be controlled by changing their growth conditions or metabolic engineering. This review is aimed to highlight different forms of biofuels produced by microalgae and the approaches taken to improve their biofuel productivity. The costs for industrial-scale production of algal biofuels in open ponds or closed photobioreactors are analyzed. Different strategies for photoproduction of hydrogen by the hydrogenase enzyme of green algae are discussed. Algae are also good sources of biodiesel since some species can make large quantities of lipids as their biomass. The lipid contents for some of the best oil-producing strains of algae in optimized growth conditions are reviewed. The potential of microalgae for producing petroleum related chemicals or ready-make fuels such as bioethanol, triterpenic hydrocarbons, isobutyraldehyde, isobutanol, and isoprene from their biomass are also presented.

  13. Nutrient limitation in rainforests and cloud forests along a 3,000-m elevation gradient in the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Joshua B; Malhi, Yadvinder; Torres, Israel Cuba; Metcalfe, Daniel B; van de Weg, Martine J; Meir, Patrick; Silva-Espejo, Javier E; Huasco, Walter Huaraca

    2013-07-01

    We report results from a large-scale nutrient fertilization experiment along a "megadiverse" (154 unique species were included in the study) 3,000-m elevation transect in the Peruvian Andes and adjacent lowland Amazonia. Our objectives were to test if nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) limitation shift along this elevation gradient, and to determine how an alleviation of nutrient limitation would manifest in ecosystem changes. Tree height decreased with increasing elevation, but leaf area index (LAI) and diameter at breast height (DBH) did not vary with elevation. Leaf N:P decreased with increasing elevation (from 24 at 200 m to 11 at 3,000 m), suggesting increased N limitation and decreased P limitation with increasing elevation. After 4 years of fertilization (N, P, N + P), plots at the lowland site (200 m) fertilized with N + P showed greater relative growth rates in DBH than did the control plots; no significant differences were evident at the 1,000 m site, and plots fertilized with N at the highest elevation sites (1,500, 3,000 m) showed greater relative growth rates in DBH than did the control plots, again suggesting increased N constraint with elevation. Across elevations in general N fertilization led to an increase in microbial respiration, while P and N + P addition led to an increase in root respiration and corresponding decrease in hyphal respiration. There was no significant canopy response (LAI, leaf nutrients) to fertilization, suggesting that photosynthetic capacity was not N or P limited in these ecosystems. In sum, our study significantly advances ecological understanding of nutrient cycling and ecosystem response in a region where our collective knowledge and data are sparse: we demonstrate N limitation in high elevation tropical montane forests, N and P co-limitation in lowland Amazonia, and a nutrient limitation response manifested not in canopy changes, but rather in stem and belowground changes. PMID:23180422

  14. Discriminating between west-side sources of nutrients and organiccarbon contributing to algal growth and oxygen demand in the San JoaquinRiver

    SciTech Connect

    Wstringfellow@lbl.gov

    2002-07-24

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the Salt and Mud Slough tributaries as sources of oxygen demanding materials entering the San Joaquin River (SJR). Mud Slough and Salt Slough are the main drainage arteries of the Grasslands Watershed, a 370,000-acre area west of the SJR, covering portions of Merced and Fresno Counties. Although these tributaries of the SJR are typically classified as agricultural, they are also heavily influenced by Federal, State and private wetlands. The majority of the surface water used for both irrigation and wetland management in the Grassland Watershed is imported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta through the Delta-Mendota Canal. In this study, they measured algal biomass (as chlorophyll a), organic carbon, ammonia, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and other measures of water quality in drainage from both agricultural and wetland sources at key points in the Salt Slough and Mud Slough tributaries. This report includes the data collected between June 16th and October 4th, 2001. The objective of the study was to compare agricultural and wetland drainage in the Grasslands Watershed and to determine the relative importance of each return flow source to the concentration and mass loading of oxygen demanding materials entering the SJR. Additionally, they compared the quality of water exiting our study area to water entering our study area. This study has demonstrated that Salt and Mud Sloughs both contribute significant amounts of oxygen demand to the SJR. Together, these tributaries could account for 35% of the oxygen demand observed below their confluence with the SJR. This study has characterized the sources of oxygen demanding materials entering Mud Slough and evaluated the oxygen demand conditions in Salt Slough. Salt Slough was found to be the dominant source of oxygen demand load in the study area, because of the higher flows in this tributary. The origins of oxygen demand in Salt Slough still remain largely uninvestigated

  15. The number of limiting resources in the environment controls the temporal diversity patterns in the algal benthos.

    PubMed

    Larson, Chad A; Adumatioge, Larry; Passy, Sophia I

    2016-07-01

    The role of the number of limiting resources (NLR) on species richness has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. However, how the NLR controls temporal beta diversity and the processes of community assembly is not well understood. To address this knowledge gap, we initiated a series of laboratory microcosm experiments, exposing periphyton communities to a gradient of NLR from 0 to 3, generated by supplementation with nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, and all their combinations. We hypothesized that similarly to alpha diversity, shown to decrease with the NLR in benthic algae, temporal beta diversity would also decline due to filtering. Additionally, we predicted that the NLR would also affect turnover and community nestedness, which would show opposing responses. Indeed, as the NLR increased, temporal beta diversity decreased; turnover, indicative of competition, decreased; and nestedness, suggestive of complementarity, increased. Finally, the NLR determined the role of deterministic versus stochastic processes in community assembly, showing respectively an increasing and a decreasing trend. These results imply that the NLR has a much greater, yet still unappreciated influence on producer communities, constraining not only alpha diversity but also temporal dynamics and community assembly. PMID:26943146

  16. The number of limiting resources in the environment controls the temporal diversity patterns in the algal benthos.

    PubMed

    Larson, Chad A; Adumatioge, Larry; Passy, Sophia I

    2016-07-01

    The role of the number of limiting resources (NLR) on species richness has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. However, how the NLR controls temporal beta diversity and the processes of community assembly is not well understood. To address this knowledge gap, we initiated a series of laboratory microcosm experiments, exposing periphyton communities to a gradient of NLR from 0 to 3, generated by supplementation with nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, and all their combinations. We hypothesized that similarly to alpha diversity, shown to decrease with the NLR in benthic algae, temporal beta diversity would also decline due to filtering. Additionally, we predicted that the NLR would also affect turnover and community nestedness, which would show opposing responses. Indeed, as the NLR increased, temporal beta diversity decreased; turnover, indicative of competition, decreased; and nestedness, suggestive of complementarity, increased. Finally, the NLR determined the role of deterministic versus stochastic processes in community assembly, showing respectively an increasing and a decreasing trend. These results imply that the NLR has a much greater, yet still unappreciated influence on producer communities, constraining not only alpha diversity but also temporal dynamics and community assembly.

  17. Sediment Microbial Enzyme Activity as an Indicator of Nutrient Limitation in Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study, the first to link microbial enzyme activities to regional-scale anthropogenic stressors, suggests that microbial enzyme regulation of carbon and nutrient dynamics may be sensitive indicators of nutrient dynamics in aquatic ecosystems, but further work is needed to elu...

  18. AGGREGATED FILTER-FEEDING CONSUMERS ALTER NUTRIENT LIMITATION: CONSEQUENCES FOR ECOSYSTEM AND COMMUNITY DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient cycling is a key process that ties all organisms together. This is especially apparent in stream environments in which nutrients are taken up readily and cycled through the system in a downstream trajectory. Ecological stoichiometry predicts that biogeochemical cycles of...

  19. Microbial response to limited nutrients in shallow water immediately after the end-Permian mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Jia, C; Huang, J; Kershaw, S; Luo, G; Farabegoli, E; Perri, M C; Chen, L; Bai, X; Xie, S

    2012-01-01

    Previous work indicates that a variety of microbes bloomed in the oceans after the end-Permian faunal mass extinction, but evidence is sporadically documented. Thus, the nature and geographic distribution of such microbes and their associations are unclear, addressed in this study using a series of biomarker groups. On the basis of microbial biomarker records of the 2-methylhopane index, evidence is presented for cyanobacterial blooms in both the western and eastern Tethys Sea and in both shallow and deep waters, after the mass extinction. The enhanced relative abundance of C(28) (expressed by the C(28) /C(29) ratio of) regular steranes suggests a bloom of prasinophyte algae occurred immediately after the end-Permian faunal extinction, comparable with those observed in some other mass extinctions in Phanerozoic. Significantly, cyanobacteria and prasinophyte algae show a synchronized onset of bloom in the shallow water Bulla section, north Italy, inferring for the first time their coupled response to the biotic crisis and the associated environmental conditions. However, in Meishan of Zhejiang Province in south China, the bloom declined earlier than in Bulla. The association of increased 2-methylhopane index with a negative shift in the nitrogen isotope composition infers a scenario of enhanced nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria immediately after the faunal mass extinction. N(2) fixation by cyanobacteria is here interpreted to have provided prasinophyte algae with ammonium in nutrient-limited shallow waters, and thus caused their associated blooms.

  20. Microbial response to limited nutrients in shallow water immediately after the end-Permian mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Jia, C; Huang, J; Kershaw, S; Luo, G; Farabegoli, E; Perri, M C; Chen, L; Bai, X; Xie, S

    2012-01-01

    Previous work indicates that a variety of microbes bloomed in the oceans after the end-Permian faunal mass extinction, but evidence is sporadically documented. Thus, the nature and geographic distribution of such microbes and their associations are unclear, addressed in this study using a series of biomarker groups. On the basis of microbial biomarker records of the 2-methylhopane index, evidence is presented for cyanobacterial blooms in both the western and eastern Tethys Sea and in both shallow and deep waters, after the mass extinction. The enhanced relative abundance of C(28) (expressed by the C(28) /C(29) ratio of) regular steranes suggests a bloom of prasinophyte algae occurred immediately after the end-Permian faunal extinction, comparable with those observed in some other mass extinctions in Phanerozoic. Significantly, cyanobacteria and prasinophyte algae show a synchronized onset of bloom in the shallow water Bulla section, north Italy, inferring for the first time their coupled response to the biotic crisis and the associated environmental conditions. However, in Meishan of Zhejiang Province in south China, the bloom declined earlier than in Bulla. The association of increased 2-methylhopane index with a negative shift in the nitrogen isotope composition infers a scenario of enhanced nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria immediately after the faunal mass extinction. N(2) fixation by cyanobacteria is here interpreted to have provided prasinophyte algae with ammonium in nutrient-limited shallow waters, and thus caused their associated blooms. PMID:22168223

  1. Effect of nutrient limitation and two-stage continuous fermentor design on productivities during "Clostridium ragsdalei" syngas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kundiyana, Dimple K; Huhnke, Raymond L; Wilkins, Mark R

    2011-05-01

    The effect of three limiting nutrients, calcium pantothenate, vitamin B(12) and cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)), on syngas fermentation using "Clostridium ragsdalei" was determined using serum bottle fermentation studies. Significant results from the bottle studies were translated into single- and two-stage continuous fermentor designs. Studies indicated that three-way interactions between the three limiting nutrients, and two-way interactions between vitamin B(12) and CoCl(2) had a significant positive effect on ethanol and acetic acid formation. In general, ethanol and acetic acid production ceased at the end of 9 days corresponding to the production of 2.01 and 1.95 gL(-1) for the above interactions. Reactor studies indicated the three-way nutrient limitation in two-stage fermentor showed improved acetic acid (17.51 gg(-1) cells) and ethanol (14.74 gg(-1) cells) yield compared to treatments in single-stage fermentors. These results further support the hypothesis that it is possible to modulate the product formation by limiting key nutrients during C. ragsdalei syngas fermentation. PMID:21470855

  2. Acclimation of the Global Transcriptome of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 to Nutrient Limitations and Different Nitrogen Sources

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    The unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a model organism for laboratory-based studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and is a potential platform for biotechnological applications. Two of its most notable properties are its exceptional tolerance of high-light intensity and very rapid growth under optimal conditions. In this study, transcription profiling by RNAseq has been used to perform an integrated study of global changes in transcript levels in cells subjected to limitation for the major nutrients CO2, nitrogen, sulfate, phosphate, and iron. Transcriptional patterns for cells grown on nitrate, ammonia, and urea were also studied. Nutrient limitation caused strong decreases of transcript levels of the genes encoding major metabolic pathways, especially for components of the photosynthetic apparatus, CO2 fixation, and protein biosynthesis. Uptake mechanisms for the respective nutrients were strongly up-regulated. The transcription data further suggest that major changes in the composition of the NADH dehydrogenase complex occur upon nutrient limitation. Transcripts for flavoproteins increased strongly when CO2 was limiting. Genes involved in protection from oxidative stress generally showed high, constitutive transcript levels, which possibly explains the high-light tolerance of this organism. The transcriptomes of cells grown with ammonia or urea as nitrogen source showed increased transcript levels for components of the CO2 fixation machinery compared to cells grown with nitrate, but in general transcription differences in cells grown on different N-sources exhibited surprisingly minor differences. PMID:22514553

  3. Do Nutrient Limitation Patterns Shift from Nitrogen Toward Phosphorus with Increasing Nitrogen Deposition Across the Northeastern United States?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is altering biogeochemical cycling in forests and interconnected lakes of the northeastern US, and may shift nutrient limitation from N toward other essential elements, such as phosphorus (P). Whether this shift is occurring relative to N depos...

  4. Algal biofuels: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Leite, Gustavo B; Abdelaziz, Ahmed E M; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2013-10-01

    Biodiesel production using microalgae is attractive in a number of respects. Here a number of pros and cons to using microalgae for biofuels production are reviewed. Algal cultivation can be carried out using non-arable land and non-potable water with simple nutrient supply. In addition, algal biomass productivities are much higher than those of vascular plants and the extractable content of lipids that can be usefully converted to biodiesel, triacylglycerols (TAGs) can be much higher than that of the oil seeds now used for first generation biodiesel. On the other hand, practical, cost-effective production of biofuels from microalgae requires that a number of obstacles be overcome. These include the development of low-cost, effective growth systems, efficient and energy saving harvesting techniques, and methods for oil extraction and conversion that are environmentally benign and cost-effective. Promising recent advances in these areas are highlighted.

  5. Do foliar, litter, and root nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations reflect nutrient limitation in a lowland tropical wet forest?

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Clare, Silvia; Mack, Michelle C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding nutrient limitation of net primary productivity (NPP) is critical to predict how plant communities will respond to environmental change. Foliar nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations ([N] and [P]) and their ratio, have been used widely as indicators of plant nutritional status and have been linked directly to nutrient limitation of NPP. In tropical systems, however, a high number of confounding factors can limit the ability to predict nutrient limitation--as defined mechanistically by NPP responses to fertilization--based on the stoichiometric signal of the plant community. We used a long-term full factorial N and P fertilization experiment in a lowland tropical wet forest in Costa Rica to explore how tissue (foliar, litter and root) [N] and [P] changed with fertilization, how different tree size classes and taxa influenced the community response, and how tissue nutrients related to NPP. Consistent with NPP responses to fertilization, there were no changes in community-wide foliar [N] and [P], two years after fertilization. Nevertheless, litterfall [N] increased with N additions and root [P] increased with P additions. The most common tree species (Pentaclethra macroloba) had 9% higher mean foliar [N] with NP additions and the most common palm species (Socratea exohrriza) had 15% and 19% higher mean foliar [P] with P and NP additions, respectively. Moreover, N:P ratios were not indicative of NPP responses to fertilization, either at the community or at the taxa level. Our study suggests that in these diverse tropical forests, tissue [N] and [P] are driven by the interaction of multiple factors and are not always indicative of the nutritional status of the plant community. PMID:25901750

  6. Do Foliar, Litter, and Root Nitrogen and Phosphorus Concentrations Reflect Nutrient Limitation in a Lowland Tropical Wet Forest?

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Clare, Silvia; Mack, Michelle C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding nutrient limitation of net primary productivity (NPP) is critical to predict how plant communities will respond to environmental change. Foliar nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations ([N] and [P]) and their ratio, have been used widely as indicators of plant nutritional status and have been linked directly to nutrient limitation of NPP. In tropical systems, however, a high number of confounding factors can limit the ability to predict nutrient limitation —as defined mechanistically by NPP responses to fertilization— based on the stoichiometric signal of the plant community. We used a long-term full factorial N and P fertilization experiment in a lowland tropical wet forest in Costa Rica to explore how tissue (foliar, litter and root) [N] and [P] changed with fertilization, how different tree size classes and taxa influenced the community response, and how tissue nutrients related to NPP. Consistent with NPP responses to fertilization, there were no changes in community-wide foliar [N] and [P], two years after fertilization. Nevertheless, litterfall [N] increased with N additions and root [P] increased with P additions. The most common tree species (Pentaclethra macroloba) had 9 % higher mean foliar [N] with NP additions and the most common palm species (Socratea exohrriza) had 15% and 19% higher mean foliar [P] with P and NP additions, respectively. Moreover, N:P ratios were not indicative of NPP responses to fertilization, either at the community or at the taxa level. Our study suggests that in these diverse tropical forests, tissue [N] and [P] are driven by the interaction of multiple factors and are not always indicative of the nutritional status of the plant community. PMID:25901750

  7. Do foliar, litter, and root nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations reflect nutrient limitation in a lowland tropical wet forest?

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Clare, Silvia; Mack, Michelle C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding nutrient limitation of net primary productivity (NPP) is critical to predict how plant communities will respond to environmental change. Foliar nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations ([N] and [P]) and their ratio, have been used widely as indicators of plant nutritional status and have been linked directly to nutrient limitation of NPP. In tropical systems, however, a high number of confounding factors can limit the ability to predict nutrient limitation--as defined mechanistically by NPP responses to fertilization--based on the stoichiometric signal of the plant community. We used a long-term full factorial N and P fertilization experiment in a lowland tropical wet forest in Costa Rica to explore how tissue (foliar, litter and root) [N] and [P] changed with fertilization, how different tree size classes and taxa influenced the community response, and how tissue nutrients related to NPP. Consistent with NPP responses to fertilization, there were no changes in community-wide foliar [N] and [P], two years after fertilization. Nevertheless, litterfall [N] increased with N additions and root [P] increased with P additions. The most common tree species (Pentaclethra macroloba) had 9% higher mean foliar [N] with NP additions and the most common palm species (Socratea exohrriza) had 15% and 19% higher mean foliar [P] with P and NP additions, respectively. Moreover, N:P ratios were not indicative of NPP responses to fertilization, either at the community or at the taxa level. Our study suggests that in these diverse tropical forests, tissue [N] and [P] are driven by the interaction of multiple factors and are not always indicative of the nutritional status of the plant community.

  8. Algal-based, single-step treatment of urban wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Henkanatte-Gedera, S M; Selvaratnam, T; Caskan, N; Nirmalakhandan, N; Van Voorhies, W; Lammers, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    Currently, urban wastewaters (UWW) laden with organic carbon (BOD) and nutrients (ammoniacal nitrogen, N, and phosphates, P) are treated in multi-stage, energy-intensive process trains to meet the mandated discharge standards. This study presents a single-step process based on mixotrophic metabolism for simultaneous removal of carbon and nutrients from UWWs. The proposed system is designed specifically for hot, arid environments utilizing an acidophilic, thermotolerant algal species, Galdieria sulphuraria, and an enclosed photobioreactor to limit evaporation. Removal rates of BOD, N, and P recorded in this study (14.93, 7.23, and 1.38 mg L(-1) d(-1), respectively) are comparable to literature reports. These results confirm that the mixotrophic system can reduce the energy costs associated with oxygen supply in current UWW treatment systems, and has the potential to generate more energy-rich biomass for net energy extraction from UWW.

  9. Nutrient Regulation by Continuous Feeding Removes Limitations on Cell Yield in the Large-Scale Expansion of Mammalian Cell Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Weegman, Bradley P.; Nash, Peter; Carlson, Alexandra L.; Voltzke, Kristin J.; Geng, Zhaohui; Jahani, Marjan; Becker, Benjamin B.; Papas, Klearchos K.; Firpo, Meri T.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular therapies are emerging as a standard approach for the treatment of several diseases. However, realizing the promise of cellular therapies across the full range of treatable disorders will require large-scale, controlled, reproducible culture methods. Bioreactor systems offer the scale-up and monitoring needed, but standard stirred bioreactor cultures do not allow for the real-time regulation of key nutrients in the medium. In this study, β-TC6 insulinoma cells were aggregated and cultured for 3 weeks as a model of manufacturing a mammalian cell product. Cell expansion rates and medium nutrient levels were compared in static, stirred suspension bioreactors (SSB), and continuously fed (CF) SSB. While SSB cultures facilitated increased culture volumes, no increase in cell yields were observed, partly due to limitations in key nutrients, which were consumed by the cultures between feedings, such as glucose. Even when glucose levels were increased to prevent depletion between feedings, dramatic fluctuations in glucose levels were observed. Continuous feeding eliminated fluctuations and improved cell expansion when compared with both static and SSB culture methods. Further improvements in growth rates were observed after adjusting the feed rate based on calculated nutrient depletion, which maintained physiological glucose levels for the duration of the expansion. Adjusting the feed rate in a continuous medium replacement system can maintain the consistent nutrient levels required for the large-scale application of many cell products. Continuously fed bioreactor systems combined with nutrient regulation can be used to improve the yield and reproducibility of mammalian cells for biological products and cellular therapies and will facilitate the translation of cell culture from the research lab to clinical applications. PMID:24204645

  10. Examination of silicate limitation of primary production in Jiaozhou Bay, North China. III. Judgment method, rules and uniqueness of nutrient limitation among N, P, and Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongfang, Yang; Zhenhui, Gao; Yu, Chen; Jing, Zhang; Peigang, Wang

    2003-06-01

    Analysis and comparison of Jiaozhou Bay data collected from May 1991 to February 1994 (12 seasonal investigations) provided by the Ecological Station of Jiaozhou Bay revealed the characteristic spatiotemporal variation of the ambient concentration Si∶DIN and Si∶16P ratios and the seasonal variation of Jiaozhou Bay Si∶DIN and Si∶16P ratios showing that the Si∶DIN ratios were <1 throughout the year in Jiaozhou Bay; and that the Si∶16P ratios were <1 throughout Jiaozhou Bay in spring, autumn and winter. The results proved that silicate limited phytoplankton growth in spring, autumn and winter in Jiaozhou Bay. Analysis of the Si∶DIN and Si∶P ratios showed that the nutrient Si has been limiting the growth of phytoplankton throughout the year in some Jiaozhou Bay waters; and that the silicate deficiency changed the phytoplankton assemblage structure. Analysis of discontinuous 1962 to 1998 nutrient data showed that there was no N or P limitation of phytoplankton growth in that period. The authors consider that the annual cyclic change of silicate limits phytoplankton growth in spring, autumn and winter every year in Jiaozhou Bay; and that in many Jiaozhou Bay waters where the phytoplankton as the predominant species need a great amount of silicate, analysis of the nutrients N or P limitation of phytoplankton growth relying only on the N and P nutrients and DIN∶P ratio could yield inaccurate conclusions. The results obtained by applying the rules of absolute and relative limitation fully support this view. The authors consider that the main function of nutrient silicon is to regulate and control the mechanism of the phytoplankton growth process in the ecological system in estuaries, bays and the sea. The authors consider that according to the evolution theory of Darwin, continuous environmental pressure gradually changes the phytoplankton assemblage's structure and the physiology of diatoms. Diatoms requiring a great deal of silicon either constantly

  11. Diagnosis & Correction of Soil Nutrient Limitations in Intensively managed southern pine forests

    SciTech Connect

    University of Florida

    2002-10-25

    Forest productivity is one manner to sequester carbon and it is a renewable energy source. Likewise, efficient use of fertilization can be a significant energy savings. To date, site-specific use of fertilization for the purpose of maximizing forest productivity has not been well developed. Site evaluation of nutrient deficiencies is primarily based on empirical approaches to soil testing and plot fertilizer tests with little consideration for soil water regimes and contributing site factors. This project uses mass flow diffusion theory in a modeling context, combined with process level knowledge of soil chemistry, to evaluate nutrient bioavailability to fast-growing juvenile forest stands growing on coastal plain Spodosols of the southeastern U.S. The model is not soil or site specific and should be useful for a wide range of soil management/nutrient management conditions. In order to use the model, field data of fast-growing southern pine needed to be measured and used in the validation of the model. The field aspect of the study was mainly to provide data that could be used to verify the model. However, we learned much about the growth and development of fast growing loblolly. Carbon allocation patterns, root shoot relationships and leaf area root relationships proved to be new, important information. The Project Objectives were to: (1) Develop a mechanistic nutrient management model based on the COMP8 uptake model. (2) Collect field data that could be used to verify and test the model. (3) Model testing.

  12. [Seasonal Variation on Nutrient Limitation for Phytoplankton Growth in a Coastal River-Reservoir System, Southeast China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong-cong; Rao, La; Huang, Jin-liang; Bai, Min-dong

    2015-09-01

    A comprehensive analysis was conducted using a dataset obtained from October in 2013 to October in 2014 monitoring in 20 headwater streams of Jiulong River and four reservoirs, situated in such a coastal river-reservoir system in Southeast China suffering from intensive anthropogenic disturbance. In-situ monitoring, GIS and statistical analysis were coupled in this study to identify the spatiotemporal variations of nutrients & phytoplankton abundance and community structure, the differentiation of nitrogen & phosphorus limitation of phytoplankton growth, and the seasonal variations in nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth. The results showed that there were obvious spatiotemporal variations in terms of nutrients & phytoplankton abundance and community structure in the 20 headwater streams and four reservoirs. The concentration of nitrogen was higher in winter and spring whereas lower in summer and autumn for both 20 headwater streams and four reservoirs. However, the concentration of phosphorus showed an opposite trend. The phytoplankton's abundance was the highest in summer for four reservoirs while it was higher in winter and spring, lower in summer and autumn in the 20 headwater streams. Meanwhile, the main trend in the succession of phytoplankton was from Bacillariophyta in autumn, winter and spring to Chlorophyta in summer in Tingxi reservoir, from Chlorophyta-Cryptophyta in winter and spring to Chlorophyta-Cyanophyta in summer and autumn in Jiangdong reservoir. No obvious trend exhibited in phytoplankton succession in Shidou-Bantou reservoir and 20 headwater streams. The Redundancy analysis (RDA) ordination plots well displayed the phytoplankton's community structure and its relationships with environmental factors. Besides, according to linear regression analysis there was a closer correlation between chlorophyll-a and nutrients in four reservoirs than in 20 headwater streams. In four reservoirs, N limitation was preliminarily observed in autumn

  13. [Seasonal Variation on Nutrient Limitation for Phytoplankton Growth in a Coastal River-Reservoir System, Southeast China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong-cong; Rao, La; Huang, Jin-liang; Bai, Min-dong

    2015-09-01

    A comprehensive analysis was conducted using a dataset obtained from October in 2013 to October in 2014 monitoring in 20 headwater streams of Jiulong River and four reservoirs, situated in such a coastal river-reservoir system in Southeast China suffering from intensive anthropogenic disturbance. In-situ monitoring, GIS and statistical analysis were coupled in this study to identify the spatiotemporal variations of nutrients & phytoplankton abundance and community structure, the differentiation of nitrogen & phosphorus limitation of phytoplankton growth, and the seasonal variations in nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth. The results showed that there were obvious spatiotemporal variations in terms of nutrients & phytoplankton abundance and community structure in the 20 headwater streams and four reservoirs. The concentration of nitrogen was higher in winter and spring whereas lower in summer and autumn for both 20 headwater streams and four reservoirs. However, the concentration of phosphorus showed an opposite trend. The phytoplankton's abundance was the highest in summer for four reservoirs while it was higher in winter and spring, lower in summer and autumn in the 20 headwater streams. Meanwhile, the main trend in the succession of phytoplankton was from Bacillariophyta in autumn, winter and spring to Chlorophyta in summer in Tingxi reservoir, from Chlorophyta-Cryptophyta in winter and spring to Chlorophyta-Cyanophyta in summer and autumn in Jiangdong reservoir. No obvious trend exhibited in phytoplankton succession in Shidou-Bantou reservoir and 20 headwater streams. The Redundancy analysis (RDA) ordination plots well displayed the phytoplankton's community structure and its relationships with environmental factors. Besides, according to linear regression analysis there was a closer correlation between chlorophyll-a and nutrients in four reservoirs than in 20 headwater streams. In four reservoirs, N limitation was preliminarily observed in autumn

  14. Zinc, iron and calcium are major limiting nutrients in the complementary diets of rural Kenyan children.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Elaine; Chege, Peter; Kimiywe, Judith; Wiesmann, Doris; Hotz, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Poor quality infant and young child (IYC) diets contribute to chronic under-nutrition. To design effective IYC nutrition interventions, an understanding of the extent to which realistic food-based strategies can improve dietary adequacy is required. We collected 24-h dietary recalls from children 6-23 months of age (n = 401) in two rural agro-ecological zones of Kenya to assess the nutrient adequacy of their diets. Linear programming analysis (LPA) was used to identify realistic food-based recommendations (FBRs) and to determine the extent to which they could ensure intake adequacy for 12 nutrients. Mean nutrient densities of the IYC diets were below the desired level for four to nine of the 10 nutrients analysed, depending on the age group. Mean dietary diversity scores ranged from 2.1 ± 1.0 among children 6-8 months old in Kitui County to 3.7 ± 1.1 food groups among children 12-23 months old in Vihiga County. LPA confirmed that dietary adequacy for iron, zinc and calcium will be difficult to ensure using only local foods as consumed. FBRs for breastfed children that promote the daily consumption of cows'/goats' milk (added to porridges), fortified cereals, green leafy vegetables, legumes, and meat, fish or eggs, 3-5 times per week can ensure dietary adequacy for nine and seven of 12 nutrients for children 6-11 and 12-23 months old, respectively. For these rural Kenyan children, even though dietary adequacy could be improved via realistic changes in habitual food consumption practices, alternative interventions are needed to ensure dietary adequacy at the population level.

  15. Zinc, iron and calcium are major limiting nutrients in the complementary diets of rural Kenyan children.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Elaine; Chege, Peter; Kimiywe, Judith; Wiesmann, Doris; Hotz, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Poor quality infant and young child (IYC) diets contribute to chronic under-nutrition. To design effective IYC nutrition interventions, an understanding of the extent to which realistic food-based strategies can improve dietary adequacy is required. We collected 24-h dietary recalls from children 6-23 months of age (n = 401) in two rural agro-ecological zones of Kenya to assess the nutrient adequacy of their diets. Linear programming analysis (LPA) was used to identify realistic food-based recommendations (FBRs) and to determine the extent to which they could ensure intake adequacy for 12 nutrients. Mean nutrient densities of the IYC diets were below the desired level for four to nine of the 10 nutrients analysed, depending on the age group. Mean dietary diversity scores ranged from 2.1 ± 1.0 among children 6-8 months old in Kitui County to 3.7 ± 1.1 food groups among children 12-23 months old in Vihiga County. LPA confirmed that dietary adequacy for iron, zinc and calcium will be difficult to ensure using only local foods as consumed. FBRs for breastfed children that promote the daily consumption of cows'/goats' milk (added to porridges), fortified cereals, green leafy vegetables, legumes, and meat, fish or eggs, 3-5 times per week can ensure dietary adequacy for nine and seven of 12 nutrients for children 6-11 and 12-23 months old, respectively. For these rural Kenyan children, even though dietary adequacy could be improved via realistic changes in habitual food consumption practices, alternative interventions are needed to ensure dietary adequacy at the population level. PMID:26778799

  16. Rapid adaptation of herbivore consumers to nutrient limitation: eco-evolutionary feedbacks to population demography and resource control.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Steven A J; Malo, Andrea R; Diehl, Sebastian; Waasdorp, Dennis; Lemmen, Kimberley D; Proios, Konstantinos; Papakostas, Spiros

    2015-06-01

    Humans alter biogeochemical cycles of essential elements such as phosphorus (P). Prediction of ecosystem consequences of altered elemental cycles requires integration of ecology, evolutionary biology and the framework of ecological stoichiometry. We studied micro-evolutionary responses of a herbivorous rotifer to P-limited food and the potential consequences for its population demography and for ecosystem properties. We subjected field-derived, replicate rotifer populations to P-deficient and P-replete algal food, and studied adaptation in common garden transplant experiments after 103 and 209 days of selection. When fed P-limited food, populations with a P-limitation selection history suffered 37% lower mortality, reached twice the steady state biomass, and reduced algae by 40% compared to populations with a P-replete selection history. Adaptation involved no change in rotifer elemental composition but reduced investment in sex. This study demonstrates potentially strong eco-evolutionary feedbacks from shifting elemental balances to ecosystem properties, including grazing pressure and the ratio of grazer:producer biomass.

  17. Environmental geochemistry of dissolved and biogenic silicon and its nutrient limitation effects in an inland lake, China.

    PubMed

    Lü, Changwei; He, Jiang; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Wei; Fan, Mingde

    2015-07-01

    Silicon (Si) processing and retention play a key role in nutrients biogeochemistry cycling in aquatic environment. In order to interpret the possibility of Si limitation, multivariate analysis was performed based on stoichiometric nutrients balance, distribution characteristics of dissolved silicon (DSi) and biogenic silica (BSi), adsorption behavior, and response relation of BSi with paleoenvironment in water-sediment system of Lake Daihai. The spatial distributions of DSi and BSi in the water-sediment system indicated that terrigenous inputs (such as the weathering of rock and soil in the drainage basin) was the main sources of Si. Meanwhile, grain sizes of sediments, water hydrogeochemistry, and space competition between diatoms and submergent or emerging plants also played important roles in regulating BSi spatial distributions. The sediments from the lake presented obvious releasing trend of Si at low initial concentrations (≤ 3 mg/L) in adsorption experiments, indicating that the sediments were the source of Si to the overlying water. Furthermore, the good response relation between BSi and paleoenvironment observed in the sediment profiles from Lake Daihai indicated that the main reasons for Si limitation to siliceous plankton were different during different periods. The multi-evidences of distribution characteristics, stoichiometric nutrient balance, adsorption behaviors, and response to paleoenvironment were jointly indicative of Si limitation on the primary production of siliceous plankton in Lake Daihai.

  18. Plant uptake of cations under nutrient limitation: An environmental tracer study using Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z.; Keller, C. K.; Stacks, D.; Grant, M.; Harsh, J. B.; Letourneau, M.; Gill, R. A.; Balogh-Brunstad, Z.; Thomashow, L.; Dohnalkova, A.

