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Sample records for algan uv leds

  1. MOCVD growth of AlGaN UV LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.; Crawford, M.H.

    1998-09-01

    Issues related to the MOCVD growth of AlGaN, specifically the gas-phase parasitic reactions among TMG, TMA, and NH{sub 3}, are studied using an in-situ optical reflectometer. It is observed that the presence of the well-known gas phase adduct (TMA: NH{sub 3}) could seriously hinder the incorporation behavior of TMGa. Relatively low reactor pressures (30--50 Torr) are employed to grow an AlGaN/GaN SCH QW p-n diode structure. The UV emission at 360 nm (FWHM {approximately} 10 nm) represents the first report of LED operation from an indium-free GaN QW diode.

  2. AlGaN UV LED and Photodiodes Radiation Hardness and Space Qualifications and Their Applications in Space Science and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K. X.

    2011-05-31

    This presentation provides an overview of robust, radiation hard AlGaN optoelectronic devices and their applications in space exploration & high energy density physics. Particularly, deep UV LED and deep UV photodiodes are discussed with regard to their applications, radiation hardness and space qualification. AC charge management of UV LED satellite payload instruments, which were to be launched in late 2012, is covered.

  3. Performance improvement of GaN-based near-UV LEDs with InGaN/AlGaN superlattices strain relief layer and AlGaN barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chuanyu; Yu, Tongjun; Feng, Xiaohui; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Guoyi

    2016-09-01

    The carrier confinement effect and piezoelectric field-induced quantum-confined stark effect of different GaN-based near-UV LED samples from 395 nm to 410 nm emission peak wavelength were investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is found that near-UV LEDs with InGaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) active region have higher output power than those with InGaN/GaN MQWs for better carrier confinement effect. However, as emission peak wavelength is longer than 406 nm, the output power of the near-UV LEDs with AlGaN barrier is lower than that of the LEDs with GaN barrier due to more serious spatial separation of electrons and holes induced by the increase of piezoelectric field. The N-doped InGaN/AlGaN superlattices (SLs) were adopted as a strain relief layer (SRL) between n-GaN and MQWs in order to suppress the polarization field. It is demonstrated the output power of near-UV LEDs is increased obviously by using SLs SRL and AlGaN barrier for the discussed emission wavelength range. Besides, the forward voltage of near-UV LEDs with InGaN/AlGaN SLs SRL is lower than that of near-UV LEDs without SRL.

  4. Deep UV LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung; Amano, Hiroshi; Schowalter, Leo

    2014-06-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) photons interact strongly with a broad range of chemical and biological molecules; compact DUV light sources could enable a wide range of applications in chemi/bio-sensing, sterilization, agriculture, and industrial curing. The much shorter wavelength also results in useful characteristics related to optical diffraction (for lithography) and scattering (non-line-of-sight communication). The family of III-N (AlGaInN) compound semiconductors offers a tunable energy gap from infrared to DUV. While InGaN-based blue light emitters have been the primary focus for the obvious application of solid state lighting, there is a growing interest in the development of efficient UV and DUV light-emitting devices. In the past few years we have witnessed an increasing investment from both government and industry sectors to further the state of DUV light-emitting devices. The contributions in Semiconductor Science and Technology 's special issue on DUV devices provide an up-to-date snapshot covering many relevant topics in this field. Given the expected importance of bulk AlN substrate in DUV technology, we are pleased to include a review article by Hartmann et al on the growth of AlN bulk crystal by physical vapour transport. The issue of polarization field within the deep ultraviolet LEDs is examined in the article by Braut et al. Several commercial companies provide useful updates in their development of DUV emitters, including Nichia (Fujioka et al ), Nitride Semiconductors (Muramoto et al ) and Sensor Electronic Technology (Shatalov et al ). We believe these articles will provide an excellent overview of the state of technology. The growth of AlGaN heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy, in contrast to the common organo-metallic vapour phase epitaxy, is discussed by Ivanov et al. Since hexagonal boron nitride (BN) has received much attention as both a UV and a two-dimensional electronic material, we believe it serves readers well to include the

  5. Monitoring and Controlling of Strain During MOCVD of AlGaN for UV Optoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.; Crawford, M.H.; Shul, R.J.; Hearne, S.J.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.J.; Banas, M.

    1999-01-14

    The grown-in tensile strain, due to a lattice mismatch between AlGaN and GaN, is responsible for the observed cracking that seriously limits the feasibility of nitride-based ultraviolet (UV) emitters. We report in-situ monitoring of strain/stress during MOCVD of AlGaN based on a wafer-curvature measurement technique. The strain/stress measurement confirms the presence of tensile strain during growth of AlGaN pseudomorphically on a thick GaN layer. Further growth leads to the onset of stress relief through crack generation. We find that the growth of AlGaN directly on low-temperature (LT) GaN or AlN buffer layers results in a reduced and possibly controllable strain.

  6. Large-Format AlGaN PIN Photodiode Arrays for UV Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, Shahid; Franz, David

    2010-01-01

    A large-format hybridized AlGaN photodiode array with an adjustable bandwidth features stray-light control, ultralow dark-current noise to reduce cooling requirements, and much higher radiation tolerance than previous technologies. This technology reduces the size, mass, power, and cost of future ultraviolet (UV) detection instruments by using lightweight, low-voltage AlGaN detectors in a hybrid detector/multiplexer configuration. The solar-blind feature eliminates the need for additional visible light rejection and reduces the sensitivity of the system to stray light that can contaminate observations.

