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Sample records for algan electron blocking

  1. On the importance of AlGaN electron blocking layer design for GaN-based light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Xia, Chang Simon Li, Z. M.; Sheng, Yang

    2013-12-02

    There has been confusion regarding the usefulness of AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with some published experimental data indicating that the LEDs without EBL performed better than those with it. InGaN/GaN LEDs have been investigated numerically to analyze its actual effect in these devices. Simulation results show that hole blocking effect of EBL mainly determines the effectiveness of using it which is more sensitive to its Al composition, band offset ratio, and polarization charges. It is found that the choice of Al composition is critical for EBL to improve the optical performance of GaN-based LEDs.

  2. Performance enhancement of AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with varied superlattice barrier electron blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songqing; Ye, Chunya; Cai, Xuefen; Li, Shuping; Lin, Wei; Kang, Junyong

    2016-05-01

    The AlGaN-based deep-UV LEDs with specific design of varied superlattice barrier electron blocking layer (EBL) has been investigated numerically by APSYS software. The proposed structure exhibits significant improvement in the light output power, internal quantum efficiency, current-voltage curve and electroluminescence intensity. After analyzing the profiles of energy band diagrams, carriers concentration and radiative recombination rate, we find the main advantages of proposed structure are ascribed to higher barrier suppressing electron leakage and reduced barrier for hole injection. Thus, compared with reference sample, the proposed EBL design may be a good method for improving the whole performance of UV LEDs.

  3. Prostate specific antigen detection using AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Lele, T. P.; Tseng, Y.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-09-01

    Antibody-functionalized Au-gated AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA). The PSA antibody was anchored to the gate area through the formation of carboxylate succinimdyl ester bonds with immobilized thioglycolic acid. The AlGaN /GaN HEMT drain-source current showed a rapid response of less than 5s when target PSA in a buffer at clinical concentrations was added to the antibody-immobilized surface. The authors could detect a wide range of concentrations from 10pg/mlto1μg/ml. The lowest detectable concentration was two orders of magnitude lower than the cutoff value of PSA measurements for clinical detection of prostate cancer. These results clearly demonstrate the promise of portable electronic biological sensors based on AlGaN /GaN HEMTs for PSA screening.

  4. Modeling of high composition AlGaN channel high electron mobility transistors with large threshold voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Akyol, Fatih; Nath, Digbijoy; Rajan, Siddharth

    2014-12-29

    We report on the potential of high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) consisting of high composition AlGaN channel and barrier layers for power switching applications. Detailed two-dimensional (2D) simulations show that threshold voltages in excess of 3 V can be achieved through the use of AlGaN channel layers. We also calculate the 2D electron gas mobility in AlGaN channel HEMTs and evaluate their power figures of merit as a function of device operating temperature and Al mole fraction in the channel. Our models show that power switching transistors with AlGaN channels would have comparable on-resistance to GaN-channel based transistors for the same operation voltage. The modeling in this paper shows the potential of high composition AlGaN as a channel material for future high threshold enhancement mode transistors.

  5. AlGaN Channel High Electron Mobility Transistors: Device Performance and Power-Switching Figure of Merit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Ajay; Dasgupta, Sansaptak; Rajan, Siddharth; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, AlGaN channels for high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have been evaluated based on a power device figure of merit. AlGaN-channel HEMTs grown on SiC substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) were fabricated. Maximum saturation current of 0.55 A/mm was obtained at VGS=1 V. Current-gain cutoff ( ft) and power-gain cutoff ( fmax) frequencies obtained from small signal measurements were ft=13.2 GHz and fmax=41 GHz. Pulsed current-voltage (I-V) measurements at 200 ns showed no dispersion in I-V curves. Large signal continuous wave (CW) measurement yielded an output power density of 4.5 W/mm with power added efficiency (PAE) of 59% at 4 GHz. This work demonstrates the potential of AlGaN channel HEMTs for high voltage switching and microwave power applications.

  6. Detection of halide ions with AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Ren, F.; Kang, M. C.; Lofton, C.; Tan, Weihong; Pearton, S. J.; Dabiran, A.; Osinsky, A.; Chow, P. P.

    2005-04-01

    AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) both with and without a Au gate are found to exhibit significant changes in channel conductance upon exposing the gate region to various halide ions. The polar nature of the halide ions leads to a change of surface charge in the gate region on the HEMT, producing a change in the surface potential at the semiconductor/liquid interface. HEMTs with a Au-gate electrode not only doubled the sensitivity of changing the channel conductance as compared to gateless HEMT, but also showed the opposite conductance behavior. When anions adsorbed on the Au, they produced a counter charge for electrovalence. These anions drag some counter ions from the bulk solution or create an image positive charge on the metal for the required neutrality. The gateless HEMTs can be used as sensors for a range of chemicals through appropriate modification with covalently bonded halide functional groups on the Au surface. This creates many possibilities to functionalize the surface for a wide range of integrated biological, chemical, and fluid monitoring sensors.

  7. Advantages of the AlGaN spacer in InAlN high-electron-mobility transistors grown using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Atsushi; Ishiguro, Tetsuro; Kotani, Junji; Tomabechi, Shuichi; Nakamura, Norikazu; Watanabe, Keiji

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the advantages of an AlGaN spacer layer in an InAlN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT). We investigated the effects of the growth parameters of the spacer layer on electron mobility in InAlN HEMTs grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, focusing on the surface roughness of the spacer layer and sharpness of the interface with the GaN channel layer. The electron mobility degraded, as evidenced by the formation of a graded AlGaN layer at the top of the GaN channel layer and the surface roughness of the AlN spacer layer. We believe that the short migration length of aluminum atoms is responsible for the observed degradation. An AlGaN spacer layer was employed to suppress the formation of the graded AlGaN layer and improve surface morphology. A high electron mobility of 1550 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and a low sheet resistance of 211 Ω/sq were achieved for an InAlN HEMT with an AlGaN spacer layer.

  8. Tailoring of polarization in electron blocking layer for electron confinement and hole injection in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yu-Hsuan; Pilkuhn, Manfred H.; Fu, Yi-Keng; Chu, Mu-Tao; Huang, Shyh-Jer E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com; Su, Yan-Kuin E-mail: totaljer48@gmail.com; Wang, Kang L.

    2014-03-21

    The influence of the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) with graded aluminum composition on electron confinement and hole injection in AlGaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated. The light output power of LED with graded AlGaN EBL was markedly improved, comparing to LED with conventional EBL. In experimental results, a high increment of 86.7% can be obtained in light output power. Simulation analysis shows that via proper modification of the barrier profile from the last barrier of the active region to EBL, not only the elimination of electron overflow to p-type layer can be achieved but also the hole injection into the active region can be enhanced, compared to a conventional LED structure. The dominant factor to the performance improvement is shown to be the modulation of polarization field by the graded Al composition in EBL.

  9. Traps and defects in pre- and post-proton irradiated AlGaN-GaN high electron mobility transistors and AlGaN Schottky diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Yongkun; Foran, Brendan; Presser, Nathan; LaLumondiere, Stephen; Lotshaw, William; Moss, Steven C.

    2013-03-01

    High electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) based on AlGaN-GaN hetero-structures are promising for both commercial and military applications that require high voltage, high power, and high efficiency operation. Study of reliability and radiation effects of AlGaN-GaN HEMTs is necessary before solid state power amplifiers based on GaN HEMT technology are successfully deployed in satellite communication systems. Several AlGaN HEMT manufacturers have recently reported encouraging reliability data, but long-term reliability of these devices in the space environment still remains a major concern because a large number of traps and defects are present both in the bulk as well as at the surface leading to undesirable characteristics. This study is to investigate the effects of the AlGaN-GaN HEMTs and AlGaN Schottky diodes irradiated with protons.

  10. New Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN high electron mobility transistor with partial etched AlGaN layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Song; Duan, Baoxing; Yuan, Xiaoning; Cao, Zhen; Guo, Haijun; Yang, Yintang

    2016-05-01

    In this letter, a new Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with the AlGaN layer is partial etched is reported for the first time. The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density in the HEMTs is changed by partially etching the AlGaN layer. A new electric field peak is introduced along the interface between the AlGaN layer and the GaN buffer by the electric field modulation effect. The high electric field near the gate in the proposed Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN HEMT is effectively decreased, which makes the surface electric field more uniform. Compared with the conventional structure, the breakdown voltage can be improved by 58% for the proposed Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN HEMT and the current collapse can be reduced resulting from the more uniform surface electric field.

  11. Engineering the Carrier Dynamics of InGaN Nanowire White Light-Emitting Diodes by Distributed p-AlGaN Electron Blocking Layers

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hieu Pham Trung; Djavid, Mehrdad; Woo, Steffi Y.; Liu, Xianhe; Connie, Ashfiqua T.; Sadaf, Sharif; Wang, Qi; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Shih, Ishiang; Mi, Zetian

    2015-01-01

    We report on the demonstration of a new type of axial nanowire LED heterostructures, with the use of self-organized InGaN/AlGaN dot-in-a-wire core-shell nanowire arrays. The large bandgap AlGaN shell is spontaneously formed on the sidewall of the nanowire during the growth of AlGaN barrier of the quantum dot active region. As such, nonradiative surface recombination, that dominates the carrier dynamics of conventional axial nanowire LED structures, can be largely eliminated, leading to significantly increased carrier lifetime from ~0.3 ns to 4.5 ns. The luminescence emission is also enhanced by orders of magnitude. Moreover, the p-doped AlGaN barrier layers can function as distributed electron blocking layers (EBLs), which is found to be more effective in reducing electron overflow, compared to the conventional AlGaN EBL. The device displays strong white-light emission, with a color rendering index of ~95. An output power of >5 mW is measured for a 1 mm × 1 mm device, which is more than 500 times stronger than the conventional InGaN axial nanowire LEDs without AlGaN distributed EBLs. PMID:25592057

  12. Engineering the Carrier Dynamics of InGaN Nanowire White Light-Emitting Diodes by Distributed p-AlGaN Electron Blocking Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hieu Pham Trung; Djavid, Mehrdad; Woo, Steffi Y.; Liu, Xianhe; Connie, Ashfiqua T.; Sadaf, Sharif; Wang, Qi; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Shih, Ishiang; Mi, Zetian

    2015-01-01

    We report on the demonstration of a new type of axial nanowire LED heterostructures, with the use of self-organized InGaN/AlGaN dot-in-a-wire core-shell nanowire arrays. The large bandgap AlGaN shell is spontaneously formed on the sidewall of the nanowire during the growth of AlGaN barrier of the quantum dot active region. As such, nonradiative surface recombination, that dominates the carrier dynamics of conventional axial nanowire LED structures, can be largely eliminated, leading to significantly increased carrier lifetime from ~0.3 ns to 4.5 ns. The luminescence emission is also enhanced by orders of magnitude. Moreover, the p-doped AlGaN barrier layers can function as distributed electron blocking layers (EBLs), which is found to be more effective in reducing electron overflow, compared to the conventional AlGaN EBL. The device displays strong white-light emission, with a color rendering index of ~95. An output power of >5 mW is measured for a 1 mm × 1 mm device, which is more than 500 times stronger than the conventional InGaN axial nanowire LEDs without AlGaN distributed EBLs.

  13. Improving hole injection and carrier distribution in InGaN light-emitting diodes by removing the electron blocking layer and including a unique last quantum barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Liwen Chen, Haitao; Wu, Shudong

    2015-08-28

    The effects of removing the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL), and using a last quantum barrier (LQB) with a unique design in conventional blue InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), were investigated through simulations. Compared with the conventional LED design that contained a GaN LQB and an AlGaN EBL, the LED that contained an AlGaN LQB with a graded-composition and no EBL exhibited enhanced optical performance and less efficiency droop. This effect was caused by an enhanced electron confinement and hole injection efficiency. Furthermore, when the AlGaN LQB was replaced with a triangular graded-composition, the performance improved further and the efficiency droop was lowered. The simulation results indicated that the enhanced hole injection efficiency and uniform distribution of carriers observed in the quantum wells were caused by the smoothing and thinning of the potential barrier for the holes. This allowed a greater number of holes to tunnel into the quantum wells from the p-type regions in the proposed LED structure.

  14. Polarization-matched quaternary superlattice electron blocking layer in blue InGaN light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yen-Kuang; Chen, Fang-Ming; Chang, Jih-Yuan; Lin, Bing-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The effect of polarization-matched AlInGaN/AlGaN superlattice (SL) electron blocking layer (EBL) on the physical characteristics of blue InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is investigated numerically. Simulation results show that the optical performance of the LEDs with polarization-matched SL EBL can be markedly improved due to the effectively suppressed polarization effect, enhanced hole injection efficiency, and reduced electron overflow. Comparing to the LEDs with conventional AlGaN EBL, an improvement of 53% in light output power is achieved for the proposed LED structure.

  15. Enhancing the performance of blue GaN-based light emitting diodes with double electron blocking layers

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yao; Liang, Meng; Fu, Jiajia; Liu, Zhiqiang E-mail: lzq@semi.ac.cn; Yi, Xiaoyan E-mail: lzq@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Junxi; Wang, Guohong; Li, Jinmin

    2015-03-15

    In this work, novel double Electron Blocking Layers for InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells light-emitting diodes were proposed to mitigate the efficiency droop at high current density. The band diagram and carriers distributions were investigated numerically. The results indicate that due to a newly formed holes stack in the p-GaN near the active region, the hole injection has been improved and an uniform carriers distribution can be achieved. As a result, in our new structure with double Electron Blocking Layers, the efficiency droop has been reduced to 15.5 % in comparison with 57.3 % for the LED with AlGaN EBL at the current density of 100 A/cm{sup 2}.

  16. Thermo-piezo-electro-mechanical simulation of AlGaN (aluminum gallium nitride) / GaN (gallium nitride) High Electron Mobility Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Lorin E.

    Due to the current public demand of faster, more powerful, and more reliable electronic devices, research is prolific these days in the area of high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) devices. This is because of their usefulness in RF (radio frequency) and microwave power amplifier applications including microwave vacuum tubes, cellular and personal communications services, and widespread broadband access. Although electrical transistor research has been ongoing since its inception in 1947, the transistor itself continues to evolve and improve much in part because of the many driven researchers and scientists throughout the world who are pushing the limits of what modern electronic devices can do. The purpose of the research outlined in this paper was to better understand the mechanical stresses and strains that are present in a hybrid AlGaN (Aluminum Gallium Nitride) / GaN (Gallium Nitride) HEMT, while under electrically-active conditions. One of the main issues currently being researched in these devices is their reliability, or their consistent ability to function properly, when subjected to high-power conditions. The researchers of this mechanical study have performed a static (i.e. frequency-independent) reliability analysis using powerful multiphysics computer modeling/simulation to get a better idea of what can cause failure in these devices. Because HEMT transistors are so small (micro/nano-sized), obtaining experimental measurements of stresses and strains during the active operation of these devices is extremely challenging. Physical mechanisms that cause stress/strain in these structures include thermo-structural phenomena due to mismatch in both coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and mechanical stiffness between different materials, as well as stress/strain caused by "piezoelectric" effects (i.e. mechanical deformation caused by an electric field, and conversely voltage induced by mechanical stress) in the AlGaN and GaN device portions (both

  17. Electronic transport characterization of AlGaN /GaN heterostructures using quantitative mobility spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisesivdin, S. B.; Yildiz, A.; Acar, S.; Kasap, M.; Ozcelik, S.; Ozbay, E.

    2007-09-01

    Resistivity and Hall effect measurements in nominally undoped Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition are carried out as a function of temperature (20-350K) and magnetic field (0-1.5T). The measurement results are analyzed using the quantitative mobility spectrum analysis techniques. It is found that there is strong two-dimensional electron gas localization below 100K, while the thermally activated minority carriers with the activation energies of ˜58 and ˜218meV contribute to the electron transport at high temperatures.

  18. Efficient charge carrier injection into sub-250 nm AlGaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Kolbe, Tim; Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2014-08-01

    The design and Mg-doping profile of AlN/Al0.7Ga0.3N electron blocking heterostructures (EBH) for AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting below 250 nm was investigated. By inserting an AlN electron blocking layer (EBL) into the EBH, we were able to increase the quantum well emission power and significantly reduce long wavelength parasitic luminescence. Furthermore, electron leakage was suppressed by optimizing the thickness of the AlN EBL while still maintaining sufficient hole injection. Ultraviolet (UV)-C LEDs with very low parasitic luminescence (7% of total emission power) and external quantum efficiencies of 0.19% at 246 nm have been realized. This concept was applied to AlGaN MQW LEDs emitting between 235 nm and 263 nm with external quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.002% to 0.93%. After processing, we were able to demonstrate an UV-C LED emitting at 234 nm with 14.5 μW integrated optical output power and an external quantum efficiency of 0.012% at 18.2 A/cm2.

  19. Efficient charge carrier injection into sub-250 nm AlGaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mehnke, Frank Kuhn, Christian; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Kolbe, Tim; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim; Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2014-08-04

    The design and Mg-doping profile of AlN/Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N electron blocking heterostructures (EBH) for AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting below 250 nm was investigated. By inserting an AlN electron blocking layer (EBL) into the EBH, we were able to increase the quantum well emission power and significantly reduce long wavelength parasitic luminescence. Furthermore, electron leakage was suppressed by optimizing the thickness of the AlN EBL while still maintaining sufficient hole injection. Ultraviolet (UV)-C LEDs with very low parasitic luminescence (7% of total emission power) and external quantum efficiencies of 0.19% at 246 nm have been realized. This concept was applied to AlGaN MQW LEDs emitting between 235 nm and 263 nm with external quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.002% to 0.93%. After processing, we were able to demonstrate an UV-C LED emitting at 234 nm with 14.5 μW integrated optical output power and an external quantum efficiency of 0.012% at 18.2 A/cm{sup 2}.

  20. Organic photovoltaic cell incorporating electron conducting exciton blocking layers

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.

    2014-08-26

    The present disclosure relates to photosensitive optoelectronic devices including a compound blocking layer located between an acceptor material and a cathode, the compound blocking layer including: at least one electron conducting material, and at least one wide-gap electron conducting exciton blocking layer. For example, 3,4,9,10 perylenetetracarboxylic bisbenzimidazole (PTCBI) and 1,4,5,8-napthalene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (NTCDA) function as electron conducting and exciton blocking layers when interposed between the acceptor layer and cathode. Both materials serve as efficient electron conductors, leading to a fill factor as high as 0.70. By using an NTCDA/PTCBI compound blocking layer structure increased power conversion efficiency is achieved, compared to an analogous device using a conventional blocking layers shown to conduct electrons via damage-induced midgap states.

  1. GaInN light-emitting diodes using separate epitaxial growth for the p-type region to attain polarization-inverted electron-blocking layer, reduced electron leakage, and improved hole injection

    SciTech Connect

    Meyaard, David S. Lin, Guan-Bo; Ma, Ming; Fred Schubert, E.; Cho, Jaehee; Han, Sang-Heon; Kim, Min-Ho; Shim, HyunWook; Sun Kim, Young

    2013-11-11

    A GaInN light-emitting diode (LED) structure is analyzed that employs a separate epitaxial growth for the p-type region, i.e., the AlGaN electron-blocking layer (EBL) and p-type GaN cladding layer, followed by wafer or chip bonding. Such LED structure has a polarization-inverted EBL and allows for uncompromised epitaxial-growth optimization of the p-type region, i.e., without the need to consider degradation of the quantum-well active region during p-type region growth. Simulations show that such an LED structure reduces electron leakage, reduces the efficiency droop, improves hole injection, and has the potential to extend high efficiencies into the green spectral region.

  2. Electrical properties of n-type AlGaN with high Si concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kunihiro; Iwaya, Motoaki; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-05-01

    The electrical properties of Si-doped AlGaN layers (AlN molar fractions: 0.03-0.06) with the donor concentrations (N D) from 8.8 × 1017 to 4.5 × 1020 cm-3 were investigated by variable-temperature Hall effect measurement using the van der Pauw method. A minimum resistivity of 3.6 × 10-4 Ω cm was obtained for Si-doped AlGaN with a smooth surface at room temperature. We found that the activation energy of the Si donor is affected by the Coulomb interaction in the AlGaN layer with N D values from 8.8 × 1017 to 2.5 × 1020 cm-3. In several AlGaN layers, the free-electron concentration did not vary with sample temperature, as expected in the case of degeneracy. The localization of GaN in the AlGaN layer was speculated as a cause of degeneracy of samples.

  3. Thin-film resistors used in functional electronic blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Vapor-deposited thin-film resistors replace diffused resistors in R-C tank circuits in a solid state electronic block. This allows an optimum parallel capacitance to be obtained for circuit applications requiring a high resistance and a low capacitance.

  4. Hydration effects on the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks.

    PubMed

    Assis Oliveira, Leonardo Bruno; L Fonseca, Tertius; Costa Cabral, Benedito J; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2016-08-28

    Theoretical results for the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks in the gas phase and water are presented. The building blocks presently investigated include the monomeric species DHI (5,6-dihydroxyindole) or hydroquinone (HQ), DHICA (5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid), indolequinone (IQ), quinone methide (MQ), two covalently bonded dimers [HM ≡ HQ + MQ and IM ≡ IQ + MQ], and two tetramers [HMIM ≡ HQ + IM, IMIM ≡ IM + IM]. The electronic properties in water were determined by carrying out sequential Monte Carlo/time dependent density functional theory calculations. The results illustrate the role played by hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions in the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks in a polar environment. In water, the dipole moments of monomeric species are significantly increased ([54-79]%) relative to their gas phase values. Recently, it has been proposed that the observed enhancement of the higher-energy absorption intensity in eumelanin can be explained by excitonic coupling among eumelanin protomolecules [C.-T. Chen et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 3859 (2014)]. Here, we are providing evidence that for DHICA, IQ, and HMIM, the electronic absorption toward the higher-energy end of the spectrum ([180-220] nm) is enhanced by long-range Coulombic interactions with the water environment. It was verified that by superposing the absorption spectra of different eumelanin building blocks corresponding to the monomers, dimers, and tetramers in liquid water, the behaviour of the experimental spectrum, which is characterised by a nearly monotonic decay from the ultraviolet to the infrared, is qualitatively reproduced. This result is in keeping with a "chemical disorder model," where the broadband absorption of eumelanin pigments is determined by the superposition of the spectra associated with the monomeric and oligomeric building blocks. PMID:27586929

  5. Analysis of HVPE grown AlGaN layers on honeycomb patterned sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Simon; Mogilatenko, Anna; Hagedorn, Sylvia; Richter, Eberhard; Goran, Daniel; Schäfer, Peter; Zeimer, Ute; Weyers, Markus; Tränkle, Günther

    2015-03-01

    Thick AlxGa1-xN layers were grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on hexagonally patterned sapphire substrates. Non-c-planar growth is found inside the etched honeycombs which in part hinders coalescence of the c-plane AlGaN layer growing on top of the ridges. From X-ray diffraction, electron backscatter diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, the orientations of the parasitic crystallites were identified as {11-22} and {1-103} AlGaN growing on m-plane sapphire sidewalls as well as c-plane oriented AlGaN growing on n-plane sidewall facets which are located in the corners of the combs. According to the geometry of parasitic crystallites, it is further observed, that the semipolar growth occurring on sapphire m-plane sidewalls does not hinder the coalescence of c-plane AlGaN growing on top of the ridges, whereas fast propagation of parasitic crystallites nucleating on n-plane sidewall facets leads to delayed layer coalescence.

  6. Fixed interface charges between AlGaN barrier and gate stack composed of in situ grown SiN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with normally off capability

    SciTech Connect

    Capriotti, M. Alexewicz, A.; Fleury, C.; Gavagnin, M.; Bethge, O.; Wanzenböck, H. D.; Bertagnolli, E.; Pogany, D.; Strasser, G.; Visalli, D.; Derluyn, J.

    2014-03-17

    Using a generalized extraction method, the fixed charge density N{sub int} at the interface between in situ deposited SiN and 5 nm thick AlGaN barrier is evaluated by measurements of threshold voltage V{sub th} of an AlGaN/GaN metal insulator semiconductor high electron mobility transistor as a function of SiN thickness. The thickness of the originally deposited 50 nm thick SiN layer is reduced by dry etching. The extracted N{sub int} is in the order of the AlGaN polarization charge density. The total removal of the in situ SiN cap leads to a complete depletion of the channel region resulting in V{sub th} = +1 V. Fabrication of a gate stack with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a second cap layer, deposited on top of the in situ SiN, is not introducing additional fixed charges at the SiN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface.

  7. Radiation Hard AlGaN Detectors and Imager

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-01

    Radiation hardness of AlGaN photodiodes was tested using a 65 MeV proton beam with a total proton fluence of 3x10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN Deep UV Photodiode have extremely high radiation hardness. These new devices have mission critical applications in high energy density physics (HEDP) and space explorations. These new devices satisfy radiation hardness requirements by NIF. NSTec is developing next generation AlGaN optoelectronics and imagers.

  8. Power electronic building block (PEDD) workshop. Trip report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.W.

    1995-10-09

    I attended the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB) workshop at DOE HQ on June 21,1995. Accompanying me was Doug Hopkins, who is contracting with the Lab through Mark Newton on power electronics. The PEBB concept, and the workshop in particular, are sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and DOE. The general concept behind PEBB is a ``second electronics revolution`` facilitated by a single-package, smart, multi-function power control block. The PEBB will potentially replace all conventional power electronic elements at scales from watts to megawatts, thus shifting power engineering from circuit design to system design. ONR is interested because power distribution aboard ships is expensive, complex, and bulky, and getting worse. The same applies to aircraft and many other military systems. DOE`s interest is in electric vehicles, utility power systems, and various end-use applications such as adjustable speed drives. There was obvious enthusiasm from industry, academia, and Government at this workshop. The PEBB concept is in its infancy. Exactly what a PEBB will encompass is still up for discussion. What is certain is that everything is up to industry: standards, innovations, marketing strategies, etc. ONR and DOE are only acting as facilitators and coordinators, and perhaps offering a little seed money. The program will be long-term but fast-paced, relying on concurrent engineering in a serious way. Great strides are required in semiconductors, packaging, controls, and system design. ONR want to put a big knee in the historic power density and dollar-per-watt curves, starting right now.

  9. Influence of substrate miscut angle on surface morphology and luminescence properties of AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Kusch, Gunnar Edwards, Paul R.; Bruckbauer, Jochen; Martin, Robert W.; Li, Haoning; Parbrook, Peter J.; Sadler, Thomas C.

    2014-03-03

    The influence of substrate miscut on Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} N layers was investigated using cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging and secondary electron imaging in an environmental scanning electron microscope. The samples were also characterized using atomic force microscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction. It was found that small changes in substrate miscut have a strong influence on the morphology and luminescence properties of the AlGaN layers. Two different types are resolved. For low miscut angle, a crack-free morphology consisting of randomly sized domains is observed, between which there are notable shifts in the AlGaN near band edge emission energy. For high miscut angle, a morphology with step bunches and compositional inhomogeneities along the step bunches, evidenced by an additional CL peak along the step bunches, are observed.

  10. Design and Synthesis of Novel Block Copolymers for Efficient Opto-Electronic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Sam-Shajing; Fan, Zhen; Wang, Yiqing; Taft, Charles; Haliburton, James; Maaref, Shahin

    2002-01-01

    It has been predicted that nano-phase separated block copolymer systems containing electron rich donor blocks and electron deficient acceptor blocks may facilitate the charge carrier separation and migration in organic photovoltaic devices due to improved morphology in comparison to polymer blend system. This paper presents preliminary data describing the design and synthesis of a novel Donor-Bridge-Acceptor (D-B-A) block copolymer system for potential high efficient organic optoelectronic applications. Specifically, the donor block contains an electron donating alkyloxy derivatized polyphenylenevinylene (PPV), the acceptor block contains an electron withdrawing alkyl-sulfone derivatized polyphenylenevinylene (PPV), and the bridge block contains an electronically neutral non-conjugated aliphatic hydrocarbon chain. The key synthetic strategy includes the synthesis of each individual block first, then couple the blocks together. While the donor block stabilizes and facilitates the transport of the holes, the acceptor block stabilizes and facilitates the transport of the electrons, the bridge block is designed to hinder the probability of electron-hole recombination. Thus, improved charge separation and stability are expected with this system. In addition, charge migration toward electrodes may also be facilitated due to the potential nano-phase separated and highly ordered block copolymer ultra-structure.

  11. Growth of AlGaN epilayers related gas-phase reactions using TPIS-MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunwoon; Seo, Junho; Lee, Kyuhan; Lee, Haeseok; Park, Keunseop; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2002-11-01

    AlGaN epilayers on GaN/sapphire were successfully grown under various growth conditions using a thermally pre-cracked ion-supplied metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The Al composition in the solid was affected by the gas-phase parasitic reaction between NH 3 and trimethylaluminum (TMAl). As the operating pressure decreased, the Al composition in the solid increased over the ideal incorporation efficiency. This is due to a scavenging effect and a site-blocking effect. As the TMAl flow rate increased with fixed flow rates of NH 3 and trimethylgallium (TMGa), the Al concentration in the solid increased but started to saturate. As the TMGa flow rate decreased, the solid Al composition increased linearly, which means different parasitic reactions between TMGa:NH 3 and TMAl:NH 3. In addition, we found that the separating plate that was inserted to the reactor in front of the heated susceptor to separate ammonia gas flow from MO source input played an important role in the AlGaN growth. Particularly, the separating plate was more attractive under high operating pressure. When it was inserted, a white crystalline solid formed by the adduct (TMAl:NH 3) of parasitic reaction in the gas phase disappeared. It also increased the Al concentration in the solid. SEM images of AlGaN epilayer's surface showed many small islands due to the lack of surface mobility of adatoms.

  12. Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of GaN and AlGaN semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppulingam, B. Singh, Shubra Baskar, K.

    2014-04-24

    Hexagonal Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) complex route. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis confirms the hexagonal wurtzite structure of GaN and Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N nanoparticles. Surface morphology and elemental analysis were carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) study shows the near band edge emission for GaN at 3.35 eV and at 3.59 eV for AlGaN nanoparticles. The Aluminum (Al) composition of 20% has been obtained from PL emission around 345 nm.

  13. Strain and defects in Si-doped (Al)GaN epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forghani, Kamran; Schade, Lukas; Schwarz, Ulrich T.; Lipski, Frank; Klein, Oliver; Kaiser, Ute; Scholz, Ferdinand

    2012-11-01

    Si is the most common dopant in (Al)GaN based devices acting as a donor. It has been observed that Si induces tensile strain in (Al)GaN films, which leads to an increasing tendency for cracking of such films with the increase of Si content and/or the increase of Al content. Based on x-ray investigations, the Si-doped films have a larger in-plane lattice constant than their undoped buffer layers, indicating involvement of a mechanism other than the change of lattice constants expected from an alloying effect. In this work, we present a model about Si dislocation interaction while debating other proposed models in the literature. According to our model, Si atoms are attracted to the strain dipole of edge-type dislocations in (Al)GaN films. It is expected that Si is more incorporated on that side of the dislocation, which is under compression leading to the formation of off-balanced dipoles with reduced compressive component. In response to such off-balanced dipoles—appearing as tensile dominant strain dipoles—the dislocation lines climb in order to accommodate the excess tensile strain. However, this dislocation climb mechanism is hindered by forces exerted by vacancies created due to the climb process. Accordingly, we have observed a lower strain level in our Si doped layers when they contain fewer dislocations. These findings were further supported by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and micro-photoluminescence investigations.

  14. Relaxation of compressively strained AlGaN by inclined threading dislocations.

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, David Martin; Lee, Stephen Roger; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Floro, Jerrold Anthony

    2005-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to assess the microstructure and strain of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N(x = 0.61-0.64) layers grown on AlN. The compressively-strained AlGaN is partially relaxed by inclined threading dislocations, similar to observations on Si-doped AlGaN by P. Cantu, F. Wu, P. Waltereit, S. Keller, A. E. Romanov, U. K. Mishra, S. P. DenBaars, and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 674 (2003) ]; however, in our material, the dislocations bend before the introduction of any Si. The bending may be initiated by the greater lattice mismatch or the lower dislocation density of our material, but the presence of Si is not necessarily required. The relaxation by inclined dislocations is quantitatively accounted for with the model of A. E. Romanov and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 2569 (2003)], and we demonstrate the predicted linear dependence of relaxation on layer thickness. Notably, such relaxation was not found in tensile strained AlGaN grown on GaN [J. A. Floro, D. M. Follstaedt, P. Provencio, S. J. Hearne, and S. R. Lee, J. Appl. Phys. 96, 7087 (2004)], even though the same mechanism appears applicable.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy of polymer blends and block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    -consistent field theory (SCFT). The liquid-like nature of this system at room temperature makes traditional staining methods for the enhancement of contrast ineffective. As an alternative, we take advantage of the large inelastic scattering cross-section of soft materials to generate contrast in zero-loss TEM images. Independent spatially resolved thickness measurements enable quantification of electron scattering. This enabled a comparison between the TEM data and predictions based on SCFT without any adjustable parameters. The second example involves the utilization of energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) to compute elemental maps by taking advantage of ionization events. Elemental mapping of lithium is used to determine the distribution of salt in nanostructured poly(styrene-block-ethylene oxide) (SEO) copolymer/lithium salt electrolytes. Surprisingly, the concentration of lithium within a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) domain is found to be inhomogeneous; the salt is localized to the middle of the channels. Self-consistent field theory simulations suggest that localization of lithium is due to chain stretching at the interface, which increases with molecular weight. EFTEM and SCFT results show that the segregation of lithium salt to the middle of the PEO lamellae is greater for higher molecular weight polymers. This is correlated with the ionic conductivity of the copolymer electrolyte, which is found to show a higher conductivity for thinner lithium lamellae.

  16. An extrinsic fmax > 100 GHz InAlN/GaN HEMT with AlGaN back barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Liu; Zhihong, Feng; Shaobo, Dun; Xiongwen, Zhang; Guodong, Gu; Yuangang, Wang; Peng, Xu; Zezhao, He; Shujun, Cai

    2013-04-01

    We report the DC and RF performance of InAlN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors with AlGaN back barrier grown on SiC substrates. These presented results confirm the high performance that is reachable by InAlN-based technology. The InAlN/GaN HEMT sample showed a high 2DEG mobility of 1550 cm2/(V·s) at a 2DEG density of 1.7 × 1013 cm-2. DC and RF measurements were performed on the unpassivated device with 0.2 μm “T“ gate. The maximum drain current density at VGS = 2 V is close to 1.05 A/mm in a reproducible way. The reduction in gate leakage current helps to increase the frequency performance of AlGaN back barrier devices. The power gain cut-off frequency of a transistor with an AlGaN back barrier is 105 GHz, which is much higher than that of the device without an AlGaN back barrier at the same gate length. These results indicate InAlN/GaN HEMT is a promising candidate for millimeter-wave application.

  17. Breaking the Block: Basic Writers in the Electronic Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kish, Judith Mara

    2000-01-01

    Fuses theories about Basic Writers and writer's block. Addresses, through the use of hypertext, how computers can help Basic Writers who experience this writing difficulty. Discusses the two main branches of students' difficulties (problems with genre and problems with the linearity of texts) which may be partially alleviated through the…

  18. Effects of Si-doping on structural, electrical, and optical properties of polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiong; Wang, Shuchang; Wang, Yi; Luan, Huakai; Dai, Qian; Wu, Zili; Zhao, Jianguo; Cui, Yiping

    2016-08-01

    The polar (0001)-oriented c-plane and non-polar (11 2 bar 0) -oriented a-plane wurtzite AlGaN epi-layers were successfully grown on polar (0001)-oriented c-plane and semi-polar (1 1 bar 02) -oriented r-plane sapphire substrates, respectively with various Si-doping levels in a low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The morphological, structural, electrical, and optical properties of the polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Hall effect, and Raman spectroscopy. The characterization results show that Si dopants incorporated into the polar and non-polar AlGaN films induced a relaxation of compressive residual strain and a generation of biaxial tensile strain on the surface in consequence of the dislocation climbing. In particular, it was found that the Si-induced compressive strain relaxation in the non-polar AlGaN samples can be promoted by the structural anisotropy as compared with the polar counterparts. The gradually increased relaxation of compressive residual strain in both polar and non-polar AlGaN samples with increasing Si-doping level was attributed to the Si-induced enhancement in the opportunity for the dislocations to interact and annihilate. This implies that the crystal quality for both polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers can be remarkably improved by Si-doping.

  19. On the increased efficiency in InGaN-based multiple quantum wells emitting at 530-590 nm with AlGaN interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleske, D. D.; Fischer, A. J.; Bryant, B. N.; Kotula, P. G.; Wierer, J. J.

    2015-04-01

    InGaN/AlGaN/GaN-based multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with AlGaN interlayers (ILs) are investigated, specifically to examine the fundamental mechanisms behind their increased radiative efficiency at wavelengths of 530-590 nm. The AlzGa1-zN (z~0.38) IL is ~1-2 nm thick, and is grown after and at the same growth temperature as the ~3 nm thick InGaN quantum well (QW). This is followed by an increase in temperature for the growth of a ~10 nm thick GaN barrier layer. The insertion of the AlGaN IL within the MQW provides various benefits. First, the AlGaN IL allows for growth of the InxGa1-xN QW well below typical growth temperatures to achieve higher x (up to~0.25). Second, annealing the IL capped QW prior to the GaN barrier growth improves the AlGaN IL smoothness as determined by atomic force microscopy, improves the InGaN/AlGaN/GaN interface quality as determined from scanning transmission electron microscope images and x-ray diffraction, and increases the radiative efficiency by reducing non-radiative defects as determined by time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. Finally, the AlGaN IL increases the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization induced electric fields acting on the InGaN QW, providing an additional red-shift to the emission wavelength as determined by Schrodinger-Poisson modeling and fitting to the experimental data. The relative impact of increased indium concentration and polarization fields on the radiative efficiency of MQWs with AlGaN ILs is explored along with implications to conventional longer wavelength emitters.

  20. Nanocellulose as Material Building Block for Energy and Flexible Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liangbing

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, I will discuss the fabrications, properties and device applications of functional nanostructured paper based on nanocellulose. Nanostructures with tunable optical, electrical, ionic and mechanical properties will be discussed. Lab-scale demonstration devices, including low-cost Na-ion batteries, microbial fuel cells, solar cells, transparent transistors, actuators and touch screens will be briefly mentioned. These studies show that nanocellulose is a promising green material for electronics and energy devices.

  1. Extreme Radiation Hardness and Space Qualification of AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ke-Xun; Balakrishnan, Kathik; Hultgren, Eric; Goebel, John; Bilenko, Yuri; Yang, Jinwei; Sun, Wenhong; Shatalov, Max; Hu, Xuhong; Gaska, Remis

    2010-09-21

    Unprecedented radiation hardness and environment robustness are required in the new generation of high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and deep space exploration. National Ignition Facility (NIF) break-even shots will have a neutron yield of 1015 or higher. The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) mission instruments will be irradiated with a total fluence of 1012 protons/cm2 during the space journey. In addition, large temperature variations and mechanical shocks are expected in these applications under extreme conditions. Hefty radiation and thermal shields are required for Si and GaAs based electronics and optoelectronics devices. However, for direct illumination and imaging applications, shielding is not a viable option. It is an urgent task to search for new semiconductor technologies and to develop radiation hard and environmentally robust optoelectronic devices. We will report on our latest systematic experimental studies on radiation hardness and space qualifications of AlGaN optoelectronic devices: Deep UV Light Emitting Diodes (DUV LEDs) and solarblind UV Photodiodes (PDs). For custom designed AlGaN DUV LEDs with a central emission wavelength of 255 nm, we have demonstrated its extreme radiation hardness up to 2x1012 protons/cm2 with 63.9 MeV proton beams. We have demonstrated an operation lifetime of over 26,000 hours in a nitrogen rich environment, and 23,000 hours of operation in vacuum without significant power drop and spectral shift. The DUV LEDs with multiple packaging styles have passed stringent space qualifications with 14 g random vibrations, and 21 cycles of 100K temperature cycles. The driving voltage, current, emission spectra and optical power (V-I-P) operation characteristics exhibited no significant changes after the space environmental tests. The DUV LEDs will be used for photoelectric charge management in space flights. For custom designed AlGaN UV photodiodes with a central response wavelength of 255 nm, we have demonstrated

  2. Improved performance in vertical GaN Schottky diode assisted by AlGaN tunneling barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y.; Chu, R.; Li, R.; Chen, M.; Williams, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    In a vertical GaN Schottky barrier diode, the free electron concentration n in the 6-μm-thick drift layer was found to greatly impact the diode reverse leakage current, which increased from 2.1 × 10-7 A to 3.9 × 10-4 A as n increased from 7.5 × 1014 cm-3 to 6.3 × 1015 cm-3 at a reverse bias of 100 V. By capping the drift layer with an ultrathin 5-nm graded AlGaN layer, reverse leakage was reduced by more than three orders of magnitude with the same n in the drift layer. We attribute this to the increased Schottky barrier height with the AlGaN at the surface. Meanwhile, the polarization field within the graded AlGaN effectively shortened the depletion depth, which led to the formation of tunneling current at a relatively small forward bias. The turn-on voltage in the vertical Schottky diodes was reduced from 0.77 V to 0.67 V—an advantage in reducing conduction loss in power switching applications.

  3. Onset of surface stimulated emission at 260 nm from AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohang E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A.; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D. E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrated onset of deep-ultraviolet (DUV) surface stimulated emission (SE) from c-plane AlGaN multiple-quantum well (MQW) heterostructures grown on a sapphire substrate by optical pumping at room temperature. The onset of SE became observable at a pumping power density of 630 kW/cm{sup 2}. Spectral deconvolution revealed superposition of a linearly amplified spontaneous emission peak at λ ∼ 257.0 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ∼12 nm and a superlinearly amplified SE peak at λ ∼ 260 nm with a narrow FWHM of less than 2 nm. In particular, the wavelength of ∼260 nm is the shortest wavelength of surface SE from III-nitride MQW heterostructures to date. Atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements were employed to investigate the material and structural quality of the AlGaN heterostructures, showing smooth surface and sharp layer interfaces. This study offers promising results for AlGaN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrates for the development of DUV vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)

  4. Assembly of phosphonic acids on GaN and AlGaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, B. S.; Hong, S.; Stine, R.; Mäkinen, A. J.; Theodore, N. D.; Mastro, M. A.; Eddy, C. R., Jr.; Pehrsson, P. E.

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers of octadecylphosphonic acid and 16-phosphonohexadecanoic acid (PHDA) were formed on the semiconductor substrates gallium nitride (GaN) and aluminium gallium nitride (AlGaN). The presence of the molecular layers was verified through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Structural information was acquired with infrared spectroscopy which verified the bonding orientation of the carboxyl-containing PHDA. The impact of the molecular layers on the channel conductivity and the surface electronic structure of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure was measured. Our results indicate that pinning of the surface Fermi level prohibits modification of the channel conductivity by the layer. However, a surface dipole of ~0.8 eV is present and associated with both phosphonic acid layers. These results are of direct relevance to field-effect-based biochemical sensors and metal-semiconductor contact formation for this system and provide a fundamental basis for further applications of GaN and AlGaN technology in the fields of biosensing and microelectronics.

  5. CBED study of grain misorientations in AlGaN epilayers.

    PubMed

    Sahonta, S-L; Cherns, D; Liu, R; Ponce, F A; Amano, H; Akasaki, I

    2005-04-01

    Large angle convergent beam electron diffraction (LACBED) has been used to examine AlGaN epilayers grown by facet-controlled epitaxial lateral overgrowth on GaN/(0001) sapphire substrates in prototype UV laser structures. The substrates, defined by masks with seed openings along a <10-10> stripe direction, had GaN seed columns with {11-22} surfaces. Studies were carried out on cross-sectional samples cut perpendicular to the stripe axis. An LACBED analysis of the orientation of (000 2) planes, and of the (11-20) planes parallel to the stripe axis, revealed that the AlGaN wings were both rotated by angles of 1-2 x 10(-2)radians about the 10-10 stripe axis with respect to the underlying GaN, and distorted due to misfit strains. It is shown that the results are consistent with the observed structure of the AlGaN/GaN and the wing/wing boundaries, and with a new model for the generation of a-type misfit dislocations at the AlGaN/GaN interface. PMID:15777597

  6. Bypasses of the antimycin a block of mitochondrial electron transport in relation to ubisemiquinone function.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, A; Lehninger, A L

    1984-10-26

    Two different bypasses around the antimycin block of electron transport from succinate to cytochrome c via the ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase of intact rat liver mitochondria were analyzed, one promoted by N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) and the other by 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP). Both bypasses are inhibited by myxothiazol, which blocks electron flow from ubiquinol to the Rieske iron-sulfur center, and by 2-hydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, which inhibits electron flow from the iron-sulfur center to cytochrome c1. In the bypass promoted by TMPD its oxidized form (Wurster's blue) acts as an electron acceptor from some reduced component prior to the antimycin block, which by exclusion of other possibilities is ubisemiquinone. In the DCIP bypass its reduced form acts as an electron donor, by reducing ubisemiquinone to ubiquinol; reduced DCIP is regenerated again at the expense of either succinate or ascorbate. The observations described are consistent with and support current models of the Q cycle. Bypasses promoted by artificial electron carriers provide an independent approach to analysis of electron flow through ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase. PMID:6091750

  7. Enhancement of blue InGaN light-emitting diodes by using AlGaN increased composition-graded barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lei; Zhiqiang, Liu; Miao, He; Xiaoyan, Yi; Junxi, Wang; Jinmin, Li; Shuwen, Zheng; Shuti, Li

    2015-05-01

    The characteristics of nitride-based blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with AlGaN composition-graded barriers are analyzed numerically. The carrier concentrations in the quantum wells (QWs), the energy band diagrams, the electrostatic fields, and the light output power are investigated by APSYS software. The simulation results show that the LED with AlGaN composition-graded barriers has a better performance than its AlGaN/InGaN counterpart owing to the increase of hole injection and the enhancement of electron confinement. The simulation results also suggest that the output power is enhanced significantly and the efficiency droop is markedly improved when the AlGaN barriers are replaced by AlGaN composition-graded barriers. Project supported by the National High Technology Program of China (Nos. 2011AA03A105, 2013AA03A101), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61306051, 61306050, 11474105), the Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Project (No. D12110300140000), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2011CB301902), the Industry-Academia-Research Union Special Fund of Guangdong Province of China (No. 2012B091000169), the Science & Technology Innovation Platform of Industry-Academia-Research Union of Guangdong Province-Ministry Cooperation Special Fund of China (No. 2012B090600038), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (No. 20134407110008), and the Science research innovation foundation of South China Normal University of China (No. 2013kyjj041).

  8. Block Diagram of a Black and White TV. Lesson Plan No. 1, Electronic Tech 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollandsworth, Donald S.

    This lesson, which is part of a course in electronics technology, explains the workings of a black-and-white television. It covers the structure and function of the 18 structural blocks of black-and-white television sets. The following materials are included: a lesson plan, transparency masters, and student handouts. The lesson plan includes lists…

  9. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-3, Gage Blocks, Mechanical Comparators and Electronic Comparators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This third in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology describes gage blocks and mechanical and electronic comparators. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject matter, (6) materials needed, (7)…

  10. Power Block Geometry Applied to the Building of Power Electronics Converters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, E. C., Jr.; da Silva, E. R. C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a new methodology, Power Block Geometry (PBG), for the presentation of power electronics topologies that process ac voltage. PBG's strategy uses formal methods based on a geometrical representation with particular rules and defines a universe with axioms and conjectures to establish a formation law. It allows power…

  11. Intriguing transmission electron microscopy images observed for perpendicularly oriented cylindrical microdomains of block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnogi, Hiroshi; Isshiki, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Sono; Sakurai, Shinichi

    2014-08-01

    Intriguing images of dislocation structures were observed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique for hexagonally packed cylindrical microdomains in a block copolymer (polystyrene-block-polyethylenebutylene-block-polystyrene triblock copolymer) film. The polystyrene (PS) cylinders were embedded in the polyethylenebutylene (PEB) matrix and oriented perpendicular to the surface of the thin section for the TEM observations. In order to understand such strange dislocation structures, we applied an image processing technique using two-dimensional Fourier transform (FT) and inverse Fourier transform (IFT) methods. It was found that these intriguing images were not ascribed to real dislocation structures but were fake ones due to the moiré effect caused by the overlapping of hexagons with a slightly mismatched orientation. Furthermore, grain boundaries in the ultrathin section can be identified by image processing using FT and IFT methods.Intriguing images of dislocation structures were observed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique for hexagonally packed cylindrical microdomains in a block copolymer (polystyrene-block-polyethylenebutylene-block-polystyrene triblock copolymer) film. The polystyrene (PS) cylinders were embedded in the polyethylenebutylene (PEB) matrix and oriented perpendicular to the surface of the thin section for the TEM observations. In order to understand such strange dislocation structures, we applied an image processing technique using two-dimensional Fourier transform (FT) and inverse Fourier transform (IFT) methods. It was found that these intriguing images were not ascribed to real dislocation structures but were fake ones due to the moiré effect caused by the overlapping of hexagons with a slightly mismatched orientation. Furthermore, grain boundaries in the ultrathin section can be identified by image processing using FT and IFT methods. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c

  12. Optical Blocking of Electron Tunneling into a Single Self-Assembled Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzmann, A.; Merkel, B.; Labud, P. A.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Lorke, A.; Geller, M.