    2012-12-01

    Vascular plant growth builds soils and ecosystem nutrient capital by sequestering and partitioning atmospheric CO2 into organic matter and continental runoff and driving terrestrial water and energy balances. Plant root-system functions, e.g. nutrient mobilization and uptake, are altered by environmental stress. However, the stress-response relationships are poorly understood. Chemical tracers have potential for assessing contributions of nutrients from various nutrient pools. Our objective is to quantitatively study how varying degrees of nutrient limitation (and corresponding needs to extract base cations from mineral sources) influence Ca and K uptake functions in a plant-root-mineral system. We are studying plant-driven mineral weathering in column experiments with red pine (Pinus resinosa) seedlings. The columns contain quartz sand amended with anorthite and biotite that constitute the sole mineral sources of Ca and K. These minerals also contain known amounts of Sr and Rb, which exhibit chemical behavior similar to Ca and K, respectively. The solution source of Ca and K was varied by adding 0% (no dissolved Ca and K), 10%, 30%, or 100% of a full strength Ca and K nutrient solution through irrigation water in which both Sr and Rb concentrations were negligible. Selected columns were destructively sampled at 3, 6 and 9 months to harvest biomass and measure plant uptake of cations. We used Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results to estimate the contributions of Ca and K from mineral and solution sources. For the 0% nutrient treatment, the Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratios in total biomass at 3 months, compared with those in the mineral phases, suggested preferential uptake of Ca and K over Sr and Rb, respectively, and allowed us to determine uptake discrimination factors for both cations. The K/Rb ratios in total biomass increased with greater K availability in the solution source, as expected, but Ca/Sr ratios did not show any dependence on Ca availability in the solution source

  19. Insights into Nitrogen Isotopic Fractionation During Algal Assimilation of Nitrate and Ammonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. L.; Swart, P. K.; Capo, T. R.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen availability is an important factor controlling algal growth in marine environments, representing a limiting nutrient throughout much of the global ocean. Anthropogenic inputs to the coastal zone may shift the nutrient regime, leading to questions regarding the extent of anthropogenic nutrient impacts in near-shore environments. A large body of work has been completed relating the δ15N of algae, seagrasses, and other benthic organisms to anthropogenic nutrient sources. However, previous work by our research group characterizing the δ15N of organic material associated with waste water discharge points, and in reef and embayment environments of the south Florida coastal zone, has suggested that δ15N values alone do not provide unequivocal evidence of anthropogenic nitrogen loading. Greater understanding of nitrogen processing and isotopic fractionation in coastal benthic organisms is necessary before blanket assumptions regarding nutrient uptake and source association can be universally accepted. Closed system mesocosm incubations examining fractionation associated with assimilation of nitrate and ammonium in cultured red algae, Gracilaria sp. and Agardhiella sp., were completed under varied nitrate and ammonium concentrations from 10 to 500 μM with initial nitrogen isotopic compositions of 2.7-3 ‰. Following 8-day incubations, the isotopic composition of new algal growth ranged between +2.43 and -5.77 ‰, with more depleted values coincident with higher N-availability. Rayleigh fractionation calculations yield fractionation factors of 4-9 ‰ (α values of 1.0045 to 1.008), which represent significantly larger values than those previously reported in the literature for macroalgae. 15N-tracer experiments (initial δ15N = 1000 ‰) were also conducted to assess nutrient preferences in the cultured algae. Isotopic composition of new algal growth varied from -1.3 to +495.0 ‰ with only Agardhiella exhibiting an obvious preference for ammonium

  20. Nutrient limitation on ecosystem productivity and processes of mature and old-growth subtropical forests in China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Enqing; Chen, Chengrong; McGroddy, Megan E; Wen, Dazhi

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is considered the dominant limiting nutrient in temperate regions, while phosphorus (P) limitation frequently occurs in tropical regions, but in subtropical regions nutrient limitation is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated N and P contents and N:P ratios of foliage, forest floors, fine roots and mineral soils, and their relationships with community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate, and microbial processes in eight mature and old-growth subtropical forests (stand age >80 yr) at Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, China. Average N:P ratios (mass based) in foliage, litter (L) layer and mixture of fermentation and humus (F/H) layer, and fine roots were 28.3, 42.3, 32.0 and 32.7, respectively. These values are higher than the critical N:P ratios for P limitation proposed (16-20 for foliage, ca. 25 for forest floors). The markedly high N:P ratios were mainly attributed to the high N concentrations of these plant materials. Community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate and microbial properties were more strongly related to measures of P than N and frequently negatively related to the N:P ratios, suggesting a significant role of P availability in determining ecosystem production and productivity and nutrient cycling at all the study sites except for one prescribed disturbed site where N availability may also be important. We propose that N enrichment is probably a significant driver of the potential P limitation in the study area. Low P parent material may also contribute to the potential P limitation. In general, our results provided strong evidence supporting a significant role for P availability, rather than N availability, in determining ecosystem primary productivity and ecosystem processes in subtropical forests of China.

  1. Nutrient Limitation on Ecosystem Productivity and Processes of Mature and Old-Growth Subtropical Forests in China

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Enqing; Chen, Chengrong; McGroddy, Megan E.; Wen, Dazhi

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is considered the dominant limiting nutrient in temperate regions, while phosphorus (P) limitation frequently occurs in tropical regions, but in subtropical regions nutrient limitation is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated N and P contents and N:P ratios of foliage, forest floors, fine roots and mineral soils, and their relationships with community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate, and microbial processes in eight mature and old-growth subtropical forests (stand age >80 yr) at Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, China. Average N:P ratios (mass based) in foliage, litter (L) layer and mixture of fermentation and humus (F/H) layer, and fine roots were 28.3, 42.3, 32.0 and 32.7, respectively. These values are higher than the critical N:P ratios for P limitation proposed (16–20 for foliage, ca. 25 for forest floors). The markedly high N:P ratios were mainly attributed to the high N concentrations of these plant materials. Community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate and microbial properties were more strongly related to measures of P than N and frequently negatively related to the N:P ratios, suggesting a significant role of P availability in determining ecosystem production and productivity and nutrient cycling at all the study sites except for one prescribed disturbed site where N availability may also be important. We propose that N enrichment is probably a significant driver of the potential P limitation in the study area. Low P parent material may also contribute to the potential P limitation. In general, our results provided strong evidence supporting a significant role for P availability, rather than N availability, in determining ecosystem primary productivity and ecosystem processes in subtropical forests of China. PMID:23284873

  2. Nutrient limitation leads to penetrative growth into agar and affects aroma formation in Pichia fabianii, P. kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Rijswijck, Irma M H; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Wolkers-Rooijackers, Judith C M; Abee, Tjakko; Smid, Eddy J

    2015-01-01

    Among fermentative yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is most frequently used as a model organism, although other yeast species may have special features that make them interesting candidates to apply in food-fermentation processes. In this study, we used three yeast species isolated from fermented masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruit, S. cerevisiae 131, Pichia fabianii 65 and Pichia kudriavzevii 129, and determined the impact of nitrogen and/or glucose limitation on surface growth mode and the production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All three species displayed significant changes in growth mode in all nutrient-limited conditions, signified by the formation of metafilaments or pseudohyphae. The timing of the transition was found to be species-specific. Transition in growth mode is suggested to be linked to the production of certain fusel alcohols, such as phenylethyl alcohol, which serve as quorum-sensing molecules. Interestingly, we did not observe concomitant increased production of phenylethyl alcohol and filamentous growth. Notably, a broader range of esters was found only for the Pichia spp. grown on nitrogen-limited agar for 21 days compared to nutrient-rich agar, and when grown on glucose- and glucose- plus nitrogen-limited agar. Our data suggest that for the Pichia spp., the formation of esters may play an important role in the switch in growth mode upon nitrogen limitation. Further biological or ecological implications of ester formation are discussed.

  3. Nutrient limitation leads to penetrative growth into agar and affects aroma formation in Pichia fabianii, P. kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Rijswijck, Irma M H; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Wolkers-Rooijackers, Judith C M; Abee, Tjakko; Smid, Eddy J

    2015-01-01

    Among fermentative yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is most frequently used as a model organism, although other yeast species may have special features that make them interesting candidates to apply in food-fermentation processes. In this study, we used three yeast species isolated from fermented masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruit, S. cerevisiae 131, Pichia fabianii 65 and Pichia kudriavzevii 129, and determined the impact of nitrogen and/or glucose limitation on surface growth mode and the production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All three species displayed significant changes in growth mode in all nutrient-limited conditions, signified by the formation of metafilaments or pseudohyphae. The timing of the transition was found to be species-specific. Transition in growth mode is suggested to be linked to the production of certain fusel alcohols, such as phenylethyl alcohol, which serve as quorum-sensing molecules. Interestingly, we did not observe concomitant increased production of phenylethyl alcohol and filamentous growth. Notably, a broader range of esters was found only for the Pichia spp. grown on nitrogen-limited agar for 21 days compared to nutrient-rich agar, and when grown on glucose- and glucose- plus nitrogen-limited agar. Our data suggest that for the Pichia spp., the formation of esters may play an important role in the switch in growth mode upon nitrogen limitation. Further biological or ecological implications of ester formation are discussed. PMID:25308873

  4. Nutrients and light limit biomass growth of N2-fixing but not non-fixing trees in tropical forests after 15 years of fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trierweiler, Annette; Wright, Joseph; Winter, Klaus; Hedin, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Tropical forests contribute a major fraction to the land C sink but the role of soil nutrients in limiting tree biomass growth in response to rising atmospheric CO2 is poorly known. Recent findings suggest that, following disturbance, successionally young forests may be deficient in nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P), however nutrient manipulations of mature forests have revealed surprisingly weak effects of nutrients on the stem growth of mature individual trees. It is unclear how such weak experimental nutrient effects are reconciled with the existence of broad geographical correlations between soil nutrients and forest biomass growth. While tree growth is a complex function of nutrients, light, and canopy status, it is plausible that responses differ across different plant functional types. Here we use data from the longest running tropical fertilization experiment to ask first whether different functional groups have different nutrient needs, second, whether a differential nutrient limitation response will affect biomass accretion, and third, whether there is an interactive light-nutrient effect. Finally we examined how nutrient responses changed over time. We show that, in an intact and biodiverse mature tropical forest in Panama, N2-fixing trees more than double their basal area growth rate when exposed to increased soil P and N in the first 11 years of fertilization, for an overall 60% increase over 15 years. In contrast, there was no effect of nutrient treatment on the growth of non-fixing trees. We found a strong interactive effect of soil nutrients and light on fixer tree growth as the greatest growth response was in mature canopy-level trees with full access to light and potentially new nitrogen through fixation. In addition, the positive nutrient effect declined over the 15 years, rather than the expected increase. Our findings suggest that N2-fixing tree species may play a disproportionately important role in governing tropical forest response to

  5. Apparent toxicity resulting from the sequestering of nutrient trace metals during standard Selenastrum capricornutum toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Ward, Timothy J; Rausina, Gary A; Stonebraker, Peter M; Robinson, William E

    2002-10-01

    chemistry of natural waters differs greatly from the nutrient limited algal medium, and the sequestration effect observed in these static tests could be absent under real world conditions. PMID:12204583

  6. Characterization of protein redox dynamics induced during light-to-dark transitions and nutrient limitation in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Sadler, Natalie C.; Hill, Eric A.; Lewis, Michael P.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-07-03

    Protein redox chemistry constitutes a major void in knowledge pertaining to photoautotrophic system regulation and signaling processes. We have employed a chemical biology approach to analyze redox sensitive proteins in live Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cells in both light and dark periods, and to understand how cellular redox balance is disrupted during nutrient perturbation. The present work identified several novel putative redox-sensitive proteins that are involved in the generation of reductant, macromolecule synthesis, and carbon flux through central metabolic pathways, and may be involved in cell signaling and response mechanisms. Furthermore, our research suggests that dynamic redox changes in response to specific nutrient limitations contribute to the regulatory changes driven by a shift from light to dark. Taken together, these results contribute to the high-level understanding of post-translational mechanisms regulating flux distributions and therefore present potential metabolic engineering targets for redirecting carbon towards biofuel precursors.

  7. Red spruce physiology and growth in response to elevated CO[sub 2], water stress and nutrient limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Spruce-fir ecosystems of the eastern United States interest scientists because of reported changes in population growth. This research examined the growth and physical responses of red spruce seedlings (Picea rubens Sarg.) to change in atmospheric CO[sub 2], water and nutrient availability to determine the response of this species to potential climatic changes. Red spruce seedlings were grown from seed for 1 year in ambient (374 ppm) or elevated (713 ppm) CO[sub 2] in combination with low or high soil fertility treatment, and well-watered or water-stressed conditions. Red spruce seedlings grown with limited nutrient and water availability increased growth in elevated CO[sub 2] as did seedlings grown with high soil fertility treatment and ample water. At 12 months of age, elevated CO[sub 2]-grown seedlings had greater dry weight, height, diameter and specific leaf weight than ambient CO[sub 2[minus

  8. Nutrient-limited productivity of calcareous versus fleshy macroalgae in a eutrophic, carbonate-rich tropical marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, O.; Lapointe, B. E.

    1994-07-01

    The results of a study of nutrient enrichment with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) on productivity and calcification of fleshy and calcareous algae are reported in this study. Plants were collected from a nearshore eutrophic site in the Florida Keys (USA) and experimentally pulsed during the night with combinations of N and P. After several days of pulsing (7 10 days), net productivity, calcification, and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA), were measured. Productivity of fleshy algae were frequently enhanced by N, P, and N+P, during both summer and winter. Phosphorus limited the productivity of Hydroclathrus clathratus during winter and Ulva spp. during summer, whereas nitrogen limited the productivity of Laurencia intricata during both seasons. During summer, Dictyota cervicornis productivity was not enhanced by any nutrient enrichment. Nitrogen limited the productivity of the three calcareous species Penicillus capitatus, Penicillus dumetosus and Halimeda opuntia during winter and that of H. opuntia during summer. Neither N nor P enrichment increased calcification of calcareous species, and P enrichment greatly inhibited calcification of P. dumetosus during winter. Nutrient enrichment enhanced the productivity of the fleshy species to a greater extent than that of calcareous algae. The seawater DIN:SRP molar ratio was low at our eutrophic study site (molar ratio average of 3:1 during winter and 9:1 during summer) compared to more oligotrophic sites in the Florida Keys, suggesting that in carbonate-rich environments, eutrophication shifts nutrient regulation of productivity from P to N. APA activities of fleshy macroalage were higher than calcareous algae, and rates of all macro algae were 2- to 7-fold higher in summer compared to winter. Productivity was also about 3-fold higher in fleshy compared to calcareous species and about 2-fold higher in summer compared to winter. These results suggest that nutrient enrichment enhances productivity of fleshy algae to a

  9. Calcium isotope fractionation during plant growth under a limited nutrient supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Anne-Désirée; Cobert, Florian; Bourgeade, Pascale; Ertlen, Damien; Labolle, François; Gangloff, Sophie; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Chabaux, François; Stille, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Hydroponic experiments were performed on bean plants using a nutrient solution at pH 6 with an initial Ca concentration of 5 ppm to test the effect of Ca deficiency on the Δ44/40Calateral roots/nutritive solution and the δ44/40Ca signatures of the different bean organs. The results of the study suggest that the process of Ca uptake by the roots follows a closed-system equilibrium fractionation with a fractionation factor (αbean plant/nutritive solution) of 0.9988, suggesting that Ca forms exchangeable bonds with the root surfaces and thus confirming 40Ca adsorption onto pectic RCOO- groups in the cell wall structure of the lateral roots. The study further suggests that for a constant pH value (i.e., 6), the average signature of the bean plants depends on the Ca isotope signature of the nutritive medium. Moreover, regardless of the concentration of the nutritive solution, the fractionation mechanism between the roots and shoots remains the same, and only the intensity of fractionation between the different organs is modified. Finally, with a decreasing Ca supply in the solution and the appearance of deficiency effects within the bean plants, the Ca isotopic signature of the leaves ceases to reflect that of free Ca but rather that of Ca oxalate crystals. The study also emphasises that Ca isotopes are important tracers of the Ca nutrient availability in soils and may be used as a tool to identify and quantify Ca recycling in soils.

  10. Seasonal Patterns of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Limitation in Four German Lakes and the Predictability of Limitation Status from Ambient Nutrient Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Kolzau, Sebastian; Wiedner, Claudia; Rücker, Jacqueline; Köhler, Jan; Köhler, Antje; Dolman, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    To identify the seasonal pattern of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) limitation of phytoplankton in four different lakes, biweekly experiments were conducted from the end of March to September 2011. Lake water samples were enriched with N, P or both nutrients and incubated under two different light intensities. Chlorophyll a fluorescence (Chla) was measured and a model selection procedure was used to assign bioassay outcomes to different limitation categories. N and P were both limiting at some point. For the shallow lakes there was a trend from P limitation in spring to N or light limitation later in the year, while the deep lake remained predominantly P limited. To determine the ability of in-lake N:P ratios to predict the relative strength of N vs. P limitation, three separate regression models were fit with the log-transformed ratio of Chla of the P and N treatments (Response ratio = RR) as the response variable and those of ambient total phosphorus:total nitrogen (TN:TP), dissolved inorganic nitrogen:soluble reactive phosphorus (DIN:SRP), TN:SRP and DIN:TP mass ratios as predictors. All four N:P ratios had significant positive relationships with RR, such that high N:P ratios were associated with P limitation and low N:P ratios with N limitation. The TN:TP and DIN:TP ratios performed better than the DIN:SRP and TN:SRP in terms of misclassification rate and the DIN:TP ratio had the highest R2 value. Nitrogen limitation was predictable, frequent and persistent, suggesting that nitrogen reduction could play a role in water quality management. However, there is still uncertainty about the efficacy of N restriction to control populations of N2 fixing cyanobacteria. PMID:24755935

  11. Polishing of secondary effluent by an algal biofilm process.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, G; Sekoulov, I

    2002-01-01

    The potential in polishing secondary effluent by an algal biofilm composed of different green and bluegreen algae was investigated. During the photosynthesis process of algal biofilm oxygen was produced while dissolved carbon dioxide was consumed. This led to an increasing pH due to the change of the carbon dioxide equilibrium in water. The high pH caused precipitation of dissolved phosphates. The attached algae took up nitrogen and phosphorus during the growth of biomass. In addition to nutrient removal, an extensive removal of faecal bacteria was observed probably caused by adsorption of the algal biofilm and by photooxidation involving dissolved oxygen. The experimental results suggest that a low-cost, close to nature process especially for small wastewater treatment plants for nutrient removal and bacteria reduction can be developed with the aid of an algal biofilm. PMID:12420969

  12. Can short-term and small-scale experiments reflect nutrient limitation on phytoplankton in natural lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haijun; Li, Yan; Feng, Weisong; Yu, Qing; Xiao, Xucheng; Liang, Xiaomin; Shao, Jianchun; Ma, Shuonan; Wang, Hongzhu

    2016-07-01

    Whether it is necessary to reduce nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P) input to mitigate lake eutrophication is controversial. The controversy stems mainly from differences in time and space in previous studies that support the contrasting ideas. To test the response of phytoplankton to various combinations of nutrient control strategies in mesocosms and the possibility of reflecting the conditions in natural ecosystems with short-term experiments, a 9-month experiment was carried out in eight 800-L tanks with four nutrient level combinations (+N+P, -N+P, +N-P, and -N-P), with an 18-month whole-ecosystem experiment in eight ~800-m 2 ponds as the reference. Phytoplankton abundance was determined by P not N, regardless of the initial TN/TP level, which was in contrast to the nutrient limitation predicted by the N/P theory. Net natural N inputs were calculated to be 4.9, 6.8, 1.5, and 3.0 g in treatments +N+P, -N+P, +N-P, and -N-P, respectively, suggesting that N deficiency and P addition may promote natural N inputs to support phytoplankton development. However, the compensation process was slow, as suggested by an observed increase in TN after 3 weeks in -N+P and 2 months in -N-P in the tank experiment, and after 3 months in -N +P and ~3 months in -N-P in our pond experiment. Obviously, such a slow process cannot be simulated in short-term experiments. The natural N inputs cannot be explained by planktonic N-fixation because N-fixing cyanobacteria were scarce, which was probably because there was a limited pool of species in the tanks. Therefore, based on our results we argue that extrapolating short-term, small-scale experiments to large natural ecosystems does not give reliable, accurate results.

  13. Nutrient limitation in three lowland tropical forests in southern China receiving high nitrogen deposition: insights from fine root responses to nutrient additions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feifei; Yoh, Muneoki; Gilliam, Frank S; Lu, Xiankai; Mo, Jiangming

    2013-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition to tropical forests may accelerate ecosystem phosphorus (P) limitation. This study examined responses of fine root biomass, nutrient concentrations, and acid phosphatase activity (APA) of bulk soil to five years of N and P additions in one old-growth and two younger lowland tropical forests in southern China. The old-growth forest had higher N capital than the two younger forests from long-term N accumulation. From February 2007 to July 2012, four experimental treatments were established at the following levels: Control, N-addition (150 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)), P-addition (150 kg P ha(-1) yr(-1)) and N+P-addition (150 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) plus 150 kg P ha(-1) yr(-1)). We hypothesized that fine root growth in the N-rich old-growth forest would be limited by P availability, and in the two younger forests would primarily respond to N additions due to large plant N demand. Results showed that five years of N addition significantly decreased live fine root biomass only in the old-growth forest (by 31%), but significantly elevated dead fine root biomass in all the three forests (by 64% to 101%), causing decreased live fine root proportion in the old-growth and the pine forests. P addition significantly increased live fine root biomass in all three forests (by 20% to 76%). The combined N and P treatment significantly increased live fine root biomass in the two younger forests but not in the old-growth forest. These results suggest that fine root growth in all three study forests appeared to be P-limited. This was further confirmed by current status of fine root N:P ratios, APA in bulk soil, and their responses to N and P treatments. Moreover, N addition significantly increased APA only in the old-growth forest, consistent with the conclusion that the old-growth forest was more P-limited than the younger forests.

  14. Eukaryotic algal phytochromes span the visible spectrum.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Nathan C; Duanmu, Deqiang; Martin, Shelley S; Bachy, Charles; Price, Dana C; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Worden, Alexandra Z; Lagarias, J Clark

    2014-03-11

    Plant phytochromes are photoswitchable red/far-red photoreceptors that allow competition with neighboring plants for photosynthetically active red light. In aquatic environments, red and far-red light are rapidly attenuated with depth; therefore, photosynthetic species must use shorter wavelengths of light. Nevertheless, phytochrome-related proteins are found in recently sequenced genomes of many eukaryotic algae from aquatic environments. We examined the photosensory properties of seven phytochromes from diverse algae: four prasinophyte (green algal) species, the heterokont (brown algal) Ectocarpus siliculosus, and two glaucophyte species. We demonstrate that algal phytochromes are not limited to red and far-red responses. Instead, different algal phytochromes can sense orange, green, and even blue light. Characterization of these previously undescribed photosensors using CD spectroscopy supports a structurally heterogeneous chromophore in the far-red-absorbing photostate. Our study thus demonstrates that extensive spectral tuning of phytochromes has evolved in phylogenetically distinct lineages of aquatic photosynthetic eukaryotes.

  15. Flocculence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells is induced by nutrient limitation, with cell surface hydrophobicity as a major determinant.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, G; Straver, M H; Lugtenberg, B J; Kijne, J W

    1992-01-01

    Initiation of flocculation ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPY1 cells was observed at the moment the cells stop dividing because of nitrogen limitation. A shift in concentration of the limiting nutrient resulted in a corresponding shift in cell division and initiation of flocculence. Other limitations also led to initiation of flocculence, with magnesium limitation as the exception. Magnesium-limited S. cerevisiae cells did not flocculate at any stage of growth. Cell surface hydrophobicity was found to be strongly correlated with the ability of the yeast cells to flocculate. Hydrophobicity sharply increased at the end of the logarithmic growth phase, shortly before initiation of flocculation ability. Treatments of cells which resulted in a decrease in hydrophobicity also yielded a decrease in flocculation ability. Similarly, the presence of polycations increased both hydrophobicity and the ability to flocculate. Magnesium-limited cells were found to be strongly affected in cell surface hydrophobicity. A proteinaceous cell surface factor(s) was identified as a flocculin. This heat-stable component had a strong emulsifying activity, and appears to be involved in both cell surface hydrophobicity and in flocculation ability of the yeast cells. PMID:1482191

  16. Effects of elevated CO[sub 2] and non-limiting nutrients on growth and photosynthesis of loblolly pine

    SciTech Connect

    Tissue, D.T.; Thomas, R.B.; Strain, B.R. )

    1994-06-01

    The effect of long-term CO[sub 2] enrichment and non-limiting nutrients on growth and photosynthesis were studied on loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings grown in three atmospheric CO[sub 2] partial pressures (ambient, ambient + 15 Pa, and ambient + 30 Pa) for 18 months in the field. Total plant biomass increased 20% for plants grown at +15 Pa and 50% for plants grown at + 30 PA compared with plants grown at ambient CO[sub 2]. Relative growth rates were higher for elevated CO[sub 2] plants in the first 10 months of treatment, then similar thereafter. Plants grown at elevated CO[sub 2] were also taller, had greater photosynthetic leaf area, and more frequent leaf flushes. Net photosynthesis was higher for plants grown in elevated CO[sub 2] in all seasons, but this difference was much greater in spring and summer. Rubisco content, activity and activation state were unaffected by growth at elevated CO[sub 2] indicating no regulation of rubisco occurred at elevated CO[sub 2]. Results from this experiment and from a previous experiment (under limiting nutrient conditions) suggest that the magnitude of the growth and photosynthetic response to a future, high-CO[sub 2] environment will largely depend on soil fertility.

  17. Industrial-strength ecology: trade-offs and opportunities in algal biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Shurin, Jonathan B; Abbott, Rachel L; Deal, Michael S; Kwan, Garfield T; Litchman, Elena; McBride, Robert C; Mandal, Shovon; Smith, Val H

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae represent one of the most promising groups of candidate organisms for replacing fossil fuels with contemporary primary production as a renewable source of energy. Algae can produce many times more biomass per unit area than terrestrial crop plants, easing the competing demands for land with food crops and native ecosystems. However, several aspects of algal biology present unique challenges to the industrial-scale aquaculture of photosynthetic microorganisms. These include high susceptibility to invading aquatic consumers and weeds, as well as prodigious requirements for nutrients that may compete with the fertiliser demands of other crops. Most research on algal biofuel technologies approaches these problems from a cellular or genetic perspective, attempting either to engineer or select algal strains with particular traits. However, inherent functional trade-offs may limit the capacity of genetic selection or synthetic biology to simultaneously optimise multiple functional traits for biofuel productivity and resilience. We argue that a community engineering approach that manages microalgal diversity, species composition and environmental conditions may lead to more robust and productive biofuel ecosystems. We review evidence for trade-offs, challenges and opportunities in algal biofuel cultivation with a goal of guiding research towards intensifying bioenergy production using established principles of community and ecosystem ecology. PMID:24015819

  18. Industrial-strength ecology: trade-offs and opportunities in algal biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Shurin, Jonathan B; Abbott, Rachel L; Deal, Michael S; Kwan, Garfield T; Litchman, Elena; McBride, Robert C; Mandal, Shovon; Smith, Val H

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae represent one of the most promising groups of candidate organisms for replacing fossil fuels with contemporary primary production as a renewable source of energy. Algae can produce many times more biomass per unit area than terrestrial crop plants, easing the competing demands for land with food crops and native ecosystems. However, several aspects of algal biology present unique challenges to the industrial-scale aquaculture of photosynthetic microorganisms. These include high susceptibility to invading aquatic consumers and weeds, as well as prodigious requirements for nutrients that may compete with the fertiliser demands of other crops. Most research on algal biofuel technologies approaches these problems from a cellular or genetic perspective, attempting either to engineer or select algal strains with particular traits. However, inherent functional trade-offs may limit the capacity of genetic selection or synthetic biology to simultaneously optimise multiple functional traits for biofuel productivity and resilience. We argue that a community engineering approach that manages microalgal diversity, species composition and environmental conditions may lead to more robust and productive biofuel ecosystems. We review evidence for trade-offs, challenges and opportunities in algal biofuel cultivation with a goal of guiding research towards intensifying bioenergy production using established principles of community and ecosystem ecology.

  19. Nutrient and biological conditions of selected small streams in the Edwards Plateau, central Texas, 2005-06, and implications for development of nutrient criteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mabe, Jeffrey A.

    2007-01-01

    During the summers of 2005 and 2006 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, evaluated nutrient and biological conditions in small streams in parts of the Edwards Plateau of Central Texas. Land-cover analysis was used to select 15 small streams that represented a gradient of conditions with the potential to affect nutrient concentrations across the study area, which comprises two of four subregions of the Edwards Plateau ecoregion. All 15 streams were sampled for water properties, nutrients, algae, benthic invertebrates, and fish in summer 2005, and eight streams were resampled in summer 2006. Streams that did not receive wastewater effluent had relatively low nutrient concentrations and were classified as oligotrophic; streams receiving wastewater effluent had relatively high nutrient concentrations and were classified as eutrophic. Nutrient concentrations measured in the least-disturbed streams closely matched the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency nutrient criteria recommendations based on estimated reference concentrations. Nitrogen/phosphorus ratios indicated streams not affected by wastewater effluent might be limited by phosphorus concentrations. Algal indicators of nutrient condition were closely related to dissolved nitrogen concentrations and streamflow conditions. Ambient dissolved nitrogen concentrations (nitrite plus nitrate) were positively correlated with benthic algal chlorophyll-a concentrations. The correlation of benthic algal chlorophyll-a with instantaneous nitrite plus nitrate load was stronger than correlations with ambient nutrients. Increased nutrient concentrations were associated with increased macroalgae cover, wider diel dissolved oxygen ranges, and reduced diel dissolved oxygen minimums. Benthic invertebrate aquatic life use scores generally were classified as High to Exceptional in study streams despite the influence of urbanization or wastewater effluent. Reductions in aquatic

  20. Influence of nutrient utilization and remineralization stoichiometry on phytoplankton species and carbon export: A modeling study at BATS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, B.; Garçon, V.; Oschlies, A.; Lomas, M. W.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this research is to understand the underlying mechanisms of the time-varying flux of carbon in the Sargasso Sea. To address this objective, a one-dimensional multi-component lower trophic level ecosystem model that includes detailed algal physiology as well as nutrient cycles is used at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS, 31∘40'N, 64∘10'W) site. In this model autotrophic growth is represented by three algal groups and the cell quota approach is used to estimate algal growth and nutrient uptake. This model is tested and evaluated for year 1998 using the bimonthly BATS cruise data. Results show that phosphorus and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are necessary compartments to correctly simulate organic elemental cycles at the BATS site. Model results show that autotrophic eukaryotes and cyanobacteria (i.e. Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus) are the most abundant algal groups and are responsible for 63% and 33% of carbon production in the region, respectively. Sensitivity analyses show that the annual contribution of nitrogen fixation and atmospheric nitrogen deposition to new production is approximately 9% and 3%, respectively. However, the recycled nitrogen and phosphorus are important components of the ecosystem dynamics because sustained growth of algal groups depends on remineralized nutrients which accounts for 75% of the annual carbon production. Nutrient uptake and remineralization stoichiometry can play an important role in determining the surface ocean nutrient distribution. Model results suggest phosphate limitation even during the spring bloom. Phosphate may thus limit the growth of all algal groups throughout the year.

  1. Relationships among nutrients, chlorophyll-a, and dissolved oxygen in agricultural streams in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Allyson M; Royer, Todd V; David, Mark B; Gentry, Lowell E

    2006-01-01

    A better understanding of the controls on algae and dissolved O2 in agricultural streams of Illinois is needed to aid in development of nutrient standards. We investigated the relationships between dissolved nutrients, algal abundance, and dissolved O2 in five streams in east-central Illinois from March through November 2004. The streams drained watersheds from 25 to 777 km2 that were dominated by row crop agriculture. Three sites had open canopies and two were bordered by a narrow forest of deciduous trees. Algal abundance was measured as chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration in the water column (sestonic) and on the streambed (periphytic). Mean NO3-N concentrations ranged from 5.5 to 8.8 mg N L(-1) and did not relate to algal abundance. Sestonic chl-a values ranged from nearly zero to >15 mg m(-3) with no differences between open and shaded streams and only a weak correlation with dissolved reactive P (mean concentrations were 44-479 microg L(-1)). The results suggest that sestonic chl-a is a poor criterion for assessing nutrient-related problems in these streams. Greatest periphytic chl-a occurred during low flow from August through October, but periphyton occurred consistently in only two of the five streams. The abundance of filamentous algae explained 64% of the variation in diel O2 saturation, but was not correlated with nutrients. Currently it appears that hydrology and light, rather than nutrients, control algal abundance in these streams, and in the agricultural landscape of east-central Illinois, it may not be possible to reduce nutrient concentrations sufficiently to limit filamentous algal blooms.

  2. Perspective assessment of algae-based biofuel production using recycled nutrient sources: the case of Japan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tunyen; Yabar, Helmut; Higano, Yoshiro

    2013-01-01

    In this study, an upper limit in the solar energy conversion efficiency which can be translated to a maximum potential algal yield of a large-scale culture is calculated based on the algal productivity model in which light and nutrient are made the growth rate limiting factors, and taking the design characteristics of the cultivation system into account. Our results indicate that for the production of low-cost biodiesel within the limits of the wastewater quality standards, that the culturing of high lipid content algae within a raceway pond would provide an appropriate solution for manufacturing biodiesel from algae. However, due to inefficient sunlight utilization and due to the large amount of fertilizer required in raceway ponds, a greater effluent recycle rate would have to be implemented to reduce the amount of fertilizer discharge to meet the wastewater quality standards and to maximize the attainable productivity of algal biomass.

  3. Critical evaluation and modeling of algal harvesting using dissolved air flotation. DAF Algal Harvesting Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Hewson, John C.; Amendola, Pasquale; Reynoso, Monica; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Yongsheng; Hu, Qiang

    2014-07-14

    In our study, Chlorella zofingiensis harvesting by dissolved air flotation (DAF) was critically evaluated with regard to algal concentration, culture conditions, type and dosage of coagulants, and recycle ratio. Harvesting efficiency increased with coagulant dosage and leveled off at 81%, 86%, 91%, and 87% when chitosan, Al3+, Fe3+, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used at dosages of 70, 180, 250, and 500 mg g-1, respectively. The DAF efficiency-coagulant dosage relationship changed with algal culture conditions. In evaluating the influence of the initial algal concentration and recycle ratio revealed that, under conditions typical for algal harvesting, we found that it is possible that the number of bubbles is insufficient. A DAF algal harvesting model was developed to explain this observation by introducing mass-based floc size distributions and a bubble limitation into the white water blanket model. Moreover, the model revealed the importance of coagulation to increase floc-bubble collision and attachment, and the preferential interaction of bubbles with larger flocs, which limited the availability of bubbles to the smaller sized flocs. The harvesting efficiencies predicted by the model agree reasonably with experimental data obtained at different Al3+ dosages, algal concentrations, and recycle ratios. Based on this modeling, critical parameters for efficient algal harvesting were identified.

  4. Critical evaluation and modeling of algal harvesting using dissolved air flotation. DAF Algal Harvesting Modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Hewson, John C.; Amendola, Pasquale; Reynoso, Monica; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Yongsheng; Hu, Qiang

    2014-07-14

    In our study, Chlorella zofingiensis harvesting by dissolved air flotation (DAF) was critically evaluated with regard to algal concentration, culture conditions, type and dosage of coagulants, and recycle ratio. Harvesting efficiency increased with coagulant dosage and leveled off at 81%, 86%, 91%, and 87% when chitosan, Al3+, Fe3+, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used at dosages of 70, 180, 250, and 500 mg g-1, respectively. The DAF efficiency-coagulant dosage relationship changed with algal culture conditions. In evaluating the influence of the initial algal concentration and recycle ratio revealed that, under conditions typical for algal harvesting, we found that itmore » is possible that the number of bubbles is insufficient. A DAF algal harvesting model was developed to explain this observation by introducing mass-based floc size distributions and a bubble limitation into the white water blanket model. Moreover, the model revealed the importance of coagulation to increase floc-bubble collision and attachment, and the preferential interaction of bubbles with larger flocs, which limited the availability of bubbles to the smaller sized flocs. The harvesting efficiencies predicted by the model agree reasonably with experimental data obtained at different Al3+ dosages, algal concentrations, and recycle ratios. Based on this modeling, critical parameters for efficient algal harvesting were identified.« less

  5. An approach to optimise nutrient management in environmental sanitation systems despite limited data.

    PubMed

    Montangero, Agnès; Belevi, Hasan

    2008-09-01

    The material flow analysis method can be used to assess the impact of environmental sanitation systems on resource consumption and environmental pollution. However, given the limited access to reliable data, application of this data-intensive method in developing countries may be difficult. This paper presents an approach allowing to develop material flow models despite limited data availability. Application of an iterative procedure is of key importance: model parameter values should first be assessed on the basis of a literature review and by eliciting expert judgement. If model outputs are not plausible, sensitive input parameters should be reassessed more accurately. Moreover, model parameters can be expressed as probability distributions and variable uncertainty estimated by using Monte Carlo simulation. The impact of environmental sanitation systems on the phosphorus load discharged into surface water in Hanoi, Vietnam, is simulated by applying the proposed approach. PMID:17868974

  6. Relation of algal biomass to characteristics of selected streams in the Lower Susquehanna River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brightbill, Robin A.; Bilger, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    Seven small tributary streams with drainage areas ranging from 12.6 to 71.9 square miles, representative of both limestone and freestone settings, in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin were sampled for algae, nutrients, water quality, habitat, land use, hydrology, fish, and invertebrates. Nutrients, site characteristics, and selected characteristics of the invertebrate and fish communities known to influence algal growth were compared to chlorophyll aconcentrations. Nitrogen was not found limiting in these streams; however, phosphorus may have been limiting in five of the seven streams. Concentrations of chlorophyll ain riffles increased with the degree of open canopy and as bottom substrate reached the gravel/cobble size fraction. These increased chlorophyll aconcentrations and the substrate size in turn raised the levels of dissolved oxygen in the streams. Freestone streams had increased chlorophyll aconcentrations associated with increases in percentage of omnivorous fish and in pH and decreases in percentage of collector/gatherer invertebrates. Concentrations of chlorophyll a in limestone riffles decreased as the percentage of omnivorous fish increased. Depositional chlorophyll a concentrations increased as the Bank Stability Index decreased and as the riffle velocity increased. Depositional chlorophyll a concentrations increased in limestone streams as collector/gatherer invertebrates increased and as phosphorus concentrations decreased. No relations were seen between chlorophyll aconcentrations and land-use characteristics of the basin. In this study, there were too few sampling sites to establish statistically based relations between algal biomass and nutrient concentrations. Further study is needed to generate data suitable for statistical interpretation.