  7. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  8. Enhanced light extraction in tunnel junction-enabled top emitting UV LEDs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yuewei; Allerman, Andrew A.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Moseley, Michael W.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Rajan, Siddharth

    2016-04-11

    The efficiency of ultra violet LEDs has been critically limited by the absorption losses in p-type and metal layers. In this work, surface roughening based light extraction structures are combined with tunneling based p-contacts to realize highly efficient top-side light extraction efficiency in UV LEDs. Surface roughening of the top n-type AlGaN contact layer is demonstrated using self-assembled Ni nano-clusters as etch mask. The top surface roughened LEDs were found to enhance external quantum efficiency by over 40% for UV LEDs with a peak emission wavelength of 326 nm. The method described here can enable highly efficient UV LEDs withoutmore » the need for complex manufacturing methods such as flip chip bonding.« less

  9. Improved efficiency of near-ultraviolet LEDs using a novel p-type AlGaN hole injection layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingsheng; Zhou, Quanbin; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Xichun

    2016-06-01

    We investigate a novel near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode (NUV-LED) with a p-type AlGaN (pAlGaN) hole injection layer to replace the conventional p-type GaN layer. The optical properties are studied numerically with simulations. Our calculated results indicate that a pAlGaN layer can significantly improve both light output power and internal quantum efficiency of a NUV-LED. The light power of NUV-LED with constant and gradually increasing Al content of the pAlGaN layer increases by 215% and 266% compared to a conventional LED. We also find that the elimination of the interface barrier and suppression of the polarization field are the key factors that lead to the improved NUV-LED performance.

  10. NASA Ames UV-LED Poster Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaroux, Belgacem Amar

    2015-01-01

    UV-LED is a small satellite technology demonstration payload being flown on the Saudisat-4 spacecraft that is demonstrating non-contacting charge control of an isolated or floating mass using new solid-state ultra-violet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). Integrated to the rest of the spacecraft and launched on a Dnepr in June 19, 2014, the project is a collaboration between the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Stanford University, and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). Beginning with its commissioning in December, 2015, the data collected by UV-LED have validated a novel method of charge control that will improve the performance of drag-free spacecraft allowing for concurrent science collection during charge management operations as well as reduce the mass, power and volume required while increasing lifetime and reliability of a charge management subsystem. UV-LED continues to operate, exploring new concepts in non-contacting charge control and collecting data crucial to understanding the lifetime of ultra-violet light emitting diodes in space. These improvements are crucial to the success of ground breaking missions such as LISA and BBO, and demonstrates the ability of low cost small satellite missions to provide technological advances that far exceed mission costs.

  11. Characterization of failure modes in deep UV and deep green LEDs utilizing advanced semiconductor localization techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Miller, Mary A.; Cole, Edward Isaac, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a two-year early career LDRD that focused on defect localization in deep green and deep ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We describe the laser-based techniques (TIVA/LIVA) used to localize the defects and interpret data acquired. We also describe a defect screening method based on a quick electrical measurement to determine whether defects should be present in the LEDs. We then describe the stress conditions that caused the devices to fail and how the TIVA/LIVA techniques were used to monitor the defect signals as the devices degraded and failed. We also describe the correlation between the initial defects and final degraded or failed state of the devices. Finally we show characterization results of the devices in the failed conditions and present preliminary theories as to why the devices failed for both the InGaN (green) and AlGaN (UV) LEDs.

  12. UV LED lighting for automated crystal centring

    PubMed Central

    Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Yamada, Yusuke; Hiraki, Masahiko; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2011-01-01

    A direct outcome of the exponential growth of macromolecular crystallography is the continuously increasing demand for synchrotron beam time, both from academic and industrial users. As more and more projects entail screening a profusion of sample crystals, fully automated procedures at every level of the experiments are being implemented at all synchrotron facilities. One of the major obstacles to achieving such automation lies in the sample recognition and centring in the X-ray beam. The capacity of UV light to specifically react with aromatic residues present in proteins or with DNA base pairs is at the basis of UV-assisted crystal centring. Although very efficient, a well known side effect of illuminating biological samples with strong UV sources is the damage induced on the irradiated samples. In the present study the effectiveness of a softer UV light for crystal centring by taking advantage of low-power light-emitting diode (LED) sources has been investigated. The use of UV LEDs represents a low-cost solution for crystal centring with high specificity. PMID:21169682

  13. UV-LED exposure system for low-cost photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapici, Murat Kaya; Farhat, Ilyas

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a low-cost, portable, light-emitting diode (LED)-based UV exposure system for photolithography. The major system components include UV-LEDs, microcontroller, digital-to-analog (D/A) converter and LED control circuitry. The UV-LED lithography system is also equipped with a digital user interface (LCD and keypad) and permits accurate electronic control on the exposure time and power. Hence the exposure dose can be varied depending on process requirements. Compared to traditional contact lithography, the UV-LED lithography system is significantly cheaper, simple to construct using off-the shelf components and does not require complex infrastructure to operate. Such reduction in system cost and complexity renders UV-LED lithography as a perfect candidate for micro lithography with large process windows typically suitable for MEMS, microfluidics applications.

  14. Fabrication of Micro Lens Array by UV-LED Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Yoshinori

    High curvature micro lens array of 240-570 μm diameters and 110-270 μm heights has been fabricated by using UV-LED lithography and imprinting technique. Curved SU-8 structures were fabricated by backside exposure through thin glass substrate because UV-LED array light source has wide directivity characteristics of UV dose. The structure was transferred to Polydimethylsiloxsane (PDMS) mold. Micro lens array of photosensitive acrylic resin was fabricated by using the mold.

  15. High-efficiency blue LEDs with thin AlGaN interlayers in InGaN/