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Sample records for algal species chlorella

  1. Impact of algal organic matter released from Microcystis aeruginosa and Chlorella sp. on the fouling of a ceramic microfiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Devanadera, Ma Catriona E; Roddick, Felicity A; Fan, Linhua; Dalida, Maria Lourdes P

    2016-10-15

    Algal blooms lead to the secretion of algal organic matter (AOM) from different algal species into water treatment systems, and there is very limited information regarding the impact of AOM from different species on the fouling of ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes. The impact of soluble AOM released from Microcystis aeruginosa and Chlorella sp. separately and together in feedwater on the fouling of a tubular ceramic microfiltration membrane (alumina, 0.1 μm) was studied at lab scale. Multi-cycle MF tests operated in constant pressure mode showed that the AOM (3 mg DOC L(-1)) extracted from the cultures of the two algae in early log phase of growth (12 days) resulted in less flux decline compared with the AOM from stationary phase (35 days), due to the latter containing significantly greater amounts of high fouling potential components (protein and humic-like substances). The AOM released from Chlorella sp. at stationary phase led to considerably greater flux decline and irreversible fouling resistance compared with that from M. aeruginosa. The mixture of the AOM (1:1, 3 mg DOC L(-1)) from the two algal species showed more similar flux decline and irreversible fouling resistance to the AOM from M. aeruginosa than Chlorella sp. This was due to the characteristics of the AOM mixture being more similar to those for M. aeruginosa than Chlorella sp. The extent of the flux decline for the AOM mixture after conventional coagulation with aluminium chlorohydrate or alum was reduced by 70%.

  2. Virus infection of Chlorella variabilis and enzymatic saccharification of algal biomass for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Shen; Zheng, Yi; Labavitch, John M; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2013-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the application of virus infection and amylolytic enzyme treatment on sugar release from Chlorella variabilis NC64A and bioethanol production from released sugars via Escherichia coli KO11 fermentation. Chlorella variabilis NC64A accumulated starch when it was cultured in a nitrogen-limited medium. The accumulated starch was not consumed during viral infection based on analysis of sugars released during infection. Both amylolytic enzyme addition and virus infection increased the hydrolysis of carbohydrates. Addition of amylolytic enzymes increased the release of glucose from algal biomass while virus addition increased the release of non-glucose neutral sugars. The combination of enzyme addition and virus infection also resulted in the highest ethanol production after fermentation. Acetic acid was generated as a co-product during fermentation in all sets of experiments. This study demonstrated that infection of microalgae with an algal virus resulted in disruption and hydrolysis of algal biomass to generate fermentable sugars.

  3. Mass cultivation of various algal species and their evaluation as a potential candidate for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Nadia; Munir, Neelma; Saleem, Faiza; Aslam, Farheen; Naz, Shagufta

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have been proposed as a promising source for biodiesel production. Focusing on algal strains for biodiesel production, efforts should be made to search new strains. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of growth parameters (nutrients, pH, light, aeration and temperature) and the oil percentage of eight algal strains (Chlorella sp., Cladophora sp., Hydrodictylium sp., Oedogonium sp., Oscillatoria sp., Spirogyra sp., Stigeocolonium sp., Ulothrix sp.). Results show that 6.5-7.5 is the optimum pH for the growth of all algal species. Temperature showed a greater variation (25°40°C). Ulothrix sp. gave more biomass productivity and is the most suitable strain for biodiesel production due to higher oil percentage (62%). Least biomass production was observed for Stigeocolonium sp. and least oil content was obtained from Hydrodictylium sp. It was observed that among these eight algal strains for biodiesel production, Ulothrix and Chlorella are the most promising algae species.

  4. Inhibition of Alkaline Flocculation by Algal Organic Matter for Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Vandamme, Dries; Beuckels, Annelies; Vadelius, Eric; Depraetere, Orily; Noppe, Wim; Dutta, Abhishek; Foubert, Imogen; Laurens, Lieve; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline flocculation is a promising strategy for the concentration of microalgae for bulk biomass production. However, previous studies have shown that biological changes during the cultivation negatively affect flocculation efficiency. The influence of changes in cell properties and in the quality and composition of algal organic matter (AOM) were studied using Chlorella vulgaris as a model species. In batch cultivation, flocculation was increasingly inhibited over time and mainly influenced by changes in medium composition, rather than biological changes at the cell surface. Total carbohydrate content of the organic matter fraction sized bigger than 3 kDa increased over time and this fraction was shown to be mainly responsible for the inhibition of alkaline flocculation. The monosaccharide identification of this fraction mainly showed the presence of neutral and anionic monosaccharides. An addition of 30–50 mg L-1 alginic acid, as a model for anionic carbohydrate polymers containing uronic acids, resulted in a complete inhibition of flocculation. Furthermore, these results suggest that inhibition of alkaline flocculation was caused by interaction of anionic polysaccharides leading to an increased flocculant demand over time.

  5. Saline wastewater treatment by Chlorella vulgaris with simultaneous algal lipid accumulation triggered by nitrate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiao-Hui; Gong, Yu-Peng; Fang, Wen-Zhe; Bi, Zi-Cheng; Cheng, Li-Hua; Xu, Xin-Hua; Chen, Huan-Lin

    2015-10-01

    Chlorella vulgaris, a marine microalgae strain adaptable to 0-50 g L(-1) of salinity, was selected for studying the coupling system of saline wastewater treatment and lipid accumulation. The effect of total nitrogen (T N) concentration was investigated on algal growth, nutrients removal as well as lipid accumulation. The removal efficiencies of TN and total phosphorus (TP) were found to be 92.2-96.6% and over 99%, respectively, after a batch cultivation of 20 days. To illustrate the response of lipid accumulation to nutrients removal, C. vulgaris was further cultivated in the recycling experiment of tidal saline water within the photobioreactor. The lipid accumulation was triggered upon the almost depletion of nitrate (<5 mg L(-1)), till the final highest lipid content of 40%. The nitrogen conversion in the sequence of nitrate, nitrite, and then to ammonium in the effluents was finally integrated with previous discussions on metabolic pathways of algal cell under nitrogen deficiency.

  6. Production of algal biomass (Chlorella vulgaris) using sediment microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyeon Jin; Seo, Kyu-won; Lee, Sang Hyun; Yang, Yung-Hun; Kumaran, Rangarajulu Senthil; Kim, Sunghyun; Hong, Seok Won; Choi, Yong Su; Kim, Hyung Joo

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a novel algal biomass production method using a sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) system was assessed. Under the experimental conditions, CO(2) generation from the SMFC and its rate of increase were found to be dependent on the current generated from the SMFC. However, the CH(4) production rate from the SMFC was inhibited by the generation of current. When Chlorella vulgaris was inoculated into the cathode compartment of the SMFC and current was generated under 10 Ω resistance, biomass production from the anode compartment was observed to be closely associated with the rate of current generation from the SMFC. The experimental results demonstrate that 420 mg/L of algae (dry cell weight) was produced when the current from the SMFC reached 48.5 mA/m(2). Therefore, SMFC could provide a means for producing algal biomass via CO(2) generated by the oxidation of organics upon current generation.

  7. Enhanced algal CO(2) sequestration through calcite deposition by Chlorella sp. and Spirulina platensis in a mini-raceway pond.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Rishiram; Kannan, Krishnamurthi; Deshkar, Ashok; Yadav, Raju; Chakrabarti, Tapan

    2010-04-01

    Biological CO(2) sequestration using algal reactors is one of the most promising and environmentally benign technologies to sequester CO(2). This research study was taken up to alleviate certain limitations associated with the technology such as low CO(2) sequestration efficiency and low biomass yields. The study demonstrates an increase in CO(2) sequestration efficiency by maneuvering chemically aided biological sequestration of CO(2). Chlorella sp. and Spirulina platensis showed 46% and 39% mean fixation efficiency, respectively, at input CO(2) concentration of 10%. The effect of acetazolamide, a potent carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, on CO(2) sequestration efficiency was studied to demonstrate the role of carbonic anhydrase in calcite deposition. Calcite formed by both species was characterized by scanning electron microscopy coupled electron dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The overall scheme of calcite deposition coupled CO(2) fixation with commercially utilizable biomass as a product seems a viable option in the efforts to sequester increasing CO(2) emissions.

  8. Immunostimulatory bioactivity of algal polysaccharides from Chlorella pyrenoidosa activates macrophages via Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Jeyashoke, Narumon; Yeh, Chin-Hsi; Song, Yuan-Jaw; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Chao, Louis Kuoping

    2010-01-27

    Much research suggests that a dietary supplement of Chlorella pyrenoidosa may be helpful to human health, but the molecular mechanism involved remains unclear. The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of certain hot-water-soluble polysaccharides from Chlorella pyrenoidosa (CWSP) on cytokine production, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression, and costimulatory molecule expression in macrophages. We demonstrated that CWSP induced IL-1beta secretion in macrophages via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mediated protein kinase signaling pathways. In addition, CWSP also stimulated the cell surface expression of HLA-DA, -DB, and -DC, and HLA-DR, -DP, and -DQ as well as the expression of costimulatory family molecules such as CD80 and CD86 in macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrated that preinjection of C57BL/6J mice with CWSP increased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-1beta secretion into serum in vivo. This outcome was consistent with the corresponding outcome for cells treated with CWSP in vitro. Our current results provide support for the possible use of CWSP as a modulation agent of immune responses in humans and certain animal species. Finally, in using GC-MS to analyze the polysaccharides, we found that the major monosaccharides of CWSP were rhamnose (31.8%), glucose (20.42%), galactose (10.28%), mannose (5.23%), and xylose (1.27%). This study is the first to report the molecular mechanism of immune-modulated signal transduction in vitro from the polysaccharides of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

  9. Combined effect of concentrations of algal food (Chlorella vulgaris) and salt (sodium chloride) on the population growth of Brachionus calyciflorus and Brachionus patulus (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Peredo-Alvarez, Víctor M; Sarma, S S; Nandini, S

    2003-06-01

    Salinity is an important variable influencing the density and diversity of rotifers. Studies on salt tolerance of rotifers have so far concentrated on euryhaline species while very little information is available on non-euryhaline taxa. In the present work, we have evaluated the combined effects of Chlorella vulgaris and sodium chloride on the population growth of two freshwater rotifers B. calyciflorus and B. patulus. A 24 hr acute tolerance test using NaCl revealed that B. calyciflorus was more resistant (LC50 = 3.75 +/- 0.04 g l-1) than B. patulus (2.14 +/- 0.09 g l-1). The maximal population density (mean +/- standard error) for B. calyciflorus in the control at 4.5 x 10(6) cells ml-1 (algal level) was 80 +/- 5 ind. ml-1, which was nearly a fifth of the one for B. patulus (397 +/- 7 ind. ml-1) under comparable conditions. Data on population growth revealed that regardless of salt concentration, the density of B. calyciflorus increased with increasing food levels, while for B. patulus, this trend was evident only in the controls. Regardless of salt concentration and algal food level, the day of maximal population density was lower (4 +/- 0.5 days) for B. calyciflorus than for B. patulus (11 +/- 1 day). The highest rates of population increase (r values) for B. calyciflorus and B. patulus were 0.429 +/- 0.012 and 0.367 +/- 0.004, respectively, recorded at 4.5 x 10(6) cells ml-1 of Chlorella in the controls. The protective role of algae in reducing the effect of salt stress was more evident in B. calyciflorus than B. patulus.

  10. Chlorella species as hosts for genetic engineering and expression of heterologous proteins: Progress, challenge and perspective.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Liu, Jin; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2016-10-01

    The species of Chlorella represent a highly specialized group of green microalgae that can produce high levels of protein. Many Chlorella strains can grow rapidly and achieve high cell density under controlled conditions and are thus considered to be promising protein sources. Many advances in the genetic engineering of Chlorella have occurred in recent years, with significant developments in successful expression of heterologous proteins for various applications. Nevertheless, a lot of obstacles remain to be addressed, and a sophisticated and stable Chlorella expression system has yet to emerge. This review provides a brief summary of current knowledge on Chlorella and an overview of recent progress in the genetic engineering of Chlorella, and highlights the advances in the development of a genetic toolbox of Chlorella for heterologous protein expression. Research directions to further exploit the Chlorella expression system with respect to both challenges and perspectives are also discussed. This paper serves as a comprehensive literature review for the Chlorella community and will provide valuable insights into future exploration of Chlorella as a promising host for heterologous protein expression.

  11. Effect of light intensity on algal biomass accumulation and biodiesel production for mixotrophic strains Chlorella kessleri and Chlorella protothecoide cultivated in highly concentrated municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Yecong; Zhou, Wenguang; Hu, Bing; Min, Min; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger R

    2012-09-01

    In this research, the effect of light intensity on biomass accumulation, wastewater nutrient removal through algae cultivation, and biodiesel productivity was investigated with algae species Chlorella kessleri and Chlorella protothecoide. The light intensities studied were 0, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1). The results showed that light intensity had profound impact on tested responses for both strains, and the dependence of these responses on light intensity varied with different algae strains. For C. kessleri, the optimum light intensity was 120 µmol m(-2) S(-1) for all responses except for COD removal. For C. protothecoide, the optimum light intensity was 30 µmol m(-2) S(-1). The major components of the biodiesel produced from algae biomass were 16-C and 18-C FAME, and the highest biodiesel contents were 24.19% and 19.48% of dried biomass for C. kessleri and C. protothecoide, respectively. Both species were capable of wastewater nutrients removal under all lighting conditions with high removal efficiencies.

  12. Recycled de-Oiled Algal Biomass Extract as a Feedstock for Boosting Biodiesel Production from Chlorella minutissima.

    PubMed

    Arora, Neha; Patel, Alok; Pruthi, Parul A; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-12-01

    The investigation for the first time assesses the efficacy of recycled de-oiled algal biomass extract (DABE) as a cultivation media to boost lipid productivity in Chlorella minutissima and its comparison with Bold's basal media (BBM) used as control. Presence of organic carbon (3.8 ± 0.8 g/l) in recycled DABE resulted in rapid growth with twofold increase in biomass productivity as compared to BBM. These cells expressed four folds higher lipid productivity (126 ± 5.54 mg/l/d) as compared to BBM. Cells cultivated in recycled DABE showed large sized lipid droplets accumulating 54.12 % of lipid content. Decrement in carbohydrate (17.76 %) and protein content (28.12 %) with loss of photosynthetic pigments compared to BBM grown cells were also recorded. The fatty acid profiles of cells cultivated in recycled DABE revealed the dominance of C16:0 (39.66 %), C18:1 (29.41 %) and C18:0 (15.82 %), respectively. This model is self-sustained and aims at neutralizing excessive feedstock consumption by exploiting recycled de-oiled algal biomass for cultivation of microalgae, making the process cost effective.

  13. Differential effects of P25 TiO2 nanoparticles on freshwater green microalgae: Chlorella and Scenedesmus species.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rajdeep; Parashar, Abhinav; Bhuvaneshwari, M; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2016-07-01

    P25 TiO2 nanoparticles majorly used in cosmetic products have well known detrimental effects towards the aquatic environment. In a freshwater ecosystem, Chlorella and Scenedesmus are among the most commonly found algal species frequently used to study the effects of metal oxide nanoparticles. A comparative study has been conducted herein to investigate differences in the toxic effects caused by these nanoparticles towards the two algae species. The three different concentrations of P25 TiO2 NPs (0.01, 0.1 & 1μg/mL, i.e., 0.12, 1.25 and 12.52μM) were selected to correlate surface water concentrations of the nanoparticles, and filtered and sterilized fresh water medium was used throughout this study. There was significant increase (p<0.001) in hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles with respect to both, time (0, 24, 48 and 72h) as well as concentration under all the exposure conditions. Although, significant dose-dependent morphological (surface area & biovolume) interspecies variations were not observed, it was evident at the highest concentration of exposure within individuals. At 1μg/mL exposure concentration, a significant difference in toxicity was noted between Chlorella and Scenedesmus under only visible light (p<0.001) and UVA (p<0.01) irradiation conditions. The viability data were well supported by the results obtained for oxidative stress induced by NPs on the cells. At the highest exposure concentration, superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione activities were assessed for both the algae under all the irradiation conditions. Increased catalase activity and LPO release complemented the cytotoxic effects observed. Significant interspecies variations were noted for these parameters under UVA and visible light exposed cells of Chlorella and Scenedesmus species, which could easily be correlated with the uptake of the NPs.

  14. Algal Species and Light Microenvironment in a Low-pH, Geothermal Microbial Mat Community

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, M. J.; Sheehan, K. B.; Kühl, M.; Cooksey, K.; Wigglesworth-Cooksey, B.; Harvey, R.; Henson, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Unicellular algae are the predominant microbial mat-forming phototrophs in the extreme environments of acidic geothermal springs. The ecology of these algae is not well known because concepts of species composition are inferred from cultivated isolates and microscopic observations, methods known to provide incomplete and inaccurate assessments of species in situ. We used sequence analysis of 18S rRNA genes PCR amplified from mat samples from different seasons and different temperatures along a thermal gradient to identify algae in an often-studied acidic (pH 2.7) geothermal creek in Yellowstone National Park. Fiber-optic microprobes were used to show that light for algal photosynthesis is attenuated to <1% over the 1-mm surface interval of the mat. Three algal sequences were detected, and each was present year-round. A Cyanidioschyzon merolae sequence was predominant at temperatures of ≥49°C. A Chlorella protothecoides var. acidicola sequence and a Paradoxia multisita-like sequence were predominant at temperatures of ≤39°C. PMID:16269755

  15. Algal species and light microenvironment in a low-pH, geothermal microbial mat community.

    PubMed

    Ferris, M J; Sheehan, K B; Kühl, M; Cooksey, K; Wigglesworth-Cooksey, B; Harvey, R; Henson, J M

    2005-11-01

    Unicellular algae are the predominant microbial mat-forming phototrophs in the extreme environments of acidic geothermal springs. The ecology of these algae is not well known because concepts of species composition are inferred from cultivated isolates and microscopic observations, methods known to provide incomplete and inaccurate assessments of species in situ. We used sequence analysis of 18S rRNA genes PCR amplified from mat samples from different seasons and different temperatures along a thermal gradient to identify algae in an often-studied acidic (pH 2.7) geothermal creek in Yellowstone National Park. Fiber-optic microprobes were used to show that light for algal photosynthesis is attenuated to < 1% over the 1-mm surface interval of the mat. Three algal sequences were detected, and each was present year-round. A Cyanidioschyzon merolae sequence was predominant at temperatures of > or = 49 degrees C. A Chlorella protothecoides var. acidicola sequence and a Paradoxia multisita-like sequence were predominant at temperatures of < or = 39 degrees C.

  16. Characterization of activated carbon prepared from chlorella-based algal residue.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuan-Ming; Tsai, Wen-Tien; Li, Ming-Hsuan

    2015-05-01

    The chlorella-based microalgal residue (AR) was tested as a novel precursor for preparing activated carbons. A combined carbonization-activation process with flowing N2 and CO2 gases was used to prepare the carbon materials at the activation temperatures of 800-1000 °C and the residence times of 0-30 min in this work. The elemental contents, pore properties and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of the resulting activated carbons have been performed. The results showed that activation temperature may be the most important parameter for determining their pore properties. The maximal Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and total pore volume of the resulting activated carbon, which was produced at the activation temperature of 950 °C with the residence time of 30 min, were 840 m(2)/g and 0.46 cm(3)/g, respectively. More interestingly, the resulting activated carbons have significant nitrogen contents of 3.6-9.6 wt%, which make them lower carbon contents (i.e., 54.6-68.4 wt%) than those of commercial activated carbons.

  17. Evolutionary Significance of an Algal Gene Encoding an [FeFe]-Hydrogenase with F-Domain Homology and Hydrogenase Activity in Chlorella Variabilis NC64A

    SciTech Connect

    Meuser, J. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Ananyev, G.; Karns, D.; Radakovits, R.; Murthy, U. M. N.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Dismukes, G. C.; Peters, J. W.; Posewitz, M. C.

    2011-10-01

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA) link the production of molecular H{sub 2} to anaerobic metabolism in many green algae. Similar to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella variabilis NC64A (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta) exhibits [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HYDA) activity during anoxia. In contrast to C. reinhardtii and other chlorophycean algae, which contain hydrogenases with only the HYDA active site (H-cluster), C. variabilis NC64A is the only known green alga containing HYDA genes encoding accessory FeS cluster-binding domains (F-cluster). cDNA sequencing confirmed the presence of F-cluster HYDA1 mRNA transcripts, and identified deviations from the in silico splicing models. We show that HYDA activity in C. variabilis NC64A is coupled to anoxic photosynthetic electron transport (PSII linked, as well as PSII-independent) and dark fermentation. We also show that the in vivo H{sub 2}-photoproduction activity observed is as O2 sensitive as in C. reinhardtii. The two C. variabilis NC64A HYDA sequences are similar to homologs found in more deeply branching bacteria (Thermotogales), diatoms, and heterotrophic flagellates, suggesting that an F-cluster HYDA is the ancestral enzyme in algae. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the algal HYDA H-cluster domains are monophyletic, suggesting that they share a common origin, and evolved from a single ancestral F-cluster HYDA. Furthermore, phylogenetic reconstruction indicates that the multiple algal HYDA paralogs are the result of gene duplication events that occurred independently within each algal lineage. Collectively, comparative genomic, physiological, and phylogenetic analyses of the C. variabilis NC64A hydrogenase has provided new insights into the molecular evolution and diversity of algal [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

  18. Recycling algae to improve species control and harvest efficiency from a high rate algal pond.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2011-12-15

    This paper investigates the influence of recycling gravity harvested algae on species dominance and harvest efficiency in wastewater treatment High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAP). Two identical pilot-scale HRAPs were operated over one year either with (HRAP(r)) or without (HRAP(c)) harvested algal biomass recycling. Algae were harvested from the HRAP effluent in algal settling cones (ASCs) and harvest efficiency was compared to settlability in Imhoff cones five times a week. A microscopic image analysis technique was developed to determine relative algal dominance based on biovolume and was conducted once a month. Recycling of harvested algal biomass back to the HRAP(r) maintained the dominance of a single readily settleable algal species (Pediastrum sp.) at >90% over one year (compared to the control with only 53%). Increased dominance of Pediastrum sp. greatly improved the efficiency of algal harvest (annual average of >85% harvest for the HRAP(r) compared with ∼60% for the control). Imhoff cone experiments demonstrated that algal settleability was influenced by both the dominance of Pediastrum sp. and the species composition of remaining algae. Algal biomass recycling increased the average size of Pediastrum sp. colonies by 13-30% by increasing mean cell residence time. These results indicate that recycling gravity harvested algae could be a simple and effective operational strategy to maintain the dominance of readily settleable algal species, and enhance algal harvest by gravity sedimentation.

  19. Azoxystrobin-induced excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of photosynthesis in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the short-term toxicity of azoxystrobin (AZ), one of strobilurins used as an effective fungicidal agent to control the Asian soybean rust, on aquatic unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris. The median percentile inhibition concentration (IC₅₀) of AZ for C. vulgaris was found to be 510 μg L(-1). We showed that the algal cells were obviously depressed or shrunk in 300 and 600 μg L(-1) AZ treatments by using the electron microscopy. Furthermore, 19, 75, and 300 μg L(-1) AZ treatments decreased the soluble protein content and chlorophyll concentrations in C. vulgaris and altered the energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expression levels in 48- and 96-h exposure periods. Simultaneously, our results showed that AZ could increase the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) level and compromise superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), glutathione S transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, and glutathione (GSH) content. These situations might render C. vulgaris more vulnerable to oxidative damage. Overall, the present study indicated that AZ might be toxic to the growth of C. vulgaris, affect energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expressions, and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in C. vulgaris.

  20. Biosorption of copper and zinc by immobilised and free algal biomass, and the effects of metal biosorption on the growth and cellular structure of Chlorella sp. and Chlamydomonas sp. isolated from rivers in Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maznah, W O Wan; Al-Fawwaz, A T; Surif, Misni

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the biosorption of copper and zinc ions by Chlorella sp. and Chlamydomonas sp. isolated from local environments in Malaysia was investigated in a batch system and by microscopic analyses. Under optimal biosorption conditions, the biosorption capacity of Chlorella sp. for copper and zinc ions was 33.4 and 28.5 mg/g, respectively, after 6 hr of biosorption in an immobilised system. Batch experiments showed that the biosorption capacity of algal biomass immobilised in the form of sodium alginate beads was higher than that of the free biomass. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses revealed that copper and zinc were mainly sorbed at the cell surface during biosorption. Exposure to 5 mg/L of copper and zinc affected both the chlorophyll content and cell count of the algal cells after the first 12 hr of contact time.

  1. Fast algal eco-toxicity assessment: Influence of light intensity and exposure time on Chlorella vulgaris inhibition by atrazine and DCMU.

    PubMed

    Camuel, Alexandre; Guieysse, Benoit; Alcántara, Cynthia; Béchet, Quentin

    2017-06-01

    In order to develop a rapid assay suitable for algal eco-toxicity assessments under conditions representative of natural ecosystems, this study evaluated the short-term (<1h) response of algae exposed to atrazine and DCMU using oxygen productivity measurements. When Chlorella vulgaris was exposed to these herbicides under 'standard' low light intensity (as prescribed by OECD201 guideline), the 20min-EC50 values recorded via oxygen productivity (atrazine: 1.32±0.07μM; DCMU: 0.31±0.005μM) were similar the 96-h EC50 recorded via algal growth (atrazine: 0.56μM; DCMU: 0.41μM), and within the range of values reported in the literature. 20min-EC50 values increased by factors of 3.0 and 2.1 for atrazine and DCMU, respectively, when light intensity increased from 60 to 1400μmolm(-2)s(-1) of photosynthetically active radiation, or PAR. Further investigation showed that exposure time significantly also impacted the sensitivity of C. vulgaris under high light intensity (>840μmolm(-2)s(-1) as PAR) as the EC50 for atrazine and DCMU decreased by up to 6.2 and 2.1 folds, respectively, after 50min of exposure at a light irradiance of 1400μmolm(-2)s(-1) as PAR. This decrease was particularly marked at high light intensities and low algae concentrations and is explained by the herbicide disruption of the electron transfer chain triggering photo-inhibition at high light intensities. Eco-toxicity assessments aiming to understand the potential impact of toxic compounds on natural ecosystems should therefore be performed over sufficient exposure times (>20min for C. vulgaris) and under light intensities relevant to these ecosystems.

  2. Differential lipid and fatty acid profiles of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic Chlorella zofingiensis: assessment of algal oils for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Junchao; Sun, Zheng; Zhong, Yujuan; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document and compare the lipid class and fatty acid composition of the green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis cultivated under photoautotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, a 900% increase in lipid yield was achieved in heterotrophic cells fed with 30 g L(-1) of glucose. Furthermore heterotrophic cells accumulated predominantly neutral lipids (NL) that accounted for 79.5% of total lipids with 88.7% being triacylglycerol (TAG); whereas photoautotrophic cells contained mainly the membrane lipids glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL). Together with the much higher content of oleic acid (C18:1) (35.2% of total fatty acids), oils from heterotrophic C. zofingiensis appear to be more feasible for biodiesel production. Our study highlights the possibility of using heterotrophic algae for producing high quality biodiesel.

  3. Hydrogen evolution as a consumption mode of reducing equivalents in green algal fermentation. [Chlamydomonas reinhardii; Chlorella pyrenoidosa; Chlorococcum minutum

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, S.; Miyamoto, K.; Miura, Y.

    1987-04-01

    Dark anaerobic fermentation in the green algae Chlamydomonas MGA 161, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and Chlorococcum minutum was studied. Their isolate, Chlamydomonas MGA 161, was unusual in having high H/sub 2/ but almost no formate. The fermentation pattern in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 was altered by changes in the NaCl or NH/sub 4/Cl concentration. Glycerol formation increased at low (0.1%) and high (7%) NaCl concentrations starch degradation, and formation of ethanol, H/sub 2/, and CO/sub 2/ increased with the addition of NH/sub 4/Cl to above 5 millimolar in N-deficient cells. C. reinhardtii and C.pyrenoidosa exhibited a very similar anaerobic metabolism, forming formate, acetate and ethanol in a ratio of about 2:2:1. C. minimum was also unusual in forming acetate, glycerol, and CO/sub 2/ as its main products, with H/sub 2/, formate, and ethanol being formed in negligible amounts. In the presence of CO, ethanol formation increased twofold in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 and C. reinhardtii, but the fermentation pattern in C. minimum did not change. An experiment with hypophosphite addition showed that dark H/sub 2/ evolution of the Escherichia coli type could be ruled out in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 and C. reinhardtii. Among the green algae investigated, three fermentation types were identified by the distribution pattern of the end products, which reflected the consumption model of reducing equivalents in the cells.

  4. Dispersed ozone flotation of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ya-Ling; Juang, Yu-Chuan; Liao, Guan-Yu; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Yeh, Kuei-Ling; Chen, Chun-Yen; Chang, Jo-Shu; Liu, Jhy-Chern; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-12-01

    Flotation separation of Chlorella vulgaris, a species with excellent potential for CO(2) capture and lipid production, was studied using dispersed ozone gas. Pure oxygen aeration did not yield flotation. Conversely, applying ozone effectively separation algae from broth through flotation. The ozone dose applied for sufficient algal flotation is <0.05 mg/g biomass, much lower than those used in practical drinking waterworks (0.1-0.3 mg/g suspended solids). Main products, lipid C16:0, was effectively collected in the flotage phase. The algae removal rate, surface charge, and hydrophobicity of algal cells, and proteins and polysaccharides contents of algogenic organic matter (AOM) were determined. Certain quantities of proteins were present in the cultivated algal suspension, hence, minimal quantity of ozone was required to release intracellular proteins as surfactants to lead to effective flotation.

  5. Starch and lipid accumulation in eight strains of six Chlorella species under comparatively high light intensity and aeration culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Shuhei; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Hirata, Aiko; Zachleder, Vilém; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2014-04-01

    The microalgae family Chlorella species are known to accumulate starch and lipids. Although nitrogen or phosphorous deficiencies promote starch and lipids formation in many microalgae, these deficiencies also limit their growth and productivity. Therefore, the Chlorellaceae strains were attempted to increase starch and lipids productivity under high-light-intensity conditions (600-μmol photons m(-2)s(-1)). The 12:12-h light-dark (LD) cycle conditions elicited more stable growth than the continuous light (LL) conditions, whereas the starch and lipids yields increased in LL conditions. The amount of starch and lipids per cell increased in Chlorella viscosa and Chlorella vulgaris in sulfur-deficient medium, and long-chain fatty acids with 20 or more carbon atoms accumulated in cells grown in sulfur-deficient medium. Accumulation of starch and lipids was investigated in eight strains. The accumulation was strain-dependent, and varied according to the medium and light conditions. Five of the eight Chlorella strains exhibited similar accumulation patterns.

  6. Toxicity of arsenic species to three freshwater organisms and biotransformation of inorganic arsenic by freshwater phytoplankton (Chlorella sp. CE-35).

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hogan, Ben; Duncan, Elliott; Doyle, Christopher; Krassoi, Rick; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Naidu, Ravi; Lim, Richard P; Maher, William; Hassler, Christel

    2014-08-01

    In the environment, arsenic (As) exists in a number of chemical species, and arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) dominate in freshwater systems. Toxicity of As species to aquatic organisms is complicated by their interaction with chemicals in water such as phosphate that can influence the bioavailability and uptake of As(V). In the present study, the toxicities of As(III), As(V) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) to three freshwater organisms representing three phylogenetic groups: a phytoplankton (Chlorella sp. strain CE-35), a floating macrophyte (Lemna disperma) and a cladoceran grazer (Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia), were determined using acute and growth inhibition bioassays (EC₅₀) at a range of total phosphate (TP) concentrations in OECD medium. The EC₅₀ values of As(III), As(V) and DMA were 27 ± 10, 1.15 ± 0.04 and 19 ± 3 mg L(-1) for Chlorella sp. CE-35; 0.57 ± 0.16, 2.3 ± 0.2 and 56 ± 15 mg L(-1) for L. disperma, and 1.58 ± 0.05, 1.72 ± 0.01 and 5.9 ± 0.1 mg L(-1) for C. cf. dubia, respectively. The results showed that As(III) was more toxic than As(V) to L. disperma; however, As(V) was more toxic than As(III) to Chlorella sp. CE-35. The toxicities of As(III) and As(V) to C. cf. dubia were statistically similar (p>0.05). DMA was less toxic than iAs species to L. disperma and C. cf. dubia, but more toxic than As(III) to Chlorella sp. CE-35. The toxicity of As(V) to Chlorella sp. CE-35 and L. disperma decreased with increasing TP concentrations in the growth medium. Phosphate concentrations did not influence the toxicity of As(III) to either organism. Chlorella sp. CE-35 showed the ability to reduce As(V) to As(III), indicating a substantial influence of phytoplankton on As biogeochemistry in freshwater aquatic systems.

  7. Release of reduced inorganic selenium species into waters by the green fresh water algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Denina Bobbie Dawn; Wallschläger, Dirk

    2011-03-15

    The common green fresh water algae Chlorella vulgaris was exposed to starting concentrations of 10 μg/L selenium in the form of selenate, selenite, or selenocyanate (SeCN(-)) for nine days in 10% Bold's basal medium. Uptake of selenate was more pronounced than that of selenite, and there was very little uptake of selenocyanate. Upon uptake of selenate, significant quantities of selenite and selenocyanate were produced by the algae and released back into the growth medium; no selenocyanate was released after selenite uptake. Release of the reduced metabolites after selenate exposure appeared to coincide with increasing esterase activity in solution, indicating that cell death (lysis) was the primary emission pathway. This is the first observation of biotic formation of selenocyanate and its release into waters from a nonindustrial source. The potential environmental implications of this laboratory observation are discussed with respect to the fate of selenium in impacted aquatic systems, the ecotoxicology of selenium bioaccumulation, and the interpretation of environmental selenium speciation data generated, using methods incapable of positively identifying reduced inorganic selenium species, such as selenocyanate.

  8. Studies on toxicity of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanoparticles to microalgae species: Scenedesmus sp. and Chlorella sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, I. Mohammed; Pakrashi, Sunandan; Chandrasekaran, N.; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2011-08-01

    In view of increasing commercial applications of metal oxide nanoparticles their toxicity assessment becomes important. Alumina (Al2O3) nanoparticles have wide range of applications in industrial as well as personal care products. In the absence of prior report on toxicological impact of alumina nanoparticles to microalgae, the principal objective of this study was to demonstrate the effect of the nanoparticles on microalgae isolated from aquatic environment ( Scenedesmus sp. and Chlorella sp.). The growth inhibitory effect of alumina nanoparticles was observed for both the species (72 h EC50 value, 45.4 mg/L for Chlorella sp.; 39.35 mg/L for Scenedesmus sp.). Bulk alumina also showed toxicity though to a lesser extent (72 h EC50 value, 110.2 mg/L for Chlorella sp.; 100.4 mg/L for Scenedesmus sp.). A clear decrease in chlorophyll content was observed in the treated cells compared to the untreated ones, more effect being notable in the case of nanoparticles. Preliminary results based on FT-IR studies, optical and scanning electron microscopic images suggest interaction of the nanoparticles with the cell surface.

  9. Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphisms as a Method to Differentiate Algal Species.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, Alice; Hestekin, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP) was explored as a fast and inexpensive method to differentiate both prokaryotic (blue-green) and eukaryotic (green and brown) algae. A selection of two blue-green algae (Nostoc muscorum and Anabaena inaequalis), five green algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Oedogonium foveolatum, Mougeotia sp., Scenedesmus quadricauda, and Ulothrix fimbriata), and one brown algae (Ectocarpus sp.) were examined and CE-SSCP electropherogram "fingerprints" were compared to each other for two variable regions of either the 16S or 18S rDNA gene. The electropherogram patterns were remarkably stable and consistent for each particular species. The patterns were unique to each species, although some common features were observed between the different types of algae. CE-SSCP could be a useful method for monitoring changes in an algae species over time as potential shifts in species occurred.

  10. Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphisms as a Method to Differentiate Algal Species

    PubMed Central

    Jernigan, Alice; Hestekin, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP) was explored as a fast and inexpensive method to differentiate both prokaryotic (blue-green) and eukaryotic (green and brown) algae. A selection of two blue-green algae (Nostoc muscorum and Anabaena inaequalis), five green algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Oedogonium foveolatum, Mougeotia sp., Scenedesmus quadricauda, and Ulothrix fimbriata), and one brown algae (Ectocarpus sp.) were examined and CE-SSCP electropherogram “fingerprints” were compared to each other for two variable regions of either the 16S or 18S rDNA gene. The electropherogram patterns were remarkably stable and consistent for each particular species. The patterns were unique to each species, although some common features were observed between the different types of algae. CE-SSCP could be a useful method for monitoring changes in an algae species over time as potential shifts in species occurred. PMID:26101693

  11. Combining and Comparing Coalescent, Distance and Character-Based Approaches for Barcoding Microalgaes: A Test with Chlorella-Like Species (Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Zou, Shanmei; Fei, Cong; Song, Jiameng; Bao, Yachao; He, Meilin; Wang, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    Several different barcoding methods of distinguishing species have been advanced, but which method is the best is still controversial. Chlorella is becoming particularly promising in the development of second-generation biofuels. However, the taxonomy of Chlorella-like organisms is easily confused. Here we report a comprehensive barcoding analysis of Chlorella-like species from Chlorella, Chloroidium, Dictyosphaerium and Actinastrum based on rbcL, ITS, tufA and 16S sequences to test the efficiency of traditional barcoding, GMYC, ABGD, PTP, P ID and character-based barcoding methods. First of all, the barcoding results gave new insights into the taxonomic assessment of Chlorella-like organisms studied, including the clear species discrimination and resolution of potentially cryptic species complexes in C. sorokiniana, D. ehrenbergianum and C. Vulgaris. The tufA proved to be the most efficient barcoding locus, which thus could be as potential "specific barcode" for Chlorella-like species. The 16S failed in discriminating most closely related species. The resolution of GMYC, PTP, P ID, ABGD and character-based barcoding methods were variable among rbcL, ITS and tufA genes. The best resolution for species differentiation appeared in tufA analysis where GMYC, PTP, ABGD and character-based approaches produced consistent groups while the PTP method over-split the taxa. The character analysis of rbcL, ITS and tufA sequences could clearly distinguish all taxonomic groups respectively, including the potentially cryptic lineages, with many character attributes. Thus, the character-based barcoding provides an attractive complement to coalescent and distance-based barcoding. Our study represents the test that proves the efficiency of multiple DNA barcoding in species discrimination of microalgaes.

  12. Occurrence of Harmful Algal Species and Shellfish Toxicity in Sardinia (Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Bazzoni, Anna Maria; Mudadu, Alessandro Graziano; Lorenzoni, Giuseppa; Arras, Igor; Lugliè, Antonella; Vivaldi, Barbara; Cicotelli, Valentina; Sanna, Giovanna; Tedde, Giuseppe; Ledda, Salvatore; Alesso, Enrico; Marongiu, Edoardo; Virgilio, Sebastiano

    2016-01-01

    Sardinia (Italy, north-western Mediterranean) is a commercially important producer of edible bivalve molluscs. Since the early 2000s, it was subjected to recurring cases of mussel farm closures due to toxic algal poison. Here, we present the studies on toxin concentrations and the associated potentially toxic phytoplankton distribution and abundances carried out by a regular monitoring programme in Sardinian shellfish areas, from January to May 2015. Diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins were detected in several bivalve molluscs samples, while paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins were present just once, without exceeding the legal limits. Potentially toxic algal species have been constantly present. Pseudo-nitzschia species were present during the entire study often with high abundances, while Dinophysis species reached high densities sporadically. Among PSP phytoplankton, only Alexandrium minutum Halim was found. The data obtained in this study showed an increase in the DSP toxicity in mussels in Sardinia. No clear relation between the occurrence of toxins in shellfish and the presence of potentially toxic algal species was found, although a slight correlation between DSP toxins and Dinophysis species could be supported. PMID:28058244

  13. Most harmful algal bloom species are vitamin B1 and B12 auxotrophs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ying Zhong; Koch, Florian; Gobler, Christopher J

    2010-11-30

    Eutrophication can play a central role in promoting harmful algal blooms (HABs), and therefore many HAB studies to date have focused on macronutrients (N, P, Si). Although a majority of algal species require exogenous B vitamins (i.e., auxotrophic for B vitamins), the possible importance of organic micronutrients such as B vitamins (B(1), B(7), B(12)) in regulating HABs has rarely been considered. Prior investigations of vitamins and algae have examined a relatively small number of dinoflagellates (n = 26) and a paucity of HAB species (n = 4). In the present study, the vitamin B(1), B(7), and B(12) requirements of 41 strains of 27 HAB species (19 dinoflagellates) were investigated. All but one species (two strains) of harmful algae surveyed required vitamin B(12), 20 of 27 species required B(1), and 10 of 27 species required B(7), all proportions higher than the previously reported for non-HAB species. Half-saturation (K(s)) constants of several HAB species for B(1) and B(12) were higher than those previously reported for other phytoplankton and similar to vitamin concentrations reported in estuaries. Cellular quotas for vitamins suggest that, in some cases, HAB demands for vitamins may exhaust standing stocks of vitamins in hours to days. The sum of these findings demonstrates the potentially significant ecological role of B-vitamins in regulating the dynamics of HABs.

  14. Differential response to green algal species to solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Tadros, M.G.; Philips, J.; Patel, H.; Pandiripally, V. )

    1994-03-01

    Unicellular algae in aquatic ecosystems are subjected to a variety of pollutants from sources such as runoff from agricultural lands and industrial outfalls. Organic solvents are natural components of oil deposits and commonly find their way into surface waters as a result discharges from refineries, waste oil, disposal, and accidental spills. Organic solvents can make their way into the environment as industrial wastes. Because of their carcinogenic potential, contamination of soil and water by solvents is cause for serious concern. Relatively few reports have been published on the comparative toxicity of solvents toward test organisms, and these dealt primarily with fish and aquatic invertebrates. However, limited data of toxicity effects of solvents on algae have been published. Algae have been considered to be good indicators of bioactivity of industrial wastes. Unicellular algae vary in their response to a variety of toxicants. Little is known, however, about toxicity of solvents to freshwater unicellular green algae. The work reported here was done to examine the effect of selected solvents on unicellular green algae species to determine whether they differed in their responses to these chemicals. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Biosorption of Lead from Wastewater Using Fresh Water Algae Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Kanchana, S; Jeyanthi, J

    2014-04-01

    The potential use of fresh water algae Chlorella to sorb lead ions from wastewater was evaluated in this study. Fourier transform infra-red analysis of algal species revealed the presence of amino, carboxylic, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups, which were responsible for biosorption of lead ions. Batch sorption experiments were performed to determine the effects of contact time, biosorbent dosage and pH on the adsorption of Pb2+ ions. The optimum conditions of biosorbent dosage, pH and contact time were found to be l0 g/L, 5 and 100 min respectively. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms for representation of the experimental data was investigated. The adsorption of lead ions on the algae Chlorella fitted well with Freundlich isotherm with a very high correlation coefficient.

  16. Combining and Comparing Coalescent, Distance and Character-Based Approaches for Barcoding Microalgaes: A Test with Chlorella-Like Species (Chlorophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Shanmei; Fei, Cong; Song, Jiameng; Bao, Yachao; He, Meilin; Wang, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    Several different barcoding methods of distinguishing species have been advanced, but which method is the best is still controversial. Chlorella is becoming particularly promising in the development of second-generation biofuels. However, the taxonomy of Chlorella–like organisms is easily confused. Here we report a comprehensive barcoding analysis of Chlorella-like species from Chlorella, Chloroidium, Dictyosphaerium and Actinastrum based on rbcL, ITS, tufA and 16S sequences to test the efficiency of traditional barcoding, GMYC, ABGD, PTP, P ID and character-based barcoding methods. First of all, the barcoding results gave new insights into the taxonomic assessment of Chlorella-like organisms studied, including the clear species discrimination and resolution of potentially cryptic species complexes in C. sorokiniana, D. ehrenbergianum and C. Vulgaris. The tufA proved to be the most efficient barcoding locus, which thus could be as potential “specific barcode” for Chlorella-like species. The 16S failed in discriminating most closely related species. The resolution of GMYC, PTP, P ID, ABGD and character-based barcoding methods were variable among rbcL, ITS and tufA genes. The best resolution for species differentiation appeared in tufA analysis where GMYC, PTP, ABGD and character-based approaches produced consistent groups while the PTP method over-split the taxa. The character analysis of rbcL, ITS and tufA sequences could clearly distinguish all taxonomic groups respectively, including the potentially cryptic lineages, with many character attributes. Thus, the character-based barcoding provides an attractive complement to coalescent and distance-based barcoding. Our study represents the test that proves the efficiency of multiple DNA barcoding in species discrimination of microalgaes. PMID:27092945

  17. The Chlorella variabilis NC64A Genome Reveals Adaptation to Photosymbiosis, Coevolution with Viruses, and Cryptic Sex[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Guillaume; Duncan, Garry; Agarkova, Irina; Borodovsky, Mark; Gurnon, James; Kuo, Alan; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Polle, Juergen; Salamov, Asaf; Terry, Astrid; Yamada, Takashi; Dunigan, David D.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Van Etten, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Chlorella variabilis NC64A, a unicellular photosynthetic green alga (Trebouxiophyceae), is an intracellular photobiont of Paramecium bursaria and a model system for studying virus/algal interactions. We sequenced its 46-Mb nuclear genome, revealing an expansion of protein families that could have participated in adaptation to symbiosis. NC64A exhibits variations in GC content across its genome that correlate with global expression level, average intron size, and codon usage bias. Although Chlorella species have been assumed to be asexual and nonmotile, the NC64A genome encodes all the known meiosis-specific proteins and a subset of proteins found in flagella. We hypothesize that Chlorella might have retained a flagella-derived structure that could be involved in sexual reproduction. Furthermore, a survey of phytohormone pathways in chlorophyte algae identified algal orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in hormone biosynthesis and signaling, suggesting that these functions were established prior to the evolution of land plants. We show that the ability of Chlorella to produce chitinous cell walls likely resulted from the capture of metabolic genes by horizontal gene transfer from algal viruses, prokaryotes, or fungi. Analysis of the NC64A genome substantially advances our understanding of the green lineage evolution, including the genomic interplay with viruses and symbiosis between eukaryotes. PMID:20852019

  18. The Chlorella variabilis NC64A Genome Reveals Adaptation to Photosymbiosis, Coevolution with Viruses, and Cryptic Sex

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Guillaume; Duncan, Garry A.; Agarakova, Irina; Borodovsky, Mark; Gurnon, James; Kuo, Alan; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Pangailinan, Jasmyn; Polle, Juergen; Salamov, Asaf; Terry, Astrid; Yamada, Takashi; Dunigan, David D.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Etten, James L. Van

    2010-05-06

    Chlorella variabilis NC64A, a unicellular photosynthetic green alga (Trebouxiophyceae), is an intracellular photobiont of Paramecium bursaria and a model system for studying virus/algal interactions. We sequenced its 46-Mb nuclear genome, revealing an expansion of protein families that could have participated in adaptation to symbiosis. NC64A exhibits variations in GC content across its genome that correlate with global expression level, average intron size, and codon usage bias. Although Chlorella species have been assumed to be asexual and nonmotile, the NC64A genome encodes all the known meiosis-specific proteins and a subset of proteins found in flagella. We hypothesize that Chlorella might have retained a flagella-derived structure that could be involved in sexual reproduction. Furthermore, a survey of phytohormone pathways in chlorophyte algae identified algal orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in hormone biosynthesis and signaling, suggesting that these functions were established prior to the evolution of land plants. We show that the ability of Chlorella to produce chitinous cell walls likely resulted from the capture of metabolic genes by horizontal gene transfer from algal viruses, prokaryotes, or fungi. Analysis of the NC64A genome substantially advances our understanding of the green lineage evolution, including the genomic interplay with viruses and symbiosis between eukaryotes.

  19. Coagulation-membrane filtration of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Liao, Guan-Yu; Chang, Yin-Ru; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-03-01

    Filtration-based separation of Chlorella vulgaris, a species with excellent potential for CO(2) capture and lipid production, was investigated using a surface-modified hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane. Coagulation using polyaluminum chloride (PACl) attained maximum turbidity removal at 200 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3). The membrane filtration flux at 1 bar increased as the PACl dose increased, regardless of overdosing in the coagulation stage. The filtered cake at the end of filtration tests peaked in solid content at 10 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3), reaching 34% w/w, roughly two times that of the original suspension. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tests demonstrate that the cake with minimum water-solid binding strength produced the driest filter cake. Coagulation using 10 mg L(-1) PACl as Al(2)O(3), followed by PTFE membrane filtration at 1 bar, is an effective process for harvesting C. vulgaris from algal froth.

  20. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals by freshwater algal species of Bhavnagar, Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Jaiswar, Santial; Kazi, Mudassar Anisoddin; Mehta, Shailesh

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated copper, cadmium, lead and zinc accumulation in algal species Oedogonium, Cladophora, Oscillatoria and Spirogyra from freshwater habitats of Bhavnagar, India. Eight different locations were periodically sampled during August 2009 to March 2011. The general trend of heavy metal concentrations in all the algal species in present study (except at few stations), were found to be in the following order: Zn > Cu > Pb > Cd. Highest accumulation of Cu was recorded in Oedogonium, while Cladophora showed highest accumulation of Pb signifying a good bioaccumulator. Oscillatoria and Oedogonium were highest Zn accumulating algae which showed significant difference between the means at P < 0.05. ANOVA was performed for comparing significance mean between the groups and within the group for heavy metals in water. The concentration of heavy metals in water was in the following order: Zn > Cu > Pb > Cd. The present study showed that Oedogonium, Cladophora, Oscillatoria and Spirogyra were excellent bioaccumulator and could be utilized as biomonitoring agents in water bodies receiving waste contaminated by metals.

  1. Oxygen Metabolic Responses of Three Species of Large Benthic Foraminifers with Algal Symbionts to Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kazuhiko; Okai, Takaaki; Hosono, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Water temperature affects the physiology of large benthic foraminifers (LBFs) with algal symbionts dwelling in coral reef environments. However, the detailed physiological responses of LBF holobionts to temperature ranges occurring in their habitats are not known. We report net oxygen (O2) production and respiration rates of three LBF holobionts (Baculogypsina sphaerulata and Calcarina gaudichaudii hosting diatom symbionts, and Amphisorus kudakajimensis hosting dinoflagellate symbionts) measured in the laboratory at water temperatures ranging from 5°C to 45°C in 2.5°C or 5°C intervals and with light saturation levels of ∼500 µmol m−2 s−1. In addition, the recovery of net O2 production and respiration rates after exposure to temperature stress was assessed. The net O2 production and respiration rates of the three LBF holobionts peaked at ∼30°C, indicating their optimal temperature for a short exposure period. At extreme high temperatures (≥40°C), the net O2 production rates of all three LBF holobionts declined to less than zero and the respiration rates slightly decreased, indicating that photosynthesis of algal symbionts was inactivated. At extreme low temperatures (≤10°C for two calcarinid species and ≤5°C for A. kudakajimensis), the net O2 production and respiration rates were near zero, indicating a weakening of holobiont activity. After exposure to extreme high or low temperature, the net O2 production rates did not recover until the following day, whereas the respiration rates recovered rapidly, suggesting that a longer time (days) is required for recovery from damage to the photosystem by temperature stress compared to the respiration system. These results indicate that the oxygen metabolism of LBF holobionts can generally cope well with conditions that fluctuate diurnally and seasonally in their habitats. However, temporal heat and cold stresses with high light levels may induce severe damage to algal symbionts and also damage to host

  2. Oxygen metabolic responses of three species of large benthic foraminifers with algal symbionts to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazuhiko; Okai, Takaaki; Hosono, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Water temperature affects the physiology of large benthic foraminifers (LBFs) with algal symbionts dwelling in coral reef environments. However, the detailed physiological responses of LBF holobionts to temperature ranges occurring in their habitats are not known. We report net oxygen (O2) production and respiration rates of three LBF holobionts (Baculogypsina sphaerulata and Calcarina gaudichaudii hosting diatom symbionts, and Amphisorus kudakajimensis hosting dinoflagellate symbionts) measured in the laboratory at water temperatures ranging from 5°C to 45°C in 2.5°C or 5°C intervals and with light saturation levels of ∼500 µmol m(-2) s(-1). In addition, the recovery of net O2 production and respiration rates after exposure to temperature stress was assessed. The net O2 production and respiration rates of the three LBF holobionts peaked at ∼30°C, indicating their optimal temperature for a short exposure period. At extreme high temperatures (≥40°C), the net O2 production rates of all three LBF holobionts declined to less than zero and the respiration rates slightly decreased, indicating that photosynthesis of algal symbionts was inactivated. At extreme low temperatures (≤10°C for two calcarinid species and ≤5°C for A. kudakajimensis), the net O2 production and respiration rates were near zero, indicating a weakening of holobiont activity. After exposure to extreme high or low temperature, the net O2 production rates did not recover until the following day, whereas the respiration rates recovered rapidly, suggesting that a longer time (days) is required for recovery from damage to the photosystem by temperature stress compared to the respiration system. These results indicate that the oxygen metabolism of LBF holobionts can generally cope well with conditions that fluctuate diurnally and seasonally in their habitats. However, temporal heat and cold stresses with high light levels may induce severe damage to algal symbionts and also damage to host

  3. Formation of disinfection byproducts from chlor(am)ination of algal organic matter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Guo, Wanhong; Shen, Qianqian

    2011-12-15

    Algal cells and extracellular organic matter (EOM) of two algae species, Microcystis aeruginosa (blue-green algae) and Chlorella vulgaris (green algae), were characterized. The low specific UV absorbance (SUVA) values of EOM and cells from both algae species indicated the very hydrophilic nature of algal materials. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix showed that algal EOM and cells were enriched with protein-like and soluble microbial by-product-like matters. The formation potential of a variety of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination and chloramination of algal cells and EOM were evaluated. Algal cells and EOM of Microcystis and Chlorella exhibited a high potential for DBP formation. Yields of total DBPs varied with the algae cultivation age. Cellular materials contributed more to DBP formation than EOM. The presence of bromide led to higher concentrations of total trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetonitriles (HANs), and halonitromethanes (HNMs). Bromide also shifted the DBPs to brominated ones. Bromine incorporation was higher in HNMs than in THMs and HANs. Compared to natural organic matter, algae under bloom seasons can contribute significantly to the DBP precursor pool.

  4. Air pollutant production by algal cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The production of phytotoxic air pollutants by cultures of Chlorella vulgaris and Euglena gracilis is considered. Algal and plant culture systems, a fumigation system, and ethylene, ethane, cyanide, and nitrogen oxides assays are discussed. Bean, tobacco, mustard green, cantaloupe and wheat plants all showed injury when fumigated with algal gases for 4 hours. Only coleus plants showed any resistance to the gases. It is found that a closed or recycled air effluent system does not produce plant injury from algal air pollutants.

  5. Delineation of six species of the primitive algal genus Glaucocystis based on in situ ultrastructural characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nishida, Tomoki; Tuji, Akihiro; Saito, Chieko; Matsuzaki, Ryo; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Yasuda, Hidehiro; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The field of microbiology was established in the 17th century upon the discovery of microorganisms by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek using a single-lens microscope. Now, the detailed ultrastructures of microorganisms can be elucidated in situ using three-dimensional electron microscopy. Since the availability of electron microscopy, the taxonomy of microscopic organisms has entered a new era. Here, we established a new taxonomic system of the primitive algal genus Glaucocystis (Glaucophyta) using a new-generation electron microscopic methodology: ultra-high-voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Various globally distributed Glaucocystis strains were delineated into six species, based on differences in in situ ultrastructural features of the protoplast periphery under UHVEM tomography and in the mother cell wall by FE-SEM, as well as differences in the light microscopic characteristics and molecular phylogenetic results. The present work on Glaucocystis provides a model case of new-generation taxonomy. PMID:27383831

  6. Isolation and identification of bacteria associated with the surfaces of several algal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zifeng; Xiao, Tian; Pang, Shaojun; Liu, Min; Yue, Haidong

    2009-09-01

    We conducted this study to assess the diversity of bacteria associated with the surfaces of algae based on 16S rDNA sequence analyses. Twelve strains of bacteria were obtained from the surfaces of the following four species of algae: Gracilaria textorii, Ulva pertusa, Laminaria japonica, and Polysiphonia urceolata. The isolated strains of bacteria can be divided into two groups: Halomonas and Vibrio, in physiology, biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analyses. The phylogenetic tree constructed based on 16S rDNA sequences of the isolates shows four obvious clusters, Halomonas venusta, Vibrio tasmaniensis, Vibrio lentus, and Vibrio splendidus. Isolates from the surface of P. urceolata are more abundant and diverse, of which strains P9 and P28 have a 16S rDNA sequence very similar (97.5%-99.8%) to that of V. splendidus. On the contrary, the isolates from the surfaces of G. textorii, U. pertusa and L. japonica are quite simple and distribute on different branches of the phylogenetic tree. In overall, the results of this study indicate that the genetic relationships among the isolates are quite close and display a certain level of host species specificity, and alga-associated bacteria species are algal species specific.

  7. Species identification of mixed algal bloom in the Northern Arabian Sea using remote sensing techniques.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, R; Rafeeq, M; Smitha, B R; Padmakumar, K B; Thomas, Lathika Cicily; Sanjeevan, V N; Prakash, Prince; Raman, Mini

    2015-02-01

    Oceanic waters of the Northern Arabian Sea experience massive algal blooms during winter-spring (mid Feb-end Mar), which prevail for at least for 3 months covering the entire northern half of the basin from east to west. Ship cruises were conducted during winter-spring of 2001-2012 covering different stages of the bloom to study the biogeochemistry of the region. Phytoplankton analysis indicated the presence of green tides of dinoflagellate, Noctiluca scintillans (=N. miliaris), in the oceanic waters. Our observations indicated that diatoms are coupled and often co-exist with N. scintillans, making it a mixed-species ecosystem. In this paper, we describe an approach for detection of bloom-forming algae N. scintillans and its discrimination from diatoms using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua data in a mixed-species environment. In situ remote sensing reflectance spectra were generated using Satlantic™ hyperspectral radiometer for the bloom and non-bloom waters. Spectral shapes of the reflectance spectra for different water types were distinct, and the same were used for species identification. Scatter of points representing different phytoplankton classes on a derivative plot revealed four diverse clusters, viz. N. scintillans, diatoms, non-bloom oceanic, and non-bloom coastal waters. The criteria developed for species discrimination were implemented on MODIS data and validated using inputs from a recent ship cruise conducted in March 2013.

  8. Studies of the effect of gibberellic acid on algal growth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. K.; Sorokin, C.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of gibberellic acid on exponential growth rate of four strains of Chlorella was investigated under variety of experimental conditions. In concentrations from 10 ppm to 100 ppm, gibberellic acid was shown to have no effect on Chlorella growth. In concentration of 200 ppm, gibberellic acid exerted some unfavorable effect on algal growth.

  9. The impact of atmospheric deposition of cadmium on dominant algal species in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Qiwei; Chen, Ying; Ma, Qingwei; Wang, Fujiang; Meng, Xi; Wang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) mainly derived from anthropogenic emissions can be transported through atmospheric pathway to marine ecosystem, affecting the phytoplankton community and primary productivity. In this study, we identified the toxicity threshold of Cd for phytoplankton under seawater conditions of the coastal East China Sea (ECS) through both laboratory and in situ mesocosm incubation experiments. The mesocosm experiment showed that Cd in low concentration (0.003 μg per μg chl a) was conducive to the growth of natural community and increased chl a productivity. In high concentration (0.03 μg per μg chl a) Cd acted as an inhibiting factor which decreased the total chl a productivity. The diatom community was found to be more sensitive to Cd toxicity than dinoflagellate, as the low concentration Cd showed toxicity to diatom but enhanced dinoflagellate growth. We noticed that the soluble Cd estimated from atmosphere deposition to the coastal ECS was below the toxicity threshold and the Cd deposition might promote phytoplankton growth in this region. In our laboratory experiments, adding Cd, similar to aerosol deposition, stimulated the growth of both dominant algal species Prorocentrum donghaiense Lu (dinoflagellate) and Skeletonema costatum (diatom). Adding Cd on a higher level inhibited the growth of both the species, but Skeletonema costatum seemed obviously more sensitive to toxicity. This indicates the potential impact of atmospheric deposition Cd on phytoplankton community succession in the ECS.

  10. Molecular detection and species identification of Alexandrium (Dinophyceae) causing harmful algal blooms along the Chilean coastline

    PubMed Central

    Jedlicki, Ana; Fernández, Gonzalo; Astorga, Marcela; Oyarzún, Pablo; Toro, Jorge E.; Navarro, Jorge M.; Martínez, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims On the basis of morphological evidence, the species involved in South American Pacific coast harmful algal blooms (HABs) has been traditionally recognized as Alexandrium catenella (Dinophyceae). However, these observations have not been confirmed using evidence based on genomic sequence variability. Our principal objective was to accurately determine the species of Alexandrium involved in local HABs in order to implement a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for its rapid and easy detection on filter-feeding shellfish, such as mussels. Methodology For species-specific determination, the intergenic spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S subunit, ITS2 and the hypervariable genomic regions D1–D5 of the large ribosomal subunit of local strains were sequenced and compared with two data sets of other Alexandrium sequences. Species-specific primers were used to amplify signature sequences within the genomic DNA of the studied species by conventional and real-time PCR. Principal results Phylogenetic analysis determined that the Chilean strain falls into Group I of the tamarensis complex. Our results support the allocation of the Chilean Alexandrium species as a toxic Alexandrium tamarense rather than A. catenella, as currently defined. Once local species were determined to belong to Group I of the tamarensis complex, a highly sensitive and accurate real-time PCR procedure was developed to detect dinoflagellate presence in Mytilus spp. (Bivalvia) samples after being fed (challenged) in vitro with the Chilean Alexandrium strain. The results show that real-time PCR is useful to detect Alexandrium intake in filter-feeding molluscs. Conclusions It has been shown that the classification of local Alexandrium using morphological evidence is not very accurate. Molecular methods enabled the HAB dinoflagellate species of the Chilean coast to be assigned as A. tamarense rather than A. catenella. Real-time PCR analysis based on A. tamarense primers allowed the

  11. Measurement and feature analysis of absorption spectra of four algal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Zhou, Hongli; Han, Bing; Li, Tongji

    2016-04-01

    Two methods for particulate pigments (i.e., quantitative filter technique, QFT, and in vivo measurement, InVivo, respectively) and two methods for dissolved pigments (i.e., Acetone Extracts, AceEx, and high-performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, respectively) were used to obtain the optical absorption coefficient spectra for cultures of four typical algal species. Through normalization and analysis of the spectra, it is shown that (1) the four methods are able to measure optical absorption spectra of particulate and/or dissolved pigments; (2) that the optical absorption spectra of particulate and dissolved pigments were consistent in terms of the peak position in the blue wavelength, and the difference of the peak position in the near infrared wavelength was ~10 nm between each other; and (3) that the leveling effect of the absorption spectra of particulate pigments was significant. These four methods can all effectively measure the absorption coefficients of phytoplankton pigments, while each one has its unique advantages in different applications. Therefore, appropriate method should be carefully selected for various application due to their intrinsic difference.

  12. Measurement and feature analysis of absorption spectra of four algal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Zhou, Hongli; Han, Bing; Li, Tongji

    2017-03-01

    Two methods for particulate pigments (i.e., quantitative filter technique, QFT, and in vivo measurement, InVivo, respectively) and two methods for dissolved pigments (i.e., Acetone Extracts, AceEx, and high-performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, respectively) were used to obtain the optical absorption coefficient spectra for cultures of four typical algal species. Through normalization and analysis of the spectra, it is shown that (1) the four methods are able to measure optical absorption spectra of particulate and/or dissolved pigments; (2) that the optical absorption spectra of particulate and dissolved pigments were consistent in terms of the peak position in the blue wavelength, and the difference of the peak position in the near infrared wavelength was 10 nm between each other; and (3) that the leveling effect of the absorption spectra of particulate pigments was significant. These four methods can all effectively measure the absorption coefficients of phytoplankton pigments, while each one has its unique advantages in different applications. Therefore, appropriate method should be carefully selected for various application due to their intrinsic difference.

  13. Clostridium algifaecis sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterial species from decomposing algal scum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Fan; Zheng, Hui; Wu, Qing-Long; Yang, Hong; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2014-11-01

    Two anaerobic bacterial strains, MB9-7(T) and MB9-9, were isolated from decomposing algal scum and were characterized using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strains MB9-7(T) and MB9-9 are closely related to each other (99.7% similarity) and they are also closely related to Clostridium tyrobutyricum (96.5%). The two strains were Gram-stain positive and rod-shaped. Growth occurred at 20-45 °C, at pH 4.0-8.0 and at NaCl concentrations of up to 2% (w/v). Acid was produced from glucose, xylose and mannose. Products of fermentation in PYG medium were mainly butyrate, acetate, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C(14:0) and C(16:0). The cellular polar lipids comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, two glycolipids, one phospholipid, one aminophospholipid and two aminolipids. The DNA G+C contents of strain MB9-7(T) and MB9-9 were 27.9 and 28.7 mol%, respectively. These results support the assignment of the new isolates to the genus Clostridium and also distinguish them from other species of the genus Clostridium. Hence, it is proposed that strains MB9-7(T) and MB9-9 represent a novel species of the genus Clostridium, with the suggested name Clostridium algifaecis sp. nov. The type strain is MB9-7(T) ( =CGMCC 1.5188(T) =DSM 28783(T)).

  14. Combined effect of predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal suppression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shengpeng; Wan, Kun; Ma, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the combined effects of four typical predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal control in a microcosm system. It would determine the effects of diverse species and biological restoration on the growth of harmful water-bloom microalgae in great lakes polluted by excess nutrients. It was found that the mixtures of each zooplankton and the floating plant Nymphoides peltatum had stronger inhibitory effects on harmful water-bloom microalgae than the individual species in clean or eutrophic water bodies. In addition, a community of four zooplankton types had a synergistic effect on algal inhibition. Algal suppression by the zooplankton community was enhanced significantly when the macrophyte was co-cultured in the microcosm. Furthermore, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was more susceptible than Microcystis aeruginosa when exposed to grazing by zooplankton and the allelopathic potential of the macrophyte. Algal inhibition was also weaker in eutrophic conditions compared with the control. These findings indicate that diverse species may enhance algal inhibition. Therefore, it is necessary to restore biological diversity and rebuild an ecologically balanced food chain or web to facilitate the control of harmful algal blooms in eutrophic lakes.

  15. Comparison of toxicity to terrestrial plants with algal growth inhibition by herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Frank, M.L.

    1984-10-01

    The toxicities of 21 different herbicides to algae (Selenastrum capricornutum and Chlorella vulgaris) and to terrestrial plants (radishes, barley, and bush beans or soybeans) were compared to order to determine the feasibility of using a short-term (96-h) algal growth inhibition test for identifying chemicals having potential toxicity in a 4-week terrestrial plant bioassay. The toxicity of each test chemical, usually in combination with a commercial formulation, was evaluated at six nominal concentrations, between 0 and 100 mg/L growth medium in the algal bioassay or between 0 and 100 mg/kg substate in the terrestrial plant bioassay, in terms of both (1) the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC), i.e., the highest concentration tested at which no significant (P < 0.05, one-sided test) reduction in algal growth rate or in terrestrial plant yield, relative to controls, was observed; and (2) the concentration at which algal growth rate or terrestrial plant yield was reduced by 50% or more relative to controls. There was generally poor agreement between results from the two types of bioassays; results from algal growth inhibition tests were not significantly correlated with results from the terrestrial plant bioassays. Overall, there was an approximately 50% chance of an algal bioassay, using Selenastrum capricornutum, successfully screening (detecting) herbicide levels that reduced terrestrial plant yield. The results indicated that algal growth inhibition tests cannot be used generically to predict phytotoxicity of herbicides to terrestrial plant species. 7 references, 14 tables.

  16. Use of De Novo Transcriptome Libraries to Characterize a Novel Oleaginous Marine Chlorella Species during the Accumulation of Triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B; Richter, Lubna V; Ahner, Beth A; Cochlan, William P; Richardson, Ruth E

    2016-01-01

    Marine chlorophytes of the genus Chlorella are unicellular algae capable of accumulating a high proportion of cellular lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, we examined the broad physiological capabilities of a subtropical strain (C596) of Chlorella sp. "SAG-211-18" including its heterotrophic growth and tolerance to low salt. We found that the alga replicates more slowly at diluted salt concentrations and can grow on a wide range of carbon substrates in the dark. We then sequenced the RNA of Chlorella strain C596 to elucidate key metabolic genes and investigate the transcriptomic response of the organism when transitioning from a nutrient-replete to a nutrient-deficient condition when neutral lipids accumulate. Specific transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in both starch and lipid biosynthesis, among others, were up-regulated as the cultures transitioned into a lipid-accumulating state whereas photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. Transcripts encoding for two of the up-regulated enzymes-a galactoglycerolipid lipase and a diacylglyceride acyltransferase-were also monitored by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results of these assays confirmed the transcriptome-sequencing data. The present transcriptomic study will assist in the greater understanding, more effective application, and efficient design of Chlorella-based biofuel production systems.

  17. Use of De Novo transcriptome libraries to characterize a novel oleaginous marine Chlorella species during the accumulation of triacylglycerols

    DOE PAGES

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Richter, Lubna V.; Ahner, Beth A.; ...

    2016-02-03

    Here, marine chlorophytes of the genus Chlorella are unicellular algae capable of accumulating a high proportion of cellular lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, we examined the broad physiological capabilities of a subtropical strain (C596) of Chlorella sp. “SAG-211-18” including its heterotrophic growth and tolerance to low salt.We found that the alga replicates more slowly at diluted salt concentrations and can grow on a wide range of carbon substrates in the dark.We then sequenced the RNA of Chlorella strain C596 to elucidate key metabolic genes and investigate the transcriptomic response of the organism when transitioningmore » from a nutrient-replete to a nutrient-deficient condition when neutral lipids accumulate. Specific transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in both starch and lipid biosynthesis, among others, were up-regulated as the cultures transitioned into a lipid-accumulating state whereas photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. Transcripts encoding for two of the up-regulated enzymes—a galactoglycerolipid lipase and a diacylglyceride acyltransferase—were also monitored by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results of these assays confirmed the transcriptome-sequencing data. The present transcriptomic study will assist in the greater understanding, more effective application, and efficient design of Chlorella-based biofuel production systems.« less

  18. Use of De Novo Transcriptome Libraries to Characterize a Novel Oleaginous Marine Chlorella Species during the Accumulation of Triacylglycerols

    PubMed Central

    Ahner, Beth A.; Cochlan, William P.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Marine chlorophytes of the genus Chlorella are unicellular algae capable of accumulating a high proportion of cellular lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, we examined the broad physiological capabilities of a subtropical strain (C596) of Chlorella sp. “SAG-211-18” including its heterotrophic growth and tolerance to low salt. We found that the alga replicates more slowly at diluted salt concentrations and can grow on a wide range of carbon substrates in the dark. We then sequenced the RNA of Chlorella strain C596 to elucidate key metabolic genes and investigate the transcriptomic response of the organism when transitioning from a nutrient-replete to a nutrient-deficient condition when neutral lipids accumulate. Specific transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in both starch and lipid biosynthesis, among others, were up-regulated as the cultures transitioned into a lipid-accumulating state whereas photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. Transcripts encoding for two of the up-regulated enzymes—a galactoglycerolipid lipase and a diacylglyceride acyltransferase—were also monitored by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results of these assays confirmed the transcriptome-sequencing data. The present transcriptomic study will assist in the greater understanding, more effective application, and efficient design of Chlorella-based biofuel production systems. PMID:26840425

  19. Impact of sonication at 20 kHz on Microcystis aeruginosa, Anabaena circinalis and Chlorella sp.

    PubMed

    Rajasekhar, Pradeep; Fan, Linhua; Nguyen, Thang; Roddick, Felicity A

    2012-04-01

    Blooms of toxic cyanobacteria such as Microcystis aeruginosa periodically occur within wastewater treatment lagoons in the warmer months, and may consequently cause contamination of downstream water and outages of the supply of recycled wastewater. Lab-scale sonication (20 kHz) was conducted on suspensions of M. aeruginosa isolated from a wastewater treatment lagoon, and two other algal strains, Anabaena circinalis and Chlorella sp., to investigate cell reduction, growth inhibition, release of microcystin and sonication efficiency in controlling the growth of the M. aeruginosa. For M. aeruginosa, for all sonication intensities and exposure times trialled, sonication led to an immediate reduction in the population, the highest reduction rate occurring within the initial 5 min. Sonication for 5 min at 0.32 W/mL, or for a longer exposure time (>10 min) at a lower power intensity (0.043 W/mL), led to an immediate increase in microcystin level in the treated suspensions. However, prolonged exposure (>10 min) to sonication at higher power intensities reduced the microcystin concentration significantly. Under the same sonication conditions, the order of decreasing growth inhibition of the three algal species was: A. circinalis > M. aeruginosa > Chlorella sp., demonstrating sonication has the potential to selectively remove/deactivate harmful cyanobacteria from the algal communities in wastewater treatment lagoons.