  7. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Eighth Annual National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing & Media August 19-21, 2014 Atlanta, GA Harmful Algal Blooms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page What's the ...

  8. Harmful Algal Blooms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.

    2007-01-01

    What are Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)? Freshwater and marine harmful algal blooms (HABs) can occur anytime water use is impaired due to excessive accumulations of algae. HAB occurrence is affected by a complex set of physical, chemical, biological, hydrological, and meteorological conditions making it difficult to isolate specific causative environmental factors. Potential impairments include reduction in water quality, accumulation of malodorous scums in beach areas, algal production of toxins potent enough to poison both aquatic and terrestrial organisms, and algal production of taste-and-odor compounds that cause unpalatable drinking water and fish. HABs are a global problem, and toxic freshwater and (or) marine algae have been implicated in human and animal illness and death in over 45 countries worldwide and in at least 27 U.S. States (Yoo and others, 1995; Chorus and Bartram, 1999; Huisman and others, 2005).

  9. Enhanced carbon pump inferred from relaxation of nutrient limitation in the glacial ocean.

    PubMed

    Pichevin, L E; Reynolds, B C; Ganeshram, R S; Cacho, I; Pena, L; Keefe, K; Ellam, R M

    2009-06-25

    The modern Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) Ocean is a large oceanic source of carbon to the atmosphere. Primary productivity over large areas of the EEP is limited by silicic acid and iron availability, and because of this constraint the organic carbon export to the deep ocean is unable to compensate for the outgassing of carbon dioxide that occurs through upwelling of deep waters. It has been suggested that the delivery of dust-borne iron to the glacial ocean could have increased primary productivity and enhanced deep-sea carbon export in this region, lowering atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations during glacial periods. Such a role for the EEP is supported by higher organic carbon burial rates documented in underlying glacial sediments, but lower opal accumulation rates cast doubts on the importance of the EEP as an oceanic region for significant glacial carbon dioxide drawdown. Here we present a new silicon isotope record that suggests the paradoxical decline in opal accumulation rate in the glacial EEP results from a decrease in the silicon to carbon uptake ratio of diatoms under conditions of increased iron availability from enhanced dust input. Consequently, our study supports the idea of an invigorated biological pump in this region during the last glacial period that could have contributed to glacial carbon dioxide drawdown. Additionally, using evidence from silicon and nitrogen isotope changes, we infer that, in contrast to the modern situation, the biological productivity in this region is not constrained by the availability of iron, silicon and nitrogen during the glacial period. We hypothesize that an invigorated biological carbon dioxide pump constrained perhaps only by phosphorus limitation was a more common occurrence in low-latitude areas of the glacial ocean.

  10. Acclimation of E miliania huxleyi (1516) to nutrient limitation involves precise modification of the proteome to scavenge alternative sources of N and P

    PubMed Central

    Metodieva, Gergana; Raines, Christine A.; Metodiev, Metodi V.; Geider, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Limitation of marine primary production by the availability of nitrogen or phosphorus is common. E miliania huxleyi, a ubiquitous phytoplankter that plays key roles in primary production, calcium carbonate precipitation and production of dimethyl sulfide, often blooms in mid‐latitude at the beginning of summer when inorganic nutrient concentrations are low. To understand physiological mechanisms that allow such blooms, we examined how the proteome of E . huxleyi (strain 1516) responds to N and P limitation. We observed modest changes in much of the proteome despite large physiological changes (e.g. cellular biomass, C, N and P) associated with nutrient limitation of growth rate. Acclimation to nutrient limitation did however involve significant increases in the abundance of transporters for ammonium and nitrate under N limitation and for phosphate under P limitation. More notable were large increases in proteins involved in the acquisition of organic forms of N and P, including urea and amino acid/polyamine transporters and numerous C‐N hydrolases under N limitation and a large upregulation of alkaline phosphatase under P limitation. This highly targeted reorganization of the proteome towards scavenging organic forms of macronutrients gives unique insight into the molecular mechanisms that underpin how E . huxleyi has found its niche to bloom in surface waters depleted of inorganic nutrients. PMID:26119724

  11. Acclimation of Emiliania huxleyi (1516) to nutrient limitation involves precise modification of the proteome to scavenge alternative sources of N and P.

    PubMed

    McKew, Boyd A; Metodieva, Gergana; Raines, Christine A; Metodiev, Metodi V; Geider, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Limitation of marine primary production by the availability of nitrogen or phosphorus is common. Emiliania huxleyi, a ubiquitous phytoplankter that plays key roles in primary production, calcium carbonate precipitation and production of dimethyl sulfide, often blooms in mid-latitude at the beginning of summer when inorganic nutrient concentrations are low. To understand physiological mechanisms that allow such blooms, we examined how the proteome of E. huxleyi (strain 1516) responds to N and P limitation. We observed modest changes in much of the proteome despite large physiological changes (e.g. cellular biomass, C, N and P) associated with nutrient limitation of growth rate. Acclimation to nutrient limitation did however involve significant increases in the abundance of transporters for ammonium and nitrate under N limitation and for phosphate under P limitation. More notable were large increases in proteins involved in the acquisition of organic forms of N and P, including urea and amino acid/polyamine transporters and numerous C-N hydrolases under N limitation and a large upregulation of alkaline phosphatase under P limitation. This highly targeted reorganization of the proteome towards scavenging organic forms of macronutrients gives unique insight into the molecular mechanisms that underpin how E. huxleyi has found its niche to bloom in surface waters depleted of inorganic nutrients. PMID:26119724

  12. Acclimation of Emiliania huxleyi (1516) to nutrient limitation involves precise modification of the proteome to scavenge alternative sources of N and P.

    PubMed

    McKew, Boyd A; Metodieva, Gergana; Raines, Christine A; Metodiev, Metodi V; Geider, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Limitation of marine primary production by the availability of nitrogen or phosphorus is common. Emiliania huxleyi, a ubiquitous phytoplankter that plays key roles in primary production, calcium carbonate precipitation and production of dimethyl sulfide, often blooms in mid-latitude at the beginning of summer when inorganic nutrient concentrations are low. To understand physiological mechanisms that allow such blooms, we examined how the proteome of E. huxleyi (strain 1516) responds to N and P limitation. We observed modest changes in much of the proteome despite large physiological changes (e.g. cellular biomass, C, N and P) associated with nutrient limitation of growth rate. Acclimation to nutrient limitation did however involve significant increases in the abundance of transporters for ammonium and nitrate under N limitation and for phosphate under P limitation. More notable were large increases in proteins involved in the acquisition of organic forms of N and P, including urea and amino acid/polyamine transporters and numerous C-N hydrolases under N limitation and a large upregulation of alkaline phosphatase under P limitation. This highly targeted reorganization of the proteome towards scavenging organic forms of macronutrients gives unique insight into the molecular mechanisms that underpin how E. huxleyi has found its niche to bloom in surface waters depleted of inorganic nutrients.

  13. Survival of mycobacteria depends on proteasome-mediated amino acid recycling under nutrient limitation

    PubMed Central

    Elharar, Yifat; Roth, Ziv; Hermelin, Inna; Moon, Alexandra; Peretz, Gabriella; Shenkerman, Yael; Vishkautzan, Marina; Khalaila, Isam; Gur, Eyal

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular protein degradation is an essential process in all life domains. While in all eukaryotes regulated protein degradation involves ubiquitin tagging and the 26S-proteasome, bacterial prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) tagging and proteasomes are conserved only in species belonging to the phyla Actinobacteria and Nitrospira. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the Pup-proteasome system (PPS) is important for virulence, yet its physiological role in non-pathogenic species has remained an enigma. We now report, using Mycobacterium smegmatis as a model organism, that the PPS is essential for survival under starvation. Upon nitrogen limitation, PPS activity is induced, leading to accelerated tagging and degradation of many cytoplasmic proteins. We suggest a model in which the PPS functions to recycle amino acids under nitrogen starvation, thereby enabling the cell to maintain basal metabolic activities. We also find that the PPS auto-regulates its own activity via pupylation and degradation of its components in a manner that promotes the oscillatory expression of PPS components. As such, the destructive activity of the PPS is carefully balanced to maintain cellular functions during starvation. PMID:24986881

  14. Enhancing microalgal photosynthesis and productivity in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Howard-Williams, Clive; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2015-05-01

    With microalgal biofuels currently receiving much attention, there has been renewed interest in the combined use of high rate algal ponds (HRAP) for wastewater treatment and biofuel production. This combined use of HRAPs is considered to be an economically feasible option for biofuel production, however, increased microalgal productivity and nutrient removal together with reduced capital costs are needed before it can be commercially viable. Despite HRAPs being an established technology, microalgal photosynthesis and productivity is still limited in these ponds and is well below the theoretical maximum. This paper critically evaluates the parameters that limit microalgal light absorption and photosynthesis in wastewater HRAPs and examines biological, chemical and physical options for improving light absorption and utilisation, with the view of enhancing biomass production and nutrient removal.

  15. Potential for eutrophication and nuisance algal blooms in the lower Neuse river estuary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paerl, H.W.; Mallin, M.; Rudek, J.; Bates, P.W.

    1990-12-01

    Phytoplankton primary production and its environmental regulation were examined at 3 stations representative of the lower Neuse River Estuary near the Pamlico Sound interface. This study covered a 3-year period (November 1987-October 1990). The authors also examined the roles of the major phytoplankton nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus in controlling growth and bloom formation. The overall potential for nuisance blooms and associated episodes of bottom water hypoxia and anoxia was investigated in field studies. Algal biomass and production varied seasonally, with high values in summer and low values in winter. In situ nutrient addition bioassays indicated the estuary experienced a general state of N limitation with especially profound limitation during summer periods. The authors recommendations for a management strategy include reductions in Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP), and suspended sediment loads in order to maintain the system in a nuisance bloom-free condition.

  16. Interannual variation in diatom bloom dynamics: roles of hydrology, nutrient limitation, sinking, and whole lake manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Julie A; Lehman, John T

    2007-06-01

    Spring development of diatoms in Ford Lake, Michigan, USA was markedly different in 2004 from 2005 and 2006. In 2004, diatom biovolume surpassed 15 mm(3)l(-1) but in 2005 and 2006 maximum biovolume was less than 5 mm(3)l(-1). Soluble reactive silica (SRSi) in 2004 fell below 5 microM whereas in 2005 and 2006, SRSi remained above 30 microM. Taxonomic composition was similar among years and consisted mainly of Asterionella, Cyclotella, Fragilaria, Aulacoseira, and Synedra. Bioassay experiments in 2005 demonstrated that P rather than Si was the element most limiting biomass development. However, P supply rate did not account for the differences among years. Model simulations of Si uptake, washout rates, and sinking implicated hydrologic differences among years as the cause of differential success by diatom populations in April of each year. Bioassay experiments performed after overturn demonstrated that diatoms could grow well in unamended lake water, but they did not flourish in the lake; model simulations implicated sinking losses as the reason. In summer 2006, we performed a selective withdrawal of hypolimnetic water from the outlet dam and weakened density stratification. An Aulacoseira bloom resulted in early to mid-August, depleting SRSi to less than 30 microM. The lake, which had been acting as a P source, changed to a P sink during the bloom, and cyanobacteria did not develop as they had in all previous years. Stoichiometric calculations indicate that the net SRSi uptake and the net DP uptake during the induced bloom were consistent with diatom production.

  17. Ethnic disparities among food sources of energy and nutrients of public health concern and nutrients to limit in adults in the United States: NHANES 2003-2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of current food sources of energy and nutrients among United States non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican American adults is needed to help with public health efforts in implementing culturally sensitive and feasible dietary recommendations. The objective of this study...

  18. Wastewater contaminant transport and treatment in a nutrient limited ribbed fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarter, C. P. R.; Price, J. S.; Branfireun, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    To minimize the discharge of wastewater contaminants from remote northern communities and mining operations, fen peatlands in sub-arctic regions are used for tertiary wastewater treatment to detain, transform, and remove these contaminants. However, there is a limited understanding of contaminant transport and treatment in fen peatlands, particularly in sub-arctic Canada. To better characterize wastewater contaminant transport and treatment in these systems, approximately 44 m3 day-1 of simulated wastewater, concentrated custom-blend fertilizer (NO3-, PO33-, and SO42-) and Cl- diluted with water, was pumped into a small 0.5 ha sub-arctic ribbed fen continuously for 47 days (July 15th -August 31st 2014). Contaminant concentration of 3 similar ribbed fens varied between 0.0-3.0 mg L-1 over the study period (May - September 2014). An exponential increase in transmissivity (2.4 to 16.8 m2 day-1) as the water table rose (~0.16 m) increased the average linear groundwater velocity (0.5 to 3.4 m day-1) and resulted in rapid SO42- (0.8 m day-1) and Cl- (1.9 m day-1) transport. Notwithstanding the rapid transport of Cl-, diffusion into inactive pores still retarded Cl- transport by a factor of 1.8. Contrary to the rapid transport of SO42- and Cl-, the other contaminants were rapidly removed from the pore water (likely through biological uptake or adsorption) and minimal transport was observed (0.29 and 0.04 m day-1 for PO33- and NO3-, respectively). Northern ribbed fens have a large capacity to detain certain wastewater contaminants (e.g., NO3- and PO33-), yet allow rapid transport of others (e.g., SO42- and Cl-). Thus, these peatlands have the potential to significantly decrease wastewater contamination in northern aquatic environment by both biogeochemical and physical processes but careful management of the hydrology is required to prevent the release of mobile contaminants.

  19. Biological nutrient removal with limited organic matter using a novel anaerobic–anoxic/oxic multi-phased activated sludge process

    PubMed Central

    Naseer, Rusul; Abualhail, Saad; Xiwu, Lu

    2012-01-01

    An anaerobic–anoxic/oxic (A2/O) multi-phased biological process called “phased isolation tank step feed technology (PITSF)” was developed to force the oscillation of organic and nutrient concentrations in process reactors. PITSF can be operated safely with a limited carbon source in terms of low carbon requirements and aeration costs whereas NAR was achieved over 95% in the last aerobic zone through a combination of short HRT and low DO levels. PCR assay was used for XAB quantification to correlate XAB numbers with nutrient removal. PCR assays showed, high NAR was achieved at XAB population 5.2 × 108 cells/g MLVSS in response to complete and partial nitrification process. It was exhibited that low DO with short HRT promoted XAB growth. Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) via nitrate were observed obviously, SND rate was between 69–72%, at a low DO level of 0.5 mg/l in the first aerobic tank during main phases and the removal efficiency of TN, NH4+-N, COD, TP was 84.7 .97, 88.3 and 96% respectively. The removal efficiencies of TN, NH4+-N, and TP at low C/N ratio and DO level were 84.2, 98.5 and 96.9% respectively which were approximately equal to the complete nitrification–denitrification with the addition of external carbon sources at a normal DO level of (1.5–2.5 mg/l). PMID:23961214

  20. Relations of principal components analysis site scores to algal-biomass, habitat, basin-characteristics, nutrient, and biological-community data in the Upper Wabash River Basin, Indiana, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leer, Donald R.; Caskey, Brian J.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Lowe, B. Scott

    2007-01-01

    The values for nutrients (nitrate, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus) and chlorophyll a (periphyton and seston) were compared to published U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) values for Aggregate Nutrient Ecoregions VI and VII and USEPA Level III Ecoregions 55 and 56. Several nutrient values were greater than the 25th percentile of the published USEPA values. Chlorophyll a (periphyton and seston) values either were greater than the 25th percentile of published USEPA values or extended data ranges in the Aggregate Nutrient and Level III Ecoregions. If the proposed values for the 25th percentile were adopted as nutrient water-quality criteria, many samples in the Upper Wabash River Basin would have exceeded the criteria.

  1. Adaptation of Bacillus subtilis carbon core metabolism to simultaneous nutrient limitation and osmotic challenge: a multi-omics perspective.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Michael; Sappa, Praveen K; Meyer, Hanna; Maaß, Sandra; Zaprasis, Adrienne; Hoffmann, Tamara; Becker, Judith; Steil, Leif; Hecker, Michael; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Lalk, Michael; Mäder, Ulrike; Stülke, Jörg; Bremer, Erhard; Völker, Uwe; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis encounters nutrient limitations and osmotic stress in its natural soil ecosystem. To ensure survival and sustain growth, highly integrated adaptive responses are required. Here, we investigated the system-wide response of B. subtilis to different, simultaneously imposed stresses. To address the anticipated complexity of the cellular response networks, we combined chemostat experiments under conditions of carbon limitation, salt stress and osmoprotection with multi-omics analyses of the transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and fluxome. Surprisingly, the flux through central carbon and energy metabolism is very robust under all conditions studied. The key to achieve this robustness is the adjustment of the biocatalytic machinery to compensate for solvent-induced impairment of enzymatic activities during osmotic stress. Specifically, increased production of several enzymes of central carbon metabolism compensates for their reduced activity in the presence of high salt. A major response of the cell during osmotic stress is the production of the compatible solute proline. This is achieved through the concerted adjustment of multiple reactions around the 2-oxoglutarate node, which drives metabolism towards the proline precursor glutamate. The fine-tuning of the transcriptional and metabolic networks involves functional modules that overarch the individual pathways.

  2. Algal Supply System Design - Harmonized Version

    SciTech Connect

    Abodeely, Jared; Stevens, Daniel; Ray, Allison; Newby, Deborah; Schaller, Kastli

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this design report is to provide an assessment of current technologies used for production, dewatering, and converting microalgae cultivated in open-pond systems to biofuel. The original draft design was created in 2011 and has subsequently been brought into agreement with the DOE harmonized model. The design report extends beyond this harmonized model to discuss some of the challenges with assessing algal production systems, including the ability to (1) quickly assess alternative algal production system designs, (2) assess spatial and temporal variability, and (3) perform large-scale assessments considering multiple scenarios for thousands of potential sites. The Algae Logistics Model (ALM) was developed to address each of these limitations of current modeling efforts to enable assessment of the economic feasibility of algal production systems across the United States. The (ALM) enables (1) dynamic assessments using spatiotemporal conditions, (2) exploration of algal production system design configurations, (3) investigation of algal production system operating assumptions, and (4) trade-off assessments with technology decisions and operating assumptions. The report discusses results from the ALM, which is used to assess the baseline design determined by harmonization efforts between U.S. DOE national laboratories. Productivity and resource assessment data is provided by coupling the ALM with the Biomass Assessment Tool developed at PNNL. This high-fidelity data is dynamically passed to the ALM and used to help better understand the impacts of spatial and temporal constraints on algal production systems by providing a cost for producing extracted algal lipids annually for each potential site.

  3. Optimizing algal cultivation & productivity : an innovative, multidiscipline, and multiscale approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Murton, Jaclyn K.; Hanson, David T.; Turner, Tom; Powell, Amy Jo; James, Scott Carlton; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Scholle, Steven; August, Andrew; Dwyer, Brian P.; Ruffing, Anne; Jones, Howland D. T.; Ricken, James Bryce; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2010-04-01

    Progress in algal biofuels has been limited by significant knowledge gaps in algal biology, particularly as they relate to scale-up. To address this we are investigating how culture composition dynamics (light as well as biotic and abiotic stressors) describe key biochemical indicators of algal health: growth rate, photosynthetic electron transport, and lipid production. Our approach combines traditional algal physiology with genomics, bioanalytical spectroscopy, chemical imaging, remote sensing, and computational modeling to provide an improved fundamental understanding of algal cell biology across multiple cultures scales. This work spans investigations from the single-cell level to ensemble measurements of algal cell cultures at the laboratory benchtop to large greenhouse scale (175 gal). We will discuss the advantages of this novel, multidisciplinary strategy and emphasize the importance of developing an integrated toolkit to provide sensitive, selective methods for detecting early fluctuations in algal health, productivity, and population diversity. Progress in several areas will be summarized including identification of spectroscopic signatures for algal culture composition, stress level, and lipid production enabled by non-invasive spectroscopic monitoring of the photosynthetic and photoprotective pigments at the single-cell and bulk-culture scales. Early experiments compare and contrast the well-studied green algae chlamydomonas with two potential production strains of microalgae, nannochloropsis and dunnaliella, under optimal and stressed conditions. This integrated approach has the potential for broad impact on algal biofuels and bioenergy and several of these opportunities will be discussed.

  4. Limiting variety in non-nutrient-dense, energy-dense foods during a lifestyle intervention: a randomized controlled trial123

    PubMed Central

    Steeves, Elizabeth A; Hecht, Jacki; Fava, Joseph L; Wing, Rena R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dietary variety is a factor that influences consumption but has received little attention in obesity treatment. Objective: This study examined the effect of limiting the variety of different non-nutrient-dense, energy-dense foods (NND-EDFs) (ie, chips, ice cream, cookies) on dietary intake and weight loss during an 18-mo lifestyle intervention. Design: Two hundred two adults aged 51.3 ± 9.5 y with a BMI (in kg/m2) of 34.9 ± 4.3 (57.8% women, 92.2% white) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 interventions: Lifestyle (1200–1500 kcal/d, ≤30% of energy as fat; n = 101) or Lifestyle + limited variety (LV) (limit variety of NND-EDFs, ie, 2 choices; n = 101). Both interventions involved 48 group sessions. Dietary intake, NND-EDF hedonics, NND-EDF variety in the home, and weight were assessed at 0, 6, 12, and 18 mo. Results: Intent-to-treat analyses showed that the Lifestyle+LV group consumed less variety (P < 0.01) and energy daily (P < 0.05) from NND-EDFs than did the Lifestyle group at 6, 12, and 18 mo. The Lifestyle+LV group consumed less total energy daily (P < 0.05) at 6 mo than did the Lifestyle group. The Lifestyle+LV group reported less (P < 0.05) NND-EDF variety in the home at 6 and 18 mo than did the Lifestyle group. The hedonics of one chosen NND-EDF decreased more (P < 0.05) in the Lifestyle+LV group. Despite these effects, no difference in percentage weight loss occurred at 18 mo (Lifestyle+LV: −9.9 ± 7.6%; Lifestyle: −9.6 ± 9.2%). Conclusions: Limitations in dietary variety decreased intakes in the targeted area but did not affect weight loss. Limiting variety in more areas may be needed to improve weight loss and weight-loss maintenance. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01096719. PMID:22552025

  5. Algal Biofuels Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    This fact sheet provides information on algal biofuels, which are generating considerable interest around the world. They may represent a sustainable pathway for helping to meet the U.S. biofuel production targets set by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  6. Hyperosmosis and its combination with nutrient-limitation are novel environmental stressors for induction of triacylglycerol accumulation in cells of Chlorella kessleri

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Kazuho; Hayashi, Taihei; Hasegawa, Yuri; Sato, Atsushi; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Sato, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Triacylglycerols of oleaginous algae are promising for production of food oils and biodiesel fuel. Air-drying of cells induces triacylglycerol accumulation in a freshwater green alga, Chlorella kessleri, therefore, it seems that dehydration, i.e., intracellular hyperosmosis, and/or nutrient-limitation are key stressors. We explored this possibility in liquid-culturing C. kessleri cells. Strong hyperosmosis with 0.9 M sorbitol or 0.45 M NaCl for two days caused cells to increase the triacylglycerol content in total lipids from 1.5 to 48.5 and 75.3 mol%, respectively, on a fatty acid basis, whereas nutrient-limitation caused its accumulation to 41.4 mol%. Even weak hyperosmosis with 0.3 M sorbitol or 0.15 M NaCl, when nutrient-limitation was simultaneously imposed, induced triacylglycerol accumulation to 61.9 and 65.7 mol%, respectively. Furthermore, culturing in three-fold diluted seawater, the chemical composition of which resembled that of the medium for the combinatory stress, enabled the cells to accumulate triacylglycerol up to 24.7 weight% of dry cells in only three days. Consequently, it was found that hyperosmosis is a novel stressor for triacylglycerol accumulation, and that weak hyperosmosis, together with nutrient-limitation, exerts a strong stimulating effect on triacylglycerol accumulation. A similar combinatory stress would contribute to the triacylglycerol accumulation in air-dried C. kessleri cells. PMID:27184595

  7. Hyperosmosis and its combination with nutrient-limitation are novel environmental stressors for induction of triacylglycerol accumulation in cells of Chlorella kessleri.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Kazuho; Hayashi, Taihei; Hasegawa, Yuri; Sato, Atsushi; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Sato, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Triacylglycerols of oleaginous algae are promising for production of food oils and biodiesel fuel. Air-drying of cells induces triacylglycerol accumulation in a freshwater green alga, Chlorella kessleri, therefore, it seems that dehydration, i.e., intracellular hyperosmosis, and/or nutrient-limitation are key stressors. We explored this possibility in liquid-culturing C. kessleri cells. Strong hyperosmosis with 0.9 M sorbitol or 0.45 M NaCl for two days caused cells to increase the triacylglycerol content in total lipids from 1.5 to 48.5 and 75.3 mol%, respectively, on a fatty acid basis, whereas nutrient-limitation caused its accumulation to 41.4 mol%. Even weak hyperosmosis with 0.3 M sorbitol or 0.15 M NaCl, when nutrient-limitation was simultaneously imposed, induced triacylglycerol accumulation to 61.9 and 65.7 mol%, respectively. Furthermore, culturing in three-fold diluted seawater, the chemical composition of which resembled that of the medium for the combinatory stress, enabled the cells to accumulate triacylglycerol up to 24.7 weight% of dry cells in only three days. Consequently, it was found that hyperosmosis is a novel stressor for triacylglycerol accumulation, and that weak hyperosmosis, together with nutrient-limitation, exerts a strong stimulating effect on triacylglycerol accumulation. A similar combinatory stress would contribute to the triacylglycerol accumulation in air-dried C. kessleri cells. PMID:27184595

  8. Algal biomass production and wastewater treatment in high rate algal ponds receiving disinfected effluent.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Aníbal Fonseca; Calijuri, Maria Lucia; Assemany, Paula Peixoto; Calijuri, Maria do Carmo; dos Reis, Alberto José Delgado

    2013-01-01

    Algal biomass production associated with wastewater is usually carried out in high rate algal ponds (HRAPs), which are concomitantly used in the treatment of such effluent. However, most types of wastewater have high levels of bacteria that can inhibit the growth of algal biomass by competing for space and nutrients. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of ultraviolet (UV) pre-disinfection on the performance of HRAPs used for wastewater treatment and algal biomass production. Two HRAPs were tested: one received effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor- HRAP -and the second received UASB effluent pre-disinfected by UV radiation-(UV)HRAP. Physical, chemical and microbiological parameters were monitored, as well as algal biomass productivity and daily pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) variation. The (UV)HRAP presented highest DO and pH values, as well as greater percentage of chlorophyll a in the biomass, which indicates greater algal biomass productivity. The average percentages of chlorophyll a found in the biomass obtained from the HRAP and the (UV)HRAP were 0.95 +/- 0.65% and 1.58 +/- 0.65%, respectively. However, total biomass productivity was greater in the HRAP (11.4 gVSSm(-2) day(-1)) compared with the (UV)HRAP (9.3 gVSSm(-2) day(-1)). Mean pH values were 7.7 +/- 0.7 in the HRAP and 8.1 +/- 1.0 in the (UV)HRAP, and mean values of DO percent saturation were 87 +/- 26% and 112 +/- 31% for the HRAP and the (UV)HRAP, respectively. Despite these differences, removal efficiencies of organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, ammoniacal nitrogen and soluble phosphorus were statistically equal at the 5% significance level.

  9. Ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus in the Pearl River and effects on the estuarine coastal waters: Nutrient management strategy in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kedong; Harrison, Paul J.; Broom, Malcolm; Chung, C. H.

    The Pearl River is the second largest river in China, and has a 454,000 km 2 drainage basin. Excess nutrients can result in algal blooms, or even harmful algal blooms and subsequent dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption can lead to hypoxia. However, not all nutrients are equal; only one nutrient relative to other nutrients is the most limiting for algal biomass production and the other nutrients that are in excess cannot be used to produce a further increase in an algal bloom. Therefore, the strategy of nutrient pollution control is to remove the most limiting nutrient from the sewage effluent to minimize eutrophication impacts on the receiving waters. This, in turn, determines the type and level of sewage treatment. In the Pearl River, nitrogen (N) is very high and phosphorus (P) is relatively low, leading to a very high N:P ratio. The Pearl River flows into coastal waters in the South China Sea and heavily influences Hong Kong waters located to the east of the Pearl River estuary. When the Hong Kong government planned to upgrade the domestic sewage facility to biological treatment, this triggered the scientific question of which nutrient, N or P is the most limiting nutrient and the answer to this question became critical in making the management decision on the treatment facilities for removal of N or P, which bears a huge financial implication. In the past, because N is high in southern waters, it was thought that any addition of N would exceed the environmental assimilation capacity and result in algal blooms. Therefore, N has been typically considered for removal from sewage effluent. However, evidence revealed that P was the most limiting nutrient in the southern waters of Hong Kong and it actually limits phytoplankton biomass accumulation and potentially limits bacterial DO consumption. Hence, the removal of P has been suggested to receive priority over N removal, if there is a need for the future elevation of treatment levels. However, as this conclusion is

  10. A colorimetric assay for determination of cell viability in algal cultures.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Juan M; Cossío, Belén R; Berl, Tomás; Rivard, Christopher J; Jiménez, Carlos

    2003-07-01

    In this work, we propose the determination of cell viability in algal cultures by using a colorimetric assay widely used for estimation of cell proliferation in animal cell cultures. The method is based on in vivo reduction by metabolically active cells of a tetrazolium compound (MTS=3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenil)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt) to a colored formazan, with maximal absorbance at 490 nm, that is released to the culture medium. For this purpose, we have tested two microalgae with high commercial value (Dunaliella and Spirulina) and two seaweeds with different morphology (Ulva and Gracilaria). Color development in this assay is directly proportional to the number of viable cells, to the incubation time in the presence of the assay solution, and to the incubation temperature. A direct significant correlation was found between algal photosynthesis rate and color development in all species used through this work. Moreover, the intensity of absorbance at 490 nm was significantly lower in stressed cells (e.g. in nutrient-limited cultures, in the presence of toxic substances, and in osmotically-stressed cultures). We conclude that cell viability of algal cultures can be rapidly and easily estimated through colorimetric determination of the reduction of MTS to formazan.

  11. Nutrient limitation restricts growth and reproductive output in a tropical montane cloud forest bromeliad: findings from a long-term forest fertilization experiment.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Eloisa; Ackerman, James D

    2013-01-01

    From studies in seasonal lowland tropical forests, bromeliad epiphytes appear to be limited mainly by water, and to a lesser extent by nutrient supply, especially phosphorous. Less is understood about the mineral nutrition of tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) epiphytes, even though their highest diversity is in this habitat. Nutrient limitation is known to be a key factor restricting forest productivity in TMCF, and if epiphytes are nutritionally linked to their host trees, as has been suggested, we would expect that they are also nutrient limited. We studied the effect of a higher nutrient input on reproduction and growth of the tank bromeliad Werauhia sintenisii in experimental plots located in a TMCF in Puerto Rico, where all macro- and micronutrients had been added quarterly starting in 1989 and continuing throughout the duration of this study. We found that bromeliads growing in fertilized plots were receiving litterfall with higher concentrations of N, P, and Zn and had higher concentrations of P, Zn, Fe, Al, and Na in their vegetative body. The N:P ratios found (fertilized = 27.5 and non-fertilized = 33.8) suggest that W. sintenisii may also be phosphorous limited as are lowland epiphytes. Fertilized plants had slightly longer inflorescences, and more flowers per inflorescence, than non-fertilized plants, but their flowers produced nectar in similar concentrations and quantities. Fertilized plants produced more seeds per fruit and per plant. Frequency of flowering in two consecutive years was higher for fertilized plants than for controls, suggesting that fertilized plants overcome the cost of reproduction more readily than non-fertilized plants. These results provide evidence that TMCF epiphytic bromeliads are nutrient limited like their lowland counterparts. PMID:22767363

  12. Using models to guide field experiments: a priori predictions for the CO2 response of a nutrient- and water-limited native Eucalypt woodland.

    PubMed

    Medlyn, Belinda E; De Kauwe, Martin G; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P; Duursma, Remko A; Luus, Kristina; Mishurov, Mikhail; Pak, Bernard; Smith, Benjamin; Wang, Ying-Ping; Yang, Xiaojuan; Crous, Kristine Y; Drake, John E; Gimeno, Teresa E; Macdonald, Catriona A; Norby, Richard J; Power, Sally A; Tjoelker, Mark G; Ellsworth, David S

    2016-08-01

    The response of terrestrial ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca ), particularly under nutrient-limited conditions, is a major uncertainty in Earth System models. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment, recently established in a nutrient- and water-limited woodland presents a unique opportunity to address this uncertainty, but can best do so if key model uncertainties have been identified in advance. We applied seven vegetation models, which have previously been comprehensively assessed against earlier forest FACE experiments, to simulate a priori possible outcomes from EucFACE. Our goals were to provide quantitative projections against which to evaluate data as they are collected, and to identify key measurements that should be made in the experiment to allow discrimination among alternative model assumptions in a postexperiment model intercomparison. Simulated responses of annual net primary productivity (NPP) to elevated Ca ranged from 0.5 to 25% across models. The simulated reduction of NPP during a low-rainfall year also varied widely, from 24 to 70%. Key processes where assumptions caused disagreement among models included nutrient limitations to growth; feedbacks to nutrient uptake; autotrophic respiration; and the impact of low soil moisture availability on plant processes. Knowledge of the causes of variation among models is now guiding data collection in the experiment, with the expectation that the experimental data can optimally inform future model improvements. PMID:26946185

  13. Herbivore vs. nutrient control of marine primary producers: context-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Burkepile, Deron E; Hay, Mark E

    2006-12-01

    Pervasive overharvesting of consumers and anthropogenic nutrient loading are changing the strengths of top-down and bottom-up forces in ecosystems worldwide. Thus, identifying the relative and synergistic roles of these forces and how they differ across habitats, ecosystems, or primary-producer types is increasingly important for understanding how communities are structured. We used factorial meta-analysis of 54 field experiments that orthogonally manipulated herbivore pressure and nutrient loading to quantify consumer and nutrient effects on primary producers in benthic marine habitats. Across all experiments and producer types, herbivory and nutrient enrichment both significantly affected primary-producer abundance. They also interacted to create greater nutrient enrichment effects in the absence of herbivores, suggesting that loss of herbivores produces more dramatic effects of nutrient loading. Herbivores consistently had stronger effects than did nutrient enrichment for both tropical macroalgae and seagrasses. The strong effects of herbivory but limited effects of nutrient enrichment on tropical macroalgae suggest that suppression of herbivore populations has played a larger role than eutrophication in driving the phase shift from coral- to macroalgal-dominated reefs in many areas, especially the Caribbean. For temperate macroalgae and benthic microalgae, the effects of top-down and bottom-up forces varied as a function of the inherent productivity of the ecosystem. For these algal groups, nutrient enrichment appeared to have stronger effects in high- vs. low-productivity systems, while herbivores exerted a stronger top-down effect in low-productivity systems. Effects of herbivores vs. nutrients also varied among algal functional groups (crustose algae, upright macroalgae, and filamentous algae), within a functional group between temperate and tropical systems, and according to the metric used to measure producer abundance. These analyses suggest that human

  14. Consequences of livestock grazing on water quality and Benthic algal biomass in a Canadian natural grassland plateau.