    2016-07-01

    Time-resolved resonance fluorescence (RF) is used to analyze electron tunneling between a single self-assembled quantum dot (QD) and an electron reservoir. In equilibrium, the RF intensity reflects the average electron occupation of the QD and exhibits a gate voltage dependence that is given by the Fermi distribution in the reservoir. In the time-resolved signal, however, we find that the relaxation rate for electron tunneling is, surprisingly, independent of the occupation in the charge reservoir—in contrast to results from all-electrical transport measurements. Using a master equation approach, which includes both the electron tunneling and the optical excitation or recombination, we are able to explain the experimental data by optical blocking, which also reduces the electron tunneling rate when the QD is occupied by an exciton.

  13. Semiconducting Polymer Photodetectors with Electron and Hole Blocking Layers: High Detectivity in the Near-Infrared

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiong; Tong, Ming-Hong; Park, Sung Heum; Liu, Michelle; Jen, Alex; Heeger, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Sensing from the ultraviolet-visible to the infrared is critical for a variety of industrial and scientific applications. Photodetectors with broad spectral response, from 300 nm to 1,100 nm, were fabricated using a narrow-band gap semiconducting polymer blended with a fullerene derivative. By using both an electron-blocking layer and a hole-blocking layer, the polymer photodetectors, operating at room temperature, exhibited calculated detectivities greater than 1013 cm Hz1/2/W over entire spectral range with linear dynamic range approximately 130 dB. The performance is comparable to or even better than Si photodetectors. PMID:22163562

  14. Pauli blocking and final-state interaction in electron-nucleus quasielastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lon-chang

    2008-01-01

    The nucleon final-state interaction in electron-nucleus quasielastic scattering is studied. Based on the unitarity equation satisfied by the scattering-wave operators, a doorway model is developed to implement the Pauli-blocking of nucleon knockout. The model is complementary to the commonly used nuclear Fermi gas model which can not be applied with confidence to light- and medium-mass nuclei. Pauli blocking in these latter nuclei is illustrated with the case of Coulomb interaction. Significant effects are noted for beam energies below {approx} 350 MeV/c. Extension of the model to high-energy hadron-nucleus quasielastic scatterings is discussed.

  15. High temperature and low pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride on AlGaN: Band offsets and passivation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Pramod; Washiyama, Shun; Kaess, Felix; Hayden Breckenridge, M.; Hernandez-Balderrama, Luis H.; Haidet, Brian B.; Alden, Dorian; Franke, Alexander; Sarkar, Biplab; Kohn, Erhard; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the band offsets and interface Fermi level at the heterojunction formed by stoichiometric silicon nitride deposited on AlxGa1-xN (of varying Al composition "x") via low pressure chemical vapor deposition. Silicon nitride is found to form a type II staggered band alignment with AlGaN for all Al compositions (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) and present an electron barrier into AlGaN even at higher Al compositions, where Eg(AlGaN) > Eg(Si3N4). Further, no band bending is observed in AlGaN for x ≤ 0.6 and a reduced band bending (by ˜1 eV in comparison to that at free surface) is observed for x > 0.6. The Fermi level in silicon nitride is found to be at 3 eV with respect to its valence band, which is likely due to silicon (≡Si0/-1) dangling bonds. The presence of band bending for x > 0.6 is seen as a likely consequence of Fermi level alignment at Si3N4/AlGaN hetero-interface and not due to interface states. Photoelectron spectroscopy results are corroborated by current-voltage-temperature and capacitance-voltage measurements. A shift in the interface Fermi level (before band bending at equilibrium) from the conduction band in Si3N4/n-GaN to the valence band in Si3N4/p-GaN is observed, which strongly indicates a reduction in mid-gap interface states. Hence, stoichiometric silicon nitride is found to be a feasible passivation and dielectric insulation material for AlGaN at any composition.

  16. Dielectric magnifying of plasma blocks by nonlinear force acceleration with delayed electron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Yazdani, Elnaz; Cang Yu; Hora, Heinrich

    2010-11-15

    Specific studies were performed in order to increase the thickness of laser generated directed space charge quasineutral plasma blocks with anomalously high ion current densities above 10{sup 11} A/cm{sup 2}. This may lead to an alternative scheme of laser driven fusion with the irradiation of petawatt-picosecond laser pulses. Initial electron densities were used with Rayleigh profiles, because these are unique for inhomogeneous plasmas for undistorted acceleration at very low reflectivity until thermal absorption processes disturb these ideal conditions. Numerical hydrodynamic results based on a genuine two-fluid code are presented to optimize the block generation for possible fast ignition and details show the delay of thermal exchange between the ion and electron plasma fluid.

  17. Three-dimensional architecture of podocytes revealed by block-face scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Sadayama, Shoji; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Koike, Masato; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Block-face imaging is a scanning electron microscopic technique which enables easier acquisition of serial ultrastructural images directly from the surface of resin-embedded biological samples with a similar quality to transmission electron micrographs. In the present study, we analyzed the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes using serial block-face imaging. It was previously believed that podocytes are divided into three kinds of subcellular compartment: cell body, primary process, and foot process, which are simply aligned in this order. When the reconstructed podocytes were viewed from their basal side, the foot processes were branched from a ridge-like prominence, which was formed on the basal surface of the primary process and was similar to the usual foot processes in structure. Moreover, from the cell body, the foot processes were also emerged via the ridge-like prominence, as found in the primary process. The ridge-like prominence anchored the cell body and primary process to the glomerular basement membrane, and connected the foot processes to the cell body and primary process. In conclusion, serial block-face imaging is a powerful tool for clear understanding the three-dimensional architecture of podocytes through its ability to reveal novel structures which were difficult to determine by conventional transmission and scanning electron microscopes alone. PMID:25759085

  18. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy and the reconstruction of plant cell membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Kittelmann, M; Hawes, C; Hughes, L

    2016-08-01

    Serial block face imaging with the scanning electron microscope has been developed as an alternative to serial sectioning and transmission electron microscopy for the ultrastructural analysis of the three-dimensional organization of cells and tissues. An ultramicrotome within the microscope specimen chamber permits sectioning and imaging to a depth of many microns within resin-embedded specimens. The technology has only recently been adopted by plant microscopists and here we describe some specimen preparation procedures suitable for plant tissue, suggested microscope imaging parameters and discuss the software required for image reconstruction and analysis. PMID:27197647

  19. Neutral beamline with ion energy recovery based on magnetic blocking of electrons

    DOEpatents

    Stirling, William L.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beamline generator with energy recovery of the full-energy ion ponent of the beam based on magnetic blocking of electrons is provided. Ions from a positive ion source are accelerated to the desired beam energy from a slightly positive potential level with respect to ground through a neutralizer cell by means of a negative acceleration voltage. The unneutralized full-energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer are retarded and slightly deflected and the electrons in the neutralizer are blocked by a magnetic field generated transverse to the beamline. An electron collector in the form of a coaxial cylinder surrounding and protruding axial a few centimeters beyond the neutralizer exit terminates the electrons which exit the neutralizer in an E x B drift to the collector when the collector is biased a few hundred volts positive with respect to the neutralizer voltage. The neutralizer is operated at the negative acceleration voltage, and the deflected full energy ions are decelerated and the charge collected at ground potential thereby expending none of their energy received from the acceleration power supply.

  20. Dual Band Deep Ultraviolet AlGaN Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, S.; Miko, L.; Stahle, C.; Franz, D.; Pugel, D.; Guan, B.; Zhang, J. P.; Gaska, R.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of a back-illuminated voltage bias selectable dual-band AlGaN UV photodetector. The photodetector can separate UVA and W-B band radiation by bias switching a two terminal n-p-n homojunction structure that is fabricated in the same pixel. When a forward bias is applied between the top and bottom electrodes, the detector can sense UV-A and reject W-B band radiation. Alternatively, under reverse bias, the photodetector can sense UV-B and reject UV-A band radiation.

  1. Optically confined polarized resonance Raman studies in identifying crystalline orientation of sub-diffraction limited AlGaN nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Sivadasan, A. K. Patsha, Avinash; Dhara, Sandip

    2015-04-27

    An optical characterization tool of Raman spectroscopy with extremely weak scattering cross section tool is not popular to analyze scattered signal from a single nanostructure in the sub-diffraction regime. In this regard, plasmonic assisted characterization tools are only relevant in spectroscopic studies of nanoscale object in the sub-diffraction limit. We have reported polarized resonance Raman spectroscopic (RRS) studies with strong electron-phonon coupling to understand the crystalline orientation of a single AlGaN nanowire of diameter ∼100 nm. AlGaN nanowire is grown by chemical vapor deposition technique using the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. The results are compared with the high resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis. As a matter of fact, optical confinement effect due to the dielectric contrast of nanowire with respect to that of surrounding media assisted with electron-phonon coupling of RRS is useful for the spectroscopic analysis in the sub-diffraction limit of 325 nm (λ/2N.A.) using an excitation wavelength (λ) of 325 nm and near ultraviolet 40× far field objective with a numerical aperture (N.A.) value of 0.50.

  2. The light-matter interaction of a single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire and noble metal Au nanoparticles in the sub-diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, A K; Madapu, Kishore K; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-08-24

    Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is not only a tool for imaging of sub-diffraction limited objects but also a prominent characteristic tool for understanding the intrinsic properties of nanostructures. In order to understand light-matter interactions in the near field regime using a NSOM technique with an excitation of 532 nm (2.33 eV), we selected an isolated single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∼120 nm grown via a vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism along with a metallic Au nanoparticle (NP) catalyst. The role of electronic transitions from different native defect related energy states of AlGaN is discussed in understanding the NSOM images for the semiconducting NW. The effect of strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of an excitation laser on the NSOM images for Au NPs, involved in the VLS growth mechanism of NWs, is also observed. PMID:27511614

  3. Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinjuan; Ji, Cheng; Xiang, Yong; Kang, Xiangning; Shen, Bo; Yu, Tongjun

    2016-05-16

    Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency (LEE) in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated in this paper. A united picture is presented to describe polarized light's emission and propagation processes. It is found that the electron-hole recombinations in AlGaN multiple quantum wells produce three kinds of angularly distributed polarized emissions and propagation process can change their intensity distributions. By investigation the change of angular distributions in 277nm and 215nm LEDs, this work reveals that LEE can be significantly enhanced by modulating the angular distributions of polarized light of DUV LEDs. PMID:27409966

  4. Neutral beamline with ion energy recovery based on magnetic blocking of electrons

    DOEpatents

    Stirling, W.L.

    1980-07-01

    A neutral beamline generator with energy recovery of the full-energy ion component of the beam based on magnetic blocking of electrons is provided. Ions from a positive ion source are accelerated to the desired beam energy from a slightly positive potential level with respect to ground through a neutralizer cell by means of a negative acceleration voltage. The unneutralized full-energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer are retarded and slightly deflected and the elecrons in the neutralizer are blocked by a magnetic field generated transverse to the beamline. An electron collector in the form of a coaxial cylinder surrounding and protruding axial a few centimeters beyond the neutralizer exit terminates the electrons which exit the neutralizer in an E x B drift to the collector when the collector is biased a few hundred volts positive with respect to the neutralizer voltage. The neutralizer is operated at the negative acceleration voltage. The neutralizer is operated at the negative acceleration voltage, and the deflected full energy ions are decelerated and the charge collected at ground potential thereby expending none of their energy received from the acceleration power supply.

  5. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-09-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO{sub 2} on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO{sub 2} and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications.

  6. Enhancement of optical polarization degree of AlGaN quantum wells by using staggered structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiying; Lu, Huimin; Fu, Lei; He, Chenguang; Wang, Mingxing; Tang, Ning; Xu, Fujun; Yu, Tongjun; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Staggered AlGaN quantum wells (QWs) are designed to enhance the transverse-electric (TE) polarized optical emission in deep ultraviolet (DUV) light- emitting diodes (LED). The optical polarization properties of the conventional and staggered AlGaN QWs are investigated by a theoretical model based on the k·p method as well as polarized photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Based on an analysis of the valence subbands and momentum matrix elements, it is found that AlGaN QWs with step-function-like Al content in QWs offers much stronger TE polarized emission in comparison to that from conventional AlGaN QWs. Experimental results show that the degree of the PL polarization at room temperature can be enhanced from 20.8% of conventional AlGaN QWs to 40.2% of staggered AlGaN QWs grown by MOCVD, which is in good agreement with the theoretical simulation. It suggests that polarization band engineering via staggered AlGaN QWs can be well applied in high efficiency AlGaN-based DUV LEDs. PMID:27505782

  7. An electrically injected AlGaN nanowire laser operating in the ultraviolet-C band

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Liu, X.; Kang, J.; Mi, Z.; Woo, S. Y.; Botton, G. A.

    2015-07-27

    We have investigated the molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of nearly defect-free AlGaN nanowire heterostructures grown directly on Si substrate. By exploiting the Anderson localization of light, we have demonstrated electrically injected AlGaN nanowire lasers that can operate at 262.1 nm. The threshold current density is 200 A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K. The relatively low threshold current is attributed to the high Q-factor of the random cavity and the three-dimensional quantum confinement offered by the atomic-scale composition modulation in self-organized AlGaN nanowires.

  8. Reporting methods for processing and analysis of data from serial block face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Borrett, S; Hughes, L

    2016-07-01

    Serial block face scanning electron microscopy is rapidly becoming a popular tool for collecting large three-dimensional data sets of cells and tissues, filling the resolution and volume gap between fluorescence microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy. The automated collection of data within the instrument occupies the smallest proportion of the time required to prepare and analyse biological samples. It is the processing of data once it has been collected that proves the greatest challenge. In this review we discuss different methods that are used to process data. We suggest potential workflows that can be used to facilitate the transfer of raw image stacks into quantifiable data as well as propose a set of criteria for reporting methods for data analysis to enable replication of work. PMID:26800017

  9. Impact of post-deposition annealing on interfacial chemical bonding states between AlGaN and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-03-02

    The effect of post-deposition annealing on chemical bonding states at interface between Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is studied by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that both of Al-O/Al 2p and Ga-O/Ga 3d area ratio decrease at annealing temperatures lower than 500 °C, which could be attributed to “clean up” effect of ALD-ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN. Compared to Ga spectra, a much larger decrease in Al-O/Al 2p ratio at a smaller take-off angle θ is observed, which indicates higher effectiveness of the passivation of Al-O bond than Ga-O bond through “clean up” effect near the interface. However, degradation of ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface quality due to re-oxidation at higher annealing temperature (>500 °C) is also found. The XPS spectra clearly reveal that Al atoms at ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface are easier to get oxidized as compared with Ga atoms.

  10. Deformation potentials in AlGaN and InGaN alloys and their impact on optical polarization properties of nitride quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łepkowski, S. P.; Gorczyca, I.; Stefańska-Skrobas, K.; Christensen, N. E.; Svane, A.

    2013-08-01

    The deformation potentials acz-D1, act-D2, D3, D4, and D5 are determined for random AlGaN and InGaN alloys using electronic band structure calculations based on the density functional theory. A sublinear composition dependence is obtained for acz-D1 and D3 in AlGaN, and D3 in InGaN, whereas superlinear behavior on composition is found for act-D2, D4, and D5 in AlGaN, and act-D2 and D5 in InGaN. The optical polarization properties of nitride quantum wells are very well described by the k·p method when the obtained deformation potentials are included. In m-plane AlGaN/AlN and InGaN/GaN quantum wells, the difference between the interband transition energies for light polarized parallel and orthogonal to the crystalline c axis compares more favorably to experimental data, than when deformation potentials previously reported in literature are used.

  11. 3D imaging by serial block face scanning electron microscopy for materials science using ultramicrotomy.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Zhou, Xiaorong; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) has emerged as a means of obtaining three dimensional (3D) electron images over volumes much larger than possible by focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning and at higher spatial resolution than achievable with conventional X-ray computed tomography (CT). Such high resolution 3D electron images can be employed for precisely determining the shape, volume fraction, distribution and connectivity of important microstructural features. While soft (fixed or frozen) biological samples are particularly well suited for nanoscale sectioning using an ultramicrotome, the technique can also produce excellent 3D images at electron microscope resolution in a time and resource-efficient manner for engineering materials. Currently, a lack of appreciation of the capabilities of ultramicrotomy and the operational challenges associated with minimising artefacts for different materials is limiting its wider application to engineering materials. Consequently, this paper outlines the current state of the art for SBFSEM examining in detail how damage is introduced during slicing and highlighting strategies for minimising such damage. A particular focus of the study is the acquisition of 3D images for a variety of metallic and coated systems. PMID:26855205

  12. Polarization engineering of back-illuminated separate absorption and multiplication AlGaN avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guofeng; Wang, Fuxue

    2016-08-01

    The back-illuminated separate absorption and multiplication AlGaN avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with a p-type graded AlGaN layer have been designed to investigate the polarization engineering on the performance of the devices. The calculated results show that the APD with p-graded AlGaN layer exhibits lower avalanche breakdown voltage and increased maximum multiplication gain compared to the structure with conventional p-type AlGaN layer. The improved performance of the designed APD is numerically explained by the polarization-assisted enhancement of the ionization electric field in the multiplication region and polarization doping effect caused by the p-type graded layer.

  13. Monitoring and Controlling of Strain During MOCVD of AlGaN for UV Optoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.; Crawford, M.H.; Shul, R.J.; Hearne, S.J.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.J.; Banas, M.

    1999-01-14

    The grown-in tensile strain, due to a lattice mismatch between AlGaN and GaN, is responsible for the observed cracking that seriously limits the feasibility of nitride-based ultraviolet (UV) emitters. We report in-situ monitoring of strain/stress during MOCVD of AlGaN based on a wafer-curvature measurement technique. The strain/stress measurement confirms the presence of tensile strain during growth of AlGaN pseudomorphically on a thick GaN layer. Further growth leads to the onset of stress relief through crack generation. We find that the growth of AlGaN directly on low-temperature (LT) GaN or AlN buffer layers results in a reduced and possibly controllable strain.

  14. MOCVD growth of AlGaN UV LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.; Crawford, M.H.

    1998-09-01

    Issues related to the MOCVD growth of AlGaN, specifically the gas-phase parasitic reactions among TMG, TMA, and NH{sub 3}, are studied using an in-situ optical reflectometer. It is observed that the presence of the well-known gas phase adduct (TMA: NH{sub 3}) could seriously hinder the incorporation behavior of TMGa. Relatively low reactor pressures (30--50 Torr) are employed to grow an AlGaN/GaN SCH QW p-n diode structure. The UV emission at 360 nm (FWHM {approximately} 10 nm) represents the first report of LED operation from an indium-free GaN QW diode.

  15. A comparison of the 60Co gamma radiation hardness, breakdown characteristics and the effect of SiN x capping on InAlN and AlGaN HEMTs for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.; O'Mahony, D.; Vitobello, F.; Muschitiello, M.; Costantino, A.; Barnes, A. R.; Parbrook, P. J.

    2016-02-01

    Electrical performance and stability of InAlN and AlGaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) subjected 9.1 mrad of 60Co gamma radiation and off-state voltage step-stressing until breakdown are reported. Comparison with commercially available production-level AlGaN HEMT devices, which showed negligible drift in DC performance throughout all experiments, suggests degradation mechanisms must be managed and suppressed through development of advanced epitaxial and surface passivation techniques in order to fully exploit the robustness of the III-nitride material system. Of the research level devices without dielectric layer surface capping, InAlN HEMTs exhibited the greater stability compared with AlGaN under off-state bias stressing and gamma irradiation in terms of their DC characteristics, although AlGaN HEMTs had significantly higher breakdown voltages. The effect of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition SiN x surface capping is explored, highlighting the sensitivity of InAlN HEMT performance to surface passivation techniques. InAlN-SiN x HEMTs suffered more from trap related degradation than AlGaN-SiN x devices in terms of radiation hardness and step-stress characteristics, attributed to an increased capturing of carriers in traps at the InAlN/SiN x interface.

  16. Electron transport mechanism of bathocuproine exciton blocking layer in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeihyun; Park, Soohyung; Lee, Younjoo; Kim, Hyein; Shin, Dongguen; Jeong, Junkyeong; Jeong, Kwangho; Cho, Sang Wan; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin

    2016-02-21

    Efficient exciton management is a key issue to improve the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). It is well known that the insertion of an exciton blocking layer (ExBL) having a large band gap promotes the efficient dissociation of photogenerated excitons at the donor-acceptor interface. However, the large band gap induces an energy barrier which disrupts the charge transport. Therefore, building an adequate strategy based on the knowledge of the true charge transport mechanism is necessary. In this study, the true electron transport mechanism of a bathocuproine (BCP) ExBL in OPVs is comprehensively investigated by in situ ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, inverse photoemission spectroscopy, density functional theory calculation, and impedance spectroscopy. The chemical interaction between deposited Al and BCP induces new states within the band gap of BCP, so that electrons can transport through these new energy levels. Localized trap states are also formed upon the Al-BCP interaction. The activation energy of these traps is estimated with temperature-dependent conductance measurements to be 0.20 eV. The Al-BCP interaction induces both transport and trap levels in the energy gap of BCP and their interplay results in the electron transport observed. PMID:26821701

  17. Charge transport studies of polymeric photovoltaic thin films with an electron blocking and trapping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harrison K. H.; Chan, Kevin K. H.; So, S. K.

    2012-06-01

    The transport properties of two photovoltaic polymers, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly(2,7-carbazole) derivative (PCDTBT), and their polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) are studied by space-charge-limited current (SCLC), dark-injection space-charge-limited current (DI-SCLC), and admittance spectroscopy(AS). For a nominally hole-only device, electrons leakage occurs. This results in a current larger than the theoretical SCLC and ill-defined DI-SCLC and AS signals. In order to prevent electron leakage, a hole-transporting but electron blocking/trapping thin layer is added between active layer and Au. The layer composed of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) doped into an amine-based small molecule. Using this interlayer, well-defined carrier transit time can be obtained for mobility extraction. With a suitable interlayer to suppress undesirable carrier injection and transport, these techniques should find broad applications in the transport characterization of narrow gap photovoltaic polymers and BHJ blends.

  18. Analysis of Brain Mitochondria Using Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Konark; Clark, Helen R; Chavan, Vrushali; Benson, Emily K; Kidd, Grahame J; Srivastava, Sarika

    2016-01-01

    Human brain is a high energy consuming organ that mainly relies on glucose as a fuel source. Glucose is catabolized by brain mitochondria via glycolysis, tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathways to produce cellular energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Impairment of mitochondrial ATP production causes mitochondrial disorders, which present clinically with prominent neurological and myopathic symptoms. Mitochondrial defects are also present in neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. autism spectrum disorder) and neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Thus, there is an increased interest in the field for performing 3D analysis of mitochondrial morphology, structure and distribution under both healthy and disease states. The brain mitochondrial morphology is extremely diverse, with some mitochondria especially those in the synaptic region being in the range of <200 nm diameter, which is below the resolution limit of traditional light microscopy. Expressing a mitochondrially-targeted green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the brain significantly enhances the organellar detection by confocal microscopy. However, it does not overcome the constraints on the sensitivity of detection of relatively small sized mitochondria without oversaturating the images of large sized mitochondria. While serial transmission electron microscopy has been successfully used to characterize mitochondria at the neuronal synapse, this technique is extremely time-consuming especially when comparing multiple samples. The serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) technique involves an automated process of sectioning, imaging blocks of tissue and data acquisition. Here, we provide a protocol to perform SBFSEM of a defined region from rodent brain to rapidly reconstruct and visualize mitochondrial morphology. This technique could also be used to provide accurate information on

  19. Effect of Orientation on Tensile Properties of Inconel 718 Block Fabricated with Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Atherton, Todd S.

    2010-01-01

    Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) direct metal deposition processing was used to fabricate an Inconel 718 bulk block deposit. Room temperature tensile properties were measured as a function of orientation and location within the block build. This study is a follow-on activity to previous work on Inconel 718 EBF3 deposits that were too narrow to allow properties to be measured in more than one orientation

  20. Novel layered two-dimensional semiconductors as the building blocks for nano-electronic/photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guoxiong; De, Debtanu; Hadjiev, Viktor G.; Peng, Haibing

    2014-06-01

    Layered two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors beyond graphene have been emerging as potential building blocks for the next-generation electronic/photonic applications. Representative metal chalcogenides, including the widely studied MoS2, possess similar layered crystal structures with weak interaction between adjacent layers, thus allowing the formation of stable thin-layer crystals with thickness down to a few or even single atomic layer. Other important chalcogenides, involving earth-abundant and environment-friendly materials desirable for sustainable applications, include SnS2 (band gap: 2.1 eV) and SnS (band gap: 1.1 eV). So far, commonly adopted for research purpose are mechanical and liquid exfoliation methods for creating thin layers of such 2D semiconductors. Most recently, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was attracting significant attention as a practical method for producing thin films or crystal grains of MoS2. However, critical yet still absent is an effective experimental approach for controlling the positions of thin crystal grains of layered 2D semiconductors during the CVD process. Here we report the controlled CVD synthesis of thin crystal arrays of representative layered semiconductors (including SnS2 and SnS) at designed locations on chip, promising large-scale optoelectronic applications. Our work opens a window for future practical applications of layered 2D semiconductors in integrated nano-electronic/photonic systems.

  1. Permutation blocking path integral Monte Carlo approach to the uniform electron gas at finite temperature.

    PubMed

    Dornheim, Tobias; Schoof, Tim; Groth, Simon; Filinov, Alexey; Bonitz, Michael

    2015-11-28

    The uniform electron gas (UEG) at finite temperature is of high current interest due to its key relevance for many applications including dense plasmas and laser excited solids. In particular, density functional theory heavily relies on accurate thermodynamic data for the UEG. Until recently, the only existing first-principle results had been obtained for N = 33 electrons with restricted path integral Monte Carlo (RPIMC), for low to moderate density, rs=r¯/aB≳1. These data have been complemented by configuration path integral Monte Carlo (CPIMC) simulations for rs ≤ 1 that substantially deviate from RPIMC towards smaller rs and low temperature. In this work, we present results from an independent third method-the recently developed permutation blocking path integral Monte Carlo (PB-PIMC) approach [T. Dornheim et al., New J. Phys. 17, 073017 (2015)] which we extend to the UEG. Interestingly, PB-PIMC allows us to perform simulations over the entire density range down to half the Fermi temperature (θ = kBT/EF = 0.5) and, therefore, to compare our results to both aforementioned methods. While we find excellent agreement with CPIMC, where results are available, we observe deviations from RPIMC that are beyond the statistical errors and increase with density. PMID:26627944

  2. Electronic and optical excitations in building blocks of the metal organic framework MOF-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Bin; Hung, Linda; Yildirim, Taner; Ogut, Serdar

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are a relatively new class of materials which are made of metal-oxide clusters linked by organic bridging ligands. In recent years, MOFs have received considerable attention due to their widely tunable structural, chemical and physical properties. We investigate one of the well characterized MOFs, MOF-5, whose framework consists of tetrahedral [Zn40]6+ units linked by rigid arylcarboxylate ligands. We use many-body perturbation (GW +BSE) and time-dependent DFT methods in real space to examine the electronic and optical excitations in the building blocks of MOF-5, such as Zn4O(COOH)6, basic zinc acetate [Zn4O(CH3COO)6], and tetranuclear zinc benzoate [Zn4O(C6H5COO)6]. The calculated spectra are compared with available experimental measurements and existing calculations to shed light on the controversy regarding the nature (metal-ligand versus ligand-ligand) of low-energy electronic and optical excitations in MOF-5. Supported by DOE Grant No. DE-SC0001853.

  3. Deconstructing Complexity: Serial Block-Face Electron Microscopic Analysis of the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Scott A.; Antonios, Joseph K.; Bushong, Eric A.; Badkoobehi, Ali; Malek, Elmar; Hwang, Minju; Terada, Masako; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) terminal is among the largest and most complex synaptic structures in the brain. Our understanding of the development of this morphologically elaborate structure has been limited because of the inability of standard electron microscopy techniques to quickly and accurately reconstruct large volumes of neuropil. Here we use serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM) to surmount these limitations and investigate the establishment of MF connectivity during mouse postnatal development. Based on volume reconstructions, we find that MF axons initially form bouton-like specializations directly onto dendritic shafts, that dendritic protrusions primarily arise independently of bouton contact sites, and that a dramatic increase in presynaptic and postsynaptic complexity follows the association of MF boutons with CA3 dendritic protrusions. We also identify a transient period of MF bouton filopodial exploration, followed by refinement of sites of synaptic connectivity. These observations enhance our understanding of the development of this highly specialized synapse and illustrate the power of SBEM to resolve details of developing microcircuits at a level not easily attainable with conventional approaches. PMID:23303931

  4. Digitally Alloyed Modulated Precursor Flow Epitaxial Growth of Ternary AlGaN with Binary AlN and GaN Sub-Layers and Observation of Compositional Inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Choi, Suk; Yoo, Dongwon; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Hawkridge, Michael E.; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Dupuis, Russell D.

    2010-05-01

    We report the growth of ternary aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) layers on AlN/sapphire template/substrates by digitally alloyed modulated precursor flow epitaxial growth (DA-MPEG), which combined an MPEG AlN sub-layer with a conventional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown GaN sub-layer. The overall composition in DA-MPEG Al x Ga1- x N was controlled by adjustment of the growth time (i.e., the thickness) of the GaN sub-layer. As the GaN sub-layer growth time increased, the Al composition in AlGaN decreased to 50%, but the surface morphology of the AlGaN layer became rough, and a three-dimensional structure with islands appeared for the DA-MPEG AlGaN with relatively thick GaN sub-layers, possibly resulting from the Ga adatom surface migration behavior and/or the strain built up from lattice mismatch between AlN and GaN sub-layers with increasing GaN sub-layer growth time. Through strain analysis by high-resolution x-ray diffraction, reciprocal space mapping, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, it was found that there was compositional inhomogeneity in the DA-MPEG AlGaN with AlN and GaN binary sub-layers for the case of the layer with relatively thick GaN sub-layers.

  5. Polarization self-screening in [0001] oriented InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes for improving the electron injection efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tiam Tan, Swee; Ji, Yun; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Kyaw, Zabu; Wei Sun, Xiao E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org; Volkan Demir, Hilmi E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org

    2014-06-23

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown along the [0001] orientation inherit very strong polarization induced electric fields. This results in a reduced effective conduction band barrier height for the p-type AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) and makes the electron blocking effect relatively ineffective and the electron injection efficiency drops. Here, we show the concept of polarization self-screening for improving the electron injection efficiency. In this work, the proposed polarization self-screening effect was studied and proven through growing a p-type EBL with AlN composition partially graded along the [0001] orientation, which induces the bulk polarization charges. These bulk polarization charges are utilized to effectively self-screen the positive polarization induced interface charges located at the interface between the EBL and the last quantum barrier when designed properly. Using this approach, the electron leakage is suppressed and the LED performance is enhanced significantly.

  6. Electrical and optical properties of Fe doped AlGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Kozhukhova, E. A.; Dabiran, A. M.; Chow, P. P.; Wowchak, A. M.; Pearton, S. J.

    2010-01-15

    Electrical and optical properties of AlGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy were studied in the Al composition range 15%-45%. Undoped films were semi-insulating, with the Fermi level pinned near E{sub c}-0.6-0.7 eV. Si doping to (5-7)x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} rendered the 15% Al films conducting n-type, but a large portion of the donors were relatively deep (activation energy 95 meV), with a 0.15 eV barrier for capture of electrons giving rise to strong persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effects. The optical threshold of this effect was {approx}1 eV. Doping with Fe to a concentration of {approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} led to decrease in concentration of uncompensated donors, suggesting compensation by Fe acceptors. Addition of Fe strongly suppressed the formation of PPC-active centers in favor of ordinary shallow donors. For higher Al compositions, Si doping of (5-7)x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} did not lead to n-type conductivity. Fe doping shifted the bandedge luminescence by 25-50 meV depending on Al composition. The dominant defect band in microcathodoluminescence spectra was the blue band near 3 eV, with the energy weakly dependent on composition.

  7. Light emission and microstructure of Mg-doped AlGaN grown on patterned sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, A.; Liu, R.; Ponce, F. A.; Amano, H.; Akasaki, I.; Cherns, D.

    2003-01-01

    Distinct crystalline and optical properties have been observed in Mg-doped Al0.03Ga0.97N grown on a patterned sapphire substrate; the pattern consisting of etched trenches along the sapphire <112¯0> direction. The epilayer has two distinct regions: one grown directly onto the sapphire mesa and the other an epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) region that overhangs the trench. Transmission electron microscopy shows the presence of pyramidal defects as well as large dislocation densities in the region grown directly on sapphire. In contrast, the ELO region is defect free and contains no Mg-related pyramidal defects. Cathodoluminescence measurements show superior near-band-edge emission in the ELO region, suggesting that the emission is susceptible to nonradiative centers caused by the high defect density in the rest of the sample. The Mg-related donor-acceptor-pair emission is fairly uniform throughout the film, indicating that it is not affected by the nonradiative centers. These optical and structural properties of AlGaN are closely related to the direction of the growth front.

  8. Catalytic activity of enzymes immobilized on AlGaN /GaN solution gate field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, B.; Howgate, J.; von Ribbeck, H.-G.; Gawlina, Y.; Bandalo, V.; Steinhoff, G.; Stutzmann, M.; Eickhoff, M.

    2006-10-01

    Enzyme-modified field-effect transistors (EnFETs) were prepared by immobilization of penicillinase on AlGaN /GaN solution gate field-effect transistors. The influence of the immobilization process on enzyme functionality was analyzed by comparing covalent immobilization and physisorption. Covalent immobilization by Schiff base formation on GaN surfaces modified with an aminopropyltriethoxysilane monolayer exhibits high reproducibility with respect to the enzyme/substrate affinity. Reductive amination of the Schiff base bonds to secondary amines significantly increases the stability of the enzyme layer. Electronic characterization of the EnFET response to penicillin G indicates that covalent immobilization leads to the formation of an enzyme (sub)monolayer.

  9. Piezoelectric domains in the AlGaN hexagonal microrods: Effect of crystal orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivadasan, A. K.; Mangamma, G.; Bera, Santanu; Kamruddin, M.; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-05-01

    Presently, the piezoelectric materials are finding tremendous applications in the micro-mechanical actuators, sensors, and self-powered devices. In this context, the studies pertaining to piezoelectric properties of materials in the different size ranges are very important for the scientific community. The III-nitrides are exceptionally important, not only for optoelectronic but also for their piezoelectric applications. In the present study, we synthesized AlGaN via self-catalytic vapor-solid mechanism by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique on AlN base layer over intrinsic Si(100) substrate. The growth process is substantiated using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Raman and photoluminescence studies reveal the formation of AlGaN microrods in the wurtzite phase and ensure the high optical quality of the crystalline material. The single crystalline, direct wide band gap and hexagonally shaped AlGaN microrods are studied for understanding the behavior of the crystallites under the application of constant external electric field using the piezoresponse force microscopy. The present study is mainly focused on understanding the behavior of induced polarization for the determination of piezoelectric coefficient of AlGaN microrod along the c-axis and imaging of piezoelectric domains in the sample originating because of the angular inclination of AlGaN microrods with respect to its AlN base layers.

  10. Ultraflat Au nanoplates as a new building block for molecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Wooseok; Lee, Miyeon; Lee, Hyunsoo; Lee, Hyoban; Kim, Bongsoo; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the charge transport properties of a self-assembled organic monolayer on Au nanoplates with conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). Atomically flat Au nanoplates, a few hundred micrometers on each side, that have only (111) surfaces, were synthesized using the chemical vapor transport method; these nanoplates were employed as the substrates for hexadecanethiol (HDT) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Atomic-scale high-resolution images show (\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3}){{R}}30^\\circ molecular periodicity, indicating a well-ordered structure of the HDT on the Au nanoplates. We observed reduced friction and adhesion forces on the HDT SAMs on Au nanoplates, compared with Si substrates, which is consistent with the lubricating nature of HDT SAMs. The electrical properties, such as I–V characteristics and current as a function of load, were measured using CP-AFM. We obtained a tunneling decay constant (β) of 0.57 Å‑1, including through-bond ({β }{tb} = 0.99 Å‑1) and through-space ({β }{{ts}} = 1.36 Å‑1) decay constants for the two-pathway model. This indicates that the charge transport properties of HDT SAMs on Au nanoplates are consistent with those on a Au (111) film, suggesting that SAMs on nanoplates can provide a new building block for molecular electronics.

  11. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Brian; Liu, Yang; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Gerwick, William H.; Valeriote, Frederick A.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula). Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM). Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF) in tumor cells. PMID:25803180

  12. Ultraflat Au nanoplates as a new building block for molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wooseok; Lee, Miyeon; Lee, Hyunsoo; Lee, Hyoban; Kim, Bongsoo; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-05-27

    We demonstrate the charge transport properties of a self-assembled organic monolayer on Au nanoplates with conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). Atomically flat Au nanoplates, a few hundred micrometers on each side, that have only (111) surfaces, were synthesized using the chemical vapor transport method; these nanoplates were employed as the substrates for hexadecanethiol (HDT) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Atomic-scale high-resolution images show [Formula: see text] molecular periodicity, indicating a well-ordered structure of the HDT on the Au nanoplates. We observed reduced friction and adhesion forces on the HDT SAMs on Au nanoplates, compared with Si substrates, which is consistent with the lubricating nature of HDT SAMs. The electrical properties, such as I-V characteristics and current as a function of load, were measured using CP-AFM. We obtained a tunneling decay constant (β) of 0.57 Å(-1), including through-bond ([Formula: see text] = 0.99 Å(-1)) and through-space ([Formula: see text] = 1.36 Å(-1)) decay constants for the two-pathway model. This indicates that the charge transport properties of HDT SAMs on Au nanoplates are consistent with those on a Au (111) film, suggesting that SAMs on nanoplates can provide a new building block for molecular electronics. PMID:27087356

  13. Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking Materials for Blue Electrophosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Von Ruden, Amber L.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Koech, Phillip K.; Swensen, James S.; Wang, Liang; Darsell, Jens T.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2010-10-26

    We report the design, synthesis, thermal, and photophysical properties of two phosphine oxide based electron transport/hole blocking materials, 2,6-bis(4-(diphenylphosphoryl)phenyl)pyridine (BM-A11) and 2,4-bis(4-(diphenyl-phosphoryl)phenyl)pyridine (BM-A10) for blue electrophosphorescent organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The use of these materials in blue OLED with iridium (III) bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2’]picolinate (Firpic) as the phosphor was demonstrated. Using the dual host device architecture with BM-A10 as the ETM yields a maximum EQE of 8.9% with a power efficiency of 21.5 lm/W (4.0V and 35 cd/m2). When BM-A11 is used as the ETM, the maximum EQE and power efficiency improves to 14.9% and 48.4 lm/W, respectively (3.0V and 40 cd/m2).

  14. A study of electrically active traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Cui, Sharon; Ma, T. P.; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Nath, Digbijoy; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-10-01

    We have studied electron conduction mechanisms and the associated roles of the electrically active traps in the AlGaN layer of an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure. By fitting the temperature dependent I-V (Current-Voltage) curves to the Frenkel-Poole theory, we have identified two discrete trap energy levels. Multiple traces of I-V measurements and constant-current injection experiment all confirm that the main role of the traps in the AlGaN layer is to enhance the current flowing through the AlGaN barrier by trap-assisted electron conduction without causing electron trapping.

  15. Rapid specimen preparation to improve the throughput of electron microscopic volume imaging for three-dimensional analyses of subcellular ultrastructures with serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Thai, Truc Quynh; Nguyen, Huy Bang; Saitoh, Sei; Wu, Bao; Saitoh, Yurika; Shimo, Satoshi; Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Ichii, Osamu; Kon, Yasuhiro; Takaki, Takashi; Joh, Kensuke; Ohno, Nobuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Serial block-face imaging using scanning electron microscopy enables rapid observations of three-dimensional ultrastructures in a large volume of biological specimens. However, such imaging usually requires days for sample preparation to reduce charging and increase image contrast. In this study, we report a rapid procedure to acquire serial electron microscopic images within 1 day for three-dimensional analyses of subcellular ultrastructures. This procedure is based on serial block-face with two major modifications, including a new sample treatment device and direct polymerization on the rivets, to reduce the time and workload needed. The modified procedure without uranyl acetate can produce tens of embedded samples observable under serial block-face scanning electron microscopy within 1 day. The serial images obtained are similar to the block-face images acquired by common procedures, and are applicable to three-dimensional reconstructions at a subcellular resolution. Using this approach, regional immune deposits and the double contour or heterogeneous thinning of basement membranes were observed in the glomerular capillary loops of an autoimmune nephropathy model. These modifications provide options to improve the throughput of three-dimensional electron microscopic examinations, and will ultimately be beneficial for the wider application of volume imaging in life science and clinical medicine. PMID:26867664

  16. Leakage mechanism in GaN and AlGaN Schottky interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Tamotsu; Kotani, Junji; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2004-06-01

    Based on detailed temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V-T) measurements the mechanism of leakage currents through GaN and AlGaN Schottky interfaces is discussed. The experiments were compared to calculations based on thin surface barrier model in which the effects of surface defects were taken into account. Our simulation method reproduced the experimental I-V-T characteristics of the GaN and AlGaN Schottky diodes, and gave excellent fitting results to the reported Schottky I-V curves in GaN for both forward and reverse biases at different temperatures. The present results indicate that the barrier thinning caused by unintentional surface-defect donors enhances the tunneling transport processes, leading to large leakage currents through GaN and AlGaN Schottky interfaces.

  17. An analysis of temperature dependent piezoelectric Franz-Keldysh effect in AlGaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y. T.; Teo, K. L.; Li, M. F.; Uchida, Kazuo; Tokunaga, Hiroki; Akutsu, Nakao; Matsumoto, Koh

    2000-02-01

    Strong Franz-Keldysh oscillations near the band gap of AlGaN are observed in the contactless electroreflectance (CER) studies of a GaN/InGaN/AlGaN multilayer structure. The line shape analysis of the CER spectra at different temperatures provides an accurate determination of the AlGaN band gap energies and the built-in electric fields. Using the existing data of the thermal expansion coefficients of GaN and sapphire, and the piezoelectric constants of AlGaN, the temperature dependence of the electric field is estimated and is in good agreement with the experimental results between 15 and 300 K. We attribute such electric field to the piezoelectric strain effect.

  18. Investigation of the thickness effect to impedance analysis results AlGaN acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özen, Soner; Bilgiç, Eyüp; Gülmez, Gülay; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan; Mohammadigharehbagh, Reza

    2016-03-01

    In this study, AlGaN acoustic sensors were deposited on aluminum metal substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method, for the first time. Impedance analyses of the fabricated acoustic sensors were investigated for the determining of effect of the nano layer thickness. Thickness values are very close to each others. Fabricated sensors have been fabricated from AlGaN deposited on aluminum substrates. Gallium materials are used in many applications for optoelectronic device and semiconductor technology. Thermionic vacuum arc is the deposition technology for the variously materials and applications field. TVA production parameters and some properties of the deposited layers were investigated. TVA is the fast deposition technology for the gallium compounds and doped gallium compounds. Obtained results that AlGaN layer are very promising material for an acoustic sensor but also TVA is proper fast technology for the production.

  19. An Electron-Deficient Building Block Based on the B←N Unit: An Electron Acceptor for All-Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Dou, Chuandong; Long, Xiaojing; Ding, Zicheng; Xie, Zhiyuan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lixiang

    2016-01-22

    A double B←N bridged bipyridyl (BNBP) is a novel electron-deficient building block for polymer electron acceptors in all-polymer solar cells. The B←N bridging units endow BNBP with fixed planar configuration and low-lying LUMO/HOMO energy levels. As a result, the polymer based on BNBP units (P-BNBP-T) exhibits high electron mobility, low-lying LUMO/HOMO energy levels, and strong absorbance in the visible region, which is desirable for polymer electron acceptors. Preliminary all-polymer solar cell (all-PSC) devices with P-BNBP-T as the electron acceptor and PTB7 as the electron donor exhibit a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.38%, which is among the highest values of all-PSCs with PTB7 as the electron donor. PMID:26663513

  20. Staining plastic blocks with triiodide to image cells and soft tissues in backscattered electron SEM of skeletal and dental tissues.

    PubMed

    Boyde, A

    2012-01-01

    Backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM) is an invaluable method for studying the histology of the hard, mineralised components of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) or other resin embedded skeletal and dental tissues. Intact tissues are studied in micro-milled or polished block faces with an electron-optical section thickness of the order of a half to one micron and with the area of the section as big as a whole--large or small--bone organ. However, BSE SEM does not give information concerning the distribution of uncalcified, 'soft', cellular and extracellular matrix components. This can be obtained by confocal microscopy of the same block and the two sorts of images merged but the blocks have to be studied in two microscope systems. The present work shows a new, simple and economic approach to visualising both components by using the triiodide ion in Lugol's iodine solution to stain the block surface prior to the application of any conductive coating--and the latter can be omitted if charging is suppressed by use of poor vacuum conditions in the SEM sample chamber. The method permits the use of archival tissue, and it will be valuable in studies of both normal growth and development and pathological changes in bones and joints, including osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, and tissue adaptation to implants. PMID:22828992

  1. A novel method of island blocking in whole abdominal radiotherapy using a modified electronic tissue compensation technique.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sharad; Osusky, Kate; Gabel, Molly; Yue, Ning J; Narra, Venkat

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, large fields requiring island blocking used external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with Cerrobend blocks to limit dose to the critical structures. It is laborious to construct blocks and use them on a daily basis. We present a novel technique for island blocking using a modified electronic tissue compensation (MECOMP) technique. Five patients treated at our institution were selected for this study. The study compared two planning techniques: a novel MECOMP and a conventional EBRT technique. Conventional fields were defined using anterior-posterior and posterior-anterior (PA) fields. The kidneys were contoured and an aperture cut-out block was fitted to the OAR with a 1-cm margin (OAR(CTV)) and placed in the PA field. A dynamic multileaf collimation (DMLC) plan with ECOMP was developed using identical beam and blocking strategy; this tissue compensation-based fluence map was modified to deliver a "zero" dose to the CTV(OAR) from the PA field. There were no significant differences in the mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the right or left kidney between the two methods. The mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the peritoneal cavity were also not significantly different. The number of monitor units (MUs) required was increased using the MECOMP (273 vs. 1152, p < 0.01). The MECOMP is effectively able to deliver DMLC-based radiotherapy, even with island blocks present. This novel use of MECOMP for whole abdominal radiotherapy should substantially reduce the labor, daily treatment time, and treatment-related errors through the elimination of cerrobend blocks. PMID:19931034

  2. A Novel Method of Island Blocking in Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy Using a Modified Electronic Tissue Compensation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sharad

    2010-10-01

    Traditionally, large fields requiring island blocking used external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with Cerrobend blocks to limit dose to the critical structures. It is laborious to construct blocks and use them on a daily basis. We present a novel technique for island blocking using a modified electronic tissue compensation (MECOMP) technique. Five patients treated at our institution were selected for this study. The study compared two planning techniques: a novel MECOMP and a conventional EBRT technique. Conventional fields were defined using anterior-posterior and posterior-anterior (PA) fields. The kidneys were contoured and an aperture cut-out block was fitted to the OAR with a 1-cm margin (OAR{sub CTV}) and placed in the PA field. A dynamic multileaf collimation (DMLC) plan with ECOMP was developed using identical beam and blocking strategy; this tissue compensation-based fluence map was modified to deliver a 'zero' dose to the CTV{sub OAR} from the PA field. There were no significant differences in the mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the right or left kidney between the two methods. The mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the peritoneal cavity were also not significantly different. The number of monitor units (MUs) required was increased using the MECOMP (273 vs. 1152, p < 0.01). The MECOMP is effectively able to deliver DMLC-based radiotherapy, even with island blocks present. This novel use of MECOMP for whole abdominal radiotherapy should substantially reduce the labor, daily treatment time, and treatment-related errors through the elimination of cerrobend blocks.

  3. An Electronic Structure Approach to Charge Transfer and Transport in Molecular Building Blocks for Organic Optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Heidi Phillips

    A fundamental understanding of charge separation in organic materials is necessary for the rational design of optoelectronic devices suited for renewable energy applications and requires a combination of theoretical, computational, and experimental methods. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD)DFT are cost effective ab-initio approaches for calculating fundamental properties of large molecular systems, however conventional DFT methods have been known to fail in accurately characterizing frontier orbital gaps and charge transfer states in molecular systems. In this dissertation, these shortcomings are addressed by implementing an optimally-tuned range-separated hybrid (OT-RSH) functional approach within DFT and TDDFT. The first part of this thesis presents the way in which RSH-DFT addresses the shortcomings in conventional DFT. Environmentally-corrected RSH-DFT frontier orbital energies are shown to correspond to thin film measurements for a set of organic semiconducting molecules. Likewise, the improved RSH-TDDFT description of charge transfer excitations is benchmarked using a model ethene dimer and silsesquioxane molecules. In the second part of this thesis, RSH-DFT is applied to chromophore-functionalized silsesquioxanes, which are currently investigated as candidates for building blocks in optoelectronic applications. RSH-DFT provides insight into the nature of absorptive and emissive states in silsesquioxanes. While absorption primarily involves transitions localized on one chromophore, charge transfer between chromophores and between chromophore and silsesquioxane cage have been identified. The RSH-DFT approach, including a protocol accounting for complex environmental effects on charge transfer energies, was tested and validated against experimental measurements. The third part of this thesis addresses quantum transport through nano-scale junctions. The ability to quantify a molecular junction via spectroscopic methods is crucial to their

  4. AlGaN Channel Transistors for Power Management and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanHove, James M.