  20. Comparative Analyses of Three Chlorella Species in Response to Light and Sugar Reveal Distinctive Lipid Accumulation Patterns in the Microalga C. sorokiniana

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Austin; Noel, Eric A.; Betenbaugh, Michael J.; Oyler, George A.

    2014-01-01

    While photosynthetic microalgae, such as Chlorella, serve as feedstocks for nutritional oils and biofuels, heterotrophic cultivation can augment growth rates, support high cell densities, and increase triacylglycerol (TAG) lipid content. However, these species differ significantly in their photoautotrophic and heterotrophic characteristics. In this study, the phylogeny of thirty Chlorella strains was determined in order to inform bioprospecting efforts and detailed physiological assessment of three species. The growth kinetics and lipid biochemistry of C. protothecoides UTEX 411, C. vulgaris UTEX 265, and C. sorokiniana UTEX 1230 were quantified during photoautotrophy in Bold's basal medium (BBM) and heterotrophy in BBM supplemented with glucose (10 g L−1). Heterotrophic growth rates of UTEX 411, 265, and 1230 were found to be 1.5-, 3.7-, and 5-fold higher than their respective autotrophic rates. With a rapid nine-hour heterotrophic doubling time, Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 1230 maximally accumulated 39% total lipids by dry weight during heterotrophy compared to 18% autotrophically. Furthermore, the discrete fatty acid composition of each strain was examined in order to elucidate lipid accumulation patterns under the two trophic conditions. In both modes of growth, UTEX 411 and 265 produced 18∶1 as the principal fatty acid while UTEX 1230 exhibited a 2.5-fold enrichment in 18∶2 relative to 18∶1. Although the total lipid content was highest in UTEX 411 during heterotrophy, UTEX 1230 demonstrated a two-fold increase in its heterotrophic TAG fraction at a rate of 28.9 mg L−1 d−1 to reach 22% of the biomass, corresponding to as much as 90% of its total lipids. Interestingly, UTEX 1230 growth was restricted during mixotrophy and its TAG production rate was suppressed to 18.2 mg L−1 d−1. This constraint on carbon flow raises intriguing questions about the impact of sugar and light on the metabolic regulation of microalgal lipid biosynthesis. PMID:24699196

  1. Comparative analyses of three Chlorella species in response to light and sugar reveal distinctive lipid accumulation patterns in the Microalga C. sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Julian N; Kobayashi, Naoko; Barnes, Austin; Noel, Eric A; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Oyler, George A

    2014-01-01

    While photosynthetic microalgae, such as Chlorella, serve as feedstocks for nutritional oils and biofuels, heterotrophic cultivation can augment growth rates, support high cell densities, and increase triacylglycerol (TAG) lipid content. However, these species differ significantly in their photoautotrophic and heterotrophic characteristics. In this study, the phylogeny of thirty Chlorella strains was determined in order to inform bioprospecting efforts and detailed physiological assessment of three species. The growth kinetics and lipid biochemistry of C. protothecoides UTEX 411, C. vulgaris UTEX 265, and C. sorokiniana UTEX 1230 were quantified during photoautotrophy in Bold's basal medium (BBM) and heterotrophy in BBM supplemented with glucose (10 g L-1). Heterotrophic growth rates of UTEX 411, 265, and 1230 were found to be 1.5-, 3.7-, and 5-fold higher than their respective autotrophic rates. With a rapid nine-hour heterotrophic doubling time, Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 1230 maximally accumulated 39% total lipids by dry weight during heterotrophy compared to 18% autotrophically. Furthermore, the discrete fatty acid composition of each strain was examined in order to elucidate lipid accumulation patterns under the two trophic conditions. In both modes of growth, UTEX 411 and 265 produced 18:1 as the principal fatty acid while UTEX 1230 exhibited a 2.5-fold enrichment in 18:2 relative to 18:1. Although the total lipid content was highest in UTEX 411 during heterotrophy, UTEX 1230 demonstrated a two-fold increase in its heterotrophic TAG fraction at a rate of 28.9 mg L(-1) d(-1) to reach 22% of the biomass, corresponding to as much as 90% of its total lipids. Interestingly, UTEX 1230 growth was restricted during mixotrophy and its TAG production rate was suppressed to 18.2 mg L-1 d-1. This constraint on carbon flow raises intriguing questions about the impact of sugar and light on the metabolic regulation of microalgal lipid biosynthesis.

  2. Algal endosymbionts in European Hydra strains reflect multiple origins of the zoochlorella symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Rajević, Nives; Kovačević, Goran; Kalafatić, Mirjana; Gould, Sven B; Martin, William F; Franjević, Damjan

    2015-12-01

    Symbiotic associations are of broad significance in evolution and biodiversity. Green Hydra is a classic example of endosymbiosis. In its gastrodermal myoepithelial cells it harbors endosymbiotic unicellular green algae, most commonly from the genus Chlorella. We reconstructed the phylogeny of cultured algal endosymbionts isolated and maintained in laboratory conditions for years from green Hydra strains collected from four different geographical sites within Croatia, one from Germany and one from Israel. Nuclear (18S rDNA, ITS region) and chloroplast markers (16S, rbcL) for maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses were used. We focused on investigating the positions of these algal endosymbiotic strains within the chlorophyte lineage. Molecular analyses established that different genera and species of unicellular green algae are present as endosymbionts in green Hydra, showing that endosymbiotic algae growing within green Hydra sampled from four Croatian localities are not monophyletic. Our results indicate that the intracellular algal endosymbionts of green Hydra have become established several times independently in evolution.

  3. Inhibition of nitrification in municipal wastewater-treating photobioreactors: Effect on algal growth and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Krustok, I; Odlare, M; Truu, J; Nehrenheim, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of inhibiting nitrification on algal growth and nutrient uptake was studied in photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater. As previous studies have indicated that algae prefer certain nitrogen species to others, and because nitrifying bacteria are inhibited by microalgae, it is important to shed more light on these interactions. In this study allylthiourea (ATU) was used to inhibit nitrification in wastewater-treating photobioreactors. The nitrification-inhibited reactors were compared to control reactors with no ATU added. Microalgae had higher growth in the inhibited reactors, resulting in a higher chlorophyll a concentration. The species mix also differed, with Chlorella and Scenedesmus being the dominant genera in the control reactors and Cryptomonas and Chlorella dominating in the inhibited reactors. The nitrogen speciation in the reactors after 8 days incubation was also different in the two setups, with N existing mostly as NH4-N in the inhibited reactors and as NO3-N in the control reactors.

  4. Inhibition of lipase and inflammatory mediators by Chlorella lipid extracts for antiacne treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sibi, G.

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease, and its treatment is challenging due to the multifactorial etiology and emergence of antibiotic-resistant Propionibacterium acnes strains. This study was focused to reduce antibiotics usage and find an alternate therapeutic source for treating acne. Lipid extracts of six Chlorella species were tested for inhibition of lipase, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cytokine production using P. acnes (Microbial Type Culture Collection 1951). Lipase inhibitory assay was determined by dimercaprol Tributyrate - 5, 5'- dithiobis 2-nitrobenzoic acid method and ROS production assay was performed using nitro-blue tetrazolium test. The anti-inflammatory activity of algal lipid extracts was determined by in vitro screening method based on inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) produced by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of lipid extracts were determined by microdilution method, and the fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Chlorella ellipsoidea has the highest lipase inhibitory activity with 61.73% inhibition, followed by Chlorella vulgaris (60.31%) and Chlorella protothecoides (58.9%). Lipid extracts from C. protothecoides and C. ellipsoidea has significantly reduced the ROS production by 61.27% and 58.34% respectively. Inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α showed the inhibition ranging from 58.39% to 78.67%. C. vulgaris has exhibited the MICvalue of 10 μg/ml followed by C. ellipsoidea, C. protothecoides and Chlorella pyrenoidosa (20 μg/ml). FAME analysis detected 19 fatty acids of which 5 were saturated fatty acids, and 14 were unsaturated fatty acids ranging from C14 to C24. The results suggest that lipid extracts of Chlorella species has significant inhibitory activity on P. acnes by inhibiting lipase activity. Further, anti-inflammatory reaction caused by the

  5. Thermal effects on the growth and fatty acid composition of four harmful algal bloom species: Possible implications for ichthyotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Bonggil; Ju, Se-Jong; Ko, Ah-Ra; Choi, Keun-Hyung; Jung, Seung Won; Jang, Pung-Guk; Jang, Min-Chul; Moon, Chang Ho; Shin, Kyoungsoon

    2016-09-01

    Little is known regarding how harmful algal bloom species respond to different temperatures in terms of fatty acid production. This study examined the effects of temperature on the growth rates, cell volumes, and fatty acid concentrations and compositions of four harmful algal bloom species (HABs), Akashiwo sanguinea, Alexandrium tamarense, Chattonella ovata, and Prorocentrum minimum. The HABs species were cultured at 15, 20, 25, and 30°C in a nutrient-enriched medium. Three of the species maintained optimal growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, but A. tamarense did not. The cell volumes of each species showed little change over the temperature range. The total fatty acid concentrations in A. sanguinea, A. tamarense and C. ovata decreased as the temperature increased, but P. minimum showed no trend in this respect. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), the key biochemical components that maintain cell membrane fluidity and which are associated with toxicity, decreased in both concentration and proportion of total fatty acids as temperature increased, except in A. sanguinea, in which the proportion of PUFAs to the total fatty acids increased. These reductions in PUFA concentration and proportion could reduce cell membrane fluidity and toxicity in HABs; however, enhanced growth and/or ruptured cells, which are considered more toxic than intact cells, could compensate for the reduced per-cell toxicity. This phenomenon might impact on the marine ecosystem and aquaculture industry.

  6. The death mechanism of the harmful algal bloom species Alexandrium tamarense induced by algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Huajun; Cai, Guanjing; Chen, Zhangran; Fu, Lijun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause a variety of deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems, especially the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, which poses a serious threat to marine economic and human health based on releasing paralytic shellfish poison into the environment. The algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35 which can induce growth inhibition on A. tamarense was used to investigate the functional mechanism. The growth status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, photosynthetic system and the nuclear system of algal cells were determined under algicidal activity. A culture of strain Y35 not only induced overproduction of ROS in algal cells within only 0.5 h of treatment, also decrease the total protein content as well as the response of the antioxidant enzyme. Meanwhile, lipid peroxidation was induced and cell membrane integrity was lost. Photosynthetic pigments including chlorophyll a and carotenoid decreased along with the photosynthetic efficiency being significantly inhibited. At the same time, photosynthesis-related gene expression showed down-regulation. More than, the destruction of cell nuclear structure and inhibition of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) related gene expression were confirmed. The potential functional mechanism of the algicidal bacterium on A. tamarense was investigated and provided a novel viewpoint which could be used in HABs control. PMID:26441921

  7. The death mechanism of the harmful algal bloom species Alexandrium tamarense induced by algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Huajun; Cai, Guanjing; Chen, Zhangran; Fu, Lijun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause a variety of deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems, especially the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, which poses a serious threat to marine economic and human health based on releasing paralytic shellfish poison into the environment. The algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35 which can induce growth inhibition on A. tamarense was used to investigate the functional mechanism. The growth status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, photosynthetic system and the nuclear system of algal cells were determined under algicidal activity. A culture of strain Y35 not only induced overproduction of ROS in algal cells within only 0.5 h of treatment, also decrease the total protein content as well as the response of the antioxidant enzyme. Meanwhile, lipid peroxidation was induced and cell membrane integrity was lost. Photosynthetic pigments including chlorophyll a and carotenoid decreased along with the photosynthetic efficiency being significantly inhibited. At the same time, photosynthesis-related gene expression showed down-regulation. More than, the destruction of cell nuclear structure and inhibition of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) related gene expression were confirmed. The potential functional mechanism of the algicidal bacterium on A. tamarense was investigated and provided a novel viewpoint which could be used in HABs control.

  8. The reduction of Chlorella vulgaris concentrations through UV-C radiation treatments: A nature-based solution (NBS).

    PubMed

    Chen, Erika S; Bridgeman, Thomas B

    2017-03-25

    Algal blooms have become a pressing issue in inland freshwater systems on local and global scales. A plausible approach to reducing algae without the use of chemical/biological agents is through the use of UV-C radiation from lamps potentially powered by in situ solar panels to eliminate algae. Yet, the quantitative scientific base has not been established. Our objective is to conduct a controlled experiment to quantify the effectiveness of UV-C radiation on the reduction of Chlorella vulgaris, a common algal species in the Great Lakes region. A full factorial design of three intensities of UV-C radiation (0, 15, and 30W) and three sources of C. vulgaris was constructed to test the corresponding hypotheses. Empirical models were constructed to predict the reductions. UV-C radiation effectively reduced the algal concentration with clear differences by radiation level and source of algal water. Algal concentration decreased exponentially over time, with distinct decreasing trends among the radiation intensities and the samples. With 15W UV-C radiation, algal concentration of three samples were reduced to 75.3%, 51.5%, and 70.0% of the initial level within an hour, respectively. We also found a clear density-dependent reduction rate by UV radiation. Using this information, more efficient treatment systems could be constructed and implemented for cleaning algae-contaminated water.

  9. Two coexisting tank bromeliads host distinct algal communities on a tropical inselberg.

    PubMed

    Carrias, J-F; Céréghino, R; Brouard, O; Pélozuelo, L; Dejean, A; Couté, A; Corbara, B; Leroy, C

    2014-09-01

    The tank bromeliads Aechmea aquilega (Salisb.) and Catopsis berteroniana (Schultes f.) coexist on a sun-exposed Neotropical inselberg in French Guiana, where they permit conspicuous freshwater pools to form that differ in size, complexity and detritus content. We sampled the algal communities (both eukaryotic and cyanobacterial taxa, including colourless forms) inhabiting either A. aquilega (n = 31) or C. berteroniana (n = 30) and examined differences in community composition and biomass patterns in relation to several biotic and abiotic variables. Chlorella sp. and Bumilleriopsis sp. were the most common taxa and dominated the algal biomass in A. aquilega and C. berteroniana, respectively. Using a redundancy analysis, we found that water volume, habitat complexity and the density of phagotrophic protozoa and collector-gatherer invertebrates were the main factors explaining the distribution of the algal taxa among the samples. Hierarchical clustering procedures based on abundance and presence/absence data clearly segregated the samples according to bromeliad species, revealing that the algal communities in the smaller bromeliad species were not a subset of the communities found in the larger bromeliad species. We conclude that, even though two coexisting tank bromeliad populations create adjacent aquatic habitats, each population hosts a distinct algal community. Hence, bromeliad diversity is thought to promote the local diversity of freshwater algae in the Neotropics.

  10. Sonication-based isolation and enrichment of Chlorella protothecoides chloroplasts for illumina genome sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, Angelina; Park, Sang-Hycuk; Kyndt, John; Fitzsimmons, Kevin; Brown, Judith K

    2013-09-01

    With the increasing world demand for biofuel, a number of oleaginous algal species are being considered as renewable sources of oil. Chlorella protothecoides Krüger synthesizes triacylglycerols (TAGs) as storage compounds that can be converted into renewable fuel utilizing an anabolic pathway that is poorly understood. The paucity of algal chloroplast genome sequences has been an important constraint to chloroplast transformation and for studying gene expression in TAGs pathways. In this study, the intact chloroplasts were released from algal cells using sonication followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, resulting in a 2.36-fold enrichment of chloroplasts from C. protothecoides, based on qPCR analysis. The C. protothecoides chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform and found to be 84,576 Kb in size (8.57 Kb) in size, with a GC content of 30.8 %. This is the first report of an optimized protocol that uses a sonication step, followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, to release and enrich intact chloroplasts from a microalga (C. prototheocoides) of sufficient quality to permit chloroplast genome sequencing with high coverage, while minimizing nuclear genome contamination. The approach is expected to guide chloroplast isolation from other oleaginous algal species for a variety of uses that benefit from enrichment of chloroplasts, ranging from biochemical analysis to genomics studies.

  11. HPLC pigment profiles of 31 harmful algal bloom species isolated from the coastal sea areas of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuxia; Yao, Peng; Yu, Zhigang; Li, Dong; Deng, Chunmei; Zhen, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Chemotaxonomy based on diagnostic pigments is now a routine tool for macroscopic determination of the composition and abundance of phytoplankton in various aquatic environments. Since the taxonomic capability of this method depends on the relationships between diagnostic pigments and chlorophyll a of classified groups, it is critical to calibrate it by using pigment relationships obtained from representative and/or dominant species local to targeted investigation area. In this study, pigment profiles of 31 harmful algal bloom (HAB) species isolated from the coastal sea areas of China were analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Pigment compositions, cellular pigment densities and ratios of pigments to chlorophyll a were determined and calculated. Among all these species, 25 kinds of pigments were detected, of which fucoxanthin, peridinin, 19'-butanoyloxyfucoxanthin, 19'-hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin, violaxanthin, and antheraxanthin were diagnostic pigments. Cellular pigment density was basically independent of species and environmental conditions, and therefore was recommended as a bridge to compare the results of HPLC-CHEMTAX technique with the traditional microscopy method. Pigment ratios of algal species isolated from the coast of China, especially the diagnostic pigment ratios, were higher than those from other locations. According to these results, pigment ratio ranges of four classes of phytoplankton common off the coast of China were summarized for using in the current chemotaxonomic method. Moreover, the differences of pigments ratios among different species under the same culturing conditions were consistent with their biological differences. Such differences have the potential to be used to classify the phytoplankton below class, which is meaningful for monitoring HABs by HPLC-CHEMTAX.

  12. A shift in the dominant toxin-producing algal species in central California alters phycotoxins in food webs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jester, R.; Lefebvre, K.; Langlois, G.; Vigilant, V.; Baugh, K.; Silver, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    In California, the toxic algal species of primary concern are the dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella and members of the pennate diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia, both producers of potent neurotoxins that are capable of sickening and killing marine life and humans. During the summer of 2004 in Monterey Bay, we observed a change in the taxonomic structure of the phytoplankton community-the typically diatom-dominated community shifted to a red tide, dinoflagellate-dominated community. Here we use a 6-year time series (2000-2006) to show how the abundance of the dominant harmful algal bloom (HAB) species in the Bay up to that point, Pseudo-nitzschia, significantly declined during the dinoflagellate-dominated interval, while two genera of toxic dinoflagellates, Alexandrium and Dinophysis, became the predominant toxin producers. This change represents a shift from a genus of toxin producers that typically dominates the community during a toxic bloom, to HAB taxa that are generally only minor components of the community in a toxic event. This change in the local HAB species was also reflected in the toxins present in higher trophic levels. Despite the small contribution of A. catenella to the overall phytoplankton community, the increase in the presence of this species in Monterey Bay was associated with an increase in the presence of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins in sentinel shellfish and clupeoid fish. This report provides the first evidence that PSP toxins are present in California's pelagic food web, as PSP toxins were detected in both northern anchovies (Engraulis mordax) and Pacific sardines (Sardinops sagax). Another interesting observation from our data is the co-occurrence of DA and PSP toxins in both planktivorous fish and sentinel shellfish. We also provide evidence, based on the statewide biotoxin monitoring program, that this increase in the frequency and abundance of PSP events related to A. catenella occurred not just in Monterey Bay, but also

  13. Secreted arginases from phylogenetically farrelated lichen species act as cross-recognition factors for two different algal cells.

    PubMed

    Legaz, María-Estrella; Fontaniella, Blanca; Millanes, Ana-María; Carlos, Vicente

    2004-08-01

    Purified arginases secreted from Evernia prunastri and Xanthoria parietina thalli hydrolyze arginine in a Mn2+ -dependent reaction. Ca2+ cannot replace Mn2+, but its addition to reaction mixtures in the presence of Mn2+ significantly inhibited arginase activity. Arginases from both lichen species also show lectin function, binding to the cell wall of both homologous and heterologous algae. Such binding is enhanced by both Ca2+ and Mn2+ and results in cytoagglutination, which is counteracted by alpha-D-galactose. A putative ligand for these lectins consists of a glycosylated urease, the polysaccharide moiety of which is uniquely composed of alpha-D-galactose. Binding of lectins inhibits its enzymatic activity, which is recovered after desorption of the lectin with alpha-D-galactose. Urease is also eluted from arginase-agarose columns by using alpha-D-galactose as eluent. Data demonstrate ligand-dependent retention of the fungal lectin on the algal cell surface and this is consistent with a model of recognition of compatible algae, through which algal cells would form a lichen with a lectin-secreting fungus only when these cells contain the specific ligand for the lectin in their cell walls. This is, lectin binding is used as a mechanism for ensuring specificity in the association.

  14. Algal bioremediation of waste waters from land-based aquaculture using ulva: selecting target species and strains.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Rebecca J; Mata, Leonardo; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2013-01-01

    The optimised reduction of dissolved nutrient loads in aquaculture effluents through bioremediation requires selection of appropriate algal species and strains. The objective of the current study was to identify target species and strains from the macroalgal genus Ulva for bioremediation of land-based aquaculture facilities in Eastern Australia. We surveyed land-based aquaculture facilities and natural coastal environments across three geographic locations in Eastern Australia to determine which species of Ulva occur naturally in this region and conducted growth trials at three temperature treatments on a subset of samples from each location to determine whether local strains had superior performance under local environmental conditions. DNA barcoding using the markers ITS and tufA identified six species of Ulva, with U. ohnoi being the most common blade species and U. sp. 3 the most common filamentous species. Both species occurred at multiple land-based aquaculture facilities in Townsville and Brisbane and multiple strains of each species grew well in culture. Specific growth rates of U. ohnoi and U. sp. 3 were high (over 9% and 15% day(-1) respectively) across temperature treatments. Within species, strains of U. ohnoi had higher growth in temperatures corresponding to local conditions, suggesting that strains may be locally adapted. However, across all temperature treatments Townsville strains had the highest growth rates (11.2-20.4% day(-1)) and Sydney strains had the lowest growth rates (2.5-8.3% day(-1)). We also found significant differences in growth between strains of U. ohnoi collected from the same geographic location, highlighting the potential to isolate and cultivate fast growing strains. In contrast, there was no clearly identifiable competitive strain of filamentous Ulva, with multiple species and strains having variable performance. The fast growth rates and broad geographical distribution of U. ohnoi make this an ideal species to target for

  15. [Generalized behavior study on the growth dynamics for dominant algae species forming algal bloom in the three Gorges reservoir region].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-an; Feng, Li; Jia, Charles Q

    2008-08-01

    From the blue-green algae species a representative algae, namely, ChloreUlla vulgaris (CV)to belong to Chlorophyta is selected as one of algae species studied in order to investigate the effect of TN, TP on the growth behavior of CV with the Monod equation, and calculate the semi-saturation constants of CV to TP(K(SP)) and TN(K(SN)). K(SN) > K(SP) showed that the effect of TP on growth of CV is obvious significant than that of TN. The growth rate of Chlorella vulgaris is very sensitive to the concentration of phosphorus: Compares with the blank value, the special growth rate (mu) has been enhanced under the low concentration of 0.002 mg x L(-1), then the concentration turned to 0.2 mg x L(-1) the special growth rate (mu) has been enhanced obviously; but there was hardly any change under the concentration of nitrogen from 0.000 to 0.050 mg x L(-1). At the same time, in order to reveal whether there was a generalized character associating the growth dynamics of CV with that of dominant blue-green algae species, the dynamic models including CV constructed from our experimental data, dominant blue-green algae and sea algae from literature information have been compared and analyzed systemically, and the results showed that their growth dynamics behavior and ecological characteristic were extremely similar and common. According to extrapolation of the intercommunity of all growth dynamics we could describe and show availably there is a common behavior to the growth of dominant blue-green algae in the Three Gorges reservoir region. This conclusion would have some important theoretical and applied significance.

  16. Impact of several harmful algal bloom (HAB) causing species, on life history characteristics of rotifer Brachionus plicatilis Müller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jianing; Yan, Tian; Zhang, Qingchun; Zhou, Mingjiang

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, harmful algal blooms (HABs) have occurred frequently along the coast of China, and have been exhibiting succession from diatom- to dinoflagellate-dominated blooms. To examine the effects of different diatom and dinoflagellate HABs, the life history parameters of rotifers ( Brachionus plicatilis Müller) were measured after exposure to different concentrations of HAB species. The HAB species examined included a diatom ( Skeletonema costatum) and four dinoflagellates ( Prorocentrum donghaiense, Alexandrium catenella, Prorocentrum lima and Karlodinium veneficum). Compared with the control treatment (CT), the diatom S. costatum showed no adverse impacts on rotifers. Exposure to dinoflagellates at densities equivalent to those measured in the field resulted in a reduction in all the life history parameters measured. This included a reduction in: lifetime egg production (CT: 20.34 eggs/ind.) reduced to 10.11, 3.22, 4.17, 7.16 eggs/ind., life span (CT: 394.53 h) reduced to 261.11, 162.90, 203.67, 196 h, net reproductive rate (CT: 19.51/ind.) reduced to 3.01, 1.26, 3.53, 5.96/ind., finite rate of increase (CT: 1.47/d) reduced to 1.16, 1.03, 1.33, 1.38/d, and intrinsic rate of population increase (CT: 0.39/d) reduced to 0.15, 0.03, 0.28, 0.32/d, for the dinoflagellates P. donghaiense, A. catenella, P. lima and K. veneficum, respectively. The results showed that the diatom S. costatum had no detrimental consequences on the reproduction and growth of B. plicatilis, however, the four dinoflagellates tested did show adverse effects. This suggests that dinoflagellate HABs may suppress microzooplankton, resulting in an increase in algal numbers.

  17. Algal endosymbiosis in brown hydra: host/symbiont specificity.

    PubMed

    Rahat, M; Reich, V

    1986-12-01

    Host/symbiont specificity has been investigated in non-symbiotic and aposymbiotic brown and green hydra infected with various free-living and symbiotic species and strains of Chlorella and Chlorococcum. Morphology and ultrastructure of the symbioses obtained have been compared. Aposymbiotic Swiss Hydra viridis and Japanese H. magnipapillata served as controls. In two strains of H. attenuata stable hereditary symbioses were obtained with Chlorococcum isolated from H. magnipapillata. In one strain of H. vulgaris, in H. oligactis and in aposymbiotic H. viridis chlorococci persisted for more than a week. Eight species of free-living Chlorococcum, 10 symbiotic and 10 free-living strains of Chlorella disappeared from the brown hydra within 1-2 days. In H. magnipapillata there was a graded distribution of chlorococci along the polyps. In hypostomal cells there were greater than 30 algae/cell while in endodermal cells of the mid-section or peduncle less than 10 algae/cell were found. In H. attenuata the algal distribution was irregular, there were up to five chlorocci/cell, and up to 20 cells/hydra hosted algae. In the dark most cells of Chlorococcum disappeared from H. magnipapillata and aposymbiotic hydra were obtained. Chlorococcum is thus an obligate phototroph, and host-dependent heterotrophy is not required for the preservation of a symbiosis. The few chlorococci that survived in the dark seem to belong to a less-demanding physiological strain. In variance with known Chlorella/H. viridis endosymbioses the chlorococci in H. magnipapillata and H. attenuata were tightly enveloped in the vacuolar membrane of the hosting cells with no visible perialgal space. Chlorococcum reproduced in these vacuoles and up to eight daughter cells were found within the same vacuole. We suggest that the graded or scant distribution of chlorococci in the various brown hydra, their inability to live in H. viridis and the inability of the various chlorellae to live in brown hydra are the

  18. A rapid and general method for measurement of protein in micro-algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Stephen P; Ross, Michael; Thomas, Naomi; McNeill, Sharon; Stanley, Michele S

    2013-02-01

    A convenient small-scale extraction method for lyophilized micro-algae is described that dispenses with labor-intensive homogenization and is widely applicable to algae from different phyla. The procedure employs an optimized sequential extraction in trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and NaOH to achieve chemical lysis. Conditions were tested using several micro-algal strains to develop a method that was generally applicable. Incubation of lyophilized material in 24% (w/v) TCA at 95 °C followed by a hot alkaline treatment was found to be effective for strains that are resistant to conventional extraction approaches, such as the Chlorella and the Eustigmatophycean species. The single-tube extraction procedure can be complete in 4h and is conveniently followed by the Lowry assay, requiring a further 30 min. Overall, this method proved to be generally applicable and ideal either for single samples or for high-throughput screening of multiple algal strains for protein content.

  19. Culture of microalgae Chlorella minutissima for biodiesel feedstock production.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haiying; Chen, Meng; Garcia, M E D; Abunasser, Nadia; Ng, K Y Simon; Salley, Steven O

    2011-10-01

    Microalgae are among the most promising of non-food based biomass fuel feedstock alternatives. Algal biofuels production is challenged by limited oil content, growth rate, and economical cultivation. To develop the optimum cultivation conditions for increasing biofuels feedstock production, the effect of light source, light intensity, photoperiod, and nitrogen starvation on the growth rate, cell density, and lipid content of Chlorella minutissima were studied. The fatty acid content and composition of Chlorella minutissima were also investigated under the above conditions. Fluorescent lights were more effective than red or white light-emitting diodes for algal growth. Increasing light intensity resulted in more rapid algal growth, while increasing the period of light also significantly increased biomass productivity. Our results showed that the lipid and triacylglycerol content were increased under N starvation conditions. Thus, a two-phase strategy with an initial nutrient-sufficient reactor followed by a nutrient deprivation strategy could likely balance the desire for rapid and high biomass generation (124 mg/L) with a high oil content (50%) of Chlorella minutissima to maximize the total amount of oil produced for biodiesel production. Moreover, methyl palmitate (C16:0), methyl oleate (C18:1), methyl linoleate (C18:2), and methyl linolenate (C18:3) are the major components of Chlorella minutissima derived FAME, and choice of light source, intensity, and N starvation impacted the FAME composition of Chlorella minutissima. The optimized cultivation conditions resulted in higher growth rate, cell density, and oil content, making Chlorella minutissima a potentially suitable organism for biodiesel feedstock production.

  20. Modelling and Optimization of Nannochloropsis and Chlorella Growth for Various Locations and Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharagozloo, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil providing domestic renewable energy. Algae-based biofuels are attractive for their large oil yield potential despite decreased land use and natural-resource requirements compared to terrestrial energy crops. Important factors controlling algal-lipid productivity include temperature, nutrient availability, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational approaches allow for inexpensive predictions of algae-growth kinetics for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without multiple, expensive measurement systems. In this work, we parameterize our physics-based computational algae growth model for the marine Nannochloropsis oceanica and freshwater Chlorella species. We then compare modelling results with experiments conducted in identical raceway ponds at six geographical locations in the United States (Hawaii, California, Arizona, Ohio, Georgia, and Florida) and three seasons through the Algae Testbed Public Private Partnership - Unified Field Studies. Results show that the computational model effectively predicts algae growth in systems across varying environments and identifies the causes for reductions in algal productivities. The model is then used to identify improvements to the cultivation system to produce higher biomass yields. This model could be used to study the effects of scale-up including the effects of predation, depth-decay of light (light extinction), and optimized nutrient and CO2 delivery. As more multifactorial data are accumulated for a variety of algal strains, the model could be used to select appropriate algal species for various geographic and climatic locations and seasons. Applying the model facilitates optimization of pond designs based on location and season.

  1. Biosynthesis of metal nanoparticles using three marine plant species: anti-algal efficiencies against "Oscillatoria simplicissima".

    PubMed

    El-Kassas, Hala Y; Ghobrial, Mary G

    2017-01-29

    This study aims at controlling of the cyanobacteria Oscillatoria simplicissima, those that produce neurotoxins and have negative impacts on the aquatic organisms, using biosynthesized metal nanoparticles (NPs). Silver-NPs (Ag-NPs) have been successfully biosynthesized using Nannochloropsis oculata and Tetraselmis tetrathele cultures. Also, Ag-NPs and iron oxide-NPs (Fe3O4-NPs) were synthesized by Halophila stipulacea aqueous extract. The structural composition of the different biosynthesized NPs was studied. The algae cultures and the extract were used as reductants of AgNO3, and brown colors due to Ag-NP biosynthesis were observed. Silver signals were recorded in their corresponding EDX spectra. FTIR analyses showed that proteins in N. oculata and T. tetrathele cultures reduced AgNO3, and aromatic compounds stabilized the biogenic Ag-NPs. H. stipulacea extract contains proteins and polyphenols that could be in charge for the reduction of silver and iron ions into nanoparticles and polysaccharides which stabilized the biosynthesized Ag-NPs and Fe3O4-NPs. The Ag-NPs biosynthesized by T. tetrathele cultures and H. stipulacea aqueous extract exerted outstanding negative impacts on O. simplicissima (optical density and total chlorophyll) and the Ag-NPs biosynthesized using N. oculata culture exerted the moderate performance. The study results suggest that the bioactive compounds present in the FTIR profiles of the Ag-NPs and or ionic silver may be the main contributors in their anti-algal effects. A trial to use the biosynthesized Fe3O4-NPs using H. stipulacea aqueous extract to separate Ag-NPs was successfully carried out. Since the synthesis and applications of nanomaterials is a hot subject of research, the study outcomes not only provide a green approach for the synthesis of metal-NPs but also open the way for more nanoparticle applications.

  2. Leptochlorella corticola gen. et sp. nov. and Kalinella apyrenoidosa sp. nov.: two novel Chlorella-like green microalgae (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta) from subaerial habitats.

    PubMed

    Neustupa, Jirí; Nemcová, Yvonne; Veselá, Jana; Steinová, Jana; Škaloud, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    The diversity of green microalgae in subaerial habitats remains largely unexplored and a number of new genus- and species-level lineages have been discovered recently. The traditional green algal genus, Chlorella, which accommodated coccoid unicellular green algal species with globular to oval cells, reproducing entirely by autospores, has been found to be polyphyletic. In this study, we provide a detailed characterization of two strains of microalgae isolated from tree bark in the Mediterranean. These algae share the general Chlorella-like morphology and their 18S rRNA and rbcL gene sequences place them in the Trebouxiophyceae. Strain CAUP H8401 forms an independent trebouxiophycean lineage, together with three previously published 18S rRNA gene environmental sequences of undescribed microalgae, which were retrieved from profoundly different habitats. In contrast, strain CAUP H7902 is related to Kalinella bambusicola in the Watanabea clade of the Trebouxiophyceae on the basis of its 18S rRNA gene sequence. This relationship is also supported by the rbcL gene sequence, acquired from the type strain of K. bambusicola. The investigated strains are described as representatives of a novel species in a new genus, Leptochlorella corticola gen. et sp. nov., and a novel species, Kalinella apyrenoidosa sp. nov., according to the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants.

  3. Biochemical composition of three algal species proposed as food for captive freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gatenby, C.M.; Orcutt, D.M.; Kreeger, D.A.; Parker, B.C.; Jones, V.A.; Neves, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    To identify potential diets for rearing captive freshwater mussels, the protein, carbohydrate (CHO), and lipid contents of two green algae, Neochloris oleoabundans, Bracteacoccus grandis, and one diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, were compared at different growth stages. The fatty acid and sterol composition were also identified. Protein was greatest (55-70%) for all species at late log growth stage (LL), and declined in late stationary (LS) growth. CHO was greatest at LS stage for all species (33.9-56.4% dry wt). No significant change in lipid levels occurred with growth stage, but tended to increase in N. oleoabundans. Mean lipid content differed significantly in the order: N. oleoabundans > P. tricornutum > B. grandis. Total fatty acids (TFA) were higher at LS stage compared to other stages in the two green algae, and stationary stage in the diatom. Mean unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) as %TFA was significantly higher in N. oleoabundans than the other species. The green algae contained high percentages of C-18 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), while the diatom was abundant in C-16 saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids and C-20 PUFA fatty acids. Growth stage had no effect on sterol concentration of any species. B. grandis showed significantly higher sterol levels than the other species except P. tricornutum at S stage. B. grandis was characterized by predominantly ??5, C-29 sterols, while N. oleoabundans synthesized ??5,7, ??5,7,22, and ??7, C-28 sterols. P. tricornutum produced primarily a ??5,22, C-28 sterol, and a small amount of a ??7,22, C-28 sterol.

  4. Analysis of Autophagy Genes in Microalgae: Chlorella as a Potential Model to Study Mechanism of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiao; Zhao, Li; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2012-01-01

    Background Microalgae, with the ability to mitigate CO2 emission and produce carbohydrates and lipids, are considered one of the most promising resources for producing bioenergy. Recently, we discovered that autophagy plays a critical role in the metabolism of photosynthetic system and lipids production. So far, more than 30-autophagy related (ATG) genes in all subtypes of autophagy have been identified. However, compared with yeast and mammals, in silico and experimental research of autophagy pathways in microalgae remained limited and fragmentary. Principal Findings In this article, we performed a genome-wide analysis of ATG genes in 7 microalgae species and explored their distributions, domain structures and evolution. Eighteen “core autophagy machinery” proteins, four mammalian-specific ATG proteins and more than 30 additional proteins (including “receptor-adaptor” complexes) in all subtypes of autophagy were analyzed. Data revealed that receptor proteins in cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting and mitophagy seem to be absent in microalgae. However, most of the “core autophagy machinery” and mammalian-specific proteins are conserved among microalgae, except for the ATG9-cycling system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the second ubiquitin-like protein conjugation complex in several algal species. The catalytic and binding residues in ATG3, ATG5, ATG7, ATG8, ATG10 and ATG12 are also conserved and the phylogenetic tree of ATG8 coincides well with the phylogenies. Chlorella contains the entire set of the core autophagy machinery. In addition, RT-PCR analysis verified that all crucial ATG genes tested are expressed during autophagy in both Chlorella and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Finally, we discovered that addition of 3-Methyladenine (a PI3K specific inhibitor) could suppress the formation of autophagic vacuoles in Chlorella. Conclusions Taken together, Chlorella may represent a potential model organism to investigate autophagy pathways in photosynthetic

  5. Evaluation of nutritive value and in vitro rumen fermentation gas accumulation of de-oiled algal residues

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Algae are widely recognized for their high oil content and for exponentially accumulating biomass with particular potential to provide single cell protein for human consumption or animal feed. It is believed that along with biodiesel from algae, the high protein de-oiled algal residue may become an alternative feed supplement option in the future. This study was conducted to investigate de-oiled algal residue obtained from the common Chlorella species, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Selenarstrum capricornutum, Scenedesmus sp., and Scenedesmus dimorphus for assessment as potential feed supplements for ruminants by comparing with soybean (Glycine max) meal and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) hay. Results With the exception of T. weissflogii, algal residue had higher concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Mn and lower concentration of Ca, Mg, and K than soybean meal and alfalfa hay. The algal residue CP (crude protein) concentrations ranged from 140 to 445 g/kg DM and varied among the de-oiled residues. In vitro rumen fermentation gas accumulation curves indicated that algal biomass degradation potential was less than that of soybean meal or alfalfa hay by up to 41.7%. The gas production curve, interpreted with a dual pool logistic model, confirmed that the fraction sizes for fast fermenting and slow fermenting of de-oiled algal residues were smaller than those in soybean meal and alfalfa hay, and the fermenting rate of the fractions was also low. Conclusions Inferior in vitro rumen gas accumulation from the five de-oiled algal residues suggests that these algal byproducts are less degradable in the rumen. PMID:25093078

  6. Screening and identification of early warning algal species for metal contamination in fresh water bodies polluted from point and non-point sources.

    PubMed

    Rai, U N; Dubey, Smita; Shukla, O P; Dwivedi, S; Tripathi, R D

    2008-09-01

    The water bodies of Lucknow, Unnao and Kanpur (U.P.), India polluted through various point and non point sources were found to be either eutrophic or oligotrophic in nature. These water bodies supported a great number of algal diversity, which varied seasonally depending upon the physico-chemical properties of water. Further, the water bodies polluted through non point sources supports diverse algal species, while the water bodies polluted through point sources supports growth of tolerant blue green algae. High biomass producing algal species growing in these water bodies have accumulated significant amount of metals in their tissues. Maximum amount of Fe was found accumulated by species of Oedogonium sp. II (20,523.00 microg g(-1) dw) and Spirogyra sp. I (4,520.00 microg g(-1) dw), while maximum Chromium (Cr) was found accumulated in Phormedium bohneri (2,109.00 microg g(-1) dw) followed by Oscillatoria nigra (1,957.88 microg g(-1) dw) and Oedogonium sp. I (156.00 microg g(-1) dw) and Ni in Ulothrix sp. (495.00 microg g(-1) dw). Results showed that some of these forms growing in polluted environment and accumulating high amounts of toxic metals may be used as bioindicator species, however, their performance in metal contaminated water under different ecological niche is to be ascertained.

  7. Future climate change scenarios differentially affect three abundant algal species in southwestern Australia.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Charlie M; Boyce, Mary C; Huggett, Megan J

    2017-02-21

    Three species of macroalgae (Ecklonia radiata, Sargassum linearifolium, and Laurencia brongniartii) were subjected to future climate change conditions, tested directly for changes in their physiology and chemical ecology, and used in feeding assays with local herbivores to identify the indirect effects of climatic stressors on subsequent levels of herbivory. Each alga had distinct physical and chemical responses to the changes in environmental conditions. In high temperature conditions, S. linearifolium exhibited high levels of bleaching and low maximum quantum yield. For E. radiata, the alga became more palatable to herbivores and the C:N ratios were either higher or lower, dependent on the treatment. Laurencia brongniartii was effected in all manipulations when compared to controls, with increases in bleaching, blade density, and C:N ratios and decreases in growth, maximum quantum yield, blade toughness, total phenolics and consumption by mesograzers. The differential responses we observed in each species have important implications for benthic communities in projected climate change conditions and we suggest that future studies target multi-species assemblage responses.

  8. Algal biofuels.

    PubMed

    Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-11-01

    The world is facing energy crisis and environmental issues due to the depletion of fossil fuels and increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Growing microalgae can contribute to practical solutions for these global problems because they can harvest solar energy and capture CO2 by converting it into biofuel using photosynthesis. Microalgae are robust organisms capable of rapid growth under a variety of conditions including in open ponds or closed photobioreactors. Their reduced biomass compounds can be used as the feedstock for mass production of a variety of biofuels. As another advantage, their ability to accumulate or secrete biofuels can be controlled by changing their growth conditions or metabolic engineering. This review is aimed to highlight different forms of biofuels produced by microalgae and the approaches taken to improve their biofuel productivity. The costs for industrial-scale production of algal biofuels in open ponds or closed photobioreactors are analyzed. Different strategies for photoproduction of hydrogen by the hydrogenase enzyme of green algae are discussed. Algae are also good sources of biodiesel since some species can make large quantities of lipids as their biomass. The lipid contents for some of the best oil-producing strains of algae in optimized growth conditions are reviewed. The potential of microalgae for producing petroleum related chemicals or ready-make fuels such as bioethanol, triterpenic hydrocarbons, isobutyraldehyde, isobutanol, and isoprene from their biomass are also presented.

  9. The seeding and cultivation of a tropical species of filamentous Ulva for algal biomass production.

    PubMed

    Carl, Christina; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous species of Ulva are ideal for cultivation because they are robust with high growth rates and maintained across a broad range of environments. Temperate species of filamentous Ulva are commercially cultivated on nets which can be artificially 'seeded' under controlled conditions allowing for a high level of control over seeding density and consequently biomass production. This study quantified for the first time the seeding and culture cycle of a tropical species of filamentous Ulva (Ulva sp. 3) and identified seeding density and nursery period as key factors affecting growth and biomass yield. A seeding density of 621,000 swarmers m(-1) rope in combination with a nursery period of five days resulted in the highest growth rate and correspondingly the highest biomass yield. A nursery period of five days was optimal with up to six times the biomass yield compared to ropes under either shorter or longer nursery periods. These combined parameters of seeding density and nursery period resulted in a specific growth rate of more than 65% day(-1) between 7 and 10 days of outdoor cultivation post-nursery. This was followed by a decrease in growth through to 25 days. This study also demonstrated that the timing of harvest is critical as the maximum biomass yield of 23.0 ± 8.8 g dry weight m(-1) (228.7 ± 115.4 g fresh weight m(-1)) was achieved after 13 days of outdoor cultivation whereas biomass degraded to 15.5 ± 7.3 g dry weight m(-1) (120.2 ± 71.8 g fresh weight m(-1)) over a longer outdoor cultivation period of 25 days. Artificially seeded ropes of Ulva with high biomass yields over short culture cycles may therefore be an alternative to unattached cultivation in integrated pond-based aquaculture systems.

  10. The Seeding and Cultivation of a Tropical Species of Filamentous Ulva for Algal Biomass Production

    PubMed Central

    Carl, Christina; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous species of Ulva are ideal for cultivation because they are robust with high growth rates and maintained across a broad range of environments. Temperate species of filamentous Ulva are commercially cultivated on nets which can be artificially ‘seeded’ under controlled conditions allowing for a high level of control over seeding density and consequently biomass production. This study quantified for the first time the seeding and culture cycle of a tropical species of filamentous Ulva (Ulva sp. 3) and identified seeding density and nursery period as key factors affecting growth and biomass yield. A seeding density of 621,000 swarmers m-1 rope in combination with a nursery period of five days resulted in the highest growth rate and correspondingly the highest biomass yield. A nursery period of five days was optimal with up to six times the biomass yield compared to ropes under either shorter or longer nursery periods. These combined parameters of seeding density and nursery period resulted in a specific growth rate of more than 65% day−1 between 7 and 10 days of outdoor cultivation post-nursery. This was followed by a decrease in growth through to 25 days. This study also demonstrated that the timing of harvest is critical as the maximum biomass yield of 23.0±8.8 g dry weight m−1 (228.7±115.4 g fresh weight m−1) was achieved after 13 days of outdoor cultivation whereas biomass degraded to 15.5±7.3 g dry weight m−1 (120.2±71.8 g fresh weight m−1) over a longer outdoor cultivation period of 25 days. Artificially seeded ropes of Ulva with high biomass yields over short culture cycles may therefore be an alternative to unattached cultivation in integrated pond-based aquaculture systems. PMID:24897115

  11. Subtle biological responses to increased CO2 concentrations by Phaeocystis globosa Scherffel, a harmful algal bloom species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Smith, Walker O.; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Shaoshan

    2010-05-01

    Recent investigations into the role of carbon dioxide on phytoplankton growth and composition have clearly shown differential effects among species and assemblages, suggesting that increases in oceanic CO2 may play a critical role in structuring lower trophic levels of marine systems in the future. Furthermore, alarming increases in the occurrence of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in coastal waters have been observed, and while not uniform among systems, appear in some manner to be linked to human impacts (eutrophication) on coastal systems. Models of HABs are in their infancy and do not at present include sophisticated biological effects or their environmental controls. Here we show that subtle biological responses occur in the HAB species Phaeocystis globosa Scherffel as a result of CO2 enrichment induced by gentle bubbling. The alga, which has a polymorphic life history involving the formation of both colonies and solitary cells, exhibited altered growth rates of colonial and solitary forms at [CO2] of 750 ppm, as well as increased colony formation. In addition, substantial modifications of elemental and photosynthetic constituents of the cells (C cell-1, N cell-1, potential quantum yield, chl a cell-1) occurred under elevated CO2 concentrations compared to those found at present CO2 levels. In contrast, other individual and population variables (e.g., colony diameter, total chlorophyll concentration, carbon/nitrogen ratio) were unaffected by increased CO2. Our results suggest that predictions of the future impacts of Phaeocystis blooms on coastal ecosystems and local biogeochemistry need to carefully examine the subtle biological responses of this alga in addition to community and ecosystem effects.

  12. The chemistry and immunochemistry of carrageenans from Eucheuma and related algal species.

    PubMed

    DiNinno, V; McCandless, E L

    1978-10-01

    Carrageenans from several species of Eucheuma have been fractionated into KC1-soluble and KC1-insoluble fractions and analyzed by the usual chemical procedures. An anti-kappa-carrageenan, the reactivity of which is directed to kappa-structures (i.e., 3-linked galactose 4-sulphate, and 4-linked 3,6-anhydrogalactose) was used to analyze these carrageenans immunochemically. The antibody preparation shows only a small amount of cross-reactivity with iota-type carrageenans and thus could be used to distinguish kappa- and iota-type carrageenans, the latter having an index of homology of less than 0.2. A comparison of chemical and immunochemical data yielded further information as to the nature of the carrageenan-anti-carrageenan interaction, as well as elucidating the finer structure of carrageenans.

  13. Species-specific engineered antifouling topographies: correlations between the settlement of algal zoospores and barnacle cyprids.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, James F; Aldred, Nick; Callow, Maureen E; Finlay, John A; Callow, James A; Clare, Anthony S; Brennan, Anthony B

    2007-01-01

    Novel, non-toxic antifouling technologies are focused on the manipulation of surface topography to deter settlement of the dispersal stages of fouling organisms. This study investigated the effect of the aspect ratio (feature height/feature width) of topographical features engineered in polydimethylsiloxane, on the settlement of cyprids of Balanus amphitrite and zoospores of Ulva linza. The correlation of relative aspect ratios to antifouling efficacy was proven to be significant. An increase in aspect ratio resulted in an increase of fouling deterrence for both zoospores and cyprids. The spore density of Ulva was reduced 42% with each unit increase in aspect ratio of the Ulva-specific Sharklet AF topography. Similarly, the number of settled cyprids was reduced 45% with each unit increase in aspect ratio. The newly described barnacle-specific Sharklet AF topography (40 microm feature height, aspect ratio of 2) reduced cyprid settled by 97%. Techniques have been developed to superimpose the smaller Ulva-specific topographies onto the barnacle-specific surfaces into a hierarchical structure to repel both organisms simultaneously. The results for spore settlement on first-generation hierarchical surfaces provide insight for the efficacious design of such structures when targeting multiple settling species.

  14. Homology modeling and docking studies of FabH (β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III) enzyme involved in type II fatty acid biosynthesis of Chlorella variabilis: a potential algal feedstock for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Sukla, Lala Bihari; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2013-03-01

    The concept of using microalgae as an alternative renewable source of biofuel has gained much importance in recent years. However, its commercial feasibility is still an area of concern for researchers. Unraveling the fatty acid metabolic pathway and understanding structural features of various key enzymes regulating the process will provide valuable insights to target microalgae for augmented oil content. FabH (β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase; KAS III) is a condensing enzyme catalyzing the initial elongation step of type II fatty acid biosynthetic process and acyl carrier protein (ACP) facilitates the shuttling of the fatty acyl intermediates to the active site of the respective enzymes in the pathway. In the present study, a reliable three-dimensional structure of FabH from Chlorella variabilis, an oleaginous green microalga was modeled and subsequently the key residues involved in substrate binding were determined by employing protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation protocols. The FabH-ACP complex having the lowest docking energy score showed the binding of ACP to the electropositive FabH surface with strong hydrogen bond interactions. The MD simulation results indicated that the substrate-complexed FabH adopted a more stable conformation than the free enzyme. Further, the FabH structure retained its stability throughout the simulation although noticeable displacements were observed in the loop regions. Molecular simulation studies suggested the importance of crucial hydrogen bonding of the conserved Arg(91) of FabH with Glu(53) and Asp(56) of ACP for exhibiting high affinity between the enzyme and substrate. The molecular modeling results are consistent with available experimental results on the flexibility of FabH and the present study provides first in silico insights into the structural and dynamical aspect of catalytic mechanism of FabH, which could be used for further site-specific mutagenic experiments to develop

  15. Genotype versus phenotype variability in Chlorella and Micractinium (Chlorophyta, Trebouxiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Pflugmacher, Stephan; Pröschold, Thomas; Walz, Norbert; Krienitz, Lothar

    2006-08-01

    The most recent revision of the genus Chlorella, based on biochemical and SSU rDNA analyses, suggested a reduction to a set of four "true" spherical Chlorella species, while a growing number of morphologically different species such as Micractinium (formerly Micractiniaceae) were found to cluster within the clade of "true"Chlorella. In this study, the generic concept in Chlorellaceae to Chlorella and Micractinium was evaluated by means of combined SSU and ITS-2 rDNA sequence analyses and biotests to induce development of bristles on the cell wall. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of Chlorella and Micractinium strains confirmed their separation into two different genera. In addition, non-homoplasious synapomorphies (NHS) and compensatory base changes (CBC) in the secondary structures of SSU and ITS-2 rDNA sequences were found for both genera using this approach. The Micractinium clade can be differentiated into three different genotypes. Using culture medium of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus, phenotypic plasticity in Chlorella and Micractinium was studied. Non-bristled Micractinium cells developed bristles during incubation with Brachionus culture medium, whereas Chlorella did not produce bristles. Grazing experiments with Brachionus showed the rotifer preferred to feed on non-bristled cells. The dominance of colonies versus solitary cells in the Micractinium culture was not correlated with the "Brachionus factor". These results suggest that morphological characteristics like formation of bristles represent phenotypic adaptations to the conditions in the ecosystem.

  16. Algicidal Effects of a Novel Marine Pseudoalteromonas Isolate (Class Proteobacteria, Gamma Subdivision) on Harmful Algal Bloom Species of the Genera Chattonella, Gymnodinium, and Heterosigma

    PubMed Central

    Lovejoy, Connie; Bowman, John P.; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf M.

    1998-01-01

    During a bacterial survey of the Huon Estuary in southern Tasmania, Australia, we isolated a yellow-pigmented Pseudoalteromonas strain (class Proteobacteria, gamma subdivision), designated strain Y, that had potent algicidal effects on harmful algal bloom species. This organism was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as a strain with close affinities to Pseudoalteromonas peptidysin. This bacterium caused rapid cell lysis and death (within 3 h) of gymnodinoids (including Gymnodinium catenatum) and raphidophytes (Chattonella marina and Heterosigma akashiwo). It caused ecdysis of armored dinoflagellates (e.g., Alexandrium catenella, Alexandrium minutum, and Prorocentrum mexicanum), but the algal cultures then recovered over the subsequent 24 h. Strain Y had no effect on a cryptomonad (Chroomonas sp.), a diatom (Skeletonema sp.), a cyanobacterium (Oscillatoria sp.), and two aplastidic protozoans. The algicidal principle of strain Y was excreted into the seawater medium and lost its efficacy after heating. Another common bacterial species, Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora, was isolated at the same time and did not have these algicidal effects. The minimum concentrations of strain Y required to kill G. catenatum were higher than the mean concentrations found in nature under nonbloom conditions. However, the new bacterium showed a chemotactic, swarming behavior that resulted in localized high concentrations around target organisms. These observations imply that certain bacteria could play an important role in regulating the onset and development of harmful algal blooms. PMID:9687434

  17. Feeding behaviour of a serpulid polychaete: Turning a nuisance species into a natural resource to counter algal blooms?

    PubMed

    Leung, Jonathan Y S; Cheung, Napo K M

    2017-02-15

    Occurrence of algal blooms in coastal waters is predicted to be more prevalent in future. To minimize their occurrence, manipulating the grazing pressure by suspension feeders is a potential management strategy, but its effectiveness may depend on their feeding preference. Therefore, we assessed the clearance rate of a widespread serpulid polychaete Hydroides elegans in larval and adult stages on various coastal phytoplankton. Additionally, the growth and development of H. elegans after consuming these phytoplankton were determined to reflect its sustainability to counter algal blooms. Results showed that H. elegans can consume and utilize different phytoplankton, except diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, for growth and development in both life stages. Given the fast-colonizing ability which allows easy manipulation of abundance, H. elegans is considered practically and biologically ideal for tackling algal blooms. Other suspension feeders with different feeding niches could be used in combination to maximize the versatility of the top-down control.

  18. Use of De Novo transcriptome libraries to characterize a novel oleaginous marine Chlorella species during the accumulation of triacylglycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Richter, Lubna V.; Ahner, Beth A.; Cochlan, William P.; Richardson, Ruth E.; Chen, Shilin

    2016-02-03

    Here, marine chlorophytes of the genus Chlorella are unicellular algae capable of accumulating a high proportion of cellular lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, we examined the broad physiological capabilities of a subtropical strain (C596) of Chlorella sp. “SAG-211-18” including its heterotrophic growth and tolerance to low salt.We found that the alga replicates more slowly at diluted salt concentrations and can grow on a wide range of carbon substrates in the dark.We then sequenced the RNA of Chlorella strain C596 to elucidate key metabolic genes and investigate the transcriptomic response of the organism when transitioning from a nutrient-replete to a nutrient-deficient condition when neutral lipids accumulate. Specific transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in both starch and lipid biosynthesis, among others, were up-regulated as the cultures transitioned into a lipid-accumulating state whereas photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. Transcripts encoding for two of the up-regulated enzymes—a galactoglycerolipid lipase and a diacylglyceride acyltransferase—were also monitored by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results of these assays confirmed the transcriptome-sequencing data. The present transcriptomic study will assist in the greater understanding, more effective application, and efficient design of Chlorella-based biofuel production systems.

  19. Isoproturon degradation as affected by the growth of two algal species at different concentrations and pH values.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, F I; Helling, C S

    2001-11-01

    Metabolism of [14C-u-phenyl]isoproturon [3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] by two soil and freshwater microorganisms, green alga Chlorella kesslerei and cyanobacterium Anabaena inaequalis, was studied as a function of pH, pesticide concentration, and incubation time. Metabolized isoproturon, in the media, ranged from 0% (Chlorella at pH 5.5 after 1 d) to 22% (Anabaena at pH 5.5 after 10 d). Twenty-five percent faster degradation of isoproturon by Anabaena occurred at pH 5.5 versus pH 7.5, when measured over 10 d. Increased 14C incorporation into tissue, with time and at lower pH, was due mainly to bioaccumulation of [14C]isoproturon and/or its metabolites in the cells. Metabolic degradation resulted in four identifiable (by TLC) metabolites. Based on this, a degradation pathway is proposed, involving mono- and di-N-demethylation, hydroxylation of the isopropyl moiety, and hydrolysis to 4-isopropylaniline. Similarity in the metabolites produced suggests that the enzyme systems responsible for metabolizing isoproturon are almost identical in both photosynthetic micro-algae.

  20. Algal biofuels from wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Craggs, R J; Heubeck, S; Lundquist, T J; Benemann, J R

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the potential of algae biofuel production in conjunction with wastewater treatment. Current technology for algal wastewater treatment uses facultative ponds, however, these ponds have low productivity (∼10 tonnes/ha.y), are not amenable to cultivating single algal species, require chemical flocculation or other expensive processes for algal harvest, and do not provide consistent nutrient removal. Shallow, paddlewheel-mixed high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) have much higher productivities (∼30 tonnes/ha.y) and promote bioflocculation settling which may provide low-cost algal harvest. Moreover, HRAP algae are carbon-limited and daytime addition of CO(2) has, under suitable climatic conditions, the potential to double production (to ∼60 tonnes/ha.y), improve bioflocculation algal harvest, and enhance wastewater nutrient removal. Algae biofuels (e.g. biogas, ethanol, biodiesel and crude bio-oil), could be produced from the algae harvested from wastewater HRAPs, The wastewater treatment function would cover the capital and operation costs of algal production, with biofuel and recovered nutrient fertilizer being by-products. Greenhouse gas abatement results from both the production of the biofuels and the savings in energy consumption compared to electromechanical treatment processes. However, to achieve these benefits, further research is required, particularly the large-scale demonstration of wastewater treatment HRAP algal production and harvest.

  1. Microbial communities mediating algal detritus turnover under anaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Jessica M.; Murphy, Chelsea L.; Baker, Kristina; Zamor, Richard M.; Nikolai, Steve J.; Wilder, Shawn; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Algae encompass a wide array of photosynthetic organisms that are ubiquitously distributed in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Algal species often bloom in aquatic ecosystems, providing a significant autochthonous carbon input to the deeper anoxic layers in stratified water bodies. In addition, various algal species have been touted as promising candidates for anaerobic biogas production from biomass. Surprisingly, in spite of its ecological and economic relevance, the microbial community involved in algal detritus turnover under anaerobic conditions remains largely unexplored. Results Here, we characterized the microbial communities mediating the degradation of Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophyta), Chara sp. strain IWP1 (Charophyceae), and kelp Ascophyllum nodosum (phylum Phaeophyceae), using sediments from an anaerobic spring (Zodlteone spring, OK; ZDT), sludge from a secondary digester in a local wastewater treatment plant (Stillwater, OK; WWT), and deeper anoxic layers from a seasonally stratified lake (Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees, OK; GL) as inoculum sources. Within all enrichments, the majority of algal biomass was metabolized within 13–16 weeks, and the process was accompanied by an increase in cell numbers and a decrease in community diversity. Community surveys based on the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene identified different lineages belonging to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria (alpha, delta, gamma, and epsilon classes), Spirochaetes, and Firmicutes that were selectively abundant under various substrate and inoculum conditions. Within all kelp enrichments, the microbial communities structures at the conclusion of the experiment were highly similar regardless of the enrichment source, and were dominated by the genus Clostridium, or family Veillonellaceae within the Firmicutes. In all other enrichments the final microbial community was dependent on the inoculum source, rather than the type of algae utilized as substrate. Lineages enriched

  2. Demography of zooplankton (Anuraeopsis fissa, Brachionus rubens and Moina macrocopa) fed Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus acutus cultured on different media.

    PubMed

    Morales-Ventura, Jesús; Nandini, S; Sarma, S S S; Castellanos-Páez, Maria Elena

    2012-09-01

    Generally zooplankton growth is often limited by the quality of their algal diet. A cheaper common practice in aquaculture, is to culture algae with fertilizers; however, the demography of zooplankton when fed these algae has not yet been evaluated. We studied the population growth and life table demography of the rotifers Anuraeopsis fissa and Brachionus rubens, and the cladoceran Moina macrocopa. For this, the algae Scenedesmus acutus or Chlorella vulgaris were cultured on defined (Bold's basal) medium or the commercial liquid fertilizer (Bayfolan). Experiments were conducted at one algal concentration 1.0 x 10(6) cells/mL of C. vulgaris or its equivalent dry weight of 0.5 x 10(6) cells/mL of S. acutus. The population dynamics were tested at 23 +/- 1 degrees C in 100 mL transparent jars, each with 50mL of the test medium, with an initial density of 0.5indiv/mL, for a total of 48 test jars (3 zooplankton 2 algal species x 2 culture media x 4 replicates). For the life table experiments with M. macrocopa, we introduced 10 neonates (<24h old) into each test jar containing the specific algal type and concentration. For the rotifer experiments, we set 5mL tubes with one neonate each and 10 replicates for each algal species and culture medium. We found that the average rotifer life span was not influenced by the diet, but for M. macrocopa fed S. acutus cultured in Bold's medium, the average lifespan was significantly lower than with the other diets. The gross and net reproductive rates of A. fissa (ranging from 18-36 offspring per female) were significantly higher for C vulgaris cultured in Bold medium. Regardless of the culture medium, Chlorella resulted in significantly higher gross and net reproductive rates for B. rubens than S. acutus diets. The reproductive rates of M. macrocopa were significantly higher in all the tested diets except when fed with S. acutus in Bold medium. The population increase rate, derived from growth experiments of A. fissa and B. rubens

  3. Ionic liquids-based hydrolysis of Chlorella biomass for fermentable sugars.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Na; Zhang, Yimin; Gong, Xiaowu; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2012-08-01

    An ionic liquids-based chemical hydrolysis strategy was developed to obtain high-yielding soluble sugars from Chlorella biomass. Initial ionic liquids dissolution and subsequently HCl catalyzed hydrolysis could dissolve 75.34% of Chlorella biomass and release 88.02% of total sugars from Chlorella biomass. The amount of HCl loading was 7 wt.% relative to Chlorella biomass weight, which was much lower (only 14.6%) than that in HCl/MgCl(2)-catalyzed system with similar sugars release (Zhou et al., 2011). Ionic liquids in the hydrolysates were recycled and fermentable sugars were evaluated by converting to bioethanol after separated by ion-exclusion chromatography. This ionic liquids-based hydrolysis strategy showed the great potential to produce fermentable sugars from algal biomass.

  4. Cultivation of Chlorella sp. with livestock waste compost for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L-D; Li, Z-H; Guo, D-B; Huang, F; Nugroho, Y; Xia, K

    2017-01-01

    Cultivation of microalgae Chlorella sp. with livestock waste compost as an alternative nutrient source was investigated in this present study. Five culture media with different nutrient concentrations were prepared. The characteristics of algal growth and lipid production were examined. The results showed that the specific growth rate together with biomass and lipid productivities was different among all the cultures. As the initial nutrient concentration decreased, the lipid content of Chlorella sp. increased. The variations in lipid productivity of Chlorella sp. among all the cultures were mainly due to the deviations in biomass productivity. The livestock waste compost medium with 2000mgL(-1)COD provided an optimal nutrient concentration for Chlorella sp. cultivation, where the highest productivities of biomass (288.84mgL(-1)day(-1)) and lipid (104.89mgL(-1)day(-1)) were presented.

  5. Critical evaluation and modeling of algal harvesting using dissolved air flotation. DAF Algal Harvesting Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Hewson, John C.; Amendola, Pasquale; Reynoso, Monica; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Yongsheng; Hu, Qiang

    2014-07-14

    In our study, Chlorella zofingiensis harvesting by dissolved air flotation (DAF) was critically evaluated with regard to algal concentration, culture conditions, type and dosage of coagulants, and recycle ratio. Harvesting efficiency increased with coagulant dosage and leveled off at 81%, 86%, 91%, and 87% when chitosan, Al3+, Fe3+, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used at dosages of 70, 180, 250, and 500 mg g-1, respectively. The DAF efficiency-coagulant dosage relationship changed with algal culture conditions. In evaluating the influence of the initial algal concentration and recycle ratio revealed that, under conditions typical for algal harvesting, we found that it is possible that the number of bubbles is insufficient. A DAF algal harvesting model was developed to explain this observation by introducing mass-based floc size distributions and a bubble limitation into the white water blanket model. Moreover, the model revealed the importance of coagulation to increase floc-bubble collision and attachment, and the preferential interaction of bubbles with larger flocs, which limited the availability of bubbles to the smaller sized flocs. The harvesting efficiencies predicted by the model agree reasonably with experimental data obtained at different Al3+ dosages, algal concentrations, and recycle ratios. Based on this modeling, critical parameters for efficient algal harvesting were identified.

  6. Critical evaluation and modeling of algal harvesting using dissolved air flotation. DAF Algal Harvesting Modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Hewson, John C.; Amendola, Pasquale; ...

    2014-07-14

    In our study, Chlorella zofingiensis harvesting by dissolved air flotation (DAF) was critically evaluated with regard to algal concentration, culture conditions, type and dosage of coagulants, and recycle ratio. Harvesting efficiency increased with coagulant dosage and leveled off at 81%, 86%, 91%, and 87% when chitosan, Al3+, Fe3+, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used at dosages of 70, 180, 250, and 500 mg g-1, respectively. The DAF efficiency-coagulant dosage relationship changed with algal culture conditions. In evaluating the influence of the initial algal concentration and recycle ratio revealed that, under conditions typical for algal harvesting, we found that itmore » is possible that the number of bubbles is insufficient. A DAF algal harvesting model was developed to explain this observation by introducing mass-based floc size distributions and a bubble limitation into the white water blanket model. Moreover, the model revealed the importance of coagulation to increase floc-bubble collision and attachment, and the preferential interaction of bubbles with larger flocs, which limited the availability of bubbles to the smaller sized flocs. The harvesting efficiencies predicted by the model agree reasonably with experimental data obtained at different Al3+ dosages, algal concentrations, and recycle ratios. Based on this modeling, critical parameters for efficient algal harvesting were identified.« less

  7. Chlorella protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced pancreatic β-cell damage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Yu; Huang, Pei-Jane; Chao, Che-Yi

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiology of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and diabetes. Studies have shown that chlorella could be important in health promotion or disease prevention through its antioxidant capacity. However, whether chlorella has a cytoprotective effect in pancreatic β-cells remains to be elucidated. We investigated the protective effects of chlorella on H2O2-induced oxidative damage in INS-1 (832/13) cells. Chlorella partially restored cell viability after H2O2 toxicity. To further investigate the effects of chlorella on mitochondria function and cellular oxidative stress, we analyzed mitochondria membrane potential, ATP concentrations, and cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Chlorella prevented mitochondria disruption and maintained cellular ATP levels after H2O2 toxicity. It also normalized intracellular levels of ROS to that of control in the presence of H2O2. Chlorella protected cells from apoptosis as indicated by less p-Histone and caspase 3 activation. In addition, chlorella not only enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), but also partially restored the reduced GSIS after H2O2 toxicity. Our results suggest that chlorella is effective in amelioration of cellular oxidative stress and destruction, and therefore protects INS-1 (832/13) cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis and increases insulin secretion. Chlorella should be studied for use in the prevention or treatment of diabetes.

  8. Population dynamics of an algal bacterial cenosis in closed ecological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Galayda, Ya. V.; Loginova, N. S.

    The paper deals with microalgae-bacteria interrelationships in the "autotroph-heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle. Explanations of why and how algal-bacterial ecosystems are formed still remain controversial. The paper presents results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the functioning of the algal-bacterial cenosis (the microalga Chlorella vulgaris and concomitant microflora). The Chlorella microbial community is dominated by representatives of the genus Pseudomonas. Experiments with non-sterile batch cultures of Chlorella on Tamiya medium showed that the biomass of microorganisms increases simultaneously with the increase in microalgal biomass. The microflora of Chlorella can grow on organic substances released by photosynthesizing Chlorella. Microorganisms can also use dying Chlorella cells, i.e. form a "producer-reducer" biocycle. To get a better insight into the cenosis-forming role of microalgae, a mathematical model of the "autotroph-heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle has been constructed, taking into account the utilization of Chlorella photosynthates and dead cells by microorganisms and the contribution of the components to the nitrogen cycle. A theoretical study showed that the biomass of concomitant bacteria grown on glucose and detritus is larger than the biomass of bacteria utilizing only microalgal photosynthates, which agrees well with the experimental data.