    PubMed

    Scrimgeour, Garry J; Kendall, Sharon

    2002-06-01

    The effects of livestock grazing on selected riparian and stream attributes, water chemistry, and algal biomass were investigated over a two-year period using livestock enclosures and by completing stream surveys in the Cypress Hills grassland plateau, Alberta, Canada. Livestock enclosure experiments, partially replicated in three streams, comprised four treatments: (1) early season livestock grazing (June-August), (2) late season livestock grazing (August-September), (3) all season grazing (June-September), and (4) livestock absent controls. Livestock grazing significantly decreased streambank stability, biomass of riparian vegetation, and the extent to which aquatic vegetation covered the stream channels compared with livestock-absent controls. Water quality comparisons indicated significant differences among the four livestock grazing treatments in Battle and Graburn creeks but not in Nine Mile Creek. In Graburn Creek, the concentration of total phosphorus in the all-season livestock grazing treatment was significantly higher than that in the livestock-absent control, and the early season and late season grazing treatments. Concentrations of soluble reactive phosphorus in the all-season livestock grazing treatment also exceeded that in livestock-absent control. In contrast, differences in water quality variables in the remaining 22 comparisons (i.e., 22 of the total 24 comparisons) were minor even when differences were statistically significant. Effects of livestock grazing on algal biomass were variable, and there was no consistent pattern among creeks. At the watershed scale, spatial variation in algal biomass was related (P < 0.05) with concentrations of NO(2)(-) + NO(3) (-) and soluble reactive phosphorus in two of the four study creeks. Nutrient diffusing substrata experiments showed that algal communities were either nitrogen-limited or not limited by nutrients, depending on stream and season.

  15. Interaction Effects of Light, Temperature and Nutrient Limitations (N, P and Si) on Growth, Stoichiometry and Photosynthetic Parameters of the Cold-Water Diatom Chaetoceros wighamii.

    PubMed

    Spilling, Kristian; Ylöstalo, Pasi; Simis, Stefan; Seppälä, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Light (20-450 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)), temperature (3-11 °C) and inorganic nutrient composition (nutrient replete and N, P and Si limitation) were manipulated to study their combined influence on growth, stoichiometry (C:N:P:Chl a) and primary production of the cold water diatom Chaetoceros wighamii. During exponential growth, the maximum growth rate (~0.8 d(-1)) was observed at high temperature and light; at 3 °C the growth rate was ~30% lower under similar light conditions. The interaction effect of light and temperature were clearly visible from growth and cellular stoichiometry. The average C:N:P molar ratio was 80:13:1 during exponential growth, but the range, due to different light acclimation, was widest at the lowest temperature, reaching very low C:P (~50) and N:P ratios (~8) at low light and temperature. The C:Chl a ratio had also a wider range at the lowest temperature during exponential growth, ranging 16-48 (weight ratio) at 3 °C compared with 17-33 at 11 °C. During exponential growth, there was no clear trend in the Chl a normalized, initial slope (α*) of the photosynthesis-irradiance (PE) curve, but the maximum photosynthetic production (P(m)) was highest for cultures acclimated to the highest light and temperature. During the stationary growth phase, the stoichiometric relationship depended on the limiting nutrient, but with generally increasing C:N:P ratio. The average photosynthetic quotient (PQ) during exponential growth was 1.26 but decreased to <1 under nutrient and light limitation, probably due to photorespiration. The results clearly demonstrate that there are interaction effects between light, temperature and nutrient limitation, and the data suggests greater variability of key parameters at low temperature. Understanding these dynamics will be important for improving models of aquatic primary production and biogeochemical cycles in a warming climate.

  16. Interaction Effects of Light, Temperature and Nutrient Limitations (N, P and Si) on Growth, Stoichiometry and Photosynthetic Parameters of the Cold-Water Diatom Chaetoceros wighamii

    PubMed Central

    Spilling, Kristian; Ylöstalo, Pasi; Simis, Stefan; Seppälä, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Light (20-450 μmol photons m-2 s-1), temperature (3-11°C) and inorganic nutrient composition (nutrient replete and N, P and Si limitation) were manipulated to study their combined influence on growth, stoichiometry (C:N:P:Chl a) and primary production of the cold water diatom Chaetoceros wighamii. During exponential growth, the maximum growth rate (~0.8 d-1) was observed at high temperture and light; at 3°C the growth rate was ~30% lower under similar light conditions. The interaction effect of light and temperature were clearly visible from growth and cellular stoichiometry. The average C:N:P molar ratio was 80:13:1 during exponential growth, but the range, due to different light acclimation, was widest at the lowest temperature, reaching very low C:P (~50) and N:P ratios (~8) at low light and temperature. The C:Chl a ratio had also a wider range at the lowest temperature during exponential growth, ranging 16-48 (weight ratio) at 3°C compared with 17-33 at 11°C. During exponential growth, there was no clear trend in the Chl a normalized, initial slope (α*) of the photosynthesis-irradiance (PE) curve, but the maximum photosynthetic production (Pm) was highest for cultures acclimated to the highest light and temperature. During the stationary growth phase, the stoichiometric relationship depended on the limiting nutrient, but with generally increasing C:N:P ratio. The average photosynthetic quotient (PQ) during exponential growth was 1.26 but decreased to <1 under nutrient and light limitation, probably due to photorespiration. The results clearly demonstrate that there are interaction effects between light, temperature and nutrient limitation, and the data suggests greater variability of key parameters at low temperature. Understanding these dynamics will be important for improving models of aquatic primary production and biogeochemical cycles in a warming climate. PMID:25993327

  17. Algal sensory photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Only five major types of sensory photoreceptors (BLUF-proteins, cryptochromes, phototropins, phytochromes, and rhodopsins) are used in nature to regulate developmental processes, photosynthesis, photoorientation, and control of the circadian clock. Sensory photoreceptors of algae and protists are exceptionally rich in structure and function; light-gated ion channels and photoactivated adenylate cyclases are unique examples. During the past ten years major progress has been made with respect to understanding the function, photochemistry, and structure of key sensory players of the algal kingdom.

  18. Nutrient dynamics in Amazon shelf waters: results from AMASSEDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaster, David J.; Pope, Robert H.

    1996-03-01

    Four hydrographic cruises were conducted on the Amazon shelf as part of the AMASSEDS field program. During each cruise, approximately 55 stations were occupied and nutrients, as well as other hydrographic parameters, were measured. The results of this time series sampling program indicate that the nutrient concentrations in the riverine end-member (silicate = 144 μmol kg -1, phosphate = 0.7 μmol kg -1, nitrate = 16 μmol kg -1, ammonium = 0.4 μmol kg -1, and urea = 0.9 μmol kg -1) remain relatively constant, despite a two-fold seasonal variation in river water discharge rate. Of the major nutrients (nitrate, phosphate, ammonium and silicate), nitrate shows the greatest seasonal change in riverine end-member concentration with a high value (23 μmol kg -1) during the March cruise (rising river discharge) and a low value (12 μmol kg -1) during the November cruise (falling river discharge). Nitrate is the dominant nutrient form of inorganic nitrogen throughout most of the river/ocean mixing zone, however, in the outershelf area, where nitrate has been depleted by biological production, this nutrient occurs at concentrations comparable to the other nitrogen species (ammonium, nitrite and urea), which are at levels < 1 μmol kg -1. Nearshore, high turbidity inhibits phytoplankton production because of light limitation, whereas on the outershelf, nitrate appears to be limiting growth more than silicate or phosphate. Nutrient uptake was observed during all four cruises, however, nearly all of this production must be regenerated in shelf bottom waters, because very little of the biogenic materials are buried in the seabed (silicate burial <4% of flux to algal blooms; ˜10% burial of biologically available inorganic nitrogen reaching the river/ocean mixing zone; and <3% burial of phosphate flux to shelf environment). Clearly the Amazon shelf is not an efficient nutrient trap. Initial estimates of primary production on the Amazon shelf suggest that algal blooms are

  19. Competing ecosystem model hypotheses for the CO2 response of a nutrient- and water-limited mature Eucalypt woodland (EucFACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kauwe, M. G.; Medlyn, B. E.; Zaehle, S.; Walker, A. P.; Norby, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Model projections of the response of the terrestrial biosphere to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations, are strongly limited by uncertainties relating to the role of nutrients. A number of long-term (~10 years) Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments have now been carried out, providing significant new understanding of system responses to increased CO2 concentrations. Recently, these data have been successfully used to examine the underlying hypotheses in a series of state-of-the-art terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs). However, these comparisons are limited in a number of ways: (i) experiments on forests, have predominantly been focussed in the temperate zone; (ii) stands are often limited to young or plantation forests; and (iii) model-data comparisons have occurred after the conclusions of these experiments. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment, which has recently been established in a nutrient-limited woodland in Sydney, Australia, thus presents a unique opportunity to address all of these issues. We applied 7 TBMs that incorporate contrasting hypotheses about nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorous) cycling, to make predictions before the experiment commenced, with particular focus on the role of potential drought. The aim was both to examine the likely model responses from the experiment and to identify key areas of model uncertainty where additional measurements could constrain models.

  20. Can nutrient limitations explain low and declining white spruce growth near the Arctic treeline in the eastern Brooks Range, Alaska?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, S.; Sullivan, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    The position of the Arctic treeline is of critical importance for global carbon cycling and surface energy budgets. However, controls on tree growth at treeline remain uncertain. In the Alaskan Brooks Range, 20th century warming has caused varying growth responses among treeline trees, with trees in the west responding positively, while trees in the east have responded negatively. The prevailing explanation of this trend ascribes the negative growth response to warming-induced drought stress in the eastern Brooks Range. However, recent measurements of carbon isotope discrimination in tree rings, xylem sap flow and needle gas exchange suggest that drought stress cannot explain these regional growth declines. Additionally, evidence from the western Brooks Range suggests that nutrient availability, rather than drought stress, may be the proximate control on tree growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that low and declining growth of eastern Brooks Range trees is due to low and declining soil nutrient availability, which may continue to decrease with climate change as soils become drier and microbial activity declines. We compared microclimate, tree performance, and a wide range of proxies for soil nutrient availability in four watersheds along a west-east transect in the Brooks Range during the growing seasons of 2013 and 2014. We hypothesized that soil nutrient availability would track closely with the strong west-east precipitation gradient, with higher rainfall and greater soil nutrient availability in the western Brooks Range. We expected to find that soil water contents in the west are near optimum for nitrogen mineralization, while those in the east are below optimum. Needle nitrogen concentration, net photosynthesis, branch extension growth, and growth in the main stem are expected to decline with the hypothesized decrease in soil nutrient availability. The results of our study will elucidate the current controls on growth of trees near the

  1. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John; Sarisky-Reed, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    The framework for National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap was constructed at the Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap Workshop, held December 9-10, 2008, at the University of Maryland-College Park. The Workshop was organized by the Biomass Program to discuss and identify the critical challenges currently hindering the development of a domestic, commercial-scale algal biofuels industry. This Roadmap presents information from a scientific, economic, and policy perspectives that can support and guide RD&D investment in algal biofuels. While addressing the potential economic and environmental benefits of using algal biomass for the production of liquid transportation fuels, the Roadmap describes the current status of algae RD&D. In doing so, it lays the groundwork for identifying challenges that likely need to be overcome for algal biomass to be used in the production of economically viable biofuels.

  2. Nutrient limitation and microbially mediated chemistry: studies using tuff inoculum obtained from the Exploratory Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. I.; Chuu, Y. J.; Meike, A.; Ringelberg, D.; Sawvel, A.

    1998-10-30

    Flow-through bioreactors are used to investigate the relationship between the supply (and limitation) of major nutrients required by microorganisms (C, N, P, S) and effluent chemistry to obtain data that can be useful to develop models of microbially mediated aqueous chemistry. The bioreactors were inoculated with crushed tuff from Yucca Mountain. Six of the 14 bioreactor experiments currently in operation have shown growth, which occurred in as few as 5 days and as much as a few months after initiation of the experiment. All of the bioreactors exhibiting growth contained glucose as a carbon source, but other nutritional components varied. Chemical signatures of each bioreactor were compared to each other and selected results were compared to computer simulations of the equivalent abiotic chemical reactions. At 21 C, the richest medium formulation produced a microbial community that lowered the effluent pH from 6.4 to as low as 3.9. The same medium formulation at 50 C produced no significant change in pH but caused a significant increase in Cl after a period of 200 days. Variations in concentrations of other elements, some of which appear to be periodic (Ca, Mg, etc.) also occur. Bioreactors fed with low C, N, P, S media showed growth, but had stabilized at lower cell densities. The room temperature bioreactor in this group exhibited a phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) signature of sulfur- or iron-reducing bacteria, which produced a significant chemical signature in the effluent from that bioreactor. Growth had not been observed yet in the alkaline bioreactors, even in those containing glucose. The value of combining detailed chemical and community (e.g., ester-linked PLFA) analyses, long-duration experiments, and abiotic chemical models to distinguish chemical patterns is evident. Although all of the bioreactors contain the same initial microorganisms and mineral constituents, PLFA analysis demonstrates that both input chemistry and temperature determine the

  3. Distribution, behavior, and condition of herbivorous fishes on coral reefs track algal resources.

    PubMed

    Tootell, Jesse S; Steele, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Herbivore distribution can impact community structure and ecosystem function. On coral reefs, herbivores are thought to play an important role in promoting coral dominance, but how they are distributed relative to algae is not well known. Here, we evaluated whether the distribution, behavior, and condition of herbivorous fishes correlated with algal resource availability at six sites in the back reef environment of Moorea, French Polynesia. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that increased algal turf availability would coincide with (1) increased biomass, (2) altered foraging behavior, and (3) increased energy reserves of herbivorous fishes. Fish biomass and algal cover were visually estimated along underwater transects; behavior of herbivorous fishes was quantified by observations of focal individuals; fish were collected to assess their condition; and algal turf production rates were measured on standardized tiles. The best predictor of herbivorous fish biomass was algal turf production, with fish biomass increasing with algal production. Biomass of herbivorous fishes was also negatively related to sea urchin density, suggesting competition for limited resources. Regression models including both algal turf production and urchin density explained 94 % of the variation in herbivorous fish biomass among sites spread over ~20 km. Behavioral observations of the parrotfish Chlorurus sordidus revealed that foraging area increased as algal turf cover decreased. Additionally, energy reserves increased with algal turf production, but declined with herbivorous fish density, implying that algal turf is a limited resource for this species. Our findings support the hypothesis that herbivorous fishes can spatially track algal resources on coral reefs.

  4. Composition, buoyancy regulation and fate of ice algal aggregates in the Central Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Peeken, Ilka; Sørensen, Heidi L; Glud, Ronnie N; Boetius, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Sea-ice diatoms are known to accumulate in large aggregates in and under sea ice and in melt ponds. There is recent evidence from the Arctic that such aggregates can contribute substantially to particle export when sinking from the ice. The role and regulation of microbial aggregation in the highly seasonal, nutrient- and light-limited Arctic sea-ice ecosystem is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling the formation and export of algal aggregates from sea ice, we investigated samples taken in late summer 2011 and 2012, during two cruises to the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean. Spherical aggregates densely packed with pennate diatoms, as well as filamentous aggregates formed by Melosira arctica showed sign of different stages of degradation and physiological stoichiometries, with carbon to chlorophyll a ratios ranging from 110 to 66700, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios of 8-35 and 9-40, respectively. Sub-ice algal aggregate densities ranged between 1 and 17 aggregates m(-2), maintaining an estimated net primary production of 0.4-40 mg C m(-2) d(-1), and accounted for 3-80% of total phototrophic biomass and up to 94% of local net primary production. A potential factor controlling the buoyancy of the aggregates was light intensity, regulating photosynthetic oxygen production and the amount of gas bubbles trapped within the mucous matrix, even at low ambient nutrient concentrations. Our data-set was used to evaluate the distribution and importance of Arctic algal aggregates as carbon source for pelagic and benthic communities. PMID:25208058

  5. Composition, buoyancy regulation and fate of ice algal aggregates in the Central Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Peeken, Ilka; Sørensen, Heidi L; Glud, Ronnie N; Boetius, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Sea-ice diatoms are known to accumulate in large aggregates in and under sea ice and in melt ponds. There is recent evidence from the Arctic that such aggregates can contribute substantially to particle export when sinking from the ice. The role and regulation of microbial aggregation in the highly seasonal, nutrient- and light-limited Arctic sea-ice ecosystem is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling the formation and export of algal aggregates from sea ice, we investigated samples taken in late summer 2011 and 2012, during two cruises to the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean. Spherical aggregates densely packed with pennate diatoms, as well as filamentous aggregates formed by Melosira arctica showed sign of different stages of degradation and physiological stoichiometries, with carbon to chlorophyll a ratios ranging from 110 to 66700, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios of 8-35 and 9-40, respectively. Sub-ice algal aggregate densities ranged between 1 and 17 aggregates m(-2), maintaining an estimated net primary production of 0.4-40 mg C m(-2) d(-1), and accounted for 3-80% of total phototrophic biomass and up to 94% of local net primary production. A potential factor controlling the buoyancy of the aggregates was light intensity, regulating photosynthetic oxygen production and the amount of gas bubbles trapped within the mucous matrix, even at low ambient nutrient concentrations. Our data-set was used to evaluate the distribution and importance of Arctic algal aggregates as carbon source for pelagic and benthic communities.

  6. Composition, Buoyancy Regulation and Fate of Ice Algal Aggregates in the Central Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Peeken, Ilka; Sørensen, Heidi L.; Glud, Ronnie N.; Boetius, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Sea-ice diatoms are known to accumulate in large aggregates in and under sea ice and in melt ponds. There is recent evidence from the Arctic that such aggregates can contribute substantially to particle export when sinking from the ice. The role and regulation of microbial aggregation in the highly seasonal, nutrient- and light-limited Arctic sea-ice ecosystem is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling the formation and export of algal aggregates from sea ice, we investigated samples taken in late summer 2011 and 2012, during two cruises to the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean. Spherical aggregates densely packed with pennate diatoms, as well as filamentous aggregates formed by Melosira arctica showed sign of different stages of degradation and physiological stoichiometries, with carbon to chlorophyll a ratios ranging from 110 to 66700, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios of 8–35 and 9–40, respectively. Sub-ice algal aggregate densities ranged between 1 and 17 aggregates m−2, maintaining an estimated net primary production of 0.4–40 mg C m−2 d−1, and accounted for 3–80% of total phototrophic biomass and up to 94% of local net primary production. A potential factor controlling the buoyancy of the aggregates was light intensity, regulating photosynthetic oxygen production and the amount of gas bubbles trapped within the mucous matrix, even at low ambient nutrient concentrations. Our data-set was used to evaluate the distribution and importance of Arctic algal aggregates as carbon source for pelagic and benthic communities. PMID:25208058

  7. An Application of Lagrangian Coherent Structures to Harmful Algal Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olascoaga, M. J.; Beron-Vera, F. J.; Brand, L. E.; Kocak, H.

    2009-04-01

    Karenia brevis is present in low concentrations in vast areas of the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). This toxic dinoflagellate sporadically develops blooms anywhere in the GoM, except in the southern portion of West Florida Shelf (WFS). There, these harmful algal blooms (HABs) are recurrent events whose frequency and intensity are increasing. HABs on the WFS are usually only evident once they have achieved high concentrations that can be detected by observation of discolored water, which may be apparent in satellite imagery; by ecological problems such as fish kills; or human health problems. Because the early development stages of HABs are usually not detected, there is limited understanding of the environmental conditions that lead to their development. Analysis of simulated surface ocean currents reveals the presence of a persistent large-scale Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) on the southern portion of the WFS. A LCS can be regarded as a distinguished material line which divides immiscible fluid regions with distinct advection properties. Consistent with satellite-tracked drifter trajectories, this LCS on the WFS constitutes a cross-shelf barrier for the lateral transport of passive tracers. We hypothesize that such a LCS provides favorable conditions for the development of HABs. LCSs are also employed to trace the early location of an observed HAB on the WFS. Using a simplified population dynamics model we infer the factors that could possibly lead to the development of this HAB. The population dynamics model determines nitrogen in two components, nutrients and phytoplankton, which are assumed to be passively advected by simulated surface ocean currents. Two nutrient sources are inferred for the HAB whose evolution is found to be strongly tied to the simulated LCSs. These nutrient sources are found to be located near shore and likely due to land runoff.

  8. NUTRIENT CONTAMINATION AS A RESULT OF POINT SOURCE DISCHARGES: A SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrients are common contaminants in Gulf of Mexico estuaries and when present in high concentrations, they can cause excessive algal growths and hypoxic conditions. The magnitude and biological significance of nutrient loading to estuarine waters receiving treated wastewaters is...

  9. Harmful algal blooms and climate change: Learning from the past and present to forecast the future

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Mark L.; Trainer, Vera L.; Smayda, Theodore J.; Karlson, Bengt S.O.; Trick, Charles G.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Ishikawa, Akira; Bernard, Stewart; Wulff, Angela; Anderson, Donald M.; Cochlan, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change pressures will influence marine planktonic systems globally, and it is conceivable that harmful algal blooms may increase in frequency and severity. These pressures will be manifest as alterations in temperature, stratification, light, ocean acidification, precipitation-induced nutrient inputs, and grazing, but absence of fundamental knowledge of the mechanisms driving harmful algal blooms frustrates most hope of forecasting their future prevalence. Summarized here is the consensus of a recent workshop held to address what currently is known and not known about the environmental conditions that favor initiation and maintenance of harmful algal blooms. There is expectation that harmful algal bloom (HAB) geographical domains should expand in some cases, as will seasonal windows of opportunity for harmful algal blooms at higher latitudes. Nonetheless there is only basic information to speculate upon which regions or habitats HAB species may be the most resilient or susceptible. Moreover, current research strategies are not well suited to inform these fundamental linkages. There is a critical absence of tenable hypotheses for how climate pressures mechanistically affect HAB species, and the lack of uniform experimental protocols limits the quantitative cross-investigation comparisons essential to advancement. A HAB “best practices” manual would help foster more uniform research strategies and protocols, and selection of a small target list of model HAB species or isolates for study would greatly promote the accumulation of knowledge. Despite the need to focus on keystone species, more studies need to address strain variability within species, their responses under multifactorial conditions, and the retrospective analyses of long-term plankton and cyst core data; research topics that are departures from the norm. Examples of some fundamental unknowns include how larger and more frequent extreme weather events may break down natural biogeographic

  10. Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-COMM) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2015-12-04

    The Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-Comm) was established in 2010 to conduct research to enable commercial viability of alternative liquid fuels produced from algal biomass. The main objective of CAB-Comm was to dramatically improve the viability of algae as a source of liquid fuels to meet US energy needs, by addressing several significant barriers to economic viability. To achieve this goal, CAB-Comm took a diverse set of approaches on three key aspects of the algal biofuels value chain: crop protection; nutrient utilization and recycling; and the development of genetic tools. These projects have been undertaken as collaboration between six academic institutions and two industrial partners: University of California, San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Rutgers University; University of California, Davis; Johns Hopkins University; Sapphire Energy; and Life Technologies.

  11. Algal Toxins Alter Copepod Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A.; Waggett, Rebecca J.; Place, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod’s feeding appendages–a “sampling beating” that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration “grazing beating” that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod’s grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod’s feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  12. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A; Waggett, Rebecca J; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  13. Anaerobic digestion of lipid-extracted Auxenochlorella protothecoides biomass for methane generation and nutrient recovery.

    PubMed

    Bohutskyi, Pavlo; Ketter, Ben; Chow, Steven; Adams, Kameron J; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Allnutt, F C Thomas; Bouwer, Edward J

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated methane production and nutrient recovery from industrially produced, lipid extracted algal biomass (LEA) of Auxenochlorella protothecoides using semi-continuous anaerobic digestion (AD) at different organic loading rates (OLRs) and hydraulic retention times (HRTs). It was shown, that AD can improve biofuel production efficiency and sustainability, especially for scaled processes, through up to 30% increase in energy generation (up to 0.25 L of methane per g of LEA volatile solids) and partial nutrient recovery and recycling. The nutrient recycling with the AD effluent may reduce the cost of the supplied fertilizers by up to 45%. However, methane production was limited to nearly 50% of theoretical maxima potentially due to biomass recalcitrance and inhibition effects from the residual solvent in the LEA. Therefore, further AD optimization is required to maximize methane yield and nutrient recovery as well as investigation and elimination of inhibition from solvent residues.

  14. Anaerobic digestion of lipid-extracted Auxenochlorella protothecoides biomass for methane generation and nutrient recovery.

    PubMed

    Bohutskyi, Pavlo; Ketter, Ben; Chow, Steven; Adams, Kameron J; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Allnutt, F C Thomas; Bouwer, Edward J

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated methane production and nutrient recovery from industrially produced, lipid extracted algal biomass (LEA) of Auxenochlorella protothecoides using semi-continuous anaerobic digestion (AD) at different organic loading rates (OLRs) and hydraulic retention times (HRTs). It was shown, that AD can improve biofuel production efficiency and sustainability, especially for scaled processes, through up to 30% increase in energy generation (up to 0.25 L of methane per g of LEA volatile solids) and partial nutrient recovery and recycling. The nutrient recycling with the AD effluent may reduce the cost of the supplied fertilizers by up to 45%. However, methane production was limited to nearly 50% of theoretical maxima potentially due to biomass recalcitrance and inhibition effects from the residual solvent in the LEA. Therefore, further AD optimization is required to maximize methane yield and nutrient recovery as well as investigation and elimination of inhibition from solvent residues. PMID:25746299

  15. Nutrient loading and selected water-quality and biological characteristics of Dickinson Bayou near Houston, Texas, 1995-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Jeffery W.; Paul, Edna M.; Porter, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    Algal samples were collected at seven stations and were analyzed for periphyton identification and enumeration, and chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b concentrations. The large relative abundance of soil algae at stations in the middle of the watershed likely indicates the cumulative effects on water quality of agricultural nonpoint sources. Farther downstream near the State Highway 3 bridge, and downstream of three major tributary inflows, the increase in abundance of soil algae to a larger-than-expected level might reflect water-quality influences from predominantly urban nonpoint sources in the drainage basins of the three major tributary inflows. Nutrient concentrations do not appear to limit algal production in the upper (non-tidal) reach of Dickinson Bayou; but nutrient concentrations could have been limiting benthicalgal production in the lower (tidal) reach of the bayou during the time of the synoptic survey. If nitrogen is the limiting resource for algal productivity in the tidal reach of Dickinson Bayou, eutrophication of the system could be (at least partially) mitigated if nonpoint-source nutrient loads into the Bayou were reduced. 

  16. Using models to guide field experiments: a priori predictions for the CO 2 response of a nutrient- and water-limited native Eucalypt woodland

    DOE PAGES

    Medlyn, Belinda E.; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P.; Duursma, Remko A.; Luus, Kristina; Mishurov, Mikhail; Pak, Bernard; Smith, Benjamin; Wang, Ying-Ping; et al

    2016-05-09

    One major uncertainty in Earth System models is the response of terrestrial ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca), particularly under nutrient-lim- ited conditions. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment, recently established in a nutrient- and water-limited woodlands, presents a unique opportunity to address this uncertainty, but can best do so if key model uncertainties have been identified in advance. Moreover, we applied seven vegetation models, which have previously been comprehensively assessed against earlier forest FACE experi- ments, to simulate a priori possible outcomes from EucFACE. Our goals were to provide quantitative projections against which to evaluate data asmore » they are collected, and to identify key measurements that should be made in the experiment to allow discrimination among alternative model assumptions in a postexperiment model intercompari- son. Simulated responses of annual net primary productivity (NPP) to elevated Ca ranged from 0.5 to 25% across models. The simulated reduction of NPP during a low-rainfall year also varied widely, from 24 to 70%. Key processes where assumptions caused disagreement among models included nutrient limitations to growth; feedbacks to nutri- ent uptake; autotrophic respiration; and the impact of low soil moisture availability on plant processes. Finally, knowledge of the causes of variation among models is now guiding data collection in the experiment, with the expectation that the experimental data can optimally inform future model improvements.« less

  17. Triacylglycerol accumulation and change in fatty acid content of four marine oleaginous microalgae under nutrient limitation and at different culture ages.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yangmin; Guo, Xiaojing; Wan, Xia; Liang, Zhuo; Jiang, Mulan

    2013-01-01

    Alteration of lipid biosynthesis is one of important biochemical changes when oleaginous microalgae grow under varied environmental conditions. The effects of culture age and nutrient limitation on triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation and fatty acid content were investigated in four eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-rich marine microalgae. The amounts of TAGs in Chaetoceros sp., Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Nannochloropsis oculata increased sharply from day 4 to day 11, and then the former two remained nearly unchanged while the latter declined gradually during the batch culture. In contrast, no marked increase in TAG accumulation was observed in Pavlova viridis during the culture. Changes in total fatty acid (TFA) content mirrored those observed for TAG accumulation, while the EPA content reached a maximum generally at day 7 or 11 in the range of 11 - 32 mg g(-1) dry cell weight (DCW) and then declined. Nitrogen limitation led to a gradual increase in the amounts of TAGs from N. oculata pronouncedly but almost no change in other three species. The TFA content of the cultures after 5 days of nitrogen limitation was nearly twice that after 1 day in Chaetoceros sp., P. tricornutum and P. viridis, while the lowest increase (220 - 283 mg g(-1) DCW) was observed in N. oculata. TAGs increased gradually under phosphorus limitation in all four species but not sharply compared with that under nitrogen limitation in N. oculata. The TFA content increased gradually under phosphorus limitation and after 5 days of phosphorus limitation it was 1.5 - 2 times that after 1 day. The EPA content was generally not significantly affected by nitrogen or phosphorus limitation. Culture age and nutrient limitation could be useful variables for optimizing TAG accumulation and fatty acid content with potential for biodiesel production. PMID:22581481

  18. [Influence of nutrient sources on Anabaena spiroides growth and odorous compounds production characteristics].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Wei; Chen, Ke-Yun; Su, Ming; Yang, Min; Liu, Dai-Cheng

    2011-08-01

    The occurrence of taste and odors, produced by secondary metabolites of cyanobacteria, has been one of the major water quality problems in drinking water. However, the odorous compounds produced by cyanobacteria usually differ significantly with different species. One cyanobacterium isolated from Yanghe reservoir was identified as Anabaena sp., which can produce high level of geosmin consistently during laboratory culture. By culture expanding experiments, the algal growth and geosmin production characteristics of the Anabaena sp. were studied on different conditions of nitrogen and phosphorus sources. The results indicated that geosmin mainly remained in the intracellular algal cells regardless of the nutrient sources, and the extracellular content was only in th range of 0.2% - 9.6%. Compared with ammonia nitrogen conditions, the growth of Anabaena sp. in nitrate nitrogen conditions was much higher, with a 1.4-fold variation in geosmin production. While ammonia nitrogen concentration was 0.5 mg/L, the algal biomass and geosmin production achieved the highest level of 3.8 x 10(4) cells, mL(-1) and 1.1 x 10(4) ngL(-1), respectively. When the nitrate nitrogen concentration was 2.0 mg/L, the algal biomass and geosmin production achieved the highest level of 6.6 x 10(4) cells x mL(-1) and 1.3 x 10(4) ng x L(-1), respectively. Compared with nitrogen sources, the growth of Anabaena sp. could be promoted significantly until phosphorus level attained 0.12 mg/L, indicating that phosphorus is the main limiting nutrient source for Anabaena sp.. For Yanghe reservoir, the nutrient level has already been enough for the growth of Anabaena sp. Therefore, the nutrient source content, especially phosphorus, should be reduced effectively to control the cyanobacterium bloom and taste and odor problems.

  19. Algal Energy Conversion and Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazendonk, P.

    2015-12-01

    We address the potential for energy conversions and capture for: energy generation; reduction in energy use; reduction in greenhouse gas emissions; remediation of water and air pollution; protection and enhancement of soil fertility. These processes have the potential to sequester carbon at scales that may have global impact. Energy conversion and capture strategies evaluate energy use and production from agriculture, urban areas and industries, and apply existing and emerging technologies to reduce and recapture energy embedded in waste products. The basis of biocrude production from Micro-algal feedstocks: 1) The nutrients from the liquid fraction of waste streams are concentrated and fed into photo bioreactors (essentially large vessels in which microalgae are grown) along with CO2 from flue gasses from down stream processes. 2) The algae are processed to remove high value products such as proteins and beta-carotenes. The advantage of algae feedstocks is the high biomass productivity is 30-50 times that of land based crops and the remaining biomass contains minimal components that are difficult to convert to biocrude. 3) The remaining biomass undergoes hydrothermal liquefaction to produces biocrude and biochar. The flue gasses of this process can be used to produce electricity (fuel cell) and subsequently fed back into the photobioreactor. The thermal energy required for this process is small, hence readily obtained from solar-thermal sources, and furthermore no drying or preprocessing is required keeping the energy overhead extremely small. 4) The biocrude can be upgraded and refined as conventional crude oil, creating a range of liquid fuels. In principle this process can be applied on the farm scale to the municipal scale. Overall, our primary food production is too dependent on fossil fuels. Energy conversion and capture can make food production sustainable.

  20. Root Nutrient Foraging1

    PubMed Central

    Giehl, Ricardo F.H.; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    During a plant's lifecycle, the availability of nutrients in the soil is mostly heterogeneous in space and time. Plants are able to adapt to nutrient shortage or localized nutrient availability by altering their root system architecture to efficiently explore soil zones containing the limited nutrient. It has been shown that the deficiency of different nutrients induces root architectural and morphological changes that are, at least to some extent, nutrient specific. Here, we highlight what is known about the importance of individual root system components for nutrient acquisition and how developmental and physiological responses can be coupled to increase nutrient foraging by roots. In addition, we review prominent molecular mechanisms involved in altering the root system in response to local nutrient availability or to the plant's nutritional status. PMID:25082891

  1. Novel resource utilization of refloated algal sludge to improve the quality of organic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Li, Rong; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Beibei; Zhang, Chenmin; Shen, Qirong

    2014-08-01

    Without further management, large amounts of refloated algal sludge from Taihu Lake to retrieve nitrogen and phosphorus resources may result in serious secondary environmental pollution. The possibility of utilization of algal sludge to improve the quality of organic fertilizer was investigated in this study. Variations of physicochemical properties, germination index (GI) and microcystin (MC) content were analysed during the composting process. The results showed that the addition of algal sludge improved the contents of nutrients, common free amino acids and total common amino acids in the novel organic fertilizer. Rapid degradation rates of MC-LR and MC-RR, a high GI value and more abundance of culturable protease-producing bacteria were observed during the composting process added with algal sludge. Growth experiments showed that the novel organic fertilizer efficiently promoted plant growth. This study provides a novel resource recovery method to reclaim the Taihu Lake algal sludge and highlights a novel method to produce a high-quality organic fertilizer.

  2. Distinct Microbial Limitations in Litter and Underlying Soil Revealed by Carbon and Nutrient Fertilization in a Tropical Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Fanin, Nicolas; Barantal, Sandra; Fromin, Nathalie; Schimann, Heidy; Schevin, Patrick; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Human-caused alterations of the carbon and nutrient cycles are expected to impact tropical ecosystems in the near future. Here we evaluated how a combined change in carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability affects soil and litter microbial respiration and litter decomposition in an undisturbed Amazonian rainforest in French Guiana. In a fully factorial C (as cellulose), N (as urea), and P (as phosphate) fertilization experiment we analyzed a total of 540 litterbag-soil pairs after a 158-day exposure in the field. Rates of substrate-induced respiration (SIR) measured in litter and litter mass loss were similarly affected by fertilization showing the strongest stimulation when N and P were added simultaneously. The stimulating NP effect on litter SIR increased considerably with increasing initial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in litter, suggesting that the combined availability of N, P, and a labile C source has a particularly strong effect on microbial activity. Cellulose fertilization, however, did not further stimulate the NP effect. In contrast to litter SIR and litter mass loss, soil SIR was reduced with N fertilization and showed only a positive effect in response to P fertilization that was further enhanced with additional C fertilization. Our data suggest that increased nutrient enrichment in the studied Amazonian rainforest can considerably change microbial activity and litter decomposition, and that these effects differ between the litter layer and the underlying soil. Any resulting change in relative C and nutrient fluxes between the litter layer and the soil can have important consequences for biogeochemical cycles in tropical forest ecosystems. PMID:23272052

  3. Distinct microbial limitations in litter and underlying soil revealed by carbon and nutrient fertilization in a tropical rainforest.