    1996-01-01

    Contained within is the Final report of a Phase 1 SBIR program to develop AlGaN channel junction field effect transistors (JFET). The report summarizes our work to design, deposit, and fabricate JFETS using molecular beam epitaxy growth AlGaN. Nitride growth is described using a RF atomic nitrogen plasma source. Processing steps needed to fabricate the device such as ohmic source-drain contacts, reactive ion etching, gate formation, and air bride fabrication are documented. SEM photographs of fabricated power FETS are shown. Recommendations are made to continue the effort in a Phase 2 Program.

  5. Large-Format AlGaN PIN Photodiode Arrays for UV Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, Shahid; Franz, David

    2010-01-01

    A large-format hybridized AlGaN photodiode array with an adjustable bandwidth features stray-light control, ultralow dark-current noise to reduce cooling requirements, and much higher radiation tolerance than previous technologies. This technology reduces the size, mass, power, and cost of future ultraviolet (UV) detection instruments by using lightweight, low-voltage AlGaN detectors in a hybrid detector/multiplexer configuration. The solar-blind feature eliminates the need for additional visible light rejection and reduces the sensitivity of the system to stray light that can contaminate observations.

  6. The effect of multifunctional monomers/oligomers Additives on electron beam radiation crosslinking of poly (styrene-block-isoprene/butadiene-block-styrene) (SIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinping; Soucek, Mark D.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of multifunctional monomers or oligomers (MFM/O) additives on electron beam (E-beam) radiation induced crosslinking of poly (styrene-block-isoprene/butadiene-block-styrene) (SIBS) was studied. Ten types of MFM/O were investigated, including trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA), trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA), triallyl cyanurate (TAC), polybutadiene diacrylate (PB-diacrylate), ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EGDMA), butylene glycol dimethacrylate (BGDMA), 1,2-polybutadiene. The effects of MFM/O concentration and E-beam radiation dose on properties of SIBS were studied including tensile strength, elongation-at-break, modulus, gel content, equilibrium swelling and crosslink density. TMPTA significantly improved the tensile modulus and crosslink density of SIBS. SIBS with TMPTMA and TMTPMA with inhibitor showed a 50% increase in tensile strength. The solubility of MFM/O in SIBS was also investigated by a selective swelling method. The MFM/O were found to be soluble in both phases of SIBS. The viscosity of SIBS with methacrylate type MFM/O was stable at 200 °C.

  7. Electron-blocking mechanisms at the hole transport layer-emissive layer interface in polymer light-emitting diodes: enhanced device performance with a novel electron-blocking interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, He; Marks, Tobin J.

    2004-11-01

    The interface between the hole transport layer (HTL) and emissive layer (EML) in polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) has attracted intense research attentioin since the initial discovery of PLEDs in 1989. In this contribution, we analyze the electron-blocking properties of various HTL at this interface and their effect on PLED device performance. We find that poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) - a conventional PLED HTL - does not possess optimum electron-blocking properties and that PLED device performance can be significantly enhanced by inserting a new type of electron-blocking layer (EBL) between the PEDOT-PSS HTL and EML. The new EBLs developed in this study consist of two major components: a siloxane-derivatized, crosslinkable, TPD-like triarylamine hole-transporting material, such as 4,4"-bis[(p-trichlorosilylpropylphenyl)phenylamino]biphenyl (TPDSi2), and a hole-transporting polymer, such as poly(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene-co-N-(4-butylphenyl) diphenylamine) (TFB). TPDSi2 undergoes crosslinking in air and rendering the TPDSi2 + TFB blend insoluble. With the TPDSi2 + TFB EBL inserted between PEDOT-PSS and BT layers, PLED device current density is reduced, device light output and current efficiency are dramatically increased (maximum current efficiency ~ 17 cd/A). Our result shows: 1) insufficient electron-blocking by PEDOT-PSS is another reason for the poor performance of PEDOT-PSS/BT based devices; 2) PLED device performance can be dramatically enhanced with a triarylamine siloxane-based EBLs.

  8. Alloy inhomogeneity and carrier localization in AlGaN sections and AlGaN/AlN nanodisks in nanowires with 240–350 nm emission

    SciTech Connect

    Himwas, C.; Hertog, M. den; Dang, Le Si; Songmuang, R.; Monroy, E.

    2014-12-15

    We present structural and optical studies of AlGaN sections and AlGaN/AlN nanodisks (NDs) in nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The Al-Ga intermixing at Al(Ga)N/GaN interfaces and the chemical inhomogeneity in AlGaN NDs evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy are attributed to the strain relaxation process. This interpretation is supported by the three-dimensional strain distribution calculated by minimizing the elastic energy in the structure. The alloy inhomogeneity increases with the Al content, leading to enhanced carrier localization signatures in the luminescence characteristics, i.e., red shift of the emission, s-shaped temperature dependence, and linewidth broadening. Despite these effects, the emission energy of AlGaN/AlN NDs can be tuned in the 240–350 nm range with internal quantum efficiencies around 30%.

  9. Performance improvement of AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with double electron blocking layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhang; Sun, Hui-Qing; Xu-Na, Li; Hao, Sun; Xuan-Cong, Fan; Zhu-Ding, Zhang; Zhi-You, Guo

    2016-02-01

    The AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LED) with double electron blocking layers (d-EBLs) on both sides of the active region are investigated theoretically. They possess many excellent performances compared with the conventional structure with only a single electron blocking layer, such as a higher recombination rate, improved light output power and internal quantum efficiency (IQE). The reasons can be concluded as follows. On the one hand, the weakened electrostatic field within the quantum wells (QWs) enhances the electron-hole spatial overlap in QWs, and therefore increases the probability of radioactive recombination. On the other hand, the added n-AlGaN layer can not only prevent holes from overflowing into the n-side region but also act as another electron source, providing more electrons. Project supported by the Special Strategic Emerging Industries of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2012A080304006), the Major Scientific and Technological Projects of Zhongshan City, Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2014A2FC204), and the Forefront of Technology Innovation and Key Technology Projects of Guangdong Province, China (Grant Nos. 2014B010121001 and 2014B010119004).

  10. Inorganic solution-processed hole-injecting and electron-blocking layers in polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, K. J.; Barker, J. A.; Greenham, N. C.; Friend, R. H.; Frey, G. L.

    2002-12-01

    The use of the solution-processed layered transition metal dichalcogenide (LTMDC) MoS2 as a hole-injecting electrode in polymer light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is reported. MoS2 functions as a very high work function metal and, in combination with an electron-blocking layer in the form of MoO3, provides good LED performance. In this study we investigated model LED devices with a single semiconductor layer, namely, the electron transporting polymer poly-[2,7-(9,9'-di-n-octylfluorene)-3,6-benzothiadiazole]. LED operation was successfully modeled using experimentally determined work functions, carrier mobilities, and barrier properties. Good agreement between experiment and model allows us to demonstrate that the MoS2 and the MoO3 layers act as a high work function hole-injection layer (MoS2) and an electron extraction barrier layer (MoO3), respectively. They improve device performance by allowing the buildup of electron density at the oxide/emissive layer interface which generates a local field, enhancing hole injection and recombination. Furthermore, the model shows the importance of controlling the thickness of the blocking layer to optimize device performance. The wide variety of polymeric emitters available and the range of electronic properties displayed by the LTMDC family and their corresponding oxides, provides the potential to tailor device performance through the selection of suitable organic and inorganic components.

  11. Aluminum incorporation efficiencies in A- and C-plane AlGaN grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-Yue, Han; Hui-Jie, Li; Gui-Juan, Zhao; Hong-Yuan, Wei; Shao-Yan, Yang; Lian-Shan, Wang

    2016-04-01

    The aluminum incorporation efficiencies in nonpolar A-plane and polar C-plane AlGaN films grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) are investigated. It is found that the aluminum content in A-plane AlGaN film is obviously higher than that in the C-plane sample when the growth temperature is above 1070 °C. The high aluminum incorporation efficiency is beneficial to fabricating deep ultraviolet optoelectronic devices. Moreover, the influences of the gas inlet ratio, the V/III ratio, and the chamber pressure on the aluminum content are studied. The results are important for growing the AlGaN films, especially nonpolar AlGaN epilayers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61504128, 61504129, 61274041, and 11275228), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB619305), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014AA032603, 2014AA032609, and 2015AA010801), and the Guangdong Provincial Scientific and Technologic Planning Program, China (Grant No. 2014B010119002).

  12. Numerical simulation of top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes with electron and hole blocking layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shu-Hsuan; Yang, Cheng-Hong

    2007-09-01

    The few reported high-contrast organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) all deal with bottom-emitting OLEDs and may not be readily adapted for top-emitting OLEDs (TOLEDs), which have a few technical merits over bottom-emitting devices for high-performance active-matrix OLED displays (AMOLEDs). The thin-film transistors on the back-plane of an AM substrate reduce the aperture ratio of a pixel that decreases the display brightness. A TOLED, which can provide a more flexible pixel design on an opaque AM substrate, represents a promising technique for achieving a high aperture-ratio AMOLED. In this work, the characteristics of TOLEDs with α-NPD and LiF blocking layers are numerically investigated with the APSYS simulation program. The α-NPD layer is used as an electron blocking layer, while the LiF layer is used as a hole blocking layer. The TOLED structure used in this study is based on a real device fabricated in lab by Yang et al. (Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 143507, 2005). The simulation results indicate that when the TOLED device is with either α-NPD or LiF blocking layer, the luminance efficiency and radiative recombination rate at the same drive voltage can be markedly improved. The TOLED with α-NPD blocking layer has the best performance when the position of light emission is located at the anti-node of the standing wave due to micro-cavity effect. The TOLED with LiF blocking layer has improved performance because the LUMO of Alq 3 can be lowered by band bending, which leads to better carrier balance and thus increased radiative recombination rate.

  13. Effect of stress on the Al composition evolution in AlGaN grown using metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chenguang; Qin, Zhixin; Xu, Fujun; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Jiaming; Hou, Mengjun; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Xinqiang; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Two series of AlGaN samples with different stresses were designed to investigate the effect of stress on the Al composition. X-ray diffraction reciprocal space mapping (XRD RSM) demonstrated that the AlGaN epilayers with different stresses have large Al composition differences despite the same growth conditions. The largest Al composition difference reached up to 21.3%, which was also confirmed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). This result is attributed to a large stress discrepancy in the AlGaN epilayers. Finally, the dependences of the solid-phase Al composition on the gas-phase Al composition under different stresses were systematically analyzed.

  14. A Small Molecule That Protects the Integrity of the Electron Transfer Chain Blocks the Mitochondrial Apoptotic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xian; Li, Li; Ying, Zhengxin; Pan, Chenjie; Huang, Shaoqiang; Li, Lin; Dai, Miaomiao; Yan, Bo; Li, Ming; Jiang, Hui; Chen, She; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-07-21

    In response to apoptotic stimuli, mitochondria in mammalian cells release cytochrome c and other apoptogenic proteins, leading to the subsequent activation of caspases and apoptotic cell death. This process is promoted by the pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, such as Bim and Bax, which, respectively, initiate and execute cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. Here we report the discovery of a small molecule that efficiently blocks Bim-induced apoptosis after Bax is activated on the mitochondria. The cellular target of this small molecule was identified to be the succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) protein of complex II of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain (ETC). The molecule protects the integrity of the ETC and allows treated cells to continue to proliferate after apoptosis induction. Moreover, this molecule blocked dopaminergic neuron death and reversed Parkinson-like behavior in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27447985

  15. Persistent photoconductivity in AlGaN/GaN heterojunction channels caused by the ionization of deep levels in the AlGaN barrier layer

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, H.; Akiyama, Y.; Niwa, R.; Sakashita, H.; Sakaki, H.; Kachi, T.; Sugimoto, M.

    2013-12-04

    Time-dependent responses of drain current (I{sub d}) in an AlGaN/GaN HEMT under UV (3.3 eV) and red (2.0 eV) light illumination have been studied at 300 K and 250 K. UV illumination enhances I{sub d} by about 10 %, indicating that the density of two-dimensional electrons is raised by about 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. When UV light is turned off at 300 K, a part of increased I{sub d} decays quickly but the other part of increment is persistent, showing a slow decay. At 250 K, the majority of increment remains persistent. It is found that such a persistent increase of I{sub d} at 250 K can be partially erased by the illumination of red light. These photo-responses are explained by a simple band-bending model in which deep levels in the AlGaN barrier get positively charged by the UV light, resulting in a parabolic band bending in the AlGaN layer, while some potion of those deep levels are neutralized by the red light.

  16. Inhomogeneous distribution of defect-related emission in Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers with different Al content and Si concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Kurai, Satoshi Ushijima, Fumitaka; Yamada, Yoichi; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa

    2014-02-07

    The spatial distribution of luminescence in Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers that differ in Al content and Si concentration has been studied by cathodoluminescence (CL) mapping in combination with scanning electron microscopy. The density of surface hillocks increased with decreasing Al content and with increasing Si concentration. The mechanisms giving rise to those hillocks are likely different. The hillocks induced surface roughening, and the compositional fluctuation and local donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) emission at hillock edges in AlGaN epitaxial layers were enhanced irrespective of the origin of the hillocks. The intensity of local DAP emission was related to Si concentration, as well as to hillock density. CL observation revealed that DAP emission areas were present inside the samples and were likely related to dislocations concentrated at hillock edges. Possible candidates for acceptors in the observed DAP emission that are closely related in terms of both Si concentration and hillock edges with large deformations are a V{sub III}-Si{sub III} complex and Si{sub N}, which are unfavorable in ordinary III-nitrides.

  17. Two coexisting mechanisms of dislocation reduction in an AlGaN layer grown using a thin GaN interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, J.; Wang, T.; Parbrook, P. J.; Wang, Q.; Lee, K. B.; Cullis, A. G.

    2007-09-24

    A significant dislocation reduction is achieved in an AlGaN layer grown on an AlN buffer by introducing a thin GaN interlayer. The mechanisms for the dislocation reduction are explored by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The GaN interlayer grown on the AlN takes the form of platelets. The mechanisms of dislocation reduction in the platelet area and the area between the platelets are different. In the GaN platelets, due to the large misfit strain, the threading dislocations (TDs) in the AlN layer migrate into the interface and annihilate with each other. However, the GaN between the platelets is highly strained so that a higher density of TDs from AlN is incorporated into the upper layer. The coalescing of the platelets induced by the AlGaN growth makes the TDs in the areas between the platelets assemble and annihilate, resulting in additional dislocation reduction.

  18. Conductivity of styrene-butadiene block copolymers upon continuous irradiation with fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khatipov, S.A.; Edrisov, A.T.; Bol`bit, N.M.; Milinchuk, V.K.

    1995-03-01

    The time dependences of the density of radiation-induced current in polystyrene, polybutadiene, and styrene-butadiene block copolymers of various composition were studied upon varying the electric field strength and radiation dose rate. Significant deviations of the values of the radiation-induced conductivity constant A{sub m} and dispersion parameter {alpha} from those expected for additive contributions of each component into the radiation-induced conductivity were revealed. Conclusions on the charge carriers generated during irradiation transfer from polybutadiene to polystyrene microdomains were drawn.

  19. Op-Amps as Building Blocks in an Undergraduate Project-Type Electronics Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, L. E.; Vignos, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a project-type undergraduate laboratory in electronics which utilizes integrated circuit operational amplifiers. Includes a brief account of ideal and nonideal operational amplifiers and a detailed description of the projects. (DF)

  20. Electron Transfer within Self-Assembling Cyclic Tetramers Using Chlorophyll-Based Donor-Acceptor Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Victoria L; Smeigh, Amanda L; Kim, Chul Hoon; Co, Dick T; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2012-05-09

    The synthesis and photoinduced charge transfer properties of a series of Chl-based donor-acceptor triad building blocks that self-assemble into cyclic tetramers are reported. Chlorophyll a was converted into zinc methyl 3-ethylpyrochlorophyllide a (Chl) and then further modified at its 20-position to covalently attach a pyromellitimide (PI) acceptor bearing a pyridine ligand and one or two naphthalene-1,8:4,5-bis(dicarboximide) (NDI) secondary electron acceptors to give Chl-PI-NDI and Chl-PI-NDI2. The pyridine ligand within each ambident triad enables intermolecular Chl metal-ligand coordination in dry toluene, which results in the formation of cyclic tetramers in solution, as determined using small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering at a synchrotron source. Femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of the monomers in toluene-1% pyridine and the cyclic tetramers in toluene shows that the selective photoexcitation of Chl results in intramolecular electron transfer from 1*Chl to PI to form Chl+.-PI-.-NDI and Chl+.-PI-.-NDI2. This initial charge separation is followed by a rapid charge shift from PI-. to NDI and subsequent charge recombination of Chl+.-PI-NDI-. and Chl+.-PI-(NDI)NDI-. on a 5-30 ns time scale. Charge recombination in the Chl-PI-NDI2 cyclic tetramer (τCR = 30 ± 1 ns in toluene) is slower by a factor of 3 relative to the monomeric building blocks (τCR = 10 ± 1 ns in toluene-1% pyridine). This indicates that the self-assembly of these building blocks into the cyclic tetramers alters their structures in a way that lengthens their charge separation lifetimes, which is an advantageous strategy for artificial photosynthetic systems.

  1. Bias Selectable Dual Band AlGaN Ultra-violet Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Feng; Miko, Laddawan; Franz, David; Guan, Bing; Stahle, Carl M.

    2007-01-01

    Bias selectable dual band AlGaN ultra-violet (UV) detectors, which can separate UV-A and UV-B using one detector in the same pixel by bias switching, have been designed, fabricated and characterized. A two-terminal n-p-n photo-transistor-like structure was used. When a forward bias is applied between the top electrode and the bottom electrode, the detectors can successfully detect W-A and reject UV-B. Under reverse bias, they can detect UV-B and reject UV-A. The proof of concept design shows that it is feasible to fabricate high performance dual-band UV detectors based on the current AlGaN material growth and fabrication technologies.

  2. On the redox origin of surface trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Chen, Di; Tuller, Harry L.; Thompson, Carl V.; Palacios, Tomás

    2014-03-28

    Water-related redox couples in ambient air are identified as an important source of the surface trapping states, dynamic on-resistance, and drain current collapse in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Through in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), direct signature of the water-related species—hydroxyl groups (OH) was found at the AlGaN surface at room temperature. It was also found that these species, as well as the current collapse, can be thermally removed above 200 °C in vacuum conditions. An electron trapping mechanism based on the H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2} redox couples is proposed to explain the 0.5 eV energy level commonly attributed to the surface trapping states. Finally, the role of silicon nitride passivation in successfully removing current collapse in these devices is explained by blocking the water molecules away from the AlGaN surface.

  3. Growth of AlGaN alloys exhibiting enhanced luminescence efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, A. V.; Garrett, G. A.; Collins, C. J.; Sarney, W. L.; Readinger, E. D.; Newman, P. G.; Shen, H.; Wraback, M.

    2006-04-01

    Interest in developing ultraviolet emitters using the III-Nitride family of semiconductors has sparked considerable effort in fabricating AlGaN alloys that exhibit enhanced luminescence based on strong carrier localization, similar to their InGaN brethren. In this paper, we report on the growth of such alloys by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE) without the use of indium. This enhancement is attributed to the presence of nanoscale compositional inhomogeneities (NCIs) in these materials. The emission wavelength in these materials has been tuned between 275 nm and 340 nm by varying growth conditions. The effects of dislocations on double heterostructures (DHs) that employ an NCI AlGaN active region has been investigated, with an internal quantum efficiency as high as 32% obtained for the lowest dislocation density samples (3×1010 cm-2). Prototype DH-ultraviolet light emitting diodes (DH-UVLEDs) emitting at 324 nm were fabricated employing an NCI AlGaN alloy as the active region.

  4. Tetramethoxybenzene is a Good Building Block for Molecular Wires: Insights from Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Luisa G; Yushchenko, Oleksandr; Neuburger, Markus; Vauthey, Eric; Wenger, Oliver S

    2015-06-01

    Two donor bridge-acceptor molecules with terminal triarylamine and Ru(bpy)3(2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) redox partners were synthesized and investigated by cyclic voltammetry, optical absorption, luminescence, and transient absorption spectroscopy. The two dyads differ only by the central bridging unit, which was tetramethoxybenzene (tmb) in one case and unsubstituted phenylene (ph) in the other case. Photoirradiation of the Ru(bpy)3(2+) complex of the two dyads triggers intramolecular electron transfer from the triarylamine to the (3)MLCT-excited metal complex, and this process occurs with time constants of 1.5 and 6.8 ns for the tmb- and ph-bridged dyads, respectively. Thermal electron transfer in the reverse direction then leads to disappearance of the photoproduct with a time constant of 10 ns in both dyads. The faster rate of photoinduced charge transfer in the tmb-bridged dyad can be understood in the framework of a hole-tunneling model in which the electron-rich tmb bridge imposes a more shallow barrier than the less electron-rich ph spacer. Until now tmb-based molecular wires have received very little attention, and alkoxy substituents have been mostly used for improving the solubility of oligo-p-phenylene vinylene (OPV) and oligo-p-phenylene ethynylene (OPE) wires. Our study illustrates how four alkoxy-substituents on a phenylene backbone can have a significant influence on the charge-transfer properties of a molecular wire, and this is relevant in the greater context of a future molecular electronics technology. PMID:25974891

  5. Improved p-type conductivity in Al-rich AlGaN using multidimensional Mg-doped superlattices.

    PubMed

    Zheng, T C; Lin, W; Liu, R; Cai, D J; Li, J C; Li, S P; Kang, J Y

    2016-01-01

    A novel multidimensional Mg-doped superlattice (SL) is proposed to enhance vertical hole conductivity in conventional Mg-doped AlGaN SL which generally suffers from large potential barrier for holes. Electronic structure calculations within the first-principle theoretical framework indicate that the densities of states (DOS) of the valence band nearby the Fermi level are more delocalized along the c-axis than that in conventional SL, and the potential barrier significantly decreases. Hole concentration is greatly enhanced in the barrier of multidimensional SL. Detailed comparisons of partial charges and decomposed DOS reveal that the improvement of vertical conductance may be ascribed to the stronger pz hybridization between Mg and N. Based on the theoretical analysis, highly conductive p-type multidimensional Al0.63Ga0.37N/Al0.51Ga0.49N SLs are grown with identified steps via metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The hole concentration reaches up to 3.5 × 10(18) cm(-3), while the corresponding resistivity reduces to 0.7 Ω cm at room temperature, which is tens times improvement in conductivity compared with that of conventional SLs. High hole concentration can be maintained even at 100 K. High p-type conductivity in Al-rich structural material is an important step for the future design of superior AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet devices. PMID:26906334

  6. Improved p-type conductivity in Al-rich AlGaN using multidimensional Mg-doped superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, T. C.; Lin, W.; Liu, R.; Cai, D. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, S. P.; Kang, J. Y.

    2016-02-01

    A novel multidimensional Mg-doped superlattice (SL) is proposed to enhance vertical hole conductivity in conventional Mg-doped AlGaN SL which generally suffers from large potential barrier for holes. Electronic structure calculations within the first-principle theoretical framework indicate that the densities of states (DOS) of the valence band nearby the Fermi level are more delocalized along the c-axis than that in conventional SL, and the potential barrier significantly decreases. Hole concentration is greatly enhanced in the barrier of multidimensional SL. Detailed comparisons of partial charges and decomposed DOS reveal that the improvement of vertical conductance may be ascribed to the stronger pz hybridization between Mg and N. Based on the theoretical analysis, highly conductive p-type multidimensional Al0.63Ga0.37N/Al0.51Ga0.49N SLs are grown with identified steps via metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The hole concentration reaches up to 3.5 × 1018 cm-3, while the corresponding resistivity reduces to 0.7 Ω cm at room temperature, which is tens times improvement in conductivity compared with that of conventional SLs. High hole concentration can be maintained even at 100 K. High p-type conductivity in Al-rich structural material is an important step for the future design of superior AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet devices.

  7. Improved p-type conductivity in Al-rich AlGaN using multidimensional Mg-doped superlattices

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, T. C.; Lin, W.; Liu, R.; Cai, D. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, S. P.; Kang, J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    A novel multidimensional Mg-doped superlattice (SL) is proposed to enhance vertical hole conductivity in conventional Mg-doped AlGaN SL which generally suffers from large potential barrier for holes. Electronic structure calculations within the first-principle theoretical framework indicate that the densities of states (DOS) of the valence band nearby the Fermi level are more delocalized along the c-axis than that in conventional SL, and the potential barrier significantly decreases. Hole concentration is greatly enhanced in the barrier of multidimensional SL. Detailed comparisons of partial charges and decomposed DOS reveal that the improvement of vertical conductance may be ascribed to the stronger pz hybridization between Mg and N. Based on the theoretical analysis, highly conductive p-type multidimensional Al0.63Ga0.37N/Al0.51Ga0.49N SLs are grown with identified steps via metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The hole concentration reaches up to 3.5 × 1018 cm−3, while the corresponding resistivity reduces to 0.7 Ω cm at room temperature, which is tens times improvement in conductivity compared with that of conventional SLs. High hole concentration can be maintained even at 100 K. High p-type conductivity in Al-rich structural material is an important step for the future design of superior AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet devices. PMID:26906334

  8. Three-dimensional reconstruction of black tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) spermatozoa using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tianyi; Paterson, Brian D; Webb, Robyn; Johnston, Stephen D

    2016-05-01

    Serial Block-Face Scanning Electron Microscopy (SBF-SEM) was used in this study to examine the ultrastructural morphology of Penaeus monodon spermatozoa. SBF-SEM provided a large dataset of sequential electron-microscopic-level images that facilitated comprehensive ultrastructural observations and three-dimensional reconstructions of the sperm cell. Reconstruction divulged a nuclear region of the spermatophoral spermatozoon filled with decondensed chromatin but with two apparent levels of packaging density. In addition, the nuclear region contained, not only numerous filamentous chromatin elements with dense microregions, but also large centrally gathered granular masses. Analysis of the sperm cytoplasm revealed the presence of degenerated mitochondria and membrane-less dense granules. A large electron-lucent vesicle and "arch-like" structures were apparent in the subacrosomal area, and an acrosomal core was found in the acrosomal vesicle. The spermatozoal spike arose from the inner membrane of the acrosomal vesicle, which was slightly bulbous in the middle region of the acrosomal vesicle, but then extended distally into a broad dense plate and to a sharp point proximally. This study has demonstrated that SBF-SEM is a powerful technique for the 3D ultrastructural reconstruction of prawn spermatozoa, that will no doubt be informative for further studies of sperm assessment, reproductive pathology and the spermiocladistics of penaeid prawns, and other decapod crustaceans. J. Morphol. 277:565-574, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26877112

  9. Phonon blocking by two dimensional electron gas in polar CdTe/PbTe heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingpo; Cai, Chunfeng; Zhu, He; Wu, Feifei; Ye, Zhenyu; Chen, Yongyue; Li, Ruifeng; Kong, Weiguang; Wu, Huizhen

    2014-04-21

    Narrow-gap lead telluride crystal is an important thermoelectric and mid-infrared material in which phonon functionality is a critical issue to be explored. In this Letter, efficient phonon blockage by forming a polar CdTe/PbTe heterojunction is explicitly observed by Raman scattering. The unique phonon screening effect can be interpreted by recent discovery of high-density two dimensional electrons at the polar CdTe/PbTe(111) interface which paves a way for design and fabrication of thermoelectric devices.

  10. Wafer-scale crack-free AlGaN on GaN through two-step selective-area growth for optically pumped stimulated emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Young-Ho; Bae, Sung-Bum; Kim, Sung-Bock; Kim, Dong Churl; Leem, Young Ahn; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Nam, Eun-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Crack-free AlGaN template has been successfully grown over entire 2-in. wafer by using 2-step selective-area growth (SAG). The GaN truncated structure was obtained by vertical growth mode with low growth temperature. AlGaN of second step was grown under lateral growth mode. Low pressure enhanced the relative ratio of lateral to vertical growth rate as well as absolute overall growth rate. High V/III ratio was favorable for lateral growth mode. Crack-free planar AlGaN was obtained under low pressure of 30 Torr and high V/III ratio of 4400. The AlGaN was crack-free over entire 2-in. wafer and had quite uniform Al-mole fraction. The dislocation density of the AlGaN with 20% Al-composition was as low as ~7.6×108 /cm2, measured by cathodoluminescence. GaN/AlGaN multi-quantum well (MQW) with cladding and waveguide layers were grown on the crack-free AlGaN template with low dislocation density. It was confirmed that the MQW on the AlGaN template emitted the stimulated emission at 355.5 nm through optical pumping experiment. The AlGaN obtained by 2-step SAG would provide high crystal quality for highly-efficient optoelectronic devices as well as the ultraviolet laser diode.

  11. Electron and proton transfer assemblies and new porous materials from nanometer-scale building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stacy Ann

    Elegant examples of molecular engineering are found in nature that make our current small devices seem primitive. By using naturally occurring examples we can better imagine how to construct useful three dimensional nanoscaled devices. Electron and proton transfer composites were prepared using a multilayer film growth technique, in which single anionic sheets derived from inorganic solids are interleaved with cationic polyelectrolytes. This method allows for the growth of concentric monolayers of redox-active polymers on high-surface-area silica supports, and for vectorial electron transfer reactions through the layers of the "onion." Photoinduced charge separation has been observed in composites consisting of an inner polycationic layer of poly(styrene- co-N-vinylbenzyl-N'-methyl-4,4 '-bipyridine), and an outer polycationic layer of poly[Ru(bpy) 2(vbpy)]2+, vbpy = 4-vinyl-4'-methyl- 2,2'-bipyridine, bpy = 2,2' -bipyridine, which are separated by a thin inorganic sheet of Zr(HOPO 3)2·H2O. Following the logic of the proton transport mechanism found in biological membranes, a photosensitive proton pump was constructed using the same electrostatic adsorption technique. This composite was prepared with a polymeric form of a luminescent ruthenium complex, poly[Ru(bpy) 2(bpm)]2+, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine bpm = 2,2'-bipyrimidine. The pH of a solution in which the composites were suspended changed reversibly when irradiated with visible light. A series of microporous polymer replicas were synthesized using inorganic templates. Zeolites were used as templates to prepare microporous polymer replicas with nanometer sized pore networks. Phenol-formaldehyde polymers were synthesized and cured within the channel networks of zeolites Y, beta, and L. Dissolution of the aluminosilicate framework in aqueous IHF yields an organic replica. The zeolite template exerts important topological effects on the structure and physical properties of the replica. A similar process is described

  12. High breakdown voltage in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs using AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN quantum-well electron-blocking layers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically study an enhancement of breakdown voltage in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) by using the AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN quantum-well (QW) electron-blocking layer (EBL) structure. This concept is based on the superior confinement of two-dimensional electron gases (2-DEGs) provided by the QW EBL, resulting in a significant improvement of breakdown voltage and a remarkable suppression of spilling electrons. The electron mobility of 2-DEG is hence enhanced as well. The dependence of thickness and composition of QW EBL on the device breakdown is also evaluated and discussed. PMID:25206318

  13. Air-stable, nanostructured electronic and plasmonic materials from solution-processable, silver nanocrystal building blocks.

    PubMed

    Fafarman, Aaron T; Hong, Sung-Hoon; Oh, Soong Ju; Caglayan, Humeyra; Ye, Xingchen; Diroll, Benjamin T; Engheta, Nader; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2014-03-25

    Herein we describe a room-temperature, chemical process to transform silver nanocrystal solids, deposited from colloidal solutions, into highly conductive, corrosion-resistant, optical and electronic materials with nanometer-scale architectures. After assembling the nanocrystal solids, we treated them with a set of simple, compact, organic and inorganic reagents: ammonium thiocyanate, ammonium chloride, potassium hydrogen sulfide, and ethanedithiol. We find that each reagent induces unique changes in the structure and composition of the resulting solid, giving rise to films that vary from insulating to, in the case of thiocyanate, conducting with a remarkably low resistivity of 8.8×10(-6) Ω·cm, only 6 times that of bulk silver. We show that thiocyanate mediates the spontaneous sintering of nanocrystals into structures with a roughness of less than 1/10th of the wavelength of visible light. We demonstrate that these solution-processed, low-resistivity, optically smooth films can be patterned, using imprint lithography, into conductive electrodes and plasmonic mesostructures with programmable resonances. We observe that thiocyanate-treated solids exhibit significantly retarded atmospheric corrosion, a feature that dramatically increases the feasibility of employing silver for electrical and plasmonic applications. PMID:24484271

  14. The generation of misfit dislocations in facet-controlled growth of AlGaN /GaN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherns, D.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Liu, R.; Ponce, F. A.; Amano, H.; Akasaki, I.

    2004-11-01

    The relaxation of tensile stresses in AlGaN layers grown on GaN /(0001)sapphire by facet-controlled epitaxial lateral overgrowth is reported. It is shown that a-type misfit dislocations are introduced at inclined {112¯2} AlGaN /GaN interfaces, with strong evidence for a half-loop nucleation and glide mechanism driven by shear stresses present on the (0001) slip plane. In addition to relieving misfit stresses, these dislocations introduce grain rotations of up to 10-2rad across the AlGaN /GaN boundaries, leading to tilt boundaries at the meeting front between laterally growing wings and between regions growing in the lateral and [0001] directions. The effects of these processes on the defect density in subsequent layers are examined.

  15. Mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution during hetero-epitaxy in a ternary AlGaN system

    PubMed Central

    He, Chenguang; Qin, Zhixin; Xu, Fujun; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Jiaming; Hou, Mengjun; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Xinqiang; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Two AlGaN samples with different strain were designed to investigate mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution. It is discovered that AlGaN grown on AlN or (AlN/GaN superlattices (SLs))/GaN both consist of two distinct regions with different compositions: transition region and uniform region, which is attributed to the compositional pulling effect. The formation of the transition region is due to the partial stress release caused by the generation of misfit dislocations near the hetero-interface. And the Al composition in the uniform region depends on the magnitude of residual strain. The difference in relaxation degree is 80.5% for the AlGaN epilayers grown on different underlayers, leading to a large Al composition difference of 22%. The evolutionary process of Al composition along [0001] direction was investigated in detail. PMID:27112969

  16. Laser diodes with 353 nm wavelength enabled by reduced-dislocation-density AlGaN templates

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Smith, Michael L.; Cross, Karen C.

    2015-10-30

    We fabricated optically pumped and electrically injected ultraviolet (UV) lasers on reduced-threading-dislocation-density (reduced-TDD) AlGaN templates. The overgrowth of sub-micron-wide mesas in the Al0.32Ga0.68N templates enabled a tenfold reduction in TDD, to (2–3) × 108 cm–2. Optical pumping of AlGaN hetero-structures grown on the reduced-TDD templates yielded a low lasing threshold of 34 kW/cm2 at 346 nm. Room-temperature pulsed operation of laser diodes at 353 nm was demonstrated, with a threshold of 22.5 kA/cm2. Furthermore, reduced-TDD templates have been developed across the entire range of AlGaN compositions, presenting a promising approach for extending laser diodes into the deep UV.

  17. Mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution during hetero-epitaxy in a ternary AlGaN system.

    PubMed

    He, Chenguang; Qin, Zhixin; Xu, Fujun; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Jiaming; Hou, Mengjun; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Xinqiang; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Two AlGaN samples with different strain were designed to investigate mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution. It is discovered that AlGaN grown on AlN or (AlN/GaN superlattices (SLs))/GaN both consist of two distinct regions with different compositions: transition region and uniform region, which is attributed to the compositional pulling effect. The formation of the transition region is due to the partial stress release caused by the generation of misfit dislocations near the hetero-interface. And the Al composition in the uniform region depends on the magnitude of residual strain. The difference in relaxation degree is 80.5% for the AlGaN epilayers grown on different underlayers, leading to a large Al composition difference of 22%. The evolutionary process of Al composition along [0001] direction was investigated in detail. PMID:27112969

  18. Mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution during hetero-epitaxy in a ternary AlGaN system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chenguang; Qin, Zhixin; Xu, Fujun; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Jiaming; Hou, Mengjun; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Xinqiang; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Two AlGaN samples with different strain were designed to investigate mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution. It is discovered that AlGaN grown on AlN or (AlN/GaN superlattices (SLs))/GaN both consist of two distinct regions with different compositions: transition region and uniform region, which is attributed to the compositional pulling effect. The formation of the transition region is due to the partial stress release caused by the generation of misfit dislocations near the hetero-interface. And the Al composition in the uniform region depends on the magnitude of residual strain. The difference in relaxation degree is 80.5% for the AlGaN epilayers grown on different underlayers, leading to a large Al composition difference of 22%. The evolutionary process of Al composition along [0001] direction was investigated in detail.

  19. Laser diodes with 353 nm wavelength enabled by reduced-dislocation-density AlGaN templates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Smith, Michael L.; Cross, Karen C.

    2015-10-30

    We fabricated optically pumped and electrically injected ultraviolet (UV) lasers on reduced-threading-dislocation-density (reduced-TDD) AlGaN templates. The overgrowth of sub-micron-wide mesas in the Al0.32Ga0.68N templates enabled a tenfold reduction in TDD, to (2–3) × 108 cm–2. Optical pumping of AlGaN hetero-structures grown on the reduced-TDD templates yielded a low lasing threshold of 34 kW/cm2 at 346 nm. Room-temperature pulsed operation of laser diodes at 353 nm was demonstrated, with a threshold of 22.5 kA/cm2. Furthermore, reduced-TDD templates have been developed across the entire range of AlGaN compositions, presenting a promising approach for extending laser diodes into the deep UV.

  20. Achieving high performance non-fullerene organic solar cells through tuning the numbers of electron deficient building blocks of molecular acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Chen, Yusheng; Chen, Shangshang; Dong, Tao; Deng, Wei; Lv, Lei; Yang, Saina; Yan, He; Huang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Two analogous dimer and tetramer compounds, SF-PDI2 and SF-PDI4, were designed, theoretically calculated, synthesized, and developed as electron acceptors for organic solar cells. The effects of the number of the electron deficient building blocks on the optical absorption, energy levels, charge transport, morphology, crystallinity, and photovoltaic performance of the molecules were investigated. In combination with two different donors, PTB7-Th and PffBT4T-2OD, the results showed that increasing the numbers of PDI building blocks is beneficial to photovoltaic performance and leads to efficiency over 5%.

  1. High-efficiency blue LEDs with thin AlGaN interlayers in InGaN/GaN MQWs grown on Si (111) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeya; Yoshida, Hisashi; Ito, Toshihide; Okada, Aoi; Uesugi, Kenjiro; Nunoue, Shinya

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate high-efficiency blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with thin AlGaN interlayers in InGaN/GaN multiquantum wells (MQWs) grown on Si (111) substrates. The peak external quantum efficiency (EQE) ηEQE of 82% at room temperature and the hot/cold factor (HCF) of 94% have been obtained by using the functional thin AlGaN interlayers in the MQWs in addition to reducing threading dislocation densities (TDDs) in the blue LEDs. An HCF is defined as ηEQE(85°C)/ηEQE(25°C). The blue LED structures were grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on Si (111) substrates. The MQWs applied as an active layer have 8- pairs of InGaN/AlyGa1-yN/GaN (0<=y<=1) heterostructures. Thinfilm LEDs were fabricated by removing the Si (111) substrates from the grown layers. It is observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and three-dimensional atom probe analysis that the 1 nm-thick AlyGa1-yN interlayers, whose Al content is y=0.3 or less, are continuously formed. EQE and the HCFs of the LEDs with thin Al0.15Ga0.85N interlayers are enhanced compared with those of the samples without the interlayers in the low-current-density region. We consider that the enhancement is due to both the reduction of the nonradiative recombination centers and the increase of the radiative recombination rate mediated by the strain-induced hole carriers indicated by the simulation of the energy band diagram.

  2. Microscopic potential fluctuations in Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers with various AlN molar fractions and Si concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurai, Satoshi; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Yamada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscopic potential fluctuations of Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers with the AlN molar fraction varying from 0.42 to 0.95 and Si-doped Al0.61Ga0.39N epitaxial layers with Si concentrations of 3.0-37 × 1017 cm-3 were investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging combined with scanning electron microscopy. The spot CL linewidths of AlGaN epitaxial layers broadened as the AlN molar fraction was increased to 0.7, and then narrowed at higher AlN molar fractions. The experimental linewidths were compared with the theoretical prediction from the alloy broadening model. The trends displayed by our spot CL linewidths were consistent with calculated results at AlN molar fractions of less than about 0.60, but the spot CL linewidths were markedly broader than the calculated linewidths at higher AlN molar fractions. The dependence of the difference between the spot CL linewidth and calculated line broadening on AlN molar fraction was found to be similar to the dependence of reported S values, indicating that the vacancy clusters acted as the origin of additional line broadening at high AlN molar fractions. The spot CL linewidths of Al0.61Ga0.39N epitaxial layers with the same Al concentration and different Si concentrations were nearly constant in the entire Si concentration range tested. From the comparison of reported S values, the increase of VAl did not contribute to the linewidth broadening, unlike the case of the VAl clusters.

  3. Quantum chemical mechanism in parasitic reaction of AlGaN alloys formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Osamu; Nakamura, Koichi; Tachibana, Akitomo; Tokunaga, Hiroki; Akutsu, Nakao; Matsumoto, Koh

    2000-06-01

    The mechanism of parasitic reactions among trimethylaluminum (TMA), trimethylgallium (TMG), and NH 3 in atmospheric pressure (AP) MOVPE for growth of AlGaN is theoretically studied using the quantum chemical method. The calculations show that metal-nitrogen chain growth reaction easily proceeds through the successive reactions of 'complex formation with NH 3' and 'CH 4 elimination by the bimolecular mechanism'. Additionally, a parasitic reaction in APMOVPE using other raw material is also investigated. The calculated result shows that small change of raw material raises activation energy of parasitic reaction, and, thus, the parasitic reaction is suppressed. This result suggests a way to improve APMOVPE by a suitable choice of substituent.

  4. Enhanced luminous efficiency and brightness using DNA electron blocking layers in bio-organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Joshua A.

    The biopolymer deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been extracted from salmon (saDNA) and used successfully as an electron blocking layer (EBL) in multiple structures of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLED). Water soluble saDNA was complexed with a cationic surfactant hexadecytrimethylammonium chloride (CTMA) which makes the resulting DNA-CTMA molecule water insoluble, and soluble in common organic media such as alcohols. Solutions of DNA-CTMA and butanol make uniform thin films from 20nm to 5 microns in thickness by varying spin coating parameters and molecular weight. The optical properties of DNA-CTMA thin films include high transparency and low optical loss for applications at wavelengths above 400nm. The DNA-CTMA films have an electrical resistivity on the order of 107 O*cm. All of these properties combined made DNA-CTMA a candidate as an EBL in OLEDs, and this resulting device was termed a Bio-organic Light Emitting Diode (BioLED). Enhanced electroluminescent efficiency has been demonstrated in both green and blue emitting BioLEDs. The resulting green and blue BioLEDs showed a maximum luminous efficiency of 8.2 and 0.8 cd/A, respectively. The DNA based BioLEDs were as much as 10x more efficient and 30x brighter than their OLED counterparts. The enhancement in performance is due to the electron blocking action with the 0.9 eV (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) value, allows hole injection to proceed with a 5.6eV (highest occupied molecular orbital) value. DNA-CTMA has also been successfully deposited in thin film form via molecular beam deposition (MBD). The growth was achieved at 160°C at vacuum levels of 10-5 Torr at a deposition rate of 0.8A/s. MBD grown DNA-CTMA thin films were highly uniform, optically transparent, and adhere to silicon, quartz and glass substrates more strongly than spin coated films. The material deposited was verified as DNA-CTMA through optical absorption, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and using a DNA indicating fluorescent dye

  5. Effects of electron beam irradiation on the property behaviour of poly(ether-block-amide) blended with various stabilisers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Kieran A.; Kennedy, James E.; Barron, Valerie; McEvoy, Brian; Vrain, Olivier; Ryan, Damien; Cowman, Richard; Higginbotham, Clement L.

    2015-05-01

    Radiosterilisation can induce modifications and/or degradation to transpire in poly(ether-block-amide) (PEBA) following irradiation. The current investigation utilises combined synergistic mixtures of stabilisers to minimise these effects, by melt blending them with the PEBA material. Hindered amine stabilisers (HAS), primary antioxidants and secondary antioxidants were the stabilisers incorporate to reduce/eliminate the effects of 50 kGy electron beam irradiation dose on the material. Results were discussed by comparing the stabilising efficiency of mixtures on the PEBA material in contrast to the control sample. Dynamic frequency sweeps demonstrated the formation of crosslinks, where the degree of crosslinking was dependent on the combination of stabilisers mixed in the base material (PEBA). The storage modulus displayed that PEBA blended with Irganox 565 had very slight changes in contrast to all other samples following irradiation. However, since this sample is a phenol containing system, severe discolouration was observed in comparison to other samples due to the oxidation of the hindered phenol. Overall, this study provides compelling evidence that a combined synergistic mixture of Irganox 565 (multifunctional phenolic antioxidant) and Tinuvin 783 (hindered amide light stabiliser) with PEBA, resulted in the best radiation stability.

  6. Efficiency improvements in single-heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells by insertion of wide-bandgap electron-blocking layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chiu-Sheng; Lee, Ching-Sung; Hsu, Wei-Chou; Lin, Cheng-Yung; Lai, Ying-Nan; Wang, Ching-Wu

    2012-10-01

    This letter reports efficiency improvements in single-heterojunction organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells exploiting different wide-bandgap electron-blocking layer (EBL) materials of N,N,NO',N' tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)-benzidine (MeO-TPD), Tris(phenypyrazole)iridium (Ir(ppz)3), or 4,4,4"-tris-(3-methylphenylphenylamino)triphenylamine (m-MTDATA), respectively. The OPV structure consists of an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode, 4 nm m-MTDATA, 30 nm copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), 40 nm fullerene (C60), 10 nm 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP), and a 100 nm Al cathode. Optimum device performances by insertion the EBL of m-MTDATA have been achieved, including short-circuit current density (JSC) of 7.26 mA/cm2, open-circuit voltage (VOC) of 0.5 V, fill-factor (FF) of 43%, and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.56% at an illumination intensity of 100 mW/cm2.

  7. Predominant growth of non-polar a-plane (Al,Ga)N on patterned c-plane sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilatenko, A.; Hagedorn, S.; Richter, E.; Zeimer, U.; Goran, D.; Weyers, M.; Tränkle, G.

    2013-03-01

    We report for the first time on predominant growth of non-polar a-plane (Al,Ga)N layers on patterned c-plane AlN/sapphire templates with ridges oriented along the [11¯00]Al2O3 direction. The layers were grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. During the first stages of the growth (Al,Ga)N nucleates simultaneously on top of the ridges, inside the trenches and on the trench sidewalls. As a result, two different (Al,Ga)N orientations are formed with respect to the horizontal growth front: c-plane (Al,Ga)N on the c-plane ridges as well as inside the trenches and a-plane (Al,Ga)N on the trench sidewalls. The growth rate of a-plane (Al,Ga)N exceeds that of c-plane regions, which leads to the complete overgrowth of c-plane (Al,Ga)N by the a-plane oriented material.

  8. Defect studies in ion irradiated AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Jagielski, Jacek; Thome, Lionel; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Chong M.; Turos, Andrzej; Nowicki, L.; Pagowska, K.; Jozwik, I.

    2010-06-01

    Defects created in Al0.4Ga0.6N crystals by 320 keV Ar ion irradiation were studied by using RBS/C and TEM techniques. One of the main aims of the work was to use a new version of McChasy, a Monte – Carlo simulation code of backscattering spectra, for the analysis of experimental results obtained for a dislocations-containing crystal. Transmission Electron Microscopy technique was used to get a better insight into dislocation and dislocation loop geometries in order to restrict the range of parameters used in simulations. RBS/C analysis was performed in a 1.5 MeV – 3 MeV energy range in order to check if MC simulations correctly reproduce backscattering spectra at different energies.

  9. Simulation for spectral response of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shiwei; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we introduced how to build a physical model of refer to the device structure and parameters. Simulations for solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes spectral characteristics were conducted in use of Silvaco TCAD, where device structure and parameters are comprehensively considered. In simulation, the effects of polarization, Urbach tail, mobility, saturated velocities and lifetime in AlGaN device was considered. Especially, we focused on how the concentration-dependent Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination model affects simulation results. By simulating, we analyzed the effects in spectral response caused by TAUN0 and TAUP0, and got the values of TAUN0 and TAUP0 which can bring a result coincides with test results. After that, we changed their values and made the simulation results especially the part under 255 nm performed better. In conclusion, the spectral response between 200 nm and 320 nm of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes were simulated and compared with test results. We also found that TAUN0 and TAUP0 have a large impact on spectral response of AlGaN material.