  9. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals phenol tolerance mechanism of evolved Chlorella strain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Cheng, Dujia; Wang, Liang; Gao, Juan; Zhao, Quanyu; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2017-03-01

    The growth of microalgae is inhibited by high concentration phenol due to reactive oxygen species. An evolved strain tolerated to 500mg/L phenol, Chlorella sp. L5, was obtained in previous study. In this study, comparative transcriptomic analysis was performed for Chlorella sp. L5 and its original strain (Chlorella sp. L3). The tolerance mechanism of Chlorella sp. L5 for high concentration phenol was explored on genome scale. It was identified that the up-regulations of the related genes according to antioxidant enzymes (SOD, APX, CAT and GR) and carotenoids (astaxanthin, lutein and lycopene) biosynthesis had critical roles to tolerate high concentration phenol. In addition, most of genes of PS I, PS II, photosynthetic electron transport chain and starch biosynthesis were also up-regulated. It was consistent to the experimental results of total carbohydrate contents of Chlorella sp. L3 and Chlorella sp. L5 under 0mg/L and 500mg/L phenol.

  10. Rapid induction of lipid droplets in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris by Brefeldin A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Hanul; Ko, Donghwi; Yamaoka, Yasuyo; Otsuru, Masumi; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Oh, Hee-Mock; Nishida, Ikuo; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Lee, Youngsook

    2013-01-01

    Algal lipids are the focus of intensive research because they are potential sources of biodiesel. However, most algae produce neutral lipids only under stress conditions. Here, we report that treatment with Brefeldin A (BFA), a chemical inducer of ER stress, rapidly triggers lipid droplet (LD) formation in two different microalgal species, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris. LD staining using Nile red revealed that BFA-treated algal cells exhibited many more fluorescent bodies than control cells. Lipid analyses based on thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography revealed that the additional lipids formed upon BFA treatment were mainly triacylglycerols (TAGs). The increase in TAG accumulation was accompanied by a decrease in the betaine lipid diacylglyceryl N,N,N-trimethylhomoserine (DGTS), a major component of the extraplastidic membrane lipids in Chlamydomonas, suggesting that at least some of the TAGs were assembled from the degradation products of membrane lipids. Interestingly, BFA induced TAG accumulation in the Chlamydomonas cells regardless of the presence or absence of an acetate or nitrogen source in the medium. This effect of BFA in Chlamydomonas cells seems to be due to BFA-induced ER stress, as supported by the induction of three homologs of ER stress marker genes by the drug. Together, these results suggest that ER stress rapidly triggers TAG accumulation in two green microalgae, C. reinhardtii and C. vulgaris. A further investigation of the link between ER stress and TAG synthesis may yield an efficient means of producing biofuel from algae.

  11. Interactions of CuO nanoparticles with the algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa: adhesion, uptake, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Cao, Xuesong; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Chenchen; White, Jason C; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-11-01

    The potential adverse effects of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) have increasingly attracted attention. Combining electron microscopic and toxicological investigations, we determined the adhesion, uptake, and toxicity of CuO NPs to eukaryotic alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. CuO NPs were toxic to C. pyrenoidosa, with a 72 h EC50 of 45.7 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy showed that CuO NPs were attached onto the surface of the algal cells and interacted with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excreted by the organisms. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that EPS layer of algae was thickened by nearly 4-fold after CuO NPs exposure, suggesting a possible protective mechanism. In spite of the thickening of EPS layer, CuO NPs were still internalized by endocytosis and were stored in algal vacuoles. TEM and electron diffraction analysis confirmed that the internalized CuO NPs were transformed to Cu2O NPs (d-spacing, ∼0.213 nm) with an average size approximately 5 nm. The toxicity investigation demonstrated that severe membrane damage was observed after attachment of CuO NPs with algae. Reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial depolarization were also noted upon exposure to CuO NPs. This work provides useful information on understanding the role of NPs-algae physical interactions in nanotoxicity.

  12. Study of polyacrylamide grafted starch based algal flocculation towards applications in algal biomass harvesting.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Chiranjib; Gupta, Pratibha; Mishra, Sumit; Sen, Gautam; Shukla, Pratyoosh; Bandopadhyay, Rajib

    2012-11-01

    Microalgae may be the source of high amount of lipid and protein. It has the property for carbon dioxide sequestration, recycling and also can remove pollutants from wastewater. Using traditional methods, collection of algal biomass is either cost effective, time consuming or may be toxic due to use of chemical salts. The aim of this study is to harvest freshwater microalgae (Chlorella sp. CB4) biomass by using polymer. Polyacrylamide grafted starch (St-g-PAM) has been synthesized by microwave assisted method involving a synergism of microwave radiation and ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) to initiate the grafting reaction. The synthesis was optimized in terms of CAN and monomer (acrylamide) concentration. The algal flocculation efficacy of all the grades of this graft copolymer was studied through standard 'Jar test' procedure. Effects of percentage grafting, pH and zeta potential on percentage recovery of algal biomass were thoroughly investigated.

  13. Influence of phosphate on toxicity and bioaccumulation of arsenic in a soil isolate of microalga Chlorella sp.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Md Mezbaul; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the toxicity, biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenite and arsenate in a soil microalga, Chlorella sp., were investigated using different phosphate levels. The results indicated that arsenate was highly toxic than arsenite to the alga, and the phosphate limitation in growth media greatly enhanced arsenate toxicity. The uptake of arsenate in algal cells was more than that of arsenite, and the predominant species in the growth media was arsenate after 8 days of exposure to arsenite or arsenate, indicating arsenite oxidation by this microalga. Arsenate reduction was also observed when the alga was incubated in a phosphate-limiting growth medium. Similar to the process of biotransformation, the alga accumulated more arsenic when it was exposed to arsenate and preferably more in a phosphate-limiting condition. Although phosphate significantly influences the biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenic, the oxidizing ability and higher accumulation capacity of this alga have great potential for its application in arsenic bioremediation.

  14. Structural Organization of DNA in Chlorella Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wulfmeyer, Timo; Polzer, Christian; Hiepler, Gregor; Hamacher, Kay; Shoeman, Robert; Dunigan, David D.; Van Etten, James L.; Lolicato, Marco; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Meckel, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Chlorella viruses have icosahedral capsids with an internal membrane enclosing their large dsDNA genomes and associated proteins. Their genomes are packaged in the particles with a predicted DNA density of ca. 0.2 bp nm−3. Occasionally infection of an algal cell by an individual particle fails and the viral DNA is dynamically ejected from the capsid. This shows that the release of the DNA generates a force, which can aid in the transfer of the genome into the host in a successful infection. Imaging of ejected viral DNA indicates that it is intimately associated with proteins in a periodic fashion. The bulk of the protein particles detected by atomic force microscopy have a size of ∼60 kDa and two proteins (A278L and A282L) of about this size are among 6 basic putative DNA binding proteins found in a proteomic analysis of DNA binding proteins packaged in the virion. A combination of fluorescence images of ejected DNA and a bioinformatics analysis of the DNA reveal periodic patterns in the viral DNA. The periodic distribution of GC rich regions in the genome provides potential binding sites for basic proteins. This DNA/protein aggregation could be responsible for the periodic concentration of fluorescently labeled DNA observed in ejected viral DNA. Collectively the data indicate that the large chlorella viruses have a DNA packaging strategy that differs from bacteriophages; it involves proteins and share similarities to that of chromatin structure in eukaryotes. PMID:22359540

  15. Effect of moderate static electric field on the growth and metabolism of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nezammahalleh, Hassan; Ghanati, Faezeh; Adams, Thomas A; Nosrati, Mohsen; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2016-10-01

    An electric field (EF) generator device was fabricated and applied to the treatment of Chlorella vulgaris ISC33 at three distinct concentrations before cultivation. The EF of moderate intensity (2.7kVcm(-1)) has a hormetic effect on algal growth. The highest growth stimulation of 51% was observed after 50min treatment of 0.4gL(-1) algal suspension. The influence of EF on the system was then studied from both theoretical and experimental perspectives. The growth rate increased with treatment time up to a maximum because of improved membrane permeability, and then declined afterwards due to peroxide accumulation in the medium. The contents of chlorophylls, carotenoids, soluble carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins were also measured to understand possible changes on algal metabolism. The EF treatment of algal suspension has no observable effect on the cell metabolism while both algal growth and metabolism was significantly affected by the inoculum size.

  16. Effects of algal food quality on sexual reproduction of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-Yun; Kim, Seong-Ki; La, Geung-Hwan; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Kyun; Jeong, Keon-Young; Park, Min S; Joo, Gea-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jeong, Kwang-Seuk

    2016-05-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate sexual reproduction of Daphnia magna associated with mating behaviors and hatching rates, according to different algal food sources. Since a diatom is known to contain more abundant long-chain poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), we hypothesized that the diatom-consuming D. magna would exhibit more successful reproduction rates. Upon the hypothesis, we designed three experiments using two algal species, a green alga (Chlorella vulgaris) and a diatom (Stephanodiscus hantzschii). From the results, we found that the mating frequency and copulation duration increased in the treatment with S. hantzschii, resulting in a significant increase of hatching rates of resting eggs. In the other two repetitive mating strategies (e.g., one female vs. multiple males, and one male vs. multiple females), we found that the hatching rates of resting eggs were greater in the S. hantzschii treatment. In addition to the mating strategy, male body size significantly increased in the diatom treatment, hence average diameter of penis was also statistically different among the treatments (greater diameter in the S. hantzschii treatment). To examine the effect of algal food quality, we estimated quantity of fatty acids in the two algal species. Our result showed that S. hantzschii had a higher proportion of long-chain PUFAs than C. vulgaris. Furthermore, a stable isotope analysis revealed that carbon and nitrogen originated from S. hantzschii were more assimilated to D. magna. In summary, our study manifested that diatom consumption of D. magna leads to more successful sexual reproduction. We then discussed how the diatom consumption of zooplankton influences food web dynamics in a freshwater ecosystem.

  17. Development and evaluation of a DNA microarray assay for the simultaneous detection of nine harmful algal species in ship ballast and seaport waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xianfeng; Zhou, Qianjin; Duan, Weijun; Zhou, Chengxu; Duan, Lijun; Zhang, Huili; Sun, Aili; Yan, Xiaojun; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, high-throughput and reliable methods are urgently required to accurately detect and monitor harmful algae, which are responsible for algal blooms, such as red and green tides. In this study, we successfully developed a multiplex PCR-based DNA microarray method capable of detecting nine harmful algal species simultaneously, namely Alexandrium tamarense, Gyrodinium instriatum, Heterosigma akashiwo, Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum donghaiense, Prorocentrum minimum, Ulva compressa, Ulva ohnoi and Ulva prolifera. This method achieved a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.5 ng of genomic DNA (orders of magnitude of the deci-nanogram range) in the tested algae cultures. Altogether, 230 field samples from ship ballast waters and seaport waters were used to evaluate the DNA microarray. The clinical sensitivity and specificity of the DNA microarray assay in detecting field samples were 96.4% and 90.9%, respectively, relative to conventional morphological methods. This indicated that this high-throughput, automatic, and specific method is well suited for the detection of algae in water samples.

  18. Structural Impacts on Thallus and Algal Cell Components of Two Lichen Species in Response to Low-Level Air Pollution in Pacific Northwest Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Hyung-Shim Y.; Rubin, Laura; Crang, Richard F. E.

    2004-04-01

    Lichens have long been regarded as bioindicators of air pollution, and structural studies typically have indicated negative impacts in highly polluted areas. In this research, Parmelia sulcata and Platismatia glauca were collected from one clean and two polluted sites in the Pacific Northwest forests of the United States to investigate the anatomical and ultrastructural responses of relatively resistant lichens to moderate air pollution. Light microscopy of polluted materials revealed only slight increases in the algal cell proportions of the thallus, and a decrease in the fungal cells of the medulla. Using transmission electron microscopy, increased lipid droplets in the cytoplasm and an increase in the cell wall thickness of the photobionts were found in the polluted lichens. These results were compared with physiological data in which the net carbon uptake did not show any significant differences; however, the total chlorophyll content was heightened in the polluted samples. The increased total chlorophyll content and the absence of any changes in the algal cell proportions of the polluted samples suggest that the photobionts possessed a higher chlorophyll content per unit volume of the photobiont at polluted sites. The results also indicate that lichens have altered their storage allocation in different cellular compartments. This may be a result of symbiotic readjustment(s) between the photobiont and the mycobiont. In comparison with the physiological results from these two species, these changes do not represent damaging effects by low-level air pollution.

  19. Cytoskeleton organisation during the infection of three brown algal species, Ectocarpus siliculosus, Ectocarpus crouaniorum and Pylaiella littoralis, by the intracellular marine oomycete Eurychasma dicksonii.

    PubMed

    Tsirigoti, A; Küpper, F C; Gachon, C M M; Katsaros, C

    2014-01-01

    Oomycete diseases in seaweeds are probably widespread and of significant ecological and economic impact, but overall still poorly understood. This study investigates the organisation of the cytoskeleton during infection of three brown algal species, Pylaiella littoralis, Ectocarpus siliculosus, and Ectocarpus crouaniorum, by the basal marine oomycete Eurychasma dicksonii. Immunofluorescence staining of tubulin revealed how the development of this intracellular biotrophic pathogen impacts on microtubule (MT) organisation of its algal host. The host MT cytoskeleton remains normal and organised by the centrosome until very late stages of the infection. Additionally, the organisation of the parasite's cytoskeleton was examined. During mitosis of the E. dicksonii nucleus the MT focal point (microtubule organisation centre, MTOC, putative centrosome) duplicates and each daughter MTOC migrates to opposite poles of the nucleus. This similarity in MT organisation between the host and pathogen reflects the relatively close phylogenetic relationship between oomycetes and brown algae. Moreover, actin labelling with rhodamine-phalloidin in E. dicksonii revealed typical images of actin dots connected by fine actin filament bundles in the cortical cytoplasm. The functional and phylogenetic implications of our observations are discussed.

  20. Selenium Accumulation in Unicellular Green Alga Chlorella vulgaris and Its Effects on Antioxidant Enzymes and Content of Photosynthetic Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xian; Zhong, Yu; Huang, Zhi; Yang, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate selenite effects in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris as a primary producer and the relationship with intracellular bioaccumulation. The effects of selenite were evaluated by measuring the effect of different selenite concentrations on algal growth during a 144 h exposure period. It was found that lower Se concentrations (≤75 mg L−1) positively promoted C. vulgaris growth and acted as antioxidant by inhibiting lipid peroxidation (LPO) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidative effect was associated with an increase in guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthetic pigments. Meanwhile, significant increase in the cell growth rate and organic Se content was also detected in the algae. In contrast, these changes were opposite in C. vulgaris exposed to Se higher than 100 mg L−1. The antioxidation and toxicity appeared to be correlated to Se bioaccumulation, which suggests the appropriate concentration of Se in the media accumulation of C. vulgaris should be 75 mg L−1. Taken together, C. vulgaris possesses tolerance to Se, and Se-Chlorella could be developed as antioxidative food for aquaculture and human health. PMID:25375113

  1. Selenium accumulation in unicellular green alga Chlorella vulgaris and its effects on antioxidant enzymes and content of photosynthetic pigments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian; Zhong, Yu; Huang, Zhi; Yang, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate selenite effects in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris as a primary producer and the relationship with intracellular bioaccumulation. The effects of selenite were evaluated by measuring the effect of different selenite concentrations on algal growth during a 144 h exposure period. It was found that lower Se concentrations (≤ 75 mg L(-1)) positively promoted C. vulgaris growth and acted as antioxidant by inhibiting lipid peroxidation (LPO) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidative effect was associated with an increase in guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthetic pigments. Meanwhile, significant increase in the cell growth rate and organic Se content was also detected in the algae. In contrast, these changes were opposite in C. vulgaris exposed to Se higher than 100 mg L-1. The antioxidation and toxicity appeared to be correlated to Se bioaccumulation, which suggests the appropriate concentration of Se in the media accumulation of C. vulgaris should be 75 mg L-1. Taken together, C. vulgaris possesses tolerance to Se, and Se-Chlorella could be developed as antioxidative food for aquaculture and human health.

  2. Chlorella starch branching enzyme II (BEII) can complement the function of BEIIb in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takayuki; Francisco, Perigio B; Aihara, Satomi; Utsumi, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Mayumi; Oyama, Yasunori; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Satoh, Hikaru; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2009-06-01

    In monocots, starch branching enzyme II (BEII) was functionally differentiated into BEIIa and BEIIb after separation from the dicots, and in cereals BEIIb plays a distinct role in amylopectin biosynthesis in the endosperm. The present study was conducted to examine to what extent a green algal BEII has an overlapping function with BEIIb in starch biosynthesis by introducing the Chlorella BEII gene into an amylose-extender (ae) mutant of rice. Chlorella BEII was found to complement the contribution of the rice endosperm BEIIb to the structures of amylopectin and starch granules because these mutated phenotypes were recovered almost completely to those of the wild type by the expression of Chlorella BEII. When the recombinant BE enzymes were incubated with the rice ae amylopectin, the branching pattern of Chlorella BEII was much more similar to that of rice BEIIb rather than rice BEIIa. Detailed analyses of BE reaction products suggests that BEIIb and Chlorella BEII only transfer chains with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 6 and 7, whereas BEIIa preferably transfers short chains with a DP of about 6-11. These results show that the Chlorella BEII is functionally similar to rice BEIIb rather than BEIIa.

  3. A systematic study on the extractability of arsenic species from algal certified reference material IAEA-140/TM (Fucus sp., Sea Plant Homogenate) using methanol/water extractant mixtures.

    PubMed

    van Elteren, Johannes Teun; Slejkovec, Zdenka; Kahn, Markus; Goessler, Walter

    2007-02-28

    Using methanol/water mixtures (from pure water to pure methanol), with different desorption and solubility parameters, and varying extractant volume to algal mass (V/m) ratios, the extractability of arsenic species from CRM IAEA-140/TM was investigated. A linear sorption isotherm-based model was developed to process the data obtained with variable volume extraction, allowing the unambiguous deduction of the maximal extractable species concentrations under the specific extraction conditions, even for more stable species. The maximal extractable arsenic fraction ranged from 41 to 68% of the total arsenic concentration in CRM IAEA-140/TM, depending on the extractant composition, with pure methanol giving the lowest extraction yield and pure water giving erratic extractability (probably due to bad wettability). The main arsenic species quantified in the methanol/water extracts were arsenosugars, with arsenosugars 1 (glycerol arsenosugar), 3 (sulfonate arsenosugar) and 4 (sulfate arsenosugar) making up ca. 90% of the maximal extractable arsenic. The rest accounts for DMA (dimethylarsinate), arsenosugar 2 (phosphate arsenosugar) and As(V). There is no clear extraction pattern emerging from the data although it may be seen that extraction of more polar species (e.g. arsenosugar 1) is favoured in pure methanol and less polar more ionic species (e.g. arsenosugar 2 and As(V)) in methanol extractants with a higher water percentage. The precise and highly accurate data may be used for quality control purposes under strictly followed extraction conditions since the extraction is operationally defined. Additionally, the variable volume extraction methodology presented may be applied to other elemental species in other matrices using other extractants. Although this approach does not maximise the absolute extractability but only that which is extractant-specific, experimentators are forewarned that in most cases only a fingerprint of the extractant-specific species is produced

  4. Screening and characterization of oleaginous Chlorella strains and exploration of photoautotrophic Chlorella protothecoides for oil production.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-gang; Gerken, Henri; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jin

    2015-05-01

    The growth and oil production of nine Chlorella strains were comparatively assessed and Chlorellaprotothecoides CS-41 demonstrated the greatest lipid production potential. The effects of different nitrogen forms and concentrations, phosphorus concentrations and light intensities on growth and oil production were studied in laboratory columns. C. protothecoides CS-41 accumulated lipids up to 55% of dry weight, with triacylglycerol and oleic acid being 71% of total lipids and 59% of total fatty acids, respectively. High biomass and lipid productivities were achieved in outdoor panel PBRs, up to 1.25 and 0.59 g L(-1) day(-1), or 44. 1 and 16.1 g m(-2) day(-1), respectively. A two-stage cultivation strategy was proposed to enhance the algal biomass and lipid production. This is the first comprehensive investigation of both indoor and outdoor photoautotrophic C. protothecoides cultures for oil production, and C. protothecoides CS-41 represents a promising biofuel feedstock worthy of further exploration.

  5. Algal Cell Response to Pulsed Waved Stimulation and Its Application to Increase Algal Lipid Production

    PubMed Central

    Savchenko, Oleksandra; Xing, Jida; Yang, Xiaoyan; Gu, Quanrong; Shaheen, Mohamed; Huang, Min; Yu, Xiaojian; Burrell, Robert; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Generating renewable energy while sequestering CO2 using algae has recently attracted significant research attention, mostly directing towards biological methods such as systems biology, genetic engineering and bio-refining for optimizing algae strains. Other approaches focus on chemical screening to adjust culture conditions or culture media. We report for the first time the physiological changes of algal cells in response to a novel form of mechanical stimulation, or a pulsed wave at the frequency of 1.5 MHz and the duty cycle of 20%. We studied how the pulsed wave can further increase algal lipid production on top of existing biological and chemical methods. Two commonly used algal strains, fresh-water Chlorella vulgaris and seawater Tetraselmis chuii, were selected. We have performed the tests in shake flasks and 1 L spinner-flask bioreactors. Conventional Gravimetric measurements show that up to 20% increase for algal lipid could be achieved after 8 days of stimulation. The total electricity cost needed for the stimulations in a one-liter bioreactor is only one-tenth of a US penny. Gas liquid chromatography shows that the fatty acid composition remains unchanged after pulsed-wave stimulation. Scanning electron microscope results also suggest that pulsed wave stimulation induces shear stress and thus increases algal lipid production. PMID:28186124

  6. Algal Cell Response to Pulsed Waved Stimulation and Its Application to Increase Algal Lipid Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, Oleksandra; Xing, Jida; Yang, Xiaoyan; Gu, Quanrong; Shaheen, Mohamed; Huang, Min; Yu, Xiaojian; Burrell, Robert; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Generating renewable energy while sequestering CO2 using algae has recently attracted significant research attention, mostly directing towards biological methods such as systems biology, genetic engineering and bio-refining for optimizing algae strains. Other approaches focus on chemical screening to adjust culture conditions or culture media. We report for the first time the physiological changes of algal cells in response to a novel form of mechanical stimulation, or a pulsed wave at the frequency of 1.5 MHz and the duty cycle of 20%. We studied how the pulsed wave can further increase algal lipid production on top of existing biological and chemical methods. Two commonly used algal strains, fresh-water Chlorella vulgaris and seawater Tetraselmis chuii, were selected. We have performed the tests in shake flasks and 1 L spinner-flask bioreactors. Conventional Gravimetric measurements show that up to 20% increase for algal lipid could be achieved after 8 days of stimulation. The total electricity cost needed for the stimulations in a one-liter bioreactor is only one-tenth of a US penny. Gas liquid chromatography shows that the fatty acid composition remains unchanged after pulsed-wave stimulation. Scanning electron microscope results also suggest that pulsed wave stimulation induces shear stress and thus increases algal lipid production.

  7. Algal Cell Response to Pulsed Waved Stimulation and Its Application to Increase Algal Lipid Production.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Oleksandra; Xing, Jida; Yang, Xiaoyan; Gu, Quanrong; Shaheen, Mohamed; Huang, Min; Yu, Xiaojian; Burrell, Robert; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2017-02-10

    Generating renewable energy while sequestering CO2 using algae has recently attracted significant research attention, mostly directing towards biological methods such as systems biology, genetic engineering and bio-refining for optimizing algae strains. Other approaches focus on chemical screening to adjust culture conditions or culture media. We report for the first time the physiological changes of algal cells in response to a novel form of mechanical stimulation, or a pulsed wave at the frequency of 1.5 MHz and the duty cycle of 20%. We studied how the pulsed wave can further increase algal lipid production on top of existing biological and chemical methods. Two commonly used algal strains, fresh-water Chlorella vulgaris and seawater Tetraselmis chuii, were selected. We have performed the tests in shake flasks and 1 L spinner-flask bioreactors. Conventional Gravimetric measurements show that up to 20% increase for algal lipid could be achieved after 8 days of stimulation. The total electricity cost needed for the stimulations in a one-liter bioreactor is only one-tenth of a US penny. Gas liquid chromatography shows that the fatty acid composition remains unchanged after pulsed-wave stimulation. Scanning electron microscope results also suggest that pulsed wave stimulation induces shear stress and thus increases algal lipid production.

  8. Phytochip: development of a DNA-microarray for rapid and accurate identification of Pseudo-nitzschia spp and other harmful algal species.

    PubMed

    Noyer, Charlotte; Abot, Anne; Trouilh, Lidwine; Leberre, Véronique Anton; Dreanno, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    Detection of harmful algal blooms has become a challenging concern because of the direct impacts on public health and economy. The identification of toxic dinoflagellates and diatoms in monitoring programs requires an extensive taxonomic expertise and is time consuming. Advances in molecular biology have allowed the development of new approaches, more rapid, accurate and cost-effective for detecting these microorganisms. In this context, we developed a new DNA microarray (called, Phytochip) for the simultaneous detection of multiple HAB species with a particular emphasis on Pseudo-nitzschia species. Oligonucleotide probes were designed along the rRNA operon. After DNA extraction, the target rDNA genes were amplified and labeled using an asymmetric PCR; then, the amplicons were hybridized to the oligonucleotide probes present on the chips. The total assay from seawater sampling to data acquisition can be performed within a working day. Specificity and sensitivity were assessed by using monoclonal cultures, mixtures of species and field samples spiked with a known amount of cultured cells. The Phytochip with its 81 validated oligonucleotide probes was able to detect 12 species of Pseudo-nitzschia and 11 species of dinoflagellates among which were 3 species of Karenia and 3 species of Alexandrium. The Phytochip was applied to environmental samples already characterized by light microscopy and cloned into DNA libraries. The hybridizations on the Phytochip were in good agreement with the sequences retrieved from the clone libraries and the microscopic observations. The Phytochip enables a reliable multiplex detection of phytoplankton and can assist a water quality monitoring program as well as more general ecological research.

  9. Streptomyces alboflavus RPS and Its Novel and High Algicidal Activity against Harmful Algal Bloom Species Phaeocystis globosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Li, Dong; Yang, Xujun; An, Xinli; Zheng, Xiaowei; Tian, Yun; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-01-01

    Phaeocystis globosa blooms have frequently occurred along coastal waters and exerted serious impacts on ecological environments by releasing toxic hemolytic substances, forming nuisance foam, and causing oxygen depletion. An actinomycete strain RPS with high algicidal activity against P. globosa was isolated and identified as Streptomyces alboflavus, based on morphology, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. RPS lysed 95% of P. globosa within 48 h by releasing an extracellular active substance into the growth medium. The activity of RPS supernatant was sensitive to temperature at and above 50°C and insensitive to pH from 3 to 11. The molecular weight of the active substance was between 100 Da and 1000 Da, and approximately 90% of it was extracted by ethyl acetate. It was presumed that the active component efficiently inhibited the movement of P. globosa, caused the flagella to fall off the algae, and finally lysed the algal cells. RPS showed a wide target range against harmful algae. S. alboflavus RPS with high algicidal activity and such novel features of temperature and pH sensitivity, low molecular weight, algicidal process, and target range possesses great potential in the biological control of P. globosa blooms. PMID:24675867

  10. [Isolation, Identification and Characteristic Analysis of an Oil-producing Chlorella sp. Tolerant to High-strength Anaerobic Digestion Effluent].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuang; Wang, Wen-guo; Ma, Dan-wei; Tang, Xiao-yu; Hu, Qi-chun

    2015-07-01

    A Chlorella strain tolerant to high-strength anaerobic digestion effluent was isolated from the anaerobic digestion effluent with a long-term exposure to air. The strain was identified as a Chlorella by morphological and molecular biological methods, and named Chlorella sp. BWY-1, The anaerobic digestion effluent used in this study was from a biogas plant with the raw materials of swine wastewater after solid-liquid separation. The Chlorella regularis (FACHB-729) was used as the control strain. The comparative study showed that Chlorella sp, BWY-Ihad relatively higher growth rate, biomass accumulation capacity and pollutants removal rate in BG11. and different concentrations of anaerobic digestion effluent. Chlorella sp. BWY-1 had the highest growth rate and biomass productivity (324.40 mg.L-1) in BG11, but its lipid productivity and lipid content increased with the increase of anaerobic digestion effluent concentration, In undiluted anaerobic digestion effluent, the lipid productivity and lipid content of Chlorella sp. BWY-1 were up to 44. 43% and 108. 70 mg.L-1, respectively. Those results showed that the isolated algal strain bad some potential applications in livestock wastewater treatment and bioenergy production, it could be combined with a solid-liquid separation, anaerobic fermentation and other techniques for processing livestock wastewater and producing biodiesel.

  11. Bioconcentration kinetics of hydrophobic chemicals in different densities of Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Sijm, D.T.H.M.; Broersen, K.W.; Roode, D.F. de; Mayer, P.

    1998-09-01

    Algal density-dependent bioconcentration factors and rate constants were determined for a series of hydrophobic compounds in Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The apparent uptake rate constants of the hydrophobic compounds in algae varied between 200 and 710,000 L/kg/d, slightly increased with hydrophobicity within an experiment, were relatively constant for each algal density, and fitted fairly within existing allometric relationships. The bioavailability of the hydrophobic test compounds was significantly reduced by sorption by algal exudates. The sorption coefficients of the hydrophobic compounds to the algal exudates were between 80 and 1,200 L/kg, and were for most algal densities in the same order of magnitude as the apparent bioconcentration factors to the algae, that is, between 80 and 60,200 L/kg. In typical field situations, however, no significant reduction in bioavailability due to exudates is expected. The apparent elimination rate constants of the hydrophobic compounds were high and fairly constant for each algal density and varied between 2 and 190/d. Because the apparent elimination rate constants were higher than the growth rate constant, and were independent of hydrophobicity, the authors speculated that other factors dominate excretion, such as exudate excretion-enhanced elimination. Bioconcentration factors increased less than proportional with hydrophobicity, i.e., the octanol-water partition coefficient [K{sub ow}]. The role of algal composition in bioconcentration is evaluated. Bioconcentrations (kinetics) of hydrophobic compounds that are determined at high algal densities should be applied with caution to field situations.

  12. Strain, biochemistry, and cultivation-dependent measurement variability of algal biomass composition.

    PubMed

    Laurens, Lieve M L; Van Wychen, Stefanie; McAllister, Jordan P; Arrowsmith, Sarah; Dempster, Thomas A; McGowen, John; Pienkos, Philip T

    2014-05-01

    Accurate compositional analysis in biofuel feedstocks is imperative; the yields of individual components can define the economics of an entire process. In the nascent industry of algal biofuels and bioproducts, analytical methods that have been deemed acceptable for decades are suddenly critical for commercialization. We tackled the question of how the strain and biochemical makeup of algal cells affect chemical measurements. We selected a set of six procedures (two each for lipids, protein, and carbohydrates): three rapid fingerprinting methods and three advanced chromatography-based methods. All methods were used to measure the composition of 100 samples from three strains: Scenedesmus sp., Chlorella sp., and Nannochloropsis sp. The data presented point not only to species-specific discrepancies but also to cell biochemistry-related discrepancies. There are cases where two respective methods agree but the differences are often significant with over- or underestimation of up to 90%, likely due to chemical interferences with the rapid spectrophotometric measurements. We provide background on the chemistry of interfering reactions for the fingerprinting methods and conclude that for accurate compositional analysis of algae and process and mass balance closure, emphasis should be placed on unambiguous characterization using methods where individual components are measured independently.

  13. [Culture medium based on biogas slurry and breeding of oil Chlorella].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Min; Mei, Shuai; Cao, You-Fu; Ding, Jin-Feng; Xu, Jia-Jie; Li, Shu-Jun

    2014-06-01

    The oil chlorella cultivation and biogas slurry treatment were combined. The biogas slurry provided water and nutrient for growing chlorella, at the same time, harmless treatment of biogas slurry was realized. This paper cultivated 4 species of oil chlorella in the mixed medium of biogas slurry and green algae medium (the volume ratios were 1 : 9, 1 : 3, 1 : 1 and 3 : 1, respectively), and compared their oil productivity to select the best oil chlorella species and the optimal culture medium. The results showed that, the combination of medium and chlorella species to reach the highest oil productivity was a volume ratio of 1 : 3 and the chlorella species BJ05, and the oil productivity of chlorella BJ05 was 9.20 mg x (L x d)(-1), higher than that in green algae medium [8.66 mg x (L x d)(-1)]. In mixed medium with a volume ratio of 1:3, the effect of adding different nutrients into the green algae medium on the oil productivity was examined, and the results showed that, sodium carbonate and citric acid had no negative effect on the oil productivity of chlorella BJ05. in the absence of sodium carbonate and citric acid, the oil productivity of chlorella BJ05 was 9.36 mg x (L x d)(-1), and the removal of COD (chemical oxygen demand), total nitrogen, total phosphorus and ammonia nitrogen rates were 59%, 75%, 61% and 100%, respectively. Deficiency in other nutrients had negative effect on the oil productivity. Therefore, the culture medium was further optimized to the mixed medium of biogas slurry and green algae medium with a volume ratio of 1 : 3 and without addition of sodium carbonate and citric acid.

  14. Seasonality in the distribution of dinoflagellates with special reference to harmful algal species in tropical coastal environment, Bay of Bengal.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Gouri; Mohanty, A K; Samantara, M K; Satpathy, K K

    2014-10-01

    A study was carried out in the coastal waters of Kalpakkam, southeast coast of India, to find out the seasonal variation in dinoflagellate community structure. Samples were collected for a period of 4 years during 2006-2010. During the study 69 species of dinoflagellates were encountered among which Ceratium furca and Prorocentrum micans were most common during all the seasons. Genus Ceratium was found to be the most diverse one with 23 species which was followed by genus Protoperidinium with 16 species. Of 69 species, 27 species were considered as dominant based on their abundance during pre-monsoon (PRM), monsoon (MON) and post-monsoon (POM) periods. Relatively high density and diversity of dinoflagellates were encountered during the PRM period as compared to the MON and POM periods. Abundance pattern of dinoflagellates for three seasons showed the following trend: PRM > POM > MON. Salinity showed a positive correlation with dinoflagellate community showing its importance in dinoflagellate growth and sustenance. Ammonia and phosphate developed negative correlation with dinoflagellate density indicating the utilization of these nutrients by the dinoflagellate community. The presence of three dinoflagellate associations, broadly representing the three seasons experienced at this location, was evident from the cluster analysis. The study revealed presence of 19 relatively abundant toxic/red tide forming dinoflagellate species in the coastal waters of Kalpakkam.

  15. [Using Excess Activated Sludge Treated 4-Chlorophenol Contained Waste Water to Cultivate Chlorella vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Chen, Xiu-rong; Yan, Long; He, Yi-xuan; Shi, Zhen-dong

    2015-04-01

    Using different rations of sludge extracts and supernate from 4-Chlorophenol (4-CP) simulated wastewater's excess sludge after centrifugation to cultivate the Chlorella vulgaris to achieve the goal of excess sludge utilization together with chlorella cultivating. The experiments were performed in 500 mL flasks with different rations of sludge extracts & BG-11 and supernate & BG-11 in a light growth chamber respectively. Number of algal cells, Chlorophyll, enzyme activity, oil and water total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total organic carbon (TOC), toxicity index were investigated. Result showed that the nutrition supplies and toxicity in the excess sludge were removed efficiently via Chlorella vulgaris, the removal rates of TN and TP were at least 40% and 90% respectively; After 10 days cultivation, the density growth of 50% sludge extracts was 20 times higher of the beginning while its chlorophyll content was lower than that of the blank group. Sludge extracts could promote the proliferation of algae, but were not conducive to the synthesis of chlorophyll. The quantity of SOD in per cell showed Chlorella vulgaris gave a positive response via stimulation from toxicant in sludge extracts and supernate. The best time for collecting chlorella vulgaris was the fifth day of cultivation, taking neutral oil accumulation as the evaluating indicator for its utilization combined with the removal of supplies and toxicity.

  16. Growth kinetics and yield study on Chlorella pyrenoidosa in chemically defined media

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, J.J.; Akin, C.

    1983-01-01

    A Chlorella culture free from heterotrophic bacteria was obtained by eliminating the bacteria with successive use of antibiotics and agar plants. The purified Chlorella was cultured in chemically defined media. Under a photon flux (16.7 mw/cmS) similar to insolation, both heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultures were luxurious but the growth rates of autotrophic cultures were reduced substantially. The Chlorella culture grew most rapidly at 30 C in the absence of heterotrophic bacteria, and the highest specific growth rates were 1.43 x 10 h and 0.46 x 10 h for mixotrophic and autotrophic cultures, respectively. The highest photosynthetic efficiency over its growth period was 2.9% for autotrophic cultures. Elimination of heterotrophic bacteria from Chlorella cultures improved the algal growth rate as well as biomass yield significantly. A parasite of 0.1- m size was identified. The motile microorganism played an important role in the growth of the Chlorella and appeared to be common to green algae. 16 references, 2 tables.

  17. Harmful Algal Bloom Webinar

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The problem is complex. Excessive nitrogen and phosphorous levels can cause harmful algal blooms. Different algal/cyanobacteria strains bloom under different conditions. Different strains produce different toxins at varying amounts.

  18. Photosynthetic plasticity in the green algal species Klebsormidium flaccidum (Streptophyta) from a terrestrial and a freshwater habitat.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Ulf; Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The genus Klebsormidium (Klebsormidiales, Streptophyta) has a worldwide distribution in terrestrial habitats. In the present study, we focused on two strains of Klebsormidium flaccidum, the type species of the genus. The isolates used in this study were isolated from a soil and freshwater habitat. Photosynthetic activity was evaluated under different controlled gradients of light, temperature and desiccation. The data clearly indicate that both isolates of K. flaccidum exhibit conspicuously different photosynthetic response patterns to photon fluence rate, temperature and desiccation, and thus can be related to their different habitats. Although both strains represent the same species, their physiological response patterns to abiotic gradients, as well as their morphology differed to some extent, indicating high phenotypic plasticity of K. flaccidum, which was maintained even after long-term culture and thus can be explained by the formation of physiologically distinct ecotypes.

  19. Photosynthetic plasticity in the green algal species Klebsormidium flaccidum (Streptophyta) from a terrestrial and a freshwater habitat

    PubMed Central

    Karsten, Ulf; Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The genus Klebsormidium (Klebsormidiales, Streptophyta) has a worldwide distribution in terrestrial habitats. In the present study, we focused on two strains of Klebsormidium flaccidum, the type species of the genus. The isolates used in this study were isolated from a soil and freshwater habitat. Photosynthetic activity was evaluated under different controlled gradients of light, temperature and desiccation. The data clearly indicate that both isolates of K. flaccidum exhibit conspicuously different photosynthetic response patterns to photon fluence rate, temperature and desiccation, and thus can be related to their different habitats. Although both strains represent the same species, their physiological response patterns to abiotic gradients, as well as their morphology differed to some extent, indicating high phenotypic plasticity of K. flaccidum, which was maintained even after long-term culture and thus can be explained by the formation of physiologically distinct ecotypes. PMID:28057961

  20. Efficacy of algal metrics for assessing nutrient and organic enrichment in flowing waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, S.D.; Mueller, D.K.; Spahr, N.E.; Munn, M.D.; Dubrovsky, N.M.

    2008-01-01

    4. Although algal species tolerance to nutrient and organic enrichment is well documented, additional taxonomic and autecological research on sensitive, endemic algal species would further enhance water-quality assessments.

  1. Eukaryotic algal phytochromes span the visible spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Rockwell, Nathan C.; Duanmu, Deqiang; Martin, Shelley S.; Bachy, Charles; Price, Dana C.; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Worden, Alexandra Z.; Lagarias, J. Clark

    2014-01-01

    Plant phytochromes are photoswitchable red/far-red photoreceptors that allow competition with neighboring plants for photosynthetically active red light. In aquatic environments, red and far-red light are rapidly attenuated with depth; therefore, photosynthetic species must use shorter wavelengths of light. Nevertheless, phytochrome-related proteins are found in recently sequenced genomes of many eukaryotic algae from aquatic environments. We examined the photosensory properties of seven phytochromes from diverse algae: four prasinophyte (green algal) species, the heterokont (brown algal) Ectocarpus siliculosus, and two glaucophyte species. We demonstrate that algal phytochromes are not limited to red and far-red responses. Instead, different algal phytochromes can sense orange, green, and even blue light. Characterization of these previously undescribed photosensors using CD spectroscopy supports a structurally heterogeneous chromophore in the far-red–absorbing photostate. Our study thus demonstrates that extensive spectral tuning of phytochromes has evolved in phylogenetically distinct lineages of aquatic photosynthetic eukaryotes. PMID:24567382

  2. Cultivation of Chlorella protothecoides with urban wastewater in continuous photobioreactor: biomass productivity and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Ramos Tercero, E A; Sforza, E; Morandini, M; Bertucco, A

    2014-02-01

    The capability to grow microalgae in nonsterilized wastewater is essential for an application of this technology in an actual industrial process. Batch experiments were carried out with the species in nonsterilized urban wastewater from local treatment plants to measure both the algal growth and the nutrient consumption. Chlorella protothecoides showed a high specific growth rate (about 1 day(-1)), and no effects of bacterial contamination were observed. Then, this microalgae was grown in a continuous photobioreactor with CO₂-air aeration in order to verify the feasibility of an integrated process of the removal of nutrient from real wastewaters. Different residence times were tested, and biomass productivity and nutrients removal were measured. A maximum of microalgae productivity was found at around 0.8 day of residence time in agreement with theoretical expectation in the case of light-limited cultures. In addition, N-NH₄ and P-PO₄ removal rates were determined in order to model the kinetic of nutrients uptake. Results from batch and continuous experiments were used to propose an integrated process scheme of wastewater treatment at industrial scale including a section with C. protothecoides.

  3. Magnesium aminoclay enhances lipid production of mixotrophic Chlorella sp. KR-1 while reducing bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohwa; Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Lee, Jiye; Nam, Bora; Kim, Dong-Myung; Lee, Kyubock; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Improving lipid productivity and preventing overgrowth of contaminating bacteria are critical issues relevant to the commercialization of the mixotrophic microalgae cultivation process. In this paper, we report the use of magnesium aminoclay (MgAC) nanoparticles for enhanced lipid production from oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 with simultaneous control of KR-1-associated bacterial growth in mixotrophic cultures with glucose as the model substrate. Addition of 0.01-0.1g/L MgAC promoted microalgal biomass production better than the MgAC-less control, via differential biocidal effects on microalgal and bacterial cells (the latter being more sensitive to MgAC's bio-toxicity than the former). The inhibition effect of MgAC on co-existing bacteria was, as based on density-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, largely dosage-dependent and species-specific. MgAC also, by inducing an oxidative stress environment, increased both the cell size and lipid content of KR-1, resulting in a considerable, ∼25% improvement of mixotrophic algal lipid productivity (to ∼410mgFAME/L/d) compared with the untreated control.

  4. Characterization and Quantitation of Vitamin B12 Compounds in Various Chlorella Supplements.

    PubMed

    Bito, Tomohiro; Bito, Mariko; Asai, Yusuke; Takenaka, Shigeo; Yabuta, Yukinori; Tago, Kazunori; Ohnishi, Masato; Mizoguchi, Toru; Watanabe, Fumio

    2016-11-16

    Vitamin B12 was determined and characterized in 19 dried Chlorella health supplements. Vitamin contents of dried Chlorella cells varied from <0.1 μg to approximately 415 μg per 100 g of dry weight. Subsequent liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analyses showed the presence of inactive corrinoid compounds, a cobalt-free corrinoid, and 5-methoxybenzimidazolyl cyanocobamide (factor IIIm) in four and three high vitamin B12-containing Chlorella tablets, respectively. In four Chlorella tablet types with high and moderate vitamin B12 contents, the coenzyme forms of vitamin B12 5'-deoxyadenosylcobalamin (approximately 32%) and methylcobalamin (approximately 8%) were considerably present, whereas the unnaturally occurring corrinoid cyanocobalamin was present at the lowest concentrations. The species Chlorella sorokiniana (formerly Chlorella pyrenoidosa) is commonly used in dietary supplements and did not show an absolute requirement of vitamin B12 for growth despite vitamin B12 uptake from the medium being observed. In further experiments, vitamin B12-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase activities were detected in cell homogenates. In particular, methionine synthase activity was significantly increased following the addition of vitamin B12 to the medium. These results suggest that vitamin B12 contents of Chlorella tablets reflect the presence of vitamin B12-generating organic ingredients in the medium or the concomitant growth of vitamin B12-synthesizing bacteria under open culture conditions.

  5. Physicochemical effects on sulfite transformation in a lipid-rich Chlorella sp. strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Fang; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2014-11-01

    SO2 is very rapidly hydrated to sulfurous acid in water solution at pH value above 6.0, whereby sulfite is yielded from the disassociation of protons. We aimed to improve the sulfite transformation efficiency and provide a basis for the direct utilization of SO2 from flue gas by a microalgal suspension. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 was cultured in a medium with 20 mmol/L sodium sulfite under different physicochemical conditions. Under light conditions, sulfite concentration in the algal suspension reduced linearly over time, and was completely converted into sulfate within 8 h. The highest sulfite transformation rate (3.25 mmol/(L·h)) was obtained under the following conditions: 35°C, light intensity of 300 μmol/(m2·s), NaHCO3 concentration of 6 g/L, initial cell density (OD540) of 0.8 and pH of 9-10. There was a positive correlation between sulfite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella, with the conditions favorable to algal growth giving better sulfite transformation. Although oxygen in the air plays a role in the transformation of SO2- 3 to SO2- 4, the transformation is mainly dependent on the metabolic activity of algal cells. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 is capable of tolerating high sulfite concentration, and can utilize sulfite as the sole sulfur source for maintaining healthy growth. We found that sulfite ≤20 mmol/L had no obvious effect on the total lipid content and fatty acid profiles of the algae. Thus, the results suggest it is feasible to use flue gas for the mass production of feedstock for biodiesel using Chlorella sp. XQ-20044, without preliminary removal of SO2, assuming there is adequate control of the pH.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF 17 NEW MICROSATELLITE MARKERS FOR THE DINOFLAGELLATE ALEXANDRIUM FUNDYENSE (DINOPHYCEAE), A HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOM SPECIES

    PubMed Central

    Sehein, Taylor; Richlen, Mindy L.; Nagai, Satoshi; Yasuike, Motoshige; Nakamura, Yoji; Anderson, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Alexandrium fundyense is the toxic marine dinoflagellate responsible for “red tide” events in temperate and sub-arctic waters worldwide. In the Gulf of Maine (GOM) and Bay of Fundy in the Northwest Atlantic, blooms of A. fundyense recur annually, and are associated with major health and ecosystem impacts. In this region, microsatellite markers have been used to investigate genetic structure and gene flow; however, the loci currently available for this species were isolated from populations from Japan and the North Sea, and only a subset are suitable for the analysis of A. fundyense populations in the Northwest Atlantic. To facilitate future studies of A. fundyense blooms, both in this region and globally, we isolated and characterized 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci from 31 isolates collected from the GOM and from the Nauset Marsh System, an estuary on Cape Cod, MA, USA. These loci yielded between two and 15 alleles per locus, with an average of 7.1. Gene diversities ranged from 0.297 to 0.952. We then analyzed these same 31 isolates using previously published markers for comparison. We determined the new markers are sufficiently variable and better suited for the investigation of genetic structure, bloom dynamics, and diversity in the Northwest Atlantic. PMID:27274617

  7. Sustainable Algal Energy Production and Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, William E.

    2012-07-14

    Overall, our results confirm that wild algal species sequester a wide range of organic and metal contaminants and excess nutrients (PAHs, trace metals, and nutrients) from natural waters, and suggest parameters that could be useful in predicting uptake rates for algae growing on an algal floway or other algal growth systems in the environment or in industrial processes. The implication for various fuel production processes differ with the detailed unit operations involved, and these results will be of use in the developing of scaling experiments for various types of engineering process designs.

  8. Algal and fungal diversity in Antarctic lichens.

    PubMed

    Park, Chae Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo; Elvebakk, Arve; Kim, Ok-Sun; Jeong, Gajin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The composition of lichen ecosystems except mycobiont and photobiont has not been evaluated intensively. In addition, recent studies to identify algal genotypes have raised questions about the specific relationship between mycobiont and photobiont. In the current study, we analyzed algal and fungal community structures in lichen species from King George Island, Antarctica, by pyrosequencing of eukaryotic large subunit (LSU) and algal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domains of the nuclear rRNA gene. The sequencing results of LSU and ITS regions indicated that each lichen thallus contained diverse algal species. The major algal operational taxonomic unit (OTU) defined at a 99% similarity cutoff of LSU sequences accounted for 78.7-100% of the total algal community in each sample. In several cases, the major OTUs defined by LSU sequences were represented by two closely related OTUs defined by 98% sequence similarity of ITS domain. The results of LSU sequences indicated that lichen-associated fungi belonged to the Arthoniomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Lecanoromycetes, Leotiomycetes, and Sordariomycetes of the Ascomycota, and Tremellomycetes and Cystobasidiomycetes of the Basidiomycota. The composition of major photobiont species and lichen-associated fungal community were mostly related to the mycobiont species. The contribution of growth forms or substrates on composition of photobiont and lichen-associated fungi was not evident.

  9. Lutein recovery from Chlorella sp. ESP-6 with coagulants.

    PubMed

    Utomo, Rhesa Pramudita; Chang, Yin-Ru; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2013-07-01

    Production of algal lutein included cell cultivation, biomass harvesting, cell wall disruption, and subsequent purification if needed. This work cultivated Chlorella sp. ESP-6 cells in photobioreactor to a biomass content of 1.1 gl(-1) and then the freezing-grinding, ultrasonic treatment (20 and 42kHz) and microwave treatment were used to disrupt the cell walls for recover intracellular lutein. The grinding recovered more lutein than ultrasound or microwave pretreatment. Single coagulation using >30 mgl(-1) chitosan or dual-conditioning using 10 mg l(-1) polyaluminum chloride and 10 mgl(-1) chitosan effectively enhance sedimentation and membrane filtration efficiency of algal suspensions. However, the presence of coagulants lowers the lutein yield from algal biomass in the subsequent 20 kHz ultrasound treatment and purification process. Simulation results revealed affine adsorption of lutein onto chitosan molecules via hydroxyl-amine interaction. The possible drawback by pre-treatment stage should be considered together with the subsequent recovery stage in whole process assessment.

  10. Removal and reductive dechlorination of triclosan by Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujuan; Wang, Xian; Poon, Karen; Wang, Yini; Li, Shangfu; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuhai; Cai, Zongwei

    2013-09-01

    Triclosan that is widely used as antimicrobial agent has been detected as contaminant in various aquatic environments. In this work, removal and biodegradation of triclosan in water by using a ubiquitous green alga, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was investigated. When C. pyrenoidosa was exposed to a series concentration of triclosan from 100 to 800ngmL(-1), more than 50% of triclosan was eliminated by algal uptake from the culture medium during the first 1h exposure and reached equilibrium after the 6h treatment. In the biodegradation experiments, a removal percentage of 77.2% was obtained after C. pyrenoidosa was cultivated with 800ngmL(-1) triclosan for 96h. A major metabolite from the reductive dechlorination of triclosan was identified by using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The ultrastructural morphology of algal cells grown in the presence of triclosan was observed by using transmission electron microscopy and the growth of algal cells was detected. It was found that the trilcosan treatment resulted in the disruption of the chloroplast and the release of organic material into aquatic environment, which indicated that triclosan may affect membrane metabolism.

  11. Widespread green algae Chlorella and Stichococcus exhibit polar-temperate and tropical-temperate biogeography.

    PubMed

    Hodač, Ladislav; Hallmann, Christine; Spitzer, Karolin; Elster, Josef; Faßhauer, Fabian; Brinkmann, Nicole; Lepka, Daniela; Diwan, Vaibhav; Friedl, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Chlorella and Stichococcus are morphologically simple airborne microalgae, omnipresent in terrestrial and aquatic habitats. The minute cell size and resistance against environmental stress facilitate their long-distance dispersal. However, the actual distribution of Chlorella- and Stichococcus-like species has so far been inferred only from ambiguous morphology-based evidence. Here we contribute a phylogenetic analysis of an expanded SSU and ITS2 rDNA sequence dataset representing Chlorella- and Stichococcus-like species from terrestrial habitats of polar, temperate and tropical regions. We aim to uncover biogeographical patterns at low taxonomic levels. We found that psychrotolerant strains of Chlorella and Stichococcus are closely related with strains originating from the temperate zone. Species closely related to Chlorella vulgaris and Muriella terrestris, and recovered from extreme terrestrial environments of polar regions and hot deserts, are particularly widespread. Stichococcus strains from the temperate zone, with their closest relatives in the tropics, differ from strains with the closest relatives being from the polar regions. Our data suggest that terrestrial Chlorella and Stichococcus might be capable of intercontinental dispersal; however, their actual distributions exhibit biogeographical patterns.

  12. Influence of light, nutrients, and temperature on the toxicity of atrazine to the algal species Raphidocelis subcapitata: Implications for the risk assessment of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Leilan; Brain, Richard A; Lissemore, Linda; Solomon, Keith R; Hanson, Mark L; Prosser, Ryan S

    2016-10-01

    The acute toxicity of herbicides to algae is commonly assessed under conditions (e.g., light intensity, water temperature, concentration of nutrients, pH) prescribed by standard test protocols. However, the observed toxicity may vary with changes in one or more of these parameters. This study examined variation in toxicity of the herbicide atrazine to a representative green algal species Raphidocelis subcapitata (formerly Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) with changes in light intensity, water temperature, concentrations of nutrients or combinations of these three parameters. Conditions were chosen that could be representative of the intensive corn growing Midwestern region of the United States of America where atrazine is used extensively. Varying light intensity (4-58µmol/m(2)s) resulted in no observable trend in 96-h EC50 values for growth rate. EC50 values for PSII yield generally increased with decreasing light intensity but not significantly in all cases. The 96-h EC50 values for growth rate decreased with decreases in temperature (20-5°C) from standard conditions (25°C), but EC50 values for PSII yield at lower temperatures were not significantly different from standard conditions. Finally, there was no clear trend in 96-h EC50 values for both endpoints with increases in nitrogen (4.1-20mg/L) and phosphorus (0.24-1.2mg/L). The 96-h EC50 values for both endpoints under combinations of conditions mimicking aquatic systems in the Midwestern U.S. were not significantly different from EC50 values generated under standard test conditions. This combination of decreased light intensity and temperature and increased nutrients relative to standard conditions does not appear to significantly affect the observed toxicity of atrazine to R. subcapitata. For atrazine specifically, and for perhaps other herbicides, this means current laboratory protocols are useful for extrapolating to effects on algae under realistic environmental conditions.

  13. Proteomic analysis of Chlorella vulgaris: Potential targets for enhanced lipid accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Guarnieri, Michael T.; Nag, Ambarish; Yang, Shihui; Pienkos, Philip T.

    2013-11-01

    Oleaginous microalgae are capable of producing large quantities of fatty acids and triacylglycerides. As such, they are promising feedstocks for the production of biofuels and bioproducts. Genetic strain-engineering strategies offer a means to accelerate the commercialization of algal biofuels by improving the rate and total accumulation of microalgal lipids. However, the industrial potential of these organisms remains to be met, largely due to the incomplete knowledgebase surrounding the mechanisms governing the induction of algal lipid biosynthesis. Such strategies require further elucidation of genes and gene products controlling algal lipid accumulation. In this study, we have set out to examine these mechanisms and identify novel strain-engineering targets in the oleaginous microalga, Chlorella vulgaris. Comparative shotgun proteomic analyses have identified a number of novel targets, including previously unidentified transcription factors and proteins involved in cell signaling and cell cycle regulation. These results lay the foundation for strain-improvement strategies and demonstrate the power of translational proteomic analysis.

  14. Gases generated from simulated thermal degradation of autotrophic and heterotrophic chlorella

    SciTech Connect

    Qingyu Wu )

    1992-01-01

    The content of crude lipid in the cells of heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides is 4.4 times as high as in the autotrophic algal cells. The gases thermally degraded from autotrophic cells at 200-300[degrees]C contain mainly CO[sub 2], while the heterotrophic algal cells produce hydrocarbon gas at a much higher rate than autotraophic algal cells. With the rise in temperature, both kinds of cells display a rapid drop in the acid/alkane ratio of the gas components and the ratio of ethane to ethylene increases regularly. Their ratio of normal and isomeric alkanes are all above 1. The study reveals that the actual potential of microplanktonic algae in producing oil and natural gas should be much greater than what people have recognized before.

  15. Species-dependent variation in sensitivity of Microcystis species to copper sulfate: implication in algal toxicity of copper and controls of blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haiming; Wei, Gaojie; Tan, Xiao; Li, Lin; Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Copper sulfate is a frequently used reagent for Microcystis blooms control but almost all the previous works have used Microcystis aeruginosa as the target organism to determine dosages. The aim of this study was to evaluate interspecific differences in the responses of various Microcystis species to varying Cu2+ concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.25, and 0.50 mg L‑1). The half maximal effective concentration values for M. aeruginosa, M. wesenbergii, M. flos-aquae, and M. viridis were 0.16, 0.09, 0.49, and 0.45 mg L‑1 Cu2+, respectively. This showed a species-dependent variation in the sensitivity of Microcystis species to copper sulfate. Malonaldehyde content did not decrease with increasing superoxide dismutase content induced by increasing Cu2+, suggesting that superoxide dismutase failed to reduce Cu2+ damage in Microcystis. Considering the risk of microcystin release when Microcystis membranes are destroyed as a result of Cu2+ treatment and the stimulation effects of a low level of Cu2+ on growth in various species, our results suggest that copper sulfate treatment for Microcystis control could be applied before midsummer when M. aeruginosa and M. viridis are not the dominant species and actual amount of Cu2+ used to control M. wesenbergii should be much greater than 0.10 mg L‑1.

  16. Species-dependent variation in sensitivity of Microcystis species to copper sulfate: implication in algal toxicity of copper and controls of blooms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiming; Wei, Gaojie; Tan, Xiao; Li, Lin; Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Copper sulfate is a frequently used reagent for Microcystis blooms control but almost all the previous works have used Microcystis aeruginosa as the target organism to determine dosages. The aim of this study was to evaluate interspecific differences in the responses of various Microcystis species to varying Cu2+ concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.25, and 0.50 mg L−1). The half maximal effective concentration values for M. aeruginosa, M. wesenbergii, M. flos-aquae, and M. viridis were 0.16, 0.09, 0.49, and 0.45 mg L−1 Cu2+, respectively. This showed a species-dependent variation in the sensitivity of Microcystis species to copper sulfate. Malonaldehyde content did not decrease with increasing superoxide dismutase content induced by increasing Cu2+, suggesting that superoxide dismutase failed to reduce Cu2+ damage in Microcystis. Considering the risk of microcystin release when Microcystis membranes are destroyed as a result of Cu2+ treatment and the stimulation effects of a low level of Cu2+ on growth in various species, our results suggest that copper sulfate treatment for Microcystis control could be applied before midsummer when M. aeruginosa and M. viridis are not the dominant species and actual amount of Cu2+ used to control M. wesenbergii should be much greater than 0.10 mg L−1. PMID:28079177

  17. Full-scale validation of a model of algal productivity.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Quentin; Shilton, Andy; Guieysse, Benoit

    2014-12-02

    While modeling algal productivity outdoors is crucial to assess the economic and environmental performance of full-scale cultivation, most of the models hitherto developed for this purpose have not been validated under fully relevant conditions, especially with regard to temperature variations. The objective of this study was to independently validate a model of algal biomass productivity accounting for both light and temperature and constructed using parameters experimentally derived using short-term indoor experiments. To do this, the accuracy of a model developed for Chlorella vulgaris was assessed against data collected from photobioreactors operated outdoor (New Zealand) over different seasons, years, and operating conditions (temperature-control/no temperature-control, batch, and fed-batch regimes). The model accurately predicted experimental productivities under all conditions tested, yielding an overall accuracy of ±8.4% over 148 days of cultivation. For the purpose of assessing the feasibility of full-scale algal cultivation, the use of the productivity model was therefore shown to markedly reduce uncertainty in cost of biofuel production while also eliminating uncertainties in water demand, a critical element of environmental impact assessments. Simulations at five climatic locations demonstrated that temperature-control in outdoor photobioreactors would require tremendous amounts of energy without considerable increase of algal biomass. Prior assessments neglecting the impact of temperature variations on algal productivity in photobioreactors may therefore be erroneous.

  18. In vivo microspectroscopy monitoring of chromium effects on the photosynthetic and photoreceptive apparatus of Eudorina unicocca and Chlorella kessleri.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Angela Beatriz; Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valter; Vesentini, Nicoletta; Conforti, Visitacion; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2008-11-01

    In microorganisms and plants, chromium (Cr) is not essential for any metabolic process, and can ultimately prove highly deleterious. Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The presence of Cr leads to the selection of specific algal populations able to tolerate high levels of Cr compounds. The varying Cr-resistance mechanisms displayed by microorganisms include biosorption, diminished accumulation, precipitation, reduction of Cr(6+) to Cr(3+), and chromate efflux. In this paper we describe the effects of Cr(6+) (the most toxic species) on the photosynthetic and photoreceptive apparatus of two fresh water microalgae, Eudorina unicocca and Chlorella kessleri. We measured the effect of this heavy metal by means of in vivo absorption microspectroscopy of both the thylakoid compartments and the eyespot. The decomposition of the overall absorption spectra in pigment constituents indicates that Cr(6+) effects are very different in the two algae. In E. unicocca the metal induced a complete pheophinitization of the chlorophylls and a modification of the carotenoids present in the eyespot after only 120 h of exposition at a concentration equal or greater than 40 microM, which is the limit for total Cr discharge established by US EPA regulations. In C. kessleri, chromium concentrations a hundred times higher than this limit had no effect on the photosynthetic machinery. The different tolerance level of the two algae is suggested to be due to the different properties of the mucilaginous envelope and cell wall covering, respectively, the colonies of Eudorina and the single cells of Chlorella, which binds chromium cations to a different extent.

  19. Effects of temperature, salinity, and irradiance on the growth of harmful algal bloom species Phaeocystis globosa Scherffel (Prymnesiophyceae) isolated from the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ning; Huang, Bozhu; Hu, Zhangxi; Tang, Yingzhong; Duan, Shunshan; Zhang, Chengwu

    2016-06-01

    Blooms of Phaeocystis globosa have been frequently reported in Chinese coastal waters, causing serious damage to marine ecosystems. To better understand the ecological characteristics of P. globosa in Chinese coastal waters that facilitate its rapid expansion, the effects of temperature, salinity and irradiance on the growth of P. globosa from the South China Sea were examined in the laboratory. The saturating irradiance for the growth of P. globosa (I s) was 60 μmol/(m2•s), which was lower than those of other harmful algal species (70-114 μmol/(m2•s)). A moderate growth rate of 0.22/d was observed at 2 μmol/(m2•s) (the minimum irradiance in the experiment), and photo-inhibition did not occur at 230 μmol/(m2•s) (the maximum irradiance in the experiment). Exposed to 42 different combinations of temperatures (10-31°C) and salinities (10-40) under saturating irradiance, P. globosa exhibited its maximum specific growth rate of 0.80/d at the combinations of 24°C and 35, and 27°C and 40. The optimum growth rates (>0.80/d) were observed at temperatures ranging from 24 to 27°C and salinities from 35 to 40. While P. globosa was able to grow well at temperatures from 20°C to 31°C and salinities from 20 to 40, it could not grow at temperatures lower than 15°C or salinities lower than 15. Factorial analysis revealed that temperature and salinity has similar influences on the growth of this species. This strain of P. globosa not only prefers higher temperatures and higher salinity, but also possesses a flexible nutrient competing strategy, adapted to lower irradiance. Therefore, the P. globosa population from South China Sea should belong to a new ecotype. There is also a potentially high risk of blooms developing in this area throughout the year.

  20. Algal productivity modeling: a step toward accurate assessments of full-scale algal cultivation.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Quentin; Chambonnière, Paul; Shilton, Andy; Guizard, Guillaume; Guieysse, Benoit

    2015-05-01

    A new biomass productivity model was parameterized for Chlorella vulgaris using short-term (<30 min) oxygen productivities from algal microcosms exposed to 6 light intensities (20-420 W/m(2)) and 6 temperatures (5-42 °C). The model was then validated against experimental biomass productivities recorded in bench-scale photobioreactors operated under 4 light intensities (30.6-74.3 W/m(2)) and 4 temperatures (10-30 °C), yielding an accuracy of ± 15% over 163 days of cultivation. This modeling approach addresses major challenges associated with the accurate prediction of algal productivity at full-scale. Firstly, while most prior modeling approaches have only considered the impact of light intensity on algal productivity, the model herein validated also accounts for the critical impact of temperature. Secondly, this study validates a theoretical approach to convert short-term oxygen productivities into long-term biomass productivities. Thirdly, the experimental methodology used has the practical advantage of only requiring one day of experimental work for complete model parameterization. The validation of this new modeling approach is therefore an important step for refining feasibility assessments of algae biotechnologies.

  1. Cultivation of Chlorella on brewery wastewater and nano-particle biosynthesis by its biomass.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyam, Vidhyasri; Subashchandrabose, Suresh Ramraj; Ganeshkumar, Vimalkumar; Thavamani, Palanisami; Chen, Zuliang; Naidu, Ravi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated an integrated and sustainable approach for iron nanoparticles synthesis using Chlorella sp. MM3 biomass produced from the remediation of brewery wastewater. The algal growth characteristics, biomass production, nutrient removal, and nanoparticle synthesis including its characterisation were studied to prove the above approach. The growth curve of Chlorella depicted lag and exponential phase characteristics during the first 4days in a brewery wastewater collected from a single batch of brewing process (single water sample) indicating the growth of algae in brewery wastewater. The pollutants such as total nitrogen, total phosphorus and total organic carbon in single water sample were completely utilised by Chlorella for its growth. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra showed peaks at 706.56eV, 727.02eV, 289.84eV and 535.73eV which corresponded to the zero-valent iron, iron oxides, carbon and oxygen respectively, confirming the formation of iron nanoparticle capped with algal biomolecules. Scanning electron microscopy and particle size analysis confirmed the presence of spherical shaped iron nanoparticles of size ranging from 5 to 50nm. To our knowledge, this is the first report on nanoparticle synthesis using the biomass generated from phycoremediation of brewery wastewater.

  2. [Effects of allelochemical isolated from Phragmites communis on algal membrane permeability].

    PubMed

    Li, Feng-Min; Hu, Hong-Ying; Chong, Yun-Xiao; Guo, Mei-Ting; Men, Yu-Jie

    2007-11-01

    Efflux of K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ ions from algal cells as signals of cell membrane permeability, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as detection method of ions, the present research investigated effects of allelochemical eathyl-2-methyl acetoacetate (EMA) isolated from Phragmites communis on cell membrane permeability of Microcystis aeruginosa, Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Chlorella vulagaris. The results showed that, when the cells were boiled for 10 min and the membrane was destroyed absolutely, the K+ efflux of M. aeruginosa and C. pyrenoidosa were 1.45 and 1.59 microg x (10(9) cell) (-1), respectively. When the concentration of EMA was 2 mg x L(-1), the K+ efflux of M. aeruginosa and C. pyrenoidosa were 1.38 and 1.40 microg x (10(9) cell)(-1), respectively. The K+ efflux of M. aeruginosa and C. pyrenoidosa reached 1.44 and 1.58 microg x (10(9) cell)(-1) while the EMA was 4 mg x L(-1). When the concentrations were 2 mg x L(-1) or 4 mg x L(-1) the K+ efflux reached more than 95% of the total ion amount in M. aeruginosa and C. pyrenoidosa cells. But when EMA concentration was 4 mg x L(-1), K+ efflux of C. vulagaris was 0.64 microg x (10(9) cell)(-1), which was only 31.5% of total K+ amount in C. vulagaris. Effects EMA on efflux of Mg2+ and Ca2+ were similar to those of K+. The results indicated that EMA destroyed the cell membrane of M. aeruginosa and C. pyrenoidosa but not C. vulagaris. This is one of the mechanisms of EMA species-selective antialgal.

  3. Kinetics of phthalate ester biodegradation by Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, H.; Ye, C.; Yin, C.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental results show that Chlorella pyrenoidosa has an ability to accumulate and biodegrade phthalate esters. Bioconcentration factors of dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) reached their maxima of 162 at 24 h, 205 at 12 h, and 4,077 at 12 h. The average biodegradation rates of DMP, DEP, and DBP per day were found to be 13.4 mg/L, 7.3 mg/L, and 2.1 mg/L, respectively. Based on the experimental data, a second-order kinetic equation was formulated as {minus}dC/dt = KNr, with a factor r indicating the rate of algal growth. Calculation of this equation fits well with the observed data, and the standard deviations between calculated and observed values were 1.72 mg/L, 1.80 mg/L, and 0.26 mg/L for DMP, DEP, DBP, respectively.

  4. Evaluation of Algal Biofilms on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) for Use in Biophotovoltaic Platforms Based on Photosynthetic Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Fong-Lee; Phang, Siew-Moi; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Yunus, Kamran; Fisher, Adrian C.

    2014-01-01

    In photosynthesis, a very small amount of the solar energy absorbed is transformed into chemical energy, while the rest is wasted as heat and fluorescence. This excess energy can be harvested through biophotovoltaic platforms to generate electrical energy. In this study, algal biofilms formed on ITO anodes were investigated for use in the algal biophotovoltaic platforms. Sixteen algal strains, comprising local isolates and two diatoms obtained from the Culture Collection of Marine Phytoplankton (CCMP), USA, were screened and eight were selected based on the growth rate, biochemical composition and photosynthesis performance using suspension cultures. Differences in biofilm formation between the eight algal strains as well as their rapid light curve (RLC) generated using a pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorometer, were examined. The RLC provides detailed information on the saturation characteristics of electron transport and overall photosynthetic performance of the algae. Four algal strains, belonging to the Cyanophyta (Cyanobacteria) Synechococcus elongatus (UMACC 105), Spirulina platensis. (UMACC 159) and the Chlorophyta Chlorella vulgaris (UMACC 051), and Chlorella sp. (UMACC 313) were finally selected for investigation using biophotovoltaic platforms. Based on power output per Chl-a content, the algae can be ranked as follows: Synechococcus elongatus (UMACC 105) (6.38×10−5 Wm−2/µgChl-a)>Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 051 (2.24×10−5 Wm−2/µgChl-a)>Chlorella sp.(UMACC 313) (1.43×10−5 Wm−2/µgChl-a)>Spirulina platensis (UMACC 159) (4.90×10−6 Wm−2/µgChl-a). Our study showed that local algal strains have potential for use in biophotovoltaic platforms due to their high photosynthetic performance, ability to produce biofilm and generation of electrical power. PMID:24874081

  5. Evaluation of algal biofilms on indium tin oxide (ITO) for use in biophotovoltaic platforms based on photosynthetic performance.