    PubMed

    Fanin, Nicolas; Barantal, Sandra; Fromin, Nathalie; Schimann, Heidy; Schevin, Patrick; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Human-caused alterations of the carbon and nutrient cycles are expected to impact tropical ecosystems in the near future. Here we evaluated how a combined change in carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability affects soil and litter microbial respiration and litter decomposition in an undisturbed Amazonian rainforest in French Guiana. In a fully factorial C (as cellulose), N (as urea), and P (as phosphate) fertilization experiment we analyzed a total of 540 litterbag-soil pairs after a 158-day exposure in the field. Rates of substrate-induced respiration (SIR) measured in litter and litter mass loss were similarly affected by fertilization showing the strongest stimulation when N and P were added simultaneously. The stimulating NP effect on litter SIR increased considerably with increasing initial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in litter, suggesting that the combined availability of N, P, and a labile C source has a particularly strong effect on microbial activity. Cellulose fertilization, however, did not further stimulate the NP effect. In contrast to litter SIR and litter mass loss, soil SIR was reduced with N fertilization and showed only a positive effect in response to P fertilization that was further enhanced with additional C fertilization. Our data suggest that increased nutrient enrichment in the studied Amazonian rainforest can considerably change microbial activity and litter decomposition, and that these effects differ between the litter layer and the underlying soil. Any resulting change in relative C and nutrient fluxes between the litter layer and the soil can have important consequences for biogeochemical cycles in tropical forest ecosystems.

  4. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, D.; Casero, D.; Cokus, S. J.; Merchant, S. S.; Pellegrini, M.

    2012-07-01

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG pathway maps and batch gene identifier conversion.

  5. Winter-time CO2 addition in high rate algal mesocosms for enhanced microalgal performance.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Montemezzani, Valerio; Mehrabadi, Abbas; Craggs, Rupert J

    2016-02-01

    Carbon limitation in domestic wastewater high rate algal ponds is thought to constrain microalgal photo-physiology and productivity and CO2 augmentation is often used to overcome this limitation in summer. However, the implications of carbon limitation during winter are poorly understood. This paper investigates the effects of 0.5%, 2%, 5% and 10% CO2 addition on the winter-time performance of wastewater microalgae in high rate algal mesocosms. Performance was measured in terms of light absorption, photosynthetic efficiency, biomass production and nutrient removal rates, along with community composition. Varying percentage CO2 addition and associated change in culture pH resulted in 3 distinct microalgal communities. Light absorption by the microalgae increased by up to 144% with CO2 addition, while a reduction in the package effect meant that there was less internal self-shading thereby increasing the efficiency of light absorption. Carbon augmentation increased the maximum rate of photosynthesis by up to 172%, which led to increased microalgal biovolume by up to 181% and an increase in total organic biomass for all treatments except 10% CO2. While 10% CO2 improved light absorption and photosynthesis this did not translate to enhanced microalgal productivity. Increased microalgal productivity with CO2 addition did not result in increased dissolved nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) removal. This experiment demonstrated that winter-time carbon augmentation up to 5% CO2 improved microalgal light absorption and utilisation, which ultimately increased microalgal biomass and is likely to enhance total annual microalgal areal productivity in HRAPs.

  6. Algal Lipids as Quantitative Paleosalinity Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, A.; Shinneman, A.; Hemeon, K.; Sachs, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The tropics play an important role in driving climate. However it is difficult to uncover past changes in tropical precipitation due to a lack of tree ring records and low accumulation rates of marine sediments. Hydrogen isotope ratios of algal lipids preserved in lacustrine and marine sediments have been used to qualitatively reconstruct tropical paleohydrology. Changes in the hydrologic balance are reflected in salinity and in lake water D/H ratios, which are closely tracked by lipid D/H ratios of algal biomarkers. While useful for determining past periods of "wetter" or "drier" conditions, variability in isotope fractionation in algal lipids during lipid biosynthesis can be exploited to more quantitatively determine how much wetter or drier conditions were in the past. The estuarine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonnana, was grown in continuous cultures under controlled light, temperature, nutrient, and growth rate conditions to assess the influence of salinity (9-40 PSU) on D/H fractionation between lipids and source water. Three fatty acids, 24-methylcholesta-5,24(28)-dien-3B-ol, and phytol show decreasing fractionation between lipid and source water as salinity increases with 0.8-1.3‰ change in fractionation per salinity unit. These results compliment field-based empirical observations of dinosterol in Chesapeake Bay suspended particles that change 0.99‰ per salinity unit and lipid biomarkers from hyper-saline ponds on Christmas Island that change 0.7-1.1‰ per salinity unit. Biological pathways responsible for the inverse relationship between fractionation and salinity will be discussed.

  7. Trophic status and assessment of non-point nutrient enrichment of Lake Crescent Olympic National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyle, Terence P.; Beeson, David R.

    1991-01-01

    A limited effort study was conducted in Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park to determine the trophic status and assess whether non-point nutrients were leaching into the lake and affecting biological resources. The concentration of chlorophyll a, total nitrogen concentration, and Secchi disk transparency used as parameters of the Trophic Status Index revealed that Lake Crescent in Olympic National Park was in the oligotrophic range. Evaluation of the nitrogen to phosphorous ration revealed that nitrogen was the nutrient limiting to overall lake productivity. Single species and community bioassays indicated that other nutrients, possibly iron, had some secondary control over community composition of the algal community. Assessment of six near-shore sites for the presence and effects of non-point nutrients revealed that La Poel Point which formerly was the site of a resort had slightly higher algal bioassay and periphyton response than the other sites. No conditions that would require immediate action by resource management of Olympic National Park were identified. The general recommendations for a long term lake monitoring plan are discussed.

  8. Algal Biofuels; Algal Biofuels R&D at NREL (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    An overview of NREL's algal biofuels projects, including U.S. Department of Energy-funded work, projects with U.S. and international partners, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects.

  9. Role of algal biofilm in improving the performance of free surface, up-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Badhe, Neha; Saha, Shaswati; Biswas, Rima; Nandy, Tapas

    2014-10-01

    The role of algal biofilm in a pilot-scale, free-surface, up-flow constructed wetland (CW), was studied for its effect on chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia and phosphate removal during three seasons-autumn, winter and early spring. Effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) was also investigated in presence and absence of algal biofilm. Principal Component Analysis was used to identify the independent factors governing the performance of CW. The study showed algal biofilm significantly improved nutrient removal, especially phosphate. Ammonia removal varied with HRT, biofilm and ambient temperature. Increase in biofilm thickness affected ammonia removal efficiency adversely. Algal biofilm-assisted COD removal compensated for reduced macrophyte density during winter. Two-way ANOVA test and the coefficients of dependent factors derived through multiple linear regression model confirmed role of algal biofilm in improving nutrient removal in CW. The study suggests that algal biofilm can be a green solution for bio-augmenting COD and nutrient removal in CW. PMID:25105266

  10. Sediment-water exchange of nutrients in the Marsdiep basin, western Wadden Sea: Phosphorus limitation induced by a controlled release?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leote, Catarina; Epping, Eric H. G.

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the release of inorganic phosphorus from the sediments and assess its contribution to present primary production, a basin-wide study of the Marsdiep (western Wadden Sea, The Netherlands) was performed. Two distinct sedimentary zones were identified: a depositional area characterized by a high content of silt and organic carbon and a small grain size and the majority of the area, composed of fine/medium sand and a low organic carbon content. The sediment-water exchange was higher in the fine grained depositional area and based on a relationship found between the release of inorganic phosphorus and the silt content, a total annual release of 1.0×107 mol P was estimated for the whole Marsdiep basin. A spatial variability in the processes controlling the nutrient release was found. The exchange in the depositional area resulted mainly from molecular diffusive transport, with mineralization and sorption determining the concentration of inorganic phosphorus in the porewater. For the coarser sediment stations the activity of macrofauna clearly enhanced the fluxes. Given the relative demand of nutrients (N:P:Si) for phytoplankton growth, the release was phosphorus deficient during most of the year. Nevertheless, it increased from February until September, in parallel with the increase in temperature and light, thus having the potential to fuel primary production during their seasonal growth period. In terms of absolute values, our results show that the present exchange, enhanced by the activity of macrofauna has the potential to fuel a significant fraction of the recent levels of primary productivity.

  11. Algal turf scrubber (ATS) floways on the Great Wicomico River, Chesapeake Bay: productivity, algal community structure, substrate and chemistry(1).

    PubMed

    Adey, Walter H; Laughinghouse, H Dail; Miller, John B; Hayek, Lee-Ann C; Thompson, Jesse G; Bertman, Steven; Hampel, Kristin; Puvanendran, Shanmugam

    2013-06-01

    Two Algal Turf Scrubber (ATS) units were deployed on the Great Wicomico River (GWR) for 22 months to examine the role of substrate in increasing algal productivity and nutrient removal. The yearly mean productivity of flat ATS screens was 15.4 g · m(-2)  · d(-1) . This was elevated to 39.6 g · m(-2)  · d(-1) with a three-dimensional (3-D) screen, and to 47.7 g · m(-2)  · d(-1) by avoiding high summer harvest temperatures. These methods enhanced nutrient removal (N, P) in algal biomass by 3.5 times. Eighty-six algal taxa (Ochrophyta [diatoms], Chlorophyta [green algae], and Cyan-obacteria [blue-green algae]) self-seeded from the GWR and demonstrated yearly cycling. Silica (SiO2 ) content of the algal biomass ranged from 30% to 50% of total biomass; phosphorus, nitrogen, and carbon content of the total algal biomass ranged from 0.15% to 0.21%, 2.13% to 2.89%, and 20.0% to 25.7%, respectively. Carbohydrate content (at 10%-25% of AFDM) was dominated by glucose. Lipids (fatty acid methyl ester; FAMEs) ranged widely from 0.5% to 9% AFDM, with Omega-3 fatty acids a consistent component. Mathematical modeling of algal produ-ctivity as a function of temperature, light, and substrate showed a proportionality of 4:3:3, resp-ectively. Under landscape ATS operation, substrate manipulation provides a considerable opportunity to increase ATS productivity, water quality amelioration, and biomass coproduction for fertilizers, fermentation energy, and omega-3 products. Based on the 3-D prod-uctivity and algal chemical composition demonstrated, ATS systems used for nonpoint source water treat-ment can produce ethanol (butanol) at 5.8× per unit area of corn, and biodiesel at 12.0× per unit area of soy beans (agricultural production US). PMID:27007038

  12. Harmful algal blooms and eutrophication: Examining linkages from selected coastal regions of the United States.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Donald M; Burkholder, Joann M; Cochlan, William P; Glibert, Patricia M; Gobler, Christopher J; Heil, Cynthia A; Kudela, Raphael; Parsons, Michael L; Rensel, J E Jack; Townsend, David W; Trainer, Vera L; Vargo, Gabriel A

    2008-12-01

    Coastal waters of the United States (U.S.) are subject to many of the major harmful algal bloom (HAB) poisoning syndromes and impacts. These include paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP), amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP), ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) and various other HAB phenomena such as fish kills, loss of submerged vegetation, shellfish mortalities, and widespread marine mammal mortalities. Here, the occurrences of selected HABs in a selected set of regions are described in terms of their relationship to eutrophication, illustrating a range of responses. Evidence suggestive of changes in the frequency, extent or magnitude of HABs in these areas is explored in the context of the nutrient sources underlying those blooms, both natural and anthropogenic. In some regions of the U.S., the linkages between HABs and eutrophication are clear and well documented, whereas in others, information is limited, thereby highlighting important areas for further research.

  13. Harmful algal blooms and eutrophication: Examining linkages from selected coastal regions of the United States.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Donald M; Burkholder, Joann M; Cochlan, William P; Glibert, Patricia M; Gobler, Christopher J; Heil, Cynthia A; Kudela, Raphael; Parsons, Michael L; Rensel, J E Jack; Townsend, David W; Trainer, Vera L; Vargo, Gabriel A

    2008-12-01

    Coastal waters of the United States (U.S.) are subject to many of the major harmful algal bloom (HAB) poisoning syndromes and impacts. These include paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP), amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP), ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) and various other HAB phenomena such as fish kills, loss of submerged vegetation, shellfish mortalities, and widespread marine mammal mortalities. Here, the occurrences of selected HABs in a selected set of regions are described in terms of their relationship to eutrophication, illustrating a range of responses. Evidence suggestive of changes in the frequency, extent or magnitude of HABs in these areas is explored in the context of the nutrient sources underlying those blooms, both natural and anthropogenic. In some regions of the U.S., the linkages between HABs and eutrophication are clear and well documented, whereas in others, information is limited, thereby highlighting important areas for further research. PMID:19956363

  14. Harmful algal blooms and eutrophication: Examining linkages from selected coastal regions of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Donald M.; Burkholder, JoAnn M.; Cochlan, William P.; Glibert, Patricia M.; Gobler, Christopher J.; Heil, Cynthia A.; Kudela, Raphael; Parsons, Michael L.; Rensel, J. E. Jack; Townsend, David W.; Trainer, Vera L.; Vargo, Gabriel A.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal waters of the United States (U.S.) are subject to many of the major harmful algal bloom (HAB) poisoning syndromes and impacts. These include paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP), amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP), ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) and various other HAB phenomena such as fish kills, loss of submerged vegetation, shellfish mortalities, and widespread marine mammal mortalities. Here, the occurrences of selected HABs in a selected set of regions are described in terms of their relationship to eutrophication, illustrating a range of responses. Evidence suggestive of changes in the frequency, extent or magnitude of HABs in these areas is explored in the context of the nutrient sources underlying those blooms, both natural and anthropogenic. In some regions of the U.S., the linkages between HABs and eutrophication are clear and well documented, whereas in others, information is limited, thereby highlighting important areas for further research. PMID:19956363

  15. RESPONSE OF COASTAL RIVERINE AND MICROBIAL AND VEGETATION COMMUNITIES TO NUTRIENT LOADING GRADIENTS: MINING SURVEY DATA FOR CRITERIA DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A probabilistic survey of Lake Michigan coastal riverine wetlands demonstrated microbial, algal, and vegetation responses to gradients in nutrient loading and N:P ratios. Sediment porewater, exchangeable, and total nutrients were strongly correlated with historic loading rates, a...

  16. Nutrient Uptake Kinetics in Two Virginia Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, A.; Mulholland, M. R.; Bernhardt, P.; Watson, A. M.; Dias, R. F.

    2002-12-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in the occurrence and geographical range of blooms of the brown tide pelagophyte Aureococcus anophagefferens in coastal areas along the east coast of the USA. Brown tide blooms occur when concentrations of inorganic nutrients are low or at the limit of analytical detection and these organisms have been shown to use organic nitrogen for growth. Indeed, it has been suggested that A. anophagefferens, along with a variety of other species that form harmful algal blooms, have a preference for organic nitrogen and because organic nitrogen compounds also have carbon, it is thought that many bloom species may supplement photosynthetic carbon fixation with uptake of organic carbon. In order to better understand the nutritional preferences of bloom organisms, we investigated uptake kinetics for inorganic and organic nutrients in two Virginia waterways where harmful algal blooms frequently occur; the Rappahannock River, a Chesapeake Bay tributary that experiences blooms of dinoflagellates, and Chincoteague Bay, a coastal bay where there are seasonal brown tide blooms. We used stable isotopes (15N and 13C) to measure uptake kinetics for NH4+, urea, two amino acids, a dipeptide and glucose. During the Chincoteague Bay study, there was a bloom of A. anophagefferens (> 1,000,000 cells/ml), however, no blooms were encountered during the Rappahannock Study. Results suggest that brown tide bloom populations had higher affinities and uptake capacities for NH4+ and dipeptides and lower affinities and uptake capacities for urea and the two amino acids. In addition, it appeared that the organic substrates were used primarily as N sources.

  17. Interactive role of elevated CO[sub 2], nutrient limitations, and water stress in the growth responses of red spruce seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.J.; Seiler, J.R. Virginia Tech., Blacksburg )

    1993-05-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) seedlings were grown from seed for 5 mo in ambient (362 ppm) or elevated (711 ppm) CO[sub 2] exposure treatments were crossed with two levels of soil fertility and water stress treatments to determine if seedling dry weight, size, and fixed growth responses to elevated CO[sub 2] depended on nutrient and water supply. Seedling dry weight and size responses to elevated CO[sub 2] at 5 mo did not depend on nutrient and water supply. Seedlings grown in both soil fertility treatments and water stress treatments responded similarly to CO[sub 2] treatment. Water stress and CO[sub 2] treatments did have an interactive influence on the fixed growth potential of the terminal leader. Leaf weight, leaf area, and height to the terminal leader of water-stressed seedlings were greater in seedlings exposed to elevated CO[sub 2] during budset than seedlings exposed to ambient CO[sub 2]. Total new fixed growth (lateral plus terminal) and total terminal fixed growth (leaf plus stem) were greater in seedlings that formed shoot primordia in elevated CO[sub 2] than in ambient CO[sub 2]. Red spruce seedlings grown in elevated CO[sub 2] for 5 mo had greater stem diameter, height, branching density, leaf weight, root weight, stem weight, total weight, and mean relative growth rate (RGR) from 3 to 5 mo than seedlings grown in ambient CO[sub 2]. Red spruce seedling responses to elevated CO[sub 2] suggest that seedling establishment in natural environments may be enhanced when ambient CO[sub 2] concentrations rise even if water and nutrient availabilities are limited.

  18. Mass algal culture system

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  19. Mass algal culture system

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  20. Recent progress and future challenges in algal biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    Shurin, Jonathan B.; Burkart, Michael D.; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Modern society is fueled by fossil energy produced millions of years ago by photosynthetic organisms. Cultivating contemporary photosynthetic producers to generate energy and capture carbon from the atmosphere is one potential approach to sustaining society without disrupting the climate. Algae, photosynthetic aquatic microorganisms, are the fastest growing primary producers in the world and can therefore produce more energy with less land, water, and nutrients than terrestrial plant crops. We review recent progress and challenges in developing bioenergy technology based on algae. A variety of high-value products in addition to biofuels can be harvested from algal biomass, and these may be key to developing algal biotechnology and realizing the commercial potential of these organisms. Aspects of algal biology that differentiate them from plants demand an integrative approach based on genetics, cell biology, ecology, and evolution. We call for a systems approach to research on algal biotechnology rooted in understanding their biology, from the level of genes to ecosystems, and integrating perspectives from physical, chemical, and social sciences to solve one of the most critical outstanding technological problems. PMID:27781084

  1. Numerical simulation of an algal bloom in Dianshan Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yizhong; Lin, Weiqing; Zhu, Jianrong; Lu, Shiqiang

    2016-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model and an aquatic ecology model of Dianshan Lake, Shanghai, were built using a hydrodynamic simulation module and the water quality simulation module of Delft3D, which is an integrated modelling suite offered by Deltares. The simulated water elevation, current velocity, and direction were validated with observed data to ensure the reliability of hydrodynamic model. The seasonal growth of different algae was analyzed with consideration of observed and historical data, as well as simulated results. In 2008, the dominant algae in Dianshan Lake was Bacillariophyta from February to March, while it was Chlorophyta from April to May, and Cyanophyta from July to August. In summer, the biomass of Cyanophyta grew quickly, reaching levels much higher than the peaks of Bacillariophyta and Chlorophyta. Algae blooms primarily occurred in the stagnation regions. This phenomenon indicates that water residence time can influence algal growth significantly. A longer water residence time was associated with higher algal growth. Two conclusions were drawn from several simulations: reducing the nutrients inflow had little effect on algal blooms in Dianshan Lake; however, increasing the discharge into Dianshan Lake could change the flow field characteristic and narrow the range of stagnation regions, resulting in inhibition of algal aggregation and propagation and a subsequent reduction in areas of high concentration algae.

  2. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  3. The Valley-of-Death: reciprocal sign epistasis constrains adaptive trajectories in a constant, nutrient limiting environment.

    PubMed

    Chiotti, Kami E; Kvitek, Daniel J; Schmidt, Karen H; Koniges, Gregory; Schwartz, Katja; Donckels, Elizabeth A; Rosenzweig, Frank; Sherlock, Gavin

    2014-12-01

    The fitness landscape is a powerful metaphor for describing the relationship between genotype and phenotype for a population under selection. However, empirical data as to the topography of fitness landscapes are limited, owing to difficulties in measuring fitness for large numbers of genotypes under any condition. We previously reported a case of reciprocal sign epistasis (RSE), where two mutations individually increased yeast fitness in a glucose-limited environment, but reduced fitness when combined, suggesting the existence of two peaks on the fitness landscape. We sought to determine whether a ridge connected these peaks so that populations founded by one mutant could reach the peak created by the other, avoiding the low-fitness "Valley-of-Death" between them. Sequencing clones after 250 generations of further evolution provided no evidence for such a ridge, but did reveal many presumptive beneficial mutations, adding to a growing body of evidence that clonal interference pervades evolving microbial populations.

  4. Algal culture studies for CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Arnett, K.; Gladue, R.; Cox, J.; Lieberman, D.

    1987-01-01

    Microalgae are well-suited as a component of a Closed Environmental Life Support System (CELSS), since they can couple the closely related functions of food production and atmospheric regeneration. The objective was to provide a basis for predicting the response of CELSS algal cultures, and thus the food supply and air regeneration system, to changes in the culture parameters. Scenedesmus growth was measured as a function of light intensity, and the spectral dependence of light absorption by the algae as well as algal respiration in the light were determined as a function of cell concentration. These results were used to test and confirm a mathematical model that describes the productivity of an algal culture in terms of the competing processes of photosynthesis and respiration. The relationship of algal productivity to cell concentration was determined at different carbon dioxide concentrations, temperatures, and light intensities. The maximum productivity achieved by an air-grown culture was found to be within 10% of the computed maximum productivity, indicating that CO2 was very efficiently removed from the gas stream by the algal culture. Measurements of biomass productivity as a function of cell concentration at different light intensities indicated that both the productivity and efficiency of light utilization were greater at higher light intensities.

  5. Micropollutant removal in an algal treatment system fed with source separated wastewater streams.

    PubMed

    de Wilt, Arnoud; Butkovskyi, Andrii; Tuantet, Kanjana; Leal, Lucia Hernandez; Fernandes, Tânia V; Langenhoff, Alette; Zeeman, Grietje

    2016-03-01

    Micropollutant removal in an algal treatment system fed with source separated wastewater streams was studied. Batch experiments with the microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana grown on urine, anaerobically treated black water and synthetic urine were performed to assess the removal of six spiked pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, ibuprofen, paracetamol, metoprolol, carbamazepine and trimethoprim). Additionally, incorporation of these pharmaceuticals and three estrogens (estrone, 17β-estradiol and ethinylestradiol) into algal biomass was studied. Biodegradation and photolysis led to 60-100% removal of diclofenac, ibuprofen, paracetamol and metoprolol. Removal of carbamazepine and trimethoprim was incomplete and did not exceed 30% and 60%, respectively. Sorption to algal biomass accounted for less than 20% of the micropollutant removal. Furthermore, the presence of micropollutants did not inhibit C. sorokiniana growth at applied concentrations. Algal treatment systems allow simultaneous removal of micropollutants and recovery of nutrients from source separated wastewater. Nutrient rich algal biomass can be harvested and applied as fertilizer in agriculture, as lower input of micropollutants to soil is achieved when algal biomass is applied as fertilizer instead of urine. PMID:26546707

  6. Variations of algal communities cause darkening of a Greenland glacier.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Stefanie; Anesio, Alexandre M; Jorge Villar, Susana E; Benning, Liane G

    2014-08-01

    We have assessed the microbial ecology on the surface of Mittivakkat glacier in SE-Greenland during the exceptional high melting season in July 2012 when the so far most extreme melting rate for the Greenland Ice Sheet has been recorded. By employing a complementary and multi-disciplinary field sampling and analytical approach, we quantified the dramatic changes in the different microbial surface habitats (green snow, red snow, biofilms, grey ice, cryoconite holes). The observed clear change in dominant algal community and their rapidly changing cryo-organic adaptation inventory was linked to the high melting rate. The changes in carbon and nutrient fluxes between different microbial pools (from snow to ice, cryoconite holes and glacial forefronts) revealed that snow and ice algae dominate the net primary production at the onset of melting, and that they have the potential to support the cryoconite hole communities as carbon and nutrient sources. A large proportion of algal cells is retained on the glacial surface and temporal and spatial changes in pigmentation contribute to the darkening of the snow and ice surfaces. This implies that the fast, melt-induced algal growth has a high albedo reduction potential, and this may lead to a positive feedback speeding up melting processes.

  7. Transient dynamics of pelagic producer-grazer systems in a gradient of nutrients and mixing depths.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Christoph G; Diehl, Sebastian; Matauschek, Christian; Klausmeier, Christopher A; Stibor, Herwig

    2008-05-01

    Phytoplankton-grazer dynamics are often characterized by long transients relative to the length of the growing season. Using a phytoplankton-grazer model parameterized for Daphnia pulex with either flexible or fixed algal carbon:nutrient stoichiometry, we explored how nutrient and light supply (the latter by varying depth of the mixed water column) affect the transient dynamics of the system starting from low densities. The system goes through an initial oscillation across nearly the entire light-nutrient supply space. With flexible (but not with fixed) algal stoichiometry, duration of the initial algal peak, timing and duration of the subsequent grazer peak, and timing of the algal minimum are consistently accelerated by nutrient enrichment but decelerated by light enrichment (decreasing mixing depth) over the range of intermediate to shallow mixing depths. These contrasting effects of nutrient vs. light enrichment are consequences of their opposing influences on food quality (algal nutrient content): algal productivity and food quality are positively related along a nutrient gradient but inversely related along a light gradient. Light enrichment therefore slows down grazer growth relative to algal growth, decelerating oscillatory dynamics; nutrient enrichment has opposite effects. We manipulated nutrient supply and mixing depth in a field enclosure experiment. The experimental results were qualitatively much more consistent with the flexible than with the fixed stoichiometry model. Nutrient enrichment increased Daphnia peak biomass, decreased algal minimum biomass, decreased the seston C:P ratio, and accelerated transient oscillatory dynamics. Light enrichment (decreasing mixing depth) produced the opposite patterns, except that Daphnia peak biomass increased monotonously with light enrichment, too. Thus, while the model predicts the possibility of the "paradox of energy enrichment" (a decrease in grazer biomass with light enrichment) at high light and low

  8. Nutrient levels in the Yazoo River Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loadings to aquatic ecosystems are linked to environmental problems including harmful algal blooms and hypoxia. Presented is an assessment of accessible data on nutrient sources, sinks and inputs to streams within the Yazoo River Basin of northern Mississippi. Ac...

  9. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  10. Water Quality and Algal Data for the North Umpqua River Basin, Oregon, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Arnsberg, Andrew J.; Anderson, Chauncey W.; Carpenter, Kurt D.

    2006-01-01

    The upper North Umpqua River Basin has experienced a variety of water-quality problems since at least the early 1990's. Several reaches of the North Umpqua River are listed as water-quality limited under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act. Diamond Lake, a eutrophic lake that is an important source of water and nutrients to the upper North Umpqua River, is also listed as a water-quality limited waterbody (pH, nuisance algae). A draft Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) was proposed for various parameters and is expected to be adopted in full in 2006. Diamond Lake has supported potentially toxic blue-green algae blooms since 2001 that have resulted in closures to recreational water contact and impacts to the local economy. Increased populations of the invasive tui chub fish are reportedly responsible, because they feed on zooplankton that would otherwise control the algal blooms. The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Diamond Lake Restoration Project advocates reduced fish biomass in Diamond Lake in 2006 as the preferred alternative. A restoration project scheduled to reduce fish biomass for the lake includes a significant water-level drawdown that began in January 2006. After the drawdown of Diamond Lake, the fish toxicant rotenone was applied to eradicate the tui chub. The lake will be refilled and restocked with game fish in 2007. Winter exports of nutrients from Diamond Lake during the restoration project could affect the summer trophic status of the North Umpqua River if retention and recycling in Lemolo Lake are significant. The FEIS includes comprehensive monitoring to assess the water quality of the restored Diamond Lake and the effects of that restoration downstream. One component of the monitoring is the collection of baseline data, in order to observe changes in the river's water quality and algal conditions resulting from the restoration of Diamond Lake. During July 2005, the USGS, in cooperation with Douglas County, performed a synoptic

  11. Effect of Tetracycline Antibiotics on Performance and Microbial Community of Algal Photo-Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Taşkan, Ergin

    2016-07-01

    Tetracycline antibiotics have been increasingly used in medical applications and have been found in wastewater treatment plants as a result of human and industrial activities. This study investigates the combined effects of tetracycline antibiotics on the performance of an algal photo-bioreactor operated under different antibiotic concentrations in the ranges of 0.25 to 30 mg/L and considers the inhibition of algal growth, carbon and nutrient removal rates, and eukaryotic and cyanobacterial algal community changes. The results indicated that increases in the concentration of tetracycline mixtures have adverse effects on the algal community and the performance of a photo-bioreactor, and the eukaryotic algae species were more sensitive to tetracycline antibiotics than were the cyanobacterial species. Cultivation tests showed that approximately 94 % growth inhibition of mixed algae occurred at 30 mg/L. PMID:26961083

  12. Mass cultivation of various algal species and their evaluation as a potential candidate for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Nadia; Munir, Neelma; Saleem, Faiza; Aslam, Farheen; Naz, Shagufta

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have been proposed as a promising source for biodiesel production. Focusing on algal strains for biodiesel production, efforts should be made to search new strains. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of growth parameters (nutrients, pH, light, aeration and temperature) and the oil percentage of eight algal strains (Chlorella sp., Cladophora sp., Hydrodictylium sp., Oedogonium sp., Oscillatoria sp., Spirogyra sp., Stigeocolonium sp., Ulothrix sp.). Results show that 6.5-7.5 is the optimum pH for the growth of all algal species. Temperature showed a greater variation (25°40°C). Ulothrix sp. gave more biomass productivity and is the most suitable strain for biodiesel production due to higher oil percentage (62%). Least biomass production was observed for Stigeocolonium sp. and least oil content was obtained from Hydrodictylium sp. It was observed that among these eight algal strains for biodiesel production, Ulothrix and Chlorella are the most promising algae species.

  13. Vertical flux and biogeochemical turnover regulate nutrient limitation of net organic production in the North Pacific Gyre

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.V.; Kimmerer, W.J.; Walsh, T.W.

    1986-01-01

    Water samples collected at a station in the North Pacific Gyre near Hawaii precisely define the temporal average vertical profile of dissolved inorganic and organic N and P (DON and DOP). DON and DOP concentrations decrease with depth. As shown by other studies, the regression of NO/sub 3//sup -/ vs PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ yields an approximately Redfield slope and a negative nitrogen intercept. If DON and DOP are included in the regression equation, the intercept approaches 0. Vertical flux ratios of dissolved materials are calculated with a one-dimensional diffusion model. Net production of particulate organic matter in the euphotic zone is N limited because of slow biochemical turnover of dissolved organic N relative to that of dissolved organic P and to downward mixing.

  14. Distributions of inorganic nutrients in the bohai sea of china

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengyan, Li; Jie, Bai; Jinhui, Shi; Huiwang, Gao

    2003-04-01

    To study the contents and distribution of inorganic nutrients in the Bohai Sea of China, two cruise surveys were undertaken in August (summer) 2000 and January (winter) 2001, respectively. A total of 595 water samples were collected from 91 stations and five nutrients, i.e., nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, phosphate and silicate, were analyzed for each sample. The results show that the average concentration of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in the Bohai Sea in winter (6.529 μmol L-1) is significantly higher than that in summer (3.717 μmol L-1). The phosphorus concentration in winter (0.660 μmol L-1) is also significantly higher than that in summer (0.329 μmol L-1). Mean silicate concentration in winter (7.858 μmol L-1) is, however, not significantly different from that in summer (7.200 μmol L-1). Nutrients also vary considerably in different areas in Bohai Sea. DIN concentration in the Laizhou Bay (4.444 μmol L-1), for example, is significantly higher than those in the Bohai Bay (2.270 μmol L-1) and Bohai Strait (2.431 μmol L-1), which is caused by the discharge of large amounts of nitrogen into Laizhou Bay via Yellow River. The nutrients show different vertical distribution patterns. In summer, nutrients in bottom layer are generally richer than those in surface and middle layers. In winter, however, nutrients are not significantly different in different layers. Compared with historic data, DIN contents have increased continually since the early 1980 s. Based on atomic ratios of different nutrients, nitrogen is still the limiting factor for algal growth in the Bohai Sea.

  15. Heterologous expression of Anabaena PCC 7120 all3940 (a Dps family gene) protects Escherichia coli from nutrient limitation and abiotic stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Om Prakash; Kumari, Nidhi; Rai, Lal Chand

    2010-03-26

    This study presents first hand data on the cloning and heterologous expression of Anabaena PCC 7120 all3940 (a dps family gene) in combating nutrients limitation and multiple abiotic stresses. The Escherichia coli transformed with pGEX-5X-2-all3940 construct when subjected to iron, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus limitation and carbofuron, copper, UV-B, heat, salt and cadmium stress registered significant increase in growth over the cells transformed with empty vector under iron (0%), carbon (0.05%), nitrogen (3.7 mM) and phosphorus (2 mM) limitation and carbofuron (0.025 mg ml{sup -1}), CuCl{sub 2} (1 mM), UV-B (10 min), heat (47 {sup o}C), NaCl (6% w/v) and CdCl{sub 2} (4 mM) stress. Enhanced expression of all3940 gene measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR at different time points under above mentioned treatments clearly demonstrates its role in tolerance against aforesaid abiotic stresses. This study opens the gate for developing transgenic cyanobacteria capable of growing successfully under above mentioned stresses.

  16. Algal taxonomy forum: Algal Taxonomist, Let Serendipity Reign!

    PubMed

    Druehl, Louis

    2013-04-01

    The publication of a mini-review by Olivier De Clerck et al. in this issue of the Journal of Phycology presented an opportunity to open a dialogue on challenges faced by contemporary algal taxonomists. The Editorial Office solicited the following two additional contributions in response to De Clerck et al.'s paper; the responses were edited solely for clarity, space and format.

  17. A comparison of the influences of urbanization in contrasting environmental settings on stream benthic algal assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Potapova, M.; Coles, J.F.; Giddings, E.M.P.; Zappia, H.

    2005-01-01

    Patterns of stream benthic algal assemblages along urbanization gradients were investigated in three metropolitan areas-Boston (BOS), Massachusetts; Birmingham (BIR), Alabama; and Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah. An index of urban intensity derived from socioeconomic, infrastructure, and land-use characteristics was used as a measure of urbanization. Of the various attributes of the algal assemblages, species composition changed along gradients of urban intensity in a more consistent manner than biomass or diversity. In urban streams, the relative abundance of pollution-tolerant species was often higher than in less affected streams. Shifts in assemblage composition were associated primarily with increased levels of conductivity, nutrients, and alterations in physical habitat. Water mineralization and nutrients were the most important determinants of assemblage composition in the BOS and SLC study areas; flow regime and grazers were key factors in the BIR study area. Species composition of algal assemblages differed significantly among geographic regions, and no particular algal taxa were found to be universal indicators of urbanization. Patterns in algal biomass and diversity along urban gradients varied among study areas, depending on local environmental conditions and habitat alteration. Biomass and diversity increased with urbanization in the BOS area, apparently because of increased nutrients, light, and flow stability in urban streams, which often are regulated by dams. Biomass and diversity decreased with urbanization in the BIR study area because of intensive fish grazing and less stable flow regime. In the SLC study area, correlations between algal biomass, diversity, and urban intensity were positive but weak. Thus, algal responses to urbanization differed considerably among the three study areas. We concluded that the wide range of responses of benthic algae to urbanization implied that tools for stream bioassessment must be region specific. ?? 2005 by the

  18. Nutrient removal using algal-bacterial mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Vaishali; Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Bose, Purnendu

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous nitrate (N), phosphate (P), and COD removal was investigated in photobioreactors containing both algae and bacteria. The reactors were operated in the semi-batch mode with a hydraulic retention time of 2 days. Reactors were operated in two phases, (1) with 33 % biomass recycle and (2) with no biomass recycle. In both phases, more than 90 % of N and P and 80 % of COD present in synthetic wastewaters with initial N and P concentrations of up to 110 and 25 mg/L, respectively, and initial COD of 45 mg/L could be removed. Biomass growth in reactors did not increase with the increase in initial N and P concentration in either phase. However, biomass growth was slightly more in reactors operated with no biomass recycle. In both phases, N and P uptake was greater in reactors with greater initial N and P concentrations. Also in all cases, N and P uptake in the reactors was far in excess of the stoichiometric requirements for the observed biomass growth. This "luxury uptake" of nitrogen and phosphorus by biomass was responsible for excellent nitrogen and phosphorus removal as observed. However, based on the results of this study, no advantage of biomass recycling could be demonstrated. PMID:25293638

  19. Development of a rotating algal biofilm growth system for attached microalgae growth with in situ biomass harvest.

    PubMed

    Gross, Martin; Henry, Wesley; Michael, Clayton; Wen, Zhiyou

    2013-12-01

    This work aimed to develop a rotating algal biofilm (RAB) cultivation system that can be widely adopted by microalgae producers for easy biomass harvest. Algal cells were grown on the surface of a material rotating between nutrient-rich liquid and CO2-rich gaseous phase. Scrapping biomass from the attached surface avoided the expensive harvest operations such as centrifugation. Among various attachment materials, cotton sheet resulted in best algal growth, durability, and cost effectiveness. A lab-scale RAB system was further optimized with harvest frequency, rotation speed, and CO2 levels. The algal biomass from the RAB system had a similar water content as that in centrifuged biomass. An open pond raceway retrofitted with a pilot-scale RAB system resulted in a much higher biomass productivity when compared to a control open pond. Collectively, the research shows that the RAB system is an efficient algal culture system for easy biomass harvest with enhanced biomass productivity.