  10. Radiation damage resistance of AlGaN detectors for applications in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Barkusky, Frank; Peth, Christian; Bayer, Armin; Mann, Klaus; John, Joachim; Malinowski, Pawel E.

    2009-09-15

    We report on the fabrication of aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) Schottky-photodiode-based detectors. AlGaN layers were grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si(111) wafers. The diodes were characterized at a wavelength of 13.5 nm using a table-top extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation source, consisting of a laser-produced xenon plasma and a Schwarzschild objective. The responsivity of the diodes was tested between EUV energies ranging from 320 nJ down to several picojoules. For low fluences, a linear responsivity of 7.14 mAs/J could be determined. Saturation starts at approximately 1 nJ, merging into a linear response of 0.113 mAs/J, which could be attributed to the photoeffect on the Au electrodes on top of the diode. Furthermore, degradation tests were performed up to an absolute dose of 3.3x10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN photodiodes were compared to commercially available silicon-based photodetectors. For AlGaN diodes, responsivity does not change even for the highest EUV dose, whereas the response of the Si diode decreases linearly to {approx}93% after 2x10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}.

  11. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... heart block. Doctors use a test called an EKG (electrocardiogram) to help diagnose heart block. This test ...

  12. Solar-blind AlGaN 256x256 p-i-n detectors and focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reine, M. B.; Hairston, A.; Lamarre, P.; Wong, K. K.; Tobin, S. P.; Sood, A. K.; Cooke, C.; Pophristic, M.; Guo, S.; Peres, B.; Singh, R.; Eddy, C. R., Jr.; Chowdhury, U.; Wong, M. M.; Dupuis, R. D.; Li, T.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports the development of aluminum-gallium nitride (AlGaN or Al xGa 1-xN) photodiode technology for high-operability 256×256 hybrid Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) for solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection in the 260-280 nm spectral region. These hybrid UV FPAs consist of a 256×256 back-illuminated AlGaN p-i-n photodiode array, operating at zero bias voltage, bump-mounted to a matching 256×256 silicon CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) chip. The unit cell size is 30×30 μm2. The photodiode arrays were fabricated from multilayer AlGaN films grown by MOCVD on 2" dia. UV-transparent sapphire substrates. Improvements in AlGaN material growth and device design enabled high quantum efficiency and extremely low leakage current to be achieved in high-operability 256×256 p-i-n photodiode arrays with cuton and cutoff wavelengths of 260 and 280 nm, placing the response in the solar-blind wavelength region (less than about 280 nm) where solar radiation is heavily absorbed by the ozone layer. External quantum efficiencies (at V=0, 270 nm, no antireflection coating) as high as 58% were measured in backilluminated devices. A number of 256×256 FPAs, with the AlGaN arrays fabricated from films grown at three different facilities, achieved response operabilities as high as 99.8%, response nonuniformities (σ/μ) as low as 2.5%, and zero-bias resistance median values as high as 1×10 16 ohm, corresponding to R 0A products of 7×10 10 ohm-cm2. Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI) data were measured on these FPAs. Median NEI values at 1 Hz are 250-500 photons/pixel-s, with best-element values as low as 90 photons/pixel-s at 1 Hz.

  13. Performance improvement of GaN-based near-UV LEDs with InGaN/AlGaN superlattices strain relief layer and AlGaN barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chuanyu; Yu, Tongjun; Feng, Xiaohui; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Guoyi

    2016-09-01

    The carrier confinement effect and piezoelectric field-induced quantum-confined stark effect of different GaN-based near-UV LED samples from 395 nm to 410 nm emission peak wavelength were investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is found that near-UV LEDs with InGaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) active region have higher output power than those with InGaN/GaN MQWs for better carrier confinement effect. However, as emission peak wavelength is longer than 406 nm, the output power of the near-UV LEDs with AlGaN barrier is lower than that of the LEDs with GaN barrier due to more serious spatial separation of electrons and holes induced by the increase of piezoelectric field. The N-doped InGaN/AlGaN superlattices (SLs) were adopted as a strain relief layer (SRL) between n-GaN and MQWs in order to suppress the polarization field. It is demonstrated the output power of near-UV LEDs is increased obviously by using SLs SRL and AlGaN barrier for the discussed emission wavelength range. Besides, the forward voltage of near-UV LEDs with InGaN/AlGaN SLs SRL is lower than that of near-UV LEDs without SRL.

  14. Electrical Properties of Recessed Algan/Gan Schottky Diodes Under off-State Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florovič, Martin; Kováč, Jaroslav; Benko, Peter; Chvála, Aleš; Škriniarová, Jaroslava; Kordó, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Electrical properties of recessed and non-recessed AlGaN/GaN Schottky diodes under off-state stress were investigated. The samples were consecutively stressed by the stepped negative bias (-60 V). Before and after the stress I-V and C-V characteristics were evaluated to verify the device degradation process. Finally, the degradation mechanism and the influence of AlGaN recessed layer thickness on the electrical properties of the Schottky diodes were analysed. It was found that the short time stress influence on I-V characteristics was most negligible for the non-recessed sample. Shallow and deep recessed samples exhibited initial trap filling and reverse current decrease. Generally it was found that the stress voltage near 60 V caused recoverable device degradation

  15. Deep ultraviolet photoluminescence of Tm-doped AlGaN alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nepal, N.; Zavada, J. M.; Lee, D. S.; Steckl, A. J.; Sedhain, A.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2009-03-16

    The ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence (PL) properties of Tm-doped Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (0.39{<=}x{<=}1) alloys grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy were probed using above-bandgap excitation from a laser source at 197 nm. The PL spectra show dominant UV emissions at 298 and 358 nm only for samples with x=1 and 0.81. Temperature dependence of the PL intensities of these emission lines reveals exciton binding energies of 150 and 57 meV, respectively. The quenching of these UV emissions appears related to the thermal activation of the excitons bound to rare-earth structured isovalent (RESI) charge traps, which transfer excitonic energy to Tm{sup 3+} ions resulting in the UV emissions. A model of the RESI trap levels in AlGaN alloys is presented.

  16. Determination of gain in AlGaN cladding free nitride laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Muziol, G.; Turski, H.; Wolny, P.

    2013-08-05

    The optical gain spectra of InGaN-based multiple-quantum-well (MQW) laser diodes (LDs) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are compared for different emission wavelengths. Two AlGaN cladding free LDs with similar epitaxial structures but with different In compositions in MQW were grown to study the dependence of material gain on lasing wavelength. As the emission wavelength increased from 432 to 458 nm, the differential modal gain decreased from 5.7 to 4.7 cm/kA, and the optical losses increased from 40 to 46 cm{sup −1} resulting in an increase in threshold current density. This dependence is attributed to lower optical mode confinement of LD emitting at longer wavelength. We found a strong decrease of confinement factor with increasing wavelength.

  17. Anisotropic optical properties of semipolar AlGaN layers grown on m-plane sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feneberg, Martin; Winkler, Michael; Klamser, Juliane; Stellmach, Joachim; Frentrup, Martin; Ploch, Simon; Mehnke, Frank; Wernicke, Tim; Kneissl, Michael; Goldhahn, Rüdiger

    2015-05-01

    The valence band order of AlxGa 1 -x N is investigated experimentally by analyzing the anisotropic dielectric functions of semipolar (11 2 ¯ 2 ) AlGaN thin films grown on m-plane Al2O3. Point-by-point fitted dielectric functions are obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry and corresponding inter-band transition energies are extracted. The known strain situation of the sample layers is used to correct for the small strain-induced energy shifts within k . p perturbation theory. It also is used to identify transitions related to the three valence bands. Transitions with E ⊥ c from the Γ9 valence band verify an inter-band bowing parameter of b =0.9 eV . The transitions with E || c allow determining the crystal field splitting energy which can be described by a linear interpolation between the values for GaN and AlN satisfactorily.

  18. Growth of high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates using a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianpeng; Yang, Xuelin; Sang, Ling; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jiaming; He, Chenguang; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Maojun; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Qin, Zhixin; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    By employing a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition, high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures have been successfully grown on Si substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The heterostructures exhibit a high electron mobility of 2150 cm(2)/Vs with an electron density of 9.3 × 10(12) cm(-2). The sheet resistance is 313 ± 4 Ω/◻ with ±1.3% variation. The high uniformity is attributed to the reduced wafer bow resulting from the balance of the compressive stress induced and consumed during the growth, and the thermal tensile stress induced during the cooling down process. By a combination of theoretical calculations and in situ wafer curvature measurements, we find that the compressive stress consumed by the dislocation relaxation (~1.2 GPa) is comparable to the value of the thermal tensile stress (~1.4 GPa) and we should pay more attention to it during growth of GaN on Si substrates. Our results demonstrate a promising approach to simplifying the growth processes of GaN-on-Si to reduce the wafer bow and lower the cost while maintaining high material quality. PMID:26960730

  19. Growth of high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates using a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianpeng; Yang, Xuelin; Sang, Ling; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jiaming; He, Chenguang; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Maojun; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Qin, Zhixin; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-03-01

    By employing a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition, high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures have been successfully grown on Si substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The heterostructures exhibit a high electron mobility of 2150 cm2/Vs with an electron density of 9.3 × 1012 cm‑2. The sheet resistance is 313 ± 4 Ω/◻ with ±1.3% variation. The high uniformity is attributed to the reduced wafer bow resulting from the balance of the compressive stress induced and consumed during the growth, and the thermal tensile stress induced during the cooling down process. By a combination of theoretical calculations and in situ wafer curvature measurements, we find that the compressive stress consumed by the dislocation relaxation (~1.2 GPa) is comparable to the value of the thermal tensile stress (~1.4 GPa) and we should pay more attention to it during growth of GaN on Si substrates. Our results demonstrate a promising approach to simplifying the growth processes of GaN-on-Si to reduce the wafer bow and lower the cost while maintaining high material quality.

  20. Growth of high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates using a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianpeng; Yang, Xuelin; Sang, Ling; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jiaming; He, Chenguang; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Maojun; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Qin, Zhixin; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    By employing a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition, high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures have been successfully grown on Si substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The heterostructures exhibit a high electron mobility of 2150 cm2/Vs with an electron density of 9.3 × 1012 cm−2. The sheet resistance is 313 ± 4 Ω/◻ with ±1.3% variation. The high uniformity is attributed to the reduced wafer bow resulting from the balance of the compressive stress induced and consumed during the growth, and the thermal tensile stress induced during the cooling down process. By a combination of theoretical calculations and in situ wafer curvature measurements, we find that the compressive stress consumed by the dislocation relaxation (~1.2 GPa) is comparable to the value of the thermal tensile stress (~1.4 GPa) and we should pay more attention to it during growth of GaN on Si substrates. Our results demonstrate a promising approach to simplifying the growth processes of GaN-on-Si to reduce the wafer bow and lower the cost while maintaining high material quality. PMID:26960730

  1. Impedance analysis of nano thickness layered AlGaN acoustic sensor deposited by thermionic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özen, Soner; Bilgiç, Eyüp; Gülmez, Gülay; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan; Mohammadigharehbagh, Reza

    2016-03-01

    In this study, AlGaN acoustic sensor was deposited on aluminum metal substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method for the first time. Gallium materials are used in many applications for optoelectronic device and semiconductor technology. Thermionic vacuum arc is the deposition technology for the variously materials and applications field. The thickness of the acoustic sensor is in deposited as nano layer. Impedance analyses were realized. Also, TVA production parameters and some properties of the deposited layers were investigated. TVA is a fast deposition technology for the gallium compounds and doped gallium compounds. Obtained results show that AlGaN materials are very promising materials. Moreover, these acoustic sensors have been produced by TVA technology.

  2. Strain-compensated AlGaN /GaN/InGaN cladding layers in homoepitaxial nitride devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernecki, R.; Krukowski, S.; Targowski, G.; Prystawko, P.; Sarzynski, M.; Krysko, M.; Kamler, G.; Grzegory, I.; Leszczynski, M.; Porowski, S.

    2007-12-01

    One of the most important problems in III-nitride violet laser diode technology is the lattice mismatch between the AlGaN cladding layers and the rest of the epitaxial structure. For efficiently working devices, it is necessary to have both a high Al content and thick claddings. This leads, however, to severe sample bowing and even cracking of the upper layer. In this work, we propose a cladding structure of strain-compensated AlGaN /GaN/InGaN superlattice grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on bulk GaN substrates. Various thicknesses and compositions of the layers were employed. We measured the radius of bowing, lattice mismatches, aluminum and indium contents, and densities of threading dislocations. The proposed cladding structures suppress bowing and cracking, which are the two parasitic effects commonly experienced in laser diodes with bulk AlGaN claddings. The suppression of cracking and bowing is shown to occur due to modified strain energy distribution of the superlattices structure.

  3. New implementation of high-level correlated methods using a general block tensor library for high-performance electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Wormit, Michael; Kuś, Tomasz; Landau, Arie; Zuev, Dmitry; Khistyaev, Kirill; Manohar, Prashant; Kaliman, Ilya; Dreuw, Andreas; Krylov, Anna I

    2013-10-01

    This article presents an open-source object-oriented C++ library of classes and routines to perform tensor algebra.The primary purpose of the library is to enable post-Hartree–Fock electronic structure methods; however, the code is general enough to be applicable in other areas of physical and computational sciences. The library supports tensors of arbitrary order (dimensionality), size, and symmetry. Implemented data structures and algorithms operate on large tensors by splitting them into smaller blocks, storing them both in core memory and in files on disk, and applying divide-and-conquer-type parallel algorithms to perform tensor algebra. The library offers a set of general tensor symmetry algorithms and a full implementation of tensor symmetries typically found in electronic structure theory: permutational, spin, and molecular point group symmetry. The Q-Chem electronic structure software uses this library to drive coupled-cluster, equation-of-motion, and algebraic-diagrammatic construction methods. PMID:24159628

  4. X-ray Microscopy as an Approach to Increasing Accuracy and Efficiency of Serial Block-face Imaging for Correlated Light and Electron Microscopy of Biological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Bushong, Eric A.; Johnson, Donald D.; Kim, Keun-Young; Terada, Masako; Hatori, Megumi; Peltier, Steven T.; Panda, Satchidananda; Merkle, Arno; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    The recently developed three-dimensional electron microscopic (EM) method of serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) has rapidly established itself as a powerful imaging approach. Volume EM imaging with this scanning electron microscopy (SEM) method requires intense staining of biological specimens with heavy metals to allow sufficient back-scatter electron signal and also to render specimens sufficiently conductive to control charging artifacts. These more extreme heavy metal staining protocols render specimens light opaque and make it much more difficult to track and identify regions of interest (ROIs) for the SBEM imaging process than for a typical thin section transmission electron microscopy correlative light and electron microscopy study. We present a strategy employing X-ray microscopy (XRM) both for tracking ROIs and for increasing the efficiency of the workflow used for typical projects undertaken with SBEM. XRM was found to reveal an impressive level of detail in tissue heavily stained for SBEM imaging, allowing for the identification of tissue landmarks that can be subsequently used to guide data collection in the SEM. Furthermore, specific labeling of individual cells using diaminobenzidine is detectable in XRM volumes. We demonstrate that tungsten carbide particles or upconverting nanophosphor particles can be used as fiducial markers to further increase the precision and efficiency of SBEM imaging. PMID:25392009

  5. X-ray microscopy as an approach to increasing accuracy and efficiency of serial block-face imaging for correlated light and electron microscopy of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Bushong, Eric A; Johnson, Donald D; Kim, Keun-Young; Terada, Masako; Hatori, Megumi; Peltier, Steven T; Panda, Satchidananda; Merkle, Arno; Ellisman, Mark H

    2015-02-01

    The recently developed three-dimensional electron microscopic (EM) method of serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) has rapidly established itself as a powerful imaging approach. Volume EM imaging with this scanning electron microscopy (SEM) method requires intense staining of biological specimens with heavy metals to allow sufficient back-scatter electron signal and also to render specimens sufficiently conductive to control charging artifacts. These more extreme heavy metal staining protocols render specimens light opaque and make it much more difficult to track and identify regions of interest (ROIs) for the SBEM imaging process than for a typical thin section transmission electron microscopy correlative light and electron microscopy study. We present a strategy employing X-ray microscopy (XRM) both for tracking ROIs and for increasing the efficiency of the workflow used for typical projects undertaken with SBEM. XRM was found to reveal an impressive level of detail in tissue heavily stained for SBEM imaging, allowing for the identification of tissue landmarks that can be subsequently used to guide data collection in the SEM. Furthermore, specific labeling of individual cells using diaminobenzidine is detectable in XRM volumes. We demonstrate that tungsten carbide particles or upconverting nanophosphor particles can be used as fiducial markers to further increase the precision and efficiency of SBEM imaging. PMID:25392009

  6. Solar-blind AlGaN 256×256 p-i-n detectors and focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reine, M. B.; Hairston, A.; Lamarre, P.; Wong, K. K.; Tobin, S. P.; Sood, A. K.; Cooke, C.; Pophristic, M.; Guo, S.; Peres, B.; Singh, R.; Eddy, C. R. _Jr., Jr.; Chowdhury, U.; Wong, M. M.; Dupuis, R. D.; Li, T.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports the development of aluminum-gallium nitride (AlGaN or Al xGa 1-xN) photodiode technology for high-operability 256×256 hybrid Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) for solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection in the 260-280 nm spectral region. These hybrid UV FPAs consist of a 256×256 back-illuminated AlGaN p-i-n photodiode array, operating at zero bias voltage, bump-mounted to a matching 256×256 silicon CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) chip. The unit cell size is 30×30 μm2. The photodiode arrays were fabricated from multilayer AlGaN films grown by MOCVD on 2" dia. UV-transparent sapphire substrates. Improvements in AlGaN material growth and device design enabled high quantum efficiency and extremely low leakage current to be achieved in high-operability 256×256 p-i-n photodiode arrays with cuton and cutoff wavelengths of 260 and 280 nm, placing the response in the solar-blind wavelength region (less than about 280 nm) where solar radiation is heavily absorbed by the ozone layer. External quantum efficiencies (at V=0, 270 nm, no antireflection coating) as high as 58% were measured in back-illuminated devices. A number of 256×256 FPAs, with the AlGaN arrays fabricated from films grown at three different facilities, achieved response operabilities as high as 99.8%, response nonuniformities (σ/μ) as low as 2.5%, and zero-bias resistance median values as high as 1×10 16 ohm, corresponding to R0A products of 7×10 10 ohm-cm2. Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI) data were measured on these FPAs. Median NEI values at 1 Hz are 250-500 photons/pixel-s, with best-element values as low as 90 photons/pixel-s at 1 Hz.

  7. Onset of the Electronic Absorption Spectra of Isolated and π-Stacked Oligomers of 5,6-Dihydroxyindole: An Ab Initio Study of the Building Blocks of Eumelanin.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Deniz; Udvarhelyi, Anikó; Sobolewski, Andrzej L; Domcke, Wolfgang; Domratcheva, Tatiana

    2016-04-14

    Eumelanin is a naturally occurring skin pigment which is responsible for developing a suntan. The complex structure of eumelanin consists of π-stacked oligomers of various indole derivatives, such as the monomeric building block 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI). In this work, we present an ab initio wave-function study of the absorption behavior of DHI oligomers and of doubly and triply π-stacked species of these oligomers. We have simulated the onset of the electronic absorption spectra by employing the MP2 and the linear-response CC2 methods. Our results demonstrate the effect of an increasing degree of oligomerization of DHI and of an increasing degree of π-stacking of DHI oligomers on the onset of the absorption spectra and on the degree of red-shift toward the visible region of the spectrum. We find that π-stacking of DHI and its oligomers substantially red-shifts the onset of the absorption spectra. Our results also suggest that the optical properties of biological eumelanin cannot be simulated by considering the DHI building blocks alone, but instead the building blocks indole-semiquinone and indole-quinone have to be considered as well. This study contributes to advancing the understanding of the complex photophysics of the eumelanin biopolymer. PMID:27005558

  8. Fabrication of Very High Efficiency 5.8 GHz Power Amplifiers using AlGaN HFETs on SiC Substrates for Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gerry

    2001-01-01

    For wireless power transmission using microwave energy, very efficient conversion of the DC power into microwave power is extremely important. Class E amplifiers have the attractive feature that they can, in theory, be 100% efficient at converting, DC power to RF power. Aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) semiconductor material has many advantageous properties, relative to silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and silicon carbide (SiC), such as a much larger bandgap, and the ability to form AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions. The large bandgap of AlGaN also allows for device operation at higher temperatures than could be tolerated by a smaller bandgap transistor. This could reduce the cooling requirements. While it is unlikely that the AlGaN transistors in a 5.8 GHz class E amplifier can operate efficiently at temperatures in excess of 300 or 400 C, AlGaN based amplifiers could operate at temperatures that are higher than a GaAs or Si based amplifier could tolerate. Under this program, AlGaN microwave power HFETs have been fabricated and characterized. Hybrid class E amplifiers were designed and modeled. Unfortunately, within the time frame of this program, good quality HFETs were not available from either the RSC laboratories or commercially, and so the class E amplifiers were not constructed.

  9. Reactions in Nitroimidazole Triggered by Low-Energy (0–2 eV) Electrons: Methylation at N1-H Completely Blocks Reactivity**

    PubMed Central

    Tanzer, Katrin; Feketeová, Linda; Puschnigg, Benjamin; Scheier, Paul; Illenberger, Eugen; Denifl, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) at energies of less than 2 eV effectively decompose 4-nitroimidazole (4NI) by dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The reactions include simple bond cleavages but also complex reactions involving multiple bond cleavages and formation of new molecules. Both simple and complex reactions are associated with pronounced sharp features in the anionic yields, which are interpreted as vibrational Feshbach resonances acting as effective doorways for DEA. The remarkably rich chemistry of 4NI is completely blocked in 1-methyl-4-nitroimidazole (Me4NI), that is, upon methylation of 4NI at the N1 site. These remarkable results have also implications for the development of nitroimidazole based radiosensitizers in tumor radiation therapy. PMID:25224248

  10. Improved performance of N-face AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with superlattice electron blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, F.; Wang, F. X.

    2016-08-01

    The performance of N-face AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV LEDs) with superlattice electron blocking layer (EBL) is investigated by using two-dimensional numerical simulation. The simulated results demonstrate that the adoption of N-face UV LED with superlattice EBL is critical to improve the device's performance. In comparison with the Ga-face UV LEDs with superlattice and conventional EBL, the N-face device structure with superlattice EBL possesses numerous advantages. By detailedly analyzing the profiles of energy band diagrams, distribution of carrier concentration, and radiative recombination rate, the advantages of N-face UV LED with superlattice EBL are attributed to the higher barrier for electron leakage, and simultaneously reduced barrier for hole injection compared with conventional Ga-face UV LEDs.

  11. Deep ultraviolet detection dynamics of AlGaN based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, G.; Conte, G.; Reverchon, J.-L.; Dussaigne, A.; Duboz, J.-Y.

    2006-11-01

    The photoconductive response of AlGaN based UV detectors to 193nm excimer laser radiation is presented. Two devices have been tested: a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) planar structure and a Schottky diode. The transient response of the MSM device closely follows the laser pulses, with a photoconductive decay time constant shorter than 3ns. Conversely, the Schottky diode shows a slower photoconductive rise and decay kinetics due to the material series resistance coupled with the junction capacitance. Moreover, a longer time constant tail is also evident in this case with a characteristic time of about 40ns, due to the presence of trap states localized at 0.2-0.3eV from the band edge. The detection dynamics has been evaluated by changing the beam energy density between 2×10-5 and 0.2mJ/mm2. The signal increases linearly in the case of the MSM device up to 0.001mJ/mm2, whereas, for a further intensity rise, the response shows a sublinear behavior. On the contrary, the Schottky diode showed a linear trend inside the reduced 2×10-3-1.5×10-2mJ/mm2 range.

  12. Composition dependent valence band order in c-oriented wurtzite AlGaN layers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuschl, B. Helbing, J.; Knab, M.; Lauer, H.; Madel, M.; Thonke, K.; Feneberg, M.

    2014-09-21

    The valence band order of polar wurtzite aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) layers is analyzed for a dense series of samples, grown heteroepitaxially on sapphire substrates, covering the complete composition range. The excitonic transition energies, found by temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, were corrected to the unstrained state using input from X-ray diffraction. k∙p theory yields a critical relative aluminum concentration x{sub c}=(0.09±0.05) for the crossing of the uppermost two valence bands for strain free material, shifting to higher values for compressively strained samples, as supported by polarization dependent PL. The analysis of the strain dependent valence band crossing reconciles the findings of other research groups, where sample strain was neglected. We found a bowing for the energy band gap to the valence band with Γ₉ symmetry of b{sub Γ₉}=0.85eV, and propose a possible bowing for the crystal field energy of b{sub cf}=-0.12eV. A comparison of the light extraction efficiency perpendicular and parallel to the c axis of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}N quantum well structures is discussed for different compositions.

  13. Electrical defects in AlGaN and InAlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, D.; Leach, Jacob H.; Kovalskii, Vladimir A.; Fan, Qian; Xie, Jingqiao; Morkoç, Hadis

    2009-02-01

    Compound semiconductors based on GaN have multiple functional applications. Useful compositions include GaN, and ternary and quaternary compositions of (AlGaIn)N. Defects arising from lattice mismatch, point defects, or impurities may act as electrical trapping centers and degrade device efficiency. Current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, thermal admittance spectroscopy (TAS), and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements are applied to characterize the defects in Al0.40Ga0.80N and In0.18Al0.82N in this report. Broad peaks with a shoulder at high temperature dominate the DLTS spectra in each of the materials. An acceptor trap associated with a dislocation appears at 340 K in AlGaN. The defect has an energy of 0.2 eV and capture cross section of 10-21 cm2. A second trap at 0.35 eV, 10-14 cm2 appears in the TAS measurements in addition to the trap at 0.2 eV. Defects in InAlN are dominated by a peak near 150 K. Two traps appear in the TAS measurements. Both traps in the InAlN are acceptors, based on a lack of field dependent emission rates using double pulse DLTS (DDLTS). The two energy levels in InAlN appear to be coupled, with only one state occupied at a time.

  14. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  15. Metal-free protodeboronation of electron-rich arene boronic acids and its application to ortho-functionalization of electron-rich arenes using a boronic acid as a blocking group.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Su-Jin; Lee, Chun-Young; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Cheon, Cheol-Hong

    2014-08-15

    The metal-free thermal protodeboronation of various electron-rich arene boronic acids was studied. Several reaction parameters controlling this protodeboronation, such as solvent, temperature, and a proton source, have been investigated. On the basis of these studies, suitable reaction conditions for protodeboronation of several types of electron-rich arene boronic acids were provided. On the basis of this protodeboronation, a new protocol for the synthesis of ortho-functionalized electron-rich arenes from these boronic acids was developed using the boronic acid moiety as a blocking group in the electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction, followed by the removal of the boronic acid moiety via thermal protodeboronation. Mechanistic studies suggested that this protodeboronation might proceed via the complex formation of a boronic acid with a proton source, followed by the carbon-boron bond fission through σ-bond metathesis, to afford the corresponding arene compound and boric acid. PMID:25052375

  16. Growth of AlGaN on silicon substrates: a novel way to make back-illuminated ultraviolet photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2015-08-01

    AlGaN, with its tunable wide-bandgap is a good choice for the realization of ultraviolet photodetectors. AlGaN films tend to be grown on foreign substrates such as sapphire, which is the most common choice for back-illuminated devices. However, even ultraviolet opaque substrates like silicon holds promise because, silicon can be removed by chemical treatment to allow back-illumination,1 and it is a very low-cost substrate which is available in large diameters up to 300 mm. However, Implementation of silicon as the solar-blind PD substrates requires overcoming the lattice-mismatch (17%) with the AlxGa1-xN that leads to high density of dislocation and crack-initiating stress. In this talk, we report the growth of thick crack-free AlGaN films on (111) silicon substrates through the use of a substrate patterning and mask-less selective area regrowth. This technique is critical as it decouples the epilayers and the substrate and allows for crack-free growth; however, the masking also helps to reduce the dislocation density by inclining the growth direction and encouraging dislocations to annihilate. A back-illuminated p-i-n PD structure is subsequently grown on this high quality template layer. After processing and hybridizing the device we use a chemical process to selectively remove the silicon substrate. This removal has minimal effect on the device, but it removes the UV-opaque silicon and allows back-illumination of the photodetector. We report our latest results of back-illuminated solar-blind photodetectors growth on silicon.

  17. The influence of growth conditions on the surface morphology and development of mechanical stresses in Al(Ga)N layers during metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, W. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Brunkov, P. N.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Troshkov, S. I.; Sakharov, A. V.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Tsatsulnikov, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the influence of technological parameters on the surface morphology and development of mechanical stresses in Al(Ga)N layers during their growth by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on sapphire substrates. Minimization of tensile stresses under conditions of a retained atomically smooth surface can be achieved by using a combination of factors including (i) nitridation of substrate in ammonia flow, (ii) formation of two-layer AlN-Al(Ga)N structures by introducing a small amount (several percent) of Ga after growth of a thin AlN layer, and (iii) reduction of ammonia flow during growth of an Al(Ga)N layer.

  18. Bay-annulated indigo (BAI) as an excellent electron accepting building block for high performance organic semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Yi; He, Bo; Pun, Andrew

    2015-11-24

    A novel electron acceptor based on bay-annulated indigo (BAI) was synthesized and used for the preparation of a series of high performance donor-acceptor small molecules and polymers. The resulting materials possess low-lying LUMO energy level and small HOMO-LUMO gaps, while their films exhibited high crystallinity upon thermal treatment, commensurate with high field effect mobilities and ambipolar transfer characteristics.

  19. Bay-annulated indigo (BAI) as an excellent electron accepting building block for high performance organic semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Yi; He, Bo; Pun, Andrew

    2016-04-19

    A novel electron acceptor based on bay-annulated indigo (BAI) was synthesized and used for the preparation of a series of high performance donor-acceptor small molecules and polymers. The resulting materials possess low-lying LUMO energy level and small HOMO-LUMO gaps, while their films exhibited high crystallinity upon thermal treatment, commensurate with high field effect mobilities and ambipolar transfer characteristics.

  20. Influence of a drain field plate on the forward blocking characteristics of an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sheng-Lei; Chen, Wei-Wei; Yue, Tong; Wang, Yi; Luo, Jun; Mao, Wei; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Hao, Yue

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the influence of a drain field plate (FP) on the forward blocking characteristics of an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) is investigated. The HEMT with only a gate FP is optimized, and breakdown voltage VBR is saturated at 1085 V for gate—drain spacing LGD >= 8 μm. On the basis of the HEMT with a gate FP, a drain FP is added with LGD = 10 μm. For the length of the drain FP LDF <= 2 μm, VBR is almost kept at 1085 V, showing no degradation. When LDF exceeds 2 μm, VBR decreases obviously as LDF increases. Moreover, the larger the LDF, the larger the decrease of VBR. It is concluded that the distance between the gate edge and the drain FP edge should be larger than a certain value to prevent the drain FP from affecting the forward blocking voltage and the value should be equal to the LGD at which VBR begins to saturate in the first structure. The electric field and potential distribution are simulated and analyzed to account for the decrease of VBR.

  1. Cardiac myocyte diversity and a fibroblast network in the junctional region of the zebrafish heart revealed by transmission and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lafontant, Pascal J; Behzad, Ali R; Brown, Evelyn; Landry, Paul; Hu, Norman; Burns, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model of heart development and regeneration. While the structural characteristics of the developing and adult zebrafish ventricle have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the nature of the interface between the compact and spongy myocardium. Here we describe how these two distinct layers are structurally and functionally integrated. We demonstrate by transmission electron microscopy that this interface is complex and composed primarily of a junctional region occupied by collagen, as well as a population of fibroblasts that form a highly complex network. We also describe a continuum of uniquely flattened transitional cardiac myocytes that form a circumferential plate upon which the radially-oriented luminal trabeculae are anchored. In addition, we have uncovered within the transitional ring a subpopulation of markedly electron dense cardiac myocytes. At discrete intervals the transitional cardiac myocytes form contact bridges across the junctional space that are stabilized through localized desmosomes and fascia adherentes junctions with adjacent compact cardiac myocytes. Finally using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, segmentation and volume reconstruction, we confirm the three-dimensional nature of the junctional region as well as the presence of the sheet-like fibroblast network. These ultrastructural studies demonstrate the previously unrecognized complexity with which the compact and spongy layers are structurally integrated, and provide a new basis for understanding development and regeneration in the zebrafish heart. PMID:24058412

  2. Enhanced charge collection with ultrathin AlOx electron blocking layer for hole-transporting material-free perovskite solar cell.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huiyun; Shi, Jiangjian; Xu, Xin; Xiao, Junyan; Luo, Jianheng; Dong, Juan; Lv, Songtao; Zhu, Lifeng; Wu, Huijue; Li, Dongmei; Luo, Yanhong; Meng, Qingbo; Chen, Qiang

    2015-02-21

    An ultrathin AlOx layer has been deposited onto a CH3NH3PbI3 film using atomic layer deposition technology, to construct a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) back contact for the hole-transporting material-free perovskite solar cell. By optimization of the ALD deposition cycles, the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the cell has been enhanced from 8.61% to 10.07% with a highest PCE of 11.10%. It is revealed that the improvement in cell performance with this MIS back contact is mainly attributed to the enhancement in charge collection resulting from the electron blocking effect of the AlOx layer. PMID:25594083

  3. Improved blue electroluminescence in InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum well light-emitting diodes with an electron blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Giwoong; Yoon, Hyunsik; Kim, Min Su; Lee, Jewon; Leem, Jae-Young; Kim, Byunggu; Ji, Iksoo; Lee, Dong-Yul; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Jin Soo; Kim, Jong Su

    2013-04-01

    InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with p-AlGaN electron blocking layers (EBLs) were grown by using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The effects of the EBL thickness on the electrical properties and the luminescent efficiency of the LEDs were investigated by using capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements, current-voltage ( I — V) measurements, electroluminescence (EL), and time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL). The EL efficiency of the LEDs increased with increasing thickness of the p-AlGaN EBL. In addition, the EL efficiency of the LEDs also increased with increasing injection current. The carrier lifetime of the LEDs increased with increasing thickness of the p-AlGaN EBL.

  4. Effects of temperature, packaging and electron beam irradiation processing conditions on the property behaviour of Poly (ether-block-amide) blends.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kieran A; Kennedy, James E; McEvoy, Brian; Vrain, Olivier; Ryan, Damien; Cowman, Richard; Higginbotham, Clement L

    2014-06-01

    The radiation stability of Poly (ether-block-amide) (PEBA) blended with a multifunctional phenolic antioxidant and a hindered amide light stabiliser was examined under various temperatures, packaging and electron beam processing conditions. FTIR revealed that there were slight alterations to the PEBA before irradiation; however, these became more pronounced following irradiation. The effect of varying the temperature, packaging and processing conditions on the resultant PEBA properties was apparent. For example, rheology demonstrated that the structural properties could be enhanced by manipulating the aforementioned criteria. Mechanical testing exhibited less radiation resistance when the PEBA samples were vacuum packed and exposed to irradiation. MFI and AFM confirmed that the melting strength and surface topography could be reduced/increased depending on the conditions employed. From this study it was concluded that virgin PEBA submerged in dry ice with non-vacuum packaging during the irradiation process, provided excellent radiation resistance (20.9% improvement) in contrast to the traditional method. PMID:24863239

  5. Benzotrithiophene versus Benzo/Naphthodithiophene Building Blocks: The Effect of Star-Shaped versus Linear Conjugation on Their Electronic Structures.

    PubMed

    Riaño, Alberto; Arrechea-Marcos, Iratxe; Mancheño, María J; Mayorga Burrezo, Paula; de la Peña, Alejandro; Loser, Stephen; Timalsina, Amod; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Casado, Juan; López Navarrete, J Teodomiro; Ponce Ortiz, Rocío; Segura, José L

    2016-04-25

    The synthesis, characterization, and optical properties of a novel star-shaped oligothiophene with a central rigid trithienobenzene (BTT) core and diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) units are reported and compared with homologous linear systems based on the benzodithiophene (BDT) and the naphthodithiophene (NDT) units end capped with DPPs. This comparison is aimed at elucidating the effect of the star-shaped configuration versus linear conformation on the optical and electrical properties. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopies, together with transient absorption spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, and DFT calculations are used to understand not only the molecular properties of these semiconductors, but also to analyze the supramolecular aggregation in these derivatives. We conclude that although the subject star-shaped derivative is not optimal in terms of π-conjugation, its extended BTT unit significantly favors intermolecular π-stacking interactions, which is interesting for their applications in devices. Field-effect transistors and solar cells were fabricated with these new molecular semiconductors and the performance difference discussed. PMID:26999589

  6. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  7. Effects of gamma ray and electron beam irradiation on the mechanical, thermal, structural and physicochemical properties of poly (ether-block-amide) thermoplastic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kieran A; Kennedy, James E; McEvoy, Brian; Vrain, Olivier; Ryan, Damien; Cowman, Richard; Higginbotham, Clement L

    2013-01-01

    Both gamma ray and electron beam irradiation are widely used as a means of medical device sterilisation. However, it is known that the radiation produced by both processes can lead to undesirable changes within biomedical polymers. The main objective of this research was to conduct a comparative study on the two key radiosterilisation methods (gamma ray and electron beam) in order to identify the more detrimental process in terms of the mechanical, structural, chemical and thermal properties of a common biomedical grade polymer. Poly (ether-block-amide) (PEBA) was prepared by injection moulding ASTM testing specimens and these were exposed to an extensive range of irradiation doses (5-200 kGy) in an air atmosphere. The effect of varying the irradiation dose concentration on the resultant PEBA properties was apparent. For instance, the tensile strength, percentage elongation at break and shore D hardness can be increased/decreased by controlling the aforementioned criteria. In addition, it was observed that the stiffness of the material increased with incremental irradiation doses as anticipated. Melt flow index demonstrated a dramatic increase in the melting strength of the material indicating a sharp increase in molecular weight. Conversely, modulated differential scanning calorimetry established that there were no significant alterations to the thermal transitions. Noteworthy trends were observed for the dynamic frequency sweeps of the material, where the crosslink density increased according to an increase in electron beam irradiation dose. Trans-vinylene unsaturations and the carbonyl group concentration increased with an increment in irradiation dose for both processes when observed by FTIR. The relationship between the irradiation dose rate, mechanical properties and the subsequent surface properties of PEBA material is further elucidated throughout this paper. This study revealed that the gamma irradiation process produced more adverse effects in the PEBA

  8. High internal quantum efficiency in AlGaN multiple quantum wells grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Zachary Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Collazo, Ramón; Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji

    2015-04-06

    The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of Al{sub 0.55}Ga{sub 0.45}N/AlN and Al{sub 0.55}Ga{sub 0.45}N/Al{sub 0.85}Ga{sub 0.15}N UVC MQW structures was analyzed. The use of bulk AlN substrates enabled us to undoubtedly distinguish the effect of growth conditions, such as V/III ratio, on the optical quality of AlGaN based MQWs from the influence of dislocations. At a high V/III ratio, a record high IQE of ∼80% at a carrier density of 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} was achieved at ∼258 nm. The high IQE was correlated with the decrease of the non-radiative coefficient A and a reduction of midgap defect luminescence, all suggesting that, in addition to dislocations, point defects are another major factor that strongly influences optical quality of AlGaN MQW structures.

  9. AlGaN UV LED and Photodiodes Radiation Hardness and Space Qualifications and Their Applications in Space Science and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K. X.

    2011-05-31

    This presentation provides an overview of robust, radiation hard AlGaN optoelectronic devices and their applications in space exploration & high energy density physics. Particularly, deep UV LED and deep UV photodiodes are discussed with regard to their applications, radiation hardness and space qualification. AC charge management of UV LED satellite payload instruments, which were to be launched in late 2012, is covered.

  10. Serial block-face scanning electron microscopy for three-dimensional analysis of morphological changes in mitochondria regulated by Cdc48p/p97 ATPase.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Esaki, Masatoshi; Ogura, Teru; Murata, Kazuyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Cdc48p is a highly conserved cytosolic AAA chaperone that is involved in a wide range of cellular processes. It consists of two ATPase domains (D1 and D2), with regulatory regions at the N- and C-terminals. We have recently shown that Cdc48p regulates mitochondrial morphology, in that a loss of the ATPase activity or positive cooperativity in the D2 domain leads to severe fragmentations and aggregations of mitochondria in the cytoplasm. We have now used serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM), an advanced three-dimensional (3D) electron microscopic technique to examine the structures and morphological changes of mitochondria in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that mutants lacking ATPase activity of Cdc48p showed mitochondrial fragmentations and aggregations, without fusion of the outer membrane. This suggests that the ATPase activity of Cdc48p is necessary for fusion of the outer membranes of mitochondria. Our results also show that SBF-SEM has considerable advantages in morphological and quantitative studies on organelles and intracellular structures in entire cells. PMID:24893221

  11. Improved performance of near UV light-emitting diodes with a composition-graded p-AlGaN irregular sawtooth electron-blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ping; Song, Wei-Dong; Hu, Wen-Xiao; Zhang, Yuan-Wen; Zhang, Chong-Zhen; Wang, Ru-Peng; Zhao, Liang-Liang; Xia, Chao; Yuan, Song-Yang; Yin, Yi-an; Li, Shu-Ti; Su, Shi-Chen

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the performances of the near-ultraviolet (about 350 nm–360 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) each with specifically designed irregular sawtooth electron blocking layer (EBL) by using the APSYS simulation program. The internal quantum efficiencies (IQEs), light output powers, carrier concentrations in the quantum wells, energy-band diagrams, and electrostatic fields are analyzed carefully. The results indicate that the LEDs with composition-graded p-Al x Ga1‑x N irregular sawtooth EBLs have better performances than their counterparts with stationary component p-AlGaN EBLs. The improvements can be attributed to the improved polarization field in EBL and active region as well as the alleviation of band bending in the EBL/p-AlGaN interface, which results in less electron leakage and better hole injection efficiency, thus reducing efficiency droop and enhancing the radiative recombination rate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474105 and 51172079), the Science and Technology Program of Guangdong Province, China (Grant Nos. 2015B090903078 and 2015B010105011), the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University, China (Grant No. IRT13064), the Science and Technology Project of Guangzhou City, China (Grant No. 201607010246), and the Science and Technology Planning Project of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2015A010105025).

  12. Controlling electron overflow in phosphor-free InGaN/GaN nanowire white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu Pham Trung; Cui, Kai; Zhang, Shaofei; Djavid, Mehrdad; Korinek, Andreas; Botton, Gianluigi A; Mi, Zetian

    2012-03-14

    We have investigated for the first time the impact of electron overflow on the performance of nanowire light-emitting diodes (LEDs) operating in the entire visible spectral range, wherein intrinsic white light emission is achieved from self-organized InGaN quantum dots embedded in defect-free GaN nanowires on a single chip. Through detailed temperature-dependent electroluminescence and simulation studies, it is revealed that electron leakage out of the device active region is primarily responsible for efficiency degradation in such nanowire devices, which in conjunction with the presence of nonradiative surface recombination largely determines the unique emission characteristics of nanowire light-emitting diodes. We have further demonstrated that electron overflow in nanowire LEDs can be effectively prevented with the incorporation of a p-doped AlGaN electron blocking layer, leading to the achievement of phosphor-free white light-emitting diodes that can exhibit for the first time virtually zero efficiency droop for injection currents up to ~2200 A/cm(2). This study also provides unambiguous evidence that Auger recombination is not the primary mechanism responsible for efficiency droop in GaN-based nanowire light-emitting diodes. PMID:22283508

  13. The influence of quaternary electron blocking layer on the performance characteristics of intracavity-contacted oxide-confined InGaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goharrizi, A. Zandi; Alahyarizadeh, Gh.; Hassan, Z.; Hassan, H. Abu

    2015-11-01

    The effect of electron blocking layer (EBL) on the performance characteristics of InGaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) was numerically investigated using an integrated system engineering technical computer aided design (ISE TCAD) simulation program. Simulation results indicated that the performance characteristics of InGaN quantum well VCSEL were improved by the ternary Al0.17Ga0.83N EBL. Better performance was also obtained when Al0.17Ga0.83N EBL was replaced by a polarization-matched Al0.275In0.115Ga0.61N EBL having the same energy bandgap. The quaternary EBL enhances the output power and differential quantum efficiency (DQE) as well as reduces the threshold current compared with the ternary EBL. Enhancement in the value of the optical intensity was also observed in the VCSEL structure with quaternary EBL. Furthermore, the effect of Al composition of AlInGaN EBL on the performance of InGaN-based VCSEL structure that uses the quaternary AlInGaN EBL was studied. In mole fraction was 0.115, Al mole fraction changed from 0.260 to 0.290 by step 0.005, and optimum performance was achieved in 0.275 Al mole fraction of AlInGaN EBL.

  14. High-efficiency hole extraction/electron-blocking layer to replace poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) in bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hains, Alexander W.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2008-01-01

    An anode interfacial layer is reported for bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells to replace the commonly used poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). A poly[9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-N-[4-(3-methylpropyl)]-diphenylamine] (TFB)+4,4'-bis[(p-trichlorosilylpropylphenyl)phenylamino]biphenyl (TPDSi2) blend is crosslinked, forming robust ˜10nm thick films covalently bound to indium tin oxide, which transport holes while blocking misdirected electrons. The thermal stability and photovoltaic performance metrics of TFB :TPDSi2-modified BHJ cells are significantly greater than those of cells fabricated in parallel with PEDOT:PSS or with no interfacial layer. For a poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxyl]-1,4-phenylene vinylene: methanofullerene[6 6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester cell, Voc=0.89V, Jsc=4.62mA/cm2, FF =54.4%, and ηp=2.23%.

  15. Highly efficient quantum-dot light-emitting diodes with DNA-CTMA as a combined hole-transporting and electron-blocking layer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingjiang; Subramanyam, Guru; Dai, Liming; Check, Michael; Campbell, Angela; Naik, Rajesh; Grote, James; Wang, Yongqiang

    2009-03-24

    Owing to their narrow bright emission band, broad size-tunable emission wavelength, superior photostability, and excellent flexible-substrate compatibility, light-emitting diodes based on quantum dots (QD-LEDs) are currently under intensive research and development for multiple consumer applications including flat-panel displays and flat lighting. However, their commercialization is still precluded by the slow development to date of efficient QD-LEDs as even the highest reported efficiency of 2.0% cannot favorably compete with their organic counterparts. Here, we report QD-LEDs with a record high efficiency (approximately 4%), high brightness (approximately 6580 cd/m(2)), low turn-on voltage (approximately 2.6 V), and significantly improved color purity by simply using deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) complexed with cetyltrimetylammonium (CTMA) (DNA-CTMA) as a combined hole transporting and electron-blocking layer (HTL/EBL). This, together with controlled thermal decomposition of ligand molecules from the QD shell, represents a novel combined, but simple and very effective, approach toward the development of highly efficient QD-LEDs with a high color purity. PMID:19309174

  16. High-performance InGaN-based green light-emitting diodes with quaternary InAlGaN/GaN superlattice electron blocking layer.

    PubMed

    Tzou, An-Jye; Lin, Da-Wei; Yu, Chien-Rong; Li, Zhen-Yu; Liao, Yu-Kuang; Lin, Bing-Cheng; Huang, Jhih-Kai; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kao, Tsung Sheng; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-05-30

    In this study, high-performance InGaN-based green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with a quaternary InAlGaN/GaN superlattice electron blocking layer (QSL-EBL) have been demonstrated. The band structural simulation was employed to investigate the electrostatic field and carriers distribution, show that the efficiency and droop behavior can be intensively improved by using a QSL-EBL in LEDs. The QSL-EBL structure can reduce the polarization-related electrostatic fields in the multiple quantum wells (MQWs), leading to a smoother band diagram and a more uniform carriers distribution among the quantum wells under forward bias. In comparison with green LEDs with conventional bulk-EBL structure, the light output power of LEDs with QSL-EBL was greatly enhanced by 53%. The efficiency droop shows only 30% at 100 A/cm2 comparing to its peak value, suggesting that the QSL-EBL LED is promising for future white lighting with high performance. PMID:27410067

  17. AlGaN/GaN current aperture vertical electron transistors with regrown channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Yaacov, Ilan; Seck, Yee-Kwang; Mishra, Umesh K.; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2004-02-01

    AlGaN/GaN current aperture vertical electron transistors with regrown aperture and source regions have been fabricated and tested. A 2 μm thick GaN:Si drain region followed by a 0.4 μm GaN:Mg current-blocking layer were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on a c-plane sapphire substrate. Channel apertures were etched, and a maskless regrowth was performed to grow unintentionally doped GaN inside the aperture as well as above the insulating layer, and to add an AlGaN cap layer. Cl2 reactive ion etching was used to pattern the device mesa, and source, drain, and gate metals were then deposited. Devices were achieved with a maximum source-drain current of 750 mA/mm, an extrinsic transconductance of 120 mS/mm, and a 2-terminal gate breakdown of 65 V while exhibiting almost no DC-RF dispersion for 80 μs pulsed I-V curves. The suppression of DC-RF dispersion was shown to result from the absence of the large electric fields at the surface on the drain-side edge of the gate that are present in high electron mobility transistors. Parasitic leakage currents, which were present in all devices, have been studied in detail. Three leakage paths have been identified, and methods to eliminate them are discussed.