    PubMed

    Ng, Fong-Lee; Phang, Siew-Moi; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Yunus, Kamran; Fisher, Adrian C

    2014-01-01

    In photosynthesis, a very small amount of the solar energy absorbed is transformed into chemical energy, while the rest is wasted as heat and fluorescence. This excess energy can be harvested through biophotovoltaic platforms to generate electrical energy. In this study, algal biofilms formed on ITO anodes were investigated for use in the algal biophotovoltaic platforms. Sixteen algal strains, comprising local isolates and two diatoms obtained from the Culture Collection of Marine Phytoplankton (CCMP), USA, were screened and eight were selected based on the growth rate, biochemical composition and photosynthesis performance using suspension cultures. Differences in biofilm formation between the eight algal strains as well as their rapid light curve (RLC) generated using a pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorometer, were examined. The RLC provides detailed information on the saturation characteristics of electron transport and overall photosynthetic performance of the algae. Four algal strains, belonging to the Cyanophyta (Cyanobacteria) Synechococcus elongatus (UMACC 105), Spirulina platensis. (UMACC 159) and the Chlorophyta Chlorella vulgaris (UMACC 051), and Chlorella sp. (UMACC 313) were finally selected for investigation using biophotovoltaic platforms. Based on power output per Chl-a content, the algae can be ranked as follows: Synechococcus elongatus (UMACC 105) (6.38×10(-5) Wm(-2)/µgChl-a)>Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 051 (2.24×10(-5) Wm(-2)/µgChl-a)>Chlorella sp.(UMACC 313) (1.43×10(-5) Wm(-2)/µgChl-a)>Spirulina platensis (UMACC 159) (4.90×10(-6) Wm(-2)/µgChl-a). Our study showed that local algal strains have potential for use in biophotovoltaic platforms due to their high photosynthetic performance, ability to produce biofilm and generation of electrical power.

  6. Algal blooms and public health

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, P.R. . Harvard Medical School)

    1993-06-01

    Alterations in coastal ecology are expanding the geographic extent, frequency, magnitude, and species complexity'' of algal blooms throughout the world, increasing the threat of fish and shellfish poisonings, anoxia in marine nurseries, and of cholera. The World Health Organization and members of the medical profession have described the potential health effects of global climate change. They warn of the consequences of increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) rays and of warming: the possible damage to agriculture and nutrition, and the impact on habitats which may alter the distribution of vector-borne and water-based infectious diseases. Algal growth due to increased nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and warming are already affecting marine microflora and aquatic plants; and there is now clear evidence that marine organisms are a reservoir for enteric pathogens. The pattern of cholera in the Western Hemisphere suggests that environmental changes have already begun to influence the epidemiology of this infectious disease. 106 refs.

  7. Chlorella: 125 years of the green survivalist.

    PubMed

    Krienitz, Lothar; Huss, Volker A R; Bock, Christina

    2015-02-01

    Chlorella, the archetype of unicellular green algae, is a high-performance primary producer in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Under the simple spherical morphology of Chlorella, many other 'green balls' unfolded as independent phylogenetic lineages as a result of convergent evolution. By contrast, green algae with strikingly different phenotypes were unmasked as close relatives of Chlorella by modern molecular techniques. Here, we point to the increasing impact of these diverse protists on ecology, evolution, and biotechnology in the light of integrative taxonomy.

  8. The Impact of Harmful Algal Blooms on USACE Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    algae multiply rapidly and accumulate in large numbers, creating an event referred to as an algal bloom. Algal blooms have occurred throughout... algae for their color (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute 2008; Vézie et al. 1998, 2002). Algal blooms can prove harmful through reductions in...when algae species produce toxins such as microcystin, saxitoxin, brevetoxin, ciguatoxin, or domoic acid (Van Dolah 2000). There is still much to be

  9. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase in Chlorella autotrophica and Chlorella saccharophila in Relation to Osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Laliberté, G; Hellebust, J A

    1989-11-01

    Pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (EC 1.5.1.2), which catalyzes the reduction of P5C to proline, was partially purified from two Chlorella species; Chlorella autotrophica, a euryhaline marine alga that responds to increases in salinity by accumulating proline and ions, and Chlorella saccharophila, which does not accumulate proline for osmoregulation. From the elution profile of this enzyme from an anion exchange column in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.6), containing sorbitol and glycine betaine, it was shown that P5C reductase from C. autotrophica was a neutral protein whereas the enzyme from C. saccharophila was negatively charged. The kinetic mechanisms of the reductase was characteristic of a ping-pong mechanism with double competitive substrate inhibition. Both enzymes showed high specificity for NADH as cofactor. The affinities of the reductases for their substrates did not change when the cells were grown at different salinities. In both algae, the apparent K(m) values of the reductase for P5C and NADH were 0.17 and 0.10 millimolar, respectively. A fourfold increase in maximal velocity of the reductase was observed when C. autotrophica was transferred from 50 to 150% artificial sea water. Even though the reductase was inhibited by NaCl, KCl, and proline, it still showed appreciable activity in the presence of these compounds at molar concentrations. A possible role for the regulation of proline synthesis at the step catalyzed by P5C reductase is discussed in relation to the specificity of P5C reductase for NADH and its responses to salt treatments.

  10. Evaluation of higher plant virus resistance genes in the green alga, Chlorella variabilis NC64A, during the early phase of infection with Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Janet M.; Dunigan, David D.; Blanc, Guillaume; Gurnon, James R.; Xia, Yuannan; Van Etten, James L.

    2014-01-01

    With growing industrial interest in algae plus their critical roles in aquatic systems, the need to understand the effects of algal pathogens is increasing. We examined a model algal host–virus system, Chlorella variabilis NC64A and virus, PBCV-1. C. variabilis encodes 375 homologs to genes involved in RNA silencing and in response to virus infection in higher plants. Illumina RNA-Seq data showed that 325 of these homologs were expressed in healthy and early PBCV-1 infected (≤60 min) cells. For each of the RNA silencing genes to which homologs were found, mRNA transcripts were detected in healthy and infected cells. C. variabilis, like higher plants, may employ certain RNA silencing pathways to defend itself against virus infection. To our knowledge this is the first examination of RNA silencing genes in algae beyond core proteins, and the first analysis of their transcription during virus infection. PMID:23701839

  11. CLONING AND EXPRESSING TRYPSIN MODULATING OOSTATIC FACTOR IN Chlorella desiccata TO CONTROL MOSQUITO LARVAE.

    PubMed

    Borovsky, Dov; Sterner, Andeas; Powell, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The insect peptide hormone trypsin modulating oostatic factor (TMOF), a decapeptide that is synthesized by the mosquito ovary and controls the translation of the gut's trypsin mRNA was cloned and expressed in the marine alga Chlorella desiccata. To express Aedes aegypti TMOF gene (tmfA) in C. desiccata cells, two plasmids (pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA) were engineered with pKYLX71 DNA (5 Kb) carrying the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter 35S(2) and the kanamycin resistant gene (neo), as well as, a 8 Kb nitrate reductase gene (nit) from Chlorella vulgaris. Transforming C. desiccata with pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA show that the engineered algal cells express TMOF (20 ± 4 μg ± SEM and 17 ± 3 μg ± SEM, respectively in 3 × 10(8) cells) and feeding the cells to mosquito larvae kill 75 and 60% of Ae. aegypti larvae in 4 days, respectively. Southern and Northern blots analyses show that tmfA integrated into the genome of C. desiccata by homologous recombination using the yeast 2 μ circle of replication and the nit in pYES2/TMOF and pYDB4-tmfA, respectively, and the transformed algal cells express tmfA transcript. Using these algal cells it will be possible in the future to control mosquito larvae in the marsh.

  12. Chlorella viruses isolated in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Burbank, D.E.; Van Etten, J.L. )

    1988-09-01

    Plaque-forming viruses of the unicellular, eukaryotic, exsymbiotic, Chlorella-like green algae strain NC64A, which are common in the United States, were also present in fresh water collected in the People's Republic of China. Seven of the Chinese viruses were examined in detail and compared with the Chlorella viruses previously isolated in the United States. Like the American viruses, the Chinese viruses were large polyhedra and sensitive to chloroform. They contained numerous structural proteins and large double-stranded DNA genomes of at least 300 kilobase pairs. Each of the DNAs from the Chinese viruses contained 5-methyldeoxycytosine, which varied from 12.6 to 46.7% of the deoxycytosine, and N{sup 6}-methyldeoxyadenosine, which varied from 2.2 to 28.3% of the deoxyadenosine. Four of the Chinese virus DNAs hybridized extensively with {sup 32}P-labeled DNA from the American virus PBCV-1, and three hybridized poorly.

  13. Genetic diversity of algal and fungal partners in four species of Umbilicaria (Lichenized Ascomycetes) along a transect of the Antarctic peninsula.

    PubMed

    Romeike, J; Friedl, T; Helms, G; Ott, S

    2002-08-01

    Lichens from the genus Umbilicaria were collected across a 5,000-km transect through Antarctica and investigated for DNA sequence polymorphism in a region of 480-660 bp of the nuclear internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal DNA. Sequences from both fungal (16 ascomycetes) and photosynthetic partners (22 chlorophytes from the genus Trebouxia) were determined and compared with homologs from lichens inhabiting more temperate, continental climates. The phylogenetic analyses reveal that Antarctic lichens have colonized their current habitats both through multiple independent colonization events from temperate embarkation zones and through recent long-range dispersal in the Antarctic of successful preexisting colonizers. Furthermore, the results suggest that relichenization-de novo establishment of the fungus-photosynthesizer symbiosis from nonlichenized algal and fungal cells-has occurred during the process of Antarctic lichen dispersal. Independent dispersal of algal and fungal cultures therefore can lead to a successful establishment of the lichen symbiosis even under harsh Antarctic conditions.

  14. Algal Attributes: An Autecological Classification of Algal Taxa Collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    Algae are excellent indicators of water-quality conditions, notably nutrient and organic enrichment, and also are indicators of major ion, dissolved oxygen, and pH concentrations and stream microhabitat conditions. The autecology, or physiological optima and tolerance, of algal species for various water-quality contaminants and conditions is relatively well understood for certain groups of freshwater algae, notably diatoms. However, applications of autecological information for water-quality assessments have been limited because of challenges associated with compiling autecological literature from disparate sources, tracking name changes for a large number of algal species, and creating an autecological data base from which algal-indicator metrics can be calculated. A comprehensive summary of algal autecological attributes for North American streams and rivers does not exist. This report describes a large, digital data file containing 28,182 records for 5,939 algal taxa, generally species or variety, collected by the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The data file includes 37 algal attributes classified by over 100 algal-indicator codes or metrics that can be calculated easily with readily available software. Algal attributes include qualitative classifications based on European and North American autecological literature, and semi-quantitative, weighted-average regression approaches for estimating optima using regional and national NAWQA data. Applications of algal metrics in water-quality assessments are discussed and national quartile distributions of metric scores are shown for selected indicator metrics.

  15. Wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2011-01-01

    While research and development of algal biofuels are currently receiving much interest and funding, they are still not commercially viable at today's fossil fuel prices. However, a niche opportunity may exist where algae are grown as a by-product of high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) operated for wastewater treatment. In addition to significantly better economics, algal biofuel production from wastewater treatment HRAPs has a much smaller environmental footprint compared to commercial algal production HRAPs which consume freshwater and fertilisers. In this paper the critical parameters that limit algal cultivation, production and harvest are reviewed and practical options that may enhance the net harvestable algal production from wastewater treatment HRAPs including CO(2) addition, species control, control of grazers and parasites and bioflocculation are discussed.

  16. Assessing the potential of polyculture to accelerate algal biofuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Deborah T.; Mathews, Teresa J.; Pate, Ron C.; Huesemann, Michael H.; Lane, Todd W.; Wahlen, Bradley D.; Mandal, Shovon; Engler, Robert K.; Feris, Kevin P.; Shurin, Jon B.

    2016-10-24

    To date, the algal biofuel industry has focused on the cultivation of monocultures of highly productive algal strains, but scaling up production remains challenging. However, algal monocultures are difficult to maintain because they are easily contaminated by wild algal strains, grazers, and pathogens. In contrast, theory suggests that polycultures (multispecies assemblages) can promote both ecosystem stability and productivity. A greater understanding of species interactions and how communities change with time will need to be developed before polycultures can be successfully applied to large-scale algal production efforts. Here in this paper we review the agricultural and ecological literature to explore opportunities for increased annual biomass production through the use of algal polycultures. We discuss case studies where algal polycultures have been successfully maintained for industries other than the biofuel industry, as well as the few studies that have compared biomass production of algal polycultures to that of monocultures. Assemblages that include species with complementary traits are of particular promise. These assemblages have the potential not only to increase crop productivity and stability, but they may also be capable of utilizing natural resources (e.g. light, nutrients, water) more efficiently via tighter niche packing. Therefore, algal polycultures show promise for enhancing biomass productivity, enabling sustainable production and reducing overall production costs.

  17. Assessing the potential of polyculture to accelerate algal biofuel production

    DOE PAGES

    Newby, Deborah T.; Mathews, Teresa J.; Pate, Ron C.; ...

    2016-10-24

    To date, the algal biofuel industry has focused on the cultivation of monocultures of highly productive algal strains, but scaling up production remains challenging. However, algal monocultures are difficult to maintain because they are easily contaminated by wild algal strains, grazers, and pathogens. In contrast, theory suggests that polycultures (multispecies assemblages) can promote both ecosystem stability and productivity. A greater understanding of species interactions and how communities change with time will need to be developed before polycultures can be successfully applied to large-scale algal production efforts. Here in this paper we review the agricultural and ecological literature to explore opportunitiesmore » for increased annual biomass production through the use of algal polycultures. We discuss case studies where algal polycultures have been successfully maintained for industries other than the biofuel industry, as well as the few studies that have compared biomass production of algal polycultures to that of monocultures. Assemblages that include species with complementary traits are of particular promise. These assemblages have the potential not only to increase crop productivity and stability, but they may also be capable of utilizing natural resources (e.g. light, nutrients, water) more efficiently via tighter niche packing. Therefore, algal polycultures show promise for enhancing biomass productivity, enabling sustainable production and reducing overall production costs.« less

  18. Harmful Algal Blooms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.

    2007-01-01

    What are Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)? Freshwater and marine harmful algal blooms (HABs) can occur anytime water use is impaired due to excessive accumulations of algae. HAB occurrence is affected by a complex set of physical, chemical, biological, hydrological, and meteorological conditions making it difficult to isolate specific causative environmental factors. Potential impairments include reduction in water quality, accumulation of malodorous scums in beach areas, algal production of toxins potent enough to poison both aquatic and terrestrial organisms, and algal production of taste-and-odor compounds that cause unpalatable drinking water and fish. HABs are a global problem, and toxic freshwater and (or) marine algae have been implicated in human and animal illness and death in over 45 countries worldwide and in at least 27 U.S. States (Yoo and others, 1995; Chorus and Bartram, 1999; Huisman and others, 2005).

  19. Indicators: Algal Toxins (microcystin)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Algal toxins are toxic substances released by some types of algae (phytoplankton) when they are present in large quantities (blooms) and decay or degrade. High nutrient levels and warm temperatures often result in favorable conditions for algae blooms.

  20. Growth, survival and reproduction in Chlorella vulgaris and C. variegata with respect to culture age and under different chemical factors.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, S C; Manisha

    2007-01-01

    Batch cultures of Chlorella vulgaris and C. variegata reproducing about twice every 5 d within 0-15 d had vegetative cells and autospore mother cells in the ratio of about 19 : 1. Continuous slow or negligible and/or no growth in > 15-d-old control cultures or in young cultures supplied with the antibiotics streptomycin, penicillin, amoxycillin (10-1000 ppm) or tetracycline (10, 100 ppm), and pesticides carbofuran, gammaxine, moticop or iralon (1-100 ppm) was due to slow autospore mother cells dehiscence (leading to an increase in their percentage); while negligible and/or no growth of both algal species in sewage water (100, 25%), detergent (0.1-1%), petrol or kerosene (5-20 %), benzene, toluene or phenol (5, 10%) and pesticides rogor or endosulfan (1, 10 ppm) was due to vegetative cells failure to differentiate into auto-spore mother cells (leading to decreased/zero autospore mother cells percentage) and/or rapid death of all cells. C. variegata was equally or slightly more sensitive to different chemical stress than C. vulgaris.

  1. Enhanced lipid accumulation and biodiesel production by oleaginous Chlorella protothecoides under a structured heterotrophic-iron (II) induction strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqin; Mu, Jinxiu; Chen, Di; Xu, Hua; Han, Fangxin

    2015-05-01

    A structured heterotrophic-iron (II) induction (HII) strategy was proposed to enhance lipid accumulation in oleaginous Chlorella protothecoides. C. protothecoides subjected to heterotrophic-iron (II) induction achieved a favorable lipid accumulation up to 62 % and a maximum lipid productivity of 820.17 mg/day, representing 2.78-fold and 3.64-fold increase respectively over heterotrophic cultivation alone. HII-induced cells produced significantly elevated levels of 16:0, 18:1(Δ9), and 18:2(Δ9,12) fatty acids (over 90 %). The lipid contents and plant lipid-like fatty acid compositions exhibit the potential of HII-induced C. protothecoides as biodiesel feedstock. Furthermore, 31 altered proteins in HII-induced algal cells were successfully identified. These differentially expressed proteins were assigned into nine molecular function categories, including carbohydrate metabolism, lipid biosynthesis, Calvin cycle, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, energy and transport, protein biosynthesis, regulate and defense, and unclassified. Analysis using the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes and gene ontology annotation showed that malic enzyme, acyltransferase, and ACP were key metabolic checkpoints found to modulate lipid accumulation in C. protothecoides. The results provided possible applications of HII cultivation strategy in other microalgal species and new possibilities in developing genetic and metabolic engineering microalgae for desirable lipid productivity.

  2. Photosensitized destruction of Chlorella vulgaris by Methylene Blue or Nuclear Fast Red combined with hydrogen peroxide under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Cathy; Robertson, Peter K J

    2006-04-01

    A considerable number of investigations have started to elucidate the essential roles biological agents play in the biodeterioration of stone. Chemical biocides are becoming increasingly banned because of the environmental and health hazards associated with these toxic substances. The present study reports the photodynamic effect of Methylene Blue (MB) and Nuclear Fast Red (NFR) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the destruction of the algae Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) under irradiation with visible light. Illumination of C. vulgaris in the presence of MB or NFR combined with H2O2 results in the decomposition of both the algal species and the photosensitizer. The photodynamic effect was investigated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Differences in mechanism type are reported and are dependent on both the presence and the absence of oxygen. The behavior of each photosensitizer leads to a Type II mechanism and a Type I/Type II combination for MB and NFR, respectively, being concluded. This novel combination could be effective for the remediation of biofilm-colonized stone surfaces.

  3. Toxicity of Cu (II) to the green alga Chlorella vulgaris: a perspective of photosynthesis and oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Song, Shufang; Wen, Yuezhong; Zou, Yuqin; Liu, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    The toxic effects of Cu (II) on the freshwater green algae Chlorella vulgaris and its chloroplast were investigated by detecting the responses of photosynthesis and oxidant stress. The results showed that Cu (II) arrested the growth of C. vulgaris and presented in a concentration- and time-dependent trend and the SRichards 2 model fitted the inhibition curve best. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, including qP, Y (II), ETR, F v /F m , and F v /F 0, were stimulated at low concentration of Cu (II) but declined at high concentration, indicating the photosystem II (PSII) of C. vulgaris was destroyed by Cu (II). The chloroplasts were extracted, and the Hill reaction activity (HRA) of chloroplast was significantly decreased with the increasing Cu (II) concentration under both illuminating and dark condition, and faster decline speed was observed under dark condition. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were also significantly decreased at high concentration Cu (II), companied with a large number of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All these results indicated a severe oxidative stress on algal cells occurred as well as the effect on photosynthesis, thus inhibiting the growth of algae, which providing sights to evaluate the phytotoxicity of Cu (II).

  4. A Novel Treatment Protects Chlorella at Commercial Scale from the Predatory Bacterium Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus

    PubMed Central

    Ganuza, Eneko; Sellers, Charles E.; Bennett, Braden W.; Lyons, Eric M.; Carney, Laura T.

    2016-01-01

    The predatory bacterium, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, can destroy a Chlorella culture in just a few days, rendering an otherwise robust algal crop into a discolored suspension of empty cell walls. Chlorella is used as a benchmark for open pond cultivation due to its fast growth. In nature, V. chlorellavorus plays an ecological role by controlling this widespread terrestrial and freshwater microalga, but it can have a devastating effect when it attacks large commercial ponds. We discovered that V. chlorellavorus was associated with the collapse of four pilot commercial-scale (130,000 L volume) open-pond reactors. Routine microscopy revealed the distinctive pattern of V. chlorellavorus attachment to the algal cells, followed by algal cell clumping, culture discoloration and ultimately, growth decline. The “crash” of the algal culture coincided with increasing proportions of 16s rRNA sequencing reads assigned to V. chlorellavorus. We designed a qPCR assay to predict an impending culture crash and developed a novel treatment to control the bacterium. We found that (1) Chlorella growth was not affected by a 15 min exposure to pH 3.5 in the presence of 0.5 g/L acetate, when titrated with hydrochloric acid and (2) this treatment had a bactericidal effect on the culture (2-log decrease in aerobic counts). Therefore, when qPCR results indicated a rise in V. chlorellavorus amplicons, we found that the pH-shock treatment prevented the culture crash and doubled the productive longevity of the culture. Furthermore, the treatment could be repeatedly applied to the same culture, at the beginning of at least two sequential batch cycles. In this case, the treatment was applied preventively, further increasing the longevity of the open pond culture. In summary, the treatment reversed the infection of V. chlorellavorus as confirmed by observations of bacterial attachment to Chlorella cells and by detection of V. chlorellavorus by 16s rRNA sequencing and qPCR assay. The p

  5. A Comparative study of microwave-induced pyrolysis of lignocellulosic and algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Tahmasebi, Arash; Yu, Jianglong; Xu, Jing; Huang, Feng; Mamaeva, Alisa

    2015-08-01

    Microwave (MW) pyrolysis of algal and lignocellulosic biomass samples were studied using a modified domestic oven. The pyrolysis temperature was recorded continuously by inserting a thermocouple into the samples. Temperatures as high as 1170 and 1015°C were achieved for peanut shell and Chlorella vulgaris. The activation energy for MW pyrolysis was calculated by Coats-Redfern method and the values were 221.96 and 214.27kJ/mol for peanut shell and C. vulgaris, respectively. Bio-oil yields reached to 27.7wt.% and 11.0wt.% during pyrolysis of C. vulgaris and peanut shell, respectively. The bio-oil samples from pyrolysis were analyzed by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Bio-oil from lignocellulosic biomass pyrolysis contained more phenolic compounds while that from microalgae pyrolysis contained more nitrogen-containing species. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis results showed that concentration of OH, CH, CO, OCH3, and CO functional groups in char samples decreased significantly after pyrolysis.

  6. Assessing the bioremediation potential of algal species indigenous to oil sands process-affected waters on mixtures of oil sands acid extractable organics.

    PubMed

    Ruffell, Sarah E; Frank, Richard A; Woodworth, Adam P; Bragg, Leslie M; Bauer, Anthony E; Deeth, Lorna E; Müller, Kirsten M; Farwell, Andrea J; Dixon, D George; Servos, Mark R; McConkey, Brendan J

    2016-11-01

    Surface mining extraction of bitumen from oil sand in Alberta, Canada results in the accumulation of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). In attempts to maximize water recycling, and because its constituents are recognized as being toxic, OSPW is retained in settling basins. Consequently, research efforts are currently focused on developing remediation strategies capable of detoxifying OSPW to allow for eventual release. One potential bioremediation strategy proposes to utilize phytoplankton native to the Alberta oil sand region to sequester, break down, or modify the complex oil sands acid extractable organic (AEO) mixtures in OSPW. Preliminary attempts to quantify changes in total oil sands AEO concentration in test solutions by ESI-MS following a 14-day algal remediation period revealed the presence of unknown organic acids in control samples, likely released by the phytoplankton strains and often of the same atomic mass range as the oil sands AEO under investigation. To address the presence of these "biogenic" organic acids in test samples, ESI-MS in MRM mode was utilized to identify oil sands AEO "marker ions" that were a) present within the tested oil sands AEO extract and b) unique to the oil sands AEO extract only (e.g. atomic masses different from biogenic organic acids). Using this approach, one of the 21 tested algal strains, Stichococcus sp. 1, proved capable of significantly reducing the AEO marker ion concentration at test concentrations of 10, 30, and 100mgL(-1). This result, along with the accelerated growth rate and recalcitrance of this algal strain with exposure to oil sands AEO, suggests the strong potential for the use of the isolated Stichococcus sp. 1 as a candidate for bioremediation strategies.

  7. Microalgae recycling improves biomass recovery from wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Raquel; Ferrer, Ivet; González-Molina, Andrés; Salvadó, Humbert; García, Joan; Uggetti, Enrica

    2016-12-01

    Microalgal biomass harvesting by inducing spontaneous flocculation (bioflocculation) sets an attractive approach, since neither chemicals nor energy are needed. Indeed, bioflocculation may be promoted by recycling part of the harvested microalgal biomass to the photobioreactor in order to increase the predominance of rapidly settling microalgae species. The aim of the present study was to improve the recovery of microalgal biomass produced in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) by recycling part of the harvested microalgal biomass. The recirculation of 2% and 10% (dry weight) of the HRAPs microalgal biomass was tested over one year in an experimental HRAP treating real urban wastewater. Results indicated that biomass recycling had a positive effect on the harvesting efficiency, obtaining higher biomass recovery in the HRAP with recycling (R-HRAP) (92-94%) than in the control HRAP without recycling (C-HRAP) (75-89%). Microalgal biomass production was similar in both systems, ranging between 3.3 and 25.8 g TSS/m(2)d, depending on the weather conditions. Concerning the microalgae species, Chlorella sp. was dominant overall the experimental period in both HRAPs (abundance >60%). However, when the recycling rate was increased to 10%, Chlorella sp. dominance decreased from 97.6 to 88.1%; while increasing the abundance of rapidly settling species such as Stigeoclonium sp. (16.8%, only present in the HRAP with biomass recycling) and diatoms (from 0.7 to 7.3%). Concerning the secondary treatment of the HRAPs, high removals of COD (80%) and N-NH4(+) (97%) were found in both HRAPs. Moreover, by increasing the biomass recovery in the R-HRAP the effluent total suspended solids (TSS) concentration was decreased to less than 35 mg/L, meeting effluent quality requirements for discharge. This study shows that microalgal biomass recycling (10% dry weight) increases biomass recovery up to 94% by selecting the most rapidly settling microalgae species without

  8. Enhancement in lipid content of Chlorella sp. MJ 11/11 from the spent medium of thermophilic biohydrogen production process.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Supratim; Roy, Shantonu; Das, Debabrata

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of spent media of acetogenic dark fermentation for mixotrophic algal cultivation for biodiesel production. Mixotrophic growth conditions were optimized in culture flask (250mL) using Chlorella sp. MJ 11/11. Maximum lipid accumulation (58% w/w) was observed under light intensity, pH, nitrate and phosphate concentration of 100μmolm(-2)s(-1), 7, 2.7mM and 1.8mM, respectively. Air lift (1.4L) and flat panel (1.4L) reactors were considered for algal cultivation. Air lift showed significant improvement in biomass and lipid production as compared to flat panel reactor. The results could help in development of sustainable technology involving acetogenic hydrogen production integrated with sequential mitigation of spent media by algal cultivation for improved energy recovery.

  9. Model based analysis of transient fluorescence yield induced by actinic laser flashes in spinach leaves and cells of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Renger, G

    2014-04-01

    Measurements of Single Flash Induced Transient Fluorescence Yield (SFITFY) on spinach leaves and whole cells of green thermophilic alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick were analyzed for electron transfer (ET) steps and coupled proton transfer (PT) on both the donor and the acceptor side of the reaction center (RC) of photosystem II (PS II). A specially developed PS II model (Belyaeva et al., 2008, 2011a) allowed the determination of ET steps that occur in a hierarchically ordered time scale from nanoseconds to several seconds. Our study demonstrates that our SFITFY data is consistent with the concept of the reduction of P680(+) by YZ in both leaves and algae (studied on spinach leaves and cells of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick). The multiphasic P680(+) reduction kinetics by YZ in PS II core complexes with high oxygen evolution capacity was seen in both algae and leaves. Model simulation to fit SFITFY curves for dark adapted species used here gives the rate constants to verify nanosecond kinetic stages of P680(+) reduction by YZ in the redox state S1 of the water oxidizing complex (WOC) shown in Kühn et al. (2004). Then a sequence of relaxation steps in the redox state S1, outlined by Renger (2012), occurs in both algae and leaves as a similar non-adiabatic ET reactions. Coupled PT is discussed briefly to understand a rearrangement of hydrogen bond protons in the protein matrix of the WOC (Umena et al., 2011). On the other hand, present studies showed a slower reoxidation of reduced QA by QB in algal cells as compared with that in a leaf that might be regarded as a consequence of differences of spatial domains at the QB-site in leaves compared to algae. Our comparative study helped to correlate theory with experimental data for molecular photosynthetic mechanisms in thylakoid membranes.

  10. Synergistic relationships in algal-bacterial microcosms for the treatment of aromatic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Borde, Xavier; Guieysse, Benoît; Delgado, Osvaldo; Muñoz, Raúl; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Nugier-Chauvin, Caroline; Patin, Henri; Mattiasson, Bo

    2003-02-01

    The potential of algal-bacterial microcosms was studied for the biodegradation of salicylate, phenol and phenanthrene. The isolation and characterization of aerobic bacterial strains capable of mineralizing each pollutant were first conducted. Ralstonia basilensis was isolated for salicylate degradation, Acinetobacter haemolyticus for phenol and Pseudomonas migulae and Sphingomonas yanoikuyae for phenanthrene. The green alga Chlorella sorokiniana was then cultivated in the presence of the pollutants at different concentrations, showing increasing inhibitory effects in the following order: salicylate < phenol < phenanthrene. The synergistic relationships in the algal-bacterial microcosms were clearly demonstrated, since for the three contaminants tested, a substantial removal (>85%) was recorded only in the systems inoculated with both algae and bacteria and incubated under continuous lighting. This study presents, to our knowledge, the first reported case of photosynthesis-enhanced biodegradation of toxic aromatic pollutants by algal-bacterial microcosms in a one-stage treatment.

  11. Accelerating Commercialization of Algal Biofuels Through Partnerships (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure describes National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) algal biofuels research capabilities and partnership opportunities. NREL is accelerating algal biofuels commercialization through: (1) Advances in applied biology; (2) Algal strain development; (3) Development of fuel conversion pathways; (4) Techno-economic analysis; and (5) Development of high-throughput lipid analysis methodologies. NREL scientists and engineers are addressing challenges across the algal biofuels value chain, including algal biology, cultivation, harvesting and extraction, and fuel conversion. Through partnerships, NREL can share knowledge and capabilities in the following areas: (1) Algal Biology - A fundamental understanding of algal biology is key to developing cost-effective algal biofuels processes. NREL scientists are experts in the isolation and characterization of microalgal species. They are identifying genes and pathways involved in biofuel production. In addition, they have developed a high-throughput, non-destructive technique for assessing lipid production in microalgae. (2) Cultivation - NREL researchers study algal growth capabilities and perform compositional analysis of algal biomass. Laboratory-scale photobioreactors and 1-m2 open raceway ponds in an on-site greenhouse allow for year-round cultivation of algae under a variety of conditions. A bioenergy-focused algal strain collection is being established at NREL, and our laboratory houses a cryopreservation system for long-term maintenance of algal cultures and preservation of intellectual property. (3) Harvesting and Extraction - NREL is investigating cost-effective harvesting and extraction methods suitable for a variety of species and conditions. Areas of expertise include cell wall analysis and deconstruction and identification and utilization of co-products. (4) Fuel Conversion - NREL's excellent capabilities and facilities for biochemical and thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels are being

  12. Algal growth and utilization of phosphorus studied by combined mono-culture and co-culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lingxiao; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Chen, Juan; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) plays a critical role in algal growth; therefore, a better understanding of P availability is essential to control harmful algal blooms. Three algae species, Microcystis aeruginosa, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, were mono-cultured and co-cultured on three types of P substrates, dissolved inorganic P (DIP), phosphomonoesters glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) and β-glycerol phosphate (β-glycerol-P), and phosphonate (glyphosate), to explore their growth and P utilization. All three species could utilize dissolved organic P (DOP) to sustain their growth, whereas DIP was their preferred P substrate in both culture types. Algae could regulate the P uptake capacity under different P conditions, and the added P could be rapidly accumulated at the beginning of the culture and slowly utilized during the subsequent life cycle. M. aeruginosa exhibited wider P selectivity and could utilize all three P substrates, whereas the other two species could only use phosphomonoester (G-6-P and β-glycerol-P) in the mono-cultures. However, in the co-cultures, the relative bioavailability of DOP for M. aeruginosa and C. pyrenoidosa was enhanced, and M. aeruginosa might contribute to the growth of C. pyrenoidosa and P. subcapitata when fed with glyphosate. The three species showed an intrinsic ability to produce alkaline phosphatase (AP), and AP activity (APA) was regulated by Pi stress. However, high APA did not necessarily lead to high Pi release and algal growth on unfavorable substrates. Although M. aeruginosa was not superior in growth rate in the mono-cultures, it showed a better P accumulation ability and maintained stable growth on different P substrates. Moreover, it was a good competitor, suppressing the thriving growth of the other species in co-cultures. Overall, the findings indicated the strategic flexibility of P utilization by algae and the strong competitive ability of M. aeruginosa in Pi-limited and DOP-enriched natural

  13. Complete genome sequence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Massimiliano; Costelli, Cristina; Malavasi, Veronica; Cusano, Roberto; Concas, Alessandro; Angius, Andrea; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of mitochondrial genome of the Chlorella sorokiniana strain (SAG 111-8 k) is presented in this work. Within the Chlorella genus, it represents the second species with a complete sequenced and annotated mitochondrial genome (GenBank accession no. KM241869). The genome consists of circular chromosomes of 52,528 bp and encodes a total of 31 protein coding genes, 3 rRNAs and 26 tRNAs. The overall AT contents of the C. sorokiniana mtDNA is 70.89%, while the coding sequence is of 97.4%.

  14. Lipid production by a CO₂-tolerant green microalga, Chlorella sp. MRA-1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanlin; Yuan, Cheng; Liu, Junhan; Hu, Guangrong; Li, Fuli

    2014-05-01

    Since CO2 concentrations in industrial flue gases are usually 10%-20%, one of the prerequisites for efficient CO2 removal by algae is the level of tolerance of microalgal species to exposure to high concentrations of CO2. A newly isolated microalgal strain, Chlorella sp. MRA-1, could retain growth with high concentrations of CO2 up to 15%. The highest lipid productivity for Chlorella sp. MRA-1 was 0.118 g/l/day with a 5% CO2 concentration. Octadecenoic acid and hexadecanoic acid, the main components of biodiesel, accounted for 70% of the total fatty acids. A lipid content of 52% of dry cell weight was achieved with limited amounts of nitrogen. Chlorella sp. MRA-1 seems to be an ideal candidate for biodiesel production when cultured with high concentrations of CO2.

  15. Cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris in Column Photobioreactor for Biomass Production and Lipid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y K; Ho, K C; Tsang, Y F; Wang, L; Yung, K K L

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae have been used as energy resources in recent decades to mitigate the global energy crisis. As the demand for pure microalgae strains for commercial use increases, designing an effective photobioreactor (PBR) for mass cultivation is important. Chlorella vulgaris, a local freshwater microalga, was used to study the algal biomass cultivation and lipid production using various PBR configurations (bubbling, air-lift, porous air-lift). The results show that a bubbling column design is a better choice for the cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris than an air-lift one. The highest biomass concentration in the bubbling PBR was 0.78 g/L while the air-lift PBR had a value of 0.09 g/L. Key operating parameters, including draft-tube length and bubbling flowrate, were then optimized based on biomass production and lipid yield. The highest lipid content was in the porous air-lift PBR and the air-lift PBR with shorter draft tube (35 cm) was also better than a longer one (50 cm) for algal cultivation, but the microalgae attachment on the inner tube of PBR always occurred. The highest biomass concentration could be produced under the highest gas flowrate of 2.7 L/min, whereas the lowest dry cell mass was under the lowest gas flowrate of 0.2 L/min.

  16. Anaerobic co-digestion of microalgae Chlorella sp. and waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Sahu, Ashish K; Rusten, Bjørn; Park, Chul

    2013-08-01

    The study investigated the growth characteristics of environmental algal strain, Chlorella, in the modified Zarrouk medium and its anaerobic co-digestion with waste activated sludge (WAS). Analysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in algal culture and WAS indicated that Chlorella secreted more EPS into the surrounding liquid than formed floc-associated EPS as in activated sludge. Mesophilic anaerobic digestion of algae alone required extended digestion period to produce methane, with biogas yield at 262 mL/gVSfed after 45 days of digestion. When algae was co-digested with varying amounts of WAS, 59-96% in mass, not only biogas yield of microalgae improved but the gas phase was reached more quickly. The dewaterability of co-digestion products were also better than two controls digesting WAS or algae only. These results suggest that anaerobic co-digestion of algae and sludge improves the digestibility of microalgae and could also bring synergistic effects on the dewaterability of digested products for existing anaerobic digesters.

  17. Mixotrophic cultivation of Chlorella for local protein production using agro-food by-products.

    PubMed

    Salati, Silvia; D'Imporzano, Giuliana; Menin, Barbara; Veronesi, Davide; Scaglia, Barbara; Abbruscato, Pamela; Mariani, Paola; Adani, Fabrizio

    2017-04-01

    A local strain of Chlorella vulgaris was cultivated by using cheese whey (CW), white wine lees (WL) and glycerol (Gly), coming from local agro-industrial activities, as C sources (2.2gCL(-1)) to support algae production under mixotrophic conditions in Lombardy. In continuous mode, Chlorella increased biomass production compared with autotrophic conditions by 1.5-2 times, with the best results obtained for the CW substrate, i.e. 0.52gL(-1)d(-1) of algal biomass vs. 0.24gL(-1)d(-1) of algal biomass for autotrophic conditions, and protein content for both conditions adopted close to 500gkg(-1) DM. Mixotrophic conditions gave a much higher energy recovery efficiency (EF) than autotrophic conditions, i.e. organic carbon energy efficiency (EFoc) of 32% and total energy efficiency (Eft) of 8%, respectively, suggesting the potential for the culture of algae as a sustainable practice to recover efficiently waste-C and a means of local protein production.

  18. Direct utilization of waste water algal biomass for ethanol production by cellulolytic Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183.

    PubMed

    Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Sanitha, Mary; Kumar, Thangarathinam; Iyappan, Sellamuthu; Ramya, Mohandass

    2016-02-01

    Direct bioconversion of waste water algal biomass into ethanol using Clostridium phytofermentans DSM1183 was demonstrated in this study. Fermentation of 2% (w/v) autoclaved algal biomass produced ethanol concentration of 0.52 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.19 g/g) where as fermentation of acid pretreated algal biomass (2%, w/v) produced ethanol concentration of 4.6 g L(-1) in GS2 media (solvent yield of 0.26 g/g). The control experiment with 2% (w/v) glucose in GS2 media produced ethanol concentration of 2.8 g L(-1) (solvent yield of 0.25 g/g). The microalgal strains from waste water algal biomass were identified as Chlamydomonas dorsoventralis, Graesiella emersonii, Coelastrum proboscideum, Scenedesmus obliquus, Micractinium sp., Desmodesmus sp., and Chlorella sp., based on ITS-2 molecular marker. The presence of glucose, galactose, xylose and rhamnose were detected by high performance liquid chromatography in the algal biomass. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of fermentation samples showed characteristic morphological changes in algal cells and bioaccessibility of C. phytofermentans.

  19. Algal Biofuels Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    This fact sheet provides information on algal biofuels, which are generating considerable interest around the world. They may represent a sustainable pathway for helping to meet the U.S. biofuel production targets set by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  20. Harmful Algal Blooms Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project represents the Agency’s first effort to unify harmful algal blooms (HABs) research that had been previously carried out in isolation within various laboratories. A unified program is the most efficient way generate useful results for the Agency’s decision...

  1. Algal Bloom Detection from HICO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Ruhul; Gould, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Ocean color satellites provide daily, global views of marine bio-optical properties in the upper ocean at various spatial scales. The most productive area of the global ocean is the coastal zone which is heavily impacted by urban and agricultural runoff, transportation, recreation, and oil and gas production. In recent years, harmful algal blooms (HABs) have become one of the serious environmental problems in the coastal areas on a global scale. The global nature of the problem has expanded in its frequency, severity, and extent over the last several decades. Human activities and population increases have contributed to an increase in various toxic and noxious algal species in the coastal regions worldwide. Eutrophication in estuaries and coastal waters is believed to be the major factor causing HABs. In this study, we assess the applicability of the Red Band Difference (RBD) HAB detection algorithm on data from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO). Our preliminary results show that due to various uncertainties such as atmospheric correction, calibration and possibly also the relatively low signal-to-noise ratio of HICO for fluorescence detection, it is difficult to extract the fluorescence portion of the reflectance spectrum that RBD uses for bloom detection. We propose an improved bloom detection technique for HICO using red and NIR bands. Our results are validated using other space-borne and ground based measurements.

  2. Epigenetic modulation of Chlorella (Chlorella vulgaris) on exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mihi; Youn, Je-In; Kim, Seung Joon; Park, Jong Y

    2015-11-01

    DNA methylation in promoter region can be a new chemopreventive marker against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We performed a randomized, double blind and cross-over trial (N=12 healthy females) to evaluate chlorella (Chlorella vulgaris)-induced epigenetic modulation on exposure to PAHs. The subjects consumed 4 tablets of placebo or chlorella supplement (total chlorophyll ≈ 8.3mg/tablet) three times a day before meals for 2 weeks. When the subjects consumed chlorella, status of global hypermethylation (5-methylcytosine) was reduced, compared to placebo (p=0.04). However, DNA methylation at the DNMT1 or NQO1 was not modified by chlorella. We observed the reduced levels of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), a typical metabolite of PAHs, by chlorella intake (p<0.1) and a positive association between chlorella-induced changes in global hypermethylation and urinary 1-OHP (p<0.01). Therefore, our study suggests chlorella works for PAH-detoxification through the epigenetic modulation, the interference of ADME of PAHs and the interaction of mechanisms.

  3. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A; Waggett, Rebecca J; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods.

  4. Algal Toxins Alter Copepod Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A.; Waggett, Rebecca J.; Place, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod’s feeding appendages–a “sampling beating” that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration “grazing beating” that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod’s grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod’s feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  5. Discovery of an algicidal compound from Brevibacterium sp. BS01 and its effect on a harmful algal bloom-causing species, Alexandrium tamarense

    PubMed Central

    An, Xinli; Zhang, Bangzhou; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Yu, Zhiming; Fu, Lijun; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Blooms of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense have become worldwide phenomena and have detrimental impacts on aquatic ecosystems and human health. In this study, a culture supernatant of the marine actinomycete BS01 exerted a strong algicidal effect on A. tamarense (ATGD98-006). The target algicide from BS01 was separated by adsorption chromatography and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and NMR analysis. The results suggested that the purified algicidal component corresponded to a hydrophobic compound (2-isobutoxyphenyl)amine (C10H15NO) with a molecular weight of 165 Da, which exhibited a significant algicidal effect (64.5%) on A. tamarense. After incubation in 5 μg/mL of (2-isobutoxyphenyl)amine for 24 h, the algae lost mobility and sank to the bottom of the flasks, and 56.5% of the algae cells lost vitality at a concentration of 20 μg/mL (p < 0.01) despite having intact cell profiles. Morphological analysis revealed that the cell structure of A. tamarense was altered by (2-isobutoxyphenyl)amine resulting in cytoplasm degradation and the loss of organelle integrity. The images following propidium iodide staining suggested that the algal nucleus was also severely damaged and eventually degraded due to exposure to the algicidal compound. All of the results indicate that (2-isobutoxyphenyl)amine from the actinomycete might be a candidate for the control of bloom-forming A. tamarense. PMID:26594205

  6. Biology and Industrial Applications of Chlorella: Advances and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella represents a group of eukaryotic green microalgae that has been receiving increasing scientific and commercial interest. It possesses high photosynthetic ability and is capable of growing robustly under mixotrophic and heterotrophic conditions as well. Chlorella has long been considered as a source of protein and is now industrially produced for human food and animal feed. Chlorella is also rich in oil, an ideal feedstock for biofuels. The exploration of biofuel production by Chlorella is underway. Chlorella has the ability to fix carbon dioxide efficiently and to remove nutrients of nitrogen and phosphorous, making it a good candidate for greenhouse gas biomitigation and wastewater bioremediation. In addition, Chlorella shows potential as an alternative expression host for recombinant protein production, though challenges remain to be addressed. Currently, omics analyses of certain Chlorella strains are being performed, which will help to unravel the biological implications of Chlorella and facilitate the future exploration of industrial applications.

  7. Operation of an experimental algal gas exchanger for use in a CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smernoff, David T.; Wharton, Robert A., Jr.; Averner, Maurice M.

    1987-01-01

    Concepts of a CELSS anticipate the use of photosynthetic organisms for air revitalization. The rates of production and uptake of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the crew and the photosynthetic organisms are mismatched. An algal system used for gas exchange only will have the difficulty of an accumulation or depletion of these gases beyond physiologically tolerable limits. The results of a study designed to test the feasibility of using environmental manipulations to maintain physiologically appropriate atmospheres for algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) and mice (Mus musculus strain DW/J) in a gas-closed system is reported. Specifically, the atmosphere behavior of this system with Chlorella grown on nitrate or urea and at different light intensities and optical densities is considered. Manipulation of both the photosynthetic rate and the assimilatory quotient of the alga has been found to reduce the mismatch of gas requirements and allow operation of the system in a gas-stable manner.

  8. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG

  9. Acid-Catalyzed Algal Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Lipid and Carbohydrate-Based Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Nagle, N.; Davis, R.; Sweeney, N.; Van Wychen, S.; Lowell, A.; Pienkos, P. T.

    2014-11-12

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. We studied the effect of harvest timing on the conversion yields, using two algal strains; Chlorella and Scenedesmus, generating biomass with distinctive compositional ratios of protein, carbohydrate, and lipids. We found that the late harvest Scenedesmus biomass had the maximum theoretical biofuel potential at 143 gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) combined fuel yield per dry ton biomass, followed by late harvest Chlorella at 128 GGE per ton. Our experimental data show a clear difference between the two strains, as Scenedesmus was more successfully converted in this process with a demonstrated 97 GGE per ton. Our measurements indicated a release of >90% of the available glucose in the hydrolysate liquors and an extraction and recovery of up to 97% of the fatty acids from wet biomass. Techno-economic analysis for the combined product yields indicates that this process exhibits the potential to improve per-gallon fuel costs by up to 33% compared to a lipids-only process for one strain, Scenedesmus, grown to the mid-point harvest condition.

  10. [Effects of allelochemical EMA isolated from Phragmites communis on algal cell membrane lipid and ultrastructure].

    PubMed

    Li, Feng-min; Hu, Hong-ying; Chong, Yun-xiao; Men, Yu-jie; Guo, Mei-ting

    2007-07-01

    In order to reveal the antialgal mechanisms of allelochemicals, effects of the allelochemical eathyl-2-methyl acetoacetate (EMA) on cell membrane lipid and ultrastructure of Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Microcystis aeruginosa and Chlorella vulagaris were studied in this paper. The lipid fatty acids of the algal membrane were isolated following the Bligh and Dye method and quantified by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry. The ultrastructure of algal cells was observed with TEM. The results showed that EMA increased the contents of linolenic acid and linolic acid with increment of 14%, while decreased the content of myristic acid and cetylic acid in C. pyrenoidosa, membrane. The content of unsaturated fatty acids C18:1 and C18:2 increased 12% and 10% in M. aeruginosa with the addition of EMA, while the content of saturated fatty acids C18:0 and C16:0 decreased. EMA showed no significant change in the fatty acid composition in C. vulagaris under the experiment condition. EMA broke off cell wall of C. pyrenoidosa and M. aeruginosa. EMA damaged the cell membrane and the inclusion of algal cell leaked out. Nuclear and mitochondrial structure was damaged with the addition of EMA. EMA showed no significant change in the ultrastructure of C. vulgaris.

  11. Separation of algal cells from water by column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Chen, Y.M.; Ju, Y.H.

    1999-08-01

    The dispersed air flotation (DiAF) process was utilized to separate algal cells (Chlorella sp.) from water. Two types of collector, cationic N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and anionic sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), were used. It was observed that 20% of cell removal was achieved in the presence of 40 mg/L of SDS, and ca. 86% of the cells were removed at 40 mg/L of CTAB. Upon the addition of 10 mg/L of chitosan, over 90% of the cells were removed when SDS (20 mg/L) was used as the collector. Air flow rate affected cell flotation slightly. Optimum pH values for cell flotation were from 4.0 to 5.0. Flotation efficiency decreased at high ionic strength. The electrostatic interaction between collector and cell surface plays a critical role in the separation processes.

  12. Enhanced acetyl-CoA production is associated with increased triglyceride accumulation in the green alga Chlorella desiccata.

    PubMed

    Avidan, Omri; Brandis, Alexander; Rogachev, Ilana; Pick, Uri

    2015-07-01

    Triglycerides (TAGs) from microalgae can be utilized as food supplements and for biodiesel production, but little is known about the regulation of their biosynthesis. This work aimed to test the relationship between acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) levels and TAG biosynthesis in green algae under nitrogen deprivation. A novel, highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique enabled us to determine the levels of Ac-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and unacetylated (free) CoA in green microalgae. A comparative study of three algal species that differ in TAG accumulation levels shows that during N starvation, Ac-CoA levels rapidly rise, preceding TAG accumulation in all tested species. The levels of Ac-CoA in the high TAG accumulator Chlorella desiccata exceed the levels in the moderate TAG accumulators Dunaliella tertiolecta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Similarly, malonyl-CoA and free CoA levels also increase, but to lower extents. Calculated cellular concentrations of Ac-CoA are far lower than reported K mAc-CoA values of plastidic Ac-CoA carboxylase (ptACCase) in plants. Transcript level analysis of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (ptPDH), the major chloroplastic Ac-CoA producer, revealed rapid induction in parallel with Ac-CoA accumulation in C. desiccata, but not in D. tertiolecta or C. reinhardtii. It is proposed that the capacity to accumulate high TAG levels in green algae critically depends on their ability to divert carbon flow towards Ac-CoA. This requires elevation of the chloroplastic CoA pool level and enhancement of Ac-CoA biosynthesis. These conclusions may have important implications for future genetic manipulation to enhance TAG biosynthesis in green algae.

  13. Factors affecting seasonal variation of membrane filtration resistance caused by Chlorella algae.

    PubMed

    Babel, Sandhya; Takizawa, Satoshi; Ozaki, Hiroaki

    2002-03-01

    A seasonal fluctuation pattern was observed in membrane filtration resistance by Chlorella algae cultured in open ponds in the tropical environment. In order to investigate the causes of this phenomenon, Chlorella was cultivated under controlled conditions and the cake resistance was measured by batch filtration in dead-end mode. The filtration resistance was found to be a function of environmental conditions. Algae could grow favourably and offered low specific cake resistance (R,s) on the order of 10(11) m/g for the culture temperature from 28 degrees C to 35 degrees C. The algal growth was inhibited and the specific cake resistance increased to the order of 10(12) m/g below or above this optimum temperature range. Strong solar radiation, coupled with high temperatures, also inhibited the growth of algae and resulted in higher specific cake resistance. The specific cake resistance of algae cultured at different temperatures increased with the amount of the extracellular organic matter (EOM) extracted by 0.1 N NaOH. Hence EOM, rather than bacteria present in the mono-algal culture, was considered to be the primary factor affecting the cake resistance. The specific cake resistance increased drastically after actively growing cells were stored in nutrient-free water under dark conditions. However, the resistance was slightly decreased when the algal cells were stored in NSIII nutrient media in a dark room, indicating the effect of nutrient availability on the change of the specific cake resistance under the light-limiting conditions. EOM extracted from the cells kept in the nutrient-free water contained less sugar than the fresh culture, whereas the EOM extracted from the cells stored in the NSIII media contained more sugar. The molecular distribution of the EOM shifted from below 1,000 kDa before storage to more than 2,000 kDa after storage in both the nutrient-free and NSIII media.

  14. Endogenous 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal in microalga Chlorella kessleri acts as a bioactive indicator of pollution with common herbicides and growth regulating factor of hormesis.

    PubMed

    Spoljaric, Dubravka; Cipak, Ana; Horvatic, Janja; Andrisic, Luka; Waeg, Georg; Zarkovic, Neven; Jaganjac, Morana

    2011-10-01

    Oxidative stress, i.e. excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leads to lipid peroxidation and to formation of reactive aldehydes (e.g. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal; HNE), which act as second messengers of free radicals. It was previously shown that herbicides can induce ROS production in algal cells. In the current paper, the unicellular green microalga Chlorella kessleri was used to study the effect of two herbicides (S-metolachlor and terbuthylazine) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on oxidative stress induction, HNE formation, chlorophyll content and the cell growth. Production of HNE was detected in this study for the first time in the cells of unicellular green algae using the antibody specific for the HNE-histidine adducts revealing the HNE-histidine adducts even in untreated, control C. kessleri. Exposure of algal cells to herbicides and H(2)O(2) increased the ROS production, modifying production of HNE. Namely, 4h upon treatment the levels of HNE-histidine conjugates were below controls. However, their amount increased afterwards. The increase of HNE levels in algae was followed by their increased growth rate, as was previously described for human carcinoma cells. Hence, changes in the cellular HNE content upon herbicide treatment inducing lipid oxidative stress and alterations in cellular growth rate of C. kessleri resemble adaptation of malignant cells to the HNE treatment. Therefore, as an addition to the standard toxicity tests, the evaluation of HNE-protein adducts in C. kessleri might indicate environmental pollution with lipid peroxidation-inducing herbicides. Finally, C. kessleri might be a convenient experimental model to further study cellular hormetic adaptation to oxidative stress-derived aldehydes.

  15. Comparison of screening methods for high-throughput determination of oil yields in micro-algal biofuel strains.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Stephen P; Zhang, Qianyi; Black, Kenneth D; Day, John G; Stanley, Michele S

    2013-08-01

    The phenotypic and phylogenetic diversity of micro-algae capable of accumulating triacylglycerols provides a challenge for the accurate determination of biotechnological potential. High-yielding strains are needed to improve economic viability and their compositional information is required for optimizing biodiesel properties. To facilitate a high-throughput screening programme, a very rapid direct-derivatization procedure capable of extracting lyophilized material for GC analysis was compared with a scaled-down Folch-based method. This was carried out on ten micro-algal strains from 6 phyla where the more rapid direct-derivatization approach was found to provide a more reliable measure of yield. The modified Folch-based procedure was found to substantially underestimate oil yield in one Chlorella species (P < 0.01). In terms of fatty acid composition however, the Folch procedure proved to be slightly better in recovering polyunsaturated fatty acids, in six out of the ten strains. Therefore, direct-derivatization is recommended for rapid determination of yields in screening approaches but can provide slightly less compositional accuracy than solvent-based extraction methods.

  16. Algal taxonomy: a road to nowhere?

    PubMed

    De Clerck, Olivier; Guiry, Michael D; Leliaert, Frederik; Samyn, Yves; Verbruggen, Heroen

    2013-04-01

    The widespread view of taxonomy as an essentially retrogressive and outmoded science unable to cope with the current biodiversity crisis stimulated us to analyze the current status of cataloguing global algal diversity. Contrary to this largely pessimistic belief, species description rates of algae through time and trends in the number of active taxonomists, as revealed by the web resource AlgaeBase, show a much more positive picture. More species than ever before are being described by a large community of algal taxonomists. The lack of any decline in the rate at which new species and genera are described, however, is indicative of the large proportion of undiscovered diversity and bears heavily on any prediction of global algal species diversity and the time needed to catalogue it. The saturation of accumulation curves of higher taxa (family, order, and classes) on the other hand suggest that at these taxonomic levels most diversity has been discovered. This reasonably positive picture does not imply that algal taxonomy does not face serious challenges in the near future. The observed levels of cryptic diversity in algae, combined with the shift in methods used to characterize them, have resulted in a rampant uncertainty about the status of many older species. As a consequence, there is a tendency in phycology to move gradually away from traditional names to a more informal system whereby clade-, specimen- or strain-based identifiers are used to communicate biological information. Whether these informal names for species-level clades represent a temporary situation stimulated by the lag between species discovery and formal description, or an incipient alternative or parallel taxonomy, will be largely determined by how well we manage to integrate historical collections into modern taxonomic research. Additionally, there is a pressing need for a consensus about the organizational framework to manage the information about algal species names. An eventual strategy

  17. The Effects of Physicochemical Factors and Cell Density on Nitrite Transformation in a Lipid-Rich Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Du, Kui; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2015-12-28

    To understand the effects of physicochemical factors on nitrite transformation by microalgae, a lipid-rich Chlorella with high nitrite tolerance was cultured with 8 mmol/l sodium nitrite as sole nitrogen source under different conditions. The results showed that nitrite transformation was mainly dependent on the metabolic activities of algal cells rather than oxidation of nitrite by dissolved oxygen. Light intensity, temperature, pH, NaHCO3 concentrations, and initial cell densities had significant effects on the rate of nitrite transformation. Single-factor experiments revealed that the optimum conditions for nitrite transformation were light intensity: 300 μmol/m(2); temperature: 30°C; pH: 7-8; NaHCO3 concentration: 2.0 g/l; and initial cell density: 0.15 g/l; and the highest nitrite transformation rate of 1.36 mmol/l/d was achieved. There was a positive correlation between nitrite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella. The relationship between nitrite transformation rate (mg/l/d) and biomass productivity (g/l/d) could be described by the regression equation y = 61.3x (R(2) = 0.9665), meaning that 61.3 mg N element was assimilated by 1.0 g dry biomass on average, which indicated that the nitrite transformation is a process of consuming nitrite as nitrogen source by Chlorella. The results demonstrated that the Chlorella suspension was able to assimilate nitrite efficiently, which implied the feasibility of using flue gas for mass production of Chlorella without preliminary removal of NOX.

  18. Enhancement of hydrolysis of Chlorella vulgaris by hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Charnho; Lee, Ja Hyun; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yoo, Hah Young; Lee, Ju Hun; Lee, Soo Kweon; Kim, Seung Wook

    2016-06-01

    Chlorella vulgaris is considered as one of the potential sources of biomass for bio-based products because it consists of large amounts of carbohydrates. In this study, hydrothermal acid hydrolysis with five different acids (hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, peracetic acid, phosphoric acid, and sulfuric acid) was carried out to produce fermentable sugars (glucose, galactose). The hydrothermal acid hydrolysis by hydrochloric acid showed the highest sugar production. C. vulgaris was hydrolyzed with various concentrations of hydrochloric acid [0.5-10 % (w/w)] and microalgal biomass [20-140 g/L (w/v)] at 121 °C for 20 min. Among the concentrations examined, 2 % hydrochloric acid with 100 g/L biomass yielded the highest conversion of carbohydrates (92.5 %) into reducing sugars. The hydrolysate thus produced from C. vulgaris was fermented using the yeast Brettanomyces custersii H1-603 and obtained bioethanol yield of 0.37 g/g of algal sugars.

  19. Use of diluted urine for cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, Sanna; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Rintala, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to study the biomass growth of microalga Chlorella vulgaris using diluted human urine as a sole nutrient source. Batch cultivations (21 days) were conducted in five different urine dilutions (1:25-1:300), in 1:100-diluted urine as such and with added trace elements, and as a reference, in artificial growth medium. The highest biomass density was obtained in 1:100-diluted urine with and without additional trace elements (0.73 and 0.60 g L(-1), respectively). Similar biomass growth trends and densities were obtained with 1:25- and 1:300-diluted urine (0.52 vs. 0.48 gVSS L(-1)) indicating that urine at dilution 1:25 can be used to cultivate microalgal based biomass. Interestingly, even 1:300-diluted urine contained sufficiently nutrients and trace elements to support biomass growth. Biomass production was similar despite pH-variation from < 5 to 9 in different incubations indicating robustness of the biomass growth. Ammonium formation did not inhibit overall biomass growth. At the beginning of cultivation, the majority of the biomass consisted of living algal cells, while towards the end, their share decreased and the estimated share of bacteria and cell debris increased.

  20. Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and associated bacteria in photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Intihar, Veera M; Tuovinen, Olli H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test three flat plate photobioreactor configurations for growth of Chlorella vulgaris under non-axenic conditions and to characterize and quantify associated bacterial communities. The photobioreactor cultivations were conducted using tap water-based media to introduce background bacterial population. Growth of algae was monitored over time with three independent methods. Additionally, the quantity and quality of eukaryotes and bacteria were analysed using culture-independent molecular tools based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). Static mixers used in the flat plate photobioreactors did not generally enhance the growth at the low light intensities used. The maximum biomass concentration and maximum specific growth rate were 1.0 g l(-1) and 2.0 day(-1) respectively. Bacterial growth as determined by QPCR was associated with the growth of C. vulgaris. Based on PCR-DGGE, bacteria in the cultures mainly originated from the tap water. Bacterial community profiles were diverse but reproducible in all flat plate cultures. Most prominent bacteria in the C. vulgaris cultures belonged to the class Alphaproteobacteria and especially to the genus Sphingomonas. Analysis of the diversity of non-photosynthetic microorganisms in algal mass cultures can provide useful information on the public health aspects and unravel community interactions.

  1. Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and associated bacteria in photobioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Lakaniemi, Aino‐Maija; Intihar, Veera M.; Tuovinen, Olli H.; Puhakka, Jaakko A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to test three flat plate photobioreactor configurations for growth of Chlorella vulgaris under non‐axenic conditions and to characterize and quantify associated bacterial communities. The photobioreactor cultivations were conducted using tap water‐based media to introduce background bacterial population. Growth of algae was monitored over time with three independent methods. Additionally, the quantity and quality of eukaryotes and bacteria were analysed using culture‐independent molecular tools based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR‐DGGE) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). Static mixers used in the flat plate photobioreactors did not generally enhance the growth at the low light intensities used. The maximum biomass concentration and maximum specific growth rate were 1.0 g l−1 and 2.0 day−1 respectively. Bacterial growth as determined by QPCR was associated with the growth of C. vulgaris. Based on PCR‐DGGE, bacteria in the cultures mainly originated from the tap water. Bacterial community profiles were diverse but reproducible in all flat plate cultures. Most prominent bacteria in the C. vulgaris cultures belonged to the class Alphaproteobacteria and especially to the genus Sphingomonas. Analysis of the diversity of non‐photosynthetic microorganisms in algal mass cultures can provide useful information on the public health aspects and unravel community interactions. PMID:21936882

  2. Chlorella induces stomatal closure via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production and its effects on instantaneous water use efficiency in Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Xu, Shan-Shan; Gao, Jing; Pan, Sha; Wang, Gen-Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been established to participate in stomatal closure induced by live microbes and microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Chlorella as a beneficial microorganism can be expected to trigger stomatal closure via ROS production. Here, we reported that Chlorella induced stomatal closure in a dose-and time-dependent manner in epidermal peels of Vicia faba. Using pharmacological methods in this work, we found that the Chlorella-induced stomatal closure was almost completely abolished by a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenger, catalase (CAT), significantly suppressed by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), and slightly affected by a peroxidase inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), suggesting that ROS production involved in Chlorella-induced stomatal closure is mainly mediated by DPI-sensitive NADPH oxidase. Additionally, Exogenous application of optimal concentrations of Chlorella suspension improved instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEi) in Vicia faba via a reduction in leaf transpiration rate (E) without a parallel reduction in net photosynthetic rate (Pn) assessed by gas-exchange measurements. The chlorophyll fluorescence and content analysis further demonstrated that short-term use of Chlorella did not influence plant photosynthetic reactions center. These results preliminarily reveal that Chlorella can trigger stomatal closure via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in epidermal strips and improve WUEi in leave levels.

  3. Chlorella Induces Stomatal Closure via NADPH Oxidase-Dependent ROS Production and Its Effects on Instantaneous Water Use Efficiency in Vicia faba

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Xu, Shan-Shan; Gao, Jing; Pan, Sha; Wang, Gen-Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been established to participate in stomatal closure induced by live microbes and microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Chlorella as a beneficial microorganism can be expected to trigger stomatal closure via ROS production. Here, we reported that Chlorella induced stomatal closure in a dose-and time-dependent manner in epidermal peels of Vicia faba. Using pharmacological methods in this work, we found that the Chlorella-induced stomatal closure was almost completely abolished by a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenger, catalase (CAT), significantly suppressed by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), and slightly affected by a peroxidase inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), suggesting that ROS production involved in Chlorella-induced stomatal closure is mainly mediated by DPI-sensitive NADPH oxidase. Additionally, Exogenous application of optimal concentrations of Chlorella suspension improved instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEi) in Vicia faba via a reduction in leaf transpiration rate (E) without a parallel reduction in net photosynthetic rate (Pn) assessed by gas-exchange measurements. The chlorophyll fluorescence and content analysis further demonstrated that short-term use of Chlorella did not influence plant photosynthetic reactions center. These results preliminarily reveal that Chlorella can trigger stomatal closure via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in epidermal strips and improve WUEi in leave levels. PMID:24687099

  4. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John; Sarisky-Reed, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    The framework for National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap was constructed at the Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap Workshop, held December 9-10, 2008, at the University of Maryland-College Park. The Workshop was organized by the Biomass Program to discuss and identify the critical challenges currently hindering the development of a domestic, commercial-scale algal biofuels industry. This Roadmap presents information from a scientific, economic, and policy perspectives that can support and guide RD&D investment in algal biofuels. While addressing the potential economic and environmental benefits of using algal biomass for the production of liquid transportation fuels, the Roadmap describes the current status of algae RD&D. In doing so, it lays the groundwork for identifying challenges that likely need to be overcome for algal biomass to be used in the production of economically viable biofuels.

  5. DNA-Based Taxonomy in Ecologically Versatile Microalgae: A Re-Evaluation of the Species Concept within the Coccoid Green Algal Genus Coccomyxa (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Veronica; Škaloud, Pavel; Rindi, Fabio; Tempesta, Sabrina; Paoletti, Michela; Pasqualetti, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Coccomyxa is a genus of unicellular green algae of the class Trebouxiophyceae, well known for its cosmopolitan distribution and great ecological amplitude. The taxonomy of this genus has long been problematic, due to reliance on badly-defined and environmentally variable morphological characters. In this study, based on the discovery of a new species from an extreme habitat, we reassess species circumscription in Coccomyxa, a unicellular genus of the class Trebouxiophyceae, using a combination of ecological and DNA sequence data (analyzed with three different methods of algorithmic species delineation). Our results are compared with those of a recent integrative study of Darienko and colleagues that reassessed the taxonomy of Coccomyxa, recognizing 7 species in the genus. Expanding the dataset from 43 to 61 sequences (SSU + ITS rDNA) resulted in a different delimitation, supporting the recognition of a higher number of species (24 to 27 depending on the analysis used, with the 27-species scenario receiving the strongest support). Among these, C. melkonianii sp. nov. is described from material isolated from a river highly polluted by heavy metals (Rio Irvi, Sardinia, Italy). Analyses performed on ecological characters detected a significant phylogenetic signal in six different characters. We conclude that the 27-species scenario is presently the most realistic for Coccomyxa and we suggest that well-supported lineages distinguishable by ecological preferences should be recognized as different species in this genus. We also recommend that for microbial lineages in which the overall diversity is unknown and taxon sampling is sparse, as is often the case for green microalgae, the results of analyses for algorithmic DNA-based species delimitation should be interpreted with extreme caution.

  6. DNA-Based Taxonomy in Ecologically Versatile Microalgae: A Re-Evaluation of the Species Concept within the Coccoid Green Algal Genus Coccomyxa (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Rindi, Fabio; Tempesta, Sabrina; Paoletti, Michela; Pasqualetti, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Coccomyxa is a genus of unicellular green algae of the class Trebouxiophyceae, well known for its cosmopolitan distribution and great ecological amplitude. The taxonomy of this genus has long been problematic, due to reliance on badly-defined and environmentally variable morphological characters. In this study, based on the discovery of a new species from an extreme habitat, we reassess species circumscription in Coccomyxa, a unicellular genus of the class Trebouxiophyceae, using a combination of ecological and DNA sequence data (analyzed with three different methods of algorithmic species delineation). Our results are compared with those of a recent integrative study of Darienko and colleagues that reassessed the taxonomy of Coccomyxa, recognizing 7 species in the genus. Expanding the dataset from 43 to 61 sequences (SSU + ITS rDNA) resulted in a different delimitation, supporting the recognition of a higher number of species (24 to 27 depending on the analysis used, with the 27-species scenario receiving the strongest support). Among these, C. melkonianii sp. nov. is described from material isolated from a river highly polluted by heavy metals (Rio Irvi, Sardinia, Italy). Analyses performed on ecological characters detected a significant phylogenetic signal in six different characters. We conclude that the 27-species scenario is presently the most realistic for Coccomyxa and we suggest that well-supported lineages distinguishable by ecological preferences should be recognized as different species in this genus. We also recommend that for microbial lineages in which the overall diversity is unknown and taxon sampling is sparse, as is often the case for green microalgae, the results of analyses for algorithmic DNA-based species delimitation should be interpreted with extreme caution. PMID:27028195

  7. Advanced Algal Systems Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    Research and development (R&D) on advanced algal biofuels and bioproducts presents an opportunity to sustainably expand biomass resource potential in the United States. The Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) Advanced Algal Systems Program is carrying out a long-term, applied R&D strategy to lower the costs of algal biofuel production by working with partners to develop revolutionary technologies and conduct crosscutting analyses to better understand the potential

  8. Effects of green algal mats on bivalves in a New England mud flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, M.; Stearns, L. M.; Watling, L.

    1998-03-01

    Concurrent with the spread of green algal mats on tidal flats, reports of macrofauna dieoffs under dense algal mats have increased in numbers. Bivalves seem to be particularly affected by persistent dense algal mats. Bivalve species with a long extendible siphon seem to be less affected underneath algal mats, but no distinction has been made in the past between species with short and those with long siphons, Mya arenaria and Macoma balthica, on an intertidal mudflat in New England. Abundances of M. arenaria declined substantially during the study period when a thick green algal mat covered the mudflat for several months. Numbers of the small bivalve Gemma gemma also decreased substantially, whereas abundances of M. balthica showed minimal variation during the time of algal coverage. In algae removal/addition experiments numbers of M. arenaria decreased, but effects were only significant in an algal addition to previously algal-free mudflat areas. Abundance of M. balthica did not change significantly in the algal removal/additition experiments. Over the time period of the experiment (9 weeks), M. arenaria showed measurable size increase in uncovered mudflat areas, but not underneath algal mats. Similarly, M. balthica only increased in size in the uncovered mudflat area. From these results it is concluded that M. balthica can survive time periods of dense algal coverage because it is able to penetrate through the algal mat with its long extendible siphon, and thus can reach well-oxygenated water layers above the mat. M. arenaria with its thick, less extendible, siphon cannot push through dense algal mats and therefore is more likely to die underneath persistent algal mats.