  20. Beach-goer behavior during a retrospectively detected algal bloom at a Great Lakes beach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Algal blooms occur among nutrient rich, warm surface waters and may adversely impact recreational beaches. During July – September 2003, a prospective study of beachgoers was conducted on weekends at a public beach on a Great Lake in the United States. We measured each beac...

  1. Modeling the impact of awareness on the mitigation of algal bloom in a lake.

    PubMed

    Misra, A K; Tiwari, P K; Venturino, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of algal bloom in water bodies due to the enhanced concentration of nutrient inflow is becoming a global issue. A prime reason behind this aquatic catastrophe is agricultural runoff, which carries a large amount of nutrients that make the lakes more fertile and cause algal blooms. The only solution to this problem is curtailing the nutrient loading through agricultural runoff. This could be achieved by raising awareness among farmers to minimize the use of fertilizers in their farms. In view of this, in this paper, we propose a mathematical model to study the effect of awareness among the farmers of the mitigation of algal bloom in a lake. The growth rate of awareness among the farmers is assumed to be proportional to the density of algae in the lake. It is further assumed that the presence of awareness among the farmers reduces the inflow rate of nutrients through agricultural runoff and helps to remove the detritus by cleaning the bottom of the lake. The results evoke that raising awareness among farmers may be a plausible factor for the mitigation of algal bloom in the lake. Numerical simulations identify the most critical parameters that influence the blooms and provide indications to possibly mitigate it.

  2. Modeling the impact of awareness on the mitigation of algal bloom in a lake.

    PubMed

    Misra, A K; Tiwari, P K; Venturino, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of algal bloom in water bodies due to the enhanced concentration of nutrient inflow is becoming a global issue. A prime reason behind this aquatic catastrophe is agricultural runoff, which carries a large amount of nutrients that make the lakes more fertile and cause algal blooms. The only solution to this problem is curtailing the nutrient loading through agricultural runoff. This could be achieved by raising awareness among farmers to minimize the use of fertilizers in their farms. In view of this, in this paper, we propose a mathematical model to study the effect of awareness among the farmers of the mitigation of algal bloom in a lake. The growth rate of awareness among the farmers is assumed to be proportional to the density of algae in the lake. It is further assumed that the presence of awareness among the farmers reduces the inflow rate of nutrients through agricultural runoff and helps to remove the detritus by cleaning the bottom of the lake. The results evoke that raising awareness among farmers may be a plausible factor for the mitigation of algal bloom in the lake. Numerical simulations identify the most critical parameters that influence the blooms and provide indications to possibly mitigate it. PMID:26411559

  3. Light, nutrients, and herbivore growth in oligotrophic streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Walter R; Smith, John G; Stewart, Arthur J

    2010-02-01

    The light : nutrient hypothesis posits that herbivore growth is increasingly constrained by low food quality as the ratio of light to nutrients increases in aquatic ecosystems. We tested predictions of this hypothesis by examining the effects of large seasonal cycles in light and nutrients on the mineral content of periphyton and the growth rate of a dominant herbivore (the snail Elimia clavaeformis) in two oligotrophic streams. Streambed irradiances in White Oak Creek and Walker Branch (eastern Tennessee, USA) varied dramatically on a seasonal basis due to leaf phenology in the surrounding deciduous forests and seasonal changes in sun angle. Concentrations of dissolved nutrients varied inversely with light, causing light : nitrate and light : phosphate to range almost 100-fold over the course of any individual year. Periphyton nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were much lower than the concentrations of these elements in snails, and they bottomed out in early spring when streambed irradiances were highest. Snail growth, however, peaked in early spring when light:nutrient ratios were highest and periphyton nutrient concentrations were lowest, Growth was linearly related to primary production (accounting for up to 85% of growth variance in individual years), which in turn was driven by seasonal variation in light. Conceptual models of herbivore growth indicate that growth should initially increase as increasing light levels stimulate primary production, but then level off, and then decrease as the negative effects of decreasing algal nutrient content override the positive effects of increased food production. Our results showed no evidence of an inflection point where increasing ratios of light to nutrients negatively affected growth. Snail growth in these intensively grazed streams is probably unaffected by periphyton nutrient content because exploitative competition for food reduces growth rates to levels where the demand for nitrogen and phosphorus is small

  4. Light, nutrients, and herbivore growth in oligotrophic streams.

    PubMed

    Hill, Walter R; Smith, John G; Stewart, Arthur J

    2010-02-01

    The light : nutrient hypothesis posits that herbivore growth is increasingly constrained by low food quality as the ratio of light to nutrients increases in aquatic ecosystems. We tested predictions of this hypothesis by examining the effects of large seasonal cycles in light and nutrients on the mineral content of periphyton and the growth rate of a dominant herbivore (the snail Elimia clavaeformis) in two oligotrophic streams. Streambed irradiances in White Oak Creek and Walker Branch (eastern Tennessee, USA) varied dramatically on a seasonal basis due to leaf phenology in the surrounding deciduous forests and seasonal changes in sun angle. Concentrations of dissolved nutrients varied inversely with light, causing light : nitrate and light : phosphate to range almost 100-fold over the course of any individual year. Periphyton nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were much lower than the concentrations of these elements in snails, and they bottomed out in early spring when streambed irradiances were highest. Snail growth, however, peaked in early spring when light:nutrient ratios were highest and periphyton nutrient concentrations were lowest, Growth was linearly related to primary production (accounting for up to 85% of growth variance in individual years), which in turn was driven by seasonal variation in light. Conceptual models of herbivore growth indicate that growth should initially increase as increasing light levels stimulate primary production, but then level off, and then decrease as the negative effects of decreasing algal nutrient content override the positive effects of increased food production. Our results showed no evidence of an inflection point where increasing ratios of light to nutrients negatively affected growth. Snail growth in these intensively grazed streams is probably unaffected by periphyton nutrient content because exploitative competition for food reduces growth rates to levels where the demand for nitrogen and phosphorus is small

  5. Removal of nutrient limitations in forest gaps enhances growth rate and resistance to cavitation in subtropical canopy tree species differing in shade tolerance.

    PubMed

    Villagra, Mariana; Campanello, Paula I; Montti, Lia; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2013-03-01

    A 4-year fertilization experiment with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) was carried out in natural gaps of a subtropical forest in northeastern Argentina. Saplings of six dominant canopy species differing in shade tolerance were grown in five control and five N + P fertilized gaps. Hydraulic architectural traits such as wood density, the leaf area to sapwood area ratio (LA : SA), vulnerability to cavitation (P50) and specific and leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity were measured, as well as the relative growth rate, specific leaf area (SLA) and percentage of leaf damage by insect herbivores. Plant growth rates and resistance to drought-induced embolisms increased when nutrient limitations were removed. On average, the P50 of control plants was -1.1 MPa, while the P50 of fertilized plants was -1.6 MPa. Wood density and LA : SA decreased with N + P additions. A trade-off between vulnerability to cavitation and efficiency of water transport was not observed. The relative growth rate was positively related to the total leaf surface area per plant and negatively related to LA : SA, while P50 was positively related to SLA across species and treatments. Plants with higher growth rates and higher total leaf area in fertilized plots were able to avoid hydraulic dysfunction by becoming less vulnerable to cavitation (more negative P50). Two high-light-requiring species exhibited relatively low growth rates due to heavy herbivore damage. Contrary to expectations, shade-tolerant plants with relatively high resistance to hydraulic dysfunction and reduced herbivory damage were able to grow faster. These results suggest that during the initial phase of sapling establishment in gaps, species that were less vulnerable to cavitation and exhibited reduced herbivory damage had faster realized growth rates than less shade-tolerant species with higher potential growth rates. Finally, functional relationships between hydraulic traits and growth rate across species and treatments

  6. PsbQ (Sll1638) in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is required for photosystem II activity in specific mutants and in nutrient-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Tina C; Shand, Jackie A; Bentley, Fiona K; Eaton-Rye, Julian J

    2005-01-18

    A PsbQ homologue has been found associated with photosystem II complexes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 where it is involved in optimal photoautotrophic growth and water splitting under CaCl(2)-depleted conditions [Thornton, L. E., Ohkawa, H., Roose, J. L., Kashino, Y., Keren, N., and Pakrasi, H. B. (2004) Plant Cell 16, 2164-2175]. By inactivating psbQ in strains carrying photosystem II-specific mutations, we have identified stringent requirements for PsbQ in vivo. Whereas under nutrient-replete conditions the DeltaPsbQ mutant was similar to wild type, a strain lacking PsbQ and PsbV was not photoautotrophic, exhibiting decreased oxygen evolution and decreased photosystem II assembly compared to the DeltaPsbV mutant. Combining the removal of PsbU and PsbQ introduced an altered requirement for Ca(2+) and Cl(-), and photoautotrophic growth of the DeltaPsbQ strain was prevented in nutrient-limiting media depleted in Ca(2+), Cl(-), and iron. Unlike other photosystem II extrinsic proteins PsbQ did not participate in the acquisition of thermotolerance; however, photoautotrophic growth at elevated temperatures was impaired in this mutant. Growth of the DeltaPsbV:DeltaPsbQ mutant was restored at pH 10.0: in contrast, an additional deletion between Arg-384 and Val-392 in the CP47 protein of photosystem II prevented recovery at alkaline pH. When conditions prevented photoautotrophy in strains lacking PsbQ, photoheterotrophic growth was indistinguishable to wild type, indicating that photosystem II had been inactivated. These data substantiate a role for PsbQ in optimizing photosystem II activity in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and establish an absolute requirement for the subunit under specific biochemical and physiological conditions. PMID:15641809

  7. Feeding distillers dried grains in replacement of forage in limit-fed dairy heifer rations: Effects on growth performance, rumen fermentation, and total-tract digestibility of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Manthey, A K; Anderson, J L; Perry, G A

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of increasing dietary concentration of distillers dried grains (DDGS) in dairy heifer rations. A 16-wk randomized complete block design study was conducted using 48 Holstein heifers [199±2 d of age; body weight (BW) 206±2kg] to evaluate effects of dietary treatment on dry matter (DM) intake, average daily gain, growth performance, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility. Treatments were (1) 30% DDGS with the diet fed at 2.65% of BW, (2) 40% DDGS with the diet fed at 2.50% of BW, and (3) 50% DDGS with the diet fed at 2.35% of BW. The remainder of the diet consisted of grass hay and 1.5% mineral mix. Heifers were individually limit-fed using Calan gates. Heifers were weighed every 2 wk and the ration amount offered was adjusted accordingly. Frame measurements and body condition score were recorded every 2wk. Rumen fluid was collected via esophageal tubing during wk 12 and 16 for pH, ammonia N, and volatile fatty acid analysis. Total-tract digestibility of nutrients was evaluated during wk 16 using fecal grab sampling. No treatment by week interactions were found for any of the growth parameters measured, and growth parameters did not differ among treatments. Heifer DM intake linearly decreased with increasing concentrations of DDGS. Body weight and average daily gain were similar among treatments, whereas gain:feed linearly increased across treatments, with a tendency for a treatment by time interaction. As the dietary concentrations of DDGS increased, rumen ammonia N linearly increased. Acetate proportion and acetate:propionate linearly decreased as DDGS increased, whereas propionate linearly increased. There were treatment by time interactions for propionate proportion and acetate:propionate. Increasing dietary concentrations of DDGS linearly increased total-tract digestibility of DM, organic matter, and crude protein. Limit-feeding diets with greater concentrations of DDGS improved gain:feed and

  8. Feeding distillers dried grains in replacement of forage in limit-fed dairy heifer rations: Effects on growth performance, rumen fermentation, and total-tract digestibility of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Manthey, A K; Anderson, J L; Perry, G A

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of increasing dietary concentration of distillers dried grains (DDGS) in dairy heifer rations. A 16-wk randomized complete block design study was conducted using 48 Holstein heifers [199±2 d of age; body weight (BW) 206±2kg] to evaluate effects of dietary treatment on dry matter (DM) intake, average daily gain, growth performance, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility. Treatments were (1) 30% DDGS with the diet fed at 2.65% of BW, (2) 40% DDGS with the diet fed at 2.50% of BW, and (3) 50% DDGS with the diet fed at 2.35% of BW. The remainder of the diet consisted of grass hay and 1.5% mineral mix. Heifers were individually limit-fed using Calan gates. Heifers were weighed every 2 wk and the ration amount offered was adjusted accordingly. Frame measurements and body condition score were recorded every 2wk. Rumen fluid was collected via esophageal tubing during wk 12 and 16 for pH, ammonia N, and volatile fatty acid analysis. Total-tract digestibility of nutrients was evaluated during wk 16 using fecal grab sampling. No treatment by week interactions were found for any of the growth parameters measured, and growth parameters did not differ among treatments. Heifer DM intake linearly decreased with increasing concentrations of DDGS. Body weight and average daily gain were similar among treatments, whereas gain:feed linearly increased across treatments, with a tendency for a treatment by time interaction. As the dietary concentrations of DDGS increased, rumen ammonia N linearly increased. Acetate proportion and acetate:propionate linearly decreased as DDGS increased, whereas propionate linearly increased. There were treatment by time interactions for propionate proportion and acetate:propionate. Increasing dietary concentrations of DDGS linearly increased total-tract digestibility of DM, organic matter, and crude protein. Limit-feeding diets with greater concentrations of DDGS improved gain:feed and

  9. Rapid Accumulation of Total Lipid in Rhizoclonium africanum Kutzing as Biodiesel Feedstock under Nutrient Limitations and the Associated Changes at Cellular Level

    PubMed Central

    Satpati, Gour Gopal; Kanjilal, Sanjit; Narayana Prasad, Rachapudi Badari; Pal, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Increase of total lipid and the proportion of the favorable fatty acids in marine green filamentous macroalga Rhizoclonium africanum (Chlorophyceae) was studied under nitrate and phosphate limitations. These stresses were given by both eliminating and doubling the required amounts of nitrate and phosphate salts in the growth media. A significant twofold increase in total lipid (193.03 mg/g) was achieved in cells in absence of nitrate in the culture medium, followed by phosphate limitation (142.65 mg/g). The intracellular accumulation of neutral lipids was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The scanning electron microscopic study showed the major structural changes under nutrient starvation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed the presence of ester (C-O-C stretching), ketone (C-C stretching), carboxylic acid (O-H bending), phosphine (P-H stretching), aromatic (C-H stretching and bending), and alcohol (O-H stretching and bending) groups in the treated cells indicating the high accumulation of lipid hydrocarbons in the treated cells. Elevated levels of fatty acids favorable for biodiesel production, that is, C16:0, C16:1, C18:1, and C20:1, were identified under nitrate- and phosphate-deficient conditions. This study shows that the manipulation of cultural conditions could affect the biosynthetic pathways leading to increased lipid production while increasing the proportion of fatty acids suitable for biodiesel production. PMID:26880924

  10. Rapid Accumulation of Total Lipid in Rhizoclonium africanum Kutzing as Biodiesel Feedstock under Nutrient Limitations and the Associated Changes at Cellular Level.

    PubMed

    Satpati, Gour Gopal; Kanjilal, Sanjit; Narayana Prasad, Rachapudi Badari; Pal, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Increase of total lipid and the proportion of the favorable fatty acids in marine green filamentous macroalga Rhizoclonium africanum (Chlorophyceae) was studied under nitrate and phosphate limitations. These stresses were given by both eliminating and doubling the required amounts of nitrate and phosphate salts in the growth media. A significant twofold increase in total lipid (193.03 mg/g) was achieved in cells in absence of nitrate in the culture medium, followed by phosphate limitation (142.65 mg/g). The intracellular accumulation of neutral lipids was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The scanning electron microscopic study showed the major structural changes under nutrient starvation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed the presence of ester (C-O-C stretching), ketone (C-C stretching), carboxylic acid (O-H bending), phosphine (P-H stretching), aromatic (C-H stretching and bending), and alcohol (O-H stretching and bending) groups in the treated cells indicating the high accumulation of lipid hydrocarbons in the treated cells. Elevated levels of fatty acids favorable for biodiesel production, that is, C16:0, C16:1, C18:1, and C20:1, were identified under nitrate- and phosphate-deficient conditions. This study shows that the manipulation of cultural conditions could affect the biosynthetic pathways leading to increased lipid production while increasing the proportion of fatty acids suitable for biodiesel production.

  11. Remote Sensing Marine Ecology: Wind-driven algal blooms in the open oceans and their ecological impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, DanLing

    2016-07-01

    Algal bloom not only can increase the primary production but also could result in negative ecological consequence, e.g., Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). According to the classic theory for the formation of algal blooms "critical depth" and "eutrophication", oligotrophic sea area is usually difficult to form a large area of algal blooms, and actually the traditional observation is only sporadic capture to the existence of algal blooms. Taking full advantage of multiple data of satellite remote sensing, this study: 1), introduces "Wind-driven algal blooms in open oceans: observation and mechanisms" It explained except classic coastal Ekman transport, the wind through a variety of mechanisms affecting the formation of algal blooms. Proposed a conceptual model of "Strong wind -upwelling-nutrient-phytoplankton blooms" in Western South China Sea (SCS) to assess role of wind-induced advection transport in phytoplankton bloom formation. It illustrates the nutrient resources that support long-term offshore phytoplankton blooms in the western SCS; 2), Proposal of the theory that "typhoons cause vertical mixing, induce phytoplankton blooms", and quantify their important contribution to marine primary production; Proposal a new ecological index for typhoon. Proposed remote sensing inversion models. 3), Finding of the spatial and temporaldistributions pattern of harmful algal bloom (HAB)and species variations of HAB in the South Yellow Sea and East China Sea, and in the Pearl River estuary, and their oceanic dynamic mechanisms related with monsoon; The project developed new techniques and generated new knowledge, which significantly improved understanding of the formation mechanisms of algal blooms. 1), It proposed "wind-pump" mechanism integrates theoretical system combing "ocean dynamics, development of algal blooms, and impact on primary production", which will benefit fisheries management. 2), A new interdisciplinary subject "Remote Sensing Marine Ecology"(RSME) has been

  12. Consistency and sensitivity of stream periphyton community structural and functional responses to nutrient enrichment.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Craig E; Bennett, Danuta M; Cardinale, Bradley J

    2013-01-01

    Eutrophication remains one of the foremost impacts of industrialization and population expansion on aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Selecting metrics for assessing the manner in which communities and biogeochemical processes respond to nutrient fertilization is an ongoing management challenge critical both for detecting changes and for monitoring recovery of impaired environments. A key limitation to the selection of response variables is the lack of consistent evaluation of metrics under the same conditions in multiple systems across ecoregions. Here we report the results of nutrient-diffusing agar fertilization experiments conducted simultaneously in 30 streams in two distinct ecoregions of California, USA: the mountainous Sierra Nevada and the coastal chaparral of Santa Barbara county. In each experiment we evaluated algal community shifts across five nutrient delivery rates using multiple response variables at the ecosystem process (respiration and primary production), community (biomass and diversity metrics), functional group (nitrogen fixing, growth form, nutrient adaptation), and taxonomic group (indicator species, genera, families) levels of ecological organization. We used mixed-effect general linear models to quantify the magnitude, sensitivity, and consistency of responses among streams within and across ecoregions to provide an objective assessment of the potential for each variable to describe and detect significant changes in algal community characteristics. Our results indicate that ecosystem- and community-level variables showed significant and consistent nutrient responses among diverse streams and across the two ecoregions, while indicator taxa and functional groups were less likely to respond consistently to nutrient enrichment. We discuss the relevance of our findings to the ongoing development of monitoring and bioassessment strategies for aquatic eutrophication.

  13. Consistency and sensitivity of stream periphyton community structural and functional responses to nutrient enrichment.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Craig E; Bennett, Danuta M; Cardinale, Bradley J

    2013-01-01

    Eutrophication remains one of the foremost impacts of industrialization and population expansion on aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Selecting metrics for assessing the manner in which communities and biogeochemical processes respond to nutrient fertilization is an ongoing management challenge critical both for detecting changes and for monitoring recovery of impaired environments. A key limitation to the selection of response variables is the lack of consistent evaluation of metrics under the same conditions in multiple systems across ecoregions. Here we report the results of nutrient-diffusing agar fertilization experiments conducted simultaneously in 30 streams in two distinct ecoregions of California, USA: the mountainous Sierra Nevada and the coastal chaparral of Santa Barbara county. In each experiment we evaluated algal community shifts across five nutrient delivery rates using multiple response variables at the ecosystem process (respiration and primary production), community (biomass and diversity metrics), functional group (nitrogen fixing, growth form, nutrient adaptation), and taxonomic group (indicator species, genera, families) levels of ecological organization. We used mixed-effect general linear models to quantify the magnitude, sensitivity, and consistency of responses among streams within and across ecoregions to provide an objective assessment of the potential for each variable to describe and detect significant changes in algal community characteristics. Our results indicate that ecosystem- and community-level variables showed significant and consistent nutrient responses among diverse streams and across the two ecoregions, while indicator taxa and functional groups were less likely to respond consistently to nutrient enrichment. We discuss the relevance of our findings to the ongoing development of monitoring and bioassessment strategies for aquatic eutrophication. PMID:23495644

  14. NUTRIENT DYNAMICS IN STREAMS AND THE ROLE OF J-NABS

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Webster, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Nutrient dynamics in streams has been an important topic of research since the 1960s. Here we review this topic and the significant role played by J-NABS in its development. We limit this review almost exclusively to studies of N and P because these elements have been shown to limit productivity in streams. We use the expression nutrient dynamics for studies that included some measures of biological processes occurring within streams. Prior to the 1970s, instream biological processes were little studied, but through 1985 conceptual advances were made, and 4 types of studies made important contributions to our understanding of instream processes: (1) evidence of increased plant production and decomposition in response to nutrient addition, (2) studies showing a downstream decrease in nutrient concentrations, (3) studies using radioisotopes, and (4) budget studies. Beginning with the first paper printed in its first issue, J-NABS has been the outlet for key papers advancing our understanding of rates and controls of nutrient dynamics in streams. In the first few years, an important review and a conceptual model for conducting experiments to study nutrient dynamics in streams were published in J-NABS. In the 1990s, J-NABS published a number of papers on nutrient recycling within algal communities, the role of the hyporheic zone, the role of spawning fish, and the coupling of data from field {sup 15}N additions and a N-cycling model to provide a synoptic view of N dynamics in streams. Since 2000, J-NABS has published influential studies on nutrient criteria for streams, rates of and controls on nitrification and denitrification, uptake of stream nutrients by riparian vegetation, and nutrient dynamics in urban streams. Nutrient dynamics will certainly continue to be an important topic in J-NABS. Topics needing further study include techniques for studying nutrient dynamics, nutrient dynamics in larger streams and rivers, the ultimate fate of nutrients taken up by plants

  15. Changes in Nutrients and Primary Production in Barrow Tundra Ponds Over the Past 40 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougheed, V.; Andresen, C.; Hernandez, C.; Miller, N.; Reyes, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Arctic tundra ponds at the International Biological Program (IBP) site in Barrow, Alaska were studied extensively in the 1970's; however, very little research has occurred there since that time. Due to the sensitivity of this region to climate warming, understanding any changes in the ponds' structure and function over the past 40 years can help identify any potential climate-related impacts. The goal of this study was to determine if the structure and function of primary producers had changed through time, and the association between these changes, urban encroachment and nutrient limitation. Nutrient levels, as well as the biomass of aquatic graminoids (Carex aquatilis and Arctophila fulva), phytoplankton and periphyton were determined in the IBP tundra ponds in both 1971-3 and 2010-12, and in 2010-11 from nearby ponds along an anthropogenic disturbance gradient. Uptake of 14C was also used to measure algal primary production in both time periods and nutrient addition experiments were performed to identify the nutrients limiting algal growth. Similar methods were utilized in the past and present studies. Overall, biomass of graminoids, phytoplankton and periphyton was greater in 2010-12 than that observed in the 1970s. This increased biomass was coincident with warmer water temperatures, increased water column nutrients and deeper active layer depth. Biomass of plants and algae was highest in the ponds closest to the village of Barrow, but no effect of urban encroachment was observed at the IBP ponds. Laboratory incubations indicated that nutrient release from thawing permafrost can explain part of these increases in nutrients and has likely contributed to changes in the primary limiting nutrient. Further studies are necessary to better understand the implications of these trends in primary production to nutrient budgets in the Arctic. The Barrow IBP tundra ponds represent one of the very few locations in the Arctic where long-term data are available on

  16. Luminescent Solar Concentrators in the Algal Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellier, Katie; Corrado, Carley; Carter, Sue; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    Today's industry for renewable energy sources and highly efficient energy management systems is rapidly increasing. Development of increased efficiency Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) has brought about new applications for commercial interests, including greenhouses for agricultural crops. This project is taking first steps to explore the potential of LSCs to enhance production and reduce costs for algae and cyanobacteria used in biofuels and nutraceuticals. This pilot phase uses LSC filtered light for algal growth trials in greenhouses and laboratory experiments, creating specific wavelength combinations to determine effects of discrete solar light regimes on algal growth and the reduction of heating and water loss in the system. Enhancing the optimal spectra for specific algae will not only increase production, but has the potential to lessen contamination of large scale production due to competition from other algae and bacteria. Providing LSC filtered light will reduce evaporation and heating in regions with limited water supply, while the increased energy output from photovoltaic cells will reduce costs of heating and mixing cultures, thus creating a more efficient and cost effective production system.

  17. Nutrient enrichment can increase the susceptibility of reef corals to bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenmann, Jörg; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Smith, Edward G.; Hunt, Alan N.; Legiret, François-Eric; Postle, Anthony D.; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2013-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching, resulting from the breakdown of coral-algal symbiosis has been identified as the most severe threat to coral reef survival on a global scale. Regionally, nutrient enrichment of reef waters is often associated with a significant loss of coral cover and diversity. Recently, increased dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have been linked to a reduction of the temperature threshold of coral bleaching, a phenomenon for which no mechanistic explanation is available. Here we show that increased levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in combination with limited phosphate concentrations result in an increased susceptibility of corals to temperature- and light-induced bleaching. Mass spectrometric analyses of the algal lipidome revealed a marked accumulation of sulpholipids under these conditions. Together with increased phosphatase activities, this change indicates that the imbalanced supply of dissolved inorganic nitrogen results in phosphate starvation of the symbiotic algae. Based on these findings we introduce a conceptual model that links unfavourable ratios of dissolved inorganic nutrients in the water column with established mechanisms of coral bleaching. Notably, this model improves the understanding of the detrimental effects of coastal nutrient enrichment on coral reefs, which is urgently required to support knowledge-based management strategies to mitigate the effects of climate change.

  18. Algal taxonomy forum: Algal Taxonomist, Let Serendipity Reign!

    PubMed

    Druehl, Louis

    2013-04-01

    The publication of a mini-review by Olivier De Clerck et al. in this issue of the Journal of Phycology presented an opportunity to open a dialogue on challenges faced by contemporary algal taxonomists. The Editorial Office solicited the following two additional contributions in response to De Clerck et al.'s paper; the responses were edited solely for clarity, space and format. PMID:27008510

  19. Nutrient Limitation in the Precambrian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planavsky, N. J.; Lalonde, S.; Konhauser, K.; Lyons, T. W.

    2010-04-01

    We present Fe and P concentrations from distal hydrothermal sediments and iron formations through time in order to evaluate the evolution of the marine P reservoir. P concentrations appear to have been elevated in Precambrian oceans.

  20. Problems related to water quality and algal control in Lopez Reservoir, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Richard H.; Averett, Robert C.; Hines, Walter G.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the present enrichment status of Liopez Reservoir in San Luis Obispo county, California, and to evaluate copper sulfate algal treatment found that stratification in the reservoir regulates nutrient release and that algal control has been ineffective. Nuisance algal blooms, particularly from March to June, have been a problem in the warm multipurpose reservoir since it was initially filled following intense storms in 1968-69. The cyanophyte Anabaena unispora has been dominant; cospecies are the diatoms Stephanodiscus astraea and Cyclotella operculata, and the chlorophytes Pediastrum deplex and Sphaerocystis schroeteri. During an A. unispora bloom in May 1972 the total lake surface cell count was nearly 100,000 cells/ml. Thermal stratification from late spring through autumn results in oxygen deficiency in the hypolimnion and metalimnion caused by bacterial oxidation of organic detritus. The anaerobic conditions favor chemical reduction of organic matter, which constitute 10-14% of the sediment. As algae die, sink to the bottom, and decompose, nutrients are released to the hypolimnion , and with the autumn overturn are spread to the epilimnion. Algal blooms not only hamper recreation, but through depletion of dissolved oxygen in the epilimnion may have caused periodic fishkills. Copper sulfate mixed with sodium citrate and applied at 1.10-1.73 lbs/acre has not significantly reduced algal growth; a method for determining correct dosage is presented. (Lynch-Wisconsin)

  1. Nutrient load summaries for major lakes and estuaries of the Eastern United States, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moorman, Michelle C.; Hoos, Anne B.; Bricker, Suzanne B.; Moore, Richard B.; García, Ana María; Ator, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment of lakes and estuaries across the Nation is widespread. Nutrient enrichment can stimulate excessive plant and algal growth and cause a number of undesirable effects that impair aquatic life and recreational activities and can also result in economic effects. Understanding the amount of nutrients entering lakes and estuaries, the physical characteristics affecting the nutrient processing within these receiving waterbodies, and the natural and manmade sources of nutrients is fundamental to the development of effective nutrient reduction strategies. To improve this understanding, sources and stream transport of nutrients to 255 major lakes and 64 estuaries in the Eastern United States were estimated using Spatially Referenced Regression on Watershed attributes (SPARROW) nutrient models.

  2. LINKING NUTRIENTS TO ALTERATIONS IN AQUATIC LIFE IN CALIFORNIA WADEABLE STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report estimates the natural background and ambient concentrations of primary producer abundance indicators in California wadeable streams, identifies thresholds of adverse effects of nutrient-stimulated primary producer abundance on benthic macroinvertebrate and algal commu...

  3. Fungal farmers or algal escorts: lichen adaptation from the algal perspective.

    PubMed

    Piercey-Normore, Michele D; Deduke, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    Domestication of algae by lichen-forming fungi describes the symbiotic relationship between the photosynthetic (green alga or cyanobacterium; photobiont) and fungal (mycobiont) partnership in lichen associations (Goward 1992). The algal domestication implies that the mycobiont cultivates the alga as a monoculture within its thallus, analogous to a farmer cultivating a food crop. However, the initial photobiont 'selection' by the mycobiont may be predetermined by the habitat rather than by the farmer. When the mycobiont selects a photobiont from the available photobionts within a habitat, the mycobiont may influence photobiont growth and reproduction (Ahmadjian & Jacobs 1981) only after the interaction has been initiated. The theory of ecological guilds (Rikkinen et al. 2002) proposes that habitat limits the variety of photobionts available to the fungal partner. While some studies provide evidence to support the theory of ecological guilds in cyanobacterial lichens (Rikkinen et al. 2002), other studies propose models to explain variation in symbiont combinations in green algal lichens (Ohmura et al. 2006; Piercey-Normore 2006; Yahr et al. 2006) hypothesizing the existence of such guilds. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Peksa & Škaloud (2011) test the theory of ecological guilds and suggest a relationship between algal habitat requirements and lichen adaptation in green algal lichens of the genus Lepraria. The environmental parameters examined in this study, exposure to rainfall, altitude and substratum type, are integral to lichen biology. Lichens have a poikilohydric nature, relying on the availability of atmospheric moisture for metabolic processes. Having no known active mechanism to preserve metabolic thallus moisture in times of drought, one would expect a strong influence of the environment on symbiont adaptation to specific habitats. Adaptation to changes in substrata and its properties would be expected with the intimate contact between crustose

  4. Algal blooms and public health

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, P.R. . Harvard Medical School)

    1993-06-01

    Alterations in coastal ecology are expanding the geographic extent, frequency, magnitude, and species complexity'' of algal blooms throughout the world, increasing the threat of fish and shellfish poisonings, anoxia in marine nurseries, and of cholera. The World Health Organization and members of the medical profession have described the potential health effects of global climate change. They warn of the consequences of increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) rays and of warming: the possible damage to agriculture and nutrition, and the impact on habitats which may alter the distribution of vector-borne and water-based infectious diseases. Algal growth due to increased nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and warming are already affecting marine microflora and aquatic plants; and there is now clear evidence that marine organisms are a reservoir for enteric pathogens. The pattern of cholera in the Western Hemisphere suggests that environmental changes have already begun to influence the epidemiology of this infectious disease. 106 refs.

  5. Combined effect of predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal suppression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shengpeng; Wan, Kun; Ma, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the combined effects of four typical predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal control in a microcosm system. It would determine the effects of diverse species and biological restoration on the growth of harmful water-bloom microalgae in great lakes polluted by excess nutrients. It was found that the mixtures of each zooplankton and the floating plant Nymphoides peltatum had stronger inhibitory effects on harmful water-bloom microalgae than the individual species in clean or eutrophic water bodies. In addition, a community of four zooplankton types had a synergistic effect on algal inhibition. Algal suppression by the zooplankton community was enhanced significantly when the macrophyte was co-cultured in the microcosm. Furthermore, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was more susceptible than Microcystis aeruginosa when exposed to grazing by zooplankton and the allelopathic potential of the macrophyte. Algal inhibition was also weaker in eutrophic conditions compared with the control. These findings indicate that diverse species may enhance algal inhibition. Therefore, it is necessary to restore biological diversity and rebuild an ecologically balanced food chain or web to facilitate the control of harmful algal blooms in eutrophic lakes. PMID:25409583

  6. Combined effect of predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal suppression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shengpeng; Wan, Kun; Ma, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the combined effects of four typical predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal control in a microcosm system. It would determine the effects of diverse species and biological restoration on the growth of harmful water-bloom microalgae in great lakes polluted by excess nutrients. It was found that the mixtures of each zooplankton and the floating plant Nymphoides peltatum had stronger inhibitory effects on harmful water-bloom microalgae than the individual species in clean or eutrophic water bodies. In addition, a community of four zooplankton types had a synergistic effect on algal inhibition. Algal suppression by the zooplankton community was enhanced significantly when the macrophyte was co-cultured in the microcosm. Furthermore, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was more susceptible than Microcystis aeruginosa when exposed to grazing by zooplankton and the allelopathic potential of the macrophyte. Algal inhibition was also weaker in eutrophic conditions compared with the control. These findings indicate that diverse species may enhance algal inhibition. Therefore, it is necessary to restore biological diversity and rebuild an ecologically balanced food chain or web to facilitate the control of harmful algal blooms in eutrophic lakes.

  7. An algal solution to large scale wastewater amelioration

    SciTech Connect

    Adey, W.H.