  18. All AlGaN epitaxial structure solar-blind avalanche photodiodes with high efficiency and high gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hualong; Wu, Weicong; Zhang, Hongxian; Chen, Yingda; Wu, Zhisheng; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Hao

    2016-05-01

    Solar-blind avalanche photodiodes were fabricated with an all AlGaN-based epitaxial structure on sapphire by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. The devices demonstrate a maximum responsivity of 114.1 mA/W at 278 nm and zero bias, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 52.7%. The EQE improves to 64.8% under a bias of ‑10 V. Avalanche gain higher than 2 × 104 was obtained at a bias of ‑140 V. The high performance is attributed to the all AlGaN-based p–i–n structure comprised of undoped and Si-doped n-type Al0.4Ga0.6N on a high quality AlN layer and highly conductive p-type AlGaN grown with In-surfactant-assisted Mg-delta doping.

  19. Stimulated emission and optical gain in AlGaN heterostructures grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei Bryan, Zachary; Kirste, Ronny; Bryan, Isaac; Hussey, Lindsay; Bobea, Milena; Haidet, Brian; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji; Gerhold, Michael

    2014-03-14

    Optical gain spectra for ∼250 nm stimulated emission were compared in three different AlGaN-based structures grown on single crystalline AlN substrates: a single AlGaN film, a double heterostructure (DH), and a Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) structure; respective threshold pumping power densities of 700, 250, and 150 kW/cm{sup 2} were observed. Above threshold, the emission was transverse-electric polarized and as narrow as 1.8 nm without a cavity. The DH and MQW structures showed gain values of 50–60 cm{sup −1} when pumped at 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. The results demonstrated the excellent optical quality of the AlGaN-based heterostructures grown on AlN substrates and their potential for realizing electrically pumped sub-280 nm laser diodes.

  20. Dependence of radiative and nonradiative recombination on carrier density and Al content in thick AlGaN epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlipskas, Ž.; Aleksiejūnas, R.; Kadys, A.; Mickevičius, J.; Jurkevičius, J.; Tamulaitis, G.; Shur, M.; Shatalov, M.; Yang, J.; Gaska, R.

    2016-04-01

    Dynamics of radiative and nonradiative recombination of non-equilibrium carriers is investigated in thick AlGaN epitaxial layers with Al content ranging from 0.11 to 0.71. The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) in the epilayers was obtained using two approaches: either estimated from PL measurements or calculated using the recombination coefficients of a simple ABC model, retrieved by fitting the kinetics of light induced transient gratings (LITG). At photoexcited carrier densities below ~1019 cm-3, both approaches provided similar IQE values indicating that the simple ABC model is applicable to analyze carrier recombination at such carrier densities. The increase in IQE at higher carrier densities slowed down for the values extracted from PL considerably faster than for those obtained from LITG transients. This discrepancy is explained in terms of the mixed nature of the rate coefficient B caused by the onset of the density-activated nonradiative recombination at high carrier densities.

  1. In situ atomic layer deposition half cycle study of Al2O3 growth on AlGaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Barry; Qin, Xiaoye; Dong, Hong; Kim, Jiyoung; Wallace, Robert M.

    2012-11-01

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 on the native oxide and hydrofluoric acid treated Al0.25Ga0.75 N surface was studied using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), after each individual "half cycle" of the ALD process. Initially, Al2O3, Ga2O3, and N-O states were detected on both surfaces at differing concentrations. During the course of the deposition process, the N-O bonds are seen to decrease to within XPS detection limits, as well as a small decrease in the Ga2O3 concentration. The Al2O3 growth rate initially is seen to be very low, indication of low reactivity between the trimethyl-aluminum molecule and the AlGaN surface.

  2. Improved efficiency of near-ultraviolet LEDs using a novel p-type AlGaN hole injection layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingsheng; Zhou, Quanbin; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Xichun

    2016-06-01

    We investigate a novel near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode (NUV-LED) with a p-type AlGaN (pAlGaN) hole injection layer to replace the conventional p-type GaN layer. The optical properties are studied numerically with simulations. Our calculated results indicate that a pAlGaN layer can significantly improve both light output power and internal quantum efficiency of a NUV-LED. The light power of NUV-LED with constant and gradually increasing Al content of the pAlGaN layer increases by 215% and 266% compared to a conventional LED. We also find that the elimination of the interface barrier and suppression of the polarization field are the key factors that lead to the improved NUV-LED performance.

  3. Three-dimensional analysis of morphological changes in the malaria parasite infected red blood cell by serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Miako; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Fujioka, Hisashi; Kaneko, Osamu; Murata, Kazuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, exhibits morphological changes during the blood stage cycle in vertebrate hosts. Here, we used serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) to visualize the entire structures of P. falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs) and to examine their morphological and volumetric changes at different stages. During developmental stages, the parasite forms Maurer's clefts and vesicles in the iRBC cytoplasm and knobs on the iRBC surface, and extensively remodels the iRBC structure for proliferation of the parasite. In our observations, the Maurer's clefts and vesicles in the P. falciparum-iRBCs, resembling the so-called tubovesicular network (TVN), were not connected to each other, and continuous membrane networks were not observed between the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) and the iRBC cytoplasmic membrane. In the volumetric analysis, the iRBC volume initially increased and then decreased to the end of the blood stage cycle. This suggests that it is necessary to absorb a substantial amount of nutrients from outside the iRBC during the initial stage, but to release waste materials from inside the iRBC at the multinucleate stage. Transportation of the materials may be through the iRBC membrane, rather than a special structure formed by the parasite, because there is no direct connection between the iRBC membrane and the parasite. These results provide new insights as to how the malaria parasite grows in the iRBC and remodels iRBC structure during developmental stages; these observation can serve as a baseline for further experiments on the effects of therapeutic agents on malaria. PMID:26772147

  4. Improved mobility of AlGaN channel heterojunction material using an AlGaN/GaN composite buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hui-Juan; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Lu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Zhi-Zhe; Ha, Wei; Ge, Sha-Sha; Cao, Rong-Tao; Hao, Yue

    2014-03-01

    The quality of an AlGaN channel heterojunction on a sapphire substrate is massively improved by using an AlGaN/GaN composite buffer layer. We demonstrate an Al0.4Ga0.5N/Al0.18Ga0.82N heterojunction with a state-of-the-art mobility of 815 cm2/(V·s) and a sheet resistance of 890 Ω/□ under room temperature. The crystalline quality and the electrical properties of the AlGaN heterojunction material are analyzed by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and van der Pauw Hall and capacitance—voltage (C—V) measurements. The results indicate that the improved electrical properties should derive from the reduced surface roughness and low dislocation density.

  5. Effect of V/III ratio on the growth of (11 2 bar 2) AlGaN by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Duc V.; Alam, S. N.; Parbrook, P. J.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of V/III ratio on the growth and properties of AlGaN layers grown on (112bar2) AlN templates grown on (101bar0) sapphire by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy was studied. The surface morphology of the (112bar2) AlGaN layers and the (112bar2) AlN templates showed an undulation along [ 1 1 bar 00 ] AlGaN , AlN. The Al-content and thickness of the layers increased with decreasing V/III ratio due to a reduction in the parasitic reactions of the precursors. The Al-content of the (112bar2) layers was found to be in the range of 29.5-47.9%, which is lower than the composition of the simultaneously grown (0001) reference layers (30.4-58.0%). This was attributed to a higher density of cation (nitrogen) dangling bonds on the (112bar2) surface. Low temperature photoluminescence measurements of the (112bar2) layers showed an emission wavelength that shifts gradually from 273 nm to 306 nm with increasing V/III ratio. A decreased PL intensity of the layers with decreasing V/III ratio was attributed to an increase in cation vacancies. The Stokes-shift of the (112bar2) layers was estimated to be about 60-194 meV, and this shift increases with increasing Al-content (decreasing V/III ratio) correlated to an increased exciton localization.

  6. Structural and optical investigations of AlGaN MQWs grown on a relaxed AlGaN buffer on AlN templates for emission at 280 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Le Gac, G.; Bouchoule, S.; El Gmili, Y.; Patriarche, G.; Sundaram, S.; Disseix, P.; Réveret, F.; Leymarie, J.; Streque, J.; Genty, F.; Salvestrini, J.-P.; Dupuis, R. D.; Li, X.-H.; Voss, P. L.; Ougazzaden, A.

    2015-12-01

    10-period Al0.57Ga0.43N/Al0.38Ga0.62N multi-quantum wells (MQWs) were grown on a relaxed Al0.58Ga0.42N buffer on AlN templates on sapphire. The threading dislocations and V-pits were characterized and their origin is discussed. The influence of V-pits on the structural quality of the MQWs and on optical emission at 280 nm was analyzed. It was observed that near-surface V-pits were always associated with grain boundaries consisting of edge threading dislocations originating from the AlN/Al2O3 interface. Although the high density of V-pits disrupted MQWs growth, it did not affect the internal quantum efficiency which was measured to be ~1% at room temperature even when V-pit density was increased from 7×107 cm-2 to 2×109 cm-2. The results help to understand the origin, propagation and influences of the typical defects in AlGaN MQWs grown on AlN/Al2O3 templates which may lead to further improvement of the performance of DUV devices.

  7. An elegant route to overcome fundamentally-limited light extraction in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes: Preferential outcoupling of strong in-plane emission

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Dong Yeong; Park, Jun Hyuk; Schubert, E. Fred; Kim, Jungsub; Lee, Jinsub; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Youngsoo; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    While there is an urgent need for semiconductor-based efficient deep ultraviolet (DUV) sources, the efficiency of AlGaN DUV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) remains very low because the extraction of DUV photons is significantly limited by intrinsic material properties of AlGaN. Here, we present an elegant approach based on a DUV LED having multiple mesa stripes whose inclined sidewalls are covered by a MgF2/Al omni-directional mirror to take advantage of the strongly anisotropic transverse-magnetic polarized emission pattern of AlGaN quantum wells. The sidewall-emission-enhanced DUV LED breaks through the fundamental limitations caused by the intrinsic properties of AlGaN, thus shows a remarkable improvement in light extraction as well as operating voltage. Furthermore, an analytic model is developed to understand and precisely estimate the extraction of DUV photons from AlGaN DUV LEDs, and hence to provide promising routes for maximizing the power conversion efficiency. PMID:26935402

  8. An elegant route to overcome fundamentally-limited light extraction in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes: Preferential outcoupling of strong in-plane emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Dong Yeong; Park, Jun Hyuk; Schubert, E. Fred; Kim, Jungsub; Lee, Jinsub; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Youngsoo; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2016-03-01

    While there is an urgent need for semiconductor-based efficient deep ultraviolet (DUV) sources, the efficiency of AlGaN DUV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) remains very low because the extraction of DUV photons is significantly limited by intrinsic material properties of AlGaN. Here, we present an elegant approach based on a DUV LED having multiple mesa stripes whose inclined sidewalls are covered by a MgF2/Al omni-directional mirror to take advantage of the strongly anisotropic transverse-magnetic polarized emission pattern of AlGaN quantum wells. The sidewall-emission-enhanced DUV LED breaks through the fundamental limitations caused by the intrinsic properties of AlGaN, thus shows a remarkable improvement in light extraction as well as operating voltage. Furthermore, an analytic model is developed to understand and precisely estimate the extraction of DUV photons from AlGaN DUV LEDs, and hence to provide promising routes for maximizing the power conversion efficiency.

  9. An elegant route to overcome fundamentally-limited light extraction in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes: Preferential outcoupling of strong in-plane emission.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Dong Yeong; Park, Jun Hyuk; Schubert, E Fred; Kim, Jungsub; Lee, Jinsub; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Youngsoo; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    While there is an urgent need for semiconductor-based efficient deep ultraviolet (DUV) sources, the efficiency of AlGaN DUV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) remains very low because the extraction of DUV photons is significantly limited by intrinsic material properties of AlGaN. Here, we present an elegant approach based on a DUV LED having multiple mesa stripes whose inclined sidewalls are covered by a MgF2/Al omni-directional mirror to take advantage of the strongly anisotropic transverse-magnetic polarized emission pattern of AlGaN quantum wells. The sidewall-emission-enhanced DUV LED breaks through the fundamental limitations caused by the intrinsic properties of AlGaN, thus shows a remarkable improvement in light extraction as well as operating voltage. Furthermore, an analytic model is developed to understand and precisely estimate the extraction of DUV photons from AlGaN DUV LEDs, and hence to provide promising routes for maximizing the power conversion efficiency. PMID:26935402

  10. Strongly transverse-electric-polarized emission from deep ultraviolet AlGaN quantum well light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, Christoph Guttmann, Martin; Wernicke, Tim; Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian; Feneberg, Martin; Goldhahn, Rüdiger; Rass, Jens; Kneissl, Michael; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Knauer, Arne; Kueller, Viola; Weyers, Markus

    2015-10-05

    The optical polarization of emission from ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on (0001)-oriented Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N multiple quantum wells (MQWs) has been studied by simulations and electroluminescence measurements. With increasing aluminum mole fraction in the quantum well x, the in-plane intensity of transverse-electric (TE) polarized light decreases relative to that of the transverse-magnetic polarized light, attributed to a reordering of the valence bands in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N. Using k ⋅ p theoretical model calculations, the AlGaN MQW active region design has been optimized, yielding increased TE polarization and thus higher extraction efficiency for bottom-emitting LEDs in the deep UV spectral range. Using (i) narrow quantum wells, (ii) barriers with high aluminum mole fractions, and (iii) compressive growth on patterned aluminum nitride sapphire templates, strongly TE-polarized emission was observed at wavelengths as short as 239 nm.

  11. High growth rate of AlGaN for buffer structures for GaN on Si to increase throughput

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koh; Ubukata, Akinori; Ikenaga, Kazutada; Naito, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Jun; Yano, Yoshiki; Tabuchi, Toshiya; Yamaguchi, Akira; Ban, Yuzaburo; Uchiyama, Kosuke

    2012-03-01

    Throughput requirement of the epitaxial process of GaN on Si is described. The impact of the growth rate of AlGaN for the buffer layer of GaN on Si is highlighted. In the attempt of growing GaN on Si, we have tested a production scale high flow speed MOVPE reactor (TAIYO NIPPON SANSO UR25k) for 6 inch X 7 wafers. Al0.58Ga0.42N was grown with the growth rate of 1.85μm/hr at 30 kPa. AlN was grown with the growth rate of 1.4μm/hr at 13kPa. AlN/GaN SLS (5nm/20nm) was also grown at the growth rate of 1.4μm/hr. An excellent uniformity of aluminum concentration of less than 0.5% was also obtained for Al0.58Ga0.42N. The challenge which we are facing to further increase of the throughput is summarized.

  12. Ultralow-threshold electrically injected AlGaN nanowire ultraviolet lasers on Si operating at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, K H; Liu, X; Wang, Q; Zhao, S; Mi, Z

    2015-02-01

    Ultraviolet laser radiation has been adopted in a wide range of applications as diverse as water purification, flexible displays, data storage, sterilization, diagnosis and bioagent detection. Success in developing semiconductor-based, compact ultraviolet laser sources, however, has been extremely limited. Here, we report that defect-free disordered AlGaN core-shell nanowire arrays, formed directly on a Si substrate, can be used to achieve highly stable, electrically pumped lasers across the entire ultraviolet AII (UV-AII) band (∼320-340 nm) at low temperatures. The laser threshold is in the range of tens of amps per centimetre squared, which is nearly three orders of magnitude lower than those of previously reported quantum-well lasers. This work also reports the first demonstration of electrically injected AlGaN-based ultraviolet lasers monolithically grown on a Si substrate, and offers a new avenue for achieving semiconductor lasers in the ultraviolet B (UV-B) (280-320 nm) and ultraviolet C (UV-C) (<280 nm) bands. PMID:25599190

  13. Ultralow-threshold electrically injected AlGaN nanowire ultraviolet lasers on Si operating at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. H.; Liu, X.; Wang, Q.; Zhao, S.; Mi, Z.

    2015-02-01

    Ultraviolet laser radiation has been adopted in a wide range of applications as diverse as water purification, flexible displays, data storage, sterilization, diagnosis and bioagent detection. Success in developing semiconductor-based, compact ultraviolet laser sources, however, has been extremely limited. Here, we report that defect-free disordered AlGaN core-shell nanowire arrays, formed directly on a Si substrate, can be used to achieve highly stable, electrically pumped lasers across the entire ultraviolet AII (UV-AII) band (˜320-340 nm) at low temperatures. The laser threshold is in the range of tens of amps per centimetre squared, which is nearly three orders of magnitude lower than those of previously reported quantum-well lasers. This work also reports the first demonstration of electrically injected AlGaN-based ultraviolet lasers monolithically grown on a Si substrate, and offers a new avenue for achieving semiconductor lasers in the ultraviolet B (UV-B) (280-320 nm) and ultraviolet C (UV-C) (<280 nm) bands.

  14. Improved characteristics of ultraviolet AlGaN multiple-quantum-well laser diodes with step-graded quantum barriers close to waveguide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xuefen; Li, Shuping; Kang, Junyong

    2016-09-01

    Ultraviolet AlGaN multiple-quantum-well laser diodes (LDs) with step-graded quantum barriers (QBs) instead of conventional first and last QBs close to waveguide layers are proposed. The characteristics of this type of laser diodes are numerically investigated by using the software PICS3D and it is found that the performances of these LDs are greatly improved. The results indicates that the structure with step-graded QBs exhibits higher output light power, slope efficiency and emission intensity, as well as lower series resistance and threshold current density under the identical condition, compared with conventional LD structure.

  15. Spintronics: Conceptual Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    The purpose of this introduction to spintronics is to provide some elementary description of its conceptual building blocks. Thus, it is intended for a newcomer to the field. After recalling rudimentary descriptions of spin precession and spin relaxation, spin-dependent transport is treated within the Boltzmann formalism. This suffices to introduce key notions such as the spin asymmetry of the conductivities in the two-current model, the spin diffusion length, and spin accumulation. Two basic mechanisms of spin relaxation are then presented, one arising from spin-orbit scattering and the other from electron-magnon collisions. Finally, the action of a spin-polarized current on magnetization is presented in a thermodynamics framework. This introduces the notion of spin torque and the characteristic length scale over which the transverse spin polarization of conduction electron decays as it is injected into a magnet.

  16. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... the P and the R waves on the EKG (electrocardiogram). First-degree heart block may not cause ...

  17. Demonstration of transverse-magnetic deep-ultraviolet stimulated emission from AlGaN multiple-quantum-well lasers grown on a sapphire substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Hang E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu; Kao, Tsung-Ting; Satter, Md. Mahbub; Shen, Shyh-Chiang; Yoder, P. Douglas; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D. E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu; Wei, Yong O.; Wang, Shuo; Xie, Hongen; Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate transverse-magnetic (TM) dominant deep-ultraviolet (DUV) stimulated emission from photo-pumped AlGaN multiple-quantum-well lasers grown pseudomorphically on an AlN/sapphire template by means of photoluminescence at room temperature. The TM-dominant stimulated emission was observed at wavelengths of 239, 242, and 243 nm with low thresholds of 280, 250, and 290 kW/cm{sup 2}, respectively. In particular, the lasing wavelength of 239 nm is shorter compared to other reports for AlGaN lasers grown on foreign substrates including sapphire and SiC. The peak wavelength difference between the transverse-electric (TE)-polarized emission and TM-polarized emission was approximately zero for the lasers in this study, indicating the crossover of crystal-field split-off hole and heavy-hole valence bands. The rapid variation of polarization between TE- and TM-dominance versus the change in lasing wavelength from 243 to 249 nm can be attributed to a dramatic change in the TE-to-TM gain coefficient ratio for the sapphire-based DUV lasers in the vicinity of TE-TM switch.

  18. High-performance AlGaN metal-semiconductor-metal solar-blind ultraviolet photodetectors by localized surface plasmon enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jin; Ye, Wei; Li, Yang; Qi, Zhiqiang; Dai, Jiangnan; Wu, Zhihao; Chen, Changqing; Yin, Jun; Li, Jing; Jiang, Hao; Fang, Yanyan

    2015-01-01

    AlGaN-based solar-blind ultraviolet photodetectors have attractive potential applications in the fields of missile plume detection, biochemical sensing, solar astronomy, etc. In this work, significant deep ultraviolet detection enhancement is demonstrated on AlGaN-based metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) solar-blind ultraviolet photodetectors by introducing the coupling of localized surface plasmon from Al nanoparticles with the high-Al-content AlGaN epilayer. The size-controlled Al nanoparticle arrays fabricated by nanosphere lithography can not only reduce the detectors' dark current but also bring about greatly enhanced responsivity. The peak responsivity of AlGaN-based MSM solar-blind ultraviolet photodetectors with Al nanoparticles can reach 2.34 A/W at 269 nm under 20 V bias, enhanced more than 25 times than that without Al nanoparticles. Our approach shows an efficient fabrication technique of high-performance and low-cost plasmonic enhanced AlGaN solar-blind MSM ultraviolet photodetectors.

  19. Measurement and simulation of top- and bottom-illuminated solar-blind AlGaN metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors with high external quantum efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel, Moritz Helbling, Markus; Knigge, Andrea; Brunner, Frank; Weyers, Markus

    2015-12-28

    A comprehensive study on top- and bottom-illuminated Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N/AlN metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors having different AlGaN absorber layer thickness is presented. The measured external quantum efficiency (EQE) shows pronounced threshold and saturation behavior as a function of applied bias voltage up to 50 V reaching about 50% for 0.1 μm and 67% for 0.5 μm thick absorber layers under bottom illumination. All experimental findings are in very good accordance with two-dimensional drift-diffusion modeling results. By taking into account macroscopic polarization effects in the hexagonal metal-polar +c-plane AlGaN/AlN heterostructures, new insights into the general device functionality of AlGaN-based MSM photodetectors are obtained. The observed threshold/saturation behavior is caused by a bias-dependent extraction of photoexcited holes from the Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N/AlN interface. While present under bottom illumination for any AlGaN layer thickness, under top illumination this mechanism influences the EQE-bias characteristics only for thin layers.

  20. Strain dependence on polarization properties of AlGaN and AlGaN-based ultraviolet lasers grown on AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Zachary Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Collazo, Ramón; Mita, Seiji; Tweedie, James

    2015-06-08

    Since the band ordering in AlGaN has a profound effect on the performance of UVC light emitting diodes (LEDs) and even determines the feasibility of surface emitting lasers, the polarization properties of emitted light from c-oriented AlGaN and AlGaN-based laser structures were studied over the whole composition range, as well as various strain states, quantum confinements, and carrier densities. A quantitative relationship between the theoretical valence band separation, determined using k•p theory, and the experimentally measured degree of polarization is presented. Next to composition, strain was found to have the largest influence on the degree of polarization while all other factors were practically insignificant. The lowest crossover point from the transverse electric to transverse magnetic polarized emission of 245 nm was found for structures pseudomorphically grown on AlN substrates. This finding has significant implications toward the efficiency and feasibility of surface emitting devices below this wavelength.

  1. How Young Children Learn to Program with Sensor, Action, and Logic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyeth, Peta

    2008-01-01

    Electronic Blocks are a new programming environment designed specifically for children aged between 3 and 8 years. These physical, stackable blocks include sensor blocks, action blocks, and logic blocks. By connecting these blocks, children can program a wide variety of structures that interact with one another and the environment. Electronic…

  2. Deep ultraviolet distributed Bragg reflectors based on graded composition AlGaN alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brummer, Gordie; Nothern, Denis; Nikiforov, A. Yu.; Moustakas, T. D.

    2015-06-01

    Distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with peak reflectivity at approximately 280 nm, based on compositionally graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N alloys, were grown on 6H-SiC substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. DBRs with square, sinusoidal, triangular, and sawtooth composition profiles were designed with the transfer matrix method. The crystal structure of these DBRs was studied with high-resolution x-ray diffraction of the (1{sup ¯}015) reciprocal lattice point. The periodicity of the DBR profiles was confirmed with cross-sectional Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy. The peak reflectance of these DBRs with 15.5 periods varies from 77% to 56% with corresponding full width at half maximum of 17–14 nm. Coupled mode analysis was used to explain the dependence of the reflectivity characteristics on the profile of the graded composition.

  3. Direct detection of a transport-blocking trap in a nanoscaled silicon single-electron transistor by radio-frequency reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Villis, B. J.; Sanquer, M.; Jehl, X.; Orlov, A. O.; Barraud, S.; Vinet, M.; Fay, P.; Snider, G.

    2014-06-09

    The continuous downscaling of transistors results in nanoscale devices which require fewer and fewer charged carriers for their operation. The ultimate charge controlled device, the single-electron transistor (SET), controls the transfer of individual electrons. It is also the most sensitive electrometer, and as a result the electron transport through it can be dramatically affected by nearby charges. Standard direct-current characterization techniques, however, are often unable to unambiguously detect and resolve the origin of the observed changes in SET behavior arising from changes in the charge state of a capacitively coupled trap. Using a radio-frequency (RF) reflectometry technique, we are able to unequivocally detect this process, in very close agreement with modeling of the trap's occupation probability.

  4. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  5. Geodetic positioning of the Aerospace Electronics Research Lab (ERL) Osborne Time Transfer Receiver (TTR) using the GPS NAVSTAR Block I satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Anthony S.

    1990-05-01

    Aerospace has routinely processed the Osborne Time Transfer Receiver (TTR) data for the purpose of monitoring the performance of ground and GPS atomic clocks in near real-time with on-line residual displays and characterizing clock stability with Allan Variance calculations. Recently, Aerospace added the ability to estimate the TTR's location by differentially correcting the TTR's location in the WGS84 reference system. This new feature is exercised on a set of TTR clock phase data and Sub-meter accurate station location estimates of the TTR at the Aerospace Electronic Research Lab (ERL) are obtained.

  6. Geodetic positioning of the Aerospace Electronics Research Lab (ERL) Osborne Time Transfer Receiver (TTR) using the GPS NAVSTAR Block I satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Anthony S.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace has routinely processed the Osborne Time Transfer Receiver (TTR) data for the purpose of monitoring the performance of ground and GPS atomic clocks in near real-time with on-line residual displays and characterizing clock stability with Allan Variance calculations. Recently, Aerospace added the ability to estimate the TTR's location by differentially correcting the TTR's location in the WGS84 reference system. This new feature is exercised on a set of TTR clock phase data and Sub-meter accurate station location estimates of the TTR at the Aerospace Electronic Research Lab (ERL) are obtained.

  7. Low-temperature sputtered nickel oxide compact thin film as effective electron blocking layer for mesoscopic NiO/CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Chin; Shen, Po-Shen; Li, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Shi; Lin, Ming-Wei; Chen, Peter; Guo, Tzung-Fang

    2014-08-13

    We introduce the use of low temperature sputtered NiOx thin film, which substitutes the PEDOT-PSS and solution-processed NiOx as an effective electron blocking layer for mesoscopic NiO/CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells. The influences of film thickness and oxygen doping on the photovoltaic performances are scrutinized. The cell efficiency has been improved from 9.51 to 10.7% for devices using NiOx fabricated under pure argon atmosphere. With adequate doping under 10% oxygen flow ratio, we achieved power conversion efficiency of 11.6%. The procedure is large area scalable and has the advantage for cost-effective perovskite-based photovoltaics. PMID:25054484

  8. A non-fullerene electron acceptor based on fluorene and diketopyrrolopyrrole building blocks for solution-processable organic solar cells with an impressive open-circuit voltage.

    PubMed

    Patil, Hemlata; Zu, Wang Xi; Gupta, Akhil; Chellappan, Vijila; Bilic, Ante; Sonar, Prashant; Rananaware, Anushri; Bhosale, Sidhanath V; Bhosale, Sheshanath V

    2014-11-21

    A novel solution-processable non-fullerene electron acceptor 6,6'-(5,5'-(9,9-dioctyl-9H-fluorene-2,7-diyl)bis(thiophene-5,2-diyl))bis(2,5-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-3-(thiophen-2-yl)pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4(2H,5H)-dione) (DPP1) based on fluorene and diketopyrrolopyrrole conjugated moieties was designed, synthesized and fully characterized. DPP1 exhibited excellent solubility and high thermal stability which are essential for easy processing. Upon using DPP1 as an acceptor with the classical electron donor poly(3-hexylthiophene), solution processable bulk-heterojunction solar cells afforded a power conversion efficiency of 1.2% with a high open-circuit voltage (1.1 V). As per our knowledge, this value of open circuit voltage is one of the highest values reported so far for a bulk-heterojunction device using DPP1 as a non-fullerene acceptor. PMID:25274538

  9. Improvement of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures by in situ deposition of a Si3N4 surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derluyn, J.; Boeykens, S.; Cheng, K.; Vandersmissen, R.; Das, J.; Ruythooren, W.; Degroote, S.; Leys, M. R.; Germain, M.; Borghs, G.

    2005-09-01

    We have made AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with a Si3N4 passivation layer that was deposited in situ in our metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition reactor in the same growth sequence as the rest of the layer stack. The Si3N4 is shown to be of high quality and stoichiometric in composition. It reduces the relaxation, cracking, and surface roughness of the AlGaN layer. It also neutralizes the charges at the top AlGaN interface, which leads to a higher two-dimensional electron-gas density. Moreover, it protects the surface during processing and improves the Ohmic source and drain contacts. This leads to devices with greatly improved characteristics.

  10. Influence of optical polarization on the improvement of light extraction efficiency from reflective scattering structures in AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wierer, J. J. Allerman, A. A.; Montaño, I.; Moseley, M. W.

    2014-08-11

    The improvement in light extraction efficiency from reflective scattering structures in AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UVLEDs) emitting at ∼270 nm is shown to be influenced by optical polarization. Three UVLEDs with different reflective scattering structures are investigated and compared to standard UVLEDs without scattering structures. The optical polarization and therefore the direction of light propagation within the various UVLEDs are altered by changes in the quantum well (QW) thickness. The improvement in light extraction efficiency of the UVLEDs with reflective scattering structures increases, compared to the UVLEDs without scattering structures, as the fraction of emitted light propagating parallel to the QW plane increases. Additionally, the light extraction efficiency increases as the average distance to the reflective scattering structures decreases.

  11. Migration enhanced lateral epitaxial overgrowth of AlN and AlGaN for high reliability deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, R.; Sun, W.; Yang, J.; Shatalov, M.; Hu, X.; Sattu, A.; Lunev, A.; Deng, J.; Shturm, I.; Bilenko, Y.; Gaska, R.; Shur, M. S.

    2008-08-01

    We report on the growth of low-defect thick films of AlN and AlGaN on trenched AlGaN/sapphire templates using migration enhanced lateral epitaxial overgrowth. Incoherent coalescence-related defects were alleviated by controlling the tilt angle of growth fronts and by allowing Al adatoms sufficient residence time to incorporate at the most energetically favorable lattice sites. Deep ultraviolet light emitting diode structures (310nm) deposited over fully coalesced thick AlN films exhibited cw output power of 1.6mW at 50mA current with extrapolated lifetime in excess of 5000hours. The results demonstrate substantial improvement in the device lifetime, primarily due to the reduced density of growth defects.

  12. Iron-blocking the high-affinity Mn-binding site in photosystem II facilitates identification of the type of hydrogen bond participating in proton-coupled electron transport via YZ.

    PubMed

    Semin, Boris K; Lovyagina, Elena R; Timofeev, Kirill N; Ivanov, Ilya I; Rubin, Andrei B; Seibert, Michael

    2005-07-19

    Incubation of Mn-depleted PSII membranes [PSII(-Mn)] with Fe(II) is accompanied by the blocking of Y(Z)(*) at the high-affinity Mn-binding site to exogenous electron donors [Semin et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 5854-5864] and a shift of the pK(app) of the hydrogen bond partner for Y(Z) (base B) from 7.1 to 6.1 [Semin, B. K., and Seibert, M. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 6772-6782]. Here we calculate activation energies (E(a)) for Y(Z)(*) reduction in PSII(-Mn) and Fe-blocked PSII(-Mn) samples [PSII(-Mn, +Fe)] from temperature dependencies of the rate constants of the fast and slow components of the flash-probe fluorescence decay kinetics. At pH < pK(app) (e.g., 5.5), the decays are fit with one (fast) component in both types of samples, and E(a) is equal to 42.2 +/- 2.9 kJ/mol in PSII(-Mn) and 46.4 +/- 3.3 kJ/mol in PSII(-Mn, +Fe) membranes. At pH > pK(app), the decay kinetics exhibit an additional slow component in PSII(-Mn, +Fe) membranes (E(a) = 36.1 +/- 7.5 kJ/mol), which is much lower than the E(a) of the corresponding component observed for Y(Z)(*) reduction in PSII(-Mn) samples (48.1 +/- 1.7 kJ/mol). We suggest that the above difference results from the formation of a strong low barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) between Y(Z) and base B in PSII(-Mn, +Fe) samples. To confirm this, Fe-blocking was performed in D(2)O to insert D(+), which has an energetic barrier distinct from H(+), into the LBHB. Measurement of the pH effects on the rates of Y(Z)(*) reduction in PSII(-Mn, +Fe) samples blocked in D(2)O shows a shift of the pK(app) from 6.1 to 7.6, and an increase in the E(a) of the slow component. This approach was also used to measure the stability of the Y(Z)(*) EPR signal at various temperatures in both kinds of membranes. In PSII(-Mn) membranes, the freeze-trapped Y(Z)(*) radical is stable below 190 K, but half of the Y(Z)(*) EPR signal disappears after a 1-min incubation when the sample is warmed to 253 K. In PSII(-Mn, +Fe) samples, the trapped Y(Z)(*) radical is

  13. Low temperature p-type doping of (Al)GaN layers using ammonia molecular beam epitaxy for InGaN laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Malinverni, M. Lamy, J.-M.; Martin, D.; Grandjean, N.; Feltin, E.; Dorsaz, J.; Castiglia, A.; Rossetti, M.; Duelk, M.; Vélez, C.

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate state-of-the-art p-type (Al)GaN layers deposited at low temperature (740 °C) by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-MBE) to be used as top cladding of laser diodes (LDs) with the aim of further reducing the thermal budget on the InGaN quantum well active region. Typical p-type GaN resistivities and contact resistances are 0.4 Ω cm and 5 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm{sup 2}, respectively. As a test bed, we fabricated a hybrid laser structure emitting at 400 nm combining n-type AlGaN cladding and InGaN active region grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, with the p-doped waveguide and cladding layers grown by NH{sub 3}-MBE. Single-mode ridge-waveguide LD exhibits a threshold voltage as low as 4.3 V for an 800 × 2 μm{sup 2} ridge dimension and a threshold current density of ∼5 kA cm{sup −2} in continuous wave operation. The series resistance of the device is 6 Ω and the resistivity is 1.5 Ω cm, confirming thereby the excellent electrical properties of p-type Al{sub 0.06}Ga{sub 0.94}N:Mg despite the low growth temperature.

  14. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, ... surgical procedures block activity in all types of neurons. This can cause numbness, paralysis, and other nervous ...

  15. The Block Scheduling Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, J. Allen

    Block scheduling encourages increased comprehensive immersion into subject matter, improved teacher-student relationships, and decreased disciplinary problems. While block scheduling may offer many advantages, moving to a block schedule from conventional scheduling can be a major adjustment for both students and teachers. This guide is intended to…

  16. Block Scheduling. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2003-01-01

    What are the effects of block scheduling? Results of transitioning from traditional to block scheduling are mixed. Some studies indicate no change in achievement results, nor change in teachers' opinions about instructional strategies. Other studies show that block scheduling doesn't work well for Advanced Placement or Music courses, that "hard to…

  17. Block copolymer investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yufa, Nataliya A.

    The research presented in this thesis deals with various aspects of block copolymers on the nanoscale: their behavior at a range of temperatures, their use as scaffolds, or for creation of chemically striped surfaces, as well as the behavior of metals on block copolymers under the influence of UV light, and the healing behavior of copolymers. Invented around the time of World War II, copolymers have been used for decades due to their macroscopic properties, such as their ability to be molded without vulcanization, and the fact that, unlike rubber, they can be recycled. In recent years, block copolymers (BCPs) have been used for lithography, as scaffolds for nano-objects, to create a magnetic hard drive, as well as in photonic and other applications. In this work we used primarily atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), described in Chapter II, to conduct our studies. In Chapter III we demonstrate a new and general method for positioning nanoparticles within nanoscale grooves. This technique is suitable for nanodots, nanocrystals, as well as DNA. We use AFM and TEM to demonstrate selective decoration. In Chapters IV and V we use AFM and TEM to study the structure of polymer surfaces coated with metals and self-assembled monolayers. We describe how the surfaces were created, exhibit their structure on the nanoscale, and prove that their macroscopic wetting properties have been altered compared to the original polymer structures. Finally, Chapters VI and VII report out in-situ AFM studies of BCP at high temperatures, made possible only recently with the invention of air-tight high-temperature AFM imaging cells. We locate the transition between disordered films and cylinders during initial ordering. Fluctuations of existing domains leading to domain coarsening are also described, and are shown to be consistent with reptation and curvature minimization. Chapter VII deals with the healing of PS-b-PMMA following AFM-tip lithography or

  18. Blocking Delaunay triangulations

    PubMed Central

    Aichholzer, Oswin; Fabila-Monroy, Ruy; Hackl, Thomas; van Kreveld, Marc; Pilz, Alexander; Ramos, Pedro; Vogtenhuber, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Given a set B of n black points in general position, we say that a set of white points W blocks B if in the Delaunay triangulation of B∪W there is no edge connecting two black points. We give the following bounds for the size of the smallest set W blocking B: (i) 3n/2 white points are always sufficient to block a set of n black points, (ii) if B is in convex position, 5n/4 white points are always sufficient to block it, and (iii) at least n−1 white points are always necessary to block a set of n black points. PMID:23483043

  19. Blocking Delaunay triangulations.

    PubMed

    Aichholzer, Oswin; Fabila-Monroy, Ruy; Hackl, Thomas; van Kreveld, Marc; Pilz, Alexander; Ramos, Pedro; Vogtenhuber, Birgit

    2013-02-01

    Given a set B of n black points in general position, we say that a set of white points W blocks B if in the Delaunay triangulation of [Formula: see text] there is no edge connecting two black points. We give the following bounds for the size of the smallest set W blocking B: (i) [Formula: see text] white points are always sufficient to block a set of n black points, (ii) if B is in convex position, [Formula: see text] white points are always sufficient to block it, and (iii) at least [Formula: see text] white points are always necessary to block a set of n black points. PMID:23483043

  20. Block LU factorization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmel, James W.; Higham, Nicholas J.; Schreiber, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Many of the currently popular 'block algorithms' are scalar algorithms in which the operations have been grouped and reordered into matrix operations. One genuine block algorithm in practical use is block LU factorization, and this has recently been shown by Demmel and Higham to be unstable in general. It is shown here that block LU factorization is stable if A is block diagonally dominant by columns. Moreover, for a general matrix the level of instability in block LU factorization can be founded in terms of the condition number kappa(A) and the growth factor for Gaussian elimination without pivoting. A consequence is that block LU factorization is stable for a matrix A that is symmetric positive definite or point diagonally dominant by rows or columns as long as A is well-conditioned.

  1. Organic photosensitive optoelectronic device having a phenanthroline exciton blocking layer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Mark E.; Li, Jian; Forrest, Stephen; Rand, Barry

    2011-02-22

    An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having an anode, a cathode, and an organic blocking layer between the anode and the cathode is described, wherein the blocking layer comprises a phenanthroline derivative, and at least partially blocks at least one of excitons, electrons, and holes.

  2. Demonstration of InAlN/AlGaN high electron mobility transistors with an enhanced breakdown voltage by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, JunShuai; Zhang, JinCheng; Hao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    In this work, InAlN/AlGaN heterostructures employing wider bandgap AlGaN instead of conventional GaN channel were grown on sapphire substrate by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition, where the nominal Al composition in InAlN barrier and AlGaN channel were chosen to be 83% and 5%, respectively, to achieve close lattice-matched condition. An electron mobility of 511 cm2/V s along with a sheet carrier density of 1.88 × 1013 cm-2 were revealed in the prepared heterostructures, both of which were lower compared with lattice-matched InAlN/GaN due to increased intrinsic alloy disorder scattering resulting from AlGaN channel and compressively piezoelectric polarization in barrier, respectively. While the high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) processed on these structures not only exhibited a sufficiently high drain output current density of 854 mA/mm but also demonstrated a significantly enhanced breakdown voltage of 87 V, which is twice higher than that of reported InAlN/GaN HEMT with the same device dimension, potential characteristics for high-voltage operation of GaN-based electronic devices.

  3. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    PubMed

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes. PMID:21318011

  4. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  5. Block Copolymers with a Twist

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, R.; Chiang, Y; Chen, C; Wang, H; Hasegawa, H; Akasaka, S; Thomas, E; Burger, C; Hsiao, B

    2009-01-01

    Chiral block copolymers (BCPs*) comprising chiral entities were designed to fabricate helical architectures (i.e., twisted morphologies) from self-assembly. A new helical phase (H*) with P622 symmetry was discovered in the self-assembly of poly(styrene)-b-poly(l-lactide) (PS-PLLA) BCPs*. Hexagonally packed, interdigitated PLLA helical microdomains in a PS matrix were directly visualized by electron tomography. The phase diagram of the PS-PLLA BCPs* was also established. Phase transitions from the H* phase to the stable cylinder and gyroid phases were found after long-time annealing, suggesting that the H* is a long-lived metastable phase. In contrast to racemic poly(styrene)-b-poly(d,l-lactide) BCPs, chiral interaction significantly enhances the incompatibility between achiral PS and chiral PLLA blocks in the PS-PLLA BCPs* and can be estimated through the determination of the interaction parameter.

  6. Enhanced ultraviolet electroluminescence and spectral narrowing from ZnO quantum dots/GaN heterojunction diodes by using high-k HfO{sub 2} electron blocking layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Xiaoming; Long, Hao; Wang, Haoning; Chen, Zhao; Wan, Jiawei; Liu, Yuping; Fang, Guojia; Li, Songzhan; Feng, Yamin; Ouyang, Yifang

    2014-08-11

    We demonstrated the capability of realizing enhanced ZnO-related UV emissions by using the low-cost and solution-processable ZnO quantum dots (QDs) with the help of a high-k HfO{sub 2} electron blocking layer (EBL) for the ZnO QDs/p-GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Full-width at half maximum of the LED devices was greatly decreased from ∼110 to ∼54 nm, and recombinations related to nonradiative centers were significantly suppressed with inserting HfO{sub 2} EBL. The electroluminescence of the ZnO QDs/HfO{sub 2}/p-GaN LEDs demonstrated an interesting spectral narrowing effect with increasing HfO{sub 2} thickness. The Gaussian fitting revealed that the great enhancement of the Zn{sub i}-related emission at ∼414 nm whereas the deep suppression of the interfacial recombination at ∼477 nm should be the main reason for the spectral narrowing effect.

  7. Simulation of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor gauge factor based on two-dimensional electron gas density and electron mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Min; Koehler, Andrew D.; Gupta, Amit; Nishida, Toshikazu; Thompson, Scott E.

    2010-11-01

    The gauge factor of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor was determined theoretically, considering the effect of stress on the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) sheet carrier density and electron mobility. Differences in the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization between the AlGaN and GaN layers, with and without external mechanical stress, were investigated to calculate the stress-altered 2DEG density. Strain was incorporated into a sp3d5-sp3 empirical tight-binding model to obtain the change in electron effective masses under biaxial and uniaxial stress. The simulated longitudinal gauge factor (-7.9±5.2) is consistent with experimental results (-2.4±0.5) obtained from measurements eliminating parasitic charge trapping effects through continuous subbandgap optical excitation.

  8. High Relief Block Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Explains a method of block printing using styrofoam shapes to make high relief. Describes the creation of the block design as well as the actual printing process. Uses a range of paper types for printing so children can see the results of using different media. (LS)

  9. Surviving Block Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Marjorie

    A discussion of block scheduling for second language instruction looks at the advantages and disadvantages and offers some suggestions for classroom management and course organization. It is argued that block scheduling may offer a potential solution to large classes, insufficient time for labs, too little individualized instruction; few…

  10. Block Scheduling Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, J. Allen

    2000-01-01

    Successful block scheduling depends on provision of initial and ongoing instructional training. Teaching strategies should vary and include cooperative learning, the case method, the socratic seminar, synectics, concept attainment, the inquiry method, and simulations. Recommendations for maximizing block scheduling are outlined. (Contains 52…

  11. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  12. Thermodynamic Stability and Redistribution of Charges in Ternary AlGaN, InGaN, and InAlN Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibuk, V.G.; Voznyi, A.V.

    2005-06-15

    A model of the delta lattice parameter is used to study the thermodynamics of AlGaN, InGaN, and InAlN alloys. The phase diagrams obtained indicate that Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N is stable in the entire range of x, whereas the miscibility gap corresponds to 0.2 < x < 0.69 for In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and to 0.16 < x < 0.7 for In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N at 1000 K. Biaxial stresses lower the critical temperature and narrow the miscibility gap. The charge-density distribution is analyzed using the pseudopotential method to obtain an approximation of 32-atom supercells. The results of the analysis show that the stability of these alloys is controlled by the competition between the destabilizing contribution of strains related to the mismatch between the lattice constants and a stabilizing charge exchange between various chemical bonds. Biaxial stress reduces the charge redistribution caused by strains and thus increases the stability of an alloy.

  13. Low-ohmic-contact-resistance V-based electrode for n-type AlGaN with high AlN molar fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuki; Takeda, Kunihiro; Kusafuka, Toshiki; Iwaya, Motoaki; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Akasaki, Isamu; Amano, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    We investigated a V-based electrode for the realization of low ohmic-contact resistivity in n-type AlGaN with a high AlN molar fraction characterized by the circular transmission line model. The contact resistivity of n-type Al0.62Ga0.38N prepared using the V/Al/Ni/Au electrode reached 1.13 × 10‑6 Ω cm2. Using this electrode, we also demonstrated the fabrication of UV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with an emission wavelength of approximately 300 nm. An operating voltage of LED prepared using a V/Al/Ni/Au electrode was 1.6 V lower at 100 mA current injection than that prepared using a Ti/Al/Ti/Au electrode, with a specific contact resistance of approximately 2.36 × 10‑4 Ω cm2 for n-type Al0.62Ga0.38N.

  14. Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from cell block two into the "Death Row" exercise yard - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and southwest guard tower, looking from cell block eight roof - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. Blocked tear duct

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby may have an eye infection called conjunctivitis . ... increase the chance of other infections, such as conjunctivitis. ... be prevented. Proper treatment of nasal infections and conjunctivitis may reduce the risk of having a blocked ...

  17. RX for Writer's Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Gail E.; Camp, Donna J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes four prewriting techniques that elementary and middle grade students can use to gather and organize ideas for writing, and by so doing, cure writer's block. Techniques discussed are: (1) brainstorming; (2) clustering; (3) freewriting; and (4) cubing.

  18. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  19. Block copolymer battery separator

    DOEpatents

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  20. Challenges in graphene integration for high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannazzo, F.; Fisichella, G.; Greco, G.; Roccaforte, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of the state-of-the-art research on graphene (Gr) for high-frequency (RF) devices. After discussing current limitations of lateral Gr RF transistors, novel vertical devices concepts such as the Gr Base Hot Electron Transistor (GBHET) will be introduced and the main challenges in Gr integration within these architectures will be discussed. In particular, a GBHET device based on Gr/AlGaN/GaN heterostructure will be considered. An approach to the fabrication of this heterostructure by transfer of CVD grown Gr on copper to the AlGaN surface will be presented. The morphological and electrical properties of this system have been investigated at nanoscale by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM). In particular, local current-voltage measurements by the CAFM probe revealed the formation of a Schottky contact with low barrier height (˜0.41 eV) and excellent lateral uniformity between Gr and AlGaN. Basing on the electrical parameters extracted from this characterization, the theoretical performances of a GBHET formed by a metal/Al2O3/Gr/AlGaN/GaN stack have been evaluated.

  1. Impression block with orientator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilin, V. I.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2015-02-01

    Tool review, namely the impression block, applied to check the shape and size of the top of fish as well as to determine the appropriate tool for fishing operation was realized. For multiple application and obtaining of the impress depth of 3 cm and more, the standard volumetric impression blocks with fix rods are used. However, the registered impress of fish is not oriented in space and the rods during fishing are in the extended position. This leads to rods deformation and sinking due to accidental impacts of impression block over the borehole irregularity and finally results in faulty detection of the top end of fishing object in hole. The impression blocks with copy rods and fixed magnetic needle allow estimating the object configuration and fix the position of magnetic needle determining the position of the top end of object in hole. However, the magnetic needle fixation is realized in staged and the rods are in extended position during fishing operations as well as it is in standard design. The most efficient tool is the impression block with copy rods which directs the examined object in the borehole during readings of magnetic needles data from azimuth plate and averaging of readings. This significantly increases the accuracy of fishing toll direction. The rods during fishing are located in the body and extended only when they reach the top of fishing object.