  9. The effect of cadmium on the growth and antioxidant response for freshwater algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinfeng; Qiu, Hongchen; Chang, Zhaoyang; Jiang, Zaimin; Yin, Wenke

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the effect of exogenously applied cadmium on the physiological response of green algae Chlorella vulgaris. The study investigated the long-term effect (18 days) of cadmium on the levels of algae biomass, assimilation pigment composition, soluble protein, oxidative status (production of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion), antioxidant enzymes (such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase enzyme) in C. vulgaris. The results showed that growth, the amount of chlorophyll a (Chl a), chlorophyll b (Chl b) and carotenoids gradually decreased with increasing cadmium over 18 days exposure. Cadmium at concentration of 7 mg L(-1) inhibited algal growth expressed as the number of cells. Our research found that C. vulgaris has a high tolerance to cadmium. Contents of chlorophylls (Chl a and Chl b) and carotenoids (Car) of C. vulgaris was significantly decline with rising concentration of cadmium (p < 0.05). The decrease of 54.04 and 93.37 % in Chl a, 60.65 and 74.32 % in Chl b, 50.00 and 71.88 % in total carotenoids was noticed following the treatment with 3 and 7 mg L(-1) cadmium doses compared with control treatment, respectively. Cadmium treatments caused a significant change in the physiological competence (calculated as chlorophyll a/b) which increased with increasing Cd(II) doses up to 1 mg L(-1) but decreased at 3 mg L(-1). While accumulation of soluble protein was enhanced by presence of cadmium, the treatment with cadmium at 3 and 7 mg L(-1) increased the concentration of soluble proteins by 88, 95.8 % in C. vulgaris, respectively. Moreover, low doses of cadmium stimulated enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase) in C. vulgaris, The content of peroxidase increased with the increasing cadmium concentration, and had slightly decreased at the concentration of 7 mg L(-1), but was still higher than control group, which showed that cadmium

  10. Enhanced accumulation of starch and total carbohydrates in alginate-immobilized Chlorella spp. induced by Azospirillum brasilense: I. Autotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Choix, Francisco J; de-Bashan, Luz E; Bashan, Yoav

    2012-10-10

    The effect of the microalgae-growth promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense on accumulation of total carbohydrates and starch in two species of Chlorella (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella sorokiniana), when the bacterium and each microalga were jointly immobilized in alginate beads was studied under autotrophic conditions for 144 h in synthetic medium. The interaction of the bacterium with the microalgae enhanced accumulation of total carbohydrate and starch. Cells of Chlorella accumulated the highest amounts of carbohydrate after incubation for 24h. Yet, this did not coincide with the highest affinity and volumetric productivity measured in these cultures. However, after incubation for 72 h, mainly in jointly immobilized treatments of both microalgae species, the cultures reached their highest total carbohydrate content (mainly as starch) and also the highest affinity and volumetric productivity. These results demonstrate the potential of A. brasilense to affect carbohydrates and starch accumulation in Chlorella spp. when both microorganisms are co-cultured, which can be an important tool for applications of microalgae.

  11. Effects of Escherichia coli on Mixotrophic Growth of Chlorella minutissima and Production of Biofuel Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Brendan T.; VanderGheynst, Jean S.

    2014-01-01

    Chlorella minutissima was co-cultured with Escherichia coli in airlift reactors under mixotrophic conditions (glucose, glycerol, and acetate substrates) to determine possible effects of bacterial contamination on algal biofuel production. It was hypothesized that E. coli would compete with C. minutissima for nutrients, displacing algal biomass. However, C. minutissima grew more rapidly and to higher densities in the presence of E. coli, suggesting a symbiotic relationship between the organisms. At an initial 1% substrate concentration, the co-culture produced 200-587% more algal biomass than the axenic C. minutissima cultures. Co-cultures grown on 1% substrate consumed 23–737% more of the available carbon substrate than the sum of substrate consumed by E. coli and C. minutissima alone. At 1% substrate, total lipid and starch productivity were elevated in co-cultures compared to axenic cultures indicating that bacterial contamination was not detrimental to the production of biofuel precursors in this specific case. Bio-fouling of the reactors observed in co-cultures and acid formation in all mixotrophic cultures, however, could present challenges for scale-up. PMID:24805253

  12. Experimental and kinetic studies for phycoremediation and dye removal by Chlorella pyrenoidosa from textile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Vinayak V; Kothari, Richa; Chopra, A K; Singh, D P

    2015-11-01

    Potential of Chlorella pyrenoidosa was experimentally investigated for phycoremediation and dye removal from textile wastewater (TWW) in batch cultures. Growth of alga was observed at various concentration of textile wastewater (25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) and was found in a range of 8.1-14 μg ml(-1) day(-1). Growth study revealed that alga potentially grows up to 75% concentrated textile wastewater and reduces phosphate, nitrate and BOD by 87%, 82% and 63% respectively. Methylene blue dye (MB) removal was also observed by using dry and wet algal biomass harvested after phycoremediation. Adsorption isotherms (Langmuir and Freundlich) and kinetic models (pseudo first and second order) were applied on adsorption process. Dry algal biomass (DAB) was found more efficient biosorbent with large surface area and showed high binding affinity for MB dye in compare to wet algal biomass (WAB). The RL value for both biosorbent showed feasible adsorption process as the obtained value was between 0 and 1. Pseudo second order kinetic model with high degree of correlation coefficient and low sum of error squares (SSE %) value was found more suitable for representation of adsorption process in case of both biosorbents, however pseudo first order also showed high degree of correlation for both biosorbents.

  13. Distribution, behavior, and condition of herbivorous fishes on coral reefs track algal resources.

    PubMed

    Tootell, Jesse S; Steele, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Herbivore distribution can impact community structure and ecosystem function. On coral reefs, herbivores are thought to play an important role in promoting coral dominance, but how they are distributed relative to algae is not well known. Here, we evaluated whether the distribution, behavior, and condition of herbivorous fishes correlated with algal resource availability at six sites in the back reef environment of Moorea, French Polynesia. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that increased algal turf availability would coincide with (1) increased biomass, (2) altered foraging behavior, and (3) increased energy reserves of herbivorous fishes. Fish biomass and algal cover were visually estimated along underwater transects; behavior of herbivorous fishes was quantified by observations of focal individuals; fish were collected to assess their condition; and algal turf production rates were measured on standardized tiles. The best predictor of herbivorous fish biomass was algal turf production, with fish biomass increasing with algal production. Biomass of herbivorous fishes was also negatively related to sea urchin density, suggesting competition for limited resources. Regression models including both algal turf production and urchin density explained 94 % of the variation in herbivorous fish biomass among sites spread over ~20 km. Behavioral observations of the parrotfish Chlorurus sordidus revealed that foraging area increased as algal turf cover decreased. Additionally, energy reserves increased with algal turf production, but declined with herbivorous fish density, implying that algal turf is a limited resource for this species. Our findings support the hypothesis that herbivorous fishes can spatially track algal resources on coral reefs.

  14. Comprehensive computational model for combining fluid hydrodynamics, light transport and biomass growth in a Taylor vortex algal photobioreactor: Lagrangian approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xi; Kong, Bo; Vigil, R Dennis

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive quantitative model incorporating the effects of fluid flow patterns, light distribution, and algal growth kinetics on biomass growth rate is developed in order to predict the performance of a Taylor vortex algal photobioreactor for culturing Chlorella vulgaris. A commonly used Lagrangian strategy for coupling the various factors influencing algal growth was employed whereby results from computational fluid dynamics and radiation transport simulations were used to compute numerous microorganism light exposure histories, and this information in turn was used to estimate the global biomass specific growth rate. The simulations provide good quantitative agreement with experimental data and correctly predict the trend in reactor performance as a key reactor operating parameter is varied (inner cylinder rotation speed). However, biomass growth curves are consistently over-predicted and potential causes for these over-predictions and drawbacks of the Lagrangian approach are addressed.

  15. Effects of various amino acids as organic nitrogen sources on the growth and biochemical composition of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Zhang, Zhenhua; Yan, Shaohua

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of eighteen l-amino acids on the growth and biochemical composition of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Under the nitrate deficiency condition, ten l-amino acids were found to exert stronger stimulative effects on the algal growth than the other amino acids. After 10-day culture, addition of 0.5gL(-1) the above mentioned ten amino acids significantly increased the cellular protein contents by 441.3-110.8%, respectively, and significantly decreased the carbohydrate contents by 60.7-16.2%, respectively. Under the normal nitrate condition, the cellular biochemical composition was not significantly affected by addition of serine, leucine, proline, aspartic acid, asparagine, and glycine, whereas addition of aspartic acid and arginine increased the algal biomass by 110.2% and 62.8% compared with the control. Finally, the significance of this work in the biotechnological application of culturing C. pyrenoidosa in organic wastewater rich in amino acids was further discussed.

  16. Production of Chlorella biomass enriched by selenium and its use in animal nutrition: a review.

    PubMed

    Doucha, Jirí; Lívanský, Karel; Kotrbácek, Václav; Zachleder, Vilém

    2009-07-01

    Feedstuffs are routinely supplemented with various selenium sources, where organic forms of Se are more bio-available and less toxic than the inorganic forms (selenites, selenates). When the algae are exposed to environmental Se in the form of selenite, they are able as other microorganisms to incorporate the element to different levels, depending on the algae species. Technology of heterotrophic fed-batch cultivation of the microalga Chlorella enriched by organically bound Se was developed, where the cultivation proceeds in fermentors on aerated and mixed nutrient solution with urea as a nitrogen and glucose as a carbon and energy source. High volumetric productivity and high cell concentrations (about 70-100 g Chlorella dry mass l(-1)) can be attained if nutrients and oxygen are adequately supplied. Addition of a small quantity of a new selenoprotein source-spray-dried Se-Chlorella biomass to the diet of farm animals had better effects on specific physiological and physical parameters of animals than selenite salt and was comparable with Se yeast added to the diet. This review introduces the importance of selenium for humans and animals, methods of Se determination, heterotrophic production of selenium-enriched Chlorella biomass in a fed-batch culture regime on organic carbon, and use of the biomass in animal nutrition.

  17. Mutate Chlorella sp. by nuclear irradiation to fix high concentrations of CO2.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Huang, Yun; Feng, Jia; Sun, Jing; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-05-01

    To improve biomass productivity and CO2 fixation of microalgae under 15% (v/v) CO2 of flue gas, Chlorella species were mutated by nuclear irradiation and domesticated with high concentrations of CO2. The biomass yield of Chlorella pyrenoidosa mutated using 500 Gy of (60)Co γ irradiation increased by 53.1% (to 1.12 g L(-1)) under air bubbling. The mutants were domesticated with gradually increased high concentrations of CO2 [from 0.038% (v/v) to 15% (v/v)], which increased the biomass yield to 2.41 g L(-1). When light transmission and culture mixing in photo-bioreactors were enhanced at 15% (v/v) CO2, the peak growth rate of the domesticated mutant (named Chlorella PY-ZU1) was increased to 0.68 g L(-1) d(-1). When the ratio of gas flow rate (L min(-1)) to 1L of microalgae culture was 0.011, the peak CO2 fixation rate and the efficiency of Chlorella PY-ZU1 were 1.54 g L(-1) d(-1) and 32.7%, respectively.

  18. Urban wastewater treatment by seven species of microalgae and an algal bloom: Biomass production, N and P removal kinetics and harvestability.

    PubMed

    Mennaa, Fatima Zahra; Arbib, Zouhayr; Perales, José Antonio

    2015-10-15

    This study evaluates the capacity of seven species and a Bloom of microalgae to grow in urban wastewater. Nutrient removal kinetics and biomass harvesting by means of centrifugation and coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation have been also tested. Results show that the best biomass productivities ranged from between 118 and 108 mgSS L(-1) d(-1) for the Bloom (Bl) and Scenedesmus obliquus (Sco). Regarding nutrient removal, microalgae were able to remove the total dissolved phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations by more than 80% and 87% respectively, depending on the species tested. The final total dissolved concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in the culture media complies with the European Commission Directive 98/15/CE on urban wastewater treatment. Regarding harvesting, the results of coagulation-flocculation sedimentation using a 60 mg L(-1) dose of Ferric chloride were similar between species, exceeding the biomass removal efficiency by more than 90%. The results of centrifugation (time required to remove 90% of solids at 1000 rpm) were not similar between species, with the shortest time being 2.9 min for Sco, followed by the bloom (7.25 min). An overall analysis suggested that the natural bloom and Scenedesmus obliquus seem to be the best candidates to grow in pre-treated wastewater, according to their biomass production, nutrient removal capability and harvestability.

  19. Studies on uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase from Chlorella kessleri (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Juárez, Angela B; Aldonatti, Carmen; Vigna, María S; Ríos de Molina, María Del C

    2007-02-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UroD) (EC 4.1.1.37) is an enzyme from the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway, in which chlorophyll is the main final product in algae. This is the first time that a study on UroD activity has been performed in a green alga (Chlorella). We isolated and partially purified the enzyme from a Chlorella kessleri (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta) strain (Copahue, Neuquén, Argentina), and describe for the first time some of its properties. In C. kessleri, the decarboxylation of uroporphyrinogen III occurs in two stages, via 7 COOH and then 6 and 5 COOH intermediates, with the decarboxylation of the 7 COOH compound being the rate-limiting step for the reaction. Cultures in the exponential growth phase showed the highest specific activity values. The most suitable conditions to measure UroD activity in C. kessleri were as follows: 0.23-0.3 mg protein/mL, approximately 6-8 micromol/L uroporphyrinogen III, and 20 min incubation time. Gel filtration chromatography and Western blot assays indicated that UroD from C. kessleri is a dimer of approximately 90 kDa formed by species of lower molecular mass, which conserves enzymatic activity.

  20. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Samson, R.; LeDuy, A.

    1982-08-01

    The photosynthetic spectrum of solar energy could be exploited for the production of chemical energy of methane through the combined algal-bacterial process. In this process, the algae are mass produced from light and from carbon in the first step. The algal biomass is then used as a nutrient for feeding the anaerobic digester, in the second step, for the production of methane by anaerobic bacteria. The carbon source for the production of algal biomass could be either organic carbon from wastewaters (for eucaryotic algae), or carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or from the combustion exhaust gases (for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae). The technical feasibility data on the anaerobic digestion of algal biomass have been reported for many species of algae including macroscopic algae and microscopic algae. Research being conducted in the authors' laboratory consists of using the semimicroscopic blue-green alga Spirulina maxima as the sole substrate for this combined algal-bacterial process. This species of alga is very attractive for the process because of its capability of using the atmospheric carbon dioxide as carbon source and its simple harvesting methods. Furthermore, it appeared that the fermentability of S. maxima is significantly higher than other microscopic algae. This communication presents the results on the anaerobic inoculum development by the adaptation technique. This inoculum was then used for the semicontinuous anaerobic digestion of S. maxima algal biomass. The evolutions of biogas production and composition, biogas yield, total volatile fatty acids, alkalinity, ammonia nitrogen, pH, and electrode potential were followed.

  1. Effects of Nitrogen Sources and C/N Ratios on the Lipid-Producing Potential of Chlorella sp. HQ.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jingjing; Hong, Yu; Hu, Hongying

    2016-07-28

    Microalgae are being researched for their potential as attractive biofuel feedstock, particularly for their lipid production. For maximizing biofuel production, it is necessary to explore the effects of environmental factors on algal lipid-producing potential. In this study, the effects of nitrogen (N) sources (NO2-N, NO3-N, urea-N, NH4-N, and N-deficiency) and carbon-to-nitrogen ratios (C/N= 0, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0) on algal lipid-producing potential of Chlorella sp. HQ were investigated. The results showed that for Chlorella growth and lipid accumulation potential, NO2-N was the best amongst the nitrogen sources, and NO3-N and urea-N also contributed to algal growth and lipid accumulation potential, but NH4-N and N-deficiency instead caused inhibitory effects. Moreover, the results indicated that algal lipid-producing potential was related to C/N ratios. With NO2-N treatment and carbon addition (C/N = 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0), total lipid yield was enhanced by 12.96-20.37%, but triacylglycerol (TAG) yields decreased by 25.52-94.31%. As for NO3-N treatment, carbon addition led to a 17.82-57.43%/ 25.86-82.67% reduction of total lipid/TAG yields. When NH4-N was used as the nitrogen source, total lipid/TAG yields were increased by 46.67-113.33%/28.99-74.76% with carbon addition. The total lipid/TAG yields of urea-N treatment varied with C/N ratios. Overall, the highest TAG yield (TAG yield: 38.75 ± 5.21 mg/l; TAG content: 44.16 ± 4.35%) was achieved under NO2-N treatment without carbon addition (C/N = 0), the condition that had merit for biofuel production.

  2. Air-drying of cells, the novel conditions for stimulated synthesis of triacylglycerol in a Green Alga, Chlorella kessleri.

    PubMed

    Shiratake, Takuma; Sato, Atsushi; Minoda, Ayumi; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Sato, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    Triacylglycerol is used for the production of commodities including food oils and biodiesel fuel. Microalgae can accumulate triacylglycerol under adverse environmental conditions such as nitrogen-starvation. This study explored the possibility of air-drying of green algal cells as a novel and simple protocol for enhancement of their triacylglycerol content. Chlorella kessleri cells were fixed on the surface of a glass fibre filter and then subjected to air-drying with light illumination. The dry cell weight, on a filter, increased by 2.7-fold in 96 h, the corresponding chlorophyll content ranging from 1.0 to 1.3-fold the initial one. Concomitantly, the triacylglycerol content remarkably increased to 70.3 mole% of fatty acids and 15.9% (w/w), relative to total fatty acids and dry cell weight, respectively, like in cells starved of nitrogen. Reduction of the stress of air-drying by placing the glass filter on a filter paper soaked in H2O lowered the fatty acid content of triacylglycerol to 26.4 mole% as to total fatty acids. Moreover, replacement of the H2O with culture medium further decreased the fatty acid content of triacylglycerol to 12.2 mole%. It thus seemed that severe dehydration is required for full induction of triacylglycerol synthesis, and that nutritional depletion as well as dehydration are crucial environmental factors. Meanwhile, air-drying of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells increased the triacylglycerol content to only 37.9 mole% of fatty acids and 4.8% (w/w), relative to total fatty acids and dry cell weight, respectively, and a marked decrease in the chlorophyll content, on a filter, of 33%. Air-drying thus has an impact on triacylglycerol synthesis in C. reinhardtii also, however, the effect is considerably limited, owing probably to instability of the photosynthetic machinery. This air-drying protocol could be useful for the development of a system for industrial production of triacylglycerol with appropriate selection of the algal species.

  3. Algal diseases: spotlight on a black box.

    PubMed

    Gachon, Claire M M; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Strittmatter, Martina; Chambouvet, Aurélie; Kim, Gwang Hoon

    2010-11-01

    Like any other living organisms, algae are plagued by diseases caused by fungi, protists, bacteria or viruses. As aquaculture continues to rise worldwide, pathogens of nori or biofuel sources are becoming a significant economic burden. Parasites are also increasingly being considered of equal importance with predators for ecosystem functioning. Altered disease patterns in disturbed environments are blamed for sudden extinctions, regime shifts, and spreading of alien species. Here we review the biodiversity and impact of pathogens and parasites of aquatic primary producers in freshwater and marine systems. We also cover recent advances on algal defence reactions, and discuss how emerging technologies can be used to reassess the profound, multi-faceted, and so far broadly-overlooked influence of algal diseases on ecosystem properties.

  4. Substitution of stable isotopes in Chlorella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.; Uphaus, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Replacement of biologically important isotopes in the alga Chlorella by corresponding heavier stable isotopes produces increasingly greater deviations from the normal cell size and changes the quality and distribution of certain cellular components. The usefulness of isotopically altered organisms increases interest in the study of such permuted organisms.

  5. Living in biological soil crust communities of African deserts-Physiological traits of green algal Klebsormidium species (Streptophyta) to cope with desiccation, light and temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Ulf; Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Green algae of the genus Klebsormidium (Klebsormidiales, Streptophyta) are typical members of biological soil crusts (BSCs) worldwide. The phylogeny and ecophysiology of Klebsormidium has been intensively studied in recent years, and a new lineage called superclade G, which was isolated from BSCs in arid southern Africa and comprising undescribed species, was reported. Three different African strains, that have previously been isolated from hot-desert BSCs and molecular-taxonomically characterized, were comparatively investigated. In addition, Klebsormidium subtilissimum from a cold-desert habitat (Alaska, USA, superclade E) was included in the study as well. Photosynthetic performance was measured under different controlled abiotic conditions, including dehydration and rehydration, as well as under a light and temperature gradient. All Klebsormidium strains exhibited optimum photosynthetic oxygen production at low photon fluence rates, but with no indication of photoinhibition under high light conditions pointing to flexible acclimation mechanisms of the photosynthetic apparatus. Respiration under lower temperatures was generally much less effective than photosynthesis, while the opposite was true for higher temperatures. The Klebsormidium strains tested showed a decrease and inhibition of the effective quantum yield during desiccation, however with different kinetics. While the single celled and small filamentous strains exhibited relatively fast inhibition, the uniserate filament forming isolates desiccated slower. Except one, all other strains fully recovered effective quantum yield after rehydration. The presented data provide an explanation for the regular occurrence of Klebsormidium strains or species in hot and cold deserts, which are characterized by low water availability and other stressful conditions.

  6. Living in biological soil crust communities of African deserts—Physiological traits of green algal Klebsormidium species (Streptophyta) to cope with desiccation, light and temperature gradients

    PubMed Central

    Karsten, Ulf; Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Green algae of the genus Klebsormidium (Klebsormidiales, Streptophyta) are typical members of biological soil crusts (BSCs) worldwide. The phylogeny and ecophysiology of Klebsormidium has been intensively studied in recent years, and a new lineage called superclade G, which was isolated from BSCs in arid southern Africa and comprising undescribed species, was reported. Three different African strains, that have previously been isolated from hot-desert BSCs and molecular-taxonomically characterized, were comparatively investigated. In addition, Klebsormidium subtilissimum from a cold-desert habitat (Alaska, USA, superclade E) was included in the study as well. Photosynthetic performance was measured under different controlled abiotic conditions, including dehydration and rehydration, as well as under a light and temperature gradient. All Klebsormidium strains exhibited optimum photosynthetic oxygen production at low photon fluence rates, but with no indication of photoinhibition under high light conditions pointing to flexible acclimation mechanisms of the photosynthetic apparatus. Respiration under lower temperatures was generally much less effective than photosynthesis, while the opposite was true for higher temperatures. The Klebsormidium strains tested showed a decrease and inhibition of the effective quantum yield during desiccation, however with different kinetics. While the single celled and small filamentous strains exhibited relatively fast inhibition, the uniserate filament forming isolates desiccated slower. Except one, all other strains fully recovered effective quantum yield after rehydration. The presented data provide an explanation for the regular occurrence of Klebsormidium strains or species in hot and cold deserts, which are characterized by low water availability and other stressful conditions. PMID:26422081

  7. Suppression Subtractive Hybridization Reveals Transcript Profiling of Chlorella under Heterotrophy to Photoautotrophy Transition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianke; Wang, Weiliang; Yin, Weibo; Hu, Zanmin; Li, Yuanguang

    2012-01-01

    Background Microalgae have been extensively investigated and exploited because of their competitive nutritive bioproducts and biofuel production ability. Chlorella are green algae that can grow well heterotrophically and photoautotrophically. Previous studies proved that shifting from heterotrophy to photoautotrophy in light-induced environments causes photooxidative damage as well as distinct physiologic features that lead to dynamic changes in Chlorella intracellular components, which have great potential in algal health food and biofuel production. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the trophic transition remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, suppression subtractive hybridization strategy was employed to screen and characterize genes that are differentially expressed in response to the light-induced shift from heterotrophy to photoautotrophy. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained from 770 and 803 randomly selected clones among the forward and reverse libraries, respectively. Sequence analysis identified 544 unique genes in the two libraries. The functional annotation of the assembled unigenes demonstrated that 164 (63.1%) from the forward library and 62 (21.8%) from the reverse showed significant similarities with the sequences in the NCBI non-redundant database. The time-course expression patterns of 38 selected differentially expressed genes further confirmed their responsiveness to a diverse trophic status. The majority of the genes enriched in the subtracted libraries were associated with energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, and stress defense. Conclusions/Significance The data presented here offer the first insights into the molecular foundation underlying the diverse microalgal trophic niche. In addition, the results can be used as a reference for unraveling candidate genes associated with the transition of Chlorella from heterotrophy to photoautotrophy, which holds

  8. Reclamation of wastewater for polyculture of freshwater fish: bioassays using Chlorella and Gambusia.

    PubMed

    Liang, Y; Wong, M H

    2000-11-01

    The feasibility of using the secondary effluents from two sewage treatment plants in Hong Kong (Yuen Long and Shek Wu Hui) for fish culture was assessed. Total ammonia contents in the two sewage effluents surpassed the level of 2 mg L(-1) recommended for wastewater fish culture. The two sewage effluents both needed essential elements for supporting algal Chlorella vulgaris growth, whereas only sewage effluent from Yuen Long had contaminants at toxic levels. Total ammonia in water explained more than 80% variations of toxicity of water samples to Gambusia patruelis, mosquito fish, according to regression analysis. Removal of ammonia from the sewage effluent is necessary before being used for fish culture. In addition, the rather high levels of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Cd) in the effluent should be closely monitored.

  9. Mixotrophic growth and biochemical analysis of Chlorella vulgaris cultivated with diluted monosodium glutamate wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan; Hu, Wenrong; Li, Xiuqing; Ma, Guixia; Song, Mingming; Pei, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate wastewater (MSGW) is a potential medium for microbial cultivation because of containing abundant organic nutrient. This paper seeks to evaluate the feasibility of growing Chlorella vulgaris with MSGW and assess the influence of MSGW concentration on the biomass productivity and biochemical compositions. The MSGW diluted in different concentrations was prepared for microalga cultivation. C. vulgaris growth was greatly promoted with MSGW compared with the inorganic BG11 medium. C. vulgaris obtained the maximum biomass concentration (1.02 g/L) and biomass productivity (61.47 mg/Ld) with 100-time diluted MSGW. The harvested biomass was rich in protein (36.01-50.64%) and low in lipid (13.47-25.4%) and carbohydrate (8.94-20.1%). The protein nutritional quality and unsaturated fatty acids content of algal increased significantly with diluted MSGW. These results indicated that the MSGW is a feasible alternative for mass cultivation of C. vulgaris.

  10. First evidence of bioflocculant from Shinella albus with flocculation activity on harvesting of Chlorella vulgaris biomass.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Xu, Yanting; Liu, Lei; Jiang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Tianling; Wang, Hailei

    2016-10-01

    Bioflocculant from Shinella albus xn-1 could be used to harvest energy-producing microalga Chlorella vulgaris biomass for the first time. In this study, we investigated the flocculation activity and mode of strain xn-1, the characteristics of bioflocculant, the effect of flocculation conditions and optimized the flocculation efficiency. The results indicated that strain xn-1 exhibited flocculation activity through secreting bioflocculant; the bioflocculant with high thermal stability, pH stability and low molecular weight was proved to be not protein and polysaccharide, and flocculation active component was confirmed to contain triple bond and cumulated double bonds; algal pH, temperature and metal ions showed great impacts on the flocculation efficiency of bioflocculant; the maximum flocculation activity of bioflocculant reached 85.65% after the response surface optimization. According to the results, the bioflocculant from S. albus xn-1 could be a good potential in applications for high-efficiency harvesting of microalgae.

  11. Mild pressure induces rapid accumulation of neutral lipid (triacylglycerol) in Chlorella spp.

    PubMed

    Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Kim, Bohwa; Lee, Jiye; Vijayan, Durairaj; Lee, Kyubock; Nam, Bora; Jeon, Sang Goo; Kim, Dong-Myung; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Effective enhancement of neutral lipid (especially triacylglycerol, TAG) content in microalgae is an important issue for commercialization of microalgal biorefineries. Pressure is a key physical factor affecting the morphological, physiological, and biochemical behaviors of organisms. In this paper, we report a new stress-based method for induction of TAG accumulation in microalgae (specifically, Chlorella sp. KR-1 and Ch. sp. AG20150) by very-short-duration application of mild pressure. Pressure treatments of 10-15bar for 2h resulted in a considerable, ∼55% improvement of the 10-100g/Lcells' TAG contents compared with the untreated control. The post-pressure-treatment increase of cytoplasmic TAG granules was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Notwithstanding the increased TAG content, the total lipid content was not changed by pressurization, implying that pressure stress possibly induces rapid remodeling/transformation of algal lipids rather than de novo biosynthesis of TAG.

  12. Gastropod grazers and nutrients, but not light, interact in determining periphytic algal diversity.

    PubMed

    Liess, Antonia; Kahlert, Maria

    2007-05-01

    The potential interactions of grazing, nutrients and light in influencing autotroph species diversity have not previously been considered. Earlier studies have shown that grazing and nutrients interact in determining autotroph species diversity, since grazing decreases species diversity when nutrients (i.e. N or P) limit autotroph growth, but increases it when nutrients are replete. We hypothesized that increased light intensities would intensify the interactions between grazing and nutrients on algal species diversity, resulting in even stronger reductions in algal species diversity through grazing under nutrient-poor conditions, and to even stronger increases of algal species diversity through grazing under nutrient-rich conditions. We studied the effects of grazing (absent, present), nutrients (ambient, N + P enriched) and light (low light, high light) on benthic algal diversity and periphyton C:nutrient ratios (which can indicate algal nutrient limitation) in a factorial laboratory experiment, using the gastropod grazer Viviparus viviparus. Grazing decreased algal biomass and algal diversity, but increased C:P and N:P ratios of periphyton. Grazing also affected periphyton species composition, by decreasing the proportion of Spirogyra sp. and increasing the proportion of species in the Chaetophorales. Grazing effects on diversity as well as on periphyton N:P ratios were weakened when nutrients were added (interaction between grazing and nutrients). Chlorophyll a (Chl a) per area increased with nutrient addition and decreased with high light intensities. Light did not increase the strength of the interaction between grazing and nutrients on periphytic algal diversity. This study shows that nutrient addition substantially reduced the negative effects of grazing on periphytic algal diversity, whereas light did not interact with grazing or nutrient enrichment in determining periphytic algal diversity.

  13. Enhanced mixotrophic growth of microalga Chlorella sp. on pretreated swine manure for simultaneous biofuel feedstock production and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Min, Min; Zhou, Wenguang; Du, Zhenyi; Mohr, Michael; Chen, Paul; Zhu, Jun; Cheng, Yanling; Liu, Yuhuan; Ruan, Roger

    2012-12-01

    The objectives were to assess the feasibility of using fermented liquid swine manure (LSM) as nutrient supplement for cultivation of Chlorella sp. UMN271, a locally isolated facultative heterotrophic strain, and to evaluate the nutrient removal efficiencies by alga compared with those from the conventionally decomposed LSM-algae system. The results showed that addition of 0.1% (v/v) acetic, propionic and butyric acids, respectively, could promote algal growth, enhance nutrient removal efficiencies and improve total lipids productivities during a 7-day batch cultivation. Similar results were observed when the acidogenic fermentation was applied to the sterilized and raw digested LSM rich in volatile fatty acids (VFAs). High algal growth rate (0.90 d(-1)) and fatty acid content (10.93% of the dry weight) were observed for the raw VFA-enriched manure sample. Finally, the fatty acid profile analyses showed that Chlorella sp. grown on acidogenically digested manure could be used as a feedstock for high-quality biodiesel production.

  14. Energetic response of Chlorella vulgaris to alpha radiation and PCB stress

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    This research project has evaluated the bioenergetic response of the green alga Chlorella vulgaris following acute exposure to either the physical stress of radiation or the chemical stress of PCBs. After exposure, changes in survival or growth, adenylate pools (ATP, ADP, and AMP), CO/sub 2/ fixation and oxygen evolution and uptake were measured. By employing anaerobic conditions, or the electron transport inhibitor DCMU or dark conditions separately and in specific combinations, this study evaluated the response of three separate algal ATP producing mechanisms (respiration, total and cyclic photophosphorylation) to alpha radiation or PCB. The use of the adenylate energy charge ratio as an indicator of stress was also evaluated. The results of the radiation experiments indicated that alpha particle exposure between 25 to 275 rads caused a one-hour latent demand for ATP due to radioinduced DNA repair. In order to compensate for this ATP demand, nonessential utilization of ATP was decreased by slowing the rate of carbon fixation. The results also suggest that use of radiation as a tool to study algal physiology. The data obtained from the PCB experiments again showed each phosphorylation mechanism to be insensitive to 10, 100 and 200 ppm Aroclor 1254 exposures. Data suggest, however, that PCBs caused an increased photosynthetic rate, and total adenylate pool with decreased growth. The use of the adenylate energy charge ratio as a stress indicator was assessed. Because this ratio did not fluctuate at doses of radiation or PCBs that caused reduced survival and growth rates, this study concluded that for Chlorella the adenylate energy charge ration was a poor indicator of sublethal stress.

  15. Algal Culture Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldock, R.

    1971-01-01

    Suggests suitable species of microscopic green algae for demonstrating diversity of form, increasing complexity in related species, the animal" and plant" characteristics of protists, and protist behavior. (AL)

  16. Effects of acidification on algal assemblages in temporary ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Glackin, M.E.; Pratt, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Atmospheric deposition monitoring in Pennsylvania has characterized a steep gradient of acidic ion depositions across the north-central portion of the state. This study evaluated acidification effects on the composition of algal assemblages in temporary ponds in two forested areas exposed to atmospheric deposition that varied in degree of acidity. Artificial substrates were used to sample and compare the algal assemblages in the two areas. Colonized communities were also transplanted to lower pH ponds to observe changes in species composition. A laboratory microcosm experiment manipulating pH was conducted to reduce the variables that differed between the two areas. Fewer algal taxa were present in lower pH ponds, on colonized substrates after transplant to lower pH ponds, and in lower pH laboratory treatments. Species composition was altered in the lower pH conditions. Most taxa that were excluded from the lower pH ponds naturally also did not survive when experimentally introduced to those conditions. These results suggest that acidification of temporary ponds can alter the structure of algal communities. There is interest in a possible link between acid deposition and reports of worldwide declines in amphibian populations. Algae are an important food source for larval amphibians, such as the wood frog, which require temporary ponds to breed. Changes in algal species composition could potentially impact the temporary pond and forest ecosystem.

  17. Algal Biofuels; Algal Biofuels R&D at NREL (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    An overview of NREL's algal biofuels projects, including U.S. Department of Energy-funded work, projects with U.S. and international partners, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects.

  18. Binding and removal of aluminum ions in water by an algal biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Zimnik, P.R.; Sneddon, J.

    1988-08-01

    A preliminary study on the binding and removal of trace concentrations of aluminum ions in waters by two species of algae, Chlorella Pyrenoidosa and Chlorella Vulgaris, were investigated. Binding by the former was minimal over all pH ranges, but binding by the latter was effective with a maximum binding of 68% occurring at pH 5. Binding was lowered drastically below pH 2, and this may be used to remove aluminum from the algae. Optimum binding occurred after 20 minutes exposure time of algae to aluminum solution and 450 mg algae mass to 100 mL solution. Binding was reproducible and more efficient in waters with low suspended solids. High salt concentrations interfere with binding, and the Chlorella Vulgaris could be reused 7 times with washings between each binding before a noticeable decrease in binding efficiency was found.

  19. Extractive-transesterification of algal lipids under microwave irradiation with hexane as solvent.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar; Mondala, Andro; Holmes, William; Hernandez, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    This study describes the use of microwaves (MW) for enhanced extractive-transesterification of algal lipids from dry algal biomass (Chlorella sp.). Two different single-step extractive-transesterification methods under MW irradiation were evaluated: (1) with ethanol as solvent/reactant and sodium hydroxide catalyst; and (2) with ethanol as reactant and hexane as solvent (sodium hydroxide catalyst). Biodiesel (fatty-acid-ethyl-esters, FAEE) yields from these two methods were compared with the conventional Bligh and Dyer (BD) method which followed a two-step extraction-transesterification process. The maximum lipid yields for MW, MW with hexane and BD methods were 20.1%, 20.1%, and 13.9%, respectively; while the FAEE conversion of the algal lipids were 96.2%, 94.3%, and 78.1%, respectively. The algae-biomass:ethanol molar ratio of 1:250-500 and 2.0-2.5% catalyst with reaction times around 6min were determined as optimum conditions for both methods. This study confers that the single-step non-conventional methods can contribute to higher algal lipid and FAEE yields.

  20. Uptake and accumulation of exogenous docosahexaenoic acid by Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Yukino, T; Maruyama, I; Kido, S; Kitaoka, S

    2001-01-01

    Tuna oil or its hydrolysate was added to a culture of Chlorella for its nutritional fortification as a feed for rotifer. Exogenous docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in its free form was taken up by the cells of Chlorella vulgaris strain K-22 and by other strains, but tuna oil was not taken up by the cells. Accumulated DHA was found by electron microscopy in the cells in oil droplets. All strains of Chlorella used in these experiments took up exogenous DHA into the cells. It seems that the structure of the cell wall did not affect the uptake of DHA into the Chlorella cells.

  1. Purification and photobiochemical profile of photosystem 1 from a high-salt tolerant, oleaginous Chlorella (Trebouxiophycaea, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    McConnell, Michael D; Lowry, David; Rowan, Troy N; van Dijk, Karin; Redding, Kevin E

    2015-06-01

    The eukaryotic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been studied extensively within the biofuel industry as a model organism, as researchers look towards algae to provide chemical feedstocks (i.e., lipids) for the production of liquid transportation fuels. C. reinhardtii, however, is unsuitable for high-level production of such precursors due to its relatively poor lipid accumulation and fresh-water demand. In this study we offer insight into the primary light harvesting and electron transfer reactions that occur during phototropic growth in a high-salt tolerant strain of Chlorella (a novel strain introduced here as NE1401), a single-celled eukaryotic algae also in the phylum Chlorophyta. Under nutrient starvation many eukaryotic algae increase dramatically the amount of lipids stored in lipid bodies within their cell interiors. Microscopy and lipid analyses indicate that Chlorella sp. NE1401 may become a superior candidate for algal biofuels production. We have purified highly active Photosystem 1 (PS1) complexes to study in vitro, so that we may understand further the photobiochemisty of this promising biofuel producer and how its characteristics compare and contrast with that of the better understood C. reinhardtii. Our findings suggest that the PS1 complex from Chlorella sp. NE1401 demonstrates similar characteristics to that of C. reinhardtii with respect to light-harvesting and electron transfer reactions. We also illustrate that the relative extent of the light state transition performed by Chlorella sp. NE1401 is smaller compared to C. reinhardtii, although they are triggered by the same dynamic light stresses.

  2. Bioaccessibility of carotenoids from Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gille, Andrea; Trautmann, Andreas; Posten, Clemens; Briviba, Karlis

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae can contribute to a balanced diet because of their composition. Beside numerous essential nutrients, carotenoids are in the focus for food applications. The bioavailability of carotenoids from photoautotrophic-cultivated Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C. reinhardtii) was compared. An in vitro digestion model was used to investigate carotenoid bioaccessibility. Furthermore, the effect of sonication on bioaccessibility was assessed. Lutein was the main carotenoid in both species. C. reinhardtii showed higher amounts of lutein and β-carotene than C. vulgaris. In contrast to C. reinhardtii, no β-carotene and only 7% of lutein were bioaccessible in nonsonicated C. vulgaris. Sonication increased the bioaccessibility of carotenoids from C. vulgaris to a level comparable with C. reinhardtii (β-carotene: ≥ 10%; lutein: ≥ 15%). Thus, C. reinhardtii represents a good carotenoid source for potential use in foods without processing, while the application of processing methods, like sonication, is necessary for C. vulgaris.

  3. Overall Energy Considerations for Algae Species Comparison and Selection in Algae-to-Fuels Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Link, D.; Kail, B.; Curtis, W.; Tuerk,A.

    2011-01-01

    The controlled growth of microalgae as a feedstock for alternative transportation fuel continues to receive much attention. Microalgae have the characteristics of rapid growth rate, high oil (lipid) content, and ability to be grown in unconventional scenarios. Algae have also been touted as beneficial for CO{sub 2} reuse, as algae can be grown using CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-based energy generation. Moreover, algae does not compete in the food chain, lessening the 'food versus fuel' debate. Most often, it is assumed that either rapid production rate or high oii content should be the primary factor in algae selection for algae-to-fuels production systems. However, many important characteristics of algae growth and lipid production must be considered for species selection, growth condition, and scale-up. Under light limited, high density, photoautotrophic conditions, the inherent growth rate of an organism does not affect biomass productivity, carbon fixation rate, and energy fixation rate. However, the oil productivity is organism dependent, due to physiological differences in how the organisms allocate captured photons for growth and oil production and due to the differing conditions under which organisms accumulate oils. Therefore, many different factors must be considered when assessing the overall energy efficiency of fuel production for a given algae species. Two species, Chlorella vulgaris and Botryococcus braunii, are popular choices when discussing algae-to-fuels systems. Chlorella is a very robust species, often outcompeting other species in mixed-culture systems, and produces a lipid that is composed primarily of free fatty acids and glycerides. Botryococcus is regarded as a slower growing species, and the lipid that it produces is characterized by high hydrocarbon content, primarily C28-C34 botryococcenes. The difference in growth rates is often considered to be an advantage oiChlorella. However, the total energy captured by each algal species in

  4. Two stage treatment of dairy effluent using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dairy effluents contains high organic load and unscrupulous discharge of these effluents into aquatic bodies is a matter of serious concern besides deteriorating their water quality. Whilst physico-chemical treatment is the common mode of treatment, immobilized microalgae can be potentially employed to treat high organic content which offer numerous benefits along with waste water treatment. Methods A novel low cost two stage treatment was employed for the complete treatment of dairy effluent. The first stage consists of treating the diary effluent in a photobioreactor (1 L) using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa while the second stage involves a two column sand bed filtration technique. Results Whilst NH4+-N was completely removed, a 98% removal of PO43--P was achieved within 96 h of two stage purification processes. The filtrate was tested for toxicity and no mortality was observed in the zebra fish which was used as a model at the end of 96 h bioassay. Moreover, a significant decrease in biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand was achieved by this novel method. Also the biomass separated was tested as a biofertilizer to the rice seeds and a 30% increase in terms of length of root and shoot was observed after the addition of biomass to the rice plants. Conclusions We conclude that the two stage treatment of dairy effluent is highly effective in removal of BOD and COD besides nutrients like nitrates and phosphates. The treatment also helps in discharging treated waste water safely into the receiving water bodies since it is non toxic for aquatic life. Further, the algal biomass separated after first stage of treatment was highly capable of increasing the growth of rice plants because of nitrogen fixation ability of the green alga and offers a great potential as a biofertilizer. PMID:24355316

  5. Identity and physiology of a new psychrophilic eukaryotic green alga, Chlorella sp., strain BI, isolated from a transitory pond near Bratina Island, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan-Kiss, R. M.; Ivanov, A.G.; Modla, S.; Czymmek, K.; Huner, N.P.A.; Priscu, J.C.; Lisle, J.T.; Hanson, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    Permanently low temperature environments are one of the most abundant microbial habitats on earth. As in most ecosystems, photosynthetic organisms drive primary production in low temperature food webs. Many of these phototrophic microorganisms are psychrophilic; however, functioning of the photosynthetic processes of these enigmatic psychrophiles (the 'photopsychrophiles') in cold environments is not well understood. Here we describe a new chlorophyte isolated from a low temperature pond, on the Ross Ice Shelf near Bratina Island, Antarctica. Phylogenetic and morphological analyses place this strain in the Chlorella clade, and we have named this new chlorophyte Chlorella BI. Chlorella BI is a psychrophilic species, exhibiting optimum temperature for growth at around 10??C. However, psychrophily in the Antarctic Chlorella was not linked to high levels of membrane-associated poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Unlike the model Antarctic lake alga, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241, Chlorella BI has retained the ability for dynamic short term adjustment of light energy distribution between photosystem II (PS II) and photosystem I (PS I). In addition, Chlorella BI can grow under a variety of trophic modes, including heterotrophic growth in the dark. Thus, this newly isolated photopsychrophile has retained a higher versatility in response to environmental change than other well studied cold-adapted chlorophytes. ?? 2008 Springer.

  6. Fueling Future with Algal Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-07-05

    Algae constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity, play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing (http://jgi.doe.gov/Algae) and contributes of the algal genome projects worldwide (GOLD database, 2012). The sequenced algal genomes offer catalogs of genes, networks, and pathways. The sequenced first of its kind genomes of a haptophyte E.huxleyii, chlorarachniophyte B.natans, and cryptophyte G.theta fill the gaps in the eukaryotic tree of life and carry unique genes and pathways as well as molecular fossils of secondary endosymbiosis. Natural adaptation to conditions critical for industrial production is encoded in algal genomes, for example, growth of A.anophagefferens at very high cell densities during the harmful algae blooms or a global distribution across diverse environments of E.huxleyii, able to live on sparse nutrients due to its expanded pan-genome. Communications and signaling pathways can be derived from simple symbiotic systems like lichens or complex marine algae metagenomes. Collectively these datasets derived from algal genomics contribute to building a comprehensive parts list essential for algal biofuel development.

  7. Metagenome survey of a multispecies and alga-associated biofilm revealed key elements of bacterial-algal interactions in photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Krohn-Molt, Ines; Wemheuer, Bernd; Alawi, Malik; Poehlein, Anja; Güllert, Simon; Schmeisser, Christel; Pommerening-Röser, Andreas; Grundhoff, Adam; Daniel, Rolf; Hanelt, Dieter; Streit, Wolfgang R

    2013-10-01

    Photobioreactors (PBRs) are very attractive for sunlight-driven production of biofuels and capturing of anthropogenic CO2. One major problem associated with PBRs however, is that the bacteria usually associated with microalgae in nonaxenic cultures can lead to biofouling and thereby affect algal productivity. Here, we report on a phylogenetic, metagenome, and functional analysis of a mixed-species bacterial biofilm associated with the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus in a PBR. The biofilm diversity and population dynamics were examined through 16S rRNA phylogeny. Overall, the diversity was rather limited, with approximately 30 bacterial species associated with the algae. The majority of the observed microorganisms were affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. A combined approach of sequencing via GS FLX Titanium from Roche and HiSeq 2000 from Illumina resulted in the overall production of 350 Mbp of sequenced DNA, 165 Mbp of which was assembled in larger contigs with a maximum size of 0.2 Mbp. A KEGG pathway analysis suggested high metabolic diversity with respect to the use of polymers and aromatic and nonaromatic compounds. Genes associated with the biosynthesis of essential B vitamins were highly redundant and functional. Moreover, a relatively high number of predicted and functional lipase and esterase genes indicated that the alga-associated bacteria are possibly a major sink for lipids and fatty acids produced by the microalgae. This is the first metagenome study of microalga- and PBR-associated biofilm bacteria, and it gives new clues for improved biofuel production in PBRs.

  8. Metagenome Survey of a Multispecies and Alga-Associated Biofilm Revealed Key Elements of Bacterial-Algal Interactions in Photobioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Krohn-Molt, Ines; Wemheuer, Bernd; Alawi, Malik; Poehlein, Anja; Güllert, Simon; Schmeisser, Christel; Pommerening-Röser, Andreas; Grundhoff, Adam; Daniel, Rolf; Hanelt, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Photobioreactors (PBRs) are very attractive for sunlight-driven production of biofuels and capturing of anthropogenic CO2. One major problem associated with PBRs however, is that the bacteria usually associated with microalgae in nonaxenic cultures can lead to biofouling and thereby affect algal productivity. Here, we report on a phylogenetic, metagenome, and functional analysis of a mixed-species bacterial biofilm associated with the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus in a PBR. The biofilm diversity and population dynamics were examined through 16S rRNA phylogeny. Overall, the diversity was rather limited, with approximately 30 bacterial species associated with the algae. The majority of the observed microorganisms were affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. A combined approach of sequencing via GS FLX Titanium from Roche and HiSeq 2000 from Illumina resulted in the overall production of 350 Mbp of sequenced DNA, 165 Mbp of which was assembled in larger contigs with a maximum size of 0.2 Mbp. A KEGG pathway analysis suggested high metabolic diversity with respect to the use of polymers and aromatic and nonaromatic compounds. Genes associated with the biosynthesis of essential B vitamins were highly redundant and functional. Moreover, a relatively high number of predicted and functional lipase and esterase genes indicated that the alga-associated bacteria are possibly a major sink for lipids and fatty acids produced by the microalgae. This is the first metagenome study of microalga- and PBR-associated biofilm bacteria, and it gives new clues for improved biofuel production in PBRs. PMID:23913425

  9. Effect of aniline on Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Amman, H.M.; Terry, b.

    1985-08-01

    A direct correlation between concentration of waste effluent, including aniline, released by a dye company into a waterway in Eastern North Carolina, and the rise and fall of populations of Chlorella, was demonstrated previously. The present study establishes threshold concentrations of aniline which affect growth of these algae, but also shows that physiologic parameters within the organism, such as the rate of photosynthesis, were decreased as sub-threshold concentrations of toxicant.

  10. Detection of surface algal blooms using the newly developed algorithm surface algal bloom index (SABI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawadi, Fahad

    2010-10-01

    Quantifying ocean colour properties has evolved over the past two decades from being able to merely detect their biological activity to the ability to estimate chlorophyll concentration using optical satellite sensors like MODIS and MERIS. The production of chlorophyll spatial distribution maps is a good indicator of plankton biomass (primary production) and is useful for the tracing of oceanographic currents, jets and blooms, including harmful algal blooms (HABs). Depending on the type of HABs involved and the environmental conditions, if their concentration rises above a critical threshold, it can impact the flora and fauna of the aquatic habitat through the introduction of the so called "red tide" phenomenon. The estimation of chlorophyll concentration is derived from quantifying the spectral relationship between the blue and the green bands reflected from the water column. This spectral relationship is employed in the standard ocean colour chlorophyll-a (Chlor-a) product, but is incapable of detecting certain macro-algal species that float near to or at the water surface in the form of dense filaments or mats. The ability to accurately identify algal formations that sometimes appear as oil spill look-alikes in satellite imagery, contributes towards the reduction of false-positive incidents arising from oil spill monitoring operations. Such algal formations that occur in relatively high concentrations may experience, as in land vegetation, what is known as the "red-edge" effect. This phenomena occurs at the highest reflectance slope between the maximum absorption in the red due to the surrounding ocean water and the maximum reflectance in the infra-red due to the photosynthetic pigments present in the surface algae. A new algorithm termed the surface algal bloom index (SABI), has been proposed to delineate the spatial distributions of floating micro-algal species like for example cyanobacteria or exposed inter-tidal vegetation like seagrass. This algorithm was

  11. Bioremoval of the azo dye Congo Red by the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Miriam; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Montes-Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2015-07-01

    Discharge of dye-containing wastewater by the textile industry can adversely affect aquatic ecosystems and human health. Bioremoval is an alternative to industrial processes for detoxifying water contaminated with dyes. In this work, active and inactive biomass of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was assayed for the ability to remove Congo Red (CR) dye from aqueous solutions. Through biosorption and biodegradation processes, Chlorella vulgaris was able to remove 83 and 58 % of dye at concentrations of 5 and 25 mg L(-1), respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity at equilibrium was 200 mg g(-1). The Langmuir model best described the experimental equilibrium data. The acute toxicity test (48 h) with two species of cladocerans indicated that the toxicity of the dye in the effluent was significantly decreased compared to the initial concentrations in the influent. Daphnia magna was the species less sensitive to dye (EC50 = 17.0 mg L(-1)), followed by Ceriodaphnia dubia (EC50 = 3.32 mg L(-1)). These results show that Chlorella vulgaris significantly reduced the dye concentration and toxicity. Therefore, this method may be a viable option for the treatment of this type of effluent.

  12. Life Cycle Analysis on Fossil Energy Ratio of Algal Biodiesel: Effects of Nitrogen Deficiency and Oil Extraction Technology

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Hou; Jing, Yang; Peidong, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been widely used to analyze various pathways of biofuel preparation from “cradle to grave.” Effects of nitrogen supply for algae cultivation and technology of algal oil extraction on life cycle fossil energy ratio of biodiesel are assessed in this study. Life cycle fossil energy ratio of Chlorella vulgaris based biodiesel is improved by growing algae under nitrogen-limited conditions, while the life cycle fossil energy ratio of biodiesel production from Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown with nitrogen deprivation decreases. Compared to extraction of oil from dried algae, extraction of lipid from wet algae with subcritical cosolvents achieves a 43.83% improvement in fossil energy ratio of algal biodiesel when oilcake drying is not considered. The outcome for sensitivity analysis indicates that the algal oil conversion rate and energy content of algae are found to have the greatest effects on the LCA results of algal biodiesel production, followed by utilization ratio of algal residue, energy demand for algae drying, capacity of water mixing, and productivity of algae. PMID:26000338

  13. Life cycle analysis on fossil energy ratio of algal biodiesel: effects of nitrogen deficiency and oil extraction technology.

    PubMed

    Jian, Hou; Jing, Yang; Peidong, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been widely used to analyze various pathways of biofuel preparation from "cradle to grave." Effects of nitrogen supply for algae cultivation and technology of algal oil extraction on life cycle fossil energy ratio of biodiesel are assessed in this study. Life cycle fossil energy ratio of Chlorella vulgaris based biodiesel is improved by growing algae under nitrogen-limited conditions, while the life cycle fossil energy ratio of biodiesel production from Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown with nitrogen deprivation decreases. Compared to extraction of oil from dried algae, extraction of lipid from wet algae with subcritical cosolvents achieves a 43.83% improvement in fossil energy ratio of algal biodiesel when oilcake drying is not considered. The outcome for sensitivity analysis indicates that the algal oil conversion rate and energy content of algae are found to have the greatest effects on the LCA results of algal biodiesel production, followed by utilization ratio of algal residue, energy demand for algae drying, capacity of water mixing, and productivity of algae.

  14. Outdoor cultures of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in the effluent of anaerobically digested activated sludge: The effects of pH and free ammonia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Ya-Lei; Yang, Li-Bin; Chu, Hua-Qiang; Guo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A freshwater algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa was cultured outdoors using anaerobically digested activated sludge effluent. The effects of pH variations were evaluated. The coupled pH variations and free ammonia toxicity significantly affected the algal growth, lipids accumulation and contamination control during every season. The free ammonia toxicity at high pH levels actually inhibited the algal growth. Compared to an optimal algal growth at a pH of 5.7-6.5, biomass productivity at a high pH of 8.3-8.8 was reduced by 67.15±6.98%, 54.39±6.42% and 83.63±5.71% in the spring, fall and summer, respectively. When the pH rose above 9.1-9.6, algae were unable to grow in the wastewater. However, high pH levels reduced contamination (e.g., bacteria and microalgae grazers) and triggered lipids accumulation in algal cells. These findings suggest that pH control strategies are essential for this type of algal wastewater system, where ammonia is the dominant nitrogen source.

  15. Cell growth kinetics of Chlorella sorokiniana and nutritional values of its biomass.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kanhaiya; Dasgupta, Chitralekha Nag; Das, Debabrata

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigates the effects of different physico-chemical parameters for the growth of Chlorella sorokiniana and subsequently determination of nutritional values of its biomass. Most suitable temperature, light intensity, pH, and acetic acid concentration were 30°C, 100 μmol m(-2)s(-1), pH 7.5, and 34.8mM, respectively for the growth of this microorganism. Arrhenius growth activation energy, Ea was calculated as 7.08 kJ mol(-1). Monod kinetics constants: maximum specific growth rate (μ max) and substrate (acetic acid) affinity coefficient (Ks) were determined as 0.1 ± 0.01 h(-1) and 76 ± 8 mg L(-1), respectively. Stoichiometric analysis revealed the capture of 1.83 g CO2 and release of 1.9 g O2 for 1g algal biomass synthesis. Algal biomass of C. sorokiniana was found rich in protein and several important minerals such as Mg, Ca, and Fe. Astaxanthin and β-carotene were extracted and quantified using high performance liquid chromatography.

  16. Enhancement of Lipid Production of Chlorella Pyrenoidosa Cultivated in Municipal Wastewater by Magnetic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Han, Songfang; Jin, Wenbiao; Chen, Yangguang; Tu, Renjie; Abomohra, Abd El-Fatah

    2016-11-01

    Despite the significant breakthroughs in research on microalgae as a feedstock for biodiesel, its production cost is still much higher than that of fossil diesel. One possible solution to overcome this problem is to optimize algal growth and lipid production in wastewater. The present study examines the feasibility of using magnetic treatment for enhancement of algal lipid production and wastewater treatment in outdoor-cultivated Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Results confirmed that magnetic treatment significantly enhances biomass and lipid productivity of C. pyrenoidosa by 12 and 10 %, respectively. Application of magnetic field in a semi-continuous culture resulted in highly treated wastewater with total nitrogen maintained under 15 mg L(-1), ammonia nitrogen below 5 mg L(-1), total phosphorus less than 0.5 mg L(-1), and CODCr less than 50 mg L(-1). In addition, magnetic treatment resulted in a decrease of wastewater turbidity, an increase of bacterial numbers, and an increase of active oxygen in wastewater which might be attributed to the enhancement of growth and lipid production of C. pyrenoidosa.

  17. The Bioconcentration and Degradation of Nonylphenol and Nonylphenol Polyethoxylates by Chlorella vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong-Wen; Hu, Hong-Wei; Wang, Lei; Yang, Ying; Huang, Guo-Lan

    2014-01-01

    Nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPnEOs), a major class of nonionic surfactants, can easily enter into aquatic environments through various pathways due to their wide applications, which leads to the extensive existence of their relative stable metabolites, namely nonylphenol (NP) and mono- to tri-ethoxylates. This study investigated the bioconcentration and degradation of NP and NPnEO oligomers (n = 1–12) by a green algae, Chlorella vulgaris. Experimental results showed that C. vulgaris can remove NP from water phase efficiently, and bioconcentration and degradation accounted for approximately half of its loss, respectively, with a 48 h BCF (bioconcentration factor) of 2.42 × 103. Moreover, C. vulgaris could concentrate and degrade NPnEOs, distribution profiles of the series homologues of the NPnEOs in algae and water phase were quite different from the initial homologue profile. The 48 h BCF of the NPnEO homologues increased with the length of the EO chain. Degradation extent of total NPnEOs by C. vulgaris was 95.7%, and only 1.1% remained in water phase, and the other 3.2% remained in the algal cells. The algae removed the NPnEOs mainly through degradation. Due to rapid degradation, concentrations of the long chain NPnEO homologous in both water (n ≥ 2) and the algal phase (n ≥ 5) was quite low at the end of a 48 h experiment. PMID:24445260

  18. Metallomics and NMR-based metabolomics of Chlorella sp. reveal the synergistic role of copper and cadmium in multi-metal toxicity and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenlin; Tan, Nicole G J; Fu, Baohui; Li, Sam F Y

    2015-03-01

    Industrial wastewaters often contain high levels of metal mixtures, in which metal mixtures may have synergistic or antagonistic effects on aquatic organisms. A combination of metallomics and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR)-based metabolomics was employed to understand the consequences of multi-metal systems (Cu, Cd, Pb) on freshwater microalgae. Morphological characterization, cell viability and chlorophyll a determination of metal-spiked Chlorella sp. suggested synergistic effects of Cu and Cd on growth inhibition and toxicity. While Pb has no apparent effect on Chlorella sp. metabolome, a substantial decrease of sucrose, amino acid content and glycerophospholipid precursors in Cu-spiked microalgae revealed Cu-induced oxidative stress. Addition of Cd to Cu-spiked cultures induced more drastic metabolic perturbations, hence we confirmed that Cu and Cd synergistically influenced photosynthesis inhibition, oxidative stress and membrane degradation. Total elemental analysis revealed a significant decrease in K, and an increase in Na, Mg, Zn and Mn concentrations in Cu-spiked cultures. This indicated that Cu is more toxic to Chlorella sp. as compared to Cd or Pb, and the combination of Cu and Cd has a strong synergistic effect on Chlorella sp. oxidative stress induction. Oxidative stress is confirmed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis, which demonstrated a drastic decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio solely in Cu-spiked cultures. Interestingly, we observed Cu-facilitated Cd and Pb bioconcentration in Chlorella sp. The absence of phytochelatins and an increment of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) yields in Cu-spiked cultures suggested that the mode of bioconcentration of Cd and Pb is through adsorption of free metals onto the algal EPS rather than intracellular chelation to phytochelatins.

  19. Kelp canopy facilitates understory algal assemblage via competitive release during early stages of secondary succession.

    PubMed

    Benes, Kylla M; Carpenter, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Kelps are conspicuous foundation species in marine ecosystems that alter the composition of understory algal assemblages. While this may be due to changes in the competitive interactions between algal species, how kelp canopies mediate propagule supply and establishment success of understory algae is not well known. In Southern California, USA, Eisenia arborea forms dense kelp canopies in shallow subtidal environments and is associated with an understory dominated by red algal species. In canopy-free areas, however, the algal assemblage is comprised of mostly brown algal species. We used a combination of mensurative and manipulative experiments to test whether Eisenia facilitates the understory assemblage by reducing competition between these different types of algae by changes in biotic interactions and/or recruitment. Our results show Eisenia facilitates a red algal assemblage via inhibition of brown algal settlement into the canopy zone, allowing recruitment to occur by vegetative means rather than establishment of new individuals. In the canopy-free zone, however, high settlement and recruitment rates suggest competitive interactions shape the community there. These results demonstrate that foundation species alter the distribution and abundance of associated organisms by affecting not only interspecific interactions but also propagule supply and recruitment limitation.

  20. Acid-Catalyzed Algal Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Lipid and Carbohydrate-Based Biofuels Production

    DOE PAGES

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Nagle, N.; Davis, R.; ...

    2014-11-12

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. We studied the effect of harvest timing on the conversion yields, using two algal strains; Chlorella and Scenedesmus, generating biomass with distinctive compositionalmore » ratios of protein, carbohydrate, and lipids. We found that the late harvest Scenedesmus biomass had the maximum theoretical biofuel potential at 143 gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) combined fuel yield per dry ton biomass, followed by late harvest Chlorella at 128 GGE per ton. Our experimental data show a clear difference between the two strains, as Scenedesmus was more successfully converted in this process with a demonstrated 97 GGE per ton. Our measurements indicated a release of >90% of the available glucose in the hydrolysate liquors and an extraction and recovery of up to 97% of the fatty acids from wet biomass. Techno-economic analysis for the combined product yields indicates that this process exhibits the potential to improve per-gallon fuel costs by up to 33% compared to a lipids-only process for one strain, Scenedesmus, grown to the mid-point harvest condition.« less

  1. Algal culture studies for CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Arnett, K.; Gladue, R.; Cox, J.; Lieberman, D.

    1987-01-01

    Microalgae are well-suited as a component of a Closed Environmental Life Support System (CELSS), since they can couple the closely related functions of food production and atmospheric regeneration. The objective was to provide a basis for predicting the response of CELSS algal cultures, and thus the food supply and air regeneration system, to changes in the culture parameters. Scenedesmus growth was measured as a function of light intensity, and the spectral dependence of light absorption by the algae as well as algal respiration in the light were determined as a function of cell concentration. These results were used to test and confirm a mathematical model that describes the productivity of an algal culture in terms of the competing processes of photosynthesis and respiration. The relationship of algal productivity to cell concentration was determined at different carbon dioxide concentrations, temperatures, and light intensities. The maximum productivity achieved by an air-grown culture was found to be within 10% of the computed maximum productivity, indicating that CO2 was very efficiently removed from the gas stream by the algal culture. Measurements of biomass productivity as a function of cell concentration at different light intensities indicated that both the productivity and efficiency of light utilization were greater at higher light intensities.

  2. Energy evaluation of algal cell disruption by high pressure homogenisation.

    PubMed

    Yap, Benjamin H J; Dumsday, Geoff J; Scales, Peter J; Martin, Gregory J O

    2015-05-01

    The energy consumption of high pressure homogenisation (HPH) was analysed to determine the feasibility of rupturing algal cells for biodiesel production. Experimentally, the processing capacity (i.e. flow rate), power draw and cell disruption efficiency of HPH were independent of feed concentration (for Nannochloropsis sp. up to 25%w/w solids). Depending on the homogenisation pressure (60-150 MPa), the solids concentration (0.25-25%w/w), and triacylglyceride (TAG) content of the harvested algal biomass (10-30%), the energy consumed by HPH represented between 6% and 110-times the energy density of the resulting biodiesel. Provided the right species (weak cell wall and high TAG content) is selected and the biomass is processed at a sufficiently high solids concentration, HPH can consume a small fraction of the energy content of the biodiesel produced. This study demonstrates the feasibility of process-scale algal cell disruption by HPH based on its energy requirement.

  3. Biogenic hydrogen and methane production from Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta biomass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Microalgae are a promising feedstock for biofuel and bioenergy production due to their high photosynthetic efficiencies, high growth rates and no need for external organic carbon supply. In this study, utilization of Chlorella vulgaris (a fresh water microalga) and Dunaliella tertiolecta (a marine microalga) biomass was tested as a feedstock for anaerobic H2 and CH4 production. Results Anaerobic serum bottle assays were conducted at 37°C with enrichment cultures derived from municipal anaerobic digester sludge. Low levels of H2 were produced by anaerobic enrichment cultures, but H2 was subsequently consumed even in the presence of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid, an inhibitor of methanogens. Without inoculation, algal biomass still produced H2 due to the activities of satellite bacteria associated with algal cultures. CH4 was produced from both types of biomass with anaerobic enrichments. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling indicated the presence of H2-producing and H2-consuming bacteria in the anaerobic enrichment cultures and the presence of H2-producing bacteria among the satellite bacteria in both sources of algal biomass. Conclusions H2 production by the satellite bacteria was comparable from D. tertiolecta (12.6 ml H2/g volatile solids (VS)) and from C. vulgaris (10.8 ml H2/g VS), whereas CH4 production was significantly higher from C. vulgaris (286 ml/g VS) than from D. tertiolecta (24 ml/g VS). The high salinity of the D. tertiolecta slurry, prohibitive to methanogens, was the probable reason for lower CH4 production. PMID:21943287

  4. Cultivation of green algae Chlorella sp. in different wastewaters from municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Min, Min; Li, Yecong; Chen, Paul; Chen, Yifeng; Liu, Yuhuan; Wang, Yingkuan; Ruan, Roger

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth of green algae Chlorella sp. on wastewaters sampled from four different points of the treatment process flow of a local municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) and how well the algal growth removed nitrogen, phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and metal ions from the wastewaters. The four wastewaters were wastewater before primary settling (#1 wastewater), wastewater after primary settling (#2 wastewater), wastewater after activated sludge tank (#3 wastewater), and centrate (#4 wastewater), which is the wastewater generated in sludge centrifuge. The average specific growth rates in the exponential period were 0.412, 0.429, 0.343, and 0.948 day(-1) for wastewaters #1, #2, #3, and #4, respectively. The removal rates of NH4-N were 82.4%, 74.7%, and 78.3% for wastewaters #1, #2, and #4, respectively. For #3 wastewater, 62.5% of NO3-N, the major inorganic nitrogen form, was removed with 6.3-fold of NO2-N generated. From wastewaters #1, #2, and #4, 83.2%, 90.6%, and 85.6% phosphorus and 50.9%, 56.5%, and 83.0% COD were removed, respectively. Only 4.7% was removed in #3 wastewater and the COD in #3 wastewater increased slightly after algal growth, probably due to the excretion of small photosynthetic organic molecules by algae. Metal ions, especially Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Mn in centrate, were found to be removed very efficiently. The results of this study suggest that growing algae in nutrient-rich centrate offers a new option of applying algal process in MWTP to manage the nutrient load for the aeration tank to which the centrate is returned, serving the dual roles of nutrient reduction and valuable biofuel feedstock production.

  5. Phytohormones as regulators of heavy metal biosorption and toxicity in green alga Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Piotrowska-Niczyporuk, Alicja; Bajguz, Andrzej; Zambrzycka, Elżbieta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2012-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to test the influence of exogenously applied phytohormones: auxins (IAA, IBA, NAA, PAA), cytokinins (BA, CPPU, DPU, 2iP, Kin, TDZ, Z), gibberellin (GA(3)), jasmonic acid (JA) as well as polyamine - spermidine (Spd) upon the growth and metabolism of green microalga Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophyceae) exposed to heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Pb) stress. The inhibitory effect of heavy metals on algal growth, metabolite accumulation and enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant system was arranged in the following order: Cd > Pb > Cu. Exogenously applied phytohormones modify the phytotoxicity of heavy metals. Auxins, cytokinins, gibberellin and spermidine (Spd) can alleviate stress symptoms by inhibiting heavy metal biosorption, restoring algal growth and primary metabolite level. Moreover, these phytohormones and polyamine stimulate antioxidant enzymes' (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase) activities and ascorbate as well as glutathione accumulation by producing increased antioxidant capacity in cells growing under abiotic stress. Increased activity of antioxidant enzymes reduced oxidative stress expressed by lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide level. In contrast JA enhanced heavy metal toxicity leading to increase in metal biosorption and ROS generation. The decrease in cell number, chlorophylls, carotenoids, monosaccharides, soluble proteins, ascorbate and glutathione content as well as antioxidant enzyme activity was also obtained in response to JA and heavy metals. Determining the stress markers (lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide) and antioxidants' level as well as antioxidant enzyme activity in cells is important for understanding the metal-specific mechanisms of toxicity and that these associated novel endpoints may be useful metrics for accurately predicting toxicity. The data suggest that phytohormones and polyamine play an important role in the C. vulgaris responding to abiotic stressor and algal

  6. Yield of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids upon chlorinating algal cells, and its prediction via algal cellular biochemical composition.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hua Chang; Mazumder, Asit; Wong, Ming Hung; Liang, Yan

    2008-12-01

    The major objective of the present study was to investigate the contribution of major biomolecules, including protein, carbohydrates and lipids, in predicting DBPs formation upon chlorination of algal cells. Three model compounds, including bovine serum albumin (BSA), starch and fish oil, as surrogates of algal-derived proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, and cells of three algae species, representing blue-green algae, green algae, and diatoms, were chlorinated in the laboratory. The results showed that BSA (27 microg mg(-1) C) and fish oil (50 microg mg(-1) C) produced more than nine times higher levels of chloroform than starch (3 microg mg(-1) C). For the formation of HAAs, BSA was shown to have higher reactivity (49 microg mg(-1) C) than fish oil and starch (5 microg mg(-1) C). For the algal cells, Nitzschia sp. (diatom) showed higher chloroform yields (48 microg mg(-1) C) but lower HAA yields (43 microg mg(-1) C) than Chlamydomonas sp. (green algae) (chloroform: 34 microg mg(-1) C; HAA: 62 microg mg(-1) C) and Oscillatoria sp. (blue-green algae) (chloroform: 26 microg mg(-1) C; HAA: 72 microg mg(-1) C). The calculated chloroform formation of cells from the three algal groups, based on their biochemical compositions, was generally consistent with the experimental data, while the predicted values for HAAs were significantly lower than the observed ones. As compared to humic substances, such as humic and fulvic acids, the algal cells appeared to be important precursors of dichloroacetic acid.