    1995-06-01

    Wastewater nutrients can be lowered to oligotrophic levels through uptake by algal biomass, while photosynthetic oxygen removes bacterial BOD, and oxygen-based ions, with UV application, can break down xenobiotic organic compounds. Algae also uptake heavy metals in cell walls, and the high pH from CO{sub 25} removal precipitates metals, earth metals and phosphorus. Algal biomass produced from many wastewaters has valuable commercial applications. Algal Turf Scrubbing (ATS) was developed as a tool to control water quality in ecosystem models, often at oligotrophic levels. ATS has routinely achieved biomass production (and water amelioration capability) of over 50 g (dry mass) m{sup -2} day{sup -1} in secondary sewage. Engineering innovations, with mechanized harvest, have brought ATS to large scale with a pilot sewage plant in central California. This is a low cost, modular unit, at 1000 cubic meters per day, and plans are underway to expand to city capacity for Tertiary-Quinary water recovery. A wide variety of wastewater applications, from agricultural, to aquacultural to industrial will be discussed.

  8. Nutrient fluxes through the Humber estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, R. J.; Jickells, T.; Malcolm, S.; Brown, J.; Kirkwood, D.; Reeve, A.; Taylor, J.; Horrobin, T.; Ashcroft, C.

    1997-05-01

    The Humber is a large and complex estuarine system on the east coast of England fed by several rivers. Fluxes of dissolved inorganic nutrients to, through and from this estuary over 1990-1993 are estimated from point flux calculations and property salinity plots. Internal nutrient sources and sinks are quantified. Fluxes of nutrients to the system are highly seasonal; fluxes of nitrate and phosphate are dominated by winter flows in the River Trent, the ammonium flux is dominated by the Rivers Aire and Don. The tidal Trent has a large internal source of ammonium, removes about 80% of its dissolved phosphate load and functions as a sink for nitrate. The tidal Ouse has large internal sources of nitrate, phosphate and ammonium, removes over 60% of its dissolved phosphate load, is an overall source of nitrate and a large sink for ammonium. The main estuary, below the confluence of the two tidal river systems, removes about 6% of the phosphate and 50% of the ammonium entering at the confluence or about 50% and 80%, respectively, if internal sources are taken into account. Nitrate behaves conservatively within the main estuary; thus any conversion of ammonium to nitrate is balanced by a nitrate sink of comparable size. Buffering mechanisms in the outer estuary may release phosphate in similar magnitudes to the direct dissolved export. The seasonality in nitrate flux to the system is preserved throughout the system. The seasonality of the phosphate flux to the system is almost eliminated in the lower part of the tidal rivers at the early part of the salinity gradient. This, combined with phosphate buffering, may render the offshore region nitrogen-limited under conditions suitable for algal growth. Overall the Humber system removes 85% of its dissolved phosphate load, and 4% of its dissolved inorganic nitrogen load.

  9. Differential Nutrient Limitation of Soil Microbial Biomass and Metabolic Quotients (qCO2): Is There a Biological Stoichiometry of Soil Microbes?

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Wyatt H.; Richardson, Curtis J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Variation in microbial metabolism poses one of the greatest current uncertainties in models of global carbon cycling, and is particularly poorly understood in soils. Biological Stoichiometry theory describes biochemical mechanisms linking metabolic rates with variation in the elemental composition of cells and organisms, and has been widely observed in animals, plants, and plankton. However, this theory has not been widely tested in microbes, which are considered to have fixed ratios of major elements in soils. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine whether Biological Stoichiometry underlies patterns of soil microbial metabolism, we compiled published data on microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) pools in soils spanning the global range of climate, vegetation, and land use types. We compared element ratios in microbial biomass pools to the metabolic quotient qCO2 (respiration per unit biomass), where soil C mineralization was simultaneously measured in controlled incubations. Although microbial C, N, and P stoichiometry appeared to follow somewhat constrained allometric relationships at the global scale, we found significant variation in the C∶N∶P ratios of soil microbes across land use and habitat types, and size-dependent scaling of microbial C∶N and C∶P (but not N∶P) ratios. Microbial stoichiometry and metabolic quotients were also weakly correlated as suggested by Biological Stoichiometry theory. Importantly, we found that while soil microbial biomass appeared constrained by soil N availability, microbial metabolic rates (qCO2) were most strongly associated with inorganic P availability. Conclusions/Significance Our findings appear consistent with the model of cellular metabolism described by Biological Stoichiometry theory, where biomass is limited by N needed to build proteins, but rates of protein synthesis are limited by the high P demands of ribosomes. Incorporation of these physiological processes may

  10. Spatiotemporal Distribution of Harmful Algal Flora in the Tropical Estuarine Complex of Goa, India

    PubMed Central

    Pednekar, Suraksha M.; Prabhu Matondkar, S. G.; Kerkar, Vijaya

    2012-01-01

    Mandovi and Zuari estuarine complex is monsoon-influenced estuaries located along the central west coast of India. During the past few years, there has been an increase in nutrient loading specially during monsoonal runoff which is responsible for the growth of harmful algal flora. To understand occurrence and distribution of harmful algal blooms species, daily/alternate day samplings were carried out in Mandovi and Zuari estuaries during 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 periods, respectively, comprising of monsoon (June–November) and nonmonsoon (December–May). In Mandovi, total 54 HAB species with 49 in monsoon and 36 during nonmonsoon period were reported. In Zuari, total 46 HAB species with 38 in monsoon and 41 were reported during nonmonsoon period. Bray-Curtis cluster analysis based on log-transformed phytoplankton density detected seven well-defined groups revealing spatiotemporal variability. The density of the dominant harmful algal species was significantly positively correlated with nutrients, but negatively correlated with salinity. The results of the study indicate that monsoon plays an important role in occurrence and distribution of harmful algal species having direct correlation with salinity variations and nutrient loading. PMID:22629154

  11. Spatiotemporal distribution of harmful algal flora in the tropical estuarine complex of Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Pednekar, Suraksha M; Prabhu Matondkar, S G; Kerkar, Vijaya

    2012-01-01

    Mandovi and Zuari estuarine complex is monsoon-influenced estuaries located along the central west coast of India. During the past few years, there has been an increase in nutrient loading specially during monsoonal runoff which is responsible for the growth of harmful algal flora. To understand occurrence and distribution of harmful algal blooms species, daily/alternate day samplings were carried out in Mandovi and Zuari estuaries during 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 periods, respectively, comprising of monsoon (June-November) and nonmonsoon (December-May). In Mandovi, total 54 HAB species with 49 in monsoon and 36 during nonmonsoon period were reported. In Zuari, total 46 HAB species with 38 in monsoon and 41 were reported during nonmonsoon period. Bray-Curtis cluster analysis based on log-transformed phytoplankton density detected seven well-defined groups revealing spatiotemporal variability. The density of the dominant harmful algal species was significantly positively correlated with nutrients, but negatively correlated with salinity. The results of the study indicate that monsoon plays an important role in occurrence and distribution of harmful algal species having direct correlation with salinity variations and nutrient loading.

  12. An experimental study on the effects of nutrient enrichment on organic carbon persistence in the western Pacific oligotrophic gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Jiao, N.; Tang, K.

    2014-09-01

    Carbon sequestration in the ocean is of great concern with respect to the mitigation of global warming. How to hold the fixed organic carbon in the presence of tremendous numbers of heterotrophic microorganisms in marine environments is the central issue. We previously hypothesized that excessive nutrients would ultimately decrease the storage of organic carbon in marine environments. To test this, a series of in situ nutrient enrichment incubation experiments were conducted at a site (17.59° N, 127.00° E) within the western Pacific oligotrophic gyre. Five treatments were employed: glucose (Glu), algal exudation organic material (EOM), nitrate (N) and phosphate (P), N and P in combination with glucose and a control with no added nutrients. The results showed that the dissolved organic carbon consumption rates and bacterial community specific growth rates were enhanced by inorganic nutrient enrichment treatments during the initial 48 h incubation. At the end of 14 days of incubation, about one-third (average 3.3 μmol C kg-1) more organic carbon was respired in the glucose-enriched incubation with the addition of inorganic nutrients compared to that without. In contrast, when nutrients were limiting, glucose could not be efficiently used by the bacteria and thus it remained in the environment. These results suggest that repletion of inorganic nutrients could facilitate microbial consumption of organic carbon and thus has a significant impact on carbon cycling in the environment.

  13. Algal Growth Potential of Microcystis aeruginosa from Reclaimed Water.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jin Chul; Ahn, Chang Hyuk; Lee, Saeromi; Jang, Dae-Gyu; Lee, Woo Hyoung; Ryu, Byong Ro

    2016-01-01

    Algal growth potential (AGP) of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa, NIES-298) using reclaimed water from various wastewater reclamation pilot plants was investigated to evaluate the feasibility of the reclaimed water usage for recreational purposes. After completing the coagulation and ultrafiltration processes, the concentrations of most contaminants in the reclaimed water were lower than the reuse guidelines for recreational water. However, M. aeruginosa successfully adapted to low levels of soluble reactive phosphorus (PO(3-)(4)) concentrations. The AGP values of M. aeruginosa decreased with the progression of treatment processes, and with the increases in the dilution volume. Also, both the AGP and chlorophyll-a values can be estimated a priori without conducting the AGP tests. Therefore, aquatic ecosystems in locations prone to environmental conditions favorable for the growth of M. aeruginosa require more rigorous nutrient management plans (e.g., reverse osmosis and dilution with clean water resources) to reduce the nutrient availability. PMID:26803027

  14. Stability of alginate-immobilized algal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dainty, A.L.; Goulding, K.H.; Robinson, P.K.; Simpkins, I; Trevan, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were carried out using immobilized Chlorella cells to determine the diameter, compressibility, tolerance to phosphate chelation, and ability to retain algal cells during incubation of various alginate beads. These physical bead-characteristics were affected by a variety of interactive factors, including multivalent cation type (hardening agent) and cell, cation, and alginate concentration, the latter exhibiting a predominant influence. The susceptibility of alginate beads to phosphate chelation involved a complex interaction of cation type, concentration, and pH of phosphate solution. A scale of response ranging from gel swelling to gel shrinking was observed for a range of conditions. However, stable Ca alginate beads were maintained in incubation media with a pH of 5.5 and a phosphate concentration of 5 micro M. A preliminary investigation into cell leakage from the beads illustrated the importance of maintaining a stable gel structure and limiting cell growth to reduce leakage.

  15. A study of algal biomass potential in selected Canadian regions.

    SciTech Connect

    Passell, Howard David; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2011-11-01

    A dynamic assessment model has been developed for evaluating the potential algal biomass and extracted biocrude productivity and costs, using nutrient and water resources available from waste streams in four regions of Canada (western British Columbia, Alberta oil fields, southern Ontario, and Nova Scotia). The purpose of this model is to help identify optimal locations in Canada for algae cultivation and biofuel production. The model uses spatially referenced data across the four regions for nitrogen and phosphorous loads in municipal wastewaters, and CO{sub 2} in exhaust streams from a variety of large industrial sources. Other data inputs include land cover, and solar insolation. Model users can develop estimates of resource potential by manipulating model assumptions in a graphic user interface, and updated results are viewed in real time. Resource potential by location can be viewed in terms of biomass production potential, potential CO{sub 2} fixed, biocrude production potential, and area required. The cost of producing algal biomass can be estimated using an approximation of the distance to move CO{sub 2} and water to the desired land parcel and an estimation of capital and operating costs for a theoretical open pond facility. Preliminary results suggest that in most cases, the CO{sub 2} resource is plentiful compared to other necessary nutrients (especially nitrogen), and that siting and prospects for successful large-scale algae cultivation efforts in Canada will be driven by availability of those other nutrients and the efficiency with which they can be used and re-used. Cost curves based on optimal possible siting of an open pond system are shown. The cost of energy for maintaining optimal growth temperatures is not considered in this effort, and additional research in this area, which has not been well studied at these latitudes, will be important in refining the costs of algal biomass production. The model will be used by NRC-IMB Canada to identify

  16. Air pollutant production by algal cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The production of phytotoxic air pollutants by cultures of Chlorella vulgaris and Euglena gracilis is considered. Algal and plant culture systems, a fumigation system, and ethylene, ethane, cyanide, and nitrogen oxides assays are discussed. Bean, tobacco, mustard green, cantaloupe and wheat plants all showed injury when fumigated with algal gases for 4 hours. Only coleus plants showed any resistance to the gases. It is found that a closed or recycled air effluent system does not produce plant injury from algal air pollutants.

  17. The role of nutrient loading and eutrophication in estuarine ecology.

    PubMed Central

    Pinckney, J L; Paerl, H W; Tester, P; Richardson, T L

    2001-01-01

    Eutrophication is a process that can be defined as an increase in the rate of supply of organic matter (OM) to an ecosystem. We provide a general overview of the major features driving estuarine eutrophication and outline some of the consequences of that process. The main chemical constituent of OM is carbon (C), and therefore rates of eutrophication are expressed in units of C per area per unit time. OM occurs in both particulate and dissolved forms. Allochthonous OM originates outside the estuary, whereas autochthonous OM is generated within the system, mostly by primary producers or by benthic regeneration of OM. The supply rates of limiting nutrients regulate phytoplankton productivity that contributes to inputs of autochthonous OM. The trophic status of an estuary is often based on eutrophication rates and can be categorized as oligotrophic (<100 g C m(-2) y(-1), mesotrophic (100-300 g C m(-2) y(-1), eutrophic (300-500 g C m(-2) y(-1), or hypertrophic (>500 g C m(-2) y(-1). Ecosystem responses to eutrophication depend on both export rates (flushing, microbially mediated losses through respiration, and denitrification) and recycling/regeneration rates within the estuary. The mitigation of the effects of eutrophication involves the regulation of inorganic nutrient (primarily N and P) inputs into receiving waters. Appropriately scaled and parameterized nutrient and hydrologic controls are the only realistic options for controlling phytoplankton blooms, algal toxicity, and other symptoms of eutrophication in estuarine ecosystems. PMID:11677178

  18. Estimation of stream nutrient uptake from nutrient addition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Payn, Robert

    2005-09-01

    Nutrient uptake in streams is often quantified by determining nutrient uptake length. However, current methods for measuring nutrient uptake length are often impractical, expensive, or demonstrably incorrect. We have developed a new method to estimate ambient nutrient uptake lengths using field experiments involving several levels of nutrient addition. Data analysis involves plotting nutrient addition uptake lengths versus added concentration and extrapolating to the negative ambient concentration. This method is relatively easy, inexpensive, and based on sound theoretical development. It is more accurate than the commonly used method involving a single nutrient addition. The utility of the method is supported by field studies directly comparing our new method with isotopic tracer methods for determining uptake lengths of phosphorus, ammonium, and nitrate. Our method also provides parameters for comparing potential nutrient limitation among streams.

  19. Methods for removing contaminants from algal oil

    DOEpatents

    Lupton, Francis Stephen

    2016-09-27

    Methods for removing contaminants from algal oil are provided. In an embodiment, a method comprises the steps of combining a sulfuric acid-aqueous solution that has a pH of about 1 or less with a contaminant-containing algal oil at treatment conditions effective to form an effluent. The effluent comprises a treated algal oil phase and contaminants in an acidic aqueous phase. The contaminants comprise metals, phosphorus, or combinations thereof. The acidic aqueous phase is removed from the effluent to form a contaminant-depleted algal oil.

  20. Future Climate Impacts on Harmful Algal Blooms in an Agriculturally Dominated Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloysius, N. R.; Martin, J.; Ludsin, S.; Stumpf, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Cyanobacteria blooms have become a major problem worldwide in aquatic ecosystems that receive excessive runoff of limiting nutrients from terrestrial drainage. Such blooms often are considered harmful because they degrade ecosystem services, threaten public health, and burden local economies. Owing to changing agricultural land-use practices, Lake Erie, the most biologically productive of the North American Great Lakes, has begun to undergo a re-eutrophication in which the frequency and extent of harmful algal blooms (HABs) has increased. Continued climate change has been hypothesized to magnify the HAB problem in Lake Erie in the absence of new agricultural management practices, although this hypothesis has yet to be formally tested empirically. Herein, we tested this hypothesis by predicting how the frequency and extent of potentially harmful cyanobacteria blooms will change in Lake Erie during the 21st century under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment climate projections in the region. To do so, we used 80 ensembles of climate projections from 20 Global Climate Models (GCMs) and two greenhouse gas emission scenarios (moderate reduction, RCP4.5; business-as-usual, RCP8.5) to drive a spatiotemporally explicit watershed-hydrology model that was linked to several statistical predictive models of annual cyanobacteria blooms in Lake Erie. Owing to anticipated increases in precipitation during spring and warmer temperatures during summer, our ensemble of predictions revealed that, if current land-management practices continue, the frequency of severe HABs in Lake Erie will increase during the 21st century. These findings identify a real need to consider future climate projections when developing nutrient reduction strategies in the short term, with adaptation also needing to be encouraged under both greenhouse gas emissions scenarios in the absence of effective nutrient mitigation strategies.

  1. Climate Variability Impacts on Watershed Nutrient Delivery and Reservoir Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. D.; Prochnow, S. J.; Zygo, L. M.; Byars, B. W.

    2005-05-01

    Reservoirs in agricultural dominated watersheds tend to exhibit pulse-system behavior especially if located in climates dominated by summer convective precipitation inputs. Concentration and bulk mass of nutrient and sediment inputs into reservoir systems vary in terms of timing and magnitude of delivery from watershed sources to reservoirs under these climate conditions. Reservoir management often focuses on long-term average inputs without considering short and long-term impacts of variation in loading. In this study we modeled a watershed-reservoir system to assess how climate variability affects reservoir primary production through shifts in external loading and internal recycling of limiting nutrients. The Bosque watershed encompasses 423,824 ha in central Texas which delivers water to Lake Waco, a 2900 ha reservoir that is the primary water source for the city of Waco and surrounding areas. Utilizing the Soil Water Assessment Tool for the watershed and river simulations and the CE-Qual-2e model for the reservoir, hydrologic and nutrient dynamics were simulated for a 10 year period encompassing two ENSO cycles. The models were calibrated based on point measurement of water quality attributes for a two year time period. Results indicated that watershed delivery of nutrients was affected by the presence and density of small flood-control structure in the watershed. However, considerable nitrogen and phosphorus loadings were derived from soils in the upper watershed which have had long-term waste-application from concentrated animal feeding operations. During El Niño years, nutrient and sediment loads increased by 3 times above non-El Niño years. The simulated response within the reservoir to these nutrient and sediment loads had both direct and indirect. Productivity evaluated from chlorophyll a and algal biomass increased under El Niño conditions, however species composition shifts were found with an increase in cyanobacteria dominance. In non-El Niño years

  2. Ocean nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Hurd, Catriona L.

    Nutrients provide the chemical life-support system for phytoplankton in the ocean. Together with the carbon fixed during photosynthesis, nutrients provide the other elements, such as N and P, needed to synthesize macromolecules to build cellular constituents such as ribosomes. The makeup of these various biochemicals, such as proteins, pigments, and nucleic acids, together determine the elemental stoichiometry of an individual phytoplankton cell. The stoichiometry of different phytoplankton species or groups will vary depending on the proportions of distinct cellular machinery, such as for growth or resource acquisition, they require for their life strategies. The uptake of nutrients by phytoplankton helps to set the primary productivity, and drives the biological pump, of the global ocean. In the case of nitrogen, the supply of nutrients is categorized as either new or regenerated. The supply of new nitrogen, such as nitrate upwelled from the ocean' interior or biological nitrogen fixation, is equal to the vertical export of particular organic matter from the upper ocean on a timescale of years. Nutrients such as silica can also play a structural role in some phytoplankton groups, such as diatoms, where they are used to synthesize a siliceous frustule that offers some mechanical protection from grazers. In this chapter, we also explore nutrient uptake kinetics, patterns in nutrient distributions in space and time, the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, the atmospheric supply of nutrients, departures from the Redfield ratio, and whether nutrient distributions and cycling will be altered in the future

  3. Algal and Invertebrate Community Composition along Agricultural Gradients: A Comparative Study from Two Regions of the Eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calhoun, Daniel L.; Gregory, M. Brian; Weyers, Holly S.

    2008-01-01

    Benthic algal and invertebrate communities in two Coastal Plain regions of the Eastern United States?the Delmarva Peninsula (27 sites) and Georgia Upper Coastal Plain (29 sites)?were assessed to determine if aspects of agricultural land use and nutrient conditions (dissolved and whole-water nitrogen and phosphorus) could be linked to biological community compositions. Extensive effort was made to compile land-use data describing the basin and riparian conditions at multiple scales to determine if scale played a role in these relations. Large differences in nutrient condition were found between the two study areas, wherein on average, the Delmarva sites had three times the total phosphorus and total nitrogen as did the sites in the Georgia Upper Coastal Plain. A statistical approach was undertaken that included multivariate correlations between Bray-Curtis similarity matrices of the biological communities and Euclidean similarity matrices of instream nutrients and land-use categories. Invertebrate assemblage composition was most associated with land use near the sampled reach, and algal diatom assemblage composition was most associated with land use farther from the streams and into the watersheds. Link tree analyses were conducted to isolate portions of nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordinations of community compositions that could be explained by break points in abiotic datasets. Invertebrate communities were better defined by factors such as agricultural land use near streams and geographic position. Algal communities were better defined by agricultural land use at the basin scale and instream nutrient chemistry. Algal autecological indices were more correlated with gradients of nutrient condition than were typically employed invertebrate metrics and may hold more promise in indicating nutrient impairment in these regions. Nutrient conditions in the respective study areas are compared to draft nutrient criteria established by the U.S. Environmental Protection

  4. Nutrient and dissolved organic carbon removal from water using mining and metallurgical by-products.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Laura A; Douglas, Grant B; Coleman, Shandel; Yuan, Zheng

    2012-05-15

    Excess nutrient input to water bodies frequently results in algal blooms and development of oxygen deficient conditions. Mining or metallurgical by-products can potentially be utilised as filtration media within water treatment systems such as constructed wetlands, permeable reactive barriers, or drain liners. These materials may offer a cost-effective solution for the removal of nutrients and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from natural waters. This study investigated steel-making, alumina refining (red mud and red sand) and heavy mineral processing by-products, as well as the low-cost mineral-based material calcined magnesia, in laboratory column trials. Influent water and column effluents were analysed for pH and flow rate, alkalinity, nutrient species and DOC, and a range of major cations and anions. In general, by-products with high Ca or Mg, and to a lesser extent those with high Fe content, were well-suited to nutrient and DOC removal from water. Of the individual materials examined, the heavy mineral processing residue neutralised used acid (NUA) exhibited the highest sorption capacity for P, and removed the greatest proportions of all N species and DOC from influent water. In general, NUA and mixtures containing NUA, particularly those with calcined magnesia or red mud/red sand were the most effective in removing nutrients and DOC from influent water. Post-treatment effluents from columns containing NUA and NUA/steel-making by-product, NUA/red sand and NUA/calcined magnesia mixtures exhibited large reductions in DOC, P and N concentrations and exhibited a shift in nutrient ratios away from potential N- and Si-limitation and towards potential P-limitation. If employed as part of a large-scale water treatment scheme, use of these mining and metallurgical by-products for nutrient removal could result in reduced algal biomass and improved water quality. Identification and effective implementation of mining by-products or blends thereof in constructed wetlands

  5. Applying the light: nutrient hypothesis to stream periphyton

    SciTech Connect

    Fanta, S.E.; Hill, Walter; Smith, Timothy B.; Roberts, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    The light:nutrient hypothesis (LNH) states that algal nutrient content is determined by the balance of light and dissolved nutrients available to algae during growth. Light and phosphorus gradients in both laboratory and natural streams were used to examine the relevance of the LNH to stream periphyton. Controlled gradients of light (12-426 mol photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP, 3-344 {mu}g L{sup -1}) were applied experimentally to large flow-through laboratory streams, and natural variability in canopy cover and discharge from a wastewater treatment facility created gradients of light (0.4-35 mol photons m{sup -2} day{sup -1}) and DRP (10-1766 {mu}g L{sup -1}) in a natural stream. Periphyton phosphorus content was strongly influenced by the light and DRP gradients, ranging from 1.8 to 10.7 {mu}g mg AFDM{sup -1} in the laboratory streams and from 2.3 to 36.9 {mu}g mg AFDM{sup -1} in the natural stream. Phosphorus content decreased with increasing light and increased with increasing water column phosphorus. The simultaneous effects of light and phosphorus were consistent with the LNH that the balance between light and nutrients determines algal nutrient content. In experiments in the laboratory streams, periphyton phosphorus increased hyperbolically with increasing DRP. Uptake then began leveling off around 50 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The relationship between periphyton phosphorus and the light: phosphorus ratio was highly nonlinear in both the laboratory and natural streams, with phosphorus content declining sharply with initial increases in the light: phosphorus ratio, then leveling off at higher values of the ratio. Although light and DRP both affected periphyton phosphorus content, the effects of DRP were much stronger than those of light in both the laboratory and natural streams. DRP explained substantially more of the overall variability in periphyton phosphorus than did light, and light effects were evident only at lower phosphorus

  6. Determination of the cyanobacterial toxin cylindrospermopsin in algal food supplements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H.; Scott, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    For the analysis of blue–green algal food supplements for cylindrospermopsin (CYN), a C18 solid-phase extraction column and a polygraphitized carbon solid-phase extraction column in series was an effective procedure for the clean-up of extracts. Determination of CYN was by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet light detection. At extract spiking levels of CYN equivalent to 25–500 μg g−1, blue–green algal supplement recoveries were in the range 70–90%. CYN was not detected in ten samples of food supplements and one chocolate product, all containing blue–green algae. The limit of detection for the method was 16 μg g−1, and the limit of quantification was 52 μg g−1. PMID:21623503

  7. Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

    DOE PAGES

    Unkefer, Clifford Jay; Sayre, Richard Thomas; Magnuson, Jon K.; Anderson, Daniel B.; Baxter, Ivan; Blaby, Ian K.; Brown, Judith K.; Carleton, Michael; Cattolico, Rose Ann; Dale, Taraka T.; et al

    2016-06-21

    In 2010,when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortium began, little was known about the molecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very few algal genome sequences were available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played by metabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass and oilmore » yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. Our review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.« less

  8. Kelp canopy facilitates understory algal assemblage via competitive release during early stages of secondary succession.

    PubMed

    Benes, Kylla M; Carpenter, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Kelps are conspicuous foundation species in marine ecosystems that alter the composition of understory algal assemblages. While this may be due to changes in the competitive interactions between algal species, how kelp canopies mediate propagule supply and establishment success of understory algae is not well known. In Southern California, USA, Eisenia arborea forms dense kelp canopies in shallow subtidal environments and is associated with an understory dominated by red algal species. In canopy-free areas, however, the algal assemblage is comprised of mostly brown algal species. We used a combination of mensurative and manipulative experiments to test whether Eisenia facilitates the understory assemblage by reducing competition between these different types of algae by changes in biotic interactions and/or recruitment. Our results show Eisenia facilitates a red algal assemblage via inhibition of brown algal settlement into the canopy zone, allowing recruitment to occur by vegetative means rather than establishment of new individuals. In the canopy-free zone, however, high settlement and recruitment rates suggest competitive interactions shape the community there. These results demonstrate that foundation species alter the distribution and abundance of associated organisms by affecting not only interspecific interactions but also propagule supply and recruitment limitation.

  9. Algal blooms reduce the uptake of toxic methylmercury in freshwater food webs.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, Paul C; Folt, Carol L; Chen, Celia Y; Klaue, Bjoern; Blum, Joel D

    2002-04-01

    Mercury accumulation in fish is a global public health concern, because fish are the primary source of toxic methylmercury to humans. Fish from all lakes do not pose the same level of risk to consumers. One of the most intriguing patterns is that potentially dangerous mercury concentrations can be found in fish from clear, oligotrophic lakes whereas fish from greener, eutrophic lakes often carry less mercury. In this study, we experimentally tested the hypothesis that increasing algal biomass reduces mercury accumulation at higher trophic levels through the dilution of mercury in consumed algal cells. Under bloom dilution, as algal biomass increases, the concentration of mercury per cell decreases, resulting in a lower dietary input to grazers and reduced bioaccumulation in algal-rich eutrophic systems. To test this hypothesis, we added enriched stable isotopes of Hg to experimental mesocosms and measured the uptake of toxic methylmercury (CH3 200Hg+) and inorganic 201Hg2+ by biota at several algal concentrations. We reduced absolute spike detection limits by 50-100 times compared with previous techniques, which allowed us to conduct experiments at the extremely low aqueous Hg concentrations that are typical of natural systems. We found that increasing algae reduced CH3Hg+ concentrations in zooplankton 2-3-fold. Bloom dilution may provide a mechanistic explanation for lower CH3Hg+ accumulation by zooplankton and fish in algal-rich relative to algal-poor systems. PMID:11904388

  10. How hydrodynamics control algal blooms in the Ythan estuary, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champangern, Khruewan; Hoey, Trevor; Thomas, Rhian

    2016-04-01

    The Ythan estuary, northeast Scotland, was designated in 2000 as a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone (NVZ) under the European Commission (EC) Nitrates Directive. Much of the catchment is intensively farmed and water quality has been adversely affected by nutrients from agricultural fertilizers. As a result, algal mats develop annually on tidal flats where sediment from upstream and from the adjacent dune systems is deposited. Understanding the patterns of water (river and ocean) circulation in the estuary as well as understanding how nutrients and sediments are transported in the estuary is crucial for understanding the role of several factors (elevation; sediment characteristics; nutrient flux) control the locations and scale of annual algal blooms. In order to understand those controls, study of interactions between hydrodynamic factors and water quality, in particular chlorophyll levels, at different time scales has been carried out. The results from the study reveal complex seasonal and event-scale relationships of river flow with the amount of chlorophyll, which provide an initial comprehension of controls over the concentrations of chlorophyll in the estuary. The concentration of chlorophyll changes, whether increasing or decreasing, with regards to changes in river flow. During high flow events, high amounts of chlorophyll are found when the tide is low. During low flow events, high amounts of chlorophyll are found at high tides. These phenomena reveal that both river flow and tidal cycle affect the amount of chlorophyll in the estuary. In addition, the Delft3d flow model, which has been extensively applied to many coastal and estuarine studies is used to simulate hydrodynamic patterns in the estuary during high flow and low flow events. The model is composed of 36,450 fine resolution grids and the upstream/ downstream boundary that represents water level is based on time-series data from river flow and tidal measurements. The bathymetry used for the model domain is

  11. Effect of lake water on algal biomass and microbial community structure in municipal wastewater-based lab-scale photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Krustok, I; Truu, J; Odlare, M; Truu, M; Ligi, T; Tiirik, K; Nehrenheim, E

    2015-08-01

    Photobioreactors are a novel environmental technology that can produce biofuels with the simultaneous removal of nutrients and pollutants from wastewaters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lake water inoculation on the production of algal biomass and phylogenetic and functional structure of the algal and bacterial communities in municipal wastewater-treating lab-scale photobioreactors. Inoculating the reactors with lake water had a significant benefit to the overall algal biomass growth and nutrient reduction in the reactors with wastewater and lake water (ratio 70/30 v/v). The metagenome-based survey showed that the most abundant algal phylum in these reactors was Chlorophyta with Scenedesmus being the most prominent genus. The most abundant bacterial phyla were Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes with most dominant families being Sphingobacteriaceae, Cytophagaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Comamonadaceae, Planctomycetaceae, Nocardiaceae and Nostocaceae. These photobioreactors were also effective in reducing the overall amount of pathogens in wastewater compared to reactors with wastewater/tap water mixture. Functional analysis of the photobioreactor metagenomes revealed an increase in relative abundance genes related to photosynthesis, synthesis of vitamins important for auxotrophic algae and decrease in virulence and nitrogen metabolism subsystems in lake water reactors. The results of the study indicate that adding lake water to the wastewater-based photobioreactor leads to an altered bacterial community phylogenetic and functional structure that could be linked to higher algal biomass production, as well as to enhanced nutrient and pathogen reduction in these reactors.

  12. Nutrient management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management has been defined as “the science and art directed to link soil, crop, weather and hydrologic factors with cultural, irrigation and soil and water conservation practices to achieve the goals of optimizing nutrient use efficiency, yields, crop quality, and economic returns, while r...

  13. Available nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar technology may contribute to the recovery and recycling of plant nutrients and thus add a fertilizer value to the biochar. Total nutrient content in biochars varies greatly and is mainly dependent on feedstock elemental composition and to a lesser extent on pyrolysis conditions. Availability...

  14. Carbon Sequestration through Sustainably Sourced Algal Fertilizer: Deep Ocean Water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Drawing down carbon from the atmosphere happens in the oceans when marine plants are growing due to the use of carbon dioxide for biological processes and by raising the pH of the water. Macro- and microscopic marine photosynthesizers are limited in their growth by the availability of light and nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorous, iron, etc.) Deep ocean water (DOW), oceanic water from bellow about 1000m, is a natural medium for marine algae, which contains all (except in rare circumstances) necessary components for algal growth and represents over 90% of the volume of the ocean. The introduction of DOW to a tropical or summer sea can increase chlorophyll from near zero to 60 mg per M3 or more. The form of the utilization infrastructure for DOW can roughly be divided into two effective types; the unconstrained release and the open pond system. Unconstrained release has the advantage of having relatively low infrastructure investment and is available to any area of the ocean. The open pond system has high infrastructure costs but enables intensive use of DOW for harvesting macro- and microalgae and sustainable mariculture. It also enables greater concomitant production of DOW's other potential products such as electricity or potable water. However, unlike an unconstrained release the open pond system can capture much of the biomaterial from the water and limits the impact to the surrounding ecosystem. The Tidal Irrigation and Electrical System (TIESystem), is an open pond that is to be constructed on a continental shelf. It harnesses the tidal flux to pump DOW into the pond on the rising tide and then uses the falling tide to pump biologically rich material out of the pond. This biomaterial represents fixed CO2 and can be used for biofuel or fertilizers. The TIESystem benefits from an economy of scale that increases at a rate that is roughly equal to the relationship of the circumference of a circle (the barrier that creates the open pond) to the area of the pond

  15. Algal and Bacterial Activities in Acidic (pH 3) Strip Mine Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Gyure, Ruth A.; Konopka, Allan; Brooks, Austin; Doemel, William

    1987-01-01

    Reservoir 29 and Lake B are extremely acid lakes (epilimnion pHs of 2.7 and 3.2, respectively), because they receive acidic discharges from coal refuse piles. They differ in that the pH of profundal sediments in Reservoir 29 increased from 2.7 to 3.8 during the period of thermal stratification, whereas permanently anoxic sediments in Lake B had a pH of 6.2. The pH rise in Reservoir 29 sediments was correlated with a temporal increase in H2S concentration in the anaerobic hypolimnion from 0 to >1 mM. The chlorophyll a levels in the epilimnion of Reservoir 29 were low, and the rate of primary production was typical of an oligotrophic system. However, there was a dense 10-cm layer of algal biomass at the bottom of the metalimnion. Production by this layer was low owing to light limitation and possibly H2S toxicity. The specific photosynthetic rates of epilimnetic algae were low, which suggests that nutrient availability is more important than pH in limiting production. The highest photosynthetic rates were obtained in water samples incubated at pH 2.7 to 4. Heterotrophic bacterial activity (measured by [14C]glucose metabolism) was greatest at the sediment/water interface. Bacterial production (assayed by thymidine incorporation) was as high in Reservoir 29 as in a nonacid mesotrophic Indiana lake. PMID:16347430

  16. Algal and bacterial activities in acidic (pH 3) strip mine lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Gyure, R.A.; Konopka, A.; Brooks, A.; Doemel, W.

    1987-09-01

    Reservoir 29 and Lake B are extremely acid lakes (epilimnion pHs of 2.7 and 3.2, respectively), because they receive acidic discharges from coal refuse piles. They differ in that the pH of profundal sediments in Reservoir 29 increased from 2.7 to 3.8 during the period of thermal stratification, whereas permanently anoxic sediments in Lake B had a pH of 6.2. The pH rise in Reservoir 29 sediments was correlated with a temporal increase in H/sub 2/S concentration in the anaerobic hypolimnion from 0 to >1 mM. The chlorophyll a levels in the epilimnion of Reservoir 29 were low, and the rate of primary production was typical of an oligotrophic system. However, there was a dense 10-cm layer of algal biomass at the bottom of the metalimnion. Production by this layer was low owing to light limitation and possibly H/sub 2/S toxicity. The specific photosynthetic rates of epilimnetic algae were low, which suggests that nutrient availability is more important than pH in limiting production. The highest photosynthetic rates were obtained in water samples incubated at pH 2.7 to 4. Heterotrophic bacterial activity (measured by (/sup 14/C)glucose metabolism) was greatest at the sediment/water interface. Bacterial production (assayed by thymidine incorporation) was as high in Reservoir 29 as in a nonacid mesotrophic Indiana lake.