  2. Comprehensive study of the electronic and optical behavior of highly degenerate p-type Mg-doped GaN and AlGaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Fabien, Chloe A. M.; Merola, Joseph J.; Clinton, Evan A.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Wang, Shuo; Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-01-01

    The bulk and 2-dimensional (2D) electrical transport properties of heavily Mg-doped p-type GaN films grown on AlN buffer layers by Metal Modulated Epitaxy are explored. Distinctions are made between three primary p-type conduction mechanisms: traditional valence band conduction, impurity band conduction, and 2D conduction within a 2D hole gas at a hetero-interface. The bulk and 2D contributions to the overall carrier transport are identified and the relative contributions are found to vary strongly with growth conditions. Films grown with III/V ratio less than 1.5 exhibit high hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 1019 cm-3 with effective acceptor activation energies of 51 meV. Films with III/V ratios greater than 1.5 exhibit lower overall hole concentrations and significant contributions from 2D transport at the hetero-interface. Films grown with III/V ratio of 1.2 and Mg concentrations exceeding 2 × 1020 cm-3 show no detectable inversion domains or Mg precipitation. Highly Mg-doped p-GaN and p-AlGaN with Al fractions up to 27% similarly exhibit hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 1019 cm-3. The p-GaN and p-Al0.11Ga0.89N films show broad ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence peaks, which intercept the valence band, supporting the presence of a Mg acceptor band. Finally, a multi-quantum-well light-emitting diode (LED) and p-i-n diode are grown, both of which demonstrate rectifying behavior with turn-on voltages of 3-3.5 V and series resistances of 6-10 Ω without the need for any post-metallization annealing. The LED exhibits violet-blue luminescence at 425 nm, while the p-i-n diode shows UV luminescence at 381 nm, and both devices still show substantial light emission even when submerged in liquid nitrogen at 77 K.

  3. Comprehensive study of the electronic and optical behavior of highly degenerate p-type Mg-doped GaN and AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Fabien, Chloe A. M.; Merola, Joseph J.; Clinton, Evan A.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Wang, Shuo; Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-01-28

    The bulk and 2-dimensional (2D) electrical transport properties of heavily Mg-doped p-type GaN films grown on AlN buffer layers by Metal Modulated Epitaxy are explored. Distinctions are made between three primary p-type conduction mechanisms: traditional valence band conduction, impurity band conduction, and 2D conduction within a 2D hole gas at a hetero-interface. The bulk and 2D contributions to the overall carrier transport are identified and the relative contributions are found to vary strongly with growth conditions. Films grown with III/V ratio less than 1.5 exhibit high hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} with effective acceptor activation energies of 51 meV. Films with III/V ratios greater than 1.5 exhibit lower overall hole concentrations and significant contributions from 2D transport at the hetero-interface. Films grown with III/V ratio of 1.2 and Mg concentrations exceeding 2 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} show no detectable inversion domains or Mg precipitation. Highly Mg-doped p-GaN and p-AlGaN with Al fractions up to 27% similarly exhibit hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. The p-GaN and p-Al{sub 0.11}Ga{sub 0.89}N films show broad ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence peaks, which intercept the valence band, supporting the presence of a Mg acceptor band. Finally, a multi-quantum-well light-emitting diode (LED) and p-i-n diode are grown, both of which demonstrate rectifying behavior with turn-on voltages of 3–3.5 V and series resistances of 6–10 Ω without the need for any post-metallization annealing. The LED exhibits violet-blue luminescence at 425 nm, while the p-i-n diode shows UV luminescence at 381 nm, and both devices still show substantial light emission even when submerged in liquid nitrogen at 77 K.

  4. Comprehensive study of the electronic and optical behavior of highly degenerate p-type Mg-doped GaN and AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, BP; Fabien, CAM; Merola, JJ; Clinton, EA; Doolittle, WA; Wang, S; Fischer, AM; Ponce, FA

    2015-01-28

    The bulk and 2-dimensional (2D) electrical transport properties of heavily Mg-doped p-type GaN films grown on AlN buffer layers by Metal Modulated Epitaxy are explored. Distinctions are made between three primary p-type conduction mechanisms: traditional valence band conduction, impurity band conduction, and 2D conduction within a 2D hole gas at a hetero-interface. The bulk and 2D contributions to the overall carrier transport are identified and the relative contributions are found to vary strongly with growth conditions. Films grown with III/V ratio less than 1.5 exhibit high hole concentrations exceeding 2 x 10(19) cm(-3) with effective acceptor activation energies of 51 meV. Films with III/V ratios greater than 1.5 exhibit lower overall hole concentrations and significant contributions from 2D transport at the hetero-interface. Films grown with III/V ratio of 1.2 and Mg concentrations exceeding 2 x 10(20) cm(-3) show no detectable inversion domains or Mg precipitation. Highly Mg-doped p-GaN and p-AlGaN with Al fractions up to 27% similarly exhibit hole concentrations exceeding 2 x 10(19) cm(-3). The p-GaN and p-Al0.11Ga0.89N films show broad ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence peaks, which intercept the valence band, supporting the presence of a Mg acceptor band. Finally, a multi-quantum-well light-emitting diode (LED) and p-i-n diode are grown, both of which demonstrate rectifying behavior with turn-on voltages of 3-3.5V and series resistances of 6-10 Omega without the need for any post-metallization annealing. The LED exhibits violet-blue luminescence at 425 nm, while the p-i-n diode shows UV luminescence at 381 nm, and both devices still show substantial light emission even when submerged in liquid nitrogen at 77 K. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  5. Bactericidal block copolymer micelles.

    PubMed

    Vyhnalkova, Renata; Eisenberg, Adi; van de Ven, Theo

    2011-05-12

    Block copolymer micelles with bactericidal properties were designed to deactivate pathogens such as E. coli bacteria. The micelles of PS-b-PAA and PS-b-P4VP block copolymers were loaded with biocides TCMTB or TCN up to 20 or 30 wt.-%, depending on the type of antibacterial agent. Bacteria were exposed to loaded micelles and bacterial deactivation was evaluated. The micelles loaded with TCN are bactericidal; bacteria are killed in less than two minutes of exposure. The most likely interpretation of the data is that the biocide is transferred to the bacteria by repeated micelle/bacteria contacts, and not via the solution. PMID:21275041

  6. A Place for Block Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of block play--including its contributions to perceptual, fine motor, and cognitive development--and components of a good preschool block play area. Recommends unit blocks complemented by stacking blocks, toys, beads, cubes, and Brio wooden toys. Makes recommendations for space, size, locations and connections to other…

  7. A Difluorobenzoxadiazole Building Block for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Li, Yunke; Hunt, Adrian; Zhang, Jianquan; Yao, Huatong; Li, Zhengke; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Fei; Ade, Harald; Yan, He

    2016-03-01

    A difluorobenzoxadiazole building block is synthesized and utilized to construct a conjugated polymer leading to high-performance thick-film polymer solar cells with a V(OC) of 0.88 V and a power conversion efficiency of 9.4%. This new building block can be used in many possible polymer structures for various organic electro-nic applications. PMID:26689976

  8. 2000 CENSUS BLOCK BOUNDARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set is a polygon shapefile of the boundaries of Census Blocks in New England derived from U.S. Census Bureau 2000 TIGER/Line data. Numerous attributes pertaining to population are included. TIGER, TIGER/Line, and Census TIGER are registered trademarks of the Bureau o...

  9. Confinement of block copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The following were studied: confinement of block copolymers, free surface confinement, effects of substrate interactions, random copolymers at homopolymer interfaces, phase separation in thin film polymer mixtures, buffing of polymer surfaces, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  10. A Fluid Block Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ubben, Gerald C.

    1976-01-01

    Achieving flexibility without losing student accountability is a challenge that faces every school. With a fluid block schedule, as described here, accountability is maintained without inhibiting flexibility. An additional advantage is that three levels of schedule decision making take some of the pressure off the principal. (Editor)

  11. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  12. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  13. [Masquerading bundle branch block].

    PubMed

    Kukla, Piotr; Baranchuk, Adrian; Jastrzębski, Marek; Bryniarski, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    We here describe a surface 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) of a 72-year-old female with a prior history of breast cancer and chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy. An echocardiogram revealed left ventricular dysfunction, ejection fraction of 23%, with mild enlarged left ventricle. The 12-lead ECG showed atrial fibrillation with a mean heart rate of about 100 bpm, QRS duration 160 ms, QT interval 400 ms, right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left anterior fascicular block (LAFB). The combination of RBBB features in the precordial leads and LAFB features in the limb leads is known as ''masquerading bundle branch block''. In most cases of RBBB and LAFB, the QRS axis deviation is located between - 80 to -120 degrees. Rarely, when predominant left ventricular forces are present, the QRS axis deviation is near about -90 degrees, turning the pattern into an atypical form. In a situation of RBBB associated with LAFB, the S wave can be absent or very small in lead I. Such a situation is the result of not only purely LAFB but also with left ventricular hypertrophy and/or focal block due to scar (extensive anterior myocardial infarction) or fibrosis (cardiomyopathy). Sometimes, this specific ECG pattern is mistaken for LBBB. RBBB with LAFB may imitate LBBB either in the limb leads (known as 'standard masquerading' - absence of S wave in lead I), or in the precordial leads (called 'precordial masquerading' - absence of S wave in leads V₅ and V₆). Our ECG showed both these types of masquerading bundle branch block - absence of S wave in lead I and in leads V₅ and V₆. PMID:24469750

  14. Improvement of process uniformity in recessed gate AlGaN/GaN HFET by selective etching of in-situ SixNy on AlGaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hwa-Young; Park, Jinhong; Lee, Hojung; Jo, Youngje; Song, Misun; Jang, T.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of in-situ SixNy etching were investigated by comparing the uniformity of threshold voltage on recessed gate AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistor (HFET) devices with in-situ grown SixNy passivation. By varying O2 ratio in total gas flow, etch rate and selectivity of SixNy and AlGaN were changed significantly. The etch rate of AlGaN was reduced by adding O2 in gas mixture, which caused the formation of AlOx and GaOx on the surface during etching process. The etch rate of in-situ SixNy was decreased with increasing O2 ratio. By this relationship, the highest selectivity was obtained with 30% O2 ratio in total gas flow and selectivity was increased from 5 : 1 to 100 : 1. Using this optimized etching condition, the standard deviation of threshold voltage on AlGaN/GaN recess gate HFET was improved from 0.60 to 0.18 on 6-in. processed wafer.

  15. Morphology and Proton Transport in Porous Block Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chelsea; Kortright, Jeffrey; Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Block copolymer electrolyte membranes consisting of a proton-conducting block and an uncharged structural block are attractive due to their potential in clean energy applications. Herein we demonstrate a novel approach of fabricating block copolymer electrolyte membranes, by inducing pores in the proton-conducting phase. We examine morphology of these membranes with contrast-matched resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSoXS) and electron tomography. Proton conductivity as a function of porosity and water activity is also investigated. By tuning the porosity of the membranes, we are able to adjust the water uptake of the membranes for improved proton conductivities, in both humid air and liquid water.

  16. Compositionally graded relaxed AlGaN buffers on semipolar GaN for mid-ultraviolet emission

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Erin C.; Wu Feng; Haeger, Daniel A.; Nakamura, Shuji; Denbaars, Steven P.; Cohen, Daniel A.; Speck, James S.; Romanov, Alexey E.

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter, we report on the growth and properties of relaxed, compositionally graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N buffer layers on freestanding semipolar (2021) GaN substrates. Continuous and step compositional grades with Al concentrations up to x = 0.61 have been achieved, with emission wavelengths in the mid-ultraviolet region as low as 265 nm. Coherency stresses were relaxed progressively throughout the grades by misfit dislocation generation via primary (basal) slip and secondary (non-basal) slip systems. Threading dislocation densities in the final layers of the grades were less than 10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2} as confirmed by plan-view transmission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence studies.

  17. Degradation and annealing effects caused by oxygen in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, R.; Shen, X.; Chen, J.; Duan, G. X.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Kaun, S. W.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S.; Pantelides, S. T.

    2016-07-01

    Hot-carrier degradation and room-temperature annealing effects are investigated in unpassivated ammonia-rich AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. Devices exhibit a fast recovery when annealed after hot carrier stress with all pins grounded. The recovered peak transconductance can exceed the original value, an effect that is not observed in control passivated samples. Density functional theory calculations suggest that dehydrogenation of pre-existing ON-H defects in AlGaN plays a significant role in the observed hot carrier degradation, and the resulting bare ON can naturally account for the "super-recovery" in the peak transconductance.

  18. NCCN Evidence Blocks.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Robert W; Jonasch, Eric

    2016-05-01

    NCCN has developed a series of Evidence Blocks: graphics that provide ratings for each recommended treatment regimen in terms of efficacy, toxicity, quality and consistency of the supporting data, and affordability. The NCCN Evidence Blocks are currently available in 10 tumor types within the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines). At a glance, patients and providers can understand how a given treatment was assessed by the NCCN Guidelines Panel and get a sense of how a given treatment may match individual needs and preferences. Robert W. Carlson, MD, CEO of NCCN, described the reasoning behind this new feature and how the tool is used, and Eric Jonasch, MD, Professor of Genitourinary Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Vice Chair of the NCCN Kidney Cancer Panel, described its applicability in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27226499

  19. Intraocular radiation blocking

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, P.T.; Ho, T.K.; Fastenberg, D.M.; Hyman, R.A.; Stroh, E.M.; Packer, S.; Perry, H.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Iodine-based liquid radiographic contrast agents were placed in normal and tumor-bearing (Greene strain) rabbit eyes to evaluate their ability to block iodine-125 radiation. This experiment required the procedures of tumor implantation, vitrectomy, air-fluid exchange, and 125I plaque and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) chip implantation. The authors quantified the amount of radiation attenuation provided by intraocularly placed contrast agents with in vivo dosimetry. After intraocular insertion of a blocking agent or sham blocker (saline) insertion, episcleral 125I plaques were placed across the eye from episcleral TLD dosimeters. This showed that radiation attenuation occurred after blocker insertion compared with the saline controls. Then computed tomographic imaging techniques were used to describe the relatively rapid transit time of the aqueous-based iohexol compared with the slow transit time of the oil-like iophendylate. Lastly, seven nontumor-bearing eyes were primarily examined for blocking agent-related ocular toxicity. Although it was noted that iophendylate induced intraocular inflammation and retinal degeneration, all iohexol-treated eyes were similar to the control eyes at 7 and 31 days of follow-up. Although our study suggests that intraocular radiopaque materials can be used to shield normal ocular structures during 125I plaque irradiation, a mechanism to keep these materials from exiting the eye must be devised before clinical application.

  20. Block 3. This photograph depicts the northern view of Block ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Block 3. This photograph depicts the northern view of Block 2 towards the May D & F Tower from the main path along the western facades - Skyline Park, 1500-1800 Arapaho Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  1. The role of ultrathin AlN barrier in the reduction in the hot electron and self-heating effects for GaN-based double-heterojunction high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Hu, W. D.; Chen, X. S.; Lu, W.

    2010-09-01

    We propose an AlN/GaN/InGaN/GaN double-heterojunction high electron mobility transistor (DH-HEMT) structure with a 4 nm thin AlN barrier layer. The performance of the DH-HEMT device is investigated by using two-dimensional numerical simulation. The conduction band profile is obtained by using the Poisson's equation and Fermi-Dirac statistics in combination with the polarization charges. Due to large conduction-band offset of the AlN/GaN interface and strong polarization of AlN, the minor channel at GaN/InGaN interface can be eliminated. Further, the hot electron and self-heating effects on the transport properties of this DH-HEMT are investigated by using hydrodynamic model. In comparison with the AlGaN barrier DH-HEMT and conventional HEMT, this kind of DH-HEMT can effectively reduce the hot electron effect under high voltage. The reason is that the maximum field strength is far below the critical value for the existence of the hot electron effect in the AlGaN barrier DH-HEMTs and conventional HEMTs with the same voltage 6 V. The simulation results also show that the ultrathin AlN barrier layer can significantly reduce thermal impedance, and then lower the self-heating effect. Furthermore, the passivation layer has significant role in the self-heating effect of the ultrathin barrier DH-HEMTs.

  2. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 510.301 Blocked...

  3. View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are used to support ship when it is repositioned to paint inaccessible areas masked by original support blocks. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Carpentry Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Hierarchical porous polymer scaffolds from block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Sai, Hiroaki; Tan, Kwan Wee; Hur, Kahyun; Asenath-Smith, Emily; Hovden, Robert; Jiang, Yi; Riccio, Mark; Muller, David A; Elser, Veit; Estroff, Lara A; Gruner, Sol M; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2013-08-01

    Hierarchical porous polymer materials are of increasing importance because of their potential application in catalysis, separation technology, or bioengineering. Examples for their synthesis exist, but there is a need for a facile yet versatile conceptual approach to such hierarchical scaffolds and quantitative characterization of their nonperiodic pore systems. Here, we introduce a synthesis method combining well-established concepts of macroscale spinodal decomposition and nanoscale block copolymer self-assembly with porosity formation on both length scales via rinsing with protic solvents. We used scanning electron microscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, transmission electron tomography, and nanoscale x-ray computed tomography for quantitative pore-structure characterization. The method was demonstrated for AB- and ABC-type block copolymers, and resulting materials were used as scaffolds for calcite crystal growth. PMID:23908232

  5. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    High altitudes and blocked ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... you are going up or coming down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are changing ...

  6. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  7. Using Attribute Blocks with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntsberger, John P.

    1978-01-01

    The classroom use of attribute blocks to develop thinking skills is defended in this article. Divergent-productive thinking is identified as an important skill that can be developed by using these blocks. However, teacher commitment and involvement in the program is considered necessary. Suggestions for using these blocks are included. (MA)

  8. Building Curriculum during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Blocks are not just for play! In this article, Nicole Andrews describes observing the interactions of three young boys enthusiastically engaged in the kindergarten block center of their classroom, using blocks in a building project that displayed their ability to use critical thinking skills, physics exploration, and the development of language…

  9. Property Blocks: Games and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Alan, Ed.; Dailey, Jean, Ed.

    This pamphlet describes the property blocks produced by MINNEMAST, and discusses their use in the development of thinking processes. Classification systems, including block diagrams and tree diagrams, are discussed. Sixteen classroom activities and eleven games which use the blocks are described. Suggestions to the teacher for further reading are…

  10. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  11. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T] also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock space exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.

  12. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T]ℓ also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock spacemore » exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.« less

  13. Nerve blocks for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Shah, Atit

    2014-10-01

    Nerve blocks are often performed as therapeutic or palliative interventions for pain relief. However, they are often performed for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. When considering nerve blocks for chronic pain, clinicians must always consider the indications, risks, benefits, and proper technique. Nerve blocks encompass a wide variety of interventional procedures. The most common nerve blocks for chronic pain and that may be applicable to the neurosurgical patient population are reviewed in this article. This article is an introduction and brief synopsis of the different available blocks that can be offered to a patient. PMID:25240668

  14. High electron mobility recovery in AlGaN/GaN 2DEG channels regrown on etched surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Silvia H.; Keller, Stacia; Tahhan, Maher; Li, Haoran; Romanczyk, Brian; DenBaars, Steven P.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports high two-dimensional electron gas mobility attained from the regrowth of the AlGaN gating layer on ex situ GaN surfaces. To repair etch-damaged GaN surfaces, various pretreatments were conducted via metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, followed by a regrown AlGaN/GaN mobility test structure to evaluate the extent of recovery. The developed treatment process that was shown to significantly improve the electron mobility consisted of a N2 + NH3 pre-anneal plus an insertion of a 4 nm or thicker GaN interlayer prior to deposition of the AlGaN gating layer. Using the optimized process, a high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) device was fabricated which exhibited a high mobility of 1450 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 (R sh = 574 ohm/sq) and low dispersion characteristics. The additional inclusion of an in situ Al2O3 dielectric into the regrowth process for MOS-HEMTs still preserved the transport properties near etch-impacted areas.

  15. Blocks database and its applications.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, J G; Henikoff, S

    1996-01-01

    Protein blocks consist of multiply aligned sequence segments without gaps that represent the most highly conserved regions of protein families. A database of blocks has been constructed by successive application of the fully automated PROTOMAT system to lists of protein family members obtained from Prosite documentation. Currently, Blocks 8.0 based on protein families documented in Prosite 12 consists of 2884 blocks representing 770 families. Searches of the Blocks Database are carried out using protein or DNA sequence queries, and results are returned with measures of significance for both single and multiple block hits. The databse has also proved useful for derivation of amino acid substitution matrices (the Blosum series) and other sets of parameters. WWW and E-mail servers provide access to the database and associated functions, including a block maker for sequences provided by the user. PMID:8743679

  16. Rotating ice blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  17. Interpleural block - part 1.

    PubMed

    Dravid, R M; Paul, R E

    2007-10-01

    Interpleural blockade is effective in treating unilateral surgical and nonsurgical pain from the chest and upper abdomen in both the acute and chronic settings. It has been shown to provide safe, high-quality analgesia after cholecystectomy, thoracotomy, renal and breast surgery, and for certain invasive radiological procedures of the renal and hepatobiliary systems. It has also been used successfully in the treatment of pain from multiple rib fractures, herpes zoster, complex regional pain syndromes, thoracic and abdominal cancer, and pancreatitis. The technique is simple to learn and has both few contra-indications and a low incidence of complications. In the first of two reviews, the authors cover the history, taxonomy and anatomical considerations, the spread of local anaesthetic, and the mechanism of action, physiological, pharmacological and technical considerations in the performance of the block. PMID:17845657

  18. Radiation Blocking Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Biomedical Optical Company of America's Eagle 475 lens absorbs 100 percent of all photowavelengths considered hazardous to eye tissue, including ultraviolet and blue light, which are considered contributors to cataract and age-related macular degeneration. The lens absorbs hazardous wavelengths, but allows a higher percentage of visually useful areas of the spectrum to pass through. Polarization blocks out irritating glint and glare and heightens visual acuity. The Eagle 475 sunglasses are the latest in a series of spinoffs that originated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where two scientists developed a protective, welding curtain that filtered out harmful irradiance. The result was a commercial curtain that absorbs filters and scatters light, providing protection for personnel in welding areas. Further research focused on protective industrial glasses and later on consumer products.

  19. Blanket integrated blocking diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uebele, P.; Kasper, C.; Rasch, K.-D.

    1986-11-01

    Two types of large area protection diodes for integration in solar arrays were developed in planar technology. For application in a bus voltage concept of V sub bus = 80 V a p-doped blanket integrated blocking diode (p-IBD) was developed with V sub rev = 120 V, whereas for the high voltage concept of V sub bus = 160 V a n-IBD with V sub rev = 250 V was developed. Application as blanket integrated shunt diodes is recommended. The optimized rearside diffusion provides a low forward voltage drop in the temperature range of minus 100 to plus 150 C. As a consequence of planar technology metallized coverglasses have to be used to minimize the photocurrent.

  20. Blocking Losses With a Photon Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Burce E.; Piazzolla, Sabino

    2012-01-01

    It was not known how to assess accurately losses in a communications link due to photodetector blocking, a phenomenon wherein a detector is rendered inactive for a short time after the detection of a photon. When used to detect a communications signal, blocking leads to losses relative to an ideal detector, which may be measured as a reduction in the communications rate for a given received signal power, or an increase in the signal power required to support the same communications rate. This work involved characterizing blocking losses for single detectors and arrays of detectors. Blocking may be mitigated by spreading the signal intensity over an array of detectors, reducing the count rate on any one detector. A simple approximation was made to the blocking loss as a function of the probability that a detector is unblocked at a given time, essentially treating the blocking probability as a scaling of the detection efficiency. An exact statistical characterization was derived for a single detector, and an approximation for multiple detectors. This allowed derivation of several accurate approximations to the loss. Methods were also derived to account for a rise time in recovery, and non-uniform illumination due to diffraction and atmospheric distortion of the phase front. It was assumed that the communications signal is intensity modulated and received by an array of photon-counting photodetectors. For the purpose of this analysis, it was assumed that the detectors are ideal, in that they produce a signal that allows one to reproduce the arrival times of electrons, produced either as photoelectrons or from dark noise, exactly. For single detectors, the performance of the maximum-likelihood (ML) receiver in blocking is illustrated, as well as a maximum-count (MC) receiver, that, when receiving a pulse-position-modulated (PPM) signal, selects the symbol corresponding to the slot with the largest electron count. Whereas the MC receiver saturates at high count rates

  1. Block copolymer adsorbed layers on solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Mani; Jiang, Naisheng; Gowd, Bhoje; Endoh, Maya; Koga, Tadanori

    Block copolymer thin films offer a simple and effective route to fabricate highly ordered periodic microdomain structures. The fundamental, yet unsolved question is whether these highly oriented microdomain structures persist even near an impenetrable solid wall. We here report the adsorbed structures of polystyrene-block-poly (4-vinylpyridine) (PS-block-P4VP, Mw = 41,000, PS (weight fraction =0.81) formed on planar silicon substrates. Perpendicularly aligned cylindrical microdomains were created by solvent vapor annealing (Gowd et al., Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 7753), and the adsorbed layer was derived by solvent leaching with chloroform, a good solvent for the polymers and thereafter characterized by using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, and x-ray reflectivity. The results showed that both PS and P4VP chains lie flat on the substrate, forming a microphase-separated structure (MSS) without long-range order. Moreover, a spin-coated PS-block-P4VP thin film annealed under vacuum at 190 °C showed similar MSS on the substrate, indicating the generality of the interfacial polymer structure. Details will be discussed in the presentation. NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  2. Local gate leakage current induced by inhomogeneous epitaxial growth in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Tomotaka; Wakejima, Akio; Egawa, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    We found that inhomogeneous epitaxial growth in a superlattice near a Si substrate creates an area where local leakage current occurs at the interface between an AlGaN surface and a Schottky electrode. Here, electroluminescence (EL) through a transparent gate of an AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor enables us to identify the area in the entire gate periphery. Further, the superlattice near the Si substrate supports clear observation of inhomogeneous growth under the EL spots. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy profile indicates that a Ga-rich layer was grown in the early stage of inhomogeneous area creation.

  3. Large Block Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W

    2001-12-01

    This report documents the Large-Block Test (LBT) conducted at Fran Ridge near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The LBT was a thermal test conducted on an exposed block of middle non-lithophysal Topopah Spring tuff (Tptpmn) and was designed to assist in understanding the thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes associated with heating and then cooling a partially saturated fractured rock mass. The LBT was unique in that it was a large (3 x 3 x 4.5 m) block with top and sides exposed. Because the block was exposed at the surface, boundary conditions on five of the six sides of the block were relatively well known and controlled, making this test both easier to model and easier to monitor. This report presents a detailed description of the test as well as analyses of the data and conclusions drawn from the test. The rock block that was tested during the LBT was exposed by excavation and removal of the surrounding rock. The block was characterized and instrumented, and the sides were sealed and insulated to inhibit moisture and heat loss. Temperature on the top of the block was also controlled. The block was heated for 13 months, during which time temperature, moisture distribution, and deformation were monitored. After the test was completed and the block cooled down, a series of boreholes were drilled, and one of the heater holes was over-cored to collect samples for post-test characterization of mineralogy and mechanical properties. Section 2 provides background on the test. Section 3 lists the test objectives and describes the block site, the site configuration, and measurements made during the test. Section 3 also presents a chronology of events associated with the LBT, characterization of the block, and the pre-heat analyses of the test. Section 4 describes the fracture network contained in the block. Section 5 describes the heating/cooling system used to control the temperature in the block and presents the thermal history of the block during the test

  4. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.; Sushinsky, G. F.; Chwirut, D. J.; Bechtoldt, C. J.; Ruff, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys are to be considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks have been taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and micro-structural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response. New fabrication techniques for reference blocks are discussed and ASTM activities are summarized.

  5. Electron effective mass in Al{sub 0.72}Ga{sub 0.28}N alloys determined by mid-infrared optical Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Schöche, S. Kühne, P.; Hofmann, T.; Schubert, M.; Nilsson, D.; Kakanakova-Georgieva, A.; Janzén, E.; Darakchieva, V.

    2013-11-18

    The effective electron mass parameter in Si-doped Al{sub 0.72}Ga{sub 0.28}N is determined to be m{sup ∗}=(0.336±0.020) m{sub 0} from mid-infrared optical Hall effect measurements. No significant anisotropy of the effective electron mass parameter is found supporting theoretical predictions. Assuming a linear change of the effective electron mass with the Al content in AlGaN alloys and m{sup ∗}=0.232 m{sub 0} for GaN, an average effective electron mass of m{sup ∗}=0.376 m{sub 0} can be extrapolated for AlN. The analysis of mid-infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements further confirms the two phonon mode behavior of the E{sub 1}(TO) and one phonon mode behavior of the A{sub 1}(LO) phonon mode in high-Al-content AlGaN alloys as seen in previous Raman scattering studies.

  6. What Are Nerve Blocks for Headache?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve blocks for headache? Print Email What are nerve blocks for headache? ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... entering your e-mail address below. What are nerve blocks for headache? A nerve block is the ...

  7. Covariant approaches to superconformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Khandker, Zuhair U.; Li, Daliang; Poland, David; Simmons-Duffin, David

    2014-08-01

    We develop techniques for computing superconformal blocks in 4d superconformal field theories. First we study the super-Casimir differential equation, deriving simple new expressions for superconformal blocks for 4-point functions containing chiral operators in theories with -extended supersymmetry. We also reproduce these results by extending the "shadow formalism" of Ferrara, Gatto, Grillo, and Parisi to supersymmetric theories, where superconformal blocks can be represented as superspace integrals of three-point functions multiplied by shadow three-point functions.

  8. Big Questions: The Ultimate Building Blocks of Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-11-06

    The Standard Model of particle physics treats quarks and leptons as having no size at all. Quarks are found inside protons and neutrons and the most familiar lepton is the electron. While the best measurements to date support that idea, there is circumstantial evidence that suggests that perhaps the these tiny particles might be composed of even smaller building blocks. This video explains this circumstantial evidence and introduces some very basic ideas of what those building blocks might be.

  9. New mechanism for dislocation blocking in strained layer epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Stach, E.A.; Schwarz, K.W.; Hull, R.; Ross, F.M.; Tromp, R.M.

    1999-09-14

    Dislocation interactions play a critical role in plasticity and heteroepitaxial strain relaxation. We use real time transmission electron microscopy observations of the interaction between threading and misfit dislocations in SiGe heterostructures to investigate interactions quantitatively. In addition to the expected long range blocking of threading segments, we observe a new short range mechanism which is significantly more effective. Simulations show that this reactive blocking occurs when two dislocations with the same Burgers vector reconnect.

  10. Big Questions: The Ultimate Building Blocks of Matter

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The Standard Model of particle physics treats quarks and leptons as having no size at all. Quarks are found inside protons and neutrons and the most familiar lepton is the electron. While the best measurements to date support that idea, there is circumstantial evidence that suggests that perhaps the these tiny particles might be composed of even smaller building blocks. This video explains this circumstantial evidence and introduces some very basic ideas of what those building blocks might be.

  11. New mechanism for dislocation blocking in strained layer epitaxial growth

    PubMed

    Stach; Schwarz; Hull; Ross; Tromp

    2000-01-31

    Dislocation interactions play a critical role in plasticity and heteroepitaxial strain relaxation. We use real time transmission electron microscopy observations of the interaction between threading and misfit dislocations in SiGe heterostructures to investigate interactions quantitatively. In addition to the expected long-range blocking of threading segments, we observe a new short-range mechanism which is significantly more effective. Simulations show that this reactive blocking occurs when two dislocations with the same Burgers vector reconnect. PMID:11017412

  12. Effect of OFF-state stress induced electric field on trapping in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si (111)

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M. J. E-mail: eging@ntu.edu.sg; Ng, G. I. E-mail: eging@ntu.edu.sg; Syamal, B.; Zhou, X.; Arulkumaran, S.; Manoj Kumar, C. M.; Ranjan, K.; Vicknesh, S.; Foo, S. C.

    2015-02-23

    The influence of electric field (EF) on the dynamic ON-resistance (dyn-R{sub DS[ON]}) and threshold-voltage shift (ΔV{sub th}) of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si has been investigated using pulsed current-voltage (I{sub DS}-V{sub DS}) and drain current (I{sub D}) transients. Different EF was realized with devices of different gate-drain spacing (L{sub gd}) under the same OFF-state stress. Under high-EF (L{sub gd} = 2 μm), the devices exhibited higher dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation but a small ΔV{sub th} (∼120 mV). However, at low-EF (L{sub gd} = 5 μm), smaller dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation but a larger ΔV{sub th} (∼380 mV) was observed. Our analysis shows that under OFF-state stress, the gate electrons are injected and trapped in the AlGaN barrier by tunnelling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanism. Under high-EF, trapping spreads towards the gate-drain access region of the AlGaN barrier causing dyn-R{sub DS[ON]} degradation, whereas under low-EF, trapping is mostly confined under the gate causing ΔV{sub th}. A trap with activation energy 0.33 eV was identified in the AlGaN barrier by I{sub D}-transient measurements. The influence of EF on trapping was also verified by Silvaco TCAD simulations.

  13. 31 CFR 589.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 589.301 Section 589.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UKRAINE RELATED SANCTIONS...

  14. 31 CFR 544.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 544.301 Section 544.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION...

  15. 31 CFR 544.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 544.301 Section 544.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION...

  16. 31 CFR 544.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 544.301 Section 544.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION...

  17. 31 CFR 544.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 544.301 Section 544.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION...

  18. 31 CFR 544.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 544.301 Section 544.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS...

  19. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  20. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  1. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  2. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  3. 31 CFR 558.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 558.301 Section 558.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOUTH SUDAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  4. 31 CFR 545.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 545.301 Section 545.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN (AFGHANISTAN)...

  5. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  6. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  7. 31 CFR 552.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 552.301 Section 552.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  8. 31 CFR 552.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 552.301 Section 552.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  9. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM...

  10. 31 CFR 541.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 541.301 Section 541.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS...

  11. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  12. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions §...

  13. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  14. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions §...

  15. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS...

  16. Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the west to the east. This photograph reveals the alignment of trees within the central path of the park. In addition, this photograph exposes broken bricks aligning tree beds - Skyline Park, 1500-1800 Arapaho Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  17. 31 CFR 593.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 593.301 Section 593.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES...

  18. 31 CFR 549.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 549.301 Section 549.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  19. 31 CFR 549.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 549.301 Section 549.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  20. 31 CFR 549.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 549.301 Section 549.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  1. 31 CFR 549.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 549.301 Section 549.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  2. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 541.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 541.301 Section 541.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  4. 31 CFR 541.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 541.301 Section 541.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  5. 31 CFR 541.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 541.301 Section 541.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  6. 31 CFR 541.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 541.301 Section 541.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  7. Strategies for Controlled Placement of Nanoscale Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The capability of placing individual nanoscale building blocks on exact substrate locations in a controlled manner is one of the key requirements to realize future electronic, optical, and magnetic devices and sensors that are composed of such blocks. This article reviews some important advances in the strategies for controlled placement of nanoscale building blocks. In particular, we will overview template assisted placement that utilizes physical, molecular, or electrostatic templates, DNA-programmed assembly, placement using dielectrophoresis, approaches for non-close-packed assembly of spherical particles, and recent development of focused placement schemes including electrostatic funneling, focused placement via molecular gradient patterns, electrodynamic focusing of charged aerosols, and others. PMID:21794185

  8. Characterizing the inverses of block tridiagonal, block Toeplitz matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffi, Nicholas M.; Hill, Judith C.; Reuter, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the inversion of block tridiagonal, block Toeplitz matrices and comment on the behaviour of these inverses as one moves away from the diagonal. Using matrix Möbius transformations, we first present an O(1) representation (with respect to the number of block rows and block columns) for the inverse matrix and subsequently use this representation to characterize the inverse matrix. There are four symmetry-distinct cases where the blocks of the inverse matrix (i) decay to zero on both sides of the diagonal, (ii) oscillate on both sides, (iii) decay on one side and oscillate on the other and (iv) decay on one side and grow on the other. This characterization exposes the necessary conditions for the inverse matrix to be numerically banded and may also aid in the design of preconditioners and fast algorithms. Finally, we present numerical examples of these matrix types.

  9. A Shifted Block Lanczos Algorithm 1: The Block Recurrence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, Roger G.; Lewis, John G.; Simon, Horst D.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we describe a block Lanczos algorithm that is used as the key building block of a software package for the extraction of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of large sparse symmetric generalized eigenproblems. The software package comprises: a version of the block Lanczos algorithm specialized for spectrally transformed eigenproblems; an adaptive strategy for choosing shifts, and efficient codes for factoring large sparse symmetric indefinite matrices. This paper describes the algorithmic details of our block Lanczos recurrence. This uses a novel combination of block generalizations of several features that have only been investigated independently in the past. In particular new forms of partial reorthogonalization, selective reorthogonalization and local reorthogonalization are used, as is a new algorithm for obtaining the M-orthogonal factorization of a matrix. The heuristic shifting strategy, the integration with sparse linear equation solvers and numerical experience with the code are described in a companion paper.

  10. Stick-slip statistics of a physical slider block model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckl, Ewald; Lederbauer, Stefan; Mertl, Stefan; Roch, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    An exhibition concerning the various scientific, technical, and social aspects of earthquakes has been organized as an Austrian contribution to IYPE - International Year of Planet Earth. In order to support the understanding of the elastic rebound theory a physical slider block model has been constructed. This model consists of a granite base plate and a granite slider block, connected to a lever by a leaf spring. The lever is driven parallel to the base plate with a constant speed in the range of 1 - 10 mm/s. The lever can move about 1 m in one direction. Thereafter the polarity of displacement is changed automatically. Opto-electronic distance measuring modules measure the displacement of the constantly moving lever and the stick-slip movement of the slider block. A geophone mounted on the slider block receives the vibrations of the slider block during the slip. From theory a periodic slip has to be expected. However, because of slight spatial changes of friction between the base plate and the slider block, individual slip distances vary in the range of 2 - 20 mm. Besides the speed of the lever further parameters of the physical slider block model can be varied: normal force between base plate and slider block, grain size and thickness of quartz sand simulating fault gouge, and stiffness of the leave spring. The stick slip statistics and derived quantities (e.g., stress release) will be shown and the influence of the variable parameters on the stick slip behaviour analyzed.

  11. Classical Virasoro irregular conformal block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, Chaiho; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Virasoro irregular conformal block with arbitrary rank is obtained for the classical limit or equivalently Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit using the beta-deformed irregular matrix model (Penner-type matrix model for the irregular conformal block). The same result is derived using the generalized Mathieu equation which is equivalent to the loop equation of the irregular matrix model.

  12. MISR Center Block Time Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

      MISR Center Block Time Tool The misr_time tool calculates the block center times for MISR Level 1B2 files. This is ... version of the IDL package or by using the IDL Virtual Machine application. The IDL Virtual Machine is bundled with IDL and is ...

  13. Blocking in multirate interconnection networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdimarsson, Einir

    1994-02-01

    We present an extension of the classical methods used to evaluate blocking probability. This method is applicable to multirate circuit and fast packet/ATM switching systems. The analytical methods are presented and compared with simulation results using Benes networks as an example. Extensive simulation has been performed focusing on ways to reduce blocking to acceptable levels.

  14. Adjustable-Angle Drill Block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Adjustable angular drill block accurately transfers hole patterns from mating surfaces not normal to each other. Block applicable to transfer of nonperpendicular holes in mating contoured assemblies in aircraft industry. Also useful in general manufacturing to transfer mating installation holes to irregular and angular surfaces.

  15. Block Transfer Agreement Evaluation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastedo, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate for the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) the effectiveness of block transfer agreements (BTAs) in the BC Transfer System and recommend steps to be taken to improve their effectiveness. Findings of this study revealed that institutions want to expand block credit transfer;…

  16. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys were considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. Some RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks were taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and microstructural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response.

  17. Atrioventricular block after ASD closure

    PubMed Central

    Asakai, Hiroko; Weskamp, Sofia; Eastaugh, Lucas; d'Udekem, Yves; Pflaumer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) is a common congenital heart defect. There is limited data on both early and late atrioventricular (AV) block post ASD closure. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of AV block associated with ASD closure. Methods A retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent ASD closure either with a device or surgical method at the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne between 1996 and 2010 was performed. Baseline demographics, procedural details and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results A total of 378 patients were identified; 242 in the device group and 136 in the surgical group. Fourteen patients (3.7%) had AV block (1 with second degree and 13 with first degree) at a median follow-up of 28 months; 11/242 (4.5%) in the device group and 3/135 (2.2%) in the surgical group (p=0.39). Six patients had new-onset AV block after ASD closure. In the device subgroup, patients with AV block at follow-up had a larger indexed device size compared with those without (22 (15–31) vs 18(7–38), p=0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed the presence of AV block either pre procedure or post procedure to be the only variables associated with late AV block. Conclusions Late AV block in patients with repaired ASD is rare and most likely independent of the technique used. In the device subgroup, the only risk factor identified to be associated with late AV block was the presence of either preprocedural or postprocedural AV block, so long-term follow-up for these patients should be provided. PMID:27540418

  18. Building blocks for correlated superconductors and magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrao, J. L.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Batista, C. D.; Zhu, J. -X.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-04-01

    Recent efforts at Los Alamos to discover strongly correlated superconductors and hard ferromagnets are reviewed. While serendipity remains a principal engine of materials discovery, design principles and structural building blocks are beginning to emerge that hold potential for predictive discovery. Successes over the last decade with the so-called “115” strongly correlated superconductors are summarized, and more recent efforts to translate these insights and principles to novel hard magnets are discussed. While true “materials by design” remains a distant aspiration, progress is being made in coupling empirical design principles to electronic structure simulation to accelerate and guide materials design and synthesis.

  19. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This student guide together with an instructor guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The student guide contains self-contained instructional material that students can study at their own pace most of the time. Six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units, with some units…

  20. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This instructor guide together with a student guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The instructor guide is a resource for planning and managing individualized, competency-based instruction in six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units with some units having several…

  1. 31 CFR 560.322 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... name of the Government of Iran, any Iranian financial institution, or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 560.211, or in which the Government of Iran,...

  2. 31 CFR 560.322 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... name of the Government of Iran, any Iranian financial institution, or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 560.211, or in which the Government of Iran,...

  3. Fluvial entrainment of low density peat blocks (block carbon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Jeff

    2014-05-01

    In many fluvial environments low density materials are transported in significant quantities and these form an important part of the stream load and /or have a distinct impact on sedimentation in these environments. However, there are significant gaps in understanding of how these materials are entrained and transported by streams and rivers. Eroding upland peatland environments in particular, frequently have fluvial systems in which large eroded peat blocks, often exceeding 1 m in length; form an important component of the stream material flux. Transport of this material is significant in determining rates of erosion but also has important impacts in terms of damage to infrastructure and carbon loss. This paper describes a field experiment designed to establish for the first time the conditions under which large peat blocks (c. > 0.1 m b axis) are initially entrained from a rough gravel bed. The field site is Trout Beck, in the North Pennines, Northern England which is an upland wandering river channel with occasional lateral and mid channel bars. Mean low flow stage is typically 0.2 m but during flood can rapidly rise, in one to two hours, to over 1.5 m. To study peat block entrainment a bespoke data acquisition system consisting of two pressure transducers, four release triggers and time lapse camera was set up. The pressure transducers provided a record of local depth and the release triggers were embedded in peat blocks to record initial motion and arranged on the rough stream bed. The time lapse camera provided verification of timing of block entrainment (during daylight hours) and also provided information on the mechanism of initial movement. Peat blocks were cut from a local source and were equidimensional, ranging in size from 0.1 to 0.7 m. The derived entrainment function is related to a critical depth of entrainment. Results demonstrate that peat blocks are entrained when the local depth approximates the height of the peat block. Blocks frequently shift

  4. Oligoaniline-containing supramolecular block copolymer nanodielectric materials.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Christopher G; Islam, Md Sayful; Gonzalez-Delozier, Dioni; Ploehn, Harry J; Tang, Chuanbing

    2012-05-14

    We report a new generation of nanodielectric energy storage materials based on supramolecular block copolymers. In our approach, highly polarizable, conducting nanodomains are embedded within an insulating matrix through block copolymer microphase separation. An applied electric field leads to electronic polarization of the conducting domains. The high interfacial area of microphase-separated domains amplifies the polarization, leading to high dielectric permittivity. Specifically, reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization was used to prepare block copolymers with poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) as the insulating segment and a strongly acidic dopant moiety, poly-(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPSA), as the basis for the conducting segment. The PAMPSA block was complexed with an oligoaniline trimer to form a dopant-conjugated moiety complex that is electronically conductive after oxidation. For the undoped neat block copolymers, the increase of the PMA block length leads to a transition in dielectric properties from ionic conductor to dielectric capacitor with polarization resulting from migration of protons within the isolated PAMPSA domains. The oligoaniline-doped copolymers show remarkably different dielectric properties. At frequencies above 200 kHz, they exhibit characteristics of dielectric capacitors with much higher permittivity and lower dielectric loss than the corresponding undoped copolymers. PMID:22331602

  5. The Building Blocks of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Betty O.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses teaching techniques for teaching about rocks, minerals, and the differences between them. Presents a model-building activity that uses plastic building blocks to build crystal and rock models. (YDS)

  6. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  7. Standard Missile Block IV battery

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.

    1996-11-01

    During the 1980`s a trend in automatic primary battery technologies was the replacement of silver-zinc batteries by thermal battery designs. The Standard missile (SM 2) Block IV development is a noteworthy reversal of this trend. The SM2, Block IV battery was originally attempted as a thermal battery with multiple companies attempting to develop a thermal battery design. These attempts resulted in failure to obtain a production thermal battery. A decision to pursue a silver-zinc battery design resulted in the development of a battery to supply the SM 2, Block IV (thermal battery design goal) and also the projected power requirements of the evolving SM 2, Block IVA in a single silver-zinc battery design. Several advancements in silver-zinc battery technology were utilized in this design that improve the producibility and extend the boundaries of silver-zinc batteries.

  8. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... the middle ear and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  9. Block Copolymer Membranes for Efficient Capture of a Chemotherapy Drug

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the use of block copolymer membranes for an emerging application, “drug capture”. The polymer is incorporated in a new class of biomedical devices, referred to as ChemoFilter, which is an image-guided temporarily deployable endovascular device designed to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy-based cancer treatment. We show that block copolymer membranes consisting of functional sulfonated polystyrene end blocks and a structural polyethylene middle block (S-SES) are capable of capturing doxorubicin, a chemotherapy drug. We focus on the relationship between morphology of the membrane in the ChemoFilter device and efficacy of doxorubicin capture measured in vitro. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy, we discovered that rapid doxorubicin capture is associated with the presence of water-rich channels in the lamellar-forming S-SES membranes in aqueous environment. PMID:27547493

  10. Skin delivery by block copolymer nanoparticles (block copolymer micelles).

    PubMed

    Laredj-Bourezg, Faiza; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Pelletier, Jocelyne; Valour, Jean-Pierre; Rovère, Marie-Rose; Smatti, Batoule; Chevalier, Yves

    2015-12-30

    Block copolymer nanoparticles often referred to as "block copolymer micelles" have been assessed as carriers for skin delivery of hydrophobic drugs. Such carriers are based on organic biocompatible and biodegradable materials loaded with hydrophobic drugs: poly(lactide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer (PLA-b-PEG) nanoparticles that have a solid hydrophobic core made of glassy poly(d,l-lactide), and poly(caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer (PCL-b-PEG) nanoparticles having a liquid core of polycaprolactone. In vitro skin absorption of all-trans retinol showed a large accumulation of retinol in stratum corneum from both block copolymer nanoparticles, higher by a factor 20 than Polysorbate 80 surfactant micelles and by a factor 80 than oil solution. Additionally, skin absorption from PLA-b-PEG nanoparticles was higher by one order of magnitude than PCL-b-PEG, although their sizes (65nm) and external surface (water-swollen PEG layer) were identical as revealed by detailed structural characterizations. Fluorescence microscopy of histological skin sections provided a non-destructive picture of the storage of Nile Red inside stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis. Though particle cores had a different physical states (solid or liquid as measured by (1)H NMR), the ability of nanoparticles for solubilization of the drug assessed from their Hildebrand solubility parameters appeared the parameter of best relevance regarding skin absorption. PMID:26602293

  11. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Comby, G.