  7. Sapphire Energy - Integrated Algal Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect

    White, Rebecca L.; Tyler, Mike

    2015-07-22

    Sapphire Energy, Inc. (SEI) is a leader in large-scale photosynthetic algal biomass production, with a strongly cohesive research, development, and operations program. SEI takes a multidiscipline approach to integrate lab-based strain selection, cultivation and harvest and production scale, and extraction for the production of Green Crude oil, a drop in replacement for traditional crude oil.. SEI’s technical accomplishments since 2007 have produced a multifunctional platform that can address needs for fuel, feed, and other higher value products. Figure 1 outlines SEI’s commercialization process, including Green Crude production and refinement to drop in fuel replacements. The large scale algal biomass production facility, the SEI Integrated Algal Biorefinery (IABR), was built in Luna County near Columbus, New Mexico (see fig 2). The extraction unit was located at the existing SEI facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico, approximately 95 miles from the IABR. The IABR facility was constructed on time and on budget, and the extraction unit expansion to accommodate the biomass output from the IABR was completed in October 2012. The IABR facility uses open pond cultivation with a proprietary harvesting method to produce algal biomass; this biomass is then shipped to the extraction facility for conversion to Green Crude. The operation of the IABR and the extraction facilities has demonstrated the critical integration of traditional agricultural techniques with algae cultivation knowledge for algal biomass production, and the successful conversion of the biomass to Green Crude. All primary unit operations are de-risked, and at a scale suitable for process demonstration. The results are stable, reliable, and long-term cultivation of strains for year round algal biomass production. From June 2012 to November 2014, the IABR and extraction facilities produced 524 metric tons (MT) of biomass (on a dry weight basis), and 2,587 gallons of Green Crude. Additionally, the IABR

  8. Optimization of phenol degradation by the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa using Plackett-Burman Design and Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Dayana Priyadharshini, S; Bakthavatsalam, A K

    2016-05-01

    Statistical optimization designs were used to optimize the phenol degradation using Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The important factor influencing phenol degradation was identified by two-level Plackett-Burman Design (PBD) with five factors. PBD determined the following three factors as significant for phenol degradation viz. algal concentration, phenol concentration and reaction time. CCD and RSM were applied to optimize the significant factors identified from PBD. The results obtained from CCD indicated that the interaction between the concentration of algae and phenol, phenol concentration and reaction time and algal concentration and reaction time affect the phenol degradation (response) significantly. The predicted results showed that maximum phenol degradation of 97% could be achieved with algal concentration of 4g/L, phenol concentration of 0.8g/L and reaction time of 4days. The predicted values were in agreement with experimental values with coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.9973. The model was validated by subsequent experimentations at the optimized conditions.

  9. Volatile organic compounds released from Microcystis flos-aquae under nitrogen sources and their toxic effects on Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinghuan; Yang, Lin; Yang, Wangting; Bai, Yan; Hou, Ping; Zhao, Jingxian; Zhou, Lv; Zuo, Zhaojiang

    2017-01-01

    Eutrophication promotes massive growth of cyanobacteria and algal blooms, which can poison other algae and reduce biodiversity. To investigate the differences in multiple nitrogen (N) sources in eutrophicated water on the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from cyanobacteria, and their toxic effects on other algal growth, we analyzed VOCs emitted from Microcystis flos-aquae with different types and concentrations of nitrogen, and determined the effects under Normal-N and Non-N conditions on Chlorella vulgaris. M. flos-aquae released 27, 22, 20, 27, 19, 25 and 17 compounds, respectively, with NaNO3, NaNO2, NH4Cl, urea, Ser, Lys and Arg as the sole N source. With the reduction in N amount, the emission of VOCs was increased markedly, and the most VOCs were found under Non-N condition. C. vulgaris cell propagation, photosynthetic pigment and Fv/Fm declined significantly following exposure to M. flos-aquae VOCs under Non-N condition, but not under Normal-N condition. When C. vulgaris cells were treated with two terpenoids, eucalyptol and limonene, the inhibitory effects were enhanced with increasing concentrations. Therefore, multiple N sources in eutrophicated water induce different VOC emissions from cyanobacteria, and reduction in N can cause nutrient competition, which can result in emissions of more VOCs. Those VOCs released from M. flos-aquae cells under Non-N for nutrient competition can inhibit other algal growth. Among those VOCs, eucalyptol and limonene are the major toxic agents.

  10. Organic carbon, influent microbial diversity and temperature strongly influence algal diversity and biomass in raceway ponds treating raw municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dae-Hyun; Ramanan, Rishiram; Heo, Jina; Kang, Zion; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Algae based wastewater treatment coupled to biofuel production has financial benefits and practical difficulties. This study evaluated the factors influencing diversity and growth of indigenous algal consortium cultivated on untreated municipal wastewater in a high rate algal pond (HRAP) for a period of 1 year using multivariate statistics. Diversity analyses revealed the presence of Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta and Bacillariophyta. Dominant microalgal genera by biovolume in various seasons were Scenedesmus sp., Microcystis sp., and Chlorella sp. Scenedesmus sp., persisted throughout the year but none of three strains co-dominated with the other. The most significant factors affecting genus dominance were temperature, inflow cyanophyta and organic carbon concentration. Cyanophyta concentration affected microalgal biomass and diversity, whereas temperature impacted biomass. Preferred diversity of microalgae is not sustained in wastewater systems but is obligatory for biofuel production. This study serves as a guideline to sustain desired microalgal consortium in wastewater treatment plants for biofuel production.

  11. Stable and sporadic symbiotic communities of coral and algal holobionts

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Eric R; Barott, Katie L; Nulton, Jim; Vermeij, Mark JA; Rohwer, Forest L

    2016-01-01

    Coral and algal holobionts are assemblages of macroorganisms and microorganisms, including viruses, Bacteria, Archaea, protists and fungi. Despite a decade of research, it remains unclear whether these associations are spatial–temporally stable or species-specific. We hypothesized that conflicting interpretations of the data arise from high noise associated with sporadic microbial symbionts overwhelming signatures of stable holobiont members. To test this hypothesis, the bacterial communities associated with three coral species (Acropora rosaria, Acropora hyacinthus and Porites lutea) and two algal guilds (crustose coralline algae and turf algae) from 131 samples were analyzed using a novel statistical approach termed the Abundance-Ubiquity (AU) test. The AU test determines whether a given bacterial species would be present given additional sampling effort (that is, stable) versus those species that are sporadically associated with a sample. Using the AU test, we show that coral and algal holobionts have a high-diversity group of stable symbionts. Stable symbionts are not exclusive to one species of coral or algae. No single bacterial species was ubiquitously associated with one host, showing that there is not strict heredity of the microbiome. In addition to the stable symbionts, there was a low-diversity community of sporadic symbionts whose abundance varied widely across individual holobionts of the same species. Identification of these two symbiont communities supports the holobiont model and calls into question the hologenome theory of evolution. PMID:26555246

  12. Algal taxonomy forum: Algal Taxonomist, Let Serendipity Reign!

    PubMed

    Druehl, Louis

    2013-04-01

    The publication of a mini-review by Olivier De Clerck et al. in this issue of the Journal of Phycology presented an opportunity to open a dialogue on challenges faced by contemporary algal taxonomists. The Editorial Office solicited the following two additional contributions in response to De Clerck et al.'s paper; the responses were edited solely for clarity, space and format.

  13. Pretreatment of poultry manure anaerobic-digested effluents by electrolysis, centrifugation and autoclaving process for Chlorella vulgaris growth and pollutants removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengzi; Wu, Yu; Li, Baoming; Dong, Renjie; Lu, Haifeng; Zhou, Hongde; Cao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Different pretreatments (electrolysis, centrifugation and autoclaving) coupled with Chlorella vulgaris biological system was used for the treatment of poultry manure anaerobic-digested effluents. The pretreated effluents were used as the growth medium for algal cultivation. The pollutant removal efficiencies of the combined treatments were determined. Electrochemical pretreatment can efficiently remove the ammonia (NH4+), total phosphorus (TP), total organic carbon (TOC), total carbon (TC), turbidity and bacteria in the digested effluents. About 100.0% NH4+, turbidity and bacteria, 97.6% TP, 81.5% TOC and 96.6% inorganic carbon were removed by 5-h electrochemical treatment. The maximal algal biomass accumulation (0.53 g L(-1)) was obtained from culture in the effluents pretreated with 2-h electrolysis. The pollutants removal amounts by the combination of electrolysis and biological treatment were much higher than the other combinations.

  14. Efficacy of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus abundans for Nutrient Removal in Rice Mill Effluent (Paddy Soaked Water).

    PubMed

    Abinandan, S; Bhattacharya, Ribhu; Shanthakumar, S

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are product of sustainable development owing to its ability to treat variety of wastewater effluents and thus produced biomass can serve as value added product for various commercial applications. This paper deals with the cultivation of microalgae species namely Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus abundans in rice mill effluent (i.e., paddy soaked water) for nutrient removal. In order to investigate the nutrient removal capability, microalgae are subjected to cultivation in both raw and autoclaved samples. The maximum phosphate removal by Scenedesmus abundans and Chlorella pyrenoidosa in raw sample was 98.3% and 97.6%, respectively, whereas, the removal of ammoniacal nitrogen by Scenedesmus abundans and Chlorella pyrenoidosa in raw sample was 92% and 90.3%, respectively. The growth (measured in terms of chlorophyll content) of Scenedesmus abundans and Chlorella pyrenoidosa in raw sample was 3.88 mg/l and 5.55 mg/l, respectively. The results indicate the suitability of microalgae cultivation in rice mill effluent treatment for nutrient removal.

  15. Nutrient removal and biofuel production in high rate algal pond using real municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Kang, Zion; Ramanan, Rishiram; Choi, Jong-Eun; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the growth and nutrient removal ability of an indigenous algal consortium on real untreated municipal wastewater in a high rate algal pond (HRAP). The HRAP was operated semicontinuously under different hydraulic retention times (HRT: 2, 4, 6, and 8 days). The average removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand, and total nitrogen and phosphate of real municipal wastewater were maintained at 85.44 ± 5.10%, 92.74 ± 5.82%, and 82.85 ± 8.63%, respectively, in 2 day HRT. Algae dominated the consortium and showed high settling efficiency (99%), and biomass and lipid productivity of 0.500 ± 0.03 g/l/day and 0.103 ± 0.0083 g/l/day (2 day HRT), respectively. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis revealed a predominance of palmitate (C16:0), palmitoleate (C16:1), linoleate (C18:2), and linolenate (C18:3). Microalgal diversity analyses determined the presence of Chlorella, Scenedesmus, and Stigeoclonium as the dominant microalgae. The algal consortium provides significant value not only in terms of energy savings and nutrient removal but also because of its bioenergy potential as indicated by the lipid content (20-23%) and FAME profiling.

  16. Seasonal determinations of algal virus decay rates reveal overwintering in a temperate freshwater pond.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew M; Short, Steven M

    2016-07-01

    To address questions about algal virus persistence (i.e., continued existence) in the environment, rates of decay of infectivity for two viruses that infect Chlorella-like algae, ATCV-1 and CVM-1, and a virus that infects the prymnesiophyte Chrysochromulina parva, CpV-BQ1, were estimated from in situ incubations in a temperate, seasonally frozen pond. A series of experiments were conducted to estimate rates of decay of infectivity in all four seasons with incubations lasting 21 days in spring, summer and autumn, and 126 days in winter. Decay rates observed across this study were relatively low compared with previous estimates obtained for other algal viruses, and ranged from 0.012 to 11% h(-1). Overall, the virus CpV-BQ1 decayed most rapidly whereas ATCV-1 decayed most slowly, but for all viruses the highest decay rates were observed during the summer and the lowest were observed during the winter. Furthermore, the winter incubations revealed the ability of each virus to overwinter under ice as ATCV-1, CVM-1 and CpV-BQ1 retained up to 48%, 19% and 9% of their infectivity after 126 days, respectively. The observed resilience of algal viruses in a seasonally frozen freshwater pond provides a mechanism that can support the maintenance of viral seed banks in nature. However, the high rates of decay observed in the summer demonstrate that virus survival and therefore environmental persistence can be subject to seasonal bottlenecks.

  17. Arsenic (V) induces a fluidization of algal cell and liposome membranes.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Le Quoc; Huong, Tran Thi Thanh; Hong, Pham Thi Anh; Kawakami, Tomonori; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Umakoshi, Hiroshi; Kuboi, Ryoichi

    2008-09-01

    Arsenate is one of the most poisonous elements for living cells. When cells are exposed to arsenate, their life activities are immediately affected by various biochemical reactions, such as the binding of arsenic to membranes and the substitution of arsenic for phosphate or the choline head of phospholipids in the biological membranes. The effects of arsenate on the life activities of algae Chlorella vulgaris were investigated at various concentrations and exposure times. The results demonstrated that the living activities of algal cells (10(10)cells/L) were seriously affected by arsenate at a concentration of more than 7.5mg As/L within 24h. Algal cells and the artificial membranes (liposomes) were exposed to arsenate to evaluate its effects on the membrane fluidization. In the presence of arsenate, the membranes were fluidized due to the binding and substitution of arsenate groups for phosphates or the choline head on the their membrane surface. This fluidization of the biological membranes was considered to enhance the transport of toxicants across the membrane of algal cells.

  18. Interactions between macro-algal mats and invertebrates in the Ythan estuary, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaelli, D.

    2000-07-01

    Blooms of opportunistic green macro-algae are a common feature of coastal areas and their effects on mudflat invertebrates can be dramatic. On the Ythan estuary, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, we have carried out a number of manipulative field experiments designed to evaluate the effects on invertebrates of different species of macro-algae with contrasting ecologies, and the effects of invertebrates on the development of the blooms. Macro-algal mats were found to have dramatic nega- tive effects on the density of the amphipod Corophium volutator, with higher algal biomasses having greater impact. The mechanism for this interaction seems to be interference by the algal filaments with the feeding behaviour of the amphipod. In contrast, the polychaete Capitella spp. increases in abundance under macro-algal mats due to enrichment of the sediment with organic material. These two interactions are seen at all scales, in areas of less than 1 m2 to the scale of the entire estuary, irrespective of the species composition of the macro- algal mats. Bioturbation by Corophium and grazing by the snail Hydrobia ulvae had little effect on macro-algal biomass, but there were less algae when the polychaete Nereis diversicolor was present. The most significant interaction in this system is the pronounced negative impact of algal mats on the abundance of Corophium, probably the most important invertebrate species in the diets of the estuary's shorebirds, fish and epibenthic crustaceans.

  19. Fungal-algal association patterns in lichen symbiosis linked to macroclimate.

    PubMed

    Singh, Garima; Dal Grande, Francesco; Divakar, Pradeep K; Otte, Jürgen; Crespo, Ana; Schmitt, Imke

    2017-04-01

    Both macroclimate and evolutionary events may influence symbiont association and diversity patterns. Here we assess how climatic factors and evolutionary events shape fungal-algal association patterns in the widely distributed lichen-forming fungal genus Protoparmelia. Multilocus phylogenies of fungal and algal partners were generated using 174 specimens. Coalescent-based species delimitation analysis suggested that 23 fungal hosts are associating with 20 algal species. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to infer how fungal-algal association patterns varied with climate. Fungi associated with one to three algal partners whereas algae accepted one to five fungal partners. Both fungi and algae were more specific, associating with fewer partners, in the warmer climates. Interaction with more than one partner was more frequent in cooler climates for both the partners. Cophylogenetic analyses suggest congruent fungal-algal phylogenies. Host switch was a more common event in warm climates, whereas failure of the photobiont to diverge with its fungal host was more frequent in cooler climates. We conclude that both environmental factors and evolutionary events drive fungal and algal evolution in Protoparmelia. The processes leading to phylogenetic congruence of fungi and algae are different in different macrohabitats in our study system. Hence, closely related species inhabiting diverse habitats may follow different evolutionary pathways.

  20. Qualitative analysis of algal secretions with multiple mass spectrometric platforms.

    PubMed

    Kind, Tobias; Meissen, John K; Yang, Dawei; Nocito, Fernando; Vaniya, Arpana; Cheng, Yu-Shen; Vandergheynst, Jean S; Fiehn, Oliver

    2012-06-29

    Lipid secretions from algae pose a great opportunity for engineering biofueler feedstocks. The lipid exudates could be interesting from a process engineering perspective because lipids could be collected directly from the medium without harvesting and disrupting cells. We here report on the extracellular secretions of algal metabolites from the strain UTEX 2341 (Chlorella minutissima) into the culture medium. No detailed analysis of these lipid secretions has been performed to date. Using multiple mass spectrometric platforms, we observed around 1000 compounds and were able to annotate 50 lipids by means of liquid chromatography coupled to accurate mass quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF), direct infusion with positive and negative electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). These compounds were annotated by tandem mass spectral (MS/MS) database matching and retention time range filtering. We observed a series of triacylglycerols (TG), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols (SQDG), phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylglycerols, as well as betaine lipids diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomoserines (DGTS).

  1. Algal Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirardi, Maria L

    2015-10-08

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under the guidance of Drs. Michael Seibert (retired, Fellow Emeritus) and Maria Ghirardi (Fellow), led 15 years of research addressing the issue of algal H2 photoproduction. This project resulted in greatly increased rates and yields of algal hydrogen production; increased understanding of the H2 metabolism in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; expanded our knowledge of other physiological aspects relevant to sustained algal photosynthetic H2 production; led to the genetic identification, cloning and manipulation of algal hydrogenase genes; and contributed to a broader, fundamental understanding of the technical and scientific challenges to improving the conversion efficiencies in order to reach the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office’s targets. Some of the tangible results are: (i) 64 publications and 6 patents, (ii) international visibility to NREL, (iii) reinvigoration of national and international biohydrogen research, and (iv) research progress that helped stimulate new funding from other DOE and non-DOE programs, including the AFOSR and the DOE Office of Science.

  2. A simple model for forecast of coastal algal blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ken T. M.; Lee, Joseph H. W.; Hodgkiss, I. J.

    2007-08-01

    In eutrophic sub-tropical coastal waters around Hong Kong and South China, algal blooms (more often called red tides) due to the rapid growth of microscopic phytoplankton are often observed. Under favourable environmental conditions, these blooms can occur and subside over rather short time scales—in the order of days to a few weeks. Very often, these blooms are observed in weakly flushed coastal waters under calm wind conditions—with or without stratification. Based on high-frequency field observations of harmful algal blooms at two coastal mariculture zones in Hong Kong, a mathematical model has been developed to forecast algal blooms. The model accounts for algal growth, decay, settling and vertical turbulent mixing, and adopts the same assumptions as the classical Riley, Stommel and Bumpus model (Riley, G.A., Stommel, H., Bumpus, D.F., 1949. Quantitative ecology of the plankton of the western North Atlantic. Bulletin of the Bingham Oceanographic Collection Yale University 12, 1-169). It is shown that for algal blooms to occur, a vertical stability criterion, E < 4 μl2/ π2, must be satisfied, where E, μ, l are the vertical turbulent diffusivity, algal growth rate, and euphotic layer depth respectively. In addition, a minimum nutrient threshold concentration must be reached. Moreover, with a nutrient competition consideration, the type of bloom (caused by motile or non-motile species) can be classified. The model requires as input simple and readily available field measurements of water column transparency and nutrient concentration, and representative maximum algal growth rate of the motile and non-motile species. In addition, with the use of three-dimensional hydrodynamic circulation models, simple relations are derived to estimate the vertical mixing coefficient as a function of tidal range, wind speed, and density stratification. The model gives a quick assessment of the likelihood of algal bloom occurrence, and has been validated against field

  3. Invasive algal mats degrade coral reef physical habitat quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Jonathan A.; Smith, Celia M.; Richmond, Robert H.

    2012-03-01

    Invasive species alter the ecology of marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms or combination of mechanisms. This study documented critical physical parameters altered by the invasive red macroalga Gracilaria salicornia in situ, including: reduced irradiance, increased sedimentation, and marked variation in diurnal dissolved oxygen and pH cycles in Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu, Hawai'i. Paired studies showed that algal mats reduced irradiance by 99% and doubled sediment accumulation. Several mats developed hypoxia and hyperoxia in the extreme minima and maxima, though there was no statistical difference detected in the mean or the variability of dissolved oxygen between different 30 min time points of 24 h cycles between algal mat-open reef pairs. The algal mat significantly acidified the water under the algal mat by decreasing pH by 0.10-0.13 pH units below open reef pH. A minimum of pH 7.47 occurred between 14 and 19 h after sunrise. Our combined results suggest that mats of G. salicornia can alter various physical parameters on a fine scale and time course not commonly detected. These changes in parameters give insight into the underlying basis for negative impact, and suggest new ways in which the presence of invasive species leads to decline of coral reef ecosystems.

  4. Bioregeneration with maltose excreting Chlorella: system concept, technological development, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Wolf, L

    1997-01-01

    ESA has been studying a small-scale bioregenerative system to support long-term biological experiments on-board spacecraft with oxygen, water and food. Core component of this system is a special photo-bioreactor in which a maltose-producing strain of the green micro alga Chlorella is cultivated. A number of auxiliary system components have been developed and are functioning on the ground according to the design specifications, among them a gas/liquid phase separator operating at the same time as a low shear-stress pneumatic pump, a dehumidifier, a maltose separator, and a liquid transfer system. All components have been designed so that--in principle--they will operate in weightlessness, though this has so far only been verified for the gas/liquid separator. The bioreactor and some of the auxiliary components have been integrated in a prototype system, which has been subjected to preliminary testing. The prototype has been sterilized successfully by autoclaving, except for the liquid transfer unit which is disinfected with isopropyl alcohol. Chlorella 241.80 has been cultured several times under controlled conditions for up to 8 weeks. Algal growth to a biomass concentration of 9 g.l-1 dry weight and maltose production to a concentration of 17 g.l-1 have been achieved. The low shear-stress pneumatic pump works reliably without the mechanical cell damage produced by other types of pumps. Contamination of the algal cultures by other micro-organisms has been avoided in most of the experiment runs. The maximum oxygen production rate observed was 2 ml.min-1, when the culture was aerated with air +0.5% CO2. This production rate is well below the CO2 gas transfer rate of 5 ml.min-1 under these conditions. It can probably be doubled by increasing the maximum light intensity of the illumination unit (currently 300 micro E.m-2S-1). In a preliminary closed gas loop experiment with Periplaneta as consumer, the possibility of controlling the Chlorella culture so as to match the

  5. Small herbivores suppress algal accumulation on Agatti atoll, Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernohorsky, Nicole H.; McClanahan, Timothy R.; Babu, Idrees; Horsák, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Despite large herbivorous fish being generally accepted as the main group responsible for preventing algal accumulation on coral reefs, few studies have experimentally examined the relative importance of herbivore size on algal communities. This study used exclusion cages with two different mesh sizes (1 × 1 cm and 6 × 6 cm) to investigate the impact of different-sized herbivores on algal accumulation rates on the shallow (<2 m) back-reef of Agatti atoll, Lakshadweep. The fine-mesh cages excluded all visible herbivores, which had rapid and lasting effects on the benthic communities, and, after 127 d of deployment, there was a visible and significant increase in algae (mainly macroalgae) with algal volume being 13 times greater than in adjacent open areas. The coarse-mesh cages excluded larger fishes (>8 cm body depth) while allowing smaller fishes to access the plots. In contrast to the conclusions of most previous studies, the exclusion of large herbivores had no significant effect on the accumulation of benthic algae and the amount of algae present within the coarse-mesh cages was relatively consistent throughout the experimental period (around 50 % coverage and 1-2 mm height). The difference in algal accumulation between the fine-mesh and coarse-mesh cages appears to be related to the actions of small individuals from 12 herbivorous fish species (0.17 ind. m-2 and 7.7 g m-2) that were able to enter through the coarse mesh. Although restricted to a single habitat, these results suggest that when present in sufficient densities and diversity, small herbivorous fishes can prevent the accumulation of algal biomass on coral reefs.

  6. Conversion of membrane lipid acyl groups to triacylglycerol and formation of lipid bodies upon nitrogen starvation in biofuel green algae Chlorella UTEX29.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Elton C; Johnson, Jodie V; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2013-11-01

    Algal lipids are ideal biofuel sources. Our objective was to determine the contributors to triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation and lipid body formation in Chlorella UTEX29 under nitrogen (N) deprivation. A fivefold increase in intracellular lipids following N starvation for 24 h confirmed the oleaginous characteristics of UTEX29. Ultrastructural studies revealed increased number of lipid bodies and decreased starch granules in N-starved cells compared to N-replete cells. Lipid bodies were observed as early as 3 h after N removal and plastids collapsed after 48 h of stress. Moreover, the identification of intracellular pyrenoids and differences in the expected nutritional requirements for Chlorella protothecoides (as UTEX29 is currently classified) led us to conduct a phylogenetic study using 18S and actin cDNA sequences. This indicated UTEX29 to be more phylogenetically related to Chlorella vulgaris. To investigate the fate of different lipids after N starvation, radiolabeling using ¹⁴C-acetate was used. A significant decrease in ¹⁴C-galactolipids and phospholipids matched the increase in ¹⁴C-TAG starting at 3 h of N starvation, consistent with acyl groups from structural lipids as sources for TAG under N starvation. These results have important implications for the identification of key steps controlling oil accumulation in N-starved biofuel algae and demonstrate membrane recycling during lipid body formation.

  7. Effects of different biomass drying and lipid extraction methods on algal lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and biodiesel quality.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Javid; Liu, Yan; Lopes, Wilson A; Druzian, Janice I; Souza, Carolina O; Carvalho, Gilson C; Nascimento, Iracema A; Liao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Three lipid extraction methods of hexane Soxhlet (Sox-Hex), Halim (HIP), and Bligh and Dyer (BD) were applied on freeze-dried (FD) and oven-dried (OD) Chlorella vulgaris biomass to evaluate their effects on lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and algal biodiesel quality. Among these three methods, HIP was the preferred one for C. vulgaris lipid recovery considering both extraction efficiency and solvent toxicity. It had the highest lipid yields of 20.0 and 22.0% on FD and OD biomass, respectively, with corresponding neutral lipid yields of 14.8 and 12.7%. The lipid profiling analysis showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids were the major fatty acids in the algal lipids, and there were no significant differences on the amount of these acids between different drying and extraction methods. Correlative models applied to the fatty acid profiles concluded that high contents of palmitic and oleic acids in algal lipids contributed to balancing the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and led to a high-quality algal biodiesel.

  8. Fungal farmers or algal escorts: lichen adaptation from the algal perspective.

    PubMed

    Piercey-Normore, Michele D; Deduke, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    lichens in the genus Lepraria. Altitude has been suggested to influence species distributions in a wide range of taxonomic groups. This is one of the first studies to illustrate an ecological guild, mainly for exposure to rainfall (ombrophiles and ombrophobes), with green algal lichens.

  9. Selective extraction of intracellular components from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by combined pulsed electric field-temperature treatment.

    PubMed

    Postma, P R; Pataro, G; Capitoli, M; Barbosa, M J; Wijffels, R H; Eppink, M H M; Olivieri, G; Ferrari, G

    2016-03-01

    The synergistic effect of temperature (25-65 °C) and total specific energy input (0.55-1.11 kWh kgDW(-1)) by pulsed electric field (PEF) on the release of intracellular components from the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris was studied. The combination of PEF with temperatures from 25 to 55 °C resulted in a conductivity increase of 75% as a result of cell membrane permeabilization. In this range of temperatures, 25-39% carbohydrates and 3-5% proteins release occurred and only for carbohydrate release a synergistic effect was observed at 55 °C. Above 55 °C spontaneous cell lysis occurred without PEF. Combined PEF-temperature treatment does not sufficiently disintegrate the algal cells to release both carbohydrates and proteins at yields comparable to the benchmark bead milling (40-45% protein, 48-58% carbohydrates).

  10. Luxury uptake of phosphorus changes the accumulation of starch and lipid in Chlorella sp. under nitrogen depletion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunni; Wang, Yajie; Xu, Jin; Shang, Changhua; Wang, Zhongming; Xu, Jingliang; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of phosphorus supply on starch and lipid production under nitrogen starvation using Chlorella sp. as a model. High phosphate level had marginal effect on cell density but increased biomass growth. Massive phosphorus was assimilated quickly and mainly stored in the form of polyphosphate. The algal cells ceased phosphorus uptake when intracellular phosphorus reached a certain level. 5mM phosphate in the culture rendered a 16.7% decrease of starch synthesis and a 22.4% increase of lipid synthesis relative to low phosphate (0.17 mM). It is plausible that phosphate can regulate carbon partitioning between starch and lipid synthesis pathway by influencing ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity. Moreover, high phosphate concentration enhanced the abundance of oleic acid, improving oil quality for biodiesel production. It is a promising cultivation strategy by integration of phosphorus removal from wastewater with biodiesel production for this alga.

  11. Elimination of bicarbonate interference in the binding of U(VI) in mill-waters to freeze-dried Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, B.; Henzl, M.T.; Hosea, J.M.; Darnall, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    Freeze-dried preparations of Chlorella vulgaris will accumulate U(Vl) from alkaline, bicarbonate-containing waters collected from uranium mill process streams, provided that the pH is pre-adjusted to between 4.0 and 6.0. Bicarbonate ion complexes the uranyl ion in these waters and seriously interferes with the binding of U(Vl) to the algal cells at pH values above 6.0. No binding of U(Vl) to the algae occurred at the natural pH of 8.0 when Chlorella vulgaris was suspended in untreated mull-waters containing up to 2.5 x 10/sup -4/M U(Vl). However, when the pH of these waters was lowered from 8.0 to near 5.0, with nitric acid, nearly quantitative binding of U(Vl) to the alga was achieved. Binding is rapid and largely unaffected by ions including Na/sup +/, Cl/sup -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, /sup -/OAc, and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. Our results indicate that provided steps are taken to eliminate bicarbonate interference, such as adjustment of the pH to near 5.0, dried algal biomass could prove useful for the removal and recovery of U(Vl) from high carbonate-containing waters.

  12. In Situ Biodiesel Production from Fast-Growing and High Oil Content Chlorella pyrenoidosa in Rice Straw Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Penglin; Miao, Xiaoling; Li, Rongxiu; Zhong, Jianjiang

    2011-01-01

    Rice straw hydrolysate was used as lignocellulose-based carbon source for Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultivation and the feasibility of in situ biodiesel production was investigated. 13.7 g/L sugar was obtained by enzymatic hydrolyzation of rice straw. Chlorella pyrenoidosa showed a rapid growth in the rice straw hydrolysate medium, the maximum biomass concentration of 2.83 g/L was obtained in only 48 hours. The lipid content of the cells reached as high as 56.3%. In situ transesterification was performed for biodiesel production. The optimized condition was 1 g algal powder, 6 mL n-hexane, and 4 mL methanol with 0.5 M sulfuric acid at the temperature of 90°C in 2-hour reaction time, under which over 99% methyl ester content and about 95% biodiesel yield were obtained. The results suggested that the method has great potential in the production of biofuels with lignocellulose as an alternative carbon source for microalgae cultivation. PMID:21318171

  13. Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

    DOE PAGES

    Unkefer, Clifford Jay; Sayre, Richard Thomas; Magnuson, Jon K.; ...

    2016-06-21

    In 2010,when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortium began, little was known about the molecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very few algal genome sequences were available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played by metabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass and oilmore » yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. Our review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.« less

  14. Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, Clifford Jay; Sayre, Richard Thomas; Magnuson, Jon K.; Anderson, Daniel B.; Baxter, Ivan; Blaby, Ian K.; Brown, Judith K.; Carleton, Michael; Cattolico, Rose Ann; Dale, Taraka T.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Downes, C. Meghan; Dutcher, Susan K.; Fox, David Thomas; Goodenough, Ursula; Jaworski, Jan; Holladay, Jonathan E.; Kramer, David M.; Koppisch, Andrew Thomas; Lipton, Mary S.; Marrone, Babetta Louise; McCormick, Margaret; Molnar, Istvan; Mott, John Blaine; Ogden, Kimberly L.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Polle, Juergen; Richardson, James W.; Sabarsky, Martin; Starkenburg, Shawn Robert; Stormo, Gary D.; Teshima, Munehiro; Twary, Scott Nicholas; Unkefer, Pat J.; Yuan, Joshua S.; Olivares, Jose Antonio

    2016-06-21

    In 2010,when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortium began, little was known about the molecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very few algal genome sequences were available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played by metabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass and oil yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. Our review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.

  15. Anaerobic digested dairy manure as a nutrient supplement for cultivation of oil-rich green microalgae Chlorella sp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Li, Yecong; Chen, Paul; Min, Min; Chen, Yifeng; Zhu, Jun; Ruan, Roger R

    2010-04-01

    The present study was to investigate the effectiveness of using digested dairy manure as a nutrient supplement for cultivation of oil-rich green microalgae Chlorella sp. Different dilution multiples of 10, 15, 20, and 25 were applied to the digested manure and algal growth was compared in regard to growth rate, nutrient removal efficiency, and final algal fatty acids content and composition. Slower growth rates were observed with less diluted manure samples with higher turbidities in the initial cultivation days. A reverse linear relationship (R(2) = 0.982) was found between the average specific growth rate of the beginning 7 days and the initial turbidities. Algae removed ammonia, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and COD by 100%, 75.7-82.5%, 62.5-74.7%, and 27.4-38.4%, respectively, in differently diluted dairy manure. COD in digested dairy manure, beside CO(2), proved to be another carbon source for mixotrophic Chlorella. Fatty acid profiles derived from triacylglyceride (TAG), phospholipid and free fatty acids showed that octadecadienoic acid (C18:2) and hexadecanoic acid (C16:0) were the two most abundant fatty acids in the algae. The total fatty acid content of the dry weight increased from 9.00% to 13.7% along with the increasing dilution multiples. Based on the results from this study, a process combining anaerobic digestion and algae cultivation can be proposed as an effective way to convert high strength dairy manure into profitable byproducts as well as to reduce contaminations to environment.

  16. The effect of pressure and temperature pretreatment on the biogas output from algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Marcin; Dębowski, Marcin; Grala, Anna; Dudek, Magda; Kupczyk, Karolina; Rokicka, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents data on methane fermentation of algal biomass containing Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. The biomass was obtained from closed-culture photobioreactors. Before the process, the algae were subjected to low temperature and pressure pretreatment for 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 h. The prepared biomass was subjected to mesophilic methane fermentation. The amount and composition of the biogas formed in the process were determined. The amount of biogas produced was larger when the biomass was subjected to thermal preprocessing. The proportion of methane in the gas also increased. Extending the heating time beyond 1.0 h did not significantly improve the biogassing effects.

  17. Hydrolysate of lipid extracted microalgal biomass residue: An algal growth promoter and enhancer.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Rahulkumar; Paliwal, Chetan; Chokshi, Kaumeel; Pancha, Imran; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Satpati, Gour Gopal; Pal, Ruma; Ghosh, Arup; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-05-01

    The present study demonstrates the utilization of the algal hydrolysate (AH) prepared from lipid extracted residual harmful bloom-forming cyanobacteria Lyngbya majuscula biomass, as a growth supplement for the cultivation of green microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. BG-11 replacements with AH in different proportions significantly affects the cell count, dry cell weight (DCW), biomass productivity (BP) and pigments concentration. Among all, 25% AH substitution in BG11 media was found to be optimum which enhanced DCW, BP and pigments content by 39.13%, 40.81% and 129.47%, respectively, compared to control. The lipid content (31.95%) was also significantly higher in the 25% AH replacement. The volumetric productivity of neutral lipids (ideal for biodiesel) and total protein content of the cells significantly increased in all AH substitutions. Thus, lipid extracted microalgal biomass residue (LMBR) hydrolysate can be a potential growth stimulating supplement for oleaginous microalgae C. vulgaris.

  18. Algal biofuels: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Leite, Gustavo B; Abdelaziz, Ahmed E M; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2013-10-01

    Biodiesel production using microalgae is attractive in a number of respects. Here a number of pros and cons to using microalgae for biofuels production are reviewed. Algal cultivation can be carried out using non-arable land and non-potable water with simple nutrient supply. In addition, algal biomass productivities are much higher than those of vascular plants and the extractable content of lipids that can be usefully converted to biodiesel, triacylglycerols (TAGs) can be much higher than that of the oil seeds now used for first generation biodiesel. On the other hand, practical, cost-effective production of biofuels from microalgae requires that a number of obstacles be overcome. These include the development of low-cost, effective growth systems, efficient and energy saving harvesting techniques, and methods for oil extraction and conversion that are environmentally benign and cost-effective. Promising recent advances in these areas are highlighted.

  19. Enhanced Production of Green Tide Algal Biomass through Additional Carbon Supply

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Silva, Pedro H.; Paul, Nicholas A.; de Nys, Rocky; Mata, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Intensive algal cultivation usually requires a high flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (Ci) to support productivity, particularly for high density algal cultures. Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment can be used to overcome Ci limitation and enhance productivity of algae in intensive culture, however, it is unclear whether algal species with the ability to utilise bicarbonate (HCO3−) as a carbon source for photosynthesis will benefit from CO2 enrichment. This study quantified the HCO3− affinity of three green tide algal species, Cladophora coelothrix, Cladophora patentiramea and Chaetomorpha linum, targeted for biomass and bioenergy production. Subsequently, we quantified productivity and carbon, nitrogen and ash content in response to CO2 enrichment. All three species had similar high pH compensation points (9.7–9.9), and grew at similar rates up to pH 9, demonstrating HCO3− utilization. Algal cultures enriched with CO2 as a carbon source had 30% more total Ci available, supplying twenty five times more CO2 than the control. This higher Ci significantly enhanced the productivity of Cladophora coelothrix (26%), Chaetomorpha linum (24%) and to a lesser extent for Cladophora patentiramea (11%), compared to controls. We demonstrated that supplying carbon as CO2 can enhance the productivity of targeted green tide algal species under intensive culture, despite their clear ability to utilise HCO3−. PMID:24324672

  20. Enhanced production of green tide algal biomass through additional carbon supply.

    PubMed

    de Paula Silva, Pedro H; Paul, Nicholas A; de Nys, Rocky; Mata, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Intensive algal cultivation usually requires a high flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (Ci) to support productivity, particularly for high density algal cultures. Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment can be used to overcome Ci limitation and enhance productivity of algae in intensive culture, however, it is unclear whether algal species with the ability to utilise bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)) as a carbon source for photosynthesis will benefit from CO2 enrichment. This study quantified the HCO3 (-) affinity of three green tide algal species, Cladophora coelothrix, Cladophora patentiramea and Chaetomorpha linum, targeted for biomass and bioenergy production. Subsequently, we quantified productivity and carbon, nitrogen and ash content in response to CO2 enrichment. All three species had similar high pH compensation points (9.7-9.9), and grew at similar rates up to pH 9, demonstrating HCO3 (-) utilization. Algal cultures enriched with CO2 as a carbon source had 30% more total Ci available, supplying twenty five times more CO2 than the control. This higher Ci significantly enhanced the productivity of Cladophora coelothrix (26%), Chaetomorpha linum (24%) and to a lesser extent for Cladophora patentiramea (11%), compared to controls. We demonstrated that supplying carbon as CO2 can enhance the productivity of targeted green tide algal species under intensive culture, despite their clear ability to utilise HCO3 (-).

  1. Chlorella sorokiniana Extract Improves Short-Term Memory in Rats.

    PubMed

    Morgese, Maria Grazia; Mhillaj, Emanuela; Francavilla, Matteo; Bove, Maria; Morgano, Lucia; Tucci, Paolo; Trabace, Luigia; Schiavone, Stefania

    2016-09-29

    Increasing evidence shows that eukaryotic microalgae and, in particular, the green microalga Chlorella, can be used as natural sources to obtain a whole variety of compounds, such as omega (ω)-3 and ω-6 polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFAs). Although either beneficial or toxic effects of Chlorella sorokiniana have been mainly attributed to its specific ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs content, the underlying molecular pathways remain to be elucidated yet. Here, we investigate the effects of an acute oral administration of a lipid extract of Chlorella sorokiniana, containing mainly ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs, on cognitive, emotional and social behaviour in rats, analysing possible underlying neurochemical alterations. Our results showed improved short-term memory in Chlorella sorokiniana-treated rats compared to controls, without any differences in exploratory performance, locomotor activity, anxiety profile and depressive-like behaviour. On the other hand, while the social behaviour of Chlorella sorokiniana-treated animals was significantly decreased, no effects on aggressivity were observed. Neurochemical investigations showed region-specific effects, consisting in an elevation of noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) content in hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex and striatum. In conclusion, our results point towards a beneficial effect of Chlorella sorokiniana extract on short-term memory, but also highlight the need of caution in the use of this natural supplement due to its possible masked toxic effects.

  2. The effects of alternative pretreatment strategies on anaerobic digestion and methane production from different algal strains.

    PubMed

    Bohutskyi, Pavlo; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Bouwer, Edward J

    2014-03-01

    The effect of various pretreatment strategies on methane yields following anaerobic digestion (AD) of five different microalgal strains was investigated. Pavlova_cf sp., Tetraselmis sp. and Thalassiosira weissflogii exhibited substantial methane yields of 0.4-0.5L/g volatile solids (VS) without pretreatment, providing up to 75-80% of theoretical values. In contrast, methane yields from Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. were around 0.35L/g VS, or 55-60% of the theoretical values, respectively. Alkali treatment was not effective and thermal pretreatment only enhanced Nannochloropsis methane yields. Thermochemical pretreatment had the strongest impact on biomass solubilization with methane yields increasing by 30% and 40% for Chlorella and Nannochloropsis, respectively. The lipid content had a strong beneficial impact on the theoretical and observed methane yields as compared to protein and carbohydrate content. Other features such as cell-wall composition are also likely to be important factors dictating algal biodegradability and methane yields addressed in part by thermochemical pretreatment.

  3. Effect of Tetracycline Antibiotics on Performance and Microbial Community of Algal Photo-Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Taşkan, Ergin

    2016-07-01

    Tetracycline antibiotics have been increasingly used in medical applications and have been found in wastewater treatment plants as a result of human and industrial activities. This study investigates the combined effects of tetracycline antibiotics on the performance of an algal photo-bioreactor operated under different antibiotic concentrations in the ranges of 0.25 to 30 mg/L and considers the inhibition of algal growth, carbon and nutrient removal rates, and eukaryotic and cyanobacterial algal community changes. The results indicated that increases in the concentration of tetracycline mixtures have adverse effects on the algal community and the performance of a photo-bioreactor, and the eukaryotic algae species were more sensitive to tetracycline antibiotics than were the cyanobacterial species. Cultivation tests showed that approximately 94 % growth inhibition of mixed algae occurred at 30 mg/L.

  4. Process development for the production of bioethanol from waste algal biomass of Gracilaria verrucosa.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Rishikesh; Kumar, Manoj; Chakraborty, Subhojit; Gupta, Rishi; Kumar, Savindra; Sahoo, Dinabandhu; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2016-11-01

    The algal biomass of different species of Gracilaria were collected from coasts of Orissa and Tamil Nadu, India and characterized biochemically. Among various species, G. verrucosa was found to be better in terms of total carbohydrate content (56.65%) and hence selected for further studies. The agar was extracted from algal biomass and the residual pulp was enzymatically hydrolyzed. The optimization of algal pulp hydrolysis for various parameters revealed a maximum sugar release of 75.8mg/ml with 63% saccharification yield. The fermentation of enzymatic hydrolysate of algal pulp was optimized and 8% (v/v) inoculum size, 12h inoculum age, pH 5.0 were found to be optimum parameters for maximum ethanol concentration (27.2g/L) after 12h. The process of enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation were successfully scaled up to 2L bioreactor scale.

  5. Effects of solar ultraviolet radiation on tropical algal communities

    SciTech Connect

    Santas, R.

    1989-01-01

    This study assessed some of the effects of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation ion coral reef algal assemblages. The first part of the investigation was carried out under controlled laboratory conditions in the coral reef microcosm at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., while a field counterpart was completed at the Smithsonian Institution's marine station on Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands, in the eastern Caribbean. The study attempted to separate the effects of UV-A from those of UV-B. In the laboratory, algal turf assemblages exposed to simulated solar UV radiation produced 55.1% less biomass than assemblages that were not exposed to UV. Assemblages not exposed to UV were dominated by Ectocarpus rhodochondroides, whereas in the assemblage developing under high UV radiation, Enteromorpha prolifera and eventually Schizothrix calcicola dominated. Lower UV-B irradiances caused a proportional reduction in biomass production and had less pronounced effects on species composition. UV-A did not have any significant effects on either algal turf productivity or community structure. In the field, assemblages exposed to naturally occurring solar UV supported a biomass 40% lower than that of assemblages protected from UV-B exposure. Once again, UV-A did not inhibit algal turf productivity.

  6. Heterotrophic Growth and Production of Xanthophylls by Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Robert J.

    1965-01-01

    The growth and level of xanthophylls of several representative species of green algae were investigated as a possible source of pigmentation for the egg yolk and broiler markets. Chlorella pyrenoidosa 7-11-05 was selected for fermentation studies because of its high level of xanthophylls and wide temperature range for growth. The heterotrophic metabolism was preferred because of the ease of adaptability to present fermentation equipment. When used as the sole carbon source, glucose was the only sugar, among many tested, that gave appreciable growth in illuminated shaken flasks. A dry cell weight of 90 g per liter and total xanthophylls of 450 mg per liter were obtained from 190 g per liter of glucose monohydrate in 168-hr illuminated shaken flasks. Higher levels of glucose decreased yields. In combination with glucose, monosaccharides, such as fructose and galactose, were readily assimilated. The 7-11-05 strain was adapted to galactose as the sole carbon source after six vegetative passages. Light of the proper intensity and duration stimulated total xanthophylls approximately 35%. The effect on dry cell weight and total xanthophylls of seven antibiotics added at various levels in shaken flasks was studied. Erythromycin was essentially stable throughout the fermentation and nontoxic up to 25 μg/ml, with only slight toxicity at higher levels. Both erythromycin and ristocetin were effective in controlling a high incidence of bacterial contamination in 30-liter fermentors. With the higher agitation and aeration rates possible in 30-liter fermentors, dry cell weights in excess of 100 g per liter and total xanthophylls of 467 to 512 mg per liter were readily obtained from 230 to 260 g per liter of glucose in 162-hr illuminated batch-type fermentations. Continuous-feed runs yielded a dry cell weight of 302 g per liter and total xanthophylls of 650 mg per liter from 520 g per liter of glucose. The type of Chlorella cell produced was an important consideration with

  7. Biomass production and nutrient removal by Chlorella sp. as affected by sludge liquor concentration.

    PubMed

    Åkerström, Anette M; Mortensen, Leiv M; Rusten, Bjørn; Gislerød, Hans Ragnar

    2014-11-01

    The use of microalgae for biomass production and nutrient removal from the reject water produced in the dewatering process of anaerobically digested sludge, sludge liquor, was investigated. The sludge liquor was characterized by a high content of total suspended solids (1590 mg L(-1)), a high nitrogen concentration (1210 mg L(-1)), and a low phosphorus concentration (28 mg L(-1)). Chlorella sp. was grown in sludge liquor diluted with wastewater treatment plant effluent water to different concentrations (12, 25, 40, 50, 70, and 100%) using batch mode. The environmental conditions were 25 °C, a continuous lightning of 115 μmol m(-2) s(-1), and a CO2 concentration of 3.0%. The highest biomass production (0.42-0.45 g dry weight L(-1) Day(-1)) was achieved at 40-50% sludge liquor, which was comparable to the production of the control culture grown with an artificial fertilizer. The biomass production was 0.12 and 0.26 g dry weight L(-1) Day(-1) at 12% and 100% sludge liquor, respectively. The percentage of nitrogen in the algal biomass increased from 3.6% in 12% sludge liquor and reached a saturation of ∼10% in concentrations with 50% sludge liquor and higher. The phosphorus content in the biomass increased linearly from 0.2 to 1.5% with increasing sludge liquor concentrations. The highest nitrogen removal rates by algal biosynthesis were 33.6-42.6 mg TN L(-1) Day(-1) at 40-70% sludge liquor, while the highest phosphorus removal rates were 3.1-4.1 mg TP L(-1) Day(-1) at 50-100% sludge liquor.

  8. Impact of Microalgae-Bacteria Interactions on the Production of Algal Biomass and Associated Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Juan Luis; Garbayo, Inés; Cuaresma, María; Montero, Zaida; González-del-Valle, Manuel; Vílchez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    A greater insight on the control of the interactions between microalgae and other microorganisms, particularly bacteria, should be useful for enhancing the efficiency of microalgal biomass production and associated valuable compounds. Little attention has been paid to the controlled utilization of microalgae-bacteria consortia. However, the studies of microalgal-bacterial interactions have revealed a significant impact of the mutualistic or parasitic relationships on algal growth. The algal growth, for instance, has been shown to be enhanced by growth promoting factors produced by bacteria, such as indole-3-acetic acid. Vitamin B12 produced by bacteria in algal cultures and bacterial siderophores are also known to be involved in promoting faster microalgal growth. More interestingly, enhancement in the intracellular levels of carbohydrates, lipids and pigments of microalgae coupled with algal growth stimulation has also been reported. In this sense, massive algal production might occur in the presence of bacteria, and microalgae-bacteria interactions can be beneficial to the massive production of microalgae and algal products. This manuscript reviews the recent knowledge on the impact of the microalgae-bacteria interactions on the production of microalgae and accumulation of valuable compounds, with an emphasis on algal species having application in aquaculture. PMID:27213407

  9. Impact of Microalgae-Bacteria Interactions on the Production of Algal Biomass and Associated Compounds.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Juan Luis; Garbayo, Inés; Cuaresma, María; Montero, Zaida; González-Del-Valle, Manuel; Vílchez, Carlos

    2016-05-19

    A greater insight on the control of the interactions between microalgae and other microorganisms, particularly bacteria, should be useful for enhancing the efficiency of microalgal biomass production and associated valuable compounds. Little attention has been paid to the controlled utilization of microalgae-bacteria consortia. However, the studies of microalgal-bacterial interactions have revealed a significant impact of the mutualistic or parasitic relationships on algal growth. The algal growth, for instance, has been shown to be enhanced by growth promoting factors produced by bacteria, such as indole-3-acetic acid. Vitamin B12 produced by bacteria in algal cultures and bacterial siderophores are also known to be involved in promoting faster microalgal growth. More interestingly, enhancement in the intracellular levels of carbohydrates, lipids and pigments of microalgae coupled with algal growth stimulation has also been reported. In this sense, massive algal production might occur in the presence of bacteria, and microalgae-bacteria interactions can be beneficial to the massive production of microalgae and algal products. This manuscript reviews the recent knowledge on the impact of the microalgae-bacteria interactions on the production of microalgae and accumulation of valuable compounds, with an emphasis on algal species having application in aquaculture.

  10. Methods for removing contaminants from algal oil

    SciTech Connect

    Lupton, Francis Stephen

    2016-09-27

    Methods for removing contaminants from algal oil are provided. In an embodiment, a method comprises the steps of combining a sulfuric acid-aqueous solution that has a pH of about 1 or less with a contaminant-containing algal oil at treatment conditions effective to form an effluent. The effluent comprises a treated algal oil phase and contaminants in an acidic aqueous phase. The contaminants comprise metals, phosphorus, or combinations thereof. The acidic aqueous phase is removed from the effluent to form a contaminant-depleted algal oil.

  11. Raman microspectroscopy of individual algal cells: sensing unsaturation of storage lipids in vivo.

    PubMed

    Samek, Ota; Jonáš, Alexandr; Pilát, Zdeněk; Zemánek, Pavel; Nedbal, Ladislav; Tříska, Jan; Kotas, Petr; Trtílek, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Algae are becoming a strategic source of fuels, food, feedstocks, and biologically active compounds. This potential has stimulated the development of innovative analytical methods focused on these microorganisms. Algal lipids are among the most promising potential products for fuels as well as for nutrition. The crucial parameter characterizing the algal lipids is the degree of unsaturation of the constituent fatty acids quantified by the iodine value. Here we demonstrate the capacity of the spatially resolved Raman microspectroscopy to determine the effective iodine value in lipid storage bodies of individual living algal cells. The Raman spectra were collected from three selected algal species immobilized in an agarose gel. Prior to immobilization, the algae were cultivated in the stationary phase inducing an overproduction of lipids. We employed the characteristic peaks in the Raman scattering spectra at 1,656 cm(-1) (cis C═C stretching mode) and 1,445 cm(-1) (CH(2) scissoring mode) as the markers defining the ratio of unsaturated-to-saturated carbon-carbon bonds of the fatty acids in the algal lipids. These spectral features were first quantified for pure fatty acids of known iodine value. The resultant calibration curve was then used to calculate the effective iodine value of storage lipids in the living algal cells from their Raman spectra. We demonstrated that the iodine value differs significantly for the three studied algal species. Our spectroscopic estimations of the iodine value were validated using GC-MS measurements and an excellent agreement was found for the Trachydiscus minutus species. A good agreement was also found with the earlier published data on Botryococcus braunii. Thus, we propose that Raman microspectroscopy can become technique of choice in the rapidly expanding field of algal biotechnology.

  12. Evolutionary trade-off between defence against grazing and competitive ability in a simple unicellular alga, Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takehito; Hairston, Nelson G.; Ellner, Stephen P.

    2004-01-01

    Trade-offs between defence and other fitness components are expected in principle, and can have major qualitative impacts on ecological dynamics. Here we show that such a trade-off exists even in the simple unicellular alga Chlorella vulgaris. We grew algal populations for multiple generations in either the presence ('grazed algae') or absence ('non-grazed algae') of the grazing rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus, and then evaluated their defence and competitive abilities. Grazed algae were better defended, yielding rotifer growth rate 32% below that of animals fed non-grazed algae, but they also had diminished competitive ability, with a growth rate under nutrient-limiting conditions 28% below that of non-grazed algae. Grazed algae also had a smaller cell size and were more concentrated in carbon and nitrogen. Thus, C. vulgaris genotypes vary phenotypically in their position along a trade-off curve between defence against grazing and competitive ability. This genetic variation underlies rapid algal evolution that significantly alters the ecological predator-prey cycles between rotifers and algae. PMID:15347519

  13. Improvement of biomass production by Chlorella sp. MJ 11/11 for use as a feedstock for biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Supratim; Roy, Shantonu; Das, Debabrata

    2015-04-01

    Algal biomass is gaining importance for biofuel production as it is rich in lipids. It becomes more significant when biomass is produced by capturing atmospheric greenhouse gas, CO2. In the present study, the effect of different physicochemical parameters were studied on the biomass and lipid productivity in Chlorella sp. MJ 11/11. The different parameters viz. initial pH, nitrate concentration, and phosphate concentration were optimized using single-parameter studies. The interactions between the parameters were determined statistically using the Box-Behnken design of optimization. The optimal values were decided by analyzing them with response surface methodology. The optimum levels of the parameters (pH 6.5, nitrate concentration 0.375 g L(-1), and phosphate concentration 0.375 mL L(-1)) yielded a maximum biomass concentration of 1.26 g L(-1) at a constant light intensity of 100 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and temperature of 30 °C. The effect of CO2 concentration on the biomass production was also investigated and was found to be a maximum of 4 g L(-1) at 5 % air-CO2 mixture (v/v). Maximum lipid content of 24.6 % (w/w) was observed at 2 % air-CO2 mixture (v/v). Fatty acid analyses of the obtained algal biomass suggested that they could be a suitable feedstock for biodiesel production.

  14. Effect of lycopene from Chlorella marina on high cholesterol-induced oxidative damage and inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Renju, G L; Kurup, G Muraleedhara; Saritha Kumari, C H

    2014-02-01

    Even though the role of all-trans lycopene from tomato in controlling atherosclerosis was reported, but no report is available on the cis-isomer of lycopene obtained from an easily available source green algae Chlorella marina. So in this study, Sprague Dawley rats fed with high-cholesterol diet were given standard drug lovastatin; algal lycopene (AL) (cis/all-trans 40:60) and tomato all-trans lycopene (TL) and the following parameters were studied. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides were decreased significantly and the high-density lipoprotein levels were increased on treatment with AL. The activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were found to be increased, whereas thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels were decreased in AL when compared to the drug and TL-treated rats. The activities of inflammatory marker enzymes like cyclooxygenase, 15-lipoxygenase in monocytes and myeloperoxidase, C-reactive protein and ceruloplasmin levels in serum were found to be decreased on treatment with AL. Histopathological studies revealed that lycopene from this alga could reduce fatty liver and aortic plaque when compared to the drug and TL. Algal lycopene showed very significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect in high-cholesterol fed rats. Therefore, AL from C. marina would be recommended for the treatment of hyperlipidemia.

  15. Algae-facilitated chemical phosphorus removal during high-density Chlorella emersonii cultivation in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Bernards, Matthew; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2014-02-01

    An algae-based membrane bioreactor (A-MBR) was evaluated for high-density algae cultivation and phosphorus (P) removal. The A-MBR was seeded with Chlorella emersonii and operated at a hydraulic retention time of 1day with minimal biomass wastage for about 150days. The algae concentration increased from initially 385mg/L (or 315mg biomass COD/L) to a final of 4840mg/L (or 1664mg COD/L), yielding an average solids (algae biomass+minerals) production rate of 32.5gm(-3)d(-1) or 6.2gm(-2)d(-1). The A-MBR was able to remove 66±9% of the total P from the water while the algal biomass had an average of 7.5±0.2% extracellular P and 0.4% of intracellular P. The results suggest that algae-induced phosphate precipitation by algae is key to P removal and high-density algae cultivation produces P-rich algal biomass with excellent settling properties.

  16. Evolutionary trade-off between defence against grazing and competitive ability in a simple unicellular alga, Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takehito; Hairston, Nelson G; Ellner, Stephen P

    2004-09-22

    Trade-offs between defence and other fitness components are expected in principle, and can have major qualitative impacts on ecological dynamics. Here we show that such a trade-off exists even in the simple unicellular alga Chlorella vulgaris. We grew algal populations for multiple generations in either the presence ('grazed algae') or absence ('non-grazed algae') of the grazing rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus, and then evaluated their defence and competitive abilities. Grazed algae were better defended, yielding rotifer growth rate 32% below that of animals fed non-grazed algae, but they also had diminished competitive ability, with a growth rate under nutrient-limiting conditions 28% below that of non-grazed algae. Grazed algae also had a smaller cell size and were more concentrated in carbon and nitrogen. Thus, C. vulgaris genotypes vary phenotypically in their position along a trade-off curve between defence against grazing and competitive ability. This genetic variation underlies rapid algal evolution that significantly alters the ecological predator-prey cycles between rotifers and algae.

  17. Sensitivity and Antioxidant Response of Chlorella sp. MM3 to Used Engine Oil and Its Water Accommodated Fraction.

    PubMed

    Ramadass, Kavitha; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-07-01

    We exposed the microalgal strain, Chlorella sp. MM3, to unused or used engine oil, or their water accommodated fractions (WAFs) to determine growth inhibition and response of antioxidant enzymes. Oil type and oil concentration greatly affected the microalgal growth. Used oil at 0.04 % (0.4 g L(-1)) resulted in 50 % inhibition in algal growth, measured in terms of chlorophyll-a, while the corresponding concentration of unused oil was nontoxic. Similarly, used oil WAF showed significant toxicity to the algal growth at 10 % level, whereas WAF from unused oil was nontoxic even at 100 % concentration. Peroxidase enzyme in the microalga significantly increased with used oil at concentrations above 0.04 g L(-1) whereas the induction of superoxide dismutase and catalase was apparent only at 0.06 g L(-1). Activities of the antioxidant enzymes increased significantly when the microalga was exposed to 75 and 100 % WAF obtained from used oil. The used oil toxicity on microalga could be due to the presence of toxic soluble mono- and polyaromatic compounds, heavy metals, and other compounds attained by the oil during its use in the motor engines.

  18. Effects of fluoride and chloride on the growth of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Wu, Y Y; Wu, Y D

    2013-01-01

    To compare the toxic action of fluoride (F(-)) and chloride (Cl(-)) on freshwater algae, effects of F(-) and Cl(-) on Chlorella pyrenoidosa growth were investigated by determination of the algal biomass and model analysis. Results showed that the exponential growth equation (D = D0 + ae(bT)) may be used to fit the relationship between cell density (D) of C. pyrenoidosa and exposure time (T), but F(-) and Cl(-) have significantly different effects on parameters a (initial quantity of algae at the exponential growth stage) and b (growth constant). In the range of experimental concentrations, F(-) inhibited C. pyrenoidosa growth, and percent inhibition increased with increasing exposure time and F(-) concentration. By contrast, Cl(-) either inhibited or enhanced C. pyrenoidosa growth depending on Cl(-) concentration and exposure time, and percent inhibition increased with increasing Cl(-) concentration but decreased with increasing exposure time. The dose-response equation: I = min + (max - min)/(1 + 10(lgEC50-lgC)) may be used to fit the relationship between percent inhibition (I) and F(-) or Cl(-) concentration (C); however, F(-) was distinct from Cl(-) in terms of effects on parameter 'min'. The EC50 values of F(-) and Cl(-) ranged from 118 to 170 mg/L and 19.73 to 36.33 g/L, respectively; the latter is much higher than the former. Thus F(-) has higher toxicity than Cl(-).

  19. Growing Chlorella sp. on meat processing wastewater for nutrient removal and biomass production.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian; Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Ma, Xiaochen; Chandra, Ceria; Doan, Yen T T; Ma, Yiwei; Zheng, Hongli; Cheng, Sibo; Griffith, Richard; Chen, Paul; Chen, Chi; Urriola, Pedro E; Shurson, Gerald C; Gislerød, Hans R; Ruan, Roger

    2015-12-01

    In this work, Chlorella sp. (UM6151) was selected to treat meat processing wastewater for nutrient removal and biomass production. To balance the nutrient profile and improve biomass yield at low cost, an innovative algae cultivation model based on wastewater mixing was developed. The result showed that biomass yield (0.675-1.538 g/L) of algae grown on mixed wastewater was much higher than that on individual wastewater and artificial medium. Wastewater mixing eased the bottleneck for algae growth and contributed to the improved biomass yield. Furthermore, in mixed wastewater with sufficient nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies (68.75-90.38%) and total nitrogen removal efficiencies (30.06-50.94%) were improved. Wastewater mixing also promoted the synthesis of protein in algal cells. Protein content of algae growing on mixed wastewater reached 60.87-68.65%, which is much higher than that of traditional protein source. Algae cultivation model based on wastewater mixing is an efficient and economical way to improve biomass yield.

  20. Cultivation of a microalga Chlorella vulgaris using recycled aqueous phase nutrients from hydrothermal carbonization process.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhenyi; Hu, Bing; Shi, Aimin; Ma, Xiaochen; Cheng, Yanling; Chen, Paul; Liu, Yuhuan; Lin, Xiangyang; Ruan, Roger

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using recovered nutrients from hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) for cultivation of microalga Chlorella vulgaris. Different dilution multiples of 50, 100 and 200 were applied to the recycled process water from HTC and algal growth was compared among these media and a standard growth medium BG-11. Algae achieved a biomass concentration of 0.79 g/L on 50 × process water after 4 days. Algae removed total nitrogen, total phosphorus and chemical oxygen demand by 45.5-59.9%, 85.8-94.6% and 50.0-60.9%, respectively, on differently diluted process water. The fatty acid methyl ester yields for algae grown on the process water were 11.2% (50 ×), 11.2% (100 ×) and 9.7% (200 ×), which were significantly higher than 4.5% for BG-11. In addition, algae cultivated on process water had 18.9% higher carbon and 7.8% lower nitrogen contents than those on BG-11, indicating that they are very suitable as biofuel feedstocks.

  1. Crystallization and Crystal-Packing Studies of Chlorella Virus Deoxyuridine Triphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Homma, K.; Moriyama, H

    2009-01-01

    The 141-amino-acid deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase) from the algal Chlorella virus IL-3A and its Glu81Ser/Thr84Arg-mutant derivative Mu-22 were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method at 298 K with polyethylene glycol as the precipitant. An apo IL-3A dUTPase with an amino-terminal T7 epitope tag and a carboxy-terminal histidine tag yielded cubic P2{sub 1}3 crystals with unit-cell parameter a = 106.65 {angstrom}. In the presence of dUDP, the enzyme produced thin stacked orthorhombic P222 crystals with unit-cell parameters a = 81.0, b = 96.2, c = 132.8 {angstrom}. T7-histidine-tagged Mu-22 dUTPase formed thin stacked rectangular crystals. Amino-terminal histidine-tagged dUTPases did not crystallize but formed aggregates. Glycyl-seryl-tagged dUTPases yielded cubic P2{sub 1}3 IL-3A crystals with unit-cell parameter a = 105.68 {angstrom} and hexagonal P6{sub 3} Mu-22 crystals with unit-cell parameters a = 132.07, c = 53.45 {angstrom}, {gamma} = 120{sup o}. Owing to the Thr84Arg mutation, Mu-22 dUTPase had different monomer-to-monomer interactions to those of IL-3A dUTPase.

  2. Metal distributions in complexes with Chlorella vulgaris in seawater and wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, P.R.; Kowalak, A.D.

    1999-10-01

    Divalent cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) simultaneous complexes with an algal biomass Chlorella vulgaris were studied for bioremediation purposes in various aqueous media: distilled-deionized water (DDIW), seawater, nuclear-reactor pool water, and process wastewater. Reactions were monitored using various dry masses of algae at constant temperature and constant metal concentrations for reaction times ranging from 0 to 150 minutes. Complexes occurred within 30 minutes and reached a steady state after 80 to 120 minutes. Distribution constants (K{prime}{sub d}) were calculated for the complexes and relative orders of K{prime}{sub d} were reported. The K{prime}{sub d} are used to evaluate relative efficiency of metal remediation from waters. Lead, Cu, and Ni complexes had the greatest K{prime}{sub d} values and those metals were most efficiently removed from these waters. Zinc and Fe formed the most labile complexes. The order of K{prime}{sub d} values for complexes in DDIW was Pb > Cu > Cd > Zn, then Cu > Cd > Zn in seawater, Cd > Cu > Zn in reactor pool water, and Ni > Cd > Cu > Zn > Fe in wastewater. C. vulgaris biomass may potentially be used as an alternative to traditional water treatment methods for simultaneous extraction of metals from seawater, process wastewater, or drinking water.

  3. Evaluation of novel starch-deficient mutants of Chlorella sorokiniana for hyper-accumulation of lipids

    PubMed Central

    Vonlanthen, Sofie; Dauvillée, David; Purton, Saul

    2015-01-01

    When green algae are exposed to physiological stresses such as nutrient deprivation, growth is arrested and the cells channel fixed carbon instead into storage compounds, accumulating first starch granules and then lipid bodies containing triacylglycerides. In recent years there has been significant interest in the commercial exploitation of algal lipids as a sustainable source of biodiesel. Since starch and lipid biosynthesis involves the same C3 precursor pool, it has been proposed that mutations blocking starch accumulation should result in increased lipid yields, and indeed several studies have supported this. The fast-growing, thermotolerant alga Chlorella sorokiniana represents an attractive strain for industrial cultivation. We have therefore generated and characterized starch-deficient mutants of C. sorokiniana and determined whether lipid levels are increased in these strains under stress conditions. One mutant (ST68) is shown to lack isoamylase, whilst two others (ST3 and ST12) are defective in starch phosphorylase. However, we find no significant change in the accumulation or profile of fatty acids in these mutants compared to the wild-type, suggesting that a failure to accumulate starch per se is not sufficient for the hyper-accumulation of lipid, and that more subtle regulatory steps underlie the partitioning of carbon to the two storage products. PMID:26865991

  4. Construction and operation of microbial fuel cell with Chlorella vulgaris biocathode for electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia-yuan; Song, Tian-shun; Zhu, Xu-jun; Wei, Ping; Zhou, Charles C

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a modified microbial fuel cell (MFC) with a tubular photobioreactor (PHB) configuration as a cathode compartment was constructed by introducing Chlorella vulgaris to the cathode chamber used to generate oxygen in situ. Two types of cathode materials and light/dark cycles were used to test the effect on MFC with algae biocathode. Results showed that the use of algae is an effective approach because these organisms can act as efficient in situ oxygenators, thereby facilitating the cathodic reaction. Dissolved oxygen and voltage output displayed a clear light positive response and were drastically enhanced compared with the abiotic cathode. In particular, carbon paper-coated Pt used as a cathode electrode increased voltage output at a higher extent than carbon felt used as an electrode. The maximum power density of 24.4 mW/m(2) was obtained from the MFC with algae biocathode which utilized the carbon paper-coated Pt as the cathode electrode under intermittent illumination. This density was 2.8 times higher than that of the abiotic cathode. Continuous illumination shortened the algal lifetime. These results demonstrated that intermittent illumination and cathode material-coated catalyst are beneficial to a more efficient and prolonged operation of MFC with C. vulgaris biocathode.

  5. Construction and operation of microbial fuel cell with Chlorella vulgaris biocathode for electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia-yuan; Song, Tian-shun; Zhu, Xu-jun; Wei, Ping; Zhou, Charles C

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a modified microbial fuel cell (MFC) with a tubular photobioreactor (PHB) configuration as a cathode compartment was constructed by introducing Chlorella vulgaris to the cathode chamber used to generate oxygen in situ. Two types of cathode materials and light/dark cycles were used to test the effect on MFC with algae biocathode. Results showed that the use of algae is an effective approach because these organisms can act as efficient in situ oxygenators, thereby facilitating the cathodic reaction. Dissolved oxygen and voltage output displayed a clear light positive response and were drastically enhanced compared with the abiotic cathode. In particular, carbon paper-coated Pt used as a cathode electrode increased voltage output at a higher extent than carbon felt used as an electrode. The maximum power density of 24.4 mW/m2 was obtained from the MFC with algae biocathode which utilized the carbon paper-coated Pt as the cathode electrode under intermittent illumination. This density was 2.8 times higher than that of the abiotic cathode. Continuous illumination shortened the algal lifetime. These results demonstrated that intermittent illumination and cathode material-coated catalyst are beneficial to a more efficient and prolonged operation of MFC with C. vulgaris biocathode.

  6. Toxic effects of 1,4-dichlorobenzene on photosynthesis in Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Jie; Feng, Jia; Lv, Junping; Cai, Jin; Liu, Qi; Xie, Shulian

    2016-09-01

    1,4-Dichlorobenzene (1,4-DCB) is a common organic contaminant in water. To determine the effects of this contaminant on photosynthesis in the freshwater alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, algal cells were treated with 1,4-DCB at different concentrations for various times, and their photosynthetic pigment contents and chlorophyll fluorescence traits were analyzed. The results showed that 1,4-DCB exerted toxic effects on photosynthesis in C. pyrenoidosa, especially at concentrations exceeding 10 mg/L. The inhibitory effects of 1,4-DCB were time- and concentration-dependent. After treatment with 1,4-DCB (≥10 mg/L), the contents of photosynthetic pigments decreased significantly, the photosystem II reaction center was irreversibly damaged, and the quantum yield of photosystem II decreased significantly. Also, there were sharp decreases in the efficiency of photosynthetic electron transport and energy conversion. Photosystem II became overloaded as the amount of excitation energy distributed to it increased. All of these events weakened the photochemical reaction, and ultimately led to serious inhibition of photosynthesis.

  7. Harvesting Chlorella vulgaris by magnetic flocculation using Fe₃O₄ coating with polyaluminium chloride and polyacrylamide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Liang, Wenyan; Liu, Lijun; Li, Feizhen; Fan, Qianlong; Sun, Xiaoli

    2015-12-01

    The harvesting of Chlorella vulgaris was investigated by magnetic flocculation, where the natural magnetite was used as magnetic seeds and the polyaluminium chloride (PACl) and polyacrylamide (PAM) were used as the coating polymer on the Fe3O4 surface. The composite modes of PACl, PAM, and Fe3O4 and their effects on harvesting were studied. The results showed that adding the composite PACl/Fe3O4 first (at (0.625 mmol Al/L)/(10 g/L)) followed by the addition PAM (at 3mg/L) was the optimum dosing strategy. Following this strategy, 99% of cells could be harvested in less than 0.5 min, and it could overcome negative impacts from pH and algal organic matter. Compared to PACl, ζ-potentials of PACl/Fe3O4 were found to be increased substantially from -4.9-8.5 mV to 1.5-19.5 mV at pH range 2.1-12.3. The charge neutralization of PACl/Fe3O4 and sweeping of PAM play an important role in magnetic harvesting of microalgal cells.

  8. Screening high oleaginous Chlorella strains from different climate zones.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Hu, Hanhua

    2013-09-01

    In outdoor cultivation, screening strains adapted to a wide temperature range or suitable strains for different environmental temperatures is of great importance. In this study, triacylglycerol (TAG) content of 23 oil-producing Chlorella strains from different climate zones were analyzed by thin layer chromatography. Four selected Chlorella strains (NJ-18, NJ-7, NMX35N and NMX139N) with rather high TAG content had higher total lipid content compared with Chlorella vulgaris SAG 211-11b. In particular, NJ-18 displayed the highest TAG productivity among the four high oil-producing Chlorella strains. Accumulation of TAGs in strain NMX35N changed a little from 30 to 40°C, showing a desirable characteristic of accumulating TAGs at high temperatures. Our results demonstrated that NJ-18 and NMX35N had suitable fatty acid profiles and good adaption to low and high temperatures respectively. Therefore, cultivation of the two Chlorella strains together might be a good option for economic biodiesel production during the whole seasons of the year.

  9. Outdoor Growth Characterization of an Unknown Microalga Screened from Contaminated Chlorella Culture

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weizheng; Zhu, Feifei

    2017-01-01

    Outdoor microalgae cultivation process is threatened by many issues, such as pest pollution and complex, changeable weather. Therefore, it is difficult to have identical growth rate for the microalgae cells and to keep their continuous growth. Outdoor cultivation requires the algae strains not only to have a strong ability to accumulate oil, but also to adapt to the complicated external environment. Using 18S rRNA technology, one wild strain Scenedesmus sp. FS was isolated and identified from the culture of Chlorella zofingiensis. Upon contamination by Scenedesmus sp., the species could quickly replace Chlorella zofingiensis G1 and occupy ecological niche in the outdoor column photobioreactors. The results indicated that Scenedesmus sp. FS showed high alkali resistance. It also showed that even under the condition of a low inoculum rate (OD680, 0.08), Scenedesmus sp. FS could still grow in the outdoor raceway pond under a high alkaline environment. Even under unoptimized conditions, the oil content of Scenedesmus sp. FS could reach more than 22% and C16–C18 content could reach up to 79.68%, showing that this species has the potential for the biodiesel production in the near future. PMID:28357405

  10. Outdoor Growth Characterization of an Unknown Microalga Screened from Contaminated Chlorella Culture.

    PubMed

    Huo, Shuhao; Shang, Changhua; Wang, Zhongming; Zhou, Weizheng; Cui, Fengjie; Zhu, Feifei; Yuan, Zhenhong; Dong, Renjie

    2017-01-01

    Outdoor microalgae cultivation process is threatened by many issues, such as pest pollution and complex, changeable weather. Therefore, it is difficult to have identical growth rate for the microalgae cells and to keep their continuous growth. Outdoor cultivation requires the algae strains not only to have a strong ability to accumulate oil, but also to adapt to the complicated external environment. Using 18S rRNA technology, one wild strain Scenedesmus sp. FS was isolated and identified from the culture of Chlorella zofingiensis. Upon contamination by Scenedesmus sp., the species could quickly replace Chlorella zofingiensis G1 and occupy ecological niche in the outdoor column photobioreactors. The results indicated that Scenedesmus sp. FS showed high alkali resistance. It also showed that even under the condition of a low inoculum rate (OD680, 0.08), Scenedesmus sp. FS could still grow in the outdoor raceway pond under a high alkaline environment. Even under unoptimized conditions, the oil content of Scenedesmus sp. FS could reach more than 22% and C16-C18 content could reach up to 79.68%, showing that this species has the potential for the biodiesel production in the near future.

  11. Cyanobacterial-algal cenoses in ordinary chernozems under the impact of different phytoameliorants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, I. E.; Suyundukov, Ya. T.; Khasanova, R. F.; Shalygina, R. R.

    2016-04-01

    General ecological and taxonomic characteristics of cyanobacterial-algal cenoses in ordinary chernozems under different ameliorative plants (phytoameliorants) were studied in the Trans-Ural region of the Republic of Bashkortostan. A comparative analysis of the taxa of studied cenoses in the soils under leguminous herbs and grasses was performed. The phytoameliorative effect of different herbs and their relationships with cyanobacterial-algal cenoses were examined. Overall, 134 cyanoprokaryotic and algal species belonging to 70 genera, 36 families, 15 orders, and 9 classes were identified. Cyanobacterial-algal cenoses included the divisions of Chlorophyta, Cyanoprokaryota, Xanthophyta, Bacillariophyta, and Euglenophyta. Representatives of Ch-, X-, CF-, and P-forms were the leading ecobiomorphs in the studied cenoses.

  12. Using oxidized liquid and solid human waste as nutrients for Chlorella vulgaris and cyanobacterium Oscillatoria deflexa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Sergey V.; Kalacheva, Galina; Tirranen, Lyalya; Gribovskaya, Iliada

    At stationary terrestrial and space stations with closed and partially closed substance exchange not only plants, but also algae can regenerate atmosphere. Their biomass can be used for feeding Daphnia and Moina species, which, in their turn, serve as food for fish. In addition, it is possible to use algae for production of biological fuel. We suggested two methods of human waste mineralization: dry (evaporation with subsequent incineration in a muffle furnace) and wet (oxidation in a reactor using hydrogen peroxide). The research task was to prepare nutrient media for green alga Chlorella vulgaris and cyanobacterium Oscillatoria deflexa using liquid human waste mineralized by dry method, and to prepare media for chlorella on the basis of 1) liquid and 2) liquid and solid human waste mineralized by wet method. The algae were grown in batch culture in a climate chamber with the following parameters: illumination 7 klx, temperature 27-30 (°) C, culture density 1-2 g/l of dry weight. The control for chlorella was Tamiya medium, pH-5, and for oscillstoria — Zarrouk medium, pH-10. Maximum permissible concentrations of NaCl, Cl, urea (NH _{2}) _{2}CO, and native urine were established for algae. Missing ingredients (such as salts and acids) for experimental nutrient media were determined: their addition made it possible to obtain the biomass production not less than that in the control. The estimation was given of the mineral and biochemical composition of algae grown on experimental media. Microbiological test revealed absence of foreign microbial flora in experimental cultures.

  13. Monthly Ensembles in Algal Bloom Predictions on the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roiha, Petra; Westerlund, Antti; Stipa, Tapani

    2010-05-01

    In this work we explore the statistical features of monthly ensembles and their capability to predict biogeochemical conditions in the Baltic Sea. Operational marine environmental modelling has been considered hard, and consequently there are very few operational ecological models. Operational modelling of harmful algal blooms is harder still, since it is difficult to separate the algal species in models, and in general, very little is known of HAB properties. We present results of an ensemble approach to HAB forecasting in the Baltic, and discuss the applicability of the forecasting method to biochemical modelling. It turns out that HABs are indeed possible to forecast with useful accuracy. For modelling the algal blooms in Baltic Sea we used FMI operational 3-dimensional biogeochemical model to produce seasonal ensemble forecasts for different physical, chemical and biological variables. The modelled variables were temperature, salinity, velocity, silicate, phosphate, nitrate, diatoms, flagellates and two species of potentially toxic filamentous cyanobacteria nodularia spumigena and aphanizomenon flos-aquae. In this work we concentrate to the latter two. Ensembles were produced by running the biogeochemical model several times and forcing it on every run with different set of seasonal weather parameters from ECMWF's mathematically perturbed ensemble prediction forecasts. The ensembles were then analysed by statistical methods and the median, quartiles, minimum and maximum values were calculated for estimating the probable amounts of algae. Validation for the forecast method was made by comparing the final results against available and valid in-situ HAB data.

  14. Simulated sugar factory wastewater remediation kinetics using algal-bacterial raceway reactor promoted by polyacrylate polyalcohol.

    PubMed

    Memon, Abdul Rehman; Andresen, John; Habib, Muddasar; Jaffar, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    The remediation kinetics of simulated sugar factory wastewater (SFW) using an algal-bacterial culture (ABC) of Chlorella vulgaris in association with Pseudomonas putida in a raceway reactor was found to be enhanced by 89% with the addition of 80ppm of copolymer Polyacrylate polyalcohol (PAPA). This was achieved by efficient suspension of the ABC throughout the water body maintaining optimum pH and dissolved oxygen that led to rapid COD removal and improved algal biomass production. The suspension of the ABC using the co-polymer PAPA maintained a DO of 8-10mgl(-1) compared to 2-3mgl(-1) when not suspended. As a result, the non-suspended ABC only achieved a 50% reduction in COD after 96h compared to a 89% COD removal using 80ppm PAPA suspension. In addition, the algae biomass increased from 0.4gl(-1)d(-1) for the non-suspended ABC to 1.1gl(-1)d(-1) when suspended using 80ppm PAPA.

  15. Pretreated algal bloom as a substantial nutrient source for microalgae cultivation for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Jain, Priyanka; Arora, Neha; Mehtani, Juhi; Pruthi, Vikas; Majumder, C B

    2017-03-28

    In the present investigation, toxic algal bloom, a copious and low-cost nutrient source was deployed for cultivating Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Various pre-treatment methods using combinations of acid/alkali and autoclave/microwave were tested for preparing hydrolysates and compared with minimal media (BG-11). Acid autoclave treatment resulted in maximum carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous content which substantially boosted the growth of the microalgal cells (4.36g/L) as compared to rest of the media. The microalga grown in this media also showed enhanced lipid content (43.2%) and lipid productivity (188mg/L/d) as compared to BG-11 (19.42mg/L/d). The biochemical composition showed 1.6-fold declines in protein while 1.27 folds in carbohydrate content as compared to BG-11. The fatty acid profile revealed the presence of C14-C22 with increased amount of monounsaturated fatty acids as compared to BG-11. The results obtained showed that algal bloom can be used as a potential nutrient source for microalgae.

  16. Degradation of algal organic matter using microbial fuel cells and its association with trihalomethane precursor removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Liu, Dongmei; Lu, Lu; Zhao, Zhiwei; Xu, Yongpeng; Cui, Fuyi

    2012-07-01

    In order to provide an alternative for removal of algal organic matter (AOM) produced during algal blooms in aquatic environment, microbial fuel cell (MFC) was used to study AOM degradation and its association with THM precursor removal. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals in MFCs were 81 ± 6% and 73 ± 3% for AOM from Microcystis aeruginosa (AOM(M)) and Chlorella vulgaris (AOM(C)), respectively. THM precursor was also effectively degraded (AOM(M) 85 ± 2%, AOM(C) 72 ± 4%). The major AOM components (proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) were obviously removed in MFCs. The contribution of each component to the THM formation potential (THMFP) was obtained based on calculation. The THMFP produced from soluble microbial products was very low. If the energy input during operation process was not considered, MFCs treatment could recover electrical energy of 0.29 ± 0.02 kWh/kg COD (AOM(M)) and 0.35 ± 0.06 kWh/kg COD (AOM(C)).

  17. NREL Algal Biofuels Projects and Partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-01

    This fact sheet highlights several algal biofuels research and development projects focused on improving the economics of the algal biofuels production process. These projects should serve as a foundation for the research efforts toward algae as a source of fuels and other chemicals.

  18. A Taste of Algal Genomes from the Joint Genome Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-06-17

    Algae play profound roles in aquatic food chains and the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, provide models for the study of symbiosis, photosynthesis, and eukaryotic evolution, and are candidate sources for bio-fuels; all of these research areas are part of the mission of DOE's Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To date JGI has sequenced, assembled, annotated, and released to the public the genomes of 18 species and strains of algae, sampling almost all of the major clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. With more algal genomes currently undergoing analysis, JGI continues its commitment to driving forward basic and applied algal science. Among these ongoing projects are the pan-genome of the dominant coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, the interrelationships between the 4 genomes in the nucleomorph-containing Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta, and the search for symbiosis genes of lichens.

  19. Didymosphenia geminata: Algal blooms in oligotrophic streams and rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundareshwar, P. V.; Upadhayay, S.; Abessa, M.; Honomichl, S.; Berdanier, B.; Spaulding, S. A.; Sandvik, C.; Trennepohl, A.

    2011-05-01

    In recent decades, the diatom Didymosphenia geminata has emerged as nuisance species in river systems around the world. This periphytic alga forms large “blooms” in temperate streams, presenting a counterintuitive result: the blooms occur primarily in oligotrophic streams and rivers, where phosphorus (P) availability typically limits primary production. The goal of this study is to examine how high algal biomass is formed under low P conditions. We reveal a biogeochemical process by which D. geminata mats concentrate P from flowing waters. First, the mucopolysaccaride stalks of D. geminata adsorb both iron (Fe) and P. Second, enzymatic and bacterial processes interact with Fe to increase the biological availability of P. We propose that a positive feedback between total stalk biomass and high growth rate is created, which results in abundant P for cell division. The affinity of stalks for Fe in association with iron-phosphorus biogeochemistry suggest a resolution to the paradox of algal blooms in oliogotrophic streams and rivers.

  20. Unraveling algal lipid metabolism: Recent advances in gene identification.

    PubMed

    Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Cohen, Zvi

    2011-01-01

    Microalgae are now the focus of intensive research due to their potential as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel. This research requires a thorough understanding of the biochemistry and genetics of these organisms' lipid-biosynthesis pathways. Genes encoding lipid-biosynthesis enzymes can now be identified in the genomes of various eukaryotic microalgae. However, an examination of the predicted proteins at the biochemical and molecular levels is mandatory to verify their function. The essential molecular and genetic tools are now available for a comprehensive characterization of genes coding for enzymes of the lipid-biosynthesis pathways in some algal species. This review mainly summarizes the novel information emerging from recently obtained algal gene identification.

  1. Algal polycultures enhance coproduct recycling from hydrothermal liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Casey M; Hietala, David C; Lashaway, Aubrey R; Narwani, Anita; Savage, Phillip E; Cardinale, Bradley J

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if polycultures of algae could enhance tolerance to aqueous-phase coproduct (ACP) from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of algal biomass to produce biocrude. The growth of algal monocultures and polycultures was characterized across a range ACP concentrations and sources. All of the monocultures were either killed or inhibited by 2% ACP, but polycultures of the same species were viable at up to 10%. The addition of ACP increased the growth rate (up to 25%) and biomass production (53%) of polycultures, several of which were more productive in ACP than any monoculture was in the presence or absence of ACP. These results suggest that a cultivation process that applies biodiversity to nutrient recycling could produce more algae with less fertilizer consumption.

  2. Constraints to commercialization of algal fuels.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Yusuf

    2013-09-10

    Production of algal crude oil has been achieved in various pilot scale facilities, but whether algal fuels can be produced in sufficient quantity to meaningfully displace petroleum fuels, has been largely overlooked. Limitations to commercialization of algal fuels need to be understood and addressed for any future commercialization. This review identifies the major constraints to commercialization of transport fuels from microalgae. Algae derived fuels are expensive compared to petroleum derived fuels, but this could change. Unfortunately, improved economics of production are not sufficient for an environmentally sustainable production, or its large scale feasibility. A low-cost point supply of concentrated carbon dioxide colocated with the other essential resources is necessary for producing algal fuels. An insufficiency of concentrated carbon dioxide is actually a major impediment to any substantial production of algal fuels. Sustainability of production requires the development of an ability to almost fully recycle the phosphorous and nitrogen nutrients that are necessary for algae culture. Development of a nitrogen biofixation ability to support production of algal fuels ought to be an important long term objective. At sufficiently large scale, a limited supply of freshwater will pose a significant limitation to production even if marine algae are used. Processes for recovering energy from the algal biomass left after the extraction of oil, are required for achieving a net positive energy balance in the algal fuel oil. The near term outlook for widespread use of algal fuels appears bleak, but fuels for niche applications such as in aviation may be likely in the medium term. Genetic and metabolic engineering of microalgae to boost production of fuel oil and ease its recovery, are essential for commercialization of algal fuels. Algae will need to be genetically modified for improved photosynthetic efficiency in the long term.

  3. Salt stimulated respiration of Chlorella fusca.

    PubMed

    Löppert, H G

    1976-01-01

    ATP contents have been measured before and after addition of KCl (5 mM final concentration) to suspensions of Chlorella in distilled water under different conditions of energy supply. The levels decreased immediately after salt addition and returned to the original values under conditions both of oxidative phosphorylation and of cyclic photophosphorylation, but not under conditions of fermentation. It appears that this decrease in the ATP level is the cause for salt stimulated respiration (S.S.R.). Furthermore, it is shown that cycloheximide and EDTA, which interact with Rb+ uptake (active and ATP-driven) at low salt concentration, also reduce S.S.R. From this parallelism it is concluded that the ATPase involved in Rb+ uptake at low salt concentration is also responsible for S.S.R. at high salt concentration. As S.S.R. provides far more energy than is required for the small influx of ions it is suggested that the ATPase is decoupled by the salt from ion transport.

  4. The Use of the Schizonticidal Agent Quinine Sulfate to Prevent Pond Crashes for Algal-Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chunyan; Wu, Kangyan; Van Ginkel, Steve W.; Igou, Thomas; Lee, Hwa Jong; Bhargava, Aditya; Johnston, Rachel; Snell, Terry; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Algal biofuels are investigated as a promising alternative to petroleum fuel sources to satisfy transportation demand. Despite the high growth rate of algae, predation by rotifers, ciliates, golden algae, and other predators will cause an algae in open ponds to crash. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as a model alga and the freshwater rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, as a model predator. The goal of this study was to test the selective toxicity of the chemical, quinine sulfate (QS), on both the alga and the rotifer in order to fully inhibit the rotifer while minimizing its impact on algal growth. The QS LC50 for B. calyciflorus was 17 µM while C. kessleri growth was not inhibited at concentrations <25 µM. In co-culture, complete inhibition of rotifers was observed when the QS concentration was 7.7 µM, while algal growth was not affected. QS applications to produce 1 million gallons of biodiesel in one year are estimated to be $0.04/gallon or ~1% of Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO) projected cost of $5/gge (gallon gasoline equivalent). This provides algae farmers an important tool to manage grazing predators in algae mass cultures and avoid pond crashes. PMID:26593899

  5. The Use of the Schizonticidal Agent Quinine Sulfate to Prevent Pond Crashes for Algal-Biofuel Production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunyan; Wu, Kangyan; Van Ginkel, Steve W; Igou, Thomas; Lee, Hwa Jong; Bhargava, Aditya; Johnston, Rachel; Snell, Terry; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-11-17

    Algal biofuels are investigated as a promising alternative to petroleum fuel sources to satisfy transportation demand. Despite the high growth rate of algae, predation by rotifers, ciliates, golden algae, and other predators will cause an algae in open ponds to crash. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as a model alga and the freshwater rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, as a model predator. The goal of this study was to test the selective toxicity of the chemical, quinine sulfate (QS), on both the alga and the rotifer in order to fully inhibit the rotifer while minimizing its impact on algal growth. The QS LC50 for B. calyciflorus was 17 µM while C. kessleri growth was not inhibited at concentrations <25 µM. In co-culture, complete inhibition of rotifers was observed when the QS concentration was 7.7 µM, while algal growth was not affected. QS applications to produce 1 million gallons of biodiesel in one year are estimated to be $0.04/gallon or ~1% of Bioenergy Technologies Office's (BETO) projected cost of $5/gge (gallon gasoline equivalent). This provides algae farmers an important tool to manage grazing predators in algae mass cultures and avoid pond crashes.

  6. Toxicity of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanobeads in Chlorella vulgaris: interaction, adaptation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farooq; Yao, Hongzhou; Zhou, Ying; Liu, Xiaoyi

    2015-11-01

    The potential toxicity of CoFe2O4 nanobeads (NBs) in Chlorella vulgaris was observed up to 72h. Algal cell morphology, membrane integrity and viability were severely compromised due to adsorption and aggregation of NBs on algal surfaces, release of Fe(3+) and Co(2+) ions and possible mechanical damage by NBs. Interactions with NBs and effective decrease in ions released by aggregation and exudation of algal cells as a self defense mechanism were observed by Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results corroborated CoFe2O4 NBs induced ROS triggered oxidative stress, leading to a reduction in catalase activity, activation of the mutagenic glutathione s-transferase (mu-GST) and acid phosphatase (AP) antioxidant enzymes, and an increase in genetic aberrations, metabolic and cellular signal transduction dysfunction. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated the weak interactions of NBs with BSA, with slight changes in the α-helix structure of BSA confirming conformational changes in structure, hence the potential for functional interactions with biomolecules. Possible interferences of CoFe2O4 NBs with assay techniques and components indicated CoFe2O4 NBs at lower concentration do not show any significant interference with ROS, catalase, mu-GST and no interference with CD measurements. This study showed ROS production is one of the pathways of toxicity initiated by CoFe2O4 NBs and illustrates the complex processes that may occur between organisms and NBs in natural complex ecosystem.

  7. Estimates of nuclear DNA content in red algal lineages

    PubMed Central

    Kapraun, Donald F.; Freshwater, D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The red algae are an evolutionarily ancient group of predominantly marine organisms with an estimated 6000 species. Consensus higher-level molecular phylogenies support a basal split between the unicellular Cyanidiophytina and morphologically diverse Rhodophytina, the later subphylum containing most red algal species. The Rhodophytina is divided into six classes, of which five represent early diverging lineages of generally uninucleate species, whose evolutionary relationships are poorly resolved. The remaining species compose the large (27 currently recognized orders), morphologically diverse and typically multinucleate Florideophyceae. Nuclear DNA content estimates have been published for <1 % of the described red algae. The present investigation summarizes the state of our knowledge and expands our coverage of DNA content information from 196 isolates of red algae. Methodology The DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and RBC (chicken erythrocytes) standards were used to estimate 2C values with static microspectrophotometry. Principal results Nuclear DNA contents are reported for 196 isolates of red algae, almost doubling the number of estimates available for these organisms. Present results also confirm the reported DNA content range of 0.1–2.8 pg, with species of Ceramiales, Nemaliales and Palmariales containing apparently polyploid genomes with 2C = 2.8, 2.3 and 2.8 pg, respectively. Conclusions Early diverging red algal lineages are characterized by relatively small 2C DNA contents while a wide range of 2C values is found within the derived Florideophyceae. An overall correlation between phylogenetic placement and 2C DNA content is not apparent; however, genome size data are available for only a small portion of red algae. Current data do support polyploidy and aneuploidy as pervasive features of red algal genome evolution. PMID:22479676

  8. Screening and characterizing oleaginous microalgal species from the southeastern United States. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Tadros, M.G.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to select and characterize promising algal species which tolerate high light intensities, temperature variations and accumulate lipids. Samples have been collected from freshwater and saltwater locations in the State of Alabama and intertidal regions of the Gulf of Mexico. Samples were screened through a multi-step process. Selected species: Cyclotella, Nitzschia, Chlorella, Scenedesmus and Ankistrodesmus, have been examined for growth requirements. Approximate cellular composition of these species was determined. This report describes accomplishments from February 1984 to January 1985. During this period, collection trips were made to Dauphin Island near the Alabama coast in the summer of 1984. Over sixty strains were isolated, and of these six were ranked as good growers. Two diatoms were isolated that are of particular interest because of their ability to accumulate high lipids. Cyclotella tolerates high temperatures (30/sup 0/-35/sup 0/C), grows at moderate salinities (15-25 parts per thousand), and with nitrogen stress accumulates 42% of its dry weight as lipid. Hantzschia is a large diatom that also grows well at elevated temperatures and full strength seawater. Hantzschia can accumulate as much as 66% of its dry weight as lipid. 29 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Metabolic systems analysis to advance algal biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Brian J; Lin-Schmidt, Xiefan; Chamberlin, Austin; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Papin, Jason A

    2010-07-01

    Algal fuel sources promise unsurpassed yields in a carbon neutral manner that minimizes resource competition between agriculture and fuel crops. Many challenges must be addressed before algal biofuels can be accepted as a component of the fossil fuel replacement strategy. One significant challenge is that the cost of algal fuel production must become competitive with existing fuel alternatives. Algal biofuel production presents the opportunity to fine-tune microbial metabolic machinery for an optimal blend of biomass constituents and desired fuel molecules. Genome-scale model-driven algal metabolic design promises to facilitate both goals by directing the utilization of metabolites in the complex, interconnected metabolic networks to optimize production of the compounds of interest. Network analysis can direct microbial development efforts towards successful strategies and enable quantitative fine-tuning of the network for optimal product yields while maintaining the robustness of the production microbe. Metabolic modeling yields insights into microbial function, guides experiments by generating testable hypotheses, and enables the refinement of knowledge on the specific organism. While the application of such analytical approaches to algal systems is limited to date, metabolic network analysis can improve understanding of algal metabolic systems and play an important role in expediting the adoption of new biofuel technologies.

  10. A comparison of the influences of urbanization in contrasting environmental settings on stream benthic algal assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Potapova, M.; Coles, J.F.; Giddings, E.M.P.; Zappia, H.

    2005-01-01

    Patterns of stream benthic algal assemblages along urbanization gradients were investigated in three metropolitan areas-Boston (BOS), Massachusetts; Birmingham (BIR), Alabama; and Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah. An index of urban intensity derived from socioeconomic, infrastructure, and land-use characteristics was used as a measure of urbanization. Of the various attributes of the algal assemblages, species composition changed along gradients of urban intensity in a more consistent manner than biomass or diversity. In urban streams, the relative abundance of pollution-tolerant species was often higher than in less affected streams. Shifts in assemblage composition were associated primarily with increased levels of conductivity, nutrients, and alterations in physical habitat. Water mineralization and nutrients were the most important determinants of assemblage composition in the BOS and SLC study areas; flow regime and grazers were key factors in the BIR study area. Species composition of algal assemblages differed significantly among geographic regions, and no particular algal taxa were found to be universal indicators of urbanization. Patterns in algal biomass and diversity along urban gradients varied among study areas, depending on local environmental conditions and habitat alteration. Biomass and diversity increased with urbanization in the BOS area, apparently because of increased nutrients, light, and flow stability in urban streams, which often are regulated by dams. Biomass and diversity decreased with urbanization in the BIR study area because of intensive fish grazing and less stable flow regime. In the SLC study area, correlations between algal biomass, diversity, and urban intensity were positive but weak. Thus, algal responses to urbanization differed considerably among the three study areas. We concluded that the wide range of responses of benthic algae to urbanization implied that tools for stream bioassessment must be region specific. ?? 2005 by the

  11. Study of cnidarian-algal symbiosis in the "omics" age.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eli; Weis, Virginia M

    2012-08-01

    The symbiotic associations between cnidarians and dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium) support productive and diverse ecosystems in coral reefs. Many aspects of this association, including the mechanistic basis of host-symbiont recognition and metabolic interaction, remain poorly understood. The first completed genome sequence for a symbiotic anthozoan is now available (the coral Acropora digitifera), and extensive expressed sequence tag resources are available for a variety of other symbiotic corals and anemones. These resources make it possible to profile gene expression, protein abundance, and protein localization associated with the symbiotic state. Here we review the history of "omics" studies of cnidarian-algal symbiosis and the current availability of sequence resources for corals and anemones, identifying genes putatively involved in symbiosis across 10 anthozoan species. The public availability of candidate symbiosis-associated genes leaves the field of cnidarian-algal symbiosis poised for in-depth comparative studies of sequence diversity and gene expression and for targeted functional studies of genes associated with symbiosis. Reviewing the progress to date suggests directions for future investigations of cnidarian-algal symbiosis that include (i) sequencing of Symbiodinium, (ii) proteomic analysis of the symbiosome membrane complex, (iii) glycomic analysis of Symbiodinium cell surfaces, and (iv) expression profiling of the gastrodermal cells hosting Symbiodinium.

  12. Micro-structured surfaces for algal biofilm growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathananthan, Suthamathy; Genin, Scott N.; Aitchison, J. Stewart; Allen, D. Grant

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that cells respond to structured surface cues that are on the micro/nanometer scale. Tissue engineering and bio-fouling fields have utilized the semiconductor device fabrication processes to make micro- and nanometer patterned surfaces to study animal cell tissue formation and to prevent algae attachment on marine surfaces respectively. In this paper we describe the use of micro-structured surfaces to study the attachment and growth of algal films. This paper gives an overview of how micro-structured surfaces are made for this purpose, how they are incorporated into a photo bioreactor and how this patterning influences the growth of an algal biofilm. Our results suggest that surface patterning with deeper V-groove patterns that are of the same size scale as the algal species has resulted in higher biomass productivity giving them a chance to embed and attach on the slope and flat surfaces whereas shallower size grooves and completely flat surfaces did not show this trend.

  13. Algal pigments in Southern Ocean abyssal foraminiferans indicate pelagobenthic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedhagen, Tomas; Cheah, Wee; Bracher, Astrid; Lejzerowicz, Franck

    2014-10-01

    The cytoplasm of four species of abyssal benthic foraminiferans from the Southern Ocean (around 51°S; 12°W and 50°S; 39°W) was analysed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and found to contain large concentrations of algal pigments and their degradation products. The composition of the algal pigments in the foraminiferan cytoplasm reflected the plankton community at the surface. Some foraminiferans contained high ratios of chlorophyll a/degraded pigments because they were feeding on fresher phytodetritus. Other foraminiferans contained only degraded pigments which shows that they utilized degraded phytodetritus. The concentration of algal pigment and corresponding degradation products in the foraminiferan cytoplasm is much higher than in the surrounding sediment. It shows that the foraminiferans collect a diluted and sparse food resource and concentrate it as they build up their cytoplasm. This ability contributes to the understanding of the great quantitative success of foraminiferans in the deep sea. Benthic foraminiferans are a food source for many abyssal metazoans. They form a link between the degraded food resources, phytodetritus, back to the active metazoan food chains.

  14. Strong fungal specificity and selectivity for algal symbionts in Florida scrub Cladonia lichens.

    PubMed

    Yahr, Rebecca; Vilgalys, Rytas; Depriest, Paula T

    2004-11-01

    Symbiosis is a major theme in the history of life and can be an important force driving evolution. However, across symbioses, it is difficult to tease apart the mechanisms that structure the interactions among potential partners. We used genetic similarity and frequency-based methods to qualitatively and quantitatively examine the patterns of association among several co-occurring Cladonia lichen fungi and their algal photobionts in six disjunct Florida scrub sites. The patterns of association were described by the degree of specificity, i.e. the phylogenetic range of associated partners, and of selectivity, i.e. the frequency of association among partners. Six fungal species associated with only one algal internal transcribed spacer clade, with the remaining two fungi being associated with two algal clades. In all cases, the fungi associated in unequal frequencies with the observed algal photobiont genotypes within those clades--suggesting that both specificity and selectivity were higher than expected. Fungal species can be grouped into three significantly different specificity classes: photobiont specialists, intermediates and generalists. In contrast to the pronounced specificity for photobionts among fungal species, the different Florida scrub sites do not harbour distinct photobiont pools, and differential photobiont availability cannot explain the patterning of lichen associations at this spatial scale. Therefore, we conclude that fungal specificity and selectivity for algal photobionts are major factors in determining the local composition of symbiotic partnerships.

  15. Stressor-Response Models Relating Nutrient Enrichment to Algal Communities in Pacific Northwest Streams and Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobota, D. J.; Hubler, S.; Paul, M. J.; Labiosa, R.

    2015-12-01

    Excessive algal growth in streams and rivers from nutrient enrichment can cause costly human health and environmental problems. As part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Nutrient Scientific Technical Exchange Partnership and Support (N-STEPS) program, we have been developing stressor-response (S-R) models relating nutrients to attached algal (periphyton) communities to help prioritize monitoring for water quality impairments in Oregon (Pacific Northwest, USA) streams and rivers. Existing data from the state and neighboring states were compiled and standardized from the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, US Environmental Protection Agency, and the US Geological Survey. To develop S-R models, algal community and biomass metrics were compared with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentration data, including total, dissolved, and inorganic forms of these nutrients. In total, 928 paired algal-nutrient samples were compiled from the 8 Level-III Ecoregions occurring in Oregon. Relationships between algal biomass metrics and nutrient concentrations were weak, with only ash-free dry mass and standing stock of chlorophyll a showing slight positive relationships across gradients of total N and soluble reactive P concentrations, respectively. In contrast, metrics describing algal community composition, including percent diatoms and abundance of nutrient-sensitive species, showed very strong nonlinear relationships with total N or P concentrations. This suggests that data describing algal community composition can help identify specific nutrient stressors across environmentally-diverse streams and rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Future analyses will examine if nutrient-algal S-R models vary across different hydrological, physiographical, and ecological settings in the region.

  16. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Cyd E.

    2014-03-25

    This white paper briefly reviews the research literature exploring complex algal communities as a means of increasing algal biomass production via increased tolerance, resilience, and resistance to a variety of abiotic and biotic perturbations occurring within harvesting timescales. This paper identifies what data are available and whether more research utilizing complex communities is needed to explore the potential of complex algal community stability (CACS) approach as a plausible means to increase biomass yields regardless of ecological context and resulting in decreased algal-based fuel prices by reducing operations costs. By reviewing the literature for what we do and do not know, in terms of CACS methodologies, this report will provide guidance for future research addressing pond crash phenomena.

  17. The paradox of algal blooms in oligotrophic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundareshwar, P. V.; Upadhyay, S.; Abessa, M. B.; Honomichl, S.; Berdanier, B.; Spaulding, S.; Sandvik, C.; Trennepohl, A.

    2010-12-01

    Nutrient inputs to streams and lakes, primarily from anthropogenic sources, lead to eutrophic conditions that favor algal blooms with undesirable consequences. In contrast, low nutrient or oligotrophic waters rarely support algal blooms; such ecosystems are typically lower in productivity. Since the mid-1980’s however, the diatom Didymosphenia geminata has dramatically expanded its range colonizing oligotrophic rivers worldwide with blooms appearing as thick benthic mats. This recent global occurrence of Didymosphenia geminata blooms in temperate rivers has been perplexing in its pace of spread and the paradoxical nature of the nuisance growths. The blooms occur primarily in oligotrophic flowing waters, where phosphorus (P) availability often limits primary production. We present a biogeochemical process by which D. geminata mats adsorb both P and iron (Fe) from flowing waters and make P available for cellular uptake. The adsorbed P becomes bioavailable through biogeochemical processes that occur within the mat. The biogeochemical processes observed here while well accepted in benthic systems are novel for algal blooms in lotic habits. Enzymatic and bacterial processes such as Fe and sulfate reduction can release the adsorbed P and increase its bioavailability, creating a positive feedback between total stalk biomass and nutrient availability. Stalk affinity for Fe, Fe-P biogeochemistry, and interaction between watershed processes and climatic setting explain the paradoxical blooms, and the recent global spread of this invasive aquatic species. At a broader scale the study also implies that such algal blooms in oligotrophic environments can fundamentally alter the retention and longitudinal transfer of important nutrients such as P in streams and rivers.

  18. Characterisation of algal organic matter produced by bloom-forming marine and freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Villacorte, L O; Ekowati, Y; Neu, T R; Kleijn, J M; Winters, H; Amy, G; Schippers, J C; Kennedy, M D

    2015-04-15

    Algal blooms can seriously affect the operation of water treatment processes including low pressure (micro- and ultra-filtration) and high pressure (nanofiltration and reverse osmosis) membranes mainly due to accumulation of algal-derived organic matter (AOM). In this study, the different components of AOM extracted from three common species of bloom-forming algae (Alexandrium tamarense, Chaetoceros affinis and Microcystis sp.) were characterised employing various analytical techniques, such as liquid chromatography - organic carbon detection, fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, alcian blue staining and lectin staining coupled with laser scanning microscopy to indentify its composition and force measurement using atomic force microscopy to measure its stickiness. Batch culture monitoring of the three algal species illustrated varying characteristics in terms of growth pattern, cell concentration and AOM release. The AOM produced by the three algal species comprised mainly biopolymers (e.g., polysaccharides and proteins) but some refractory compounds (e.g., humic-like substances) and other low molecular weight acid and neutral compounds were also found. Biopolymers containing fucose and sulphated functional groups were found in all AOM samples while the presence of other functional groups varied between different species. A large majority (>80%) of the acidic polysaccharide components (in terms of transparent exopolymer particles) were found in the colloidal size range (<0.4 μm). The relative stickiness of AOM substantially varied between algal species and that the cohesion between AOM-coated surfaces was much stronger than the adhesion of AOM on AOM-free surfaces. Overall, the composition as well as the physico-chemical characteristics (e.g., stickiness) of AOM will likely dictate the severity of fouling in membrane systems during algal blooms.

  19. Characteristics of algal succession following rock scraping at Imwon area in the east coast of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Dae; Ahn, Jung Kwan; Nam, Myung Mo; Lee, Chu; Yoo, Hyun Il; Yeon, Su Yeoung; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Jang Kyun; Choi, Jae Suk

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the characteristics of algal succession following rock scraping using hoe or high-pressure water sprayer in the period from June 2010 to April 2011. We divided the research area off the eastern coast of Korean near Imwon into 3 categories depending upon the severity of the barren ground, i.e., the urchin barren-affected, urchin barren-ongoing and urchin barren-free areas. In April 2011, in the urchin barren-affected area with 25 seaweed species, the cover percentage and importance value (IV) of crustose coralline algae were higher than those of other species. In the urchin barren-ongoing area with 33 seaweed species, crustose coralline algae (mean IV = 62%) as well as Sargassum sp. (mean IV = 28%), and Gelidium amansii (mean IV = 19%) were observed following rock scraping. In the urchin barren-free area where seaweed communities were relatively abundant with 42 species, a variety of algal species including G. amansii (mean IV = 32%) underwent algal succession. Overall, it was observed that, as an aspect of algal succession, the weaker the barren ground severity was, the more frequent and diverse the seaweeds were, and the more complex the succession pattern was in the study. As an aspect of recovering algal community, rock scraping using hoe was shown to be superior to the method using high-pressure water spraying. Therefore, we conclude that rock scraping using hoe is a very effective strategy for recovering the algal community in urchin barren-ongoing area.

  20. Utilization of papaya waste and oil production by Chlorella protothecoides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Algae derived oils have outstanding potential for use in biodiesel production. Chlorella protothecoides has been shown to accumulate lipid up to 60% of its cellular dry weight with glucose supplementation under heterotrophic growth conditions. To reduce production costs, alternative carbon feedstock...

  1. Uptake and bioaccumulation of three PCBs by Chlorella fusca

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.; Rott, B.; Korte, F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports the bioaccumulation of three PCBs (2,4'-dichlorobiphenyl, 2,4,6,2'-tetrachlorobiphenyl and 2,4,6,2',4'-pentachlorobiphenyl) by the green alga Chlorella fusca under various conditions. A probable pattern of the bioconcentration mechanism is suggested. No metabolites were extracted from algae or water 6 days after incubation with PCBs.

  2. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  3. Evaluation of Chlorella as a Decorporation Agent to Enhance the Elimination of Radioactive Strontium from Body

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Fukuda, Tadahisa; Han, Jaegab; Kitamura, Yoji; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Background Release of radionuclides, such as 137Cs and 90Sr, into the atmosphere and the ocean presents an important problem because internal exposure to 137Cs and 90Sr could be very harmful to humans. Chlorella has been reported to be effective in enhancing the excretion of heavy metals; thus, we hypothesized that Chlorella could also enhance the elimination of 137Cs or 90Sr from the body. We evaluated the potential of Chlorella as a decorporation agent in vitro and in vivo, using 85Sr instead of 90Sr. Methods In vitro experiments of adsorption of 137Cs and 85Sr to Chlorella were performed under wide pH conditions. The maximum sorption capacity of Chlorella to strontium was estimated using the Langmuir model. A 85Sr solution was orally administrated to mice pretreated with Chlorella. At 48 h after 85Sr administration, the biodistribution of radioactivity was determined. Results In the in vitro experiments, although 85Sr barely adsorbed to Chlorella at low pH, the 85Sr adsorption ratio to Chlorella increased with increasing pH. The maximum sorption capacity of Chlorella to strontium was 9.06 mg / g. 137Cs barely adsorbed to Chlorella under any pH conditions. In the biodistribution experiments, bone accumulation of radioactivity after 85Sr administration was significantly decreased in the Chlorella pretreatment group compared with the non-treatment control group. Conclusions In conclusion, these results indicated that Chlorella could inhibit the absorption of 90Sr into the blood and enhance the elimination of 90Sr from the body through adsorption in intestine. Further studies are required to elucidate the mechanism and the components of Chlorella needed for adsorption to strontium and could promote the development of more effective decorporation agents. PMID:26828430

  4. High Frequency Monitoring for Harmful Algal Blooms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are increasingly becoming a significant ecologic, economic, and social driver in the use of water resources. Cyanobacteria and their toxins play an important role in management decisions for drinking water utilities and public health officials. Online ...

  5. Factsheet: Climate Change and Harmful Algal Blooms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Climate change is predicted to change many environmental conditions that could affect the properties of fresh and marine waters. These changes could favor the growth of harmful algal blooms and habitat changes.

  6. Environmental performance of algal biofuel technology options.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Venkatesh; Stratton, Russell W; Pearlson, Matthew N; Jersey, Gilbert R; Beyene, Abraham G; Weissman, Joseph C; Rubino, Michele; Hileman, James I

    2012-02-21

    Considerable research and development is underway to produce fuels from microalgae, one of several options being explored for increasing transportation fuel supplies and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). This work models life-cycle GHG and on-site freshwater consumption for algal biofuels over a wide technology space, spanning both near- and long-term options. The environmental performance of algal biofuel production can vary considerably and is influenced by engineering, biological, siting, and land-use considerations. We have examined these considerations for open pond systems, to identify variables that have a strong influence on GHG and freshwater consumption. We conclude that algal biofuels can yield GHG reductions relative to fossil and other biobased fuels with the use of appropriate technology options. Further, freshwater consumption for algal biofuels produced using saline pond systems can be comparable to that of petroleum-derived fuels.

  7. Climate Adaptation and Harmful Algal Blooms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA supports local, state and tribal efforts to maintain water quality. A key element of its efforts is to reduce excess nutrient pollution and the resulting adverse impacts, including harmful algal blooms.

  8. Recent Advances in Algal Genetic Tool Development

    SciTech Connect

    R. Dahlin, Lukas; T. Guarnieri, Michael

    2016-06-24

    The goal of achieving cost-effective biofuels and bioproducts derived from algal biomass will require improvements along the entire value chain, including identification of robust, high-productivity strains and development of advanced genetic tools. Though there have been modest advances in development of genetic systems for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, progress in development of algal genetic tools, especially as applied to non-model algae, has generally lagged behind that of more commonly utilized laboratory and industrial microbes. This is in part due to the complex organellar structure of algae, including robust cell walls and intricate compartmentalization of target loci, as well as prevalent gene silencing mechanisms, which hinder facile utilization of conventional genetic engineering tools and methodologies. However, recent progress in global tool development has opened the door for implementation of strain-engineering strategies in industrially-relevant algal strains. Here, we review recent advances in algal genetic tool development and applications in eukaryotic microalgae.

  9. Remote Sensing Marine Ecology: Wind-driven algal blooms in the open oceans and their ecological impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, DanLing

    2016-07-01

    Algal bloom not only can increase the primary production but also could result in negative ecological consequence, e.g., Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). According to the classic theory for the formation of algal blooms "critical depth" and "eutrophication", oligotrophic sea area is usually difficult to form a large area of algal blooms, and actually the traditional observation is only sporadic capture to the existence of algal blooms. Taking full advantage of multiple data of satellite remote sensing, this study: 1), introduces "Wind-driven algal blooms in open oceans: observation and mechanisms" It explained except classic coastal Ekman transport, the wind through a variety of mechanisms affecting the formation of algal blooms. Proposed a conceptual model of "Strong wind -upwelling-nutrient-phytoplankton blooms" in Western South China Sea (SCS) to assess role of wind-induced advection transport in phytoplankton bloom formation. It illustrates the nutrient resources that support long-term offshore phytoplankton blooms in the western SCS; 2), Proposal of the theory that "typhoons cause vertical mixing, induce phytoplankton blooms", and quantify their important contribution to marine primary production; Proposal a new ecological index for typhoon. Proposed remote sensing inversion models. 3), Finding of the spatial and temporaldistributions pattern of harmful algal bloom (HAB)and species variations of HAB in the South Yellow Sea and East China Sea, and in the Pearl River estuary, and their oceanic dynamic mechanisms related with monsoon; The project developed new techniques and generated new knowledge, which significantly improved understanding of the formation mechanisms of algal blooms. 1), It proposed "wind-pump" mechanism integrates theoretical system combing "ocean dynamics, development of algal blooms, and impact on primary production", which will benefit fisheries management. 2), A new interdisciplinary subject "Remote Sensing Marine Ecology"(RSME) has been

  10. Direct conversion of algal biomass to biofuel

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Shuguang; Patil, Prafulla D; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for providing direct conversion of algal biomass. Optionally, the method and system can be used to directly convert dry algal biomass to biodiesels under microwave irradiation by combining the reaction and combining steps. Alternatively, wet algae can be directly processed and converted to fatty acid methyl esters, which have the major components of biodiesels, by reacting with methanol at predetermined pressure and temperature ranges.

  11. [Research status and prospect on hot water extract of Chlorella: the high value-added bioactive substance from Chlorella].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiuyuan; Huang, Yingming; Zhang, Daojing; Tao, Liming; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-01-01

    Chlorella is nutritious and has been used as a functional food much earlier than the other microalgae. C. pyrenoidosa, the potential microalgae which is currently cultured and developed for the new strategic industry of biofuels production and biological CO2 fixation, is a new resource food announced by the Ministry of Health of the People's Republic of China late 2012. Accumulation of high value-added substances in C. pyrenoidosa during the cultivation for lipid makes it possible to reduce the costs for C. pyrenoidosa-based biofuels production. Among these potential substances, hot water extract of Chlorella (CE), commercially known as "Chlorella growth factor", is the unique one that makes Chlorella more precious than the other algae, and the market price of CE is high. It is believed that CE is effective in growth promotion and immunoregulation. However, there is no systematic analysis on the research status of CE and its bioactivity. The present report summarized recent research progress of CE and its bioactivity. Generally, besides the main effect on immunoregulation and tumor inhibition, CE was efficient in improving metabolic syndrome, scavenging for free radicals, protecting against ultraviolet damage, chelating heavy metals, and protecting liver and bowel. Several major challenges in CE research as well as its prospects were also analysed in the present report.

  12. Pyrolysis Strategies for Effective Utilization of Lignocellulosic and Algal Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddi, Balakrishna

    Pyrolysis is a processing technique involving thermal degradation of biomass in the absence of oxygen. The bio-oils obtained following the condensation of the pyrolysis vapors form a convenient starting point for valorizing the major components of lignocellulosic as well as algal biomass feed stocks for the production of fuels and value-added chemicals. Pyrolysis can be implemented on whole biomass or on residues left behind following standard fractionation methods. Microalgae and oil seeds predominantly consist of protein, carbohydrate and triglycerides, whereas lignocellulose is composed of carbohydrates (cellulose and hemicellulose) and lignin. The differences in the major components of these two types of biomass will necessitate different pyrolysis strategies to derive the optimal benefits from the resulting bio-oils. In this thesis, novel pyrolysis strategies were developed that enable efficient utilization of the bio-oils (and/or their vapors) from lignocellulose, algae, as well as oil seed feed stocks. With lignocellulosic feed stocks, pyrolysis of whole biomass as well as the lignin residue left behind following well-established pretreatment and saccharification (i.e., depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose to their monomeric-sugars) of the biomass was studied with and without catalysts. Following this, pyrolysis of (lipid-deficient) algae and lignocellulosic feed stocks, under similar reactor conditions, was performed for comparison of product (bio-oil, gas and bio-char) yields and composition. In spite of major differences in component bio-polymers, feedstock properties relevant to thermo-chemical conversions, such as overall C, H and O-content, C/O and H/C molar ratio as well as calorific values, were found to be similar for algae and lignocellulosic material. Bio-oil yields from algae and some lignocellulosic materials were similar; however, algal bio-oils were compositionally different and contained several N-compounds (most likely from

  13. A bacterium capable of using phytol as its sole carbon source, isolated from algal sediment of Mud Lake, Florida.

    PubMed

    Hoag, K B; Bradley, W H; Tousimis, A J; Price, D L

    1969-07-01

    A species of Flavobacterium that consistently attacks pure phytol and can use it as a sole source of carbon has been isolated from the blue-green algal sediment of Mud Lake, Florida. Biochemical tests demonstrate that this bacterium also readily uses various other organic compounds. This bacterium may account for the degradation products of chlorophyll and its side chain phytol, which have been found in the Mud Lake algal sediment. Phytol and its degradation products play a role in Refsum's disease, but phytol is also the most promising precursor of the isoprenoid hydrocarbons found in oil shale of the Green River Formation (Eocene) of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. The discovery of this species of Flavobacterium is a significant product of a protracted study of the bacteriology, phycology, zoology, and geochemistry of the algal sediment forming in Mud Lake, which is believed to be a modern analogue of the kind of algal sediment that, through geologic time, became oil shale.

  14. Possible importance of algal toxins in the Salton Sea, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reifel, K.M.; McCoy, M.P.; Rocke, T.E.; Tiffany, M.A.; Hurlbert, S.H.; Faulkner, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    In response to wildlife mortality including unexplained eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis) die-off events in 1992 and 1994 and other mortality events including large fish kills, a survey was conducted for the presence of algal toxins in the Salton Sea. Goals of this survey were to determine if and when algal toxins are present in the Salton Sea and to describe the phytoplankton composition during those times. A total of 29 samples was collected for toxicity analysis from both nearshore and midlake sites visited biweekly from January to December 1999. Dinoflagellates and diatoms dominated most samples, but some were dominated by a prymnesiophyte (Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis) or a raphidophyte (Chattonella marina). Several types of blooms were observed and sampled. The dinoflagellate Gyrodinium uncatenum formed an extensive, dense (up to 310 000 cells ml-1) and long-lasting bloom during the winter in 1999. A coccolithophorid, Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis, occurred at high densities in surface films and nearshore areas during the spring and summer of 1999. These surface films also contained high densities of one or two other species (an unidentified scrippsielloid, Heterocapsa niei, Chattonella marina). Localized blooms were also observed in the Salton Sea. An unknown small dinoflagellate reached high densities (110 000 cells ml-1) inside Varner Harbor, and an unidentified species of Gymnodinium formed a dense (270 000 cells ml-1) band along part of the southern shoreline during the summer. Three species known to produce toxins in other systems were found. Protoceratium reticulatum (=Gonyaulax grindleyi) and Chattonella marina were found in several samples taken during summer months, and Prorocentrum minimum was found in low densities in several samples. Extracts of most samples, including those containing known toxic species, showed a low level (<10% mortality across all concentrations) of activity in the brine shrimp lethality assay and were not considered

  15. A rapid and accurate quantification method for real-time dynamic analysis of cellular lipids during microalgal fermentation processes in Chlorella protothecoides with low field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Zejian; Tian, Xiwei; Yang, Yi; Guo, Meijin; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping

    2016-05-01

    The rapid and real-time lipid determination can provide valuable information on process regulation and optimization in the algal lipid mass production. In this study, a rapid, accurate and precise quantification method of in vivo cellular lipids of Chlorella protothecoides using low field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) was newly developed. LF-NMR was extremely sensitive to the algal lipids with the limits of the detection (LOD) of 0.0026g and 0.32g/L in dry lipid samples and algal broth, respectively, as well as limits of quantification (LOQ) of 0.0093g and 1.18g/L. Moreover, the LF-NMR signal was specifically proportional to the cellular lipids of C. protothecoides, thus the superior regression curves existing in a wide detection range from 0.02 to 0.42g for dry lipids and from 1.12 to 8.97gL(-1) of lipid concentration for in vivo lipid quantification were obtained with all R(2) higher than 0.99, irrespective of the lipid content and fatty acids profile variations. The accuracy of this novel method was further verified to be reliable by comparing lipid quantification results to those obtained by GC-MS. And the relative standard deviation (RSD) of LF-NMR results were smaller than 2%, suggesting the precision of this method. Finally, this method was successfully used in the on-line lipid monitoring during the algal lipid fermentation processes, making it possible for better understanding of the lipid accumulation mechanism and dynamic bioprocess control.

  16. STUDIES ON THE CHANGE OF THE CONCENTRATIONS OF INTERMEDIATES DURING PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF CHLORELLA AND ISOLATED CHLOROPLASTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The chages in the concentrations of intermediates and the distribution of C(14) after photosynthesis in C(14)02 by Chlorella and isolated...changes in the concentrations of intermediates in Chlorella during the transition from light to dark and vice versa are independent of CO2, but...dependent on anaerobiosis. (2) In Chlorella photosynthesis is inhibited even by a concentration of monoiodoacetic acid which is 100 times lower than that

  17. ALGAL RESPONSE TO NUTRIENT ENRICHMENT IN FORESTED OLIGOTROPHIC STREAM(1).

    PubMed

    Veraart, Annelies J; Romaní, Anna M; Tornés, Elisabet; Sabater, Sergi

    2008-06-01

    Nutrient input in streams alters the density and species composition of attached algal communities in open systems. However, in forested streams, the light reaching the streambed (rather than the local nutrient levels) may limit the growth of these communities. A nutrient-enrichment experiment in a forested oligotrophic stream was performed to test the hypothesis that nutrient addition has only minor effects on the community composition of attached algae and cyanobacteria under light limitation. Moderate nutrient addition consisted of increasing basal phosphorus (P) concentrations 3-fold and basal nitrogen (N) concentrations 2-fold. Two upstream control reaches were compared to a downstream reach before and after nutrient addition. Nutrients were added continuously to the downstream reach for 1 year. Algal biofilms growing on ceramic tiles were sampled and identified for more than a year before nutrient addition to 12 months after. Diatoms were the most abundant taxonomic group in the three stream reaches. Nutrient enrichment caused significant variations in the composition of the diatom community. While some taxa showed significant decreases (e.g., Achnanthes minutissima, Gomphonema angustum), increases for other taxa (such as Rhoicosphenia abbreviata and Amphora ovalis) were detected in the enriched reach (for taxonomic authors, see Table 2). Epiphytic and adnate taxa of large size were enhanced, particularly during periods of favorable growth conditions (spring). Nutrients also caused a change in the algal chl a, which increased from 0.5-5.8 to 2.1-10.7 μg chl · cm(-2) . Our results indicate that in oligotrophic forested streams, long-term nutrient addition has significant effects on the algal biomass and community composition, which are detectable despite the low light availability caused by the tree canopy. Low light availability moderates but does not detain the long-term tendency toward a nutrient-tolerant community. Furthermore, the effects

  18. Algal remediation of CO₂ and nutrient discharges: A review.

    PubMed

    Judd, Simon; van den Broeke, Leo J P; Shurair, Mohamed; Kuti, Yussuf; Znad, Hussein

    2015-12-15

    The recent literature pertaining to the application of algal photobioreactors (PBRs) to both carbon dioxide mitigation and nutrient abatement is reviewed and the reported data analysed. The review appraises the influence of key system parameters on performance with reference to (a) the absorption and biological fixation of CO2 from gaseous effluent streams, and (b) the removal of nutrients from wastewaters. Key parameters appraised individually with reference to CO2 removal comprise algal speciation, light intensity, mass transfer, gas and hydraulic residence time, pollutant (CO2 and nutrient) loading, biochemical and chemical stoichiometry (including pH), and temperature. Nutrient removal has been assessed with reference to hydraulic residence time and reactor configuration, along with C:nutrient ratios and other factors affecting carbon fixation, and outcomes compared with those reported for classical biological nutrient removal (BNR). Outcomes of the review indicate there has been a disproportionate increase in algal PBR research outputs over the past 5-8 years, with a significant number of studies based on small, bench-scale systems. The quantitative impacts of light intensity and loading on CO2 uptake are highly dependent on the algal species, and also affected by solution chemical conditions such as temperature and pH. Calculations based on available data for biomass growth rates indicate that a reactor CO2 residence time of around 4 h is required for significant CO2 removal. Nutrient removal data indicate residence times of 2-5 days are required for significant nutrient removal, compared with <12 h for a BNR plant. Moreover, the shallow depth of the simplest PBR configuration (the high rate algal pond, HRAP) means that its footprint is at least two orders of magnitude greater than a classical BNR plant. It is concluded that the combined carbon capture/nutrient removal process relies on optimisation of a number of process parameters acting synergistically

  19. Algal Supply System Design - Harmonized Version

    SciTech Connect

    Abodeely, Jared; Stevens, Daniel; Ray, Allison; Newby, Deborah; Schaller, Kastli

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this design report is to provide an assessment of current technologies used for production, dewatering, and converting microalgae cultivated in open-pond systems to biofuel. The original draft design was created in 2011 and has subsequently been brought into agreement with the DOE harmonized model. The design report extends beyond this harmonized model to discuss some of the challenges with assessing algal production systems, including the ability to (1) quickly assess alternative algal production system designs, (2) assess spatial and temporal variability, and (3) perform large-scale assessments considering multiple scenarios for thousands of potential sites. The Algae Logistics Model (ALM) was developed to address each of these limitations of current modeling efforts to enable assessment of the economic feasibility of algal production systems across the United States. The (ALM) enables (1) dynamic assessments using spatiotemporal conditions, (2) exploration of algal production system design configurations, (3) investigation of algal production system operating assumptions, and (4) trade-off assessments with technology decisions and operating assumptions. The report discusses results from the ALM, which is used to assess the baseline design determined by harmonization efforts between U.S. DOE national laboratories. Productivity and resource assessment data is provided by coupling the ALM with the Biomass Assessment Tool developed at PNNL. This high-fidelity data is dynamically passed to the ALM and used to help better understand the impacts of spatial and temporal constraints on algal production systems by providing a cost for producing extracted algal lipids annually for each potential site.

  20. Algal Energy Conversion and Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazendonk, P.

    2015-12-01

    We address the potential for energy conversions and capture for: energy generation; reduction in energy use; reduction in greenhouse gas emissions; remediation of water and air pollution; protection and enhancement of soil fertility. These processes have the potential to sequester carbon at scales that may have global impact. Energy conversion and capture strategies evaluate energy use and production from agriculture, urban areas and industries, and apply existing and emerging technologies to reduce and recapture energy embedded in waste products. The basis of biocrude production from Micro-algal feedstocks: 1) The nutrients from the liquid fraction of waste streams are concentrated and fed into photo bioreactors (essentially large vessels in which microalgae are grown) along with CO2 from flue gasses from down stream processes. 2) The algae are processed to remove high value products such as proteins and beta-carotenes. The advantage of algae feedstocks is the high biomass productivity is 30-50 times that of land based crops and the remaining biomass contains minimal components that are difficult to convert to biocrude. 3) The remaining biomass undergoes hydrothermal liquefaction to produces biocrude and biochar. The flue gasses of this process can be used to produce electricity (fuel cell) and subsequently fed back into the photobioreactor. The thermal energy required for this process is small, hence readily obtained from solar-thermal sources, and furthermore no drying or preprocessing is required keeping the energy overhead extremely small. 4) The biocrude can be upgraded and refined as conventional crude oil, creating a range of liquid fuels. In principle this process can be applied on the farm scale to the municipal scale. Overall, our primary food production is too dependent on fossil fuels. Energy conversion and capture can make food production sustainable.

  1. Biological CO2 fixation using Chlorella vulgaris and its thermal characteristics through thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Razzak, Shaikh A; Ali, Saad Aldin M; Hossain, Mohammad M; Mouanda, Alexis Nzila

    2016-11-01

    The present research is focused on cultivation of microalgae strain Chlorella vulgaris for bio-fixation of CO2 coupled with biomass production. In this regard, a single semi-batch vertical tubular photobioreactor and four similar photobioreactors in series have been employed. The concentration of CO2 in the feed stream was varied from 2 to 12 % (v/v) by adjusting CO2 to air ratio. The amount of CO2 capture and algae growth were monitored by measuring decrease of CO2 concentration in the gas phase, microalgal cell density, and algal biomass production rate. The results show that 4 % CO2 gives maximum amount of biomass (0.9 g L(-1)) and productivity (0.118 g L(-1) day(-1)) of C. vulgaris in a single reactor. In series reactors, average productivity per reactor found to be 0.078 g L(-1) day(-1). The maximum CO2 uptake for single reactor also found with 4 % CO2, and it is around 0.2 g L(-1) day(-1). In series reactors, average CO2 uptake is 0.13 g L(-1) day(-1) per reactor. TOC analysis shows that the carbon content of the produced biomass is around 40.67 % of total weight. The thermochemical characteristics of the cultivated C. vulgaris samples were analyzed in the presence of air. All samples burn above 200 °C and the combustion rate become faster at around 600 °C. Almost 98 wt% of the produced biomass is combustible in this range.

  2. Algicidal effects of four Chinese herb extracts on bloom-forming Microcystis aeruginosa and Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Ye, Liangtao; Qian, Jiazhong; Jin, Song; Zuo, Shengpeng; Mei, Hui; Ma, Suming

    2014-01-01

    Extracts from four Chinese herbs, Phellodendri chinensis cortex, Artemisia annua L., Scutellaria baicalensis G. and Citrus reticulate peel were tested for their algicidal effects on Microcystis aeruginosa and Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The results showed that M. aeruginosa was more susceptible than C. pyrenoidosa. The growth of M. aeruginosa was significantly inhibited (p < 0.05) by the four herb extracts. Among the four herbs, P. chinensis cortex and S. baicalensis had the greatest inhibitory effects on M. aeruginosa, followed by C reticulate peel and A. annua. The 50% effective concentrations (EC50) of S. baicalensis, P chinensis cortex, C. reticulate peel and A. annua were 0.87, 0.88, 5.27 and 1 1.16 gherb L-1, respectively. The growth of C. pyrenoidosa was moderately inhibited by the herb extracts individually. The EC5o concentrations for S. baicalensis, P. chinensis cortex, C. reticulate peel andA. annua were 8.67, 11.67, 12.81 and 12.44 g herb L-1', respectively. Extract from S. baicalensis displayed stronger algicidal effects on C. pyrenoidosa than the other three herbs, although no lethal effect on C. pyrenoidosa was observed during the cultivation period. Compared with corresponding individual extract at the same dosage, the binary mixtures of the four herb extracts enhanced the algicidal effects on M. aeruginosa. The maximum inhibitory rates of all binary mixtures of the four herb extracts were all above 92% during the 10-day incubation. The results demonstrate that Chinese herbs, such as P. chinensis cortex or S. baicalensis and their combinations, could offer an effective alternative for mitigating outbreaks of harmful algal blooms in water bodies.

  3. Single and mixture toxicity of pharmaceuticals and chlorophenols to freshwater algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Elisabeth; Hornek-Gausterer, Romana; Saçan, Melek Türker

    2016-07-01

    Organisms in the aquatic environment are exposed to a variety of substances of numerous chemical classes. The unintentional co-occurrence of pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern may pose risk to non-target organisms. In this study, individual and binary mixture toxicity experiments of selected pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen and ciprofloxacin) and chlorophenols (2.4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and 3-chlorophenol (3-CP)) have been performed with freshwater algae Chlorella vulgaris. All experiments have been carried out according to the 96-h algal growth inhibition test OECD No. 201. Binary mixture tests were conducted using proportions of the respective IC50s in terms of toxic unit (TU). The mixture concentration-response curve was compared to predicted effects based on both the concentration addition (CA) and the independent action (IA) model. Additionally, the Combination Index (CI)-isobologram equation method was used to assess toxicological interactions of the binary mixtures. All substances individually tested had a significant effect on C. vulgaris population density and revealed IC50 values <100mgL(-1) after exposure period of 96-h. The toxic ranking of these four compounds to C. vulgaris was 2,4-DCP>ciprofloxacin>3-CP>ibuprofen. Generally, it can be concluded from this study that toxic mixture effects of all tested chemicals to C. vulgaris are higher than the individual effect of each mixture component. It could be demonstrated that IC50 values of the tested mixtures predominately lead to additive effects. The CA model is appropriate to estimate mixture toxicity, while the IA model tends to underestimate the joint effect. The CI-isobologram equation method predicted the mixtures accurately and elicited synergism at low effect levels for the majority of tested combinations.

  4. Algal swimming velocities signal fatty acid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Travis J; Hondzo, Miki; Mashek, Mara T; Mashek, Douglas G; Lefebvre, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The use of microalgae for biofuel production will be beneficial to society if we can produce biofuels at large scales with minimal mechanical energy input in the production process. Understanding micro-algal physiological responses under variable environmental conditions in bioreactors is essential for the optimization of biofuel production. We demonstrate that measuring micro-algal swimming speed provides information on culture health and total fatty acid accumulation. Three strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were grown heterotrophically on acetate and subjected to various levels of nitrogen starvation. Other nutrient levels were explored to determine their effect on micro-algal kinetics. Swimming velocities were measured with two-dimensional micro-particle tracking velocimetry. The results show an inverse linear relationship between normalized total fatty acid mass versus swimming speed of micro-algal cells. Analysis of RNA sequencing data confirms these results by demonstrating that the biological processes of cell motion and the generation of energy precursors are significantly down-regulated. Experiments demonstrate that changes in nutrient concentration in the surrounding media also affect swimming speed. The findings have the potential for the in situ and indirect assessment of lipid content by measuring micro-algal swimming kinetics.

  5. Platy algal banks: Modern and ancient

    SciTech Connect

    Brinton, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Plaly algal banks and associated cycles in the lower Ismay zone of the Paradox Formation are exposed along the walls of the San Juan River canyon, southeastern Utah. These complexes closely resemble algal bank reservoirs in the lower Ismay zone of Ismay and Cache, and possibly other Paradox basin fields. Similarities include facies relationships, lateral and vertical textural variations, and early diagenesis. Extensive algal banks exposed along the San Juan canyon generally have flat bases and mound and swale topographic surfaces, and are separated by interbank channels. The surficial mounds have a regular amplitude and wavelength suggesting a hydrologic rather than biologic influence on topography. The banks themselves, however, are believed to be thick, predominantly in-situ accumulations of platy algae. Distribution of algal banks can be mapped on a field scale; mound and swale topographic features may be identified in core on the basis of depositional and early diagenetic characteristics. Halimeda bioherms (Holocene) cover large areas behind the Great Barrier Reef, developing adjacent to the deep passes that separate the individual reefs. These large in-situ accumulations (20-50 m deep) display similar bank geometries, interbank features, topographic features, vertical textural sequence (including porosity type and distribution), and facies relationships to algal banks observed in the outcropping and subsurface Paradox Formation. Although the hydrodynamic and paleobathymetric settings differ markedly between these two examples, analogies between the mounds themselves are very close. The resemblance lends relevance to exploration and development drilling.

  6. Trophic transfer potential of aluminium oxide nanoparticles using representative primary producer (Chlorella ellipsoides) and a primary consumer (Ceriodaphnia dubia).

    PubMed

    Pakrashi, Sunandan; Dalai, Swayamprava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2014-07-01

    The transfer of nanoparticles through the food chain can lead to bioaccumulation and biomagnification resulting in a long term negative impact on the ecosystem functions. The primary objective of this study was evaluation of aluminium oxide nanoparticles transfer from primary producers to primary consumers. A simple set up consisting of a primary producer (Chlorella ellipsoides) and a primary consumer (Ceriodaphnia dubia) was used. Here, C. ellipsoides were exposed to the varying concentrations of the nanoparticles ranging from 20 to 120μg/mL (196 to 1176μM) for 48h and the infested algal cells were used as the feed to C. dubia. The bioaccumulation of the nanoparticles into the daphnids was noted and the biomagnification factors were computed. The exposure was noted to cause subtle alterations in the feeding behaviour of the daphnids. This might have long term consequences in the energy flow through the food chain. The reproductive behaviour of the daphnids remained unaffected upon exposure to nanoparticle infested algal feed. Distinct observations at ultra-structural scale using transmission electron microscopy provided visual evidences for the disrupted feeding behaviour upon exposure to nanoparticle treated algae. Internalization of nanoparticle like inclusion bodies in the intracellular space of algae was also detected. The findings were further substantiated by a detailed analysis of hydrodynamic stability, bioavailability and dissolution of ions from the nanoparticles over the exposure period. Altogether, the study brings out the first of its kind of observation of trophic transfer potential/behaviour of aluminium oxide nanoparticles and its probable impacts on the energy flow in the fresh water aquatic ecosystem.

  7. Simulated Macro-Algal Outbreak Triggers a Large-Scale Response on Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Justin Q.; Bellwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystem degradation has become common throughout the world. On coral reefs, macroalgal outbreaks are one of the most widely documented signs of degradation. This study simulated local-scale degradation on a healthy coral reef to determine how resident taxa, with the potential to reverse algal outbreaks, respond. We utilized a combination of acoustic and video monitoring to quantify changes in the movements and densities, respectively, of coral reef herbivores following a simulated algal outbreak. We found an unprecedented accumulation of functionally important herbivorous taxa in response to algal increases. Herbivore densities increased by 267% where algae were present. The increase in herbivore densities was driven primarily by an accumulation of the browsing taxa Naso unicornis and Kyphosus vaigiensis, two species which are known to be important in removing macroalgae and which may be capable of reversing algal outbreaks. However, resident individuals at the site of algal increase exhibited no change in their movements. Instead, analysis of the size classes of the responding individuals indicates that large functionally-important non-resident individuals changed their movement patterns to move in and feed on the algae. This suggests that local-scale reef processes may not be sufficient to mitigate the effects of local degradation and highlights the importance of mobile links and cross-scale interactions. PMID:26171788

  8. Algal layer ratios as indicators of air pollutant effects in Permelia sulcata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Parmelia sulcata Taylor is generally believed to be fairly pollution tolerant, and consequently it is sometimes collected in urban and/or polluted localities. The condition of these specimens, however, is not always luxuriant and healthy. This study tested the hypothesis that total thallus and algal layer thickness, and the algal layer ratio would be thinner in polluted areas, thus allowing these characters to be used a indicators of air pollutant effects. Herbarium specimens were studied from 16 different localities varying in pollution level. The thallus and algal layers and ratio were not affected by year or locality of sampling, but decreased 11, 31 and 21% respectively between low and high pollution level localities. These results agreed with earlier studies using other species, but further work is needed to clarify the effects of geography and substrate on these phenomena.

  9. Addressing the challenges for sustainable production of algal biofuels: II. Harvesting and conversion to biofuels.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Ahmed E M; Leite, Gustavo B; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2013-01-01

    In order to ensure the sustainability of algal biofuel production, a number of issues need to be addressed. Previously, we reviewed some of the questions in this area involving algal species and the important challenges of nutrient supply and how these might be met. Here, we take up issues involving harvesting and the conversion ofbiomass to biofuels. Advances in both these areas are required if these third-generation fuels are to have a sufficiently high net energy ratio and a sustainable footprint. A variety of harvesting technologies are under investigation and recent studies in this area are presented and discussed. A number of different energy uses are available for algal biomass, each with their own advantages as well as challenges in terms of efficiencies and yields. Recent advances in these areas are presented and some of the especially promising conversion processes are highlighted.

  10. Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-08-01

    DOE-EERE's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) works to accelerate the development of a sustainable, cost-competitive, advanced biofuel industry that can strengthen U.S. energy security, environmental quality, and economic vitality, through research, development, and demonstration projects in partnership with industry, academia, and national laboratory partners. BETO’s Advanced Algal Systems Program (also called the Algae Program) has a long-term applied research and development (R&D) strategy to increase the yields and lower the costs of algal biofuels. The team works with partners to develop new technologies, to integrate technologies at commercially relevant scales, and to conduct crosscutting analyses to better understand the potential and challenges of the algal biofuels industry. Research has indicated that this industry is capable of producing billions of gallons of renewable diesel, gasoline, and jet fuels annually. R&D activities are integrated with BETO’s longstanding effort to accelerate the commercialization of lignocellulosic biofuels.