  17. Algal Bloom Detection from HICO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Ruhul; Gould, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Ocean color satellites provide daily, global views of marine bio-optical properties in the upper ocean at various spatial scales. The most productive area of the global ocean is the coastal zone which is heavily impacted by urban and agricultural runoff, transportation, recreation, and oil and gas production. In recent years, harmful algal blooms (HABs) have become one of the serious environmental problems in the coastal areas on a global scale. The global nature of the problem has expanded in its frequency, severity, and extent over the last several decades. Human activities and population increases have contributed to an increase in various toxic and noxious algal species in the coastal regions worldwide. Eutrophication in estuaries and coastal waters is believed to be the major factor causing HABs. In this study, we assess the applicability of the Red Band Difference (RBD) HAB detection algorithm on data from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO). Our preliminary results show that due to various uncertainties such as atmospheric correction, calibration and possibly also the relatively low signal-to-noise ratio of HICO for fluorescence detection, it is difficult to extract the fluorescence portion of the reflectance spectrum that RBD uses for bloom detection. We propose an improved bloom detection technique for HICO using red and NIR bands. Our results are validated using other space-borne and ground based measurements.

  18. Toward a transport-based analysis of nutrient spiraling and uptake in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Nutrient addition experiments are designed to study the cycling of nutrients in stream ecosystems where hydrologic and nonhydrologic processes determine nutrient fate. Because of the importance of hydrologic processes in stream ecosystems, a conceptual model known as nutrient spiraling is frequently employed. A central part of the nutrient spiraling approach is the determination of uptake length (SW), the average distance traveled by dissolved nutrients in the water column before uptake. Although the nutrient spiraling concept has been an invaluable tool in stream ecology, the current practice of estimating uptake length from steady-state nutrient data using linear regression (called here the "SW approach") presents a number of limitations. These limitations are identified by comparing the exponential SW equation with analytical solutions of a stream solute transport model. This comparison indicates that (1) SW, is an aggregate measure of uptake that does not distinguish between main channel and storage zone processes, (2) SW, is an integrated measure of numerous hydrologie and nonhydrologic processes-this process integration may lead to difficulties in interpretation when comparing estimates of SW, and (3) estimates of uptake velocity and areal uptake rate (Vf and U) based on S W, are not independent of system hydrology. Given these findings, a transport-based approach to nutrient spiraling is presented for steady-state and time-series data sets. The transport-based approach for time-series data sets is suggested for future research on nutrient uptake as it provides a number of benefits, including the ability to (1) separately quantify main channel and storage zone uptake, (2) quantify specific hydrologic and nonhydrologic processes using various model parameters (process separation), (3) estimate uptake velocities and areal uptake rates that are independent of hydrologic effects, and (4) use short-term, non-plateau nutrient additions such that the effects of

  19. Watershed management strategies to prevent and control cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Piehler, Michael F

    2008-01-01

    The tenets of watershed management--a focus on the land area linked to the water body, the incorporation of sound scientific information into the decision-making process and stakeholder involvement throughout the process--are well-suited for the management of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (C-HABs). The management of C-HABs can be viewed as having two main areas of focus. First, there is mitigation--control and/or removal of the bloom. This type of crisis response is an important component to managing active C-HABs and there are several techniques that have been successfully utilized, including the application of algicides, physical removal of surface scums and the mechanical mixing of the water column. While these methods are valuable because they address the immediate problem, they do not address the conditions that exist in the system that promote and maintain C-HABs. Thus, the second component of a successful C-HAB management strategy would include a focus on prevention. C-HABs require nutrients to fuel their growth and are often favored in longer-residence time systems with vertical stratification of the water column. Consequently, nutrients and hydrology are the two factors most commonly identified as the targets for prevention of C-HABs. Management strategies to control the sources, transformation and delivery of the primary growth-limiting nutrients have been applied with success in many areas. The most effective of these include controlling land use, maintaining the integrity of the landscape and applying best management practices. In the past, notable successes in managing C-HABs have relied on the reduction of nutrients from point-sources. Because many point sources are now well-managed, current efforts are focused on non-point source nutrient reduction, such as runoff from agricultural and urban areas. Non-point sources present significant challenges due to their diffuse nature. Regardless of which techniques are utilized, effective watershed

  20. Solving problems resulting from solutions: evolution of a dual nutrient management strategy for the eutrophying Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Valdes, Lexia M; Joyner, Alan R; Piehler, Michael F; Lebo, Martin E

    2004-06-01

    In estuaries, phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) inputs generally control freshwater and saltwater primary production, respectively. Improved wastewater P removal and a P-detergent ban in the late 1980s decreased P loading to the nutrient over-enriched Neuse River Estuary, NC, without a contemporaneous reduction in N loading. This led to a decrease in upstream freshwater phytoplankton production and a reduction in nuisance algal blooms. While this nutrient management approach appeared to be effective in reducing the symptoms of freshwater eutrophication, it may have also diminished the upstream algal N filter, promoting N enrichment, relative to P enrichment, and eutrophication of the more saline downstream N-limited waters. Recent N controls implemented by the State of North Carolina should help address the problem. These findings underscore the need for watershed- and basin-scale, dual nutrient (N and P) reduction strategies that consider the entire freshwater--marine continuum as well as hydrologic variability (e.g., hurricanes, floods, droughts) when formulating long-term controls of estuarine eutrophication.

  1. Transformations of nutrients (N, P, Si) in the turbidity maximum zone of the Seine estuary and export to the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Josette; Billen, Gilles; Némery, Julien; Sebilo, Mathieu

    2010-12-01

    Nutrients (N, P, Si) were studied in the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) of the Seine estuary at various moments of tidal cycles from April to October in 2001, 2002 and 2003, covering a salinity gradient from 0 to 27. Contrasted hydrological conditions were observed (extremely wet in 2001, unusually dry in 2003). Nutrient fluxes were analysed in terms of an indicator of coastal eutrophication potential (ICEP) using nutrient stoichiometry. Besides these three years, nutrient fluxes and corresponding ICEP values were analysed for a 17-year period, from 1990 to 2006. N, P and Si forms did not show ample transformations in the salinity gradient, revealing that the estuary plays a limited buffer role at the interface between river and coastal zone, however not inconsiderable during dry hydrology when longer water and particle residence times are compatible with the biological growth rates. The simplified LIFT model of the TMZ, already used for analysing organic matter transformation, was implemented here to simulate the nutrients' behaviour in the salinity gradient and to quantify nutrient fluxes after their transit in the TMZ. Abatements ranging from 15% to 40% of incoming N and P were calculated, without significant changes for silica. Although P-ICEP values did not show a severe risk for coastal eutrophication for the past few years, contrary to the situation from 1970 to 2000, the high N-ICEP, due to a steady use of fertilisers in agriculture, is a real threat for eutrophication and harmful algal blooms.

  2. Evaluation of a bacterial algal control agent in tank-based experiments.

    PubMed

    Schmack, M; Chambers, J; Dallas, S

    2012-05-01

    A bacterial-based bioremediation product, LakeRelief™ by Novozymes (Waterguru LakeRelief, 2011), was tested in a series of experiments between October 2008 and March 2009 to evaluate its suitability as a short-term intervention technique to reduce algal blooms in the Swan-Canning River system. Results from fibreglass tank experiments (1100 L) suggested that the product did not actively attack and lyse algal cells. The product decreased NH(4) and NO(x) concentrations in treated tanks, both aerated and non-aerated. Product application decreased PO(4) concentrations in non-aerated tanks but not in aerated tanks. The product appeared to suppress algal growth in non-aerated tanks over short periods (several days). Algal growth regularly diminished after product application but reappeared shortly afterwards. Aeration had a negative effect on bacterial proliferation in the tanks, possibly through alteration of environmental conditions (e.g. water mixing). As a consequence of the environmental conditions in the tanks being counterproductive to the development of a representative microbial composition, several aspects regarding the product's effectiveness could not be assessed satisfactorily in the tank experiments. The importance of long-term nutrient immobilisation into a well developed food web and the subsequent nutrient removal through removal of the top order organisms is highlighted. PMID:22386889

  3. Study on the dynamics of algal bloom and its influence factors in Tolo Harbour, Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Li, Y S; Chen, X; Wai, Onyx W H; King, B

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the semi-enclosed bay named Tolo Harbour and Channel in Hong Kong, which was frequently attacked by red tides, was used as a case study. Data sets related to marine water quality, river nutrients, and meteorological conditions recorded between 1988 and 1999 were chosen for statistical analysis. A multivariate analysis showed that algal growth, represented by the chlorophyll a concentration, had obvious spatial and temporal variations in the study area. The chlorophyll a concentration had a consistently decreasing trend from the inner part of the Harbour and surface waters to the outer part and bottom waters. The temporal variations had a markedly seasonal variation with high bioproductivity in spring and winter. There were long-term fluctuations in the chlorophyll a concentration with a high-low-high pattern in the study period. Nutrients and hydrological and meteorological conditions were important factors of algal bloom. Besides nitrogen, which was the most critical factor of algal bloom for the whole water body, total phosphorus in the surface waters and phosphate (PO4) and silica (SiO2) in the bottom waters also showed strongly positive or negative correlations with the chlorophyll a level. For the meteorological conditions, global solar radiation was the key factor of massive algal bloom in the study period, while rainfall and wind direction were the most important factors of seasonal variation. PMID:16042112

  4. Maintenance of algal endosymbionts in Paramecium bursaria: a simple model based on population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Sosuke; Fujiwara, Kenji; Tamura, Takuro

    2016-09-01

    Algal endosymbiosis is widely distributed in eukaryotes including many protists and metazoans, and plays important roles in aquatic ecosystems, combining phagotrophy and phototrophy. To maintain a stable symbiotic relationship, endosymbiont population size in the host must be properly regulated and maintained at a constant level; however, the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of algal endosymbionts are still largely unknown. Here we investigate the population dynamics of the unicellular ciliate Paramecium bursaria and its Chlorella-like algal endosymbiont under various experimental conditions in a simple culture system. Our results suggest that endosymbiont population size in P. bursaria was not regulated by active processes such as cell division coupling between the two organisms, or partitioning of the endosymbionts at host cell division. Regardless, endosymbiont population size was eventually adjusted to a nearly constant level once cells were grown with light and nutrients. To explain this apparent regulation of population size, we propose a simple mechanism based on the different growth properties (specifically the nutrient requirements) of the two organisms, and based from this develop a mathematical model to describe the population dynamics of host and endosymbiont. The proposed mechanism and model may provide a basis for understanding the maintenance of algal endosymbionts. PMID:26625979

  5. Maintenance of algal endosymbionts in Paramecium bursaria: a simple model based on population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Sosuke; Fujiwara, Kenji; Tamura, Takuro

    2016-09-01

    Algal endosymbiosis is widely distributed in eukaryotes including many protists and metazoans, and plays important roles in aquatic ecosystems, combining phagotrophy and phototrophy. To maintain a stable symbiotic relationship, endosymbiont population size in the host must be properly regulated and maintained at a constant level; however, the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of algal endosymbionts are still largely unknown. Here we investigate the population dynamics of the unicellular ciliate Paramecium bursaria and its Chlorella-like algal endosymbiont under various experimental conditions in a simple culture system. Our results suggest that endosymbiont population size in P. bursaria was not regulated by active processes such as cell division coupling between the two organisms, or partitioning of the endosymbionts at host cell division. Regardless, endosymbiont population size was eventually adjusted to a nearly constant level once cells were grown with light and nutrients. To explain this apparent regulation of population size, we propose a simple mechanism based on the different growth properties (specifically the nutrient requirements) of the two organisms, and based from this develop a mathematical model to describe the population dynamics of host and endosymbiont. The proposed mechanism and model may provide a basis for understanding the maintenance of algal endosymbionts.

  6. Harmful Algal Bloom Hotspots Really Are Hot: A Case Study from Monterey Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudela, R. M.; Anderson, C.; Birch, J. M.; Bowers, H.; Caron, D. A.; Chao, Y.; Doucette, G.; Farrara, J. D.; Gellene, A. G.; Negrey, K.; Howard, M. D.; Ryan, J. P.; Scholin, C. A.; Smith, J.; Sukhatme, G.

    2015-12-01

    Monterey Bay, California is one of several recognized hotspots for harmful algal blooms along the US west coast, particularly for the toxigenic diatom Pseudo-nitzschia, which produces domoic acid and is responsible for Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning. Historical observations have linked bloom activity to anomalously warm conditions with weak and sporadic upwelling. In particular, blooms appear to be associated with El Niño conditions. Monterey, as with much of the US west coast, experienced unusual warm conditions in spring and summer 2014, leading to multiple ecosystem effects including massive algal blooms, concentration of apex predators nearshore, and unusually high levels of domoic acid. As the warm anomalies continued and strengthened into 2015, Monterey (and much of the west coast) has been experiencing the largest and most toxic algal bloom recorded in the last 15 years, as well as unprecedented coccolithophore blooms associated with warm, nutrient-depleted waters. With the strengthening El Niño conditions developing in summer 2015, it is possible that 2016 will result in a third consecutive year of unusually toxic algal blooms. Using a combination of historical observations, intensive field studies, and predictive models we explore the hypothesis that these warm anomalies lead to shifts in the typical upwelling-dominated food web leading to a collapse of the ecosystem towards the coast, unusual algal blooms, and enhanced trophic transfer of toxins, resulting in magnified negative impacts to wildlife and, potentially, humans.

  7. Novel resource utilization of refloated algal sludge to improve the quality of organic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Li, Rong; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Beibei; Zhang, Chenmin; Shen, Qirong

    2014-08-01

    Without further management, large amounts of refloated algal sludge from Taihu Lake to retrieve nitrogen and phosphorus resources may result in serious secondary environmental pollution. The possibility of utilization of algal sludge to improve the quality of organic fertilizer was investigated in this study. Variations of physicochemical properties, germination index (GI) and microcystin (MC) content were analysed during the composting process. The results showed that the addition of algal sludge improved the contents of nutrients, common free amino acids and total common amino acids in the novel organic fertilizer. Rapid degradation rates of MC-LR and MC-RR, a high GI value and more abundance of culturable protease-producing bacteria were observed during the composting process added with algal sludge. Growth experiments showed that the novel organic fertilizer efficiently promoted plant growth. This study provides a novel resource recovery method to reclaim the Taihu Lake algal sludge and highlights a novel method to produce a high-quality organic fertilizer. PMID:24956756

  8. Atmosphere stabilization and element recycle in an experimental mouse-algal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smernoff, David T.

    1986-01-01

    Life support systems based on bioregeneration rely on the control and manipulation of organisms. Experiments conducted with a gas-closed mouse-algal system designed to investigate principles of photosynthetic gas exchange focus primarily on observing gas exchange phenomena under varying algal environmental conditions and secondarily on studying element cycling through compartments of the experimental system. Inherent instabilities exit between the uptake and release of carbon dioxide CO2 and oxygen O2 by the mouse and algae. Variations in light intensity and cell density alter the photosynthetic rate of the algae and enable maintenance of physiologic concentrations of CO2 and O2. Different nitrogen sources (urea and nitrate) result in different algal assimilatory quotients (AQ). Combinations of photosynthetic rate and AQ ratio manipulations have been examined for their potential in stabilizing atmospheric gas concentrations in the gas-closed algal-mouse system. Elemental mass balances through the experimental systems compartments are being studied with the concurrent development of a mathematical simulation model. Element cycling experiments include quantification of elemental flows through system compartments and wet oxidation of system waste materials for use as an algal nutrient source. Oxidized waste products demonstrate inhibitory properties although dilution has been shown to allow normal growth.

  9. Evaluating nutrient impacts in urban watersheds: challenges and research opportunities.

    PubMed

    Carey, Richard O; Hochmuth, George J; Martinez, Christopher J; Boyer, Treavor H; Dukes, Michael D; Toor, Gurpal S; Cisar, John L

    2013-02-01

    This literature review focuses on the prevalence of nitrogen and phosphorus in urban environments and the complex relationships between land use and water quality. Extensive research in urban watersheds has broadened our knowledge about point and non-point pollutant sources, but the fate of nutrients is not completely understood. For example, it is not known how long-term nutrient cycling processes in turfgrass landscapes influence nitrogen retention rates or the relative atmospheric contribution to urban nitrogen exports. The effect of prolonged reclaimed water irrigation is also unknown. Stable isotopes have been used to trace pollutants, but distinguishing sources (e.g., fertilizers, wastewater, etc.) can be difficult. Identifying pollutant sources may aid our understanding of harmful algal blooms because the extent of the relationship between urban nutrient sources and algal blooms is unclear. Further research on the delivery and fate of nutrients within urban watersheds is needed to address manageable water quality impacts. PMID:23202644

  10. Effects of ammonium effluents on planktonic primary production and decomposition in a coastal brackish water environment I. Nutrient balance of the water body and effluent tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamminen, T.

    Effects of ammonium discharge on the regulation of photosynthetic production was studied from June to October 1979 in the Archipelago Sea, near the entrance of the Gulf of Finland. Sampled were the inner archipelago loaded with ammonium-rich industry effluents and some stations towards the open sea. Acute effects of effluent on natural algal and bacterial communities were tested by measurements of primary productivity and heterotrophic activity. Effluent tests were also conducted with a test alga ( Chorella sp.). Nutrient ratios and AGP tests indicated that nitrogen was the principal limiting nutrient for algal growth even in the ammonium-loaded regions. Therefore, the discharge causes a considerable eutrophication in the area. Effluent concentrations from 0.01 to 1% stimulated primary productivity of natural algal communities up to 230% of the control, whereas 10% concentrations were toxic. Test algae tolerated also 10% of effluent in some cases, and showed stimulations up to 960% of the control. No stimulation of heterotrophic activity was usually detected in effluent tests, and the threshold of toxicity was considerably lower than with algae. The effect of effluents on heterotrophic bacteria of the water body is therefore likely to be mediated through autotrophic production.

  11. Didymosphenia geminata: Algal blooms in oligotrophic streams and rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundareshwar, P. V.; Upadhayay, S.; Abessa, M.; Honomichl, S.; Berdanier, B.; Spaulding, S. A.; Sandvik, C.; Trennepohl, A.

    2011-05-01

    In recent decades, the diatom Didymosphenia geminata has emerged as nuisance species in river systems around the world. This periphytic alga forms large “blooms” in temperate streams, presenting a counterintuitive result: the blooms occur primarily in oligotrophic streams and rivers, where phosphorus (P) availability typically limits primary production. The goal of this study is to examine how high algal biomass is formed under low P conditions. We reveal a biogeochemical process by which D. geminata mats concentrate P from flowing waters. First, the mucopolysaccaride stalks of D. geminata adsorb both iron (Fe) and P. Second, enzymatic and bacterial processes interact with Fe to increase the biological availability of P. We propose that a positive feedback between total stalk biomass and high growth rate is created, which results in abundant P for cell division. The affinity of stalks for Fe in association with iron-phosphorus biogeochemistry suggest a resolution to the paradox of algal blooms in oliogotrophic streams and rivers.

  12. Algal 'greening' and the conservation of stone heritage structures.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Nick A; Viles, Heather A; Ahmad, Samin; McCabe, Stephen; Smith, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    In humid, temperate climates, green algae can make a significant contribution to the deterioration of building stone, both through unsightly staining ('greening') and, possibly, physical and chemical transformations. However, very little is known about the factors that influence the deteriorative impact and spatial distribution of green algal biofilms, hindering attempts to model the influence of climate change on building conservation. To address this problem, we surveyed four sandstone heritage structures in Belfast, UK. Our research had two aims: 1) to investigate the relationships between greening and the deterioration of stone structures and 2) to assess the impacts of environmental factors on the distribution of green biofilms. We applied an array of analytical techniques to measure stone properties indicative of deterioration status (hardness, colour and permeability) and environmental conditions related to algal growth (surface and sub-surface moisture, temperature and surface texture). Our results indicated that stone hardness was highly variable but only weakly related to levels of greening. Stone that had been exposed for many years was, on average, darker and greener than new stone of the same type, but there was no correlation between greening and darkening. Stone permeability was higher on 'old', weathered stone but not consistently related to the incidence of greening. However, there was evidence to suggest that thick algal biofilms were capable of reducing the ingress of moisture. Greening was negatively correlated with point measurements of surface temperature, but not moisture or surface texture. Our findings suggested that greening had little impact on the physical integrity of stone; indeed the influence of algae on moisture regimes in stone may have a broadly bioprotective action. Furthermore, the relationship between moisture levels and greening is not straightforward and is likely to be heavily dependent upon temporal patterns in moisture

  13. Nutrient Loss in Runoff from Turf: Effect on Surface Water Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excess nutrients in surface waters may result in enhanced algal blooms and plant growth that can lead to eutrophication and a decline in water quality. The applicatin of fertilizer to golf courses may be a source of nutrients to surface waters. Runoff studies were conducted to measure applied nitrog...

  14. Arctic spring awakening - Steering principles behind the phenology of vernal ice algal blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, E.; Mundy, C. J.; Assmy, P.; Campbell, K.; Gabrielsen, T. M.; Gosselin, M.; Juul-Pedersen, T.; Gradinger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Marine ecosystems at high latitudes are characterized by extreme seasonal changes in light conditions, as well as a limited period of high primary production during spring and early summer. As light returns at the end of winter to Arctic ice-covered seas, a first algal bloom takes place in the bottom layer of the sea ice. This bottom ice algae community develops through three distinct phases in the transition from winter to spring, starting with phase I, a predominantly net heterotroph community that has limited interaction with the pelagic or benthic realms. Phase II begins in the spring once light for photosynthesis becomes available at the ice bottom, although interaction with the water column and benthos remains limited. The transition to the final phase III is then mainly driven by a balance of atmospheric and oceanographic forcing that induce structural changes in the sea ice and ultimately the removal of algal biomass from the ice. Due to limited data availability an incomplete understanding exists of all the processes determining ice algal bloom phenology and the considerable geographic differences in sympagic algal standing stocks and primary production. We present here the first pan-Arctic compilation of available time-series data on vernal sea ice algal bloom development and identify the most important factors controlling its development and termination. Using data from the area surrounding Resolute Bay (Nunavut, Canada) as an example, we support previous investigations that snow cover on top of the ice influences sea ice algal phenology, with highest biomass development, but also earliest termination of blooms, under low snow cover. We also provide a pan-Arctic overview of sea ice algae standing stocks and primary production, and discuss the pertinent processes behind the geographic differences we observed. Finally, we assess potential future changes in vernal algal bloom phenology as a consequence of climate change, including their importance to

  15. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Cyd E.

    2014-03-25

    This white paper briefly reviews the research literature exploring complex algal communities as a means of increasing algal biomass production via increased tolerance, resilience, and resistance to a variety of abiotic and biotic perturbations occurring within harvesting timescales. This paper identifies what data are available and whether more research utilizing complex communities is needed to explore the potential of complex algal community stability (CACS) approach as a plausible means to increase biomass yields regardless of ecological context and resulting in decreased algal-based fuel prices by reducing operations costs. By reviewing the literature for what we do and do not know, in terms of CACS methodologies, this report will provide guidance for future research addressing pond crash phenomena.

  16. Identification and characterization of a novel yeast gene: the YGP1 gene product is a highly glycosylated secreted protein that is synthesized in response to nutrient limitation.

    PubMed Central

    Destruelle, M; Holzer, H; Klionsky, D J

    1994-01-01

    Nutrient starvation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to a number of physiological changes that accompany entry into stationary phase. The expression of genes whose products play a role in stress adaptation is regulated in a manner that allows the cell to sense and respond to changing environmental conditions. We have identified a novel yeast gene, YGP1, that displays homology to the sporulation-specific SPS100 gene. The expression of YGP1 is regulated by nutrient availability. The gene is expressed at a basal level during "respiro-fermentative" (logarithmic) growth. When the glucose concentration in the medium falls below 1%, the YGP1 gene is derepressed and the gene product, gp37, is synthesized at levels up to 50-fold above the basal level. The glucose-sensing mechanism is independent of the SNF1 pathway and does not operate when cells are directly shifted to a low glucose concentration. The expression of YGP1 also responds to the depletion of nitrogen and phosphate, indicating a general response to nutrient deprivation. These results suggest that the YGP1 gene product may be involved in cellular adaptations prior to stationary phase and may be a useful marker protein for monitoring early events associated with the stress response. Images PMID:8139573

  17. Sea-ice algal primary production and nitrogen uptake rates off East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukaerts, Arnout; Cavagna, Anne-Julie; Fripiat, François; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M.; Dehairs, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Antarctic pack ice comprises about 90% of the sea ice in the southern hemisphere and plays an important structuring role in Antarctic marine ecosystems, yet measurements of ice algal primary production and nitrogen uptake rates remain scarce. During the early austral spring of 2012, measurements for primary production rates and uptake of two nitrogen substrates (nitrate and ammonium) were conducted at 5 stations in the East Antarctic pack ice (63-66°S, 115-125°E). Carbon uptake was low (3.52 mg C m-2 d-1) but a trend of increased production was observed towards the end of the voyage suggesting pre-bloom conditions. Significant snow covers reaching, up to 0.8 m, induced strong light limitation. Two different regimes were observed in the ice with primarily nitrate based 'new' production (f-ratio: 0.80-0.95) at the bottom of the ice cover, due to nutrient-replete conditions at the ice-water interface, and common for pre-bloom conditions. In the sea-ice interior, POC:PN ratios (20-70) and higher POC:Chl a ratios suggested the presence of large amounts of detrital material trapped in the ice and here ammonium was the prevailing nitrogen substrate. This suggests that most primary production in the sea-ice interior was regenerated and supported by a microbial food web, recycling detritus.

  18. Algal blooms in the spread and persistence of cholera.

    PubMed

    Epstein, P R

    1993-01-01

    Cholera has been long associated with the seasonality of coastal algal blooms off Bangladesh. Using fluorescent antibody (FA) techniques, microbiologists have now identified a viable, non-cultivable form of Vibrio cholerae in a wide range of marine life, including cyanobacteria (Anabaena variabilis), diatoms (Skeletonema costatum), phaeophytes (Ascophyllum nodosum), in copepod molts, and in freshwater vascular aquatic plants (water hyacinths and duckweed). In unfavourable conditions V. cholerae assumes spore-like forms; with proper nutrients, pH and temperature, it reverts to a readily transmissible and infectious state. Nitrates and phosphates in sewage and fertilizers cause eutrophication, and scientists report an increase in intensity, duration and shifts in the biodiversity of algal blooms in many coastal, brackish and fresh waters worldwide. V. cholerae has been isolated from phyto- and zooplankton in marine and fresh waters near Lima, Peru. V. cholera 01, biotype El Tor, serotype Inaba, may have arrived in the Americas in the bilge of a Chinese freighter. There, in the abundant coastal sea life along the Latin American Pacific coast, nourished by the Humboldt current and eutrophication, it found a reservoir for surviving unfavourable conditions. It is hypothesized that the algae and Vibrio populations grew exponentially; consumed by fish, mollusks and crustacea, a heavy 'inoculum' of carriers infected with V. cholerae was generated and transported into multiple coastal communities. PMID:8155853

  19. Riparian shading controls instream spring phytoplankton and benthic algal growth.

    PubMed

    Halliday, S J; Skeffington, R A; Wade, A J; Bowes, M J; Read, D S; Jarvie, H P; Loewenthal, M

    2016-06-15

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations showed a striking pattern in a multi-year study of the River Enborne, a small river in SE England. In each of three years (2010-2012), maximum DO concentrations were attained in mid-April, preceded by a period of steadily increasing diurnal amplitudes, followed by a steady reduction in both amplitude and concentration. Flow events during the reduction period reduce DO to low concentrations until the following spring. Evidence is presented that this pattern is mainly due to benthic algal growth which is eventually suppressed by the growth of the riparian tree canopy. Nitrate and silicate concentrations are too high to inhibit the growth of either benthic algae or phytoplankton, but phosphate concentrations might have started to reduce growth if the tree canopy development had been delayed. This interpretation is supported by evidence from weekly flow cytometry measurements and analysis of the diurnal, seasonal and annual patterns of nutrient concentrations. As the tree canopy develops, the river switches from an autotrophic to a heterotrophic state. The results support the use of riparian shading to help control algal growth, and highlight the risks of reducing riparian shade.

  20. Riparian shading controls instream spring phytoplankton and benthic algal growth.

    PubMed

    Halliday, S J; Skeffington, R A; Wade, A J; Bowes, M J; Read, D S; Jarvie, H P; Loewenthal, M

    2016-06-15

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations showed a striking pattern in a multi-year study of the River Enborne, a small river in SE England. In each of three years (2010-2012), maximum DO concentrations were attained in mid-April, preceded by a period of steadily increasing diurnal amplitudes, followed by a steady reduction in both amplitude and concentration. Flow events during the reduction period reduce DO to low concentrations until the following spring. Evidence is presented that this pattern is mainly due to benthic algal growth which is eventually suppressed by the growth of the riparian tree canopy. Nitrate and silicate concentrations are too high to inhibit the growth of either benthic algae or phytoplankton, but phosphate concentrations might have started to reduce growth if the tree canopy development had been delayed. This interpretation is supported by evidence from weekly flow cytometry measurements and analysis of the diurnal, seasonal and annual patterns of nutrient concentrations. As the tree canopy develops, the river switches from an autotrophic to a heterotrophic state. The results support the use of riparian shading to help control algal growth, and highlight the risks of reducing riparian shade. PMID:27192431

  1. Recycling produced water for algal cultivation for biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Justin N.; Sullivan, Enid J.; Dean, Cynthia A.; Steichen, Seth A.

    2012-08-09

    Algal growth demands a continuous source of water of appropriate salinity and nutritional content. Fresh water sources are scarce in the deserts of the Southwestern United States, hence, salt water algae species are being investigated as a renewable biofuel source. The use of produced water from oil wells (PW) could offset the demand for fresh water in cultivation. Produced water can contain various concentrations of dissolved solids, metals and organic contaminants and often requires treatment beyond oil/water separation to make it suitable for algae cultivation. The produced water used in this study was taken from an oil well in Jal, New Mexico. An F/2-Si (minus silica) growth media commonly used to cultivate Nannochloropsis salina 1776 (NS 1776) was prepared using the produced water (F/2-Si PW) taking into account the metals and salts already present in the water. NS 1776 was seeded into a bioreactor containing 5L of the (F/2-Si PW) media. After eleven days the optical density at 750 nm (an indicator of algal growth) increased from 0 to 2.52. These results indicate algae are able to grow, though inhibited when compared with non-PW media, in the complex chemical conditions found in produced water. Savings from using nutrients present in the PW, such as P, K, and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, results in a 44.38% cost savings over fresh water to mix the F/2-Si media.

  2. Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of algal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, Ota; Jonáš, Alexandr; Pilát, Zdeněk; Zemánek, Pavel; Nedbal, Ladislav; Tříska, Jan; Kotas, Petr; Trtílek, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy can elucidate fundamental questions about intercellular variability and what governs it. Moreover, knowing the metabolic response on single cell level this can significantly contribute to the study and use of microalgae in systems biology and biofuel technology. Raman spectroscopy is capable to measure nutrient dynamics and metabolism in vivo, in real-time, label free making it possible to monitor/evaluate population variability. Also, degree of unsaturation of the algae oil (iodine value) can be measured using Raman spectra obtained from single microalgae. The iodine value is the determination of the amount of unsaturation contained in fatty acids (in the form of double bonds). Here we demonstrate the capacity of the spatially resolved Raman microspectroscopy to determine the effective iodine value in lipid storage bodies of individual living algal cells. We employed the characteristic peaks in the Raman scattering spectra at 1,656 cm-1 (cis C=C stretching mode) and 1,445 cm-1 (CH2 scissoring mode) as the markers defining the ratio of unsaturated-to-saturated carbon-carbon bonds of the fatty acids in the algal lipids.

  3. Feedback Interactions between Trace Metal Nutrients and Phytoplankton in the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Sunda, William G.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to control by major nutrient elements (nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon) the productivity and species composition of marine phytoplankton communities are also regulated by a number of trace metal nutrients (iron, zinc, cobalt, manganese, copper, and cadmium). Of these, iron is most limiting to phytoplankton growth and has the greatest effect on algal species diversity. It also plays an important role in limiting di-nitrogen (N2) fixation rates, and thus is important in controlling ocean inventories of fixed nitrogen. Because of these effects, iron is thought to play a key role in regulating biological cycles of carbon and nitrogen in the ocean, including the biological transfer of carbon to the deep sea, the so-called biological CO2 pump, which helps regulate atmospheric CO2 and CO2-linked global warming. Other trace metal nutrients (zinc, cobalt, copper, and manganese) have lesser effects on productivity; but may exert an important influence on the species composition of algal communities because of large differences in metal requirements among species. The interactions between trace metals and ocean plankton are reciprocal: not only do the metals control the plankton, but the plankton regulate the distributions, chemical speciation, and cycling of these metals through cellular uptake and recycling processes, downward flux of biogenic particles, biological release of organic chelators, and mediation of redox reactions. This two way interaction has influenced not only the biology and chemistry of the modern ocean, but has had a profound influence on biogeochemistry of the ocean and earth system as a whole, and on the evolution of marine and terrestrial biology over geologic history. PMID:22701115

  4. The potential of freshwater macroalgae as a biofuels feedstock and the influence of nutrient availability on freshwater macroalgal biomass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jin-Ho

    Extensive efforts have been made to evaluate the potential of microalgae as a biofuel feedstock during the past 4-5 decades. However, filamentous freshwater macroalgae have numerous characteristics that favor their potential use as an alternative algal feedstock for biofuels production. Freshwater macroalgae exhibit high rates of areal productivity, and their tendency to form dense floating mats on the water surface imply significant reductions in harvesting and dewater costs compared to microalgae. In Chapter 1, I reviewed the published literature on the elemental composition and energy content of five genera of freshwater macroalgae. This review suggested that freshwater macroalgae compare favorably with traditional bio-based energy sources, including terrestrial residues, wood, and coal. In addition, I performed a semi-continuous culture experiment using the common Chlorophyte genus Oedogonium to investigate whether nutrient availability can influence its higher heating value (HHV), productivity, and proximate analysis. The experimental study suggested that the most nutrient-limited growth conditions resulted in a significant increase in the HHV of the Oedogonium biomass (14.4 MJ/kg to 16.1 MJ/kg). Although there was no significant difference in productivity between the treatments, the average dry weight productivity of Oedogonium (3.37 g/m2/day) was found to be much higher than is achievable with common terrestrial plant crops. Although filamentous freshwater macroalgae, therefore, have significant potential as a renewable source of bioenergy, the ultimate success of freshwater macroalgae as a biofuel feedstock will depend upon the ability to produce biomass at the commercial-scale in a cost-effective and sustainable manner. Aquatic ecology can play an important role to achieve the scale-up of algal crop production by informing the supply rates of nutrients to the cultivation systems, and by helping to create adaptive production systems that are resilient to

  5. Advancing Commercialization of Algal Biofuels Through Increased Biomass Productivity and Technology Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xuemei; Sabarsky, Martin

    2013-09-30

    Cellana is a leading developer of algae-based bioproducts, and its pre-commercial production of marine microalgae takes place at Cellana?s Kona Demonstration Facility (KDF) in Hawaii. KDF is housing more than 70 high-performing algal strains for different bioproducts, of which over 30 have been grown outside at scale. So far, Cellana has produced more than 10 metric tons of algal biomass for the development of biofuels, animal feed, and high-value nutraceuticals. Cellana?s ALDUO algal cultivation technology allows Cellana to grow non-extremophile algal strains at large scale with no contamination disruptions. Cellana?s research and production at KDF have addressed three major areas that are crucial for the commercialization of algal biofuels: yield improvement, cost reduction, and the overall economics. Commercially acceptable solutions have been developed and tested for major factors limiting areal productivity of algal biomass and lipids based on years of R&D work conducted at KDF. Improved biomass and lipid productivit