    1996-10-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  12. Nanopatterning of recombinant proteins and viruses using block copolymer templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresce, Arthur Von Wald

    The study of interfaces is important in understanding biological interactions, including cellular signaling and virus infection. This thesis is an original effort to examine the interaction between a block copolymer and both a protein and a virus. Block copolymers intrinsically form nanometer-scale structures over large areas without expensive processing, making them ideal for the synthesis of the nanopatterned surfaces used in this study. The geometry of these nanostructures can be easily tuned for different applications by altering the block ratio and composition of the block copolymer. Block copolymers can be used for controlled uptake of metal ions, where one block selectively binds metal ions while the other does not. 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid is synthesized through ring-opening metathesis polymerization. It formed spherical domains with spheres approximately 30 nm in diameter, and these spheres were then subsequently loaded with nickel ion. This norbornene block copolymer was tested for its ability to bind histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (hisGFP), and it was found that the nickel-loaded copolymer was able to retain hisGFP through chelation between the histidine tag and the metal-containing portions of the copolymer surface. Poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine) (PS/P4VP) was also loaded with nickel, forming a cylindrical microstructure. The binding of Tobacco mosaic virus and Tobacco necrosis virus was tested through Tween 20 detergent washes. Electron microscopy allowed for observation of both block copolymer nanostructures and virus particles. Results showed that Tween washes could not remove bound Tobacco mosaic virus from the surface of PS/P4VP. It was also seen that the size and tunability of block copolymers and the lack of processing needed to attain different structures makes them attractive for many applications, including microfluidic devices, surfaces to influence cellular signaling and growth, and as a nanopatterning surface for

  13. Patchy micelles based on coassembly of block copolymer chains and block copolymer brushes on silica particles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuzhe; Li, Zhan-Wei; Zhao, Hanying

    2015-04-14

    Patchy particles are a type of colloidal particles with one or more well-defined patches on the surfaces. The patchy particles with multiple compositions and functionalities have found wide applications from the fundamental studies to practical uses. In this research patchy micelles with thiol groups in the patches were prepared based on coassembly of free block copolymer chains and block copolymer brushes on silica particles. Thiol-terminated and cyanoisopropyl-capped polystyrene-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) block copolymers (PS-b-PNIPAM-SH and PS-b-PNIPAM-CIP) were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and chemical modifications. Pyridyl disulfide-functionalized silica particles (SiO2-SS-Py) were prepared by four-step surface chemical reactions. PS-b-PNIPAM brushes on silica particles were prepared by thiol-disulfide exchange reaction between PS-b-PNIPAM-SH and SiO2-SS-Py. Surface micelles on silica particles were prepared by coassembly of PS-b-PNIPAM-CIP and block copolymer brushes. Upon cleavage of the surface micelles from silica particles, patchy micelles with thiol groups in the patches were obtained. Dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and zeta-potential measurements demonstrate the preparation of patchy micelles. Gold nanoparticles can be anchored onto the patchy micelles through S-Au bonds, and asymmetric hybrid structures are formed. The thiol groups can be oxidized to disulfides, which results in directional assembly of the patchy micelles. The self-assembly behavior of the patchy micelles was studied experimentally and by computer simulation. PMID:25811763

  14. Chirped-Superlattice, Blocked-Intersubband QWIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath; Ting, David; Bandara, Sumith

    2004-01-01

    An Al(x)Ga(1-x)As/GaAs quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP) of the blocked-intersubband-detector (BID) type, now undergoing development, features a chirped (that is, aperiodic) superlattice. The purpose of the chirped superlattice is to increase the quantum efficiency of the device. A somewhat lengthy background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a brief description of the present developmental QWIP. A BID QWIP was described in "MQW Based Block Intersubband Detector for Low-Background Operation" (NPO-21073), NASA Tech Briefs Vol. 25, No. 7 (July 2001), page 46. To recapitulate: The BID design was conceived in response to the deleterious effects of operation of a QWIP at low temperature under low background radiation. These effects can be summarized as a buildup of space charge and an associated high impedance and diminution of responsivity with increasing modulation frequency. The BID design, which reduces these deleterious effects, calls for a heavily doped multiple-quantum-well (MQW) emitter section with barriers that are thinner than in prior MQW devices. The thinning of the barriers results in a large overlap of sublevel wave functions, thereby creating a miniband. Because of sequential resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling of electrons from the negative ohmic contact to and between wells, any space charge is quickly neutralized. At the same time, what would otherwise be a large component of dark current attributable to tunneling current through the whole device is suppressed by placing a relatively thick, undoped, impurity-free AlxGa1 x As blocking barrier layer between the MQW emitter section and the positive ohmic contact. [This layer is similar to the thick, undoped Al(x)Ga(1-x)As layers used in photodetectors of the blocked-impurity-band (BIB) type.] Notwithstanding the aforementioned advantage afforded by the BID design, the responsivity of a BID QWIP is very low because of low collection efficiency, which, in turn, is a result of low

  15. A standardized block fabrication technique

    SciTech Connect

    Famiglietti, R.; Noriega, B.; Sanders, R. )

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of delivered dose is a primary goal in every radiation therapy department. Improved imaging techniques now enable the radiation therapist to define more precisely the area of interest, which helps the sparing of normal surrounding tissue. Tray-mounted customized blocks are routinely used to define this treatment portal accurately and reproducibly. However, the level of accuracy is dependent on the block fabrication technique and the skill of the block cutter. We at Moffitt Cancer Center have standardized our system in a way that minimizes some of the human errors, while keeping the procedure fast and accurate. This system uses a tray template that simulates our blocking trays. The function of this tray is to position the styrofoam (and therefore the cerrobend block) on the tray in such a way as to insure proper alignment with the treatment machine. We also feel this improves upon some common designs using random holes or hole patterns, which may interfere with the treatment area. This system is not overly sophisticated and can be easily implemented in most radiation therapy departments.

  16. Block Matching for Object Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gyaourova, A; Kamath, C; Cheung, S

    2003-10-13

    Models which describe road traffic patterns can be helpful in detection and/or prevention of uncommon and dangerous situations. Such models can be built by the use of motion detection algorithms applied to video data. Block matching is a standard technique for encoding motion in video compression algorithms. We explored the capabilities of the block matching algorithm when applied for object tracking. The goal of our experiments is two-fold: (1) to explore the abilities of the block matching algorithm on low resolution and low frame rate video and (2) to improve the motion detection performance by the use of different search techniques during the process of block matching. Our experiments showed that the block matching algorithm yields good object tracking results and can be used with high success on low resolution and low frame rate video data. We observed that different searching methods have small effect on the final results. In addition, we proposed a technique based on frame history, which successfully overcame false motion caused by small camera movements.

  17. Nanoscale Building Blocks and Nanoassembly of Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkan, Cengiz

    2003-03-01

    Electronics and photonics industries are highly interested in developing new methods for nanofabrication in order to be able to continue their long-term trend of building ever smaller, faster and less expensive devices. Conventional patterning strategies must be augmented by new techniques in order to truly take advantage of the quantum nature of novel nanoscale devices. In our research, we are developing a bottom-up approach to fabricate building blocks, which can be used to assemble nanostructures and devices. This involves the assembly of atom- and molecule-like nanostructures into functional 2-D and 3-D units. This will take advantage of the unique optical, electronic, and size-tunable properties of nanostructures and permit the use of these properties for "real" applications in a larger system (> 10 nm and < 1 um). Here, we demonstrate a novel technique for the fabrication of nano-assemblies of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and quantum dots (QD) (CNT-QD conjugates) for the first time using a zero length cross-linker. CNT's are primarily functionalized with carboxylic end groups by oxidation in concentrated sulfuric acid. Thiol stabilized QD's in aqueous solution with amino end groups were prepared in the laboratory. The ethylene carbodiimide coupling reaction was used to achieve the CNT-QD conjugation. Sulfo-N-Hydroxysuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) was used to enhance this coupling procedure. We present EDS and FTIR data for the chemical modification and SEM images of the first nano-building blocks. Current work includes the more complex 3-D assembly of QD's and nanotubes on Anodized Aluminum Oxide (AAO) template for nanodevices. Potential future applications of our method include the fabrication of novel electronic and photonic devices, crystal displays and biosensors.

  18. Block copolymer blend phase behavior: Binary diblock blends and amphiphilic block copolymer/epoxy mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipic, Paul Martin

    The phase behavior of block copolymers and block copolymer blends has provided an extensive amount of exciting research and industrial applications for over thirty years. However, the unique nanoscale morphologies of microphase separated block copolymer systems is still not completely understood. This thesis examines the phase behavior of diblock copolymers and binary diblock copolymer blends in the strong segregation limit (SSL), and blends of an amphiphilic diblock copolymer with an epoxy resin. Studies of high molecular weight (˜84,000 g/mole) poly(ethylene)-poly(ethyl ethylene) (PE-PEE) diblock copolymers probed the ability of block copolymers to reach equilibrium in the SSL. Samples of pure diblocks or binary diblock blends prepared using different preparation techniques (solvent casting or precipitation) had different phase behaviors, as identified with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), confirming non-equilibrium phase behavior. This non-equilibrium behavior was metastable, and these results identify the caution that should be used when claiming equilibrium phase behavior in the SSL. Blends of an amphiphilic diblock copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PEO-PEP) with a polymerizable epoxy resin selectively miscible with PEO, poly(Bisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin), supported theoretical calculations and increased the understanding of block copolymer/homopolymer blends. These blends formed different ordered structures (lamellae, bicontinuous cubic gyroid, hexagonally packed cylinders, cubic and hexagonally packed spheres) as well as a disordered spherical micellar structure, identified with SAXS and rheological measurements. Addition of hardener, methylene dianiline, to the system resulted in cross-linking of the epoxy resin and formation of a thermoset material. Macrophase separation between the epoxy and block copolymer did not occur, but local expulsion of the PEO from the epoxy was

  19. Toy Blocks and Rotational Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varieschi, Gabriele U.; Jully, Isabel R.

    2005-09-01

    Have you ever observed a child playing with toy blocks? A favorite game is to build towers and then make them topple like falling trees. To the eye of a trained physicist this should immediately look like an example of the physics of "falling chimneys," when tall structures bend and break in mid-air while falling to the ground. The game played with toy blocks can actually reproduce well what is usually seen in photographs of falling towers, such as the one that appeared on the cover of the September 1976 issue of The Physics Teacher. In this paper we describe how we performed and analyzed these simple but interesting experiments with toy blocks.

  20. Projectors, shadows, and conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons-Duffin, David

    2014-04-01

    We introduce a method for computing conformal blocks of operators in arbitrary Lorentz representations in any spacetime dimension, making it possible to apply bootstrap techniques to operators with spin. The key idea is to implement the "shadow formalism" of Ferrara, Gatto, Grillo, and Parisi in a setting where conformal invariance is manifest. Conformal blocks in d-dimensions can be expressed as integrals over the projective null-cone in the "embedding space" d+1,1. Taking care with their analytic structure, these integrals can be evaluated in great generality, reducing the computation of conformal blocks to a bookkeeping exercise. To facilitate calculations in four-dimensional CFTs, we introduce techniques for writing down conformally-invariant correlators using auxiliary twistor variables, and demonstrate their use in some simple examples.

  1. Pseudophakic pupillary-block glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, D.; Kaback, M.

    1977-01-01

    Four cases of iris-supported pseudophakic pupillary-block glaucoma were presented. Pupillary-block glaucoma is the first postoperative complication seen following the implantation of an intraocular lens, and in our series occurred at an incidence of 3-8%. A short review was made of pupillary-block glaucoma with all types of intraocular lenses, with emphasis on the iris-supported lens. The role of inflammation, haemorrhage, and vitreous and lens material in obstructing aqueous flow at the pupil and peripheral iridectomy site was emphasised. Pitfalls in the diagnosis and management of this condition were reviewed. Methods of prevention and treatment were reviewed with emphasis on early mydriasis, along with carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and hyperosmotic agents as a primary medical treatment. Iridectomy, laser iridotomy, or transfixation of the iris was mentioned as a surgical treatment. PMID:871462

  2. Block-based neural networks.

    PubMed

    Moon, S W; Kong, S G

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a novel block-based neural network (BBNN) model and the optimization of its structure and weights based on a genetic algorithm. The architecture of the BBNN consists of a 2D array of fundamental blocks with four variable input/output nodes and connection weights. Each block can have one of four different internal configurations depending on the structure settings, The BBNN model includes some restrictions such as 2D array and integer weights in order to allow easier implementation with reconfigurable hardware such as field programmable logic arrays (FPGA). The structure and weights of the BBNN are encoded with bit strings which correspond to the configuration bits of FPGA. The configuration bits are optimized globally using a genetic algorithm with 2D encoding and modified genetic operators. Simulations show that the optimized BBNN can solve engineering problems such as pattern classification and mobile robot control. PMID:18244385

  3. Tharsis block tectonics on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitala, Jouko T.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of block tectonics provides a framework for understanding many aspects of Tharsis and adjoining structures. This Tharsis block tectonics on Mars is manifested partly by mantle-related doming and partly by response to loading by subsequent volcanic construction. Although the origin of the volcanism from beneath Tharsis is a subject of controversy explanations have to include inhomogeneities in Martian internal structure, energy distribution, magma accumulation and motion below the lithosphere. Thermal convection can be seen as a necessary consequence for transient initial phase of Martian cooling. This produced part of the elevated topography with tensional stresses and graben systems radial to the main bulge. The linear grabens, radial to the Tharsis center, can be interpreted to indicate rift zones that define the crustal block boundaries. The load-induced stresses may then have contributed on further graben and ridge formation over an extended period of time.

  4. Automatic blocking of nested loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Robert; Dongarra, Jack J.

    1990-01-01

    Blocked algorithms have much better properties of data locality and therefore can be much more efficient than ordinary algorithms when a memory hierarchy is involved. On the other hand, they are very difficult to write and to tune for particular machines. The reorganization is considered of nested loops through the use of known program transformations in order to create blocked algorithms automatically. The program transformations used are strip mining, loop interchange, and a variant of loop skewing in which invertible linear transformations (with integer coordinates) of the loop indices are allowed. Some problems are solved concerning the optimal application of these transformations. It is shown, in a very general setting, how to choose a nearly optimal set of transformed indices. It is then shown, in one particular but rather frequently occurring situation, how to choose an optimal set of block sizes.

  5. Implication of Blocking Layer Functioning with the Effect of Temperature in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kou, Dongxing; Chen, Shuanghong; Hu, Linhua; Wu, Sixin; Dai, Songyuan

    2016-06-01

    The properties of thin titanium dioxide blocking layers onto TCO in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have been widely reported as their intensity dependence of illumination intensity. Herein, a further investigation about their functioning with the effect of temperature is developed. The electron recombination process, photovoltage response on illumination intensity and photocurrent-voltage properties for DSCs with/without blocking layer at different temperatures are detected. It is found that the electron recombination via TCO becomes increasingly pronounced with increasing temperature and the effect of blocking layer is extremely temperature dependent. The band bending of the compact layer is more effectively to block electron losses at high temperatures, preventing large falloff of photovoltage. Hence, a resistive layer at the surface of TCO keeps comparable cell performances without falloff over a wide temperature range, while the device without blocking layer shows large decrease by over 10% at high temperature for contrast. PMID:27427620

  6. Morphological studies on block copolymer modified PA 6 blends

    SciTech Connect

    Poindl, M. E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Bonten, C. E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de

    2014-05-15

    Recent studies show that compounding polyamide 6 (PA 6) with a PA 6 polyether block copolymers made by reaction injection molding (RIM) or continuous anionic polymerization in a reactive extrusion process (REX) result in blends with high impact strength and high stiffness compared to conventional rubber blends. In this paper, different high impact PA 6 blends were prepared using a twin screw extruder. The different impact modifiers were an ethylene propylene copolymer, a PA PA 6 polyether block copolymer made by reaction injection molding and one made by reactive extrusion. To ensure good particle matrix bonding, the ethylene propylene copolymer was grafted with maleic anhydride (EPR-g-MA). Due to the molecular structure of the two block copolymers, a coupling agent was not necessary. The block copolymers are semi-crystalline and partially cross-linked in contrast to commonly used amorphous rubbers which are usually uncured. The combination of different analysis methods like atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gave a detailed view in the structure of the blends. Due to the partial cross-linking, the particles of the block copolymers in the blends are not spherical like the ones of ethylene propylene copolymer. The differences in molecular structure, miscibility and grafting of the impact modifiers result in different mechanical properties and different blend morphologies.

  7. Morphological studies on block copolymer modified PA 6 blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindl, M.; Bonten, C.

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies show that compounding polyamide 6 (PA 6) with a PA 6 polyether block copolymers made by reaction injection molding (RIM) or continuous anionic polymerization in a reactive extrusion process (REX) result in blends with high impact strength and high stiffness compared to conventional rubber blends. In this paper, different high impact PA 6 blends were prepared using a twin screw extruder. The different impact modifiers were an ethylene propylene copolymer, a PA PA 6 polyether block copolymer made by reaction injection molding and one made by reactive extrusion. To ensure good particle matrix bonding, the ethylene propylene copolymer was grafted with maleic anhydride (EPR-g-MA). Due to the molecular structure of the two block copolymers, a coupling agent was not necessary. The block copolymers are semi-crystalline and partially cross-linked in contrast to commonly used amorphous rubbers which are usually uncured. The combination of different analysis methods like atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gave a detailed view in the structure of the blends. Due to the partial cross-linking, the particles of the block copolymers in the blends are not spherical like the ones of ethylene propylene copolymer. The differences in molecular structure, miscibility and grafting of the impact modifiers result in different mechanical properties and different blend morphologies.

  8. Block ground interaction of rockfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkwein, Axel; Gerber, Werner; Kummer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    During a rockfall the interaction of the falling block with the ground is one of the most important factors that define the evolution of a rockfall trajectory. It steers the rebound, the rotational movement, possibly brake effects, friction losses and damping effects. Therefore, if most reliable rockfall /trajectory simulation software is sought a good understanding of the block ground interaction is necessary. Today's rockfall codes enable the simulation of a fully 3D modelled block within a full 3D surface . However, the details during the contact, i.e. the contact duration, the penetration depth or the dimension of the marks in the ground are usually not part of the simulation. Recent field tests with rocks between 20 and 80 kg have been conducted on a grassy slope in 2014 [1]. A special rockfall sensor [2] within the blocks measured the rotational velocity and the acting accelerations during the tests. External video records and a so-called LocalPositioningSystem deliver information on the travel velocity. With these data not only the flight phases of the trajectories but also the contacts with the ground can be analysed. During the single jumps of a block the flight time, jump length, the velocity, and the rotation are known. During the single impacts their duration and the acting accelerations are visible. Further, the changes of rotational and translational velocity influence the next jump of the block. The change of the rotational velocity over the whole trajectory nicely visualizes the different phases of a rockfall regarding general acceleration and deceleration in respect to the inclination and the topography of the field. References: [1] Volkwein A, Krummenacher B, Gerber W, Lardon J, Gees F, Brügger L, Ott T (2015) Repeated controlled rockfall trajectory testing. [Abstract] Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17: EGU2015-9779. [2] Volkwein A, Klette J (2014) Semi-Automatic Determination of Rockfall Trajectories. Sensors 14: 18187-18210.

  9. Block LancZos PACKage

    2005-05-01

    BLZPACK (for Block LancZos PACKage) is a standard Fortran 77 implementation of the block Lanczos algorithm intended for the solution of the standard eigenvalue problem Ax=ux or the generalized eigenvalue problem Ax=uBx, where A and B are real, sparse symmetric matrices, u and eigenvalue and x and eigenvector. The development of this eigensolver was motivated by the need to solve large, sparse, generalized problems from free vibration analyses in structural engineering. Several upgrades were performedmore » afterwards aiming at the solution of eigenvalues problems from a wider range of applications.« less

  10. Characterization of interface states in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlGaN/GaN structures for improved performance of high-electron-mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Y.; Yatabe, Z.; Hashizume, T.

    2013-12-28

    We have investigated the relationship between improved electrical properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors (MOS-HEMTs) and electronic state densities at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlGaN interface evaluated from the same structures as the MOS-HEMTs. To evaluate Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlGaN interface state densities of the MOS-HEMTs, two types of capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement techniques were employed: the photo-assisted C-V measurement for the near-midgap states and the frequency dependent C-V characteristics for the states near the conduction-band edge. To reduce the interface states, an N{sub 2}O-radical treatment was applied to the AlGaN surface just prior to the deposition of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} insulator. As compared to the sample without the treatment, the N{sub 2}O-radical treated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlGaN/GaN structure showed smaller frequency dispersion of the C-V curves in the positive gate bias range. The state densities at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlGaN interface were estimated to be 1 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} or less around the midgap and 8 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} near the conduction-band edge. In addition, we observed higher maximum drain current at the positive gate bias and suppressed threshold voltage instability under the negative gate bias stress even at 150 °C. Results presented in this paper indicated that the N{sub 2}O-radical treatment is effective both in reducing the interface states and improving the electrical properties of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlGaN/GaN MOS-HEMTs.

  11. Nanoscale investigation of AlGaN/GaN-on-Si high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontserè, A.; Pérez-Tomás, A.; Placidi, M.; Llobet, J.; Baron, N.; Chenot, S.; Cordier, Y.; Moreno, J. C.; Jennings, M. R.; Gammon, P. M.; Fisher, C. A.; Iglesias, V.; Porti, M.; Bayerl, A.; Lanza, M.; Nafría, M.

    2012-10-01

    AlGaN/GaN HEMTs are devices which are strongly influenced by surface properties such as donor states, roughness or any kind of inhomogeneity. The electron gas is only a few nanometers away from the surface and the transistor forward and reverse currents are considerably affected by any variation of surface property within the atomic scale. Consequently, we have used the technique known as conductive AFM (CAFM) to perform electrical characterization at the nanoscale. The AlGaN/GaN HEMT ohmic (drain and source) and Schottky (gate) contacts were investigated by the CAFM technique. The estimated area of these highly conductive pillars (each of them of approximately 20-50 nm radius) represents around 5% of the total contact area. Analogously, the reverse leakage of the gate Schottky contact at the nanoscale seems to correlate somehow with the topography of the narrow AlGaN barrier regions producing larger currents.

  12. Calibrator Blocks For Computerized Tomography (CT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, H. Peter

    1990-01-01

    Sets of calibrator blocks developed for use with industrial computerized tomography (CT) systems. Set of blocks (or number of stacked sets of blocks) placed on object table of CT system and scanned in usual way. Blocks include holes of known size, shape, and location. Appearance of holes in output image of CT system used to verify operation of system.

  13. Teaching Numeracy, Language, and Literacy with Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburger, Abigail; Vaughan, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    By enhancing the block play in classrooms, teachers can help children acquire the emerging skills they need--with numbers, vocabulary, and reading--for kindergarten readiness. Newburger and Vaughan provide a theoretical foundation describing why and how to use blocks, and give guidance on selecting blocks and block safety. With chapters on the…

  14. Unit Blocks: A Curriculum for Early Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Mary Ann

    Teachers can use unit blocks as tools for directed learning activities, or blocks can be reserved for children's discovery learning experiences. To use unit blocks for discovery learning, children need adequate, protected space and sufficient, uninterrupted time. Given opportunities for free play with unit blocks, children progress through seven…

  15. Block Scheduling's Missteps, Successes and Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rettig, Michael D.; Canady, Robert Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Documents Virginia's history of adoption and implementation of block scheduling, highlights common forms of block scheduling, and describes mistakes that caused schools to abandon block scheduling. Describes three key variables (time, teachers, and students) in the use of block scheduling to improve student achievement. (PKP)

  16. Redox-controlled micellization of organometallic block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Rider, David A; Winnik, Mitchell A; Manners, Ian

    2007-11-21

    Polystyrene-block-polyferrocenylsilane (PS-b-PFS) diblock copolymers were stoichiometrically oxidized in solution using salts of the one-electron oxidant tris(4-bromophenyl)ammoniumyl. Due to a redox-induced polarity change for the PFS block, self-assembly into well-defined spherical micelles occurs. The micelles are composed of a core of partially oxidized PFS segments and a corona of PS. When the micellar solutions were treated with the reducing agent decamethylcobaltocene, the spherical micelles disassemble and regenerate unassociated and pristine PS-b-PFS free chains. PMID:17971963

  17. What is a MISR block?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-21

    ... and processing of these data, swathes are broken into a series of predefined, uniformly-sized boxes along the ground track called ... about 142 blocks will contain valid data at any particular time. A MISR Browse Tool is available to help determine MISR paths and ...

  18. Building Blocks for Personal Brands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the four essential building blocks for personal brands: (1) name; (2) message; (3) channels; and (4) bridges. However, outstanding building materials can only take a person so far. The author emphasizes that vision, determination, faith, a sense of humor, and humility are also required.

  19. Preschoolers' Thinking during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccolo, Diana L.; Test, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Children build foundations for mathematical thinking in early play and exploration. During the preschool years, children enjoy exploring mathematical concepts--such as patterns, shape, spatial relationships, and measurement--leading them to spontaneously engage in mathematical thinking during play. Block play is one common example that engages…

  20. The Federal Block Grant Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Seymour; Linster, Charles A.

    Block grants have been defined as programs through which funds are provided to governmental units, such as state or local governments, based upon a statutory formula. They are usually provided for use in a defined, but broad, area and at the recipient's discretion. This document describes the historical development of these grants and the role of…

  1. X2000 power system electronics development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Franco, Lauro; Jones, Loren; Lam, Barbara; Nelson, Ron; Pantaleon, Jose; Ruiz, Ian; Treichler, John; Wester, Gene; Sauers, Jim; Giampoli, Paul; Haskell, Russ; Mulvey, Jim; Repp, John

    2005-01-01

    The X2000 Power System Electronics (PSE) is a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) task to develop a new generation of power system building blocks for potential use on future deep space missions. The effort includes the development of electronic components and modules that can be used as building blocks in the design of generic spacecraft power systems.

  2. Effect of high-temperature annealing for single-Ni-layer gate in AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanjo, Takuma; Imai, Akifumi; Kurahashi, Kenichiro; Matsuda, Takashi; Suita, Muneyoshi; Yagyu, Eiji

    2016-05-01

    AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) with Schottky gate contacts are strong candidates for high-power applications with high-frequency operation. The existence of interfacial traps between Schottky gate contacts and an AlGaN surface is one of the issues causing relatively high gate leakage current in these HEMTs. High-temperature gate annealing, which reduces the density of traps owing to the interfacial reaction between Schottky gate contacts and an AlGaN surface, was investigated using a single-Ni-layer gate structure to prevent the alloying of conventional stacked metal layers such as Ni/Au and Pt/Au. As a result, a strong gate annealing temperature dependence of Schottky characteristics was observed and this dependence also caused drain current collapse. In addition, it was confirmed that 700 °C is the optimal gate annealing temperature for improving both the Schottky characteristics and drain current collapse. These results are attributed to the change in the density of interfacial trap states.

  3. Synthesis and morphology characterization of polydimethylsiloxane-containing block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadley, Maurice

    The thin film morphology characteristics of polydimethylsiloxane-containing block copolymers have been investigated. For this investigation, a commercially available hydroxyl terminated PDMS was purchased from Gelest and attached to a carboxylic acid functional reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agent by Steglich esterification. This produced macro-RAFT agents to which styrene monomer was polymerized. By using this approach the generation of low polydispersity polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-block-PDMS) copolymers of various molecular weights spanning a wide volume fraction range in which the PDMS block remained the same in each polymerization. Synthesized block copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bulk and thin film characterization of PS-block-PDMS copolymers was done by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), contact angle measurements, scanning force microscopy (SFM), and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). The following observations have been made. For PS-rich PS-block -PDMS copolymer thin films the low surface tension of PDMS caused it to migrate to the film surface regardless of solvent choice. The surface morphology was found to depend strongly on the solubility parameter of the solvent and exhibited SFM images consistent with parallel cylinder, perforated lamellar, and lamellar surface layers with increasing solvent solubility parameter. This behavior was due to the selective swelling of the individual blocks under slightly selective, good solvent conditions. A custom solvent annealing apparatus provided similar results in which order-order transitions in the thin films were observed with increasing solvent solubility parameter. Additionally improvements in the long-range order were observed after 1 h of solvent annealing. PS-rich PS-block-PDMS copolymer thin films also displayed PDMS

  4. Block QCA Fault-Tolerant Logic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firjany, Amir; Toomarian, Nikzad; Modarres, Katayoon

    2003-01-01

    Suitably patterned arrays (blocks) of quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) have been proposed as fault-tolerant universal logic gates. These block QCA gates could be used to realize the potential of QCA for further miniaturization, reduction of power consumption, increase in switching speed, and increased degree of integration of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) electronic circuits. The limitations of conventional VLSI circuitry, the basic principle of operation of QCA, and the potential advantages of QCA-based VLSI circuitry were described in several NASA Tech Briefs articles, namely Implementing Permutation Matrices by Use of Quantum Dots (NPO-20801), Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 42; Compact Interconnection Networks Based on Quantum Dots (NPO-20855) Vol. 27, No. 1 (January 2003), page 32; Bit-Serial Adder Based on Quantum Dots (NPO-20869), Vol. 27, No. 1 (January 2003), page 35; and Hybrid VLSI/QCA Architecture for Computing FFTs (NPO-20923), which follows this article. To recapitulate the principle of operation (greatly oversimplified because of the limitation on space available for this article): A quantum-dot cellular automata contains four quantum dots positioned at or between the corners of a square cell. The cell contains two extra mobile electrons that can tunnel (in the quantummechanical sense) between neighboring dots within the cell. The Coulomb repulsion between the two electrons tends to make them occupy antipodal dots in the cell. For an isolated cell, there are two energetically equivalent arrangements (denoted polarization states) of the extra electrons. The cell polarization is used to encode binary information. Because the polarization of a nonisolated cell depends on Coulomb-repulsion interactions with neighboring cells, universal logic gates and binary wires could be constructed, in principle, by arraying QCA of suitable design in suitable patterns. Heretofore, researchers have recognized two major obstacles to realization of QCA

  5. Characterization of Lithium Polysulfide Salts in Homopolymers and Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dunyang; Wujcik, Kevin; Balsara, Nitash

    Ion-conducting polymers are important for solid-state batteries due to the promise of better safety and the potential to produce higher energy density batteries. Nanostructured block copolymer electrolytes can provide high ionic conductivity and mechanical strength through microphase separation. One of the potential use of block copolymer electrolytes is in lithium-sulfur batteries, a system that has high theoretical energy density wherein the reduction of sulfur leads to the formation of lithium polysulfide intermediates. In this study we investigate the effect of block copolymer morphology on the speciation and transport properties of the polysulfides. The morphology and conductivities of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (SEO) containing lithium polysulfides were studies using small-angle X-ray scattering and ac impedance spectroscopy. UV-vis spectroscopy is being used to determine nature of the polysulfide species in poly(ethylene oxide) and SEO. Department of Energy, Soft Matter Electron Microscopy Program and Battery Materials Research Program.

  6. Block copolymer/ferroelectric nanoparticle nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xinchang; He, Yanjie; Jiang, Beibei; Iocozzia, James; Zhao, Lei; Guo, Hanzheng; Liu, Jin; Akinc, Mufit; Bowler, Nicola; Tan, Xiaoli; Lin, Zhiqun

    2013-08-01

    first synthesized by exploiting amphiphilic unimolecular star-like poly(acrylic acid)-block-polystyrene (PAA-b-PS) diblock copolymers as nanoreactors. Subsequently, PS-functionalized BaTiO3 NPs were preferentially sequestered within PS nanocylinders in the linear cylinder-forming polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) diblock copolymer upon mixing the BaTiO3 NPs with PS-b-PMMA. The use of PS-b-PMMA diblock copolymers, rather than traditional homopolymers, offers the opportunity for controlling the spatial organization of PS-functionalized BaTiO3 NPs in the PS-b-PMMA/BaTiO3 NP nanocomposites. Selective solvent vapor annealing was utilized to control the nanodomain orientation in the nanocomposites. Vertically oriented PS nanocylinders containing PS-functionalized BaTiO3 NPs were yielded after exposing the PS-b-PMMA/BaTiO3 NP nanocomposite thin film to acetone vapor, which is a selective solvent for PMMA block. The dielectric properties of nanocomposites in the microwave frequency range were investigated. The molecular weight of PS-b-PMMA and the size of BaTiO3 NPs were found to exert an apparent influence on the dielectric properties of the resulting nanocomposites. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Summary of data for star-like PAA-b-PS, 1H-NMR, XRD, EDS, TGA, TEM and AFM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03036a

  7. Gauge Blocks - A Zombie Technology.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Gauge blocks have been the primary method for disseminating length traceability for over 100 years. Their longevity was based on two things: the relatively low cost of delivering very high accuracy to users, and the technical limitation that the range of high precision gauging systems was very small. While the first reason is still true, the second factor is being displaced by changes in measurement technology since the 1980s. New long range sensors do not require master gauges that are nearly the same length as the part being inspected, and thus one of the primary attributes of gauge blocks, wringing stacks to match the part, is no longer needed. Relaxing the requirement that gauges wring presents an opportunity to develop new types of end standards that would increase the accuracy and usefulness of gauging systems. PMID:27096119

  8. Belos Block Linear Solvers Package

    2004-03-01

    Belos is an extensible and interoperable framework for large-scale, iterative methods for solving systems of linear equations with multiple right-hand sides. The motivation for this framework is to provide a generic interface to a collection of algorithms for solving large-scale linear systems. Belos is interoperable because both the matrix and vectors are considered to be opaque objects--only knowledge of the matrix and vectors via elementary operations is necessary. An implementation of Balos is accomplished viamore » the use of interfaces. One of the goals of Belos is to allow the user flexibility in specifying the data representation for the matrix and vectors and so leverage any existing software investment. The algorithms that will be included in package are Krylov-based linear solvers, like Block GMRES (Generalized Minimal RESidual) and Block CG (Conjugate-Gradient).« less

  9. Dissolution patterns on caramel blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Berhanu, Michael; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    We investigate erosion by dissolution processes. We perform laboratory experiments on hard caramel bodies, which dissolve on a short timescale, compared to geological material such as limestone. We put a block of caramel, tilted from the horizontal, in a water tank without flow. The dissolution syrup, which is denser than pure water, sinks and the flow detaching from the surface creates patterns underneath the caramel block. These patterns result from the coupled dynamics of the flow detaching and the eroding surface and are reminiscent of scallops observed in the walls of phreatic cave passages. We investigate the mechanisms of formation of these structures and their evolution depending on several parameters such as the fluid density or the flow velocity. We finally parallel the formation of patterns on melting iceberg.

  10. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  11. Uav Photogrammetry: Block Triangulation Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gini, R.; Pagliari, D.; Passoni, D.; Pinto, L.; Sona, G.; Dosso, P.

    2013-08-01

    UAVs systems represent a flexible technology able to collect a big amount of high resolution information, both for metric and interpretation uses. In the frame of experimental tests carried out at Dept. ICA of Politecnico di Milano to validate vector-sensor systems and to assess metric accuracies of images acquired by UAVs, a block of photos taken by a fixed wing system is triangulated with several software. The test field is a rural area included in an Italian Park ("Parco Adda Nord"), useful to study flight and imagery performances on buildings, roads, cultivated and uncultivated vegetation. The UAV SenseFly, equipped with a camera Canon Ixus 220HS, flew autonomously over the area at a height of 130 m yielding a block of 49 images divided in 5 strips. Sixteen pre-signalized Ground Control Points, surveyed in the area through GPS (NRTK survey), allowed the referencing of the block and accuracy analyses. Approximate values for exterior orientation parameters (positions and attitudes) were recorded by the flight control system. The block was processed with several software: Erdas-LPS, EyeDEA (Univ. of Parma), Agisoft Photoscan, Pix4UAV, in assisted or automatic way. Results comparisons are given in terms of differences among digital surface models, differences in orientation parameters and accuracies, when available. Moreover, image and ground point coordinates obtained by the various software were independently used as initial values in a comparative adjustment made by scientific in-house software, which can apply constraints to evaluate the effectiveness of different methods of point extraction and accuracies on ground check points.

  12. Multi-level block permutation

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Anderson M.; Webster, Matthew A.; Vidaurre, Diego; Nichols, Thomas E.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Under weak and reasonable assumptions, mainly that data are exchangeable under the null hypothesis, permutation tests can provide exact control of false positives and allow the use of various non-standard statistics. There are, however, various common examples in which global exchangeability can be violated, including paired tests, tests that involve repeated measurements, tests in which subjects are relatives (members of pedigrees) — any dataset with known dependence among observations. In these cases, some permutations, if performed, would create data that would not possess the original dependence structure, and thus, should not be used to construct the reference (null) distribution. To allow permutation inference in such cases, we test the null hypothesis using only a subset of all otherwise possible permutations, i.e., using only the rearrangements of the data that respect exchangeability, thus retaining the original joint distribution unaltered. In a previous study, we defined exchangeability for blocks of data, as opposed to each datum individually, then allowing permutations to happen within block, or the blocks as a whole to be permuted. Here we extend that notion to allow blocks to be nested, in a hierarchical, multi-level definition. We do not explicitly model the degree of dependence between observations, only the lack of independence; the dependence is implicitly accounted for by the hierarchy and by the permutation scheme. The strategy is compatible with heteroscedasticity and variance groups, and can be used with permutations, sign flippings, or both combined. We evaluate the method for various dependence structures, apply it to real data from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) as an example application, show that false positives can be avoided in such cases, and provide a software implementation of the proposed approach. PMID:26074200

  13. Interfaces between Block Copolymer Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeup; Jeong, Seong-Jun; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2011-03-01

    Block copolymers naturally form nanometer scale structures which repeat their geometry on a larger scale. Such a small scale periodic pattern can be used for various applications such as storage media, nano-circuits and optical filters. However, perfect alignment of block copolymer domains in the macroscopic scale is still a distant dream. The nanostructure formation usually occurs with spontaneously broken symmetry; hence it is easily infected by topological defects which sneak in due to entropic fluctuation and incomplete annealing. Careful annealing can gradually reduce the number of defects, but once kinetically trapped, it is extremely difficult to remove all the defects. One of the main reasons is that the defect finds a locally metastable morphology whose potential depth is large enough to prohibit further morphology evolution. In this work, the domain boundaries between differently oriented lamellar structures in thin film are studied. For the first time, it became possible to quantitatively study the block copolymer morphology in the transitional region, and it was shown that the twisted grain boundary is energetically favorable compared to the T-junction grain boundary. [Nano Letters, 9, 2300 (2010)]. This theoretical method successfully explained the experimental results.

  14. Colostomy with Transversus Abdominis Plane Block.

    PubMed

    Tekelioğlu, Ümit Yaşar; Demirhan, Abdullah; Şit, Mustafa; Kurt, Adem Deniz; Bilgi, Murat; Koçoğlu, Hasan

    2015-12-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is one of the abdominal field block. The TAP block is used for both anaesthetic management and post-operative pain therapy in lower abdominal surgery. TAP block is a procedure in which local anaesthetic agents are applied to the anatomic neurofacial space between the internal oblique and the transversus abdominis muscle. TAP block is a good method for post-operative pain control as well as allows for short operations involving the abdominal area. In this article, a case of colostomy under TAP block is presented. PMID:27366540

  15. [THE TECHNOLOGY "CELL BLOCK" IN CYTOLOGICAL PRACTICE].

    PubMed

    Volchenko, N N; Borisova, O V; Baranova, I B

    2015-08-01

    The article presents summary information concerning application of "cell block" technology in cytological practice. The possibilities of implementation of various modern techniques (immune cytochemnical analysis. FISH, CISH, polymerase chain reaction) with application of "cell block" method are demonstrated. The original results of study of "cell block" technology made with gelatin, AgarCyto and Shadon Cyoblock set are presented. The diagnostic effectiveness of "cell block" technology and common cytological smear and also immune cytochemical analysis on samples of "cell block" technology and fluid cytology were compared. Actually application of "cell block" technology is necessary for ensuring preservation of cell elements for subsequent immune cytochemical and molecular genetic analysis. PMID:26596046

  16. Manipulating Ordering Transitions in Interfacially Modified Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, N.; Tureau, M; Epps, T

    2009-01-01

    We report a synthetic strategy that allows us to manipulate the interfacial region between blocks and control ordering transitions in poly(isoprene-b-styrene) [P(I-S)] block copolymers. This interfacial modification is accomplished by combining a semi-batch feed with anionic polymerization techniques. Using this approach, we are able to control the segmental composition and molecular interactions in our phase-separated block copolymers, independent of molecular weight and block constituents. A library of copolymers is prepared with various interfacial modifications to examine the effect of interfacial composition on copolymer self-assembly. The morphological characteristics of the self-assembled structures are investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Normal and inverse tapered block copolymers, containing approximately 15-35 vol% tapered material, show a measurable decrease in the order-disorder transition temperature (TODT) relative to the corresponding non-tapered diblock copolymers, with the inverse tapered materials showing the greatest deviation in TODT. Additionally, TODT was inversely related to the volume fraction of the tapered region in both normal and inverse tapered copolymer materials.

  17. Gas Permeation through Polystyrene-Poly(ethylene oxide) Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallinan, Daniel, Jr.; Minelli, Matteo; Giacinti-Baschetti, Marco; Balsara, Nitash

    2013-03-01

    Lithium air batteries are a potential technology for affordable energy storage. They consist of a lithium metal anode and a porous air cathode separated by a solid polymer electrolyte membrane, such as PEO/LiTFSI (PEO = poly(ethylene oxide), LiTFSI = lithium bis-trifluoromethane sulfonimide). For extended operation of such a battery, the polymer electrolyte must conduct lithium ions while blocking electrons and gases present in air. In order to maintain a pressure difference the membrane must be mechanically robust, which can be achieved by incorporating the PEO into a block copolymer with a glassy block such as PS (PS = polystyrene). To protect the lithium electrode, the membrane must have low permeability to gases in air such as CO2, N2, and O2. We have therefore studied the permeation of pure gases through a PS-PEO block copolymer. A high molecular weight, symmetric block copolymer with a lamellar morphology was used to cast free-standing membranes. Gas permeability was measured through these membranes with a standard, pressure-based technique. A model was developed to account for transport through the polymer membrane consisting of semi-crystalline PEO lamellae and amorphous PS lamellae. PEO crystallinity was extracted from the permeation model and compares well with values from differential scanning calorimetry measurements.

  18. The effect of the amount of blocking cue training on blocking of appetitive conditioning in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, David J.; Jones, William S.; Austen, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Conditioning of a target cue is blocked when it occurs in compound with another cue (blocking cue) that has already received conditioning. Although blocking of appetitive conditioning is commonly used in rodents as a test of selective learning, it has been demonstrated rarely in mice. In order to investigate the conditions that result in blocking in mice two studies tested the effect of the extent of prior blocking cue training on blocking of appetitive conditioning. Mice received either 80 or 200 trials of blocking cue training prior to compound conditioning. A control group received only compound training. Experiment 1 assessed the ability of a visual cue to block conditioning to an auditory target cue. Exposure to the context and the unconditioned stimulus, sucrose pellets, was equated across groups. Blocking was evident in mice that received 200, but not 80 training trials with the visual blocking cue. Responding to the blocking cue was similar across groups. Experiment 2 assessed the ability of an auditory cue to block conditioning to a visual target cue. Blocking was evident in mice trained with 80 and 200 auditory blocking cue trials. The results demonstrate that the strength of blocking in mice is dependent on the modality and experience of the blocking cue. Furthermore, prolonged training of the blocking cue after asymptotic levels of conditioned responding have been reached is necessary for blocking to occur under certain conditions suggesting that the strength of conditioned responding is a limited measure of learning. PMID:26562656

  19. Threading and Near-Surface Dislocations in InGaSb/AlSb Films with Blocking and Anti-Blocking Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, M. B.; Twigg, M. E.; Mahadik, N. A.; Canedy, C. L.; Affouda, C. A.

    2016-04-01

    In order to mitigate the formation of threading dislocations in an In0.1Ga0.9Sb heteroepitaxial buffer layer grown on a (001) GaSb substrate, an AlSb blocking layer was grown within the buffer layer. Transmission electron microscopy measurements revealed that the film with the AlSb blocking layer had a significantly lower threading dislocation density than a buffer layer of equivalent thickness in the absence of the blocking layer. Because the AlSb blocking layer is of greater mechanical stiffness than the In0.1Ga0.9Sb buffer layer, attractive image forces that act to draw dislocations to the film surface are countered by repulsive image forces traceable to the In0.1Ga0.9Sb/AlSb interface. These experimental results are consistent with calculations based on anisotropic elasticity theory for repulsive image forces acting on a dislocation beneath the blocking layer.

  20. Using Quilt Blocks to Construct Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westegaard, Susanne K.

    2008-01-01

    The article documents student experiences with quilt blocks in a mathematics classroom. Using blocks as tools, students construct their understanding of perimeter, area, probability, and transformations. (Contains 9 figures.)

  1. Hillslope-derived blocks retard river incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobe, Charles M.; Tucker, Gregory E.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-05-01

    The most common detachment-limited river incision models ignore the effects of sediment on fluvial erosion, yet steep reaches of mountain rivers often host clusters of large (>1 m) blocks. We argue that this distribution of blocks is a manifestation of an autogenic negative feedback in which fast vertical river incision steepens adjacent hillslopes, which deliver blocks to the channel. Blocks inhibit incision by shielding the bed and enhancing form drag. We explore this feedback with a 1-D channel-reach model in which block delivery by hillslopes depends on the river incision rate. Results indicate that incision-dependent block delivery can explain the block distribution in Boulder Creek, Colorado. The proposed negative feedback may significantly slow knickpoint retreat, channel adjustment, and landscape response compared to rates predicted by current theory. The influence of hillslope-derived blocks may complicate efforts to extract base level histories from river profiles.

  2. Workflow in interventional radiology: nerve blocks and facet blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddoway, Donald; Ingeholm, Mary Lou; Burgert, Oliver; Neumuth, Thomas; Watson, Vance; Cleary, Kevin

    2006-03-01

    Workflow analysis has the potential to dramatically improve the efficiency and clinical outcomes of medical procedures. In this study, we recorded the workflow for nerve block and facet block procedures in the interventional radiology suite at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, DC, USA. We employed a custom client/server software architecture developed by the Innovation Center for Computer Assisted Surgery (ICCAS) at the University of Leipzig, Germany. This software runs in an internet browser, and allows the user to record the actions taken by the physician during a procedure. The data recorded during the procedure is stored as an XML document, which can then be further processed. We have successfully gathered data on a number if cases using a tablet PC, and these preliminary results show the feasibility of using this software in an interventional radiology setting. We are currently accruing additional cases and when more data has been collected we will analyze the workflow of these procedures to look for inefficiencies and potential improvements.

  3. Method for making block siloxane copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Nora; Jessop, Edward S.; Kolb, John R.

    1982-01-01

    A method for synthesizing block polysiloxane copolymers. Diorganoscyclosiloxanes and an end-blocking compound are interacted in the presence of a ring opening polymerization catalyst, producing a blocked prepolymer. The prepolymer is then interacted with a silanediol, resulting in condensation polymerization of the prepolymers. A second end-blocking compound is subsequently introduced to end-cap the polymers and copolymers formed from the condensation polymerization.

  4. Method for making block siloxane copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Butler, N.L.; Jessop, E.S.; Kolb, J.R.

    1981-02-25

    A method for synthesizing block polysiloxane copolymers is disclosed. Diorganoscyclosiloxanes and an end-blocking compound are interacted in the presence of a ring opening polymerization catalyst, producing a blocked prepolymer. The prepolymer is then interacted with a silanediol, resulting in condensation polymerization of the prepolymers. A second end-blocking compound is subsequently introduced to end-cap the polymers and copolymers formed from the condensation polymerization.

  5. Math for Electronics; Industrial Electronics 1: 9323.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This curriculum guide is designed for the student interested in preparing for vocational electronics and related fields of electricity, emphasizing the mathematics necessary for an indepth study of electronics. Included in the course content are goals, specific block objectives, basic algebra, powers of 10, the slide rule, basic trigonometry…

  6. Attraction by Repulsion: Pairing Electrons using Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilani, Shahal

    One of the fundamental properties of electrons is their mutual Columbic repulsion. If electrons are placed in a solid, however, this basic property may change. A famous example is that of superconductors, where coupling to lattice vibrations makes electrons attractive and leads to the formation of bound pairs. But what if all the degrees of freedom in the solid are electronic? Is it possible to make electrons attract each other only by their repulsion to other electrons? Such an `excitonic' mechanism for attraction was proposed fifty years ago by W. A. Little, with the hope that it could lead to better and more exotic superconductivity. Yet, despite many efforts to synthesize materials that possess this unique property, to date there is still no evidence for electronic-based attraction. In this talk I will present our recent experiments that observe this unusual electronic attraction using a different, bottom-up approach. Our experiments are based on a new generation of quantum devices made from pristine carbon nanotubes, combined with precision cryogenic manipulation. Using this setup we can now assemble the fundamental building block of the excitonic attraction and demonstrate that two electrons that naturally repel each other can be made attractive using an independent electronic system as the binding glue. I will discuss the lessons learned from these experiments on what is achievable with plain electrostatics, and on the possibility to use the observed mechanism for creating exotic states of matter.

  7. Standardized Curriculum for Brick, Block, and Stonemasonry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized curricula are provided for two courses for the secondary vocational education program in Mississippi: brick, block, and stonemasonry I and II. The six units in brick, block, and stonemasonry I are as follows: orientation and leadership activities; safety; basic tools and equipment; masonry units; mortar; and wall layout. Brick, block,…

  8. Bullet-Block Science Video Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A science video blog, which has gone viral, shows a wooden block shot by a vertically aimed rifle. The video shows that the block hit dead center goes exactly as high as the one shot off-center. (Fig. 1). The puzzle is that the block shot off-center carries rotational kinetic energy in addition to the gravitational potential energy. This leads a…

  9. Encoders for block-circulant LDPC codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus to encode message input symbols in accordance with an accumulate-repeat-accumulate code with repetition three or four are disclosed. Block circulant matrices are used. A first method and apparatus make use of the block-circulant structure of the parity check matrix. A second method and apparatus use block-circulant generator matrices.

  10. 31 CFR 515.319 - Blocked account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account. 515.319 Section 515... § 515.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals or...

  11. 31 CFR 515.319 - Blocked account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account. 515.319 Section 515... § 515.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals or...

  12. 31 CFR 500.319 - Blocked account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account. 500.319 Section 500... § 500.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals of...

  13. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  14. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  15. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  16. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  17. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  18. Evaluation of 4 X 4 Block Schedule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutter, Davida W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes 4 X 4 block scheduling and its advantages and disadvantages. Examines block scheduling's effects on a Virginia high school's students, teachers, and administration, based on school data and survey results. Most participants preferred block scheduling over the six-period schedule. Grades, attendance, and discipline improved; students…

  19. Naming Block Structures: A Multimodal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Lynn; Uhry, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    This study describes symbolic representation in block play in a culturally diverse suburban preschool classroom. Block play is "multimodal" and can allow children to experiment with materials to represent the world in many forms of literacy. Combined qualitative and quantitative data from seventy-seven block structures were collected and analyzed.…

  20. Block Play: Practical Suggestions for Common Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunks, Karyn Wellhousen

    2009-01-01

    Learning materials and teaching methods used in early childhood classrooms have fluctuated greatly over the past century. However, one learning tool has stood the test of time: Wood building blocks, often called unit blocks, continue to be a source of pleasure and learning for young children at play. Wood blocks have the unique capacity to engage…

  1. Basalt-Block Heat-Storage Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Concept for storage of solar heat for later use based on use of basalt, cast into blocks and stacked in inflatable gas-tight enclosure serving as heat-storage chamber. Heat flows to blocks from solar collector during day and from blocks to heat engine at night.

  2. Block copolymers for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.M.; Ball, L.E.

    1987-05-19

    A water soluble block copolymer is described comprising two or more water soluble polymer blocks, wherein the water soluble polymer blocks comprise polymerized monomers. The monomers are selected from the group consisting of acrylamide, methacrylamide, vinyl methyl ether, acrylic and methacrylic acid and their water soluble salts and N-substituted acrylamides.

  3. An Analysis of Research on Block Scheduling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepeda, Sally J.; Mayers, R. Stewart

    2006-01-01

    In this analysis of 58 empirical studies of high school block scheduling, the authors report findings in and across five groupings. Within groups, data were inconsistent regarding whether teachers' practices changed, but teachers believed that staff development was necessary to teach in a block schedule. Block scheduling appeared to increase…

  4. MARINE BOTTOM COMMUNITIES OF BLOCK ISLAND WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sea has long been an integral part of Block Island's natural history, beginning when the rising sea surrounded the high spot on a Pleistocene terminal moraine that became Block Island. The southern New England continental shelf, which lies around Block Island, and the Great S...

  5. BLOCK DISPLACEMENT METHOD FIELD DEMONSTRATION AND SPECIFICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Block Displacement technique has been developed as a remedial action method for isolating large tracks of ground contaminated by hazardous waste. The technique places a low permeability barrier around and under a large block of contaminated earth. The Block Displacement proce...

  6. Imide/arylene ether block copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Bass, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Two series of imide/arylene either block copolymers were prepared using an arylene ether block and either an amorphous or semi-crystalline imide block. The resulting copolymers were characterized and selected physical and mechanical properties were determined. These results, as well as comparisons to the homopolymer properties, are discussed.

  7. Pattern transfer using block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaodan; Gunkel, Ilja; Russell, Thomas P

    2013-10-13

    To meet the increasing demand for patterning smaller feature sizes, a lithography technique is required with the ability to pattern sub-20 nm features. While top-down photolithography is approaching its limit in the continued drive to meet Moore's law, the use of directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCPs) offers a promising route to meet this challenge in achieving nanometre feature sizes. Recent developments in BCP lithography and in the DSA of BCPs are reviewed. While tremendous advances have been made in this field, there are still hurdles that need to be overcome to realize the full potential of BCPs and their actual use. PMID:24000358

  8. Suboptimum decoding of block codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Kasami, Tadao

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigates a class of decomposable codes, their distance and structural properties. it is shown that this class includes several classes of well known and efficient codes as subclasses. Several methods for constructing decomposable codes or decomposing codes are presented. A two-stage soft decision decoding scheme for decomposable codes, their translates or unions of translates is devised. This two-stage soft-decision decoding is suboptimum, and provides an excellent trade-off between the error performance and decoding complexity for codes of moderate and long block length.

  9. Block Oriented Simulation System (BOSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, Jaimie

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation is assuming greater importance as a flexible and expedient approach to modeling system and subsystem behavior. Simulation has played a key role in the growth of complex, multiple access space communications such as those used by the space shuttle and the TRW-built Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS). A powerful new simulator for use in designing and modeling the communication system of NASA's planned Space Station is being developed. Progress to date on the Block (Diagram) Oriented Simulation System (BOSS) is described.

  10. Large block test status report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, D.G.; Lin, W.; Blair, S.C.

    1997-08-26

    This report is intended to serve as a status report, which essentially transmits the data that have been collected to date on the Large Block Test (LBT). The analyses of data will be performed during FY98, and then a complete report will be prepared. This status report includes introductory material that is not needed merely to transmit data but is available at this time and therefore included. As such, this status report will serve as the template for the future report, and the information is thus preserved.

  11. Electrical detection of kidney injury molecule-1 with AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. T.; Kang, B. S.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-11-26

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), an important biomarker for early kidney injury detection. The gate region consisted of 5 nm gold deposited onto the AlGaN surface. The gold was conjugated to highly specific KIM-1 antibodies through a self-assembled monolayer of thioglycolic acid. The HEMT source-drain current showed a clear dependence on the KIM-1 concentration in phosphate-buffered saline solution. The limit of detection was 1 ng/ml using a 20x50 {mu}m{sup 2} gate sensing area. This approach shows potential for both preclinical and clinical kidney injury diagnosis with accurate, rapid, noninvasive, and high throughput capabilities.

  12. An AlN/Al0.85Ga0.15N high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baca, Albert G.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Douglas, Erica A.; Sanchez, Carlos A.; King, Michael P.; Coltrin, Michael E.; Fortune, Torben R.; Kaplar, Robert J.

    2016-07-01

    An AlN barrier high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based on the AlN/Al0.85Ga0.15N heterostructure was grown, fabricated, and electrically characterized, thereby extending the range of Al composition and bandgap for AlGaN channel HEMTs. An etch and regrowth procedure was implemented for source and drain contact formation. A breakdown voltage of 810 V was achieved without a gate insulator or field plate. Excellent gate leakage characteristics enabled a high Ion/Ioff current ratio greater than 107 and an excellent subthreshold slope of 75 mV/decade. A large Schottky barrier height of 1.74 eV contributed to these results. The room temperature voltage-dependent 3-terminal off-state drain current was adequately modeled with Frenkel-Poole emission.

  13. Bias Dependence of Gallium Nitride Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Actuation Using a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Achraf Ben; Faucher, Marc; Grimbert, Bertrand; Cordier, Yvon; Fran\\{c}ois, Marc; Tilmant, Pascal; Werquin, Matthieu; Zhang, Victor; Ducatteau, Damien; Gaquière, Christophe; Buchaillot, Lionel; Théron, Didier

    2012-06-01

    The piezoelectric actuation of a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator based on an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is studied under various bias conditions. Using an actuator electrode that is also a transistor gate, we correlate the mechanical behaviour to the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) presence. The measured amplitude of the actuated resonator is maximum at moderate negative biases and drops near the pinch-off voltage in concordance with the 2DEG becoming depleted. Below the pinch-off voltage, residual actuation is still present, which is attributed to a more complex electric field pattern supported by quantitative modelling. The results confirm that epitaxial AlGaN barriers are fully adapted to the piezoelectric actuation of MEMS.

  14. A New Method to Modify Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Density by GaN Cap Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongda; Chow, T. Paul

    2013-08-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated a new method for modifying the two-dimensional electron density (2DEG) at the AlGaN/GaN interface by etching of the GaN cap layer on top of the AlGaN. GaN MOS capacitors have been fabricated on samples with partially or fully etched GaN cap, and the 2DEG density has been extracted. The results show a linear relation between the 2DEG density and the thickness of the GaN cap being etched. We have also fabricated van der Pauw structures and obtained the 2DEG density using Hall measurements, and the results are consistent with that from the GaN MOS capacitors.

  15. Coastal protection using topological interlocking blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pattiaratchi, Charitha; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2013-04-01

    The coastal protection systems mainly rely on the self-weight of armour blocks to ensure its stability. We propose a system of interlocking armour blocks, which form plate-shape assemblies. The shape and the position of the blocks are chosen in such a way as to impose kinematic constraints that prevent the blocks from being removed from the assembly. The topological interlocking shapes include simple convex blocks such as platonic solids, the most practical being tetrahedra, cubes and octahedra. Another class of topological interlocking blocks is so-called osteomorphic blocks, which form plate-like assemblies tolerant to random block removal (almost 25% of blocks need to be removed for the assembly to loose integrity). Both classes require peripheral constraint, which can be provided either by the weight of the blocks or post-tensioned internal cables. The interlocking assemblies provide increased stability because lifting one block involves lifting (and bending) the whole assembly. We model the effect of interlocking by introducing an equivalent additional self-weight of the armour blocks. This additional self-weight is proportional to the critical pressure needed to cause bending of the interlocking assembly when it loses stability. Using beam approximation we find an equivalent stability coefficient for interlocking. It is found to be greater than the stability coefficient of a structure with similar blocks without interlocking. In the case when the peripheral constraint is provided by the weight of the blocks and for the slope angle of 45o, the effective stability coefficient for a structure of 100 blocks is 33% higher than the one for a similar structure without interlocking. Further increase in the stability coefficient can be reached by a specially constructed peripheral constraint system, for instance by using post-tension cables.

  16. Seismicity of the Jalisco Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Rutz, M.; Camarena-Garcia, M.; Trejo-Gomez, E.; Reyes-Davila, G.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2002-12-01

    In April 2002 began to transmit the stations of the first phase of Jalisco Telemetric Network located at the northwest of Jalisco Block and at the area of Volcan de Fuego (Colima Volcano), in June were deployed four additional MarsLite portable stations in the Bahia de Banderas area, and by the end of August one more portable station at Ceboruco Volcano. The data of these stations jointly with the data from RESCO (Colima Telemetric Network) give us the minimum seismic stations coverage to initiate in a systematic and permanent way the study of the seismicity in this very complex tectonic region. A preliminary analysis of seismicity based on the events registered by the networks using a shutter algorithm, confirms several important features proposed by microseismicity studies carried out between 1996 and 1998. A high level of seismicity inside and below of Rivera plate is observed, this fact suggest a very complex stress pattern acting on this plate. Shallow seismicity at south and east of Bahia de Banderas also suggest a complex stress pattern in this region of the Jalisco Block, events at more than 30 km depth are located under the mouth of the bay and in face of it, a feature denominated Banderas Boundary mark the change of the seismic regime at north of this latitude (20.75°N), however some shallow events were located at the region of Nayarit.

  17. BLOCKING OSCILLATOR DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Haase, J.A.

    1961-01-24

    A double-pulse generator, particuiarly a double-pulse generator comprising a blocking oscillator utilizing a feedback circuit to provide means for producing a second pulse within the recovery time of the blocking oscillator, is described. The invention utilized a passive network which permits adjustment of the spacing between the original pulses derived from the blocking oscillator and further utilizes the original pulses to trigger a circuit from which other pulses are initiated. These other pulses are delayed and then applied to the input of the blocking oscillator, with the result that the output from the oscillator circuit contains twice the number of pulses originally initiated by the blocking oscillator itself.

  18. Multicharacterization approach for studying InAl(Ga)N/Al(Ga)N/GaN heterostructures for high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Naresh-Kumar, G. Trager-Cowan, C.; Vilalta-Clemente, A.; Morales, M.; Ruterana, P.; Pandey, S.; Cavallini, A.; Cavalcoli, D.; Skuridina, D.; Vogt, P.; Kneissl, M.; Behmenburg, H.; Giesen, C.; Heuken, M.; Gamarra, P.; Di Forte-Poisson, M. A.; Patriarche, G.; Vickridge, I.

    2014-12-15

    We report on our multi–pronged approach to understand the structural and electrical properties of an InAl(Ga)N(33nm barrier)/Al(Ga)N(1nm interlayer)/GaN(3μm)/ AlN(100nm)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) heterostructure grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). In particular we reveal and discuss the role of unintentional Ga incorporation in the barrier and also in the interlayer. The observation of unintentional Ga incorporation by using energy dispersive X–ray spectroscopy analysis in a scanning transmission electron microscope is supported with results obtained for samples with a range of AlN interlayer thicknesses grown under both the showerhead as well as the horizontal type MOVPE reactors. Poisson–Schrödinger simulations show that for high Ga incorporation in the Al(Ga)N interlayer, an additional triangular well with very small depth may be exhibited in parallel to the main 2–DEG channel. The presence of this additional channel may cause parasitic conduction and severe issues in device characteristics and processing. Producing a HEMT structure with InAlGaN as the barrier and AlGaN as the interlayer with appropriate alloy composition may be a possible route to optimization, as it might be difficult to avoid Ga incorporation while continuously depositing the layers using the MOVPE growth method. Our present work shows the necessity of a multicharacterization approach to correlate structural and electrical properties to understand device structures and their performance.

  19. Efficiency droop enhancement in AlGaN deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes by making whole barriers but the bottom Mg doped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Sun, Huiqing; Yi, Xinyan; Yang, Xian; Fan, Xuancong; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhuding; Guo, Zhiyou

    2016-09-01

    Ultra violet light-emitting diodes (UVLEDs) with different types of Mg-doped barriers have been studied. The energy band diagrams, internal quantum efficiency, total output power and radiative recombination rate are investigated by APSYS software. The simulation results show that the UVLED with only a p-doped top barrier get little enhancement comparing to the conventional one, on the contrary the structure with p-doping in all but the bottom barriers has a much better optical and electrical properties due to enhancement of the holes' injection and the electrons' confinement. The efficiency droop is significantly alleviated and the light output power is greatly enhanced. To avoid forming a PN junction by the bottom barrier and the n-AlGaN in the proposed structure, therefore, the bottom barrier isn't p-doped. Then structures with different hole densities in the Mg-doped barriers have been studied numerically and that confirmed the best.

  20. Strains and tilts on crustal blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilham, R. G.; Beavan, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Geodetic work done over the past century is examined to investigate block motion in areas of intense tectonic deformation, with special attention to geodetic releveling data obtained for Japan. Problems in interpreting strainmeter and tiltmeter to study the behavior of crustal blocks and block boundaries are discussed. Block dimensions of 5 to 50 km seem to occur frequently in regions of intense tectonic activity. Block boundaries are often considerably weaker than contiguous crustal blocks, resulting in a concentration of strains at boundaries and decrease of strains within blocks. Block to block variations in tilt phase and magnitude are observed. There is some evidence that block boundaries may exhibit strain-dependent elastic properties or respond viscoelastically, possibly accounting for the slow transmission of tectonic deformation reported in Japan. If nonlinear behavior is characteristic of regions fragmented by crustal blocks, it will generally not be possible to apply a site correction factor based on the observed distortion of tidal or seismic strains in interpreting secular strains.

  1. A technique for optimizing grid blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenhoffer, John F., III

    1995-01-01

    A new technique for automatically combining grid blocks of a given block-structured grid into logically-rectangular clusters which are 'optimal' is presented. This technique uses the simulated annealing optimization method to reorganize the blocks into an optimum configuration, that is, one which minimizes a user-defined objective function such as the number of clusters or the differential in the sizes of all the clusters. The clusters which result from applying the technique to two different two-dimensional configurations are presented for a variety of objective function definitions. In all cases, the automatically-generated clusters are significantly better than the original clusters. While this new technique can be applied to block-structured grids generated from any source, it is particularly useful for operating on block-structured grids containing many blocks, such as those produced by the emerging automatic block-structured grid generators.

  2. Study of carrier blocking property of poly-linalyl acetate thin layer by electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Anderson, Liam J.; Jacob, Mohan V.

    2014-02-01

    By using electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement, we studied the carrier-blocking property of poly-linalyl acetate (PLA) thin layers sandwiched in indium-zinc-oxide (IZO)/PLA/C60/Al double-layer diodes. Results showed that the PLA layer totally blocks electrons crossing the C60 layer, and also blocks holes entering from the IZO layer. The EFISHG measurement effectively substantiates the hole-blocking electron-blocking property of the PLA layer sandwiched in double layer diodes.

  3. Spin-torque building blocks.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, N; Cros, V; Grollier, J

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the spin-torque effect has made magnetic nanodevices realistic candidates for active elements of memory devices and applications. Magnetoresistive effects allow the read-out of increasingly small magnetic bits, and the spin torque provides an efficient tool to manipulate - precisely, rapidly and at low energy cost - the magnetic state, which is in turn the central information medium of spintronic devices. By keeping the same magnetic stack, but by tuning a device's shape and bias conditions, the spin torque can be engineered to build a variety of advanced magnetic nanodevices. Here we show that by assembling these nanodevices as building blocks with different functionalities, novel types of computing architecture can be envisaged. We focus in particular on recent concepts such as magnonics and spintronic neural networks. PMID:24343514

  4. Spin-torque building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, N.; Cros, V.; Grollier, J.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the spin-torque effect has made magnetic nanodevices realistic candidates for active elements of memory devices and applications. Magnetoresistive effects allow the read-out of increasingly small magnetic bits, and the spin torque provides an efficient tool to manipulate -- precisely, rapidly and at low energy cost -- the magnetic state, which is in turn the central information medium of spintronic devices. By keeping the same magnetic stack, but by tuning a device's shape and bias conditions, the spin torque can be engineered to build a variety of advanced magnetic nanodevices. Here we show that by assembling these nanodevices as building blocks with different functionalities, novel types of computing architecture can be envisaged. We focus in particular on recent concepts such as magnonics and spintronic neural networks.

  5. Dynamic Covalent Nanoparticle Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Kay, Euan R

    2016-07-25

    Rational and generalisable methods for engineering surface functionality will be crucial to realising the technological potential of nanomaterials. Nanoparticle-bound dynamic covalent exchange combines the error-correcting and environment-responsive features of equilibrium processes with the stability, structural precision, and vast diversity of covalent chemistry, defining a new and powerful approach for manipulating structure, function and properties at nanomaterial surfaces. Dynamic covalent nanoparticle (DCNP) building blocks thus present a whole host of possibilities for constructing adaptive systems, devices and materials that incorporate both nanoscale and molecular functional components. At the same time, DCNPs have the potential to reveal fundamental insights regarding dynamic and complex chemical systems confined to nanoscale interfaces. PMID:27312526

  6. Automatic blocking for complex three-dimensional configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenhoffer, John F., III

    1995-01-01

    A new blocking technique for complex three-dimensional configurations is described. This new technique is based upon the concept of an abstraction, or squared-up representation, of the configuration and the associated grid. By allowing the user to describe blocking requirements in natural terms (such as 'wrap a grid around this leading edge' or 'make all grid lines emanating from this wall orthogonal to it'), users can quickly generate complex grids around complex configurations, while still maintaining a high level of control where desired. An added advantage of the abstraction concept is that once a blocking is defined for a class of configurations, it can be automatically applied to other configurations of the same class, making the new technique particularly well suited for the parametric variations which typically occur during design processes. Grids have been generated for a variety of real-world, two- and three-dimensional configurations. In all cases, the time required to generate the grid, given just an electronic form of the configuration, was at most a few days. Hence with this new technique, the generation of a block-structured grid is only slightly more expensive than the generation of an unstructured grid for the same configuration.

  7. Using Tapered Block Copolymers to Create Conducting Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, Thomas, III

    2014-03-01

    Soft materials, such as polymers, colloids, surfactants, and liquid crystals, are a technologically important class of matter employed in a variety of applications. One sub-class of soft material, block copolymers, provides the opportunity to design materials with attractive chemical and mechanical properties based on the ability to assemble into periodic structures with nanoscale domain spacings. Several applications for block copolymers currently under investigation in my group include battery and fuel cell membranes, analytical separations membranes, nano-tool templates, precursors to electronic arrays, and drug delivery vehicles. One area of recent progress in the group focuses on the behavior of conventional block copolymer and tapered block copolymer systems for lithium battery membrane applications. We find that we can tune poly(styrene- b-ethylene oxide) diblock copolymer nanostructures by adjusting the lithium counterion and lithium salt concentration, as well as the taper volume fraction and composition. Additionally, we can estimate the effective interaction parameters (χeff) for the salt-doped copolymers to determine the overall influence of tapering on the energetics of copolymer assembly. These tapered materials allow us to design nanostructured membrane systems with increased conductivity and improved mechanical properties in ion transport devices. We gratefully acknowledge AFOSR-PECASE (FA9550-09-1-0706) and NSF-CAREER (DMR-0645586) for financial support.

  8. Metal Nanoparticle/Block Copolymer Composite Assembly and Disassembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Zihui; Sai, Hiroaki; Warren, Scott C; Kamperman, Marleen; Arora, Hitesh; Gruner, Sol M; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Ligand-stabilized platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) were self-assembled with poly(isoprene-block-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PI-b-PDMAEMA) block copolymers to generate organic-inorganic hybrid materials. High loadings of NPs in hybrids were achieved through usage of N,N-di-(2-(allyloxy)ethyl)-N-3-mercaptopropyl-N-3-methylammonium chloride as the ligand, which provided high solubility of NPs in various solvents as well as high affinity to PDMAEMA. From NP synthesis, existence of sub-1 nm Pt NPs was confirmed by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. Estimations of the Pt NP ligand head group density based on HAADF-STEM images and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data yielded results comparable to what has been found for alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on flat Pt {111} surfaces. Changing the volume fraction of Pt NPs in block copolymer-NP composites yielded hybrids with spherical micellar, wormlike micellar, lamellar and inverse hexagonal morphologies. Disassembly of hybrids with spherical, wormlike micellar, and lamellar morphologies generated isolated metal-NP based nano-spheres, cylinders and sheets, respectively. Results suggest the existence of powerful design criteria for the formation of metal-based nanostructures from designer blocked macromolecules. PMID:21103025

  9. Synthesis and Application of Conducting Block Copolymers in Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudouris, Bryan W.; Hillmyer, Marc A.; Frisbie, C. Daniel

    2007-03-01

    Recent advances in the fabrication and post-processing of polymer -- fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have allowed for devices with power conversion efficiencies up to 5% to be generated. An understanding of how the internal morphology of the active layer affects device performance would facilitate optimization and ultimately lead to higher efficiencies. Block copolymers have been shown to self-assemble into well-structured, microphase-separated domains on the order of the diffusion length (˜ 10 nm) of an exciton (bound electron-hole pair) in thin films. In an effort to make a nanostructured active layer morphology we have synthesized block copolymers where the conducting moiety is either poly(3-hexylthiophene) or poly(3-dodeclythiophene) and the second, etchable block is polylactide. Hydroxyl-terminated polythiophene molecules were synthesized via the McCullough method and used as macroinitiators for the ring-opening polymerization of D,L-lactide. AFM images of spin-coated block copolymer films show separation between the polythiophene and polylactide segments. After subjecting the samples to a dilute aqueous base for short periods of time, we have selectively etched the polylactide segments to create pits in the semicrystalline polythiophene matrices. In addition to these findings, preliminary device results will also be discussed.

  10. Effect of Hydrogen-Bonding Junctions on Microphase Separation in Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Greg; Hedrick, Jim; Nederberg, Fredrik; Balsara, Nitash

    2008-03-01

    The morphology of poly(styrene-block- trimethylene carbonate) (PS-PTMC) copolymers with and without thiourea groups at the junction between the blocks was studied by a combination of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thiourea groups are known to exhibit inter-molecular hydrogen bonding. We demonstrate that the presence of thiourea groups results in increased segregation between PS and PTMC blocks. We focus on symmetric systems with total molecular weights in the 5 kg/mol range. In conventional block copolymers without hydrogen bonding groups it is difficult to obtain strong segregation in low molecular weight systems because the product chi*N controls segregation (chi is the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter and N is the number of monomers per chain). The incorporation of hydrogen bonding groups may provide a route for the generation of patterns with small, sharply defined features using block copolymers.

  11. Phase behavior of multi-arm star-shaped polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Sangshin; Moon, Hong Chul; Bae, Dusik; Kwak, Jonghen; Kim, Jin Kon

    2013-03-01

    We synthesized star-shaped polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer (PS- b-PMMA) by utilizing α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) as a core of the star-shaped block copolymer. Eighteen hydroxyl groups on α-CD were transformed to bromine by the reaction with α-bromoisobutyryl bromide. We found that the number of bromine substituted arms per one α-CD was higher than 16, which was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization. We could control molecular weight of block copolymers by changing polymerization times. The block copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Phase behaviors of these star-shaped block copolymers were investigated by small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy.

  12. Variation of blocking temperatures for exchange biased CoO/Co/Ge(100) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cheng-Hsun-Tony; Chang, Shin-Chen; Tsay, Jyh-Shen; Yao, Yeong-Der

    2016-05-01

    Variations of the blocking temperature and related structures for CoO/Co/Ge(100) films are investigated by employing reflection high energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and surface magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements. By increasing the CoO thickness, the blocking temperature is smaller than the Neel temperature of CoO. The monotonous increase of the blocking temperature is mainly attributed to the increasing thermal stability of the antiferromagnetic grains by way of increasing the antiferromagnetic thickness. The deviation of the blocking temperature from the linear relation and the full widths at half maximum of the diffraction spots show a similar trend. The minimums appear around 25 monolayer of CoO and are related to the formation of larger grains.

  13. Block truncation signature coding for hyperspectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sumit; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces a new signature coding which is designed based on the well-known Block Truncation Coding (BTC). It comprises of bit-maps of the signature blocks generated by different threshold criteria. Two new BTC-based algorithms are developed for signature coding, to be called Block Truncation Signature Coding (BTSC) and 2-level BTSC (2BTSC). In order to compare the developed BTC based algorithms with current binary signature coding schemes such as Spectral Program Analysis Manager (SPAM) developed by Mazer et al. and Spectral Feature-based Binary Coding (SFBC) by Qian et al., three different thresholding functions, local block mean, local block gradient, local block correlation are derived to improve the BTSC performance where the combined bit-maps generated by these thresholds can provide better spectral signature characterization. Experimental results reveal that the new BTC-based signature coding performs more effectively in characterizing spectral variations than currently available binary signature coding methods.

  14. Blocking Losses on an Optical Communications Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Piazzolla, Sabino

    2011-01-01

    Many photon-counting photo-detectors have the property that they become inoperative for some time after detection event. We say the detector is blocked during this time.Blocking produces losses when using the detector as a photon-counter to detect a communications signal. In this paper, we characterize blocking losses for single detectors and for arrays of detectors. For arrays, we discuss conditions under which the output may be approximated as a Poisson point process, and provide a simple approximation to the blocking loss. We show how to extend the analysis to arrays of non-uniformly illuminated arrays.

  15. Transient Trifascicular Block in Severe Hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Navnit; Singh, Anurag; Gaba, Ripudaman; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Agarwal, Mandavi; Shukla, Ranjeet

    2015-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a commonly encountered electrolyte abnormality that can significantly alter normal cardiac conduction. Potentially lethal dysrhythmias associated with hyperkalemia include complete heart block and Mobitz Type II second-degree AV block. We report a case of trifascicular block, due to hyperkalemia. The patient's symptoms and electrocardiogram (ECG) evidence of trifascicular block resolved with lowering of serum potassium levels, with subsequent ECG showing left anterior hemiblock. This paper highlights an infrequently reported dysrhythmia associated with hyperkalemia that emergency physicians should be familiar with. PMID:27608872

  16. Recent developments in paediatric neuraxial blocks

    PubMed Central

    Ponde, Vrushali Chandrashekhar

    2012-01-01

    Paediatric anaesthesia and paediatric regional anaesthesia are intertwined. Almost all surgeries unless contradicted could be and should be supplemented with a regional block. The main objective of this review is to elaborate on the recent advances of the central neuraxial blocks, such as application of ultrasound guidance and electrical stimulation in the pursuit of safety and an objective end point. This review also takes account of the traditional technique and understand the benefits as well the risk of each as compared with the recent technique. The recent trends in choosing the most appropriate peripheral block for a given surgery thereby sparing the central neuroaxis is considered. A penile block for circumcision or a sciatic block for unilateral foot surgery, rather than caudal epidural would have a better risk benefit equation. Readers will find a special mention on the recent thoughts on continuous epidural analgesia in paediatrics, especially its rise and fall, yet its unique importance. Lastly, the issue of block placements under sedation or general anaesthesia with its implication in this special population is dealt with. We conducted searches in MEDLINE (PubMed) and assessed the relevance of the abstracts of citations identified from literature searches. The search was carried out in English, for last 10 years, with the following key words: Recent advances in paediatric regional anaesthesia; ultrasound guidance for central neuraxial blocks in children; role of electrical stimulation in neuraxial blocks in children; complications in neuraxial block. Full-text articles of potentially relevant abstracts were retrieved for further review. PMID:23293386

  17. High-performance thermoelectric nanocomposites from nanocrystal building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Maria; Luo, Zhishan; Genç, Aziz; Piveteau, Laura; Ortega, Silvia; Cadavid, Doris; Dobrozhan, Oleksandr; Liu, Yu; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Zebarjadi, Mona; Arbiol, Jordi; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Cabot, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    The efficient conversion between thermal and electrical energy by means of durable, silent and scalable solid-state thermoelectric devices has been a long standing goal. While nanocrystalline materials have already led to substantially higher thermoelectric efficiencies, further improvements are expected to arise from precise chemical engineering of nanoscale building blocks and interfaces. Here we present a simple and versatile bottom-up strategy based on the assembly of colloidal nanocrystals to produce consolidated yet nanostructured thermoelectric materials. In the case study on the PbS-Ag system, Ag nanodomains not only contribute to block phonon propagation, but also provide electrons to the PbS host semiconductor and reduce the PbS intergrain energy barriers for charge transport. Thus, PbS-Ag nanocomposites exhibit reduced thermal conductivities and higher charge carrier concentrations and mobilities than PbS nanomaterial. Such improvements of the material transport properties provide thermoelectric figures of merit up to 1.7 at 850 K.

  18. Preparation and Morphology of ABn Mictoarm Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Atsushi; Watanabe, Momoka; Asai, Yusuke; Suzuki, Jiro; Matsushita, Yushu

    A series of ABn mictoarm block copolymers (bottle brush copolymers) consisting of polystyrene (S) as a backbone and polyisoprenes (I) as grafts were precisely synthesized by an anionic polymerization, and their microphase-separated structures were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle X-ray scattering(SAXS). A copolymer with composition of φS =0.57 and number of grafts(n) of 10 shows characteristic cylindrical structure, where microdomains of S reveals hexagonal cross section with non-constant mean curvature interface. While a sample with composition of φS =0.37 and number of grafts(n) of 40 shows spherical structure with rather large S isolated domains and characteristic domain packing manner was found. Furthermore composition dependence of microphase-separated structures for SIn mictoarm block copolymers were investigated and compared to SI diblock copolymer system.

  19. Nanostructured photovoltaic materials using block polymer assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastroianni, Sarah Elizabeth

    Despite its potential as an abundant, sustainable alternative to non-renewable energy sources, solar energy currently is underutilized. Photovoltaics, which convert energy from sunlight into electricity, commonly are made from inorganic semiconductor materials that require expensive manufacturing and processing techniques. Alternatively, organic materials can be used to produce flexible and lightweight organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can be prepared using solution-based processing techniques. However, OPV devices are limited by low efficiencies and short lifetimes compared to their inorganic counterparts. In OPV systems, charge carriers are generated in the active layer via the separation of excitons (electron-hole pairs) at interfaces between donor and acceptor materials. Because excitons have a limited diffusion length (˜10 nm), they may recombine before reaching a donor-acceptor interface if domain sizes are large. This exciton recombination can limit device efficiency; thus, the design parameters for improved active layer morphologies include large interfacial areas, small size scales, and continuous conducting pathways. Currently, most OPV devices are prepared by blending donor and acceptor materials in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices, often resulting in non-ideal, process-dependent morphologies. Alternatively, the self-assembly of block polymers (BP)s offers a reproducible means to generate nanostructured active layers. The work presented in this dissertation examines the synthetic approaches to preparing BPs containing different electroactive materials: non-conjugated, amorphous poly(vinyl-m-triphenylamine) [PVmTPA] and conjugated poly(3-alkythiophene) [P3AT] p-type materials as well as fullerene-based n-type materials. The synthesis and self-assembly of a model poly(methyl methacrylate)- b-PVmTPA system is presented. This work was extended to synthesize PVmTPA BPs with complementary poly(methyl methacrylate- co-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [P

  20. The building blocks of magnonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenk, B.; Ulrichs, H.; Garbs, F.; Münzenberg, M.

    2011-10-01

    Novel material properties can be realized by designing waves’ dispersion relations in artificial crystals. The crystal’s structural length scales may range from nano- (light) up to centimeters (sound waves). Because of their emergent properties these materials are called metamaterials. Different to photonics, where the dielectric constant dominantly determines the index of refraction, in a ferromagnet the spin-wave index of refraction can be dramatically changed already by the magnetization direction. This allows a different flexibility in realizing dynamic wave guides or spin-wave switches. The present review will give an introduction into the novel functionalities of spin-wave devices, concepts for spin-wave based computing and magnonic crystals. The parameters of the magnetic metamaterials are adjusted to the spin-wave k-vector such that the magnonic band structure is designed. However, already the elementary building block of an antidot lattice, the singular hole, owns a strongly varying internal potential determined by its magnetic dipole field and a localization of spin-wave modes. Photo-magnonics reveal a way to investigate the control over the interplay between localization and delocalization of the spin-wave modes using femtosecond lasers, which is a major focus of this review. We will discuss the crucial parameters to realize free Bloch states and how, by contrast, a controlled localization might allow us to gradually turn on and manipulate spin-wave interactions in spin-wave based devices in the future.

  1. Blocking for Sequential Political Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    In typical political experiments, researchers randomize a set of households, precincts, or individuals to treatments all at once, and characteristics of all units are known at the time of randomization. However, in many other experiments, subjects “trickle in” to be randomized to treatment conditions, usually via complete randomization. To take advantage of the rich background data that researchers often have (but underutilize) in these experiments, we develop methods that use continuous covariates to assign treatments sequentially. We build on biased coin and minimization procedures for discrete covariates and demonstrate that our methods outperform complete randomization, producing better covariate balance in simulated data. We then describe how we selected and deployed a sequential blocking method in a clinical trial and demonstrate the advantages of our having done so. Further, we show how that method would have performed in two larger sequential political trials. Finally, we compare causal effect estimates from differences in means, augmented inverse propensity weighted estimators, and randomization test inversion. PMID:24143061

  2. Optimization of Blocked Designs in fMRI Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maus, Barbel; van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Goebel, Rainer; Berger, Martijn P. F.

    2010-01-01

    Blocked designs in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are useful to localize functional brain areas. A blocked design consists of different blocks of trials of the same stimulus type and is characterized by three factors: the length of blocks, i.e., number of trials per blocks, the ordering of task and rest blocks, and the time between…

  3. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Progress was made on synthesis of new materials for directional electron transfer (block copolymers and helical oligopeptides), preparation and characterization of anisotropic composites bearing organics and inorganics, electrocatalysis (redox-activated catalysts), and surface modifications of metals and semiconductors.

  4. Simultaneous observation of two dimensional electron gas and polarization in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure using scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Kotaro; Goto, Yasunori; Chinone, Norimichi; Cho, Yasuo

    2016-08-01

    The AlGaN/GaN heterostructure has two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) and electric polarization. We observed both of them simultaneously in the cross section of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure by scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy (SNDM), which can visualize both carrier and polarization distributions. The AlGaN/GaN heterostructure was cross-sectioned at an angle of 20° from the [0001] axis and, hence, the perpendicular components of the polarizations of AlGaN and GaN were observed. Moreover, the 2DEG distribution was confirmed in a range of ∼10 nm at the AlGaN/GaN interface.

  5. DNA block copolymers: functional materials for nanoscience and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Tobias; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-09-18

    We live in a world full of synthetic materials, and the development of new technologies builds on the design and synthesis of new chemical structures, such as polymers. Synthetic macromolecules have changed the world and currently play a major role in all aspects of daily life. Due to their tailorable properties, these materials have fueled the invention of new techniques and goods, from the yogurt cup to the car seat belts. To fulfill the requirements of modern life, polymers and their composites have become increasingly complex. One strategy for altering polymer properties is to combine different polymer segments within one polymer, known as block copolymers. The microphase separation of the individual polymer components and the resulting formation of well defined nanosized domains provide a broad range of new materials with various properties. Block copolymers facilitated the development of innovative concepts in the fields of drug delivery, nanomedicine, organic electronics, and nanoscience. Block copolymers consist exclusively of organic polymers, but researchers are increasingly interested in materials that combine synthetic materials and biomacromolecules. Although many researchers have explored the combination of proteins with organic polymers, far fewer investigations have explored nucleic acid/polymer hybrids, known as DNA block copolymers (DBCs). DNA as a polymer block provides several advantages over other biopolymers. The availability of automated synthesis offers DNA segments with nucleotide precision, which facilitates the fabrication of hybrid materials with monodisperse biopolymer blocks. The directed functionalization of modified single-stranded DNA by Watson-Crick base-pairing is another key feature of DNA block copolymers. Furthermore, the appropriate selection of DNA sequence and organic polymer gives control over the material properties and their self-assembly into supramolecular structures. The introduction of a hydrophobic polymer into DBCs

  6. Biopolymers Containing Unnatural Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-06-30

    Although the main chain structure of polymers has a profound effect on their materials properties, the side groups can also have dramatic effects on their properties including conductivity, liquid crystallinity, hydrophobicity, elasticity and biodegradability. Unfortunately control over the side chain structure of polymers remains a challenge – it is difficult to control the sequence of chain elongation when mixtures of monomers are polymerized, and postpolymerization side chain modification is made difficult by polymer effects on side chain reactivity. In contrast, the mRNA templated synthesis of polypeptides on the ribosome affords absolute control over the primary sequence of the twenty amino acid monomers. Moreover, the length of the biopolymer is precisely controlled as are sites of crosslinking. However, whereas synthetic polymers can be synthesized from monomers with a wide range of chemically defined structures, ribosomal biosynthesis is largely limited to the 20 canonical amino acids. For many applications in material sciences, additional building blocks would be desirable, for example, amino acids containing metallocene, photoactive, and halogenated side chains. To overcome this natural constraint we have developed a method that allows unnatural amino acids, beyond the common twenty, to be genetically encoded in response to nonsense or frameshift codons in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells with high fidelity and good yields. Here we have developed methods that allow identical or distinct noncanonical amino acids to be incorporated at multiple sites in a polypeptide chain, potentially leading to a new class of templated biopolymers. We have also developed improved methods for genetically encoding unnatural amino acids. In addition, we have genetically encoded new amino acids with novel physical and chemical properties that allow selective modification of proteins with synthetic agents. Finally, we have evolved new metal-ion binding sites in proteins

  7. Erosion patterns on dissolving blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Patterns in nature are shaped under water flows and wind action, and the understanding of their morphodynamics goes through the identification of the physical mechanisms at play. When a dissoluble body is exposed to a water flow, typical patterns with scallop-like shapes may appear [1,2]. These shapes are observed on the walls of underground rivers or icebergs. We experimentally study the erosion of dissolving bodies made of salt, caramel or ice into water solutions without external flow. The dissolving mixture, which is created at the solid/liquid interface, undergoes a buoyancy-driven instability comparable to a Rayleigh-Bénard instability so that the dissolving front destabilizes into filaments. This mechanism yields to spatial variations of solute concentration and to differential dissolution of the dissolving block. We first observe longitudinal stripes with a well defined wavelength, which evolve towards chevrons and scallops that interact and move again the dissolving current. Thanks to a careful analysis of the competing physical mechanisms, we propose scaling laws, which account for the characteristic lengths and times of the early regime in experiments. The long-term evolution of patterns is understood qualitatively. A close related mechanism has been proposed to explain structures observed on the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes [3] and we suggest that our experiments are analogous and explain the scallop-like patterns on iceberg walls. [1] P. Meakin and B. Jamtveit, Geological pattern formation by growth and dissolution in aqueous systems, Proc. R. Soc. A 466, 659-694 (2010). [2] P.N. Blumberg and R.L. Curl, Experimental and theoretical studies of dissolution roughness, J. Fluid Mech. 65, 735-751 (1974). [3] L. Solari and G. Parker, Morphodynamic modelling of the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes, J.G.R. 118, 1432-1442 (2013).

  8. LJ Teaching Award 2007: Rick J. Block

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles Rick J. Block, the recipient of the 2008 "LJ Teaching Award." Despite his "day job" and a heavy schedule of classroom teaching, Block finds time and intense energy to be the mentor, internship supervisor, and individual advisor to the students who fill every available seat in his classes at two LIS programs. In addition to…

  9. Light extraction block with curved surface

    DOEpatents

    Levermore, Peter; Krall, Emory; Silvernail, Jeffrey; Rajan, Kamala; Brown, Julia J.

    2016-03-22

    Light extraction blocks, and OLED lighting panels using light extraction blocks, are described, in which the light extraction blocks include various curved shapes that provide improved light extraction properties compared to parallel emissive surface, and a thinner form factor and better light extraction than a hemisphere. Lighting systems described herein may include a light source with an OLED panel. A light extraction block with a three-dimensional light emitting surface may be optically coupled to the light source. The three-dimensional light emitting surface of the block may includes a substantially curved surface, with further characteristics related to the curvature of the surface at given points. A first radius of curvature corresponding to a maximum principal curvature k.sub.1 at a point p on the substantially curved surface may be greater than a maximum height of the light extraction block. A maximum height of the light extraction block may be less than 50% of a maximum width of the light extraction block. Surfaces with cross sections made up of line segments and inflection points may also be fit to approximated curves for calculating the radius of curvature.

  10. How Block Scheduling Reform Effects Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William R.; Flinders, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Block scheduling has become an increasingly popular reform movement for schools, school districts, and principals to enact. Much of the decision making as to whether to implement some type of block scheduling has occurred without understanding the implications this type of reform has on teachers and their classroom practices. This paper reports on…

  11. Improving massive experiments with threshold blocking.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Michael J; Sävje, Fredrik; Sekhon, Jasjeet S

    2016-07-01

    Inferences from randomized experiments can be improved by blocking: assigning treatment in fixed proportions within groups of similar units. However, the use of the method is limited by the difficulty in deriving these groups. Current blocking methods are restricted to special cases or run in exponential time; are not sensitive to clustering of data points; and are often heuristic, providing an unsatisfactory solution in many common instances. We present an algorithm that implements a widely applicable class of blocking-threshold blocking-that solves these problems. Given a minimum required group size and a distance metric, we study the blocking problem of minimizing the maximum distance between any two units within the same group. We prove this is a nondeterministic polynomial-time hard problem and derive an approximation algorithm that yields a blocking where the maximum distance is guaranteed to be, at most, four times the optimal value. This algorithm runs in O(n log n) time with O(n) space complexity. This makes it, to our knowledge, the first blocking method with an ensured level of performance that works in massive experiments. Whereas many commonly used algorithms form pairs of units, our algorithm constructs the groups flexibly for any chosen minimum size. This facilitates complex experiments with several treatment arms and clustered data. A simulation study demonstrates the efficiency and efficacy of the algorithm; tens of millions of units can be blocked using a desktop computer in a few minutes. PMID:27382151

  12. Block Grants: Federal Data Collection Provisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This fact sheet compares statutory data collection and reporting provisions of the federal education block grant (chapter 2 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act of 1981) with the nine other block grant programs funded in fiscal year 1986; data on statutory administrative cost limits are also provided. Each grant's legislation was…

  13. Young Children's Block Play and Mathematical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Boyoung; Chae, Jeong-Lim; Boyd, Barbara Foulks

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated young children's mathematical engagement in play with wooden unit blocks. Two boys, ages 6 and 7, were independently observed completing the task of filling outlined regions with the various sets of blocks. Three major mathematical actions were observed: categorizing geometric shapes, composing a larger shape…

  14. Precision aligned split V-block

    DOEpatents

    George, Irwin S.

    1984-01-01

    A precision aligned split V-block for holding a workpiece during a milling operation having an expandable frame for allowing various sized workpieces to be accommodated, is easily secured directly to the mill table and having key lugs in one base of the split V-block that assures constant alignment.

  15. Block Study: Learning About Your Local Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckbreth, Catherine

    Designed for 7th- and 8th-grade students, five lessons using a block of houses in an urban neighborhood help students learn about the history of a neighborhood, the owners of the houses, and the style and architectural features of the homes. Although this unit has been developed for a specific neighborhood, a similar block study could be conducted…

  16. A Scholarly Article about Block Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Keith

    This paper provides a brief literature review on the use of building blocks in the elementary school classroom and discusses classroom activities using blocks as they influence other subject areas. The paper includes work activities that develop mathematics and science skills, language arts and reading, and social sciences. Comments on these…

  17. A Nonlinear Multi-Scale Interaction Model for Atmospheric Blocking: The Eddy-Blocking Matching Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dehai; Cha, Jing; Zhong, Linhao; Dai, Aiguo

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear multi-scale interaction (NMI) model is used to propose an eddy-blocking matching (EBM) mechanism to account for how synoptic eddies reinforce or suppress a blocking flow. It is shown that the spatial structure of the eddy vorticity forcing (EVF) arising from upstream synoptic eddies determines whether an incipient block can grow into a meandering blocking flow through its interaction with the transient synoptic eddies from the west. Under certain conditions, the EVF exhibits a low-frequency oscillation on timescales of 2-3 weeks. During the EVF phase with a negative-over- positive dipole structure, a blocking event can be resonantly excited through the transport of eddy energy into the incipient block by the EVF. As the EVF changes into an opposite phase, the blocking decays. The NMI model produces life cycles of blocking events that resemble observations. Moreover, it is shown that the eddy north-south straining is a response of the eddies to a dipole- or Ω-type block. In our model, as in observations, two synoptic anticyclones (cyclones) can attract and merge with one another as the blocking intensifies, but only when the feedback of the blocking on the eddies is included. Thus, we attribute the eddy straining and associated vortex interaction to the feedback of the intensified blocking on synoptic eddies. The results illustrate the concomitant nature of the eddy deformation, whose role as a PV source for the blocking flow becomes important only during the mature stage of a block. Our EBM mechanism suggests that an incipient block flow is amplified (or suppressed) under certain conditions by the EVF coming from the upstream of the blocking region.

  18. Self-Assembly of Rod-Coil Block Copolymers And Their Application in Electroluminescent Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.; Ma, B.; Segalman, R.A.

    2009-05-26

    The formation of alternating electron transporting and hole transporting 15 nm lamellae within the active layer of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is demonstrated to improve device performance. A new multifunctional bipolar rod-coil block copolymer containing a poly(alkoxy phenylenevinylene) (PPV) rod-shaped block as the hole transporting and emitting material and a poly(vinyloxadiazole) coil-shaped electron transporting block is synthesized. This new block copolymer is the active material of a self-assembling multicomponent electroluminescent device that can be deposited in a single step. In the thin film, grazing incidence X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy demonstrate that the layers form grains which are oriented bimodally: parallel and perpendicular from the anode. In this mixed orientation, the device demonstrates better performance than those with either pure PPV or a blend of the two analogous homopolymers as the active materials, i.e., higher external quantum efficiency (EQE) and brightness. This improved device performance is mainly attributed to the bipolar functionality and microphase separation of the block copolymer, which provide highly efficient hole and electron recombination at the nanodomain interfaces.

  19. Self-Assembly of Rod-Coil Block Copolymers and Their Application in Electroluminescent Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yuefei; Ma, Biwu; Segalman, Rachel A.

    2008-11-18

    The formation of alternating electron transporting and hole transporting 15 nm lamellae within the active layer of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is demonstrated to improve device performance. A new multifunctional bipolar rod-coil block copolymer containing a poly(alkoxy phenylenevinylene) (PPV) rod-shaped block as the hole transporting and emitting material and a poly(vinyloxadiazole) coil-shaped electron transporting block is synthesized. This new block copolymer is the active material of a self-assembling multicomponent electroluminescent device that can be deposited in a single step. In the thin film, grazing incidence X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy demonstrate that the layers form grains which are oriented bimodally: parallel and perpendicular from the anode. In this mixed orientation, the device demonstrates better performance than those with either pure PPV or a blend of the two analogous homopolymers as the active materials, i.e., higher external quantum efficiency (EQE) and brightness. This improved device performance is mainly attributed to the bipolar functionality and microphase separation of the block copolymer, which provide highly efficient hole and electron recombination at the nanodomain interfaces.

  20. Continuous peripheral nerve blocks in children.

    PubMed

    Dadure, C; Capdevila, X

    2005-06-01

    In recent years, regional anaesthesia in children has generated increasing interest. Continuous peripheral nerve blocks have an important role in the anaesthetic arsenal, allowing effective, safe and prolonged postoperative pain management. Indications for continuous peripheral nerve blocks depend on benefits/risks analysis of each technique for each patient. The indications include surgery associated with intense postoperative pain, surgery requiring painful physical therapy, and complex regional pain syndrome. Continuous peripheral nerve blocks are usually performed under general anaesthesia or sedation, and require appropriate equipment in order to decrease the risk of nerve injury. New techniques, such as transcutaneous stimulation or ultrasound guidance, appear to facilitate nerve and plexus identification in paediatric patients. Nevertheless, continuous peripheral nerve block may mask compartment syndrome in certain surgical procedure or trauma. Finally, ropivacaine appears to be the best local anaesthetic for continuous peripheral nerve blocks in children, requiring low flow rate with low concentration of the local anaesthetic. PMID:15966500