  11. Water Permeability of Chlorella Cell Membranes by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Darryl G.; Steponkus, Peter L.; Bustard, Larry D.; Cotts, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurement by two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques of the mean residence time τa of water molecules inside Chlorella vulgaris (Beijerinck) var. “viridis” (Chodot) is reported. The first is the Conlon and Outhred (1972 Biochim Biophys Acta 288: 354-361) technique in which extracellular water is doped with paramagnetic Mn2+ ions. Some complications in application of this technique are identified as being caused by the affinity of Chlorella cell walls for Mn2+ ions which shortens the NMR relaxation times of intra- and extracellular water. The second is based upon observations of effects of diffusion on the spin echo of intra- and extracellular water. Echo attenuation of intracellular water is distinguished from that of extracellular water by the extent to which diffusive motion is restricted. Intracellular water, being restricted to the cell volume, suffers less echo attenuation. From the dependence of echo amplitude upon gradient strength at several values of echo time, the mean residence time of intracellular water can be determined. From the mean residence time of intracellular water, the diffusional water permeability coefficient of the Chlorella membrane is calculated to be 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10−3 cm sec−1. PMID:16660456

  12. Transformation of algal turf by echinoids and scarid fishes on French Polynesian coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille L.; Peyrot-Clausade, Mireille; Romano, Jean-Claude

    1992-04-01

    The respective roles of regular echinoids and scarid fishes in the transformation of turf algae, the main food resource for reef herbivores, were investigated on French Polynesian coral reefs. The role of one species of parrotfish ( Scarus sordidus) was compared with that of four species of echinoids. The degree and ways of degradation of the algal matter were determined by the organic matter percentage, the composition of the sugar fraction, and the concentration and composition of chlorophylltype pigments as assayed by HPLC analysis. Chemical analyses were performed on anterior and posterior intestines for scarids, intestinal contents and faeces for echinoids, and on fresh algal turf as a control of initial food quality. A decrease in mean percentage of organic matter in gut content was observed from intestine (9.7%) to faeces (7%) in sea urchins, but not in parrotfishes. The total sugar fraction decreased from fresh algal turf (32% of total organic matter) to echinoid (28%) to scarid (18%) gut contents. The ratio of insoluble to soluble sugars (I/S ratios) was higher in echinoids (2.6) than in scarid gut contents (1.0). A decrease in the total pigment concentration was measured from fresh algal turf to echinoid and it was found to be even lower in scarid gut contents. Chromatograms showed that the composition of chlorophyll-type pigments in scarid intestines was very similar to fresh algal turf, with a dominance of native forms, mainly chlorophyll a and b. On the contrary, degraded pigment forms dominated in echinoids. The main degraded products were pheophorbides in sea urchins, and chlorophyllides in parrotfishes. These results provided evidence for differentiation in digestive processes occurring in the two types of grazers. Echinoids released higher degraded algal material than did scarids. Thus, these two types of grazers play different roles in the recycling of organic matter on coral reefs.

  13. Low densities of sea urchins influence the structure of algal assemblages in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacín, Cruz; Giribet, Gonzalo; Carner, Susanna; Dantart, Luis; Turon, Xavier

    1998-06-01

    Numerous studies of interactions between urchins and algae in temperate areas have shown an important structuring effect of sea urchin populations. These studies focused almost wholly on the effect of high urchin densities on laminarian forests. In contrast, algal communities below 5-6 m depth in the northwestern Mediterranean are characterised by low sea urchin densities (<5 ind m -2) and the absence of laminarian forests. No previous research has addressed sea urchin/algal interactions in this type of community. To determine the effect of the most abundant echinoid species, Paracentrotus lividus, on well-established algal communities in this area, we performed a removal-reintroduction experiment in rocky patches located between 13 and 16 m depth in the northwestern Mediterranean, where sea urchin densities ranged between 0.9 and 3.4 ind m -2. After 6 months, the cover of non-crustose algae was significantly higher in the plots from which sea urchins had been removed than in control plots (84 vs 67% cover). These removal plots reverted to their original state upon reintroduction of sea urchins. The non-crustose algae consisted of turfing and frondose forms, with the former representing some 70% of the non-crustose algal cover. Change in the cover of turfing algae was responsible for the significant increase in algal development in the sea urchin removal plots. The response of frondose algae to the treatment varied between algal species. It is concluded that grazing by P. lividus exerts a significant effect on habitat structure, even in communities with low sea urchin densities, such as those found in vast areas of the Mediterranean sublittoral.

  14. Algal recycling enhances algal productivity and settleability in Pediastrum boryanum pure cultures.

    PubMed

    Park, Jason B K; Craggs, Rupert J; Shilton, Andy N

    2015-12-15

    Recycling a portion of gravity harvested algae (i.e. algae and associated bacteria biomass) has been shown to improve both algal biomass productivity and harvest efficiency by maintaining the dominance of a rapidly-settleable colonial alga, Pediastrum boryanum in both pilot-scale wastewater treatment High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAP) and outdoor mesocosms. While algal recycling did not change the relative proportions of algae and bacteria in the HRAP culture, the contribution of the wastewater bacteria to the improved algal biomass productivity and settleability with the recycling was not certain and still required investigation. P. boryanum was therefore isolated from the HRAP and grown in pure culture on synthetic wastewater growth media under laboratory conditions. The influence of recycling on the productivity and settleability of the pure P. boryanum culture was then determined without wastewater bacteria present. Six 1 L P. boryanum cultures were grown over 30 days in a laboratory growth chamber simulating New Zealand summer conditions either with (Pr) or without (Pc) recycling of 10% of gravity harvested algae. The cultures with recycling (Pr) had higher algal productivity than the controls (Pc) when the cultures were operated at both 4 and 3 d hydraulic retention times by 11% and 38% respectively. Furthermore, algal recycling also improved 1 h settleability from ∼60% to ∼85% by increasing the average P. boryanum colony size due to the extended mean cell residence time and promoted formation of large algal bio-flocs (>500 μm diameter). These results demonstrate that the presence of wastewater bacteria was not necessary to improve algal productivity and settleability with algal recycling.

  15. Measurement of Lipid Accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris via Flow Cytometry and Liquid-State ¹H NMR Spectroscopy for Development of an NMR-Traceable Flow Cytometry Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bono Jr., Michael S.; Garcia, Ravi D.; Sri-Jayantha, Dylan V.; Ahner, Beth A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we cultured Chlorella vulgaris cells with a range of lipid contents, induced via nitrogen starvation, and characterized them via flow cytometry, with BODIPY 505/515 as a fluorescent lipid label, and liquid-state 1H NMR spectroscopy. In doing so, we demonstrate the utility of calibrating flow cytometric measurements of algal lipid content using triacylglyceride (TAG, also known as triacylglycerol or triglyceride) content per cell as measured via quantitative 1H NMR. Ensemble-averaged fluorescence of BODIPY-labeled cells was highly correlated with average TAG content per cell measured by bulk NMR, with a linear regression yielding a linear fit with r2 = 0.9974. This correlation compares favorably to previous calibrations of flow cytometry protocols to lipid content measured via extraction, and calibration by NMR avoids the time and complexity that is generally required for lipid quantitation via extraction. Flow cytometry calibrated to a direct measurement of TAG content can be used to investigate the distribution of lipid contents for cells within a culture. Our flow cytometry measurements showed that Chlorella vulgaris cells subjected to nitrogen limitation exhibited higher mean lipid content but a wider distribution of lipid content that overlapped the relatively narrow distribution of lipid content for replete cells, suggesting that nitrogen limitation induces lipid accumulation in only a subset of cells. Calibration of flow cytometry protocols using direct in situ measurement of TAG content via NMR will facilitate rapid development of more precise flow cytometry protocols, enabling investigation of algal lipid accumulation for development of more productive algal biofuel feedstocks and cultivation protocols. PMID:26267664

  16. Black silicon SERS substrate: effect of surface morphology on SERS detection and application of single algal cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu-Luen; Juang, Yi-Je

    2014-03-15

    In this study, we have investigated the effect of the surface morphology of the black silicon substrate on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and explored its application of single algal cell detection. By adjusting the O2 and SF6 flow rates in the cryogenic plasma etching process, different surface morphologies of the black silicon substrate was produced without performing the lithographic process. It was found the Raman signals were better enhanced as the tip density of the black silicon substrate increased. In addition, as the thickness of the deposited gold layer increased, the SERS effect increased as well, which could be owing to the generation of more hot spots by bridging individual silicon tips through deposition of gold layer. For the black silicon substrate with tip density of 30 tips/μm(2) and covered by 400 nm deposited gold layer, the detection limit of 10 fM R6G solution concentration with uniform SERS effect across the substrate was achieved. Furthermore, detection of individual algal cell (Chlorella vulgaris) was performed at the SERS substrate as fabricated and the Raman signals of carotenoid and lipid were substantially enhanced.

  17. Harmful Algal Blooms – Special Sampling and Response Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Harmful Algal Blooms – Special Sampling and Response Actions webpage contains information about Background on Harmful Algae in Surface Waters and What to Do if Your System Has Indicators of an Algal Bloom.

  18. Multi-objective optimization of media nutrients for enhanced production of algae biomass and fatty acid biosynthesis from Chlorella pyrenoidosa NCIM 2738.

    PubMed

    Kanaga, Kamaraj; Pandey, Ashutosh; Kumar, Sanjay; Geetanjali

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize significant medium nutrient parameters for maximization of algal lipid and biomass production by using multi objective optimization strategy. Nutrients (nitrate, phosphate and carbohydrate) were investigated to improve the lipid accumulation, biomass production and carbohydrate consumption individually and cumulative manner using a central composite design for the Chlorella pyrenoidosa NCIM 2738 cultivation. Maximum lipid, algal biomass and carbohydrate utilization for individual response optimization were found 34.8% (w/w), 1464.3mgL(-1) and 93.4%, respectively at different optimum level of selected parameters. Whereas, maximum lipid accumulation, biomass production and glucose consumption values in multi-response optimization were observed 28.9%, 1271.2mgL(-1) and 89.2%, respectively at optimum level of 16.8mM NaNO3, 300.9μM K2HPO4 and 2.6% (w/v) glucose. The overall enhancements in lipid productivities by single and multi-response optimization in comparison with control medium conditions were found 2.35 and 2.90-fold with productivity level of 24.8 and 30.6mgL(-1)day(-1), respectively.

  19. Engineering characterisation of a shaken, single-use photobioreactor for early stage microalgae cultivation using Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Ojo, E O; Auta, H; Baganz, F; Lye, G J

    2014-12-01

    This work describes the characterisation and culture performance of a novel, orbitally shaken, single-use photobioreactor (SUPBr) system for microalgae cultivation. The SUPBr mounted on an orbitally shaken platform was illuminated from below. Investigation of fluid hydrodynamics indicated a range of different flow regimes and the existence of 'in-phase' and 'out-of-phase' conditions. Quantification of the fluid mixing time (tm) indicated a decrease in tm values with increasing shaking frequency up to 90 rpm and then approximately constant tm values in the range 15-40 s. For batch cultivation of Chlorella sorokiniana, the highest biomass concentration achieved was 6.6 g L(-1) at light intensity of 180 μmol m2 s(-1). Doubling the total working volume resulted in 35-40% reduction in biomass yield while shaking frequency had little influence on culture kinetics and fatty methyl esters composition. Overall this work demonstrates the utility of the SUPBr for early stage development of algal cultivation processes.

  20. Effect of nutrients on the biodegradation of tributyltin (TBT) by alginate immobilized microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, in natural river water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Yang, Lihua; Chan, Sidney M N; Luan, Tiangang; Li, Yan; Tam, Nora F Y

    2011-01-30

    The removal and degradation of tributyltin (TBT) by alginate immobilized Chlorella vulgaris has been evidenced in our previously published work. The present study was further to investigate the effect of spiked nutrient concentrations on the TBT removal capacity and degradation in the same alginate immobilized C. vulgaris. During the 14-d experiment, compared to the control (natural river water), the spiked nutrient groups (50% or 100% nutrients of the commercial Bristol medium as the reference, marked as 1/2N or 1N) showed more rapid cell proliferation of microalgae and higher TBT removal rate. Moreover, significantly more TBT was adsorbed onto the alginate matrix, but less TBT was taken up by the algal cells of the nutrient groups than that of the control. Mass balance data showed that TBT was lost as inorganic tin in the highest degree in 1N group, followed by 1/2N group and the least was in the control, but the relative abundance of the intermediate products of debutylation (dibutyltin and monobutyltin) were comparable among three groups. In conclusion, the addition of nutrients in contaminated water stimulated the growth and physiological activity of C. vulgaris immobilized in alginate beads and improved its TBT degradation efficiency.

  1. Light attenuates lipid accumulation while enhancing cell proliferation and starch synthesis in the glucose-fed oleaginous microalga Chlorella zofingiensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianpeng; Liu, Jin; Guo, Bingbing; Ma, Xiaonian; Sun, Peipei; Liu, Bin; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of light on lipid and starch accumulation in the oleaginous green algae Chlorella zofingiensis supplemented with glucose. C. zofingiensis, when fed with 30 g/L glucose, synthesized lipids up to 0.531 g/g dry weight; while in the presence of light, the lipid content dropped down to 0.352 g/g dry weight. Lipid yield on glucose was 0.184 g/g glucose, 14% higher than that cultured with light. The light-mediated lipid reduction was accompanied by the down-regulation of fatty acid biosynthetic genes at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, light promoted cell proliferation, starch accumulation, and the starch yield based on glucose. Taken together, light may attenuate lipid accumulation, possibly through the inhibition of lipid biosynthetic pathway, leading to more carbon flux from glucose to starch. This study reveals the dual effects of light on the sugar-fed C. zofingiensis and provides valuable insights into the possible optimization of algal biomass and lipid production by manipulation of culture conditions. PMID:26442783

  2. Purifying synthetic high-strength wastewater by microalgae chlorella vulgaris under various light emitting diode wavelengths and intensities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The high-strength wastewater is now well known as a threat to the natural water since it is highly possible to arouse water eutrophication or algal blooms. The effects of various light emitting diode wavelengths and intensities on the microalgae biological wastewater treatment system was studied in this research. The various nutrient removals and economic efficiencies represented similar variation trends, and these variations under both high C and N loading treatments were similar too. The order for microalgae C. vulgaris reproduction in terms of dry weight and nutrient removal efficiency both were red > white > yellow > blue, under high carbon and nitrogen loading treatments, indicating that the red light was the optimum light wavelength. Furthermore, considering the optimal light intensity in terms of nutrient removal efficiency was 2500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s, while in terms of economic efficiency was 1000, 1500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s. Therefore, the optimum light intensity was found to be 2000 μmol/m2•s. In addition, the optimal experimental illumination time was determined as 120 h. The Chlorella vulgaris microalgae biological wastewater treatment system utilized in this research was able to purify the high-strength carbon and nitrogen wastewater effectively under optimum light wavelength and intensity. PMID:24499586

  3. Light attenuates lipid accumulation while enhancing cell proliferation and starch synthesis in the glucose-fed oleaginous microalga Chlorella zofingiensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianpeng; Liu, Jin; Guo, Bingbing; Ma, Xiaonian; Sun, Peipei; Liu, Bin; Chen, Feng

    2015-10-07

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of light on lipid and starch accumulation in the oleaginous green algae Chlorella zofingiensis supplemented with glucose. C. zofingiensis, when fed with 30 g/L glucose, synthesized lipids up to 0.531 g/g dry weight; while in the presence of light, the lipid content dropped down to 0.352 g/g dry weight. Lipid yield on glucose was 0.184 g/g glucose, 14% higher than that cultured with light. The light-mediated lipid reduction was accompanied by the down-regulation of fatty acid biosynthetic genes at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, light promoted cell proliferation, starch accumulation, and the starch yield based on glucose. Taken together, light may attenuate lipid accumulation, possibly through the inhibition of lipid biosynthetic pathway, leading to more carbon flux from glucose to starch. This study reveals the dual effects of light on the sugar-fed C. zofingiensis and provides valuable insights into the possible optimization of algal biomass and lipid production by manipulation of culture conditions.

  4. Inorganic carbon acquisition in the acid-tolerant alga Chlorella kessleri.

    PubMed

    El-Ansari, Omar; Colman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the freshwater alga, Chlorella kessleri, to maintain a carbon concentrating mechanism when grown at acid pH was investigated. The alga grows over the pH range 4.0-9.0 and was found to take up bicarbonate and CO2 actively when grown at pH 6.0. However, when grown at acid pH (below 5.5), it does not have active CO2 uptake. The acidotolerant species maintained an internal pH of 6.1-7.5 over the external pH range 4.5-7.5, thus the pH difference between the cell interior and the external medium was large enough to allow for the diffusive uptake of CO2 at acid external pH. Mass spectrometric monitoring of O2 and CO2 fluxes by suspensions of C. kessleri, grown at acid pH, and maintained at pH 7.5 showed that the rates of O2 evolution did not exceed those of CO2 uptake. The final CO2 compensation concentrations of 14.0-17.7 µM reached by photosynthetic cells were above the CO2 equilibrium concentration in the external medium, indicating a lack of active CO2 uptake at acid pH. Chlorella kessleri accumulated CO2 with internal concentrations that were 9.9, 18.7 and 22.7-fold that of the external medium for cells grown, respectively, at pH 4.5, 5.0 and 5.5. The ability of C. kessleri cells to accumulate high intracellular concentrations of inorganic carbon at acid pH would provide a sufficiently high concentration of CO2 at the active site of Rubisco thus allowing the alga to maintain growth rates similar to those at alkaline pH.

  5. [Research on characteristic of interrelationship between toxic organic compound BPA and Chlorella vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Jia; Chen, Xiu-Rong; Yan, Long; Zhao, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Fei; Jiang, Zi-Jian

    2014-04-01

    The effects of different concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA) on Chlorella vulgaris and removal capacity of BPA by Chlorella vulgaris were investigated. Results showed that a low concentration (0-20 mg x L(-1)) of BPA promoted the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, whereas a relative high concentration (20-50 mg x L(-1)) of BPA inhibited the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, and the inhibition effect was positively correlated with the concentration of BPA. Likewise, a high dose of initial BPA (> 20 mg x L(-1)) led to a decline in the content of chlorephyll a. Chlorella vulgaris had BPA removal capacity when initial BPA concentration ranged from 2 mg x L(-1) to 50 mg x L(-1). There was positive correlation between the removal rate of BPA per cell and initial BPA concentration. The removal rate of BPA was the highest when initial BPA was 50 mg x L(-1), which appeared between lag phase and logarithmic phase.

  6. Acute and chronic toxic effects of chloramphenicol on Scenedesmus obliquus and Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Sun, Wenfang; An, Shuai; Xiong, Bang; Lin, Kuangfei; Cui, Xinhong; Guo, Meijin

    2013-08-01

    The acute and chronic toxicological effects of Chloramphenicol (CAP) on Scenedesmus obliquus and Chlorella pyrenoidosa are not well understood. The indoor experiments were carried to observe and analyze the CAP induced changes. Results of the observations have showed that CAP exposure could significantly inhibit the growth of Scenedesmus obliquus in almost all the treated groups, while Chlorella pyrenoidosa exhibited less sensitivity. Chlorophyll-a syntheses of Scenedesmus obliquus were all inhibited by CAP exposure, while Chlorella pyrenoidosa displayed obvious stimulation effect. Catalase (CAT) and Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities of both algae were promoted in all the treatments. The experimental results indicated that the growth and Chlorophyll-a syntheses of Scenedesmus obliquus were more sensitive in response to CAP exposure than that of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. While for CAT and SOD activities, Chlorella pyrenoidosa showed more susceptible. This research provides a basic understanding of CAP toxicity to aquatic organisms.

  7. Sequestration of CO2 discharged from anode by algal cathode in microbial carbon capture cells (MCCs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Feng, Yujie; Liu, Jia; Lee, He; Li, Chao; Li, Nan; Ren, Nanqi

    2010-08-15

    Due to increased discharge of CO(2) is incurring problems, CO(2) sequestration technologies require substantial development. By introducing anodic off gas into an algae grown cathode (Chlorella vulgaris), new microbial carbon capture cells (MCCs) were constructed and demonstrated here to be an effective technology for CO(2) emission reduction with simultaneous voltage output without aeration (610+/-50 mV, 1000 Omega). Maximum power densities increased from 4.1 to 5.6 W/m(3) when the optical density (OD) of cathodic algae suspension increased from 0.21 to 0.85 (658 nm). Compared to a stable voltage of 706+/-21 mV (1000 Omega) obtained with cathodic dissolved oxygen (DO) of 6.6+/-1.0 mg/L in MCC, voltage outputs decreased from 654 to 189 mV over 70 h in the control reactor (no algae) accompanied with a decrease in DO from 7.6 to 0.9 mg/L, indicating that cathode electron acceptor was oxygen. Gas analysis showed that all the CO(2) generated from anode was completely eliminated by catholyte, and the soluble inorganic carbon was further converted into algal biomass. These results showed the possibility of a new method for simultaneous carbon fixing, power generation and biodiesel production during wastewater treatment without aeration.

  8. Triflate-catalyzed (trans)esterification of lipids within carbonized algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Levine, Robert B; Bollas, Alexandra A; Durham, Matthew D; Savage, Phillip E

    2012-05-01

    This study demonstrates the utility of rare-earth metal triflate catalysts (i.e., Sc(OTf)(3) and In(OTf)(3)) in the (trans)esterification of oleic acid as well as the lipids contained within carbonized algal biomass using ethanol in the presence of water. Both catalysts are highly active between 200 and 235°C with an ethanol:fatty acid (EtOH:FA) molar ratio of 10-20:1 and showed a high tolerance for moisture. Lipids within hydrochars produced by reacting Chlorella protothecoides paste (25% solids) in high temperature water (220-250°C) were successfully converted into fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE). The highest FAEE yields (85-98%) were obtained when hydrochars were reacted for 60 min at 215°C with about 11-13 mol% Sc(OTf)(3), a 17-19:1 EtOH:FA molar ratio, and without water. FAEE yields remained as high as 93% in the presence of 9 wt.% water. Our preliminary results warrant further work to optimize triflate-catalyzed in situ (trans)esterification at low catalyst and ethanol loadings.

  9. Integrated evaluation of cost, emissions, and resource potential for algal biofuels at the national scale.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ryan E; Fishman, Daniel B; Frank, Edward D; Johnson, Michael C; Jones, Susanne B; Kinchin, Christopher M; Skaggs, Richard L; Venteris, Erik R; Wigmosta, Mark S

    2014-05-20

    Costs, emissions, and resource availability were modeled for the production of 5 billion gallons yr(-1) (5 BGY) of renewable diesel in the United States from Chlorella biomass by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). The HTL model utilized data from a continuous 1-L reactor including catalytic hydrothermal gasification of the aqueous phase, and catalytic hydrotreatment of the HTL oil. A biophysical algae growth model coupled with weather and pond simulations predicted biomass productivity from experimental growth parameters, allowing site-by-site and temporal prediction of biomass production. The 5 BGY scale required geographically and climatically distributed sites. Even though screening down to 5 BGY significantly reduced spatial and temporal variability, site-to-site, season-to-season, and interannual variations in productivity affected economic and environmental performance. Performance metrics based on annual average or peak productivity were inadequate; temporally and spatially explicit computations allowed more rigorous analysis of these dynamic systems. For example, 3-season operation with a winter shutdown was favored to avoid high greenhouse gas emissions, but economic performance was harmed by underutilized equipment during slow-growth periods. Thus, analysis of algal biofuel pathways must combine spatiotemporal resource assessment, economic analysis, and environmental analysis integrated over many sites when assessing national scale performance.

  10. Integrated Evaluation of Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential for Algal Biofuels at the National Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Ryan; Fishman, Daniel; Frank, Edward D.; Johnson, Michael C.; Jones, Susanne B.; Kinchin, Christopher; Skaggs, Richard; Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-04-21

    Costs, emissions, and resource availability were modeled for the production of 5 billion gallons yr-1 (5 BGY) of renewable diesel in the United States from Chlorella biomass by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). The HTL model utilized data from a continuous 1-L reactor including catalytic hydrothermal gasification of the aqueous phase, and catalytic hydrotreatment of the HTL oil. A biophysical algae growth model coupled with weather and pond simulations predicted biomass productivity from experimental growth parameters, allowing site-by-site and temporal prediction of biomass production. The 5 BGY scale required geographically and climatically distributed sites. Even though screening down to 5 BGY significantly reduced spatial and temporal variability, site-to-site, season-to-season, and inter-annual variations in productivity affected economic and environmental performance. Performance metrics based on annual average or peak productivity were inadequate; temporally and spatially explicit computations allowed more rigorous analysis of these dynamic systems. For example, 3-season operation with a winter shutdown was favored to avoid high greenhouse gas emissions, and economic performance was harmed by underutilized equipment during slow-growth periods. Thus, analysis of algal biofuel pathways must combine spatiotemporal resource assessment, economic analysis, and environmental analysis integrated over many sites when assessing national scale performance.

  11. Simultaneous wastewater treatment, electricity generation and biomass production by an immobilized photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    He, Huanhuan; Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Hu, Youshuang; Zhao, Yingying

    2014-05-01

    A photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell (PAMFC) was constructed by the introduction of immobilized microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) into the cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells to fulfill electricity generation, biomass production and wastewater treatment. The immobilization conditions, including the concentration of immobilized matrix, initial inoculation concentration and cross-linking time, were investigated both for the growth of C. vulgaris and power generation. It performed the best at 5 % sodium alginate and 2 % calcium chloride as immobilization matrix, initial inoculation concentration of 10(6) cell/mL and cross-linking time of 4 h. Our findings indicated that C. vulgaris immobilization was an effective and promising approach to improve the performance of PAMFC, and after optimization the power density and Coulombic efficiency improved by 258 and 88.4 %, respectively. Important parameters such as temperature and light intensity were optimized on the performance. PAMFC could achieve a COD removal efficiency of 92.1 %, and simultaneously the maximum power density reached 2,572.8 mW/m(3) and the Coulombic efficiency was 14.1 %, under the light intensity of 5,000 lux and temperature at 25 °C.

  12. Recent Advances in Algal Genetic Tool Development

    DOE PAGES

    R. Dahlin, Lukas; T. Guarnieri, Michael

    2016-06-24

    The goal of achieving cost-effective biofuels and bioproducts derived from algal biomass will require improvements along the entire value chain, including identification of robust, high-productivity strains and development of advanced genetic tools. Though there have been modest advances in development of genetic systems for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, progress in development of algal genetic tools, especially as applied to non-model algae, has generally lagged behind that of more commonly utilized laboratory and industrial microbes. This is in part due to the complex organellar structure of algae, including robust cell walls and intricate compartmentalization of target loci, as well asmore » prevalent gene silencing mechanisms, which hinder facile utilization of conventional genetic engineering tools and methodologies. However, recent progress in global tool development has opened the door for implementation of strain-engineering strategies in industrially-relevant algal strains. Here, we review recent advances in algal genetic tool development and applications in eukaryotic microalgae.« less

  13. Algal production in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for potential biofuel use.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J

    2011-01-01

    Wastewater treatment High Rate Algal Ponds with CO2 addition could provide cost-effective and efficient tertiary-level wastewater treatment with the co-benefit of algal biomass production for biofuel use. Wastewater grown algal biomass can have a lipid content of 10-30% of dry weight, which could be used to make biodiesel. This research investigated algal biomass and total lipid production by two pilot-scale wastewater treatment HRAP(S) (4-day HRT) with and without CO2 addition under New Zealand mid summer (Nov-Jan) conditions. The influence of CO2 addition on wastewater treatment performance was also determined. CO2 was added to one of the HRAPs (the HRAP(E)) by maintaining the maximum pH of the pond below 8. Measurements of HRAP influent and effluent water qualities, total lipid content and algal biomass production were made twice a week over the experimental period. Both HRAP(S) achieved high levels of organic compound and nutrient removal, with >85% SBOD5, >92 NH4(+)-N and >70% DRP removal. Algal/bacterial biomass production in the HRAP(E) (15.2 g/m2/d) was improved by CO2 addition by approximately 30% compared with that of the control HRAP(W) (10.6 g/m2/d). Total lipid content of the biomass grown on both HRAP(S) was slightly reduced (from 25% to 20%) with CO2 addition and the maximum total lipid content of approximately 40% was observed in the HRAP(W) when low NH4(+)-N concentration (<0.5 mg/L) and high maximum pH (>10.0) occurred. Total lipid content of the biomass increased by approximately 15% under nitrogen limiting conditions, however, overall algal/bacterial biomass production was reduced by half during the period of nitrogen limitation. More research is required to maintain algal production under near nitrogen-limiting conditions.

  14. Tumebacillus algifaecis sp. nov., isolated from decomposing algal scum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Fan; Zhang, Bo; Xing, Peng; Wu, Qing-Long; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial strain THMBR28(T) was isolated from decomposing algal scum that was collected during an algal bloom in Taihu lake, China. Cells of strain THMBR28(T) were Gram-staining-positive, facultatively anaerobic and rod-shaped. Growth was observed at 20-45 °C (optimum, 30 °C), at pH 5.0-9.5 (optimum, pH 6.5-7.5), and in the presence of 0-1.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0.5%). Strain THMBR28(T) contained MK-7 as the major menaquinone and iso-C15 : 0 as the major cellular fatty acid. The polar lipid profile contained phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine and six unidentified polar lipids. The diamino acid found in the cell-wall peptidoglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid. The DNA G+C content was 57.6 mol% (Tm). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain THMBR28(T) belonged to the genus Tumebacillus, most closely related to Tumebacillus ginsengisoli DSM 18389(T) (95.0%) and Tumebacillus permanentifrigoris Eur1 9.5(T) (93.4%). Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic characterization, it is concluded that strain THMBR28(T) represents a novel species of the genus Tumebacillus, for which the name Tumebacillus algifaecis sp. nov. is proposed, with THMBR28(T) ( = CGMCC 1.10949(T) = NBRC 108765(T)) as the type strain.

  15. Recycling produced water for algal cultivation for biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Justin N.; Sullivan, Enid J.; Dean, Cynthia A.; Steichen, Seth A.

    2012-08-09

    Algal growth demands a continuous source of water of appropriate salinity and nutritional content. Fresh water sources are scarce in the deserts of the Southwestern United States, hence, salt water algae species are being investigated as a renewable biofuel source. The use of produced water from oil wells (PW) could offset the demand for fresh water in cultivation. Produced water can contain various concentrations of dissolved solids, metals and organic contaminants and often requires treatment beyond oil/water separation to make it suitable for algae cultivation. The produced water used in this study was taken from an oil well in Jal, New Mexico. An F/2-Si (minus silica) growth media commonly used to cultivate Nannochloropsis salina 1776 (NS 1776) was prepared using the produced water (F/2-Si PW) taking into account the metals and salts already present in the water. NS 1776 was seeded into a bioreactor containing 5L of the (F/2-Si PW) media. After eleven days the optical density at 750 nm (an indicator of algal growth) increased from 0 to 2.52. These results indicate algae are able to grow, though inhibited when compared with non-PW media, in the complex chemical conditions found in produced water. Savings from using nutrients present in the PW, such as P, K, and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, results in a 44.38% cost savings over fresh water to mix the F/2-Si media.

  16. Didymosphenia geminata: Algal blooms in oligotrophic streams and rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundareshwar, P.V.; Upadhayay, S.; Abessa, M.; Honomichl, S.; Berdanier, B.; Spaulding, S.A.; Sandvik, C.; Trennepohl, A.

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, the diatom Didymosphenia geminata has emerged as nuisance species in river systems around the world. This periphytic alga forms large "blooms" in temperate streams, presenting a counterintuitive result: the blooms occur primarily in oligotrophic streams and rivers, where phosphorus (P) availability typically limits primary production. The goal of this study is to examine how high algal biomass is formed under low P conditions. We reveal a biogeochemical process by which D. geminata mats concentrate P from flowing waters. First, the mucopolysaccaride stalks of D. geminata adsorb both iron (Fe) and P. Second, enzymatic and bacterial processes interact with Fe to increase the biological availability of P. We propose that a positive feedback between total stalk biomass and high growth rate is created, which results in abundant P for cell division. The affinity of stalks for Fe in association with iron-phosphorus biogeochemistry suggest a resolution to the paradox of algal blooms in oliogotrophic streams and rivers. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection by-product formation from algal organic matter.

    PubMed

    Goslan, Emma H; Seigle, Céline; Purcell, Diane; Henderson, Rita; Parsons, Simon A; Jefferson, Bruce; Judd, Simon J

    2017-03-01

    Seasonal algal blooms in drinking water sources release intracellular and extracellular algal organic matter (AOM) in significant concentrations into the water. This organic matter provides precursors for disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed when the water is subsequently chlorinated at the final disinfection stage of the potable water treatment process. This paper presents results of AOM characterisation from five algal species (three cyanobacteria, one diatom and one green) alongside the measurement of the DBP formation potential from the AOM of six algal species (an additional diatom). The character was explored in terms of hydrophilicity, charge and protein and carbohydrate content. 18 DBPs were measured following chlorination of the AOM samples: the four trihalomethanes (THMs), nine haloacetic acids (HAAs), four haloacetonitriles (HANs) and one halonitromethane (HNM). The AOM was found to be mainly hydrophilic (52 and 81%) in nature. Yields of up to 92.4 μg mg(-1) C carbonaceous DBPs were measured, with few consistent trends between DBP formation propensity and either the specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) or the chemical characteristics. The AOM from diatomaceous algae formed significant amounts of nitrogenous DBPs (up to 1.7 μg mg(-1) C). The weak trends in DBPFP may be attributable to the hydrophilic nature of AOM, which also makes it more challenging to remove by conventional water treatment processes.

  18. Harmful algal blooms and eutrophication: "strategies" for nutrient uptake and growth outside the Redfield comfort zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glibert, Patricia M.; Burkholder, Joann M.

    2011-07-01

    While many harmful algal blooms have been associated with increasing eutrophication, not all species respond similarly and the increasing challenge, especially for resource managers, is to determine which blooms are related to eutrophication and to understand why particular species proliferate under specific nutrient conditions. The overall goal of this brief review is to describe why nutrient loads are not changing in stoichiometric proportion to the "Redfield ratio", and why this has important consequences for algal growth. Many types of harmful algae appear to be able to thrive, and/or increase their production of toxins, when nutrient loads are not in proportion classically identified as Redfield ratios. Here we also describe some of the physiological mechanisms of different species to take up nutrients and to thrive under conditions of nutrient imbalance.

  19. Different algal symbionts explain the vertical distribution of dominant reef corals in the eastern Pacific.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Prieto, R; Beltrán, V H; LaJeunesse, T C; Reyes-Bonilla, H; Thomé, P E

    2004-08-22

    Symbiotic reef corals occupy the entire photic zone; however, most species have distinct zonation patterns within the light intensity gradient. It is hypothesized that the presence of specific symbionts adapted to different light regimes may determine the vertical distribution of particular hosts. We have tested this hypothesis by genetic and in situ physiological analyses of the algal populations occupying two dominant eastern Pacific corals, over their vertical distribution in the Gulf of California. Our findings indicate that each coral species hosts a distinct algal taxon adapted to a particular light regime. The differential use of light by specific symbiotic dinoflagellates constitutes an important axis for niche diversification and is sufficient to explain the vertical distribution patterns of these two coral species.

  20. Different algal symbionts explain the vertical distribution of dominant reef corals in the eastern Pacific.

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Prieto, R.; Beltrán, V. H.; LaJeunesse, T. C.; Reyes-Bonilla, H.; Thomé, P. E.

    2004-01-01

    Symbiotic reef corals occupy the entire photic zone; however, most species have distinct zonation patterns within the light intensity gradient. It is hypothesized that the presence of specific symbionts adapted to different light regimes may determine the vertical distribution of particular hosts. We have tested this hypothesis by genetic and in situ physiological analyses of the algal populations occupying two dominant eastern Pacific corals, over their vertical distribution in the Gulf of California. Our findings indicate that each coral species hosts a distinct algal taxon adapted to a particular light regime. The differential use of light by specific symbiotic dinoflagellates constitutes an important axis for niche diversification and is sufficient to explain the vertical distribution patterns of these two coral species. PMID:15306298

  1. Hyperspectral and Physiological Analyses of Coral-Algal Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Barott, Katie; Smith, Jennifer; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Hatay, Mark; Sandin, Stuart; Rohwer, Forest

    2009-01-01

    Space limitation leads to competition between benthic, sessile organisms on coral reefs. As a primary example, reef-building corals are in direct contact with each other and many different species and functional groups of algae. Here we characterize interactions between three coral genera and three algal functional groups using a combination of hyperspectral imaging and oxygen microprofiling. We also performed in situ interaction transects to quantify the relative occurrence of these interaction on coral reefs. These studies were conducted in the Southern Line Islands, home to some of the most remote and near-pristine reefs in the world. Our goal was to determine if different types of coral-coral and coral-algal interactions were characterized by unique fine-scale physiological signatures. This is the first report using hyperspectral imaging for characterization of marine benthic organisms at the micron scale and proved to be a valuable tool for discriminating among different photosynthetic organisms. Consistent patterns emerged in physiology across different types of competitive interactions. In cases where corals were in direct contact with turf or macroalgae, there was a zone of hypoxia and altered pigmentation on the coral. In contrast, interaction zones between corals and crustose coralline algae (CCA) were not hypoxic and the coral tissue was consistent across the colony. Our results suggest that at least two main characteristic coral interaction phenotypes exist: 1) hypoxia and coral tissue disruption, seen with interactions between corals and fleshy turf and/or some species of macroalgae, and 2) no hypoxia or tissue disruption, seen with interactions between corals and some species of CCA. Hyperspectral imaging in combination with oxygen profiling provided useful information on competitive interactions between benthic reef organisms, and demonstrated that some turf and fleshy macroalgae can be a constant source of stress for corals, while CCA are not. PMID

  2. The role of selective predation in harmful algal blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé, Jordi; Garcia-Ladona, Emilio; Estrada, Marta

    2006-08-01

    A feature of marine plankton communities is the occurrence of rapid population explosions. When the blooming species are directly or indirectly noxious for humans, these proliferations are denoted as harmful algal blooms (HAB). The importance of biological interactions for the appearance of HABs, in particular when the proliferating microalgae produce toxins that affect other organisms in the food web, remains still poorly understood. Here we analyse the role of toxins produced by a microalgal species and affecting its predators, in determining the success of that species as a bloom former. A three-species predator-prey model is used to define a criterion that determines whether a toxic microalga will be able to initiate a bloom in competition against a non-toxic one with higher growth rate. Dominance of the toxic species depends on a critical parameter that defines the degree of feeding selectivity by grazers. The criterion is applied to a particular simplified model and to numerical simulations of a full marine ecosystem model. The results suggest that the release of toxic compounds affecting predators may be a plausible biological factor in allowing the development of HABs.

  3. Interaction of organic solvents with the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, G.W.; Smith, T.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Solvents are often a component of bioassay systems when water-insoluble toxicants are being tested. These solvents must also be considered as xenobiotics and therefore, as potential toxicants in the bioassay. However, the effects of solvents on the organisms being tested and their possible interaction with the test compound are often overlooked by researchers. The purpose of the present study was to compare the inhibitory effects of six solvents commonly used in pesticide bioassays towards growth of the common green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and to examine the occurrence of solvent-pesticide interactions with this organism.

  4. Ecological role of algobacterial cenosis links (chlorella - associated microflora or associated bacteria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechurkin, N. S.

    The problems of interrelation of microalgae and bacteria in the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle are discussed. The cause and mechanisms of algobacterial cenosis formation still have been explained contradictorily. This work views the results of experimental and theoretical study of algobacterial cenosis functioning by the example of microalga Chlorella vulgaris and associated microflora. The representatives of Pseudomonas mainly predominate in the Chlorella microbial complex. The experiment at non-sterile batch cultivation of Chlorella on Tamya medium showed that the biomass of microorganisms increases simultaneously with the increase of microalgal biomass. Microflora of Chlorella can use organic materials evolved by Chlorella after photosynthesis for reproduction. Moreover, microorganisms can use dying cells of Chlorella, i.e. form the "producer - reducer" biocycle. To understand the cenosis-forming role of microalgae the mathematical model of the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle was constructed taking into consideration the opportunities for microorganisms of using Chlorella photosynthates, dying cells and contribution of links to the nitrogen cycle. The theoretical investigation showed that the biomass of associated bacteria growing on glucose and detritus exceeds the biomass of bacteria using only microalgal photosynthates, which is comparable with experimental data.

  5. Chlorella is an effective dietary source of lutein for human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Taiki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kimura, Fumiko; Nakashima, Yuya; Maruyama, Isao; Higuchi, Ohki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Chlorella contains a high amount of carotenoids, especially lutein, and has received attention as a possible dietary source for improving carotenoid levels in human blood. In the present study, we performed a 2-month single arm human study, and investigated the efficacy of Chlorella supplementation (9 g Chlorella/day; equivalent to 32 mg lutein/day) on lutein and other carotenoid concentrations in plasma as well as erythrocytes of 12 healthy subjects. Following Chlorella supplementation, lutein was the predominant carotenoid in erythrocytes, showing a 4-fold increase (from 14 to 54 pmol/mL packed cells). After the one month without Chlorella ingestion, erythrocyte lutein then decreased to a basal level (17 pmol/mL packed cells). Erythrocyte carotenoid (lutein, zeaxanthin, α-carotene, and β-carotene) levels were proportional to plasma carotenoid levels. The results suggest the transfer of Chlorella carotenoids, especially lutein, from plasma lipoprotein particles to the erythrocyte membrane. Chlorella intake would be effective for improving and maintaining lutein concentrations in human erythrocytes.

  6. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase gene from the oleaginous microalga Chlorella zofingiensis: cloning, characterization and transcriptional analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Sun, Zheng; Zhong, Yujuan; Huang, Junchao; Hu, Qiang; Chen, Feng

    2012-12-01

    The green alga Chlorella zofingiensis can accumulate high level of oleic acid (OA, C18:1△(9)) rich oils in response to stress conditions. To understand the regulation of biosynthesis of fatty acid in particular OA at the molecular level, we cloned and characterized the stearoyl acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) responsible for OA formation through desaturation of stearic acid (C18:0) from C. zofingiensis. Southern blot indicated that the C. zofingiensis genome contained a single copy of SAD, from which the deduced amino acid sequence shared high identity to the corresponding homologs from other microalgae and higher plants. The desaturation activity of SAD was demonstrated in vitro using C18:0-ACP as a substrate. Stress conditions such as high light (HL), nitrogen deficiency (N(-)), or combination of HL and N(-) (HL + N(-)) drastically up-regulated the transcripts of biotin carboxylase (BC, a subunit of ACCase) and SAD, and therefore induced considerably the cellular accumulation of total fatty acids including OA. Glucose (50 mM) gave rise to the similar up-regulation of the two genes and induction of fatty acid accumulation. The accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species was found to be associated with the up-regulation of genes. This is the first report of characterization of Chlorella-derived SAD and the results may contribute to understanding of the mechanisms involved in fatty acid/lipid biosynthesis in microalgae.

  7. Chlorella vulgaris Attenuates Dermatophagoides Farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heerim; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Seo, Sang Gwon; Han, Jae Gab; Kim, Byung Gon; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-09-02

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and inflammatory skin disease that can place a significant burden on quality of life for patients. AD most frequently appears under the age of six and although its prevalence is increasing worldwide, therapeutic treatment options are limited. Chlorella vulgaris (CV) is a species of the freshwater green algae genus chlorella, and has been reported to modulate allergy-inducible factors when ingested. Here, we examined the effect of CV supplementation on AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. CV was orally administrated for six weeks while AD-like symptoms were induced via topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE). CV treatment reduced dermatitis scores, epidermal thickness, and skin hydration. Histological analysis also revealed that CV treatment reduced DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin, while analysis of serum chemokine levels indicated that CV treatment downregulated thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) levels. In addition, CV treatment downregulated mRNA expression levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that CV extract may have potential as a nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of AD.

  8. Chlorella vulgaris Attenuates Dermatophagoides Farinae-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Heerim; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Jong Rhan; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Seo, Sang Gwon; Han, Jae Gab; Kim, Byung Gon; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and inflammatory skin disease that can place a significant burden on quality of life for patients. AD most frequently appears under the age of six and although its prevalence is increasing worldwide, therapeutic treatment options are limited. Chlorella vulgaris (CV) is a species of the freshwater green algae genus chlorella, and has been reported to modulate allergy-inducible factors when ingested. Here, we examined the effect of CV supplementation on AD-like symptoms in NC/Nga mice. CV was orally administrated for six weeks while AD-like symptoms were induced via topical application of Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE). CV treatment reduced dermatitis scores, epidermal thickness, and skin hydration. Histological analysis also revealed that CV treatment reduced DFE-induced eosinophil and mast cell infiltration into the skin, while analysis of serum chemokine levels indicated that CV treatment downregulated thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) levels. In addition, CV treatment downregulated mRNA expression levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ. Taken together, these results suggest that CV extract may have potential as a nutraceutical ingredient for the prevention of AD. PMID:26404252

  9. The inactivation of Chlorella spp. with dielectric barrier discharge in gas-liquid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dan; Sun, Bing; Zhu, Xiaomei; Yan, Zhiyu; Liu, Hui; Liu, Yongjun

    2013-03-01

    The inactivation of Chlorella spp. with high voltage and frequency pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in hybrid gas-liquid reactor with a suspension electrode was studied experimentally. In the hybrid gas-liquid reactor, a steel plate was used as high voltage electrode while a quartz plate as a dielectric layer, another steel plate placing in the aqueous solution worked as a whole ground electrode. A suspension electrode is installed near the surface of solution between high voltage and ground electrode to make the dielectric barrier discharge uniform and stable, the discharge gap was between the quartz plate and the surface of the water. The effect of peak voltage, treatment time, the initial concentration of Chlorella spp. and conductivity of solution on the inactivation rate of Chlorella spp. was investigated, and the inactivation mechanism of Chlorella spp. preliminarily was studied. Utilizing this system inactivation of Chlorella spp., the inactivation rate increased with increasing of peak voltage, treatment time and electric conductivity. It was found that the inactivation rate of Chlorella spp. arrived at 100% when the initial concentration was 4 × 106 cells mL-1, and the optimum operation condition required a peak voltage of 20 kV, a treatment time of 10 min and a frequency of 7 kHz. Though the increasing of initial concentration of the Chlorella spp. contributed to the addition of interaction probability between the Chlorella spp. and O3, H2O2, high-energy electrons, UV radiation and other active substances, the total inactivation number raise, but the inactivation rate of the Chlorella spp. decreased.

  10. Algal light sensing and photoacclimation in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Rockwell, Nathan C; Clark Lagarias, J

    2017-02-28

    Anoxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes arose in ancient oceans ~3.5 billion years ago. Evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis by cyanobacteria followed soon after, enabling eukaryogenesis and the evolution of complex life. The Archaeplastida lineage dates back ~1.5 billion years to the domestication of a cyanobacterium. Eukaryotic algae have subsequently radiated throughout oceanic/fresh-water/terrestrial environments, adopting distinctive morphological and developmental strategies for adaptation to diverse light environments. Descendants of the ancestral photosynthetic alga remain challenged by a typical diurnally fluctuating light supply ranging from ~0 to ~2000 μE m(-2) s(-1) . Such extreme changes in light intensity and variations in light quality have driven evolution of novel photoreceptors, light harvesting complexes and photoprotective mechanisms in photosynthetic eukaryotes. This minireview focuses on algal light sensors, highlighting the unexpected roles for linear tetrapyrroles (bilins) in the maintenance of functional chloroplasts in chlorophytes, sister species to streptophyte algae and land plants.

  11. Energy-efficient photobioreactor configuration for algal biomass production.

    PubMed

    Pegallapati, Ambica Koushik; Arudchelvam, Yalini; Nirmalakhandan, Nagamany

    2012-12-01

    An internally illuminated photobioreactor (IIPBR) design is proposed for energy-efficient biomass production. Theoretical rationale of the IIPBR design and its advantages over the traditional bubble column photobioreactors (PBRs) are presented, followed by experimental results from prototype scale cultivation of freshwater and marine algal strains in an 18L IIPBR. Based on theoretical considerations, the proposed IIPBR design has the potential to support 160% higher biomass density and higher biomass productivity per unit energy input, B/E, than a bubble column PBR of equal incident area per unit culture volume. Experimental B/E values recorded in this study with fresh water algae and marine algae (1.42 and 0.37 gW(-1)d(-1), respectively) are at least twice as those reported in the literature for comparable species cultivated in bubble column and airlift PBRs.

  12. Coupling of Algal Biofuel Production with Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Amit; Bisht, Tara Singh; Tamta, Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae have gained enormous consideration from scientific community worldwide emerging as a viable feedstock for a renewable energy source virtually being carbon neutral, high lipid content, and comparatively more advantageous to other sources of biofuels. Although microalgae are seen as a valuable source in majority part of the world for production of biofuels and bioproducts, still they are unable to accomplish sustainable large-scale algal biofuel production. Wastewater has organic and inorganic supplements required for algal growth. The coupling of microalgae with wastewater is an effective way of waste remediation and a cost-effective microalgal biofuel production. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the possibilities and current scenario regarding coupling of microalgal cultivation with biofuel production emphasizing recent progress in this area. PMID:24982930

  13. Coupling of algal biofuel production with wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Neha Chamoli; Panwar, Amit; Bisht, Tara Singh; Tamta, Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae have gained enormous consideration from scientific community worldwide emerging as a viable feedstock for a renewable energy source virtually being carbon neutral, high lipid content, and comparatively more advantageous to other sources of biofuels. Although microalgae are seen as a valuable source in majority part of the world for production of biofuels and bioproducts, still they are unable to accomplish sustainable large-scale algal biofuel production. Wastewater has organic and inorganic supplements required for algal growth. The coupling of microalgae with wastewater is an effective way of waste remediation and a cost-effective microalgal biofuel production. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the possibilities and current scenario regarding coupling of microalgal cultivation with biofuel production emphasizing recent progress in this area.

  14. Grazer diversity interacts with biogenic habitat heterogeneity to accelerate intertidal algal succession.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Matthew A; Aquilino, Kristin M; Stachowicz, John J

    2016-08-01

    Environmental heterogeneity contributes to coexistence by allowing species with different traits to persist when different species perform best at different times or places. This interaction between niche differences and environmental variability may also help explain relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, but few data are available to rigorously evaluate this hypothesis. We assessed how a biologically relevant aspect of environmental heterogeneity interacts with species diversity to determine ecosystem processes in a natural rocky intertidal community. We used field removals to factorially manipulate biogenic habitat heterogeneity (barnacles, bare rock, and plots that were 50/50 mixes of the two habitat types) and gastropod grazer species richness and then tracked algal community succession and recovery over the course of 1 yr. We found that herbivore diversity, substrate heterogeneity, and their interaction played unique roles in the peak abundance and timing of occurrence of different algal functional groups. Early successional microalgae were most heavily grazed in diverse herbivore assemblages and those with barnacles present, which was likely due to complementary feeding strategies among all three grazers. In contrast, late successional macroalgae were strongly influenced by the presence of a habitat generalist limpet. In this herbivore's absence, heterogeneous habitats (i.e., mixtures of bare rock and barnacles) experienced the greatest algal accumulation, which was partly a result of complementary habitat use by the remaining herbivores. The complex way habitat identity and heterogeneity altered grazer-algal interactions in our study suggests species' differences and environmental heterogeneity both separately and interactively contribute to the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functions.

  15. Copper desorption from Gelidium algal biomass.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2007-04-01

    Desorption of divalent copper from marine algae Gelidium sesquipedale, an algal waste (from agar extraction industry) and a composite material (the algal waste immobilized in polyacrylonitrile) was studied in a batch system. Copper ions were first adsorbed until saturation and then desorbed by HNO(3) and Na(2)EDTA solutions. Elution efficiency using HNO(3) increases as pH decreases. At pH=1, for a solid to liquid ratio S/L=4gl(-1), elution efficiency was 97%, 95% and 88%, the stoichiometric coefficient for the ionic exchange, 0.70+/-0.02, 0.73+/-0.05 and 0.76+/-0.06 and the selectivity coefficient, 0.93+/-0.07, 1.0+/-0.3 and 1.1+/-0.3, respectively, for algae Gelidium, algal waste and composite material. Complexation of copper ions by EDTA occurs in a molar proportion of 1:1 and the elution efficiency increases with EDTA concentration. For concentrations of 1.4, 0.88 and 0.57 mmoll(-1), the elution efficiency for S/L=4gl(-1), was 91%, 86% and 78%, respectively, for algae Gelidium, algal waste and composite material. The S/L ratio, in the range 1-20gl(-1), has little influence on copper recovery by using 0.1M HNO(3). Desorption kinetics was very fast for all biosorbents. Kinetic data using HNO(3) as eluant were well described by the mass transfer model, considering the average metal concentration in the solid phase and the equilibrium relationship given by the mass action law. The homogeneous diffusion coefficient varied between 1.0 x 10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for algae Gelidium and 3.0 x 10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for the composite material.

  16. Collection and conversion of algal lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Chieh

    Sustainable economic activities mandate a significant replacement of fossil energy by renewable forms. Algae-derived biofuels are increasingly seen as an alternative source of energy with potential to supplement the world's ever increasing demand. Our primary objective is, once the algae were cultivated, to eliminate or make more efficient energy-intensive processing steps of collection, drying, grinding, and solvent extraction prior to conversion. To overcome the processing barrier, we propose to streamline from cultivated algae to biodiesel via algal biomass collection by sand filtration, cell rupturing with ozone, and immediate transesterification. To collect the algal biomass, the specific Chlorococcum aquaticum suspension was acidified to pH 3.3 to promote agglomeration prior to sand filtration. The algae-loaded filter bed was drained of free water and added with methanol and ozonated for 2 min to rupture cell membrane to accelerate release of the cellular contents. The methanol solution now containing the dissolved lipid product was collected by draining, while the filter bed was regenerated by further ozonation when needed. The results showed 95% collection of the algal biomass from the suspension and a 16% yield of lipid from the algae, as well as restoration of filtration velocity of the sand bed via ozonation. The results further showed increased lipid yield upon cell rupturing and transesterified products composed entirely of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) compounds, demonstrating that the rupture and transesterification processes could proceed consecutively in the same medium, requiring no separate steps of drying, extraction, and conversion. The FAME products from algae without exposure to ozone were mainly of 16 to 18 carbons containing up to 3 double bonds, while those from algae having been ozonated were smaller, highly saturated hydrocarbons. The new technique streamlines individual steps from cultivated algal lipid to transesterified products and

  17. Micro-columns packed with Chlorella vulgaris immobilised on silica gel for mercury speciation.

    PubMed

    Tajes-Martínez, P; Beceiro-González, E; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2006-02-28

    A method has been developed for mercury speciation in water by using columns packed with Chlorella vulgaris immobilised on silica gel. The method involves the retention of CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+) in micro-columns prepared by packing immobilised algae in polypropylene tubes, followed by selective and sequential elution with 0.03 and 1.5M HCl for CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+), respectively. The adsorption capacity of the micro-algae for Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+) has been evaluated using free and immobilised C. vulgaris. The efficiency uptake for both species at pH 3 was higher than 97%. Studies were carried out on the effect of retention and elution conditions for both species. Furthermore, the stability of mercury species retained on algae-silica gel micro-columns and lifetime of the columns were also investigated. Hg(2+) showed a higher stability than CH(3)Hg(+) at 0 degrees C (21 and 3 days, respectively) and a better lifetime than for the organic species. The developed method was applied to the analysis of spiked tap, sea and wastewater samples. Recovery studies on tap and filtered seawater provided results between 96+/-3 and 106+/-2 for Hg(2+) and from 98+/-5 to 107+/-5 for CH(3)Hg(+), for samples spiked with single species. For samples spiked with both CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+), the average recoveries varied from 96+/-5 to 99+/-3 and from 103+/-6 to 115+/-5 for Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+), respectively. However, the percentages of retention and elution on wastewater and unfiltered seawater were only adequate for the inorganic species.

  18. Liquid transportation fuels from algal oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daichuan

    Liquid transportation fuels from renewable sources are becoming more prominent and important in modem society. Processing of hydrocarbon oils from algae has not been studied in detail in the past, so components which have been proposed for incorporation in algal oils via genetic engineering, such as cuparene, farnesene, phytol and squalene, have been subjected to processing via catalytic cracking in a pulse reactor at different temperatures. The cracking results showed that liquid products contained numerous high octane molecules which make it feasible for use in automobiles. Additionally, canola oil, chosen as an algal oil model compound, was studied as a feed for catalytic cracking in a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure over different types of zeolites. The results showed that MFI catalysts gave the highest yield of gasoline range products and lowest coke formation. Gallium loaded MFI zeolites increased the total aromatics yield for the canola oil cracking relative to the acid form of the zeolite. Finally, algal oils were cracked on several selected zeolites, and the results showed the same trend as canola oil cracking. MFI gave the highest gasoline yield (43.8 wt%) and lowest coke (4.7 wt%). The total aromatics yield from algae oil cracking is improved 7.8 wt% when MFI is loaded with gallium.

  19. Survey on nitrogen removal and membrane filtration characteristics of Chlorella vulgaris Beij. on treating domestic type wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Chuen-Mei; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chu, Ching-Ping; Chung, Yu-Jen; Liao, Chien-Sen

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to evaluate the nitrogen assimilation and filtration characteristics of Chlorella vulgaris Beij. when treating domestic wastewaters. Chlorella could assimilate organic nitrogen, ammonia and nitrate in wastewater, and the mean cell residence time (MCRT) to achieve the maximum biomass content in a bioreactor was different for each individual nitrogen source used. The experimental results showed that using nitrate as the only nitrogen source was the most favorable for biomass growth. With ammonia and nitrate coexisting in the aquatic phase, Chlorella possibly utilized ammonia first, and this was unfavorable to subsequent biomass growth. Nitrifying bacteria in wastewaters significantly affected Chlorella growth as they possibly competed with Chlorella in assimilating ammonia and nitrate in domestic wastewater. In a submerged ultrafiltration (UF) membrane module, with an initial concentration of 850 mg/L of Chlorella, the optimized flux was 0.02 m(3)/(m(2)·h), and the filtration cycle was 30 min. A 'dual membrane bioreactor (MBR)' configuration using UF membranes for Chlorella incubation was proposed. MBR1 provides an environment with long MCRT for efficient nitrification. The converted nitrate is assimilated by Chlorella in MBR2 to sustain its growth. UF permeate from MBR1 is bacteria-free and does not affect the growth of Chlorella in MBR2. MCRT of Chlorella growth is controlled by the UF membrane of MBR2, providing the flexibility to adjust variations of nitrogen composition in the wastewater.

  20. Industrial-strength ecology: trade-offs and opportunities in algal biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Shurin, Jonathan B; Abbott, Rachel L; Deal, Michael S; Kwan, Garfield T; Litchman, Elena; McBride, Robert C; Mandal, Shovon; Smith, Val H

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae represent one of the most promising groups of candidate organisms for replacing fossil fuels with contemporary primary production as a renewable source of energy. Algae can produce many times more biomass per unit area than terrestrial crop plants, easing the competing demands for land with food crops and native ecosystems. However, several aspects of algal biology present unique challenges to the industrial-scale aquaculture of photosynthetic microorganisms. These include high susceptibility to invading aquatic consumers and weeds, as well as prodigious requirements for nutrients that may compete with the fertiliser demands of other crops. Most research on algal biofuel technologies approaches these problems from a cellular or genetic perspective, attempting either to engineer or select algal strains with particular traits. However, inherent functional trade-offs may limit the capacity of genetic selection or synthetic biology to simultaneously optimise multiple functional traits for biofuel productivity and resilience. We argue that a community engineering approach that manages microalgal diversity, species composition and environmental conditions may lead to more robust and productive biofuel ecosystems. We review evidence for trade-offs, challenges and opportunities in algal biofuel cultivation with a goal of guiding research towards intensifying bioenergy production using established principles of community and ecosystem ecology.

  1. Response of an algal assemblage to nutrient enrichment and shading in a Hawaiian stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, S.H.; Brasher, A.M.D.; Smith, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of nitrate enrichment, phosphate enrichment, and light availability on benthic algae, nutrient-diffusing clay flowerpots were colonized with algae at two sites in a Hawaiian stream during spring and autumn 2002 using a randomized factorial design. The algal assemblage that developed under the experimental conditions was investigated by determining biomass (ash-free dry mass and chlorophyll a concentrations) and composition of the diatom assemblage. In situ pulse amplitude-modulated fluorometry was also used to model photosynthetic rate of the algal assemblage. Algal biomass and maximum photosynthetic rate were significantly higher at the unshaded site than at the shaded site. These parameters were higher at the unshaded site with either nitrate, or to a lesser degree, nitrate plus phosphate enrichment. Analysis of similarity of diatom assemblages showed significant differences between shaded and unshaded sites, as well as between spring and autumn experiments, but not between nutrient treatments. However, several individual species of diatoms responded significantly to nitrate enrichment. These results demonstrate that light availability (shaded vs. unshaded) is the primary limiting factor to algal growth in this stream, with nitrogen as a secondary limiting factor. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  2. Stability and loading properties of curcumin encapsulated in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Yaser; Sabahi, Hossein; Rahaie, Mahdi

    2016-11-15

    Curcumin (Cur), a polyphenols with pharmacological function, was successfully encapsulated in algae (Alg) cell (Chlorella vulgaris) as confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Fluorescence micrographs, TGA, DSC and FTIR spectra suggested the hypothesis inclusion Cur in Nano-empty spaces inside cell wall of Alg. The TGA analysis showed that the thermal stability of Alg and Cur at algae/curcumin complex was 3.8% and 33% higher than their free forms at 0-300°C and 300-600°C ranges, respectively. After encapsulation in Alg cells, the photostability of Cur was enhanced by about 2.5-fold. Adsorption isotherm of Cur into Alg was fitted with the Freundlich isotherm. The microcapsules were loaded with Cur up to about 55% w/w which is much higher than other reported bio-carriers. In conclusion, the data proved that Chlorella vulgaris cell can be used as a new stable carrier for Cur.

  3. Growth and Metabolism of the Green Alga, Chlorella Pyrenoidosa, in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, W. Ronald

    2003-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on living organisms during space flight has been a topic of interest for some time, and a substantial body of knowledge on the subject has accumulated. Despite this, comparatively little information is available regarding the influence of microgravity on algae, even though it has been suggested for long duration flight or occupancy in space that plant growth systems, including both higher plants and algae, are likely to be necessary for bioregenerative life support systems. High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating-Wall Vessel or HARV bioreactors developed at Johnson Space Center provide a laboratory-based approach to investigating the effects of microgravity on cellular reactions. In this study, the HARV bioreactor was used to examine the influence of simulated microgravity on the growth and metabolism of the green alga, Chlorella pyrenoidosa. After the first 2 days of culture, cell numbers increased more slowly in simulated microgravity than in the HARV gravity control; after 7 days, growth in simulated microgravity was just over half (58%) that of the gravity control and at 14 days it was less than half (42%). Chlorophyll and protein were also followed as indices of cell competence and function; as with growth, after 2-3 days, protein and chlorophyll levels were reduced in modeled microgravity compared to gravity controls. Photosynthesis is a sensitive biochemical index of the fitness of photosynthetic organisms; thus, CO2-dependent O2 evolution was tested as a measure of photosynthetic capacity of cells grown in simulated microgravity. When data were expressed with respect to cell number, modeled microgravity appeared to have little effect on CO2 fixation. Thus, even though the overall growth rate was lower for cells cultured in microgravity, the photosynthetic capacity of the cells appears to be unaffected. Cells grown in simulated microgravity formed loose clumps or aggregates within about 2 days of culture, with aggregation increasing over time

  4. Effect of static magnetic fields on the growth, photosynthesis and ultrastructure of Chlorella kessleri microalgae.

    PubMed

    Small, Darcy P; Hüner, Norman P A; Wan, Wankei

    2012-05-01

    Microalgal biotechnology could generate substantial amounts of biofuels with minimal environmental impact if the economics can be improved by increasing the rate of biomass production. Chlorella kessleri was grown in a small-scale raceway pond and in flask cultures with the entire volume, 1% (v/v) at any instant, periodically exposed to static magnetic fields to demonstrate increased biomass production and investigate physiological changes, respectively. The growth rate in flasks was maximal at a field strength of 10 mT, increasing from 0.39 ± 0.06 per day for the control to 0.88 ± 0.06 per day. In the raceway pond the 10 mT field increased the growth rate from 0.24 ± 0.03 to 0.45 ± 0.05 per day, final biomass from 0.88 ± 0.11 to 1.56 ± 0.18 g/L per day, and maximum biomass production from 0.11 ± 0.02 to 0.38 ± 0.04 g/L per day. Increased pigment, protein, Ca, and Zn content made the biomass produced with magnetic stimulation nutritionally superior. An increase in oxidative stress was measured indirectly as a decrease in antioxidant capacity from 26 ± 2 to 17 ± 1 µmol antioxidant/g biomass. Net photosynthetic capacity (NPC) and respiratory rate were increased by factors of 2.1 and 3.1, respectively. Loss of NPC enhancement after the removal of magnetic field fit a first-order model well (R(2)  = 0.99) with a half-life of 3.3 days. Transmission electron microscopy showed enlarged chloroplasts and decreased thylakoid order with 10 mT treatment. By increasing daily biomass production about fourfold, 10 mT magnetic field exposure could make algal oil cost competitive with other biodiesel feedstocks.

  5. Use of a chemical equilibrium model to describe surface properties and uptake of cadmium, strontium, and lead by Chlorella (UTEX 252)

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Metal-aquatic biota interactions are important in both natural and engineered systems. In this study, the uptake of cadmium, strontium and lead by the unicellular green alga Chlorella (UTEX 252) was investigated. Variables included metal concentration, pH, and ionic strength. Data gathered included dry weights (mg/l), cell counts (cells/ml), electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs, {mu}m/sec/V/cm) of metal-free and metal-exposed cells, and metal uptake - difference in concentration in filtrate of cell-metal and cell-free metal solutions. Derived data included cell volumes and surface area, uptake on a {mu}M/m{sup 2} basis, {zeta}-potentials, diffuse layer potentials and charge densities. Typical uptake values were 1.1, 5.2, and 6 {mu}M/m{sup 2} for Cd, Pb, and Sr, respectively, from solutions of pH 6, ionic strength 0.02M, and metal concentration 10{sup {minus}4} M. Cell EPMs were insensitive to metal; under certain conditions, however, (pM > 4, pH > 8), cadmium exposed cells exhibited a reversal in surface charge from negative to positive. The chemical equilibrium model MINEQL1 + STANFORD was used to model algal surface properties and metal uptake. Input data included site pK, density, and {Delta}pK, estimated from EPM-pH data. The model described surface properties of Chlorella (UTEX 252) as judged by a close fit of {zeta}-potentials and model-derived diffuse layer potentials. Metal uptake was modelled by adjusting site density and/or metal-surface site equilibrium constants. Attempts to model surface properties and metal uptake simultaneously were not successful.

  6. The Effect of Copper and Selenium Nanocarboxylates on Biomass Accumulation and Photosynthetic Energy Transduction Efficiency of the Green Algae Chlorella Vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhaylenko, Natalia F.; Zolotareva, Elena K.

    2017-02-01

    Nanoaquachelates, the nanoparticles with the molecules of water and/or carboxylic acids as ligands, are used in many fields of biotechnology. Ultra-pure nanocarboxylates of microelements are the materials of spatial perspective. In the present work, the effects of copper and selenium nanoaquachelates carboxylated with citric acid on biomass accumulation of the green algae Chlorella vulgaris were examined. Besides, the efficiency of the reactions of the light stage of photosynthesis was estimated by measuring chlorophyll a fluorescence. The addition of 0.67-4 mg L-1 of Cu nanocarboxylates resulted in the increase in Chlorella biomass by ca. 20%; however, their concentrations ranging from 20 to 40 mg L-1 strongly inhibited algal growth after the 12th day of cultivation. Se nanocarboxylates at 0.4-4 mg L-1 concentrations also stimulated the growth of C. vulgaris, and the increase in biomass came up to 40-45%. The addition of Se nanocarboxylates at smaller concentrations (0.07 or 0.2 mg L-1) at first caused the retardation of culture growth, but that effect disappeared after 18-24 days of cultivation. The addition of 2-4 mg L-1 of Cu nanocarboxylates or 0.4-4 mg L-1 of Se nanocarboxylates caused the evident initial increase in such chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters as maximal quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry ( F v/ F m) and the quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry in the light-adapted state ( F v'/ F m'). Photochemical fluorescence quenching coefficients declined after 24 days of growth with Cu nanocarboxylates, but they increased after 6 days of the addition of 2 or 4 mg L-1 Se nanocarboxylates. Those alterations affected the overall quantum yield of the photosynthetic electron transport in photosystem II.

  7. Algal exudates and stream organic matter influence the structure and function of denitrifying bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Kalscheur, Kathryn N; Rojas, Miguel; Peterson, Christopher G; Kelly, John J; Gray, Kimberly A

    2012-11-01

    Within aquatic ecosystems, periphytic biofilms can be hot spots of denitrification, and previous work has suggested that algal taxa within periphyton can influence the species composition and activity of resident denitrifying bacteria. This study tested the hypothesis that algal species composition within biofilms influences the structure and function of associated denitrifying bacterial communities through the composition of organic exudates. A mixed population of bacteria was incubated with organic carbon isolated from one of seven algal species or from one of two streams that differed in anthropogenic inputs. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) revealed differences in the organic composition of algal exudates and stream waters, which, in turn, selected for distinct bacterial communities. Organic carbon source had a significant effect on potential denitrification rates (DNP) of the communities, with organics isolated from a stream with high anthropogenic inputs resulting in a bacterial community with the highest DNP. There was no correlation between DNP and numbers of denitrifiers (based on nirS copy numbers), but there was a strong relationship between the species composition of denitrifier communities (as indicated by tag pyrosequencing of nosZ genes) and DNP. Specifically, the relative abundance of Pseudomonas stutzeri-like nosZ sequences across treatments correlated significantly with DNP, and bacterial communities incubated with organic carbon from the stream with high anthropogenic inputs had the highest relative abundance of P. stutzeri-like nosZ sequences. These results demonstrate a significant relationship between bacterial community composition and function and provide evidence of the potential impacts of anthropogenic inputs on the structure and function of stream microbial communities.

  8. Effects of algal turfs and sediment on coral settlement.

    PubMed

    Birrell, Chico L; McCook, Laurence J; Willis, Bette L

    2005-01-01

    Successful settlement and recruitment of corals is critical to the resilience of coral reefs. Given that many degraded reefs are dominated by benthic algae, recovery of coral populations after bleaching and other disturbances requires successful settlement amidst benthic algae. Algal turfs often accumulate sediments, sediments are known to inhibit coral settlement, and reefs with high inputs of terrestrial sediments are often dominated by turfs. We investigated the impacts of two algal turf assemblages, and of sediment deposits, on settlement of the coral Acropora millepora (Ehrenberg). Adding sediment reduced coral settlement, but the effects of different algal turfs varied. In one case, algal turfs inhibited coral settlement, whereas the other turf only inhibited settlement when combined with sediments. These results provide the first direct, experimental evidence of effects of filamentous algal turfs on coral settlement, the variability in those effects, and the potential combined effects of algal turfs and trapped sediments.

  9. Mechanism and challenges in commercialisation of algal biofuels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anoop; Nigam, Poonam Singh; Murphy, Jerry D

    2011-01-01

    Biofuels made from algal biomass are being considered as the most suitable alternative energy in current global and economical scenario. Microalgae are known to produce and accumulate lipids within their cell mass which is similar to those found in many vegetable oils. The efficient lipid producer algae cell mass has been reported to contain more than 30% of their cell weight as lipids. According to US DOE microalgae have the potential to produce 100 times more oil per acre land than any terrestrial plants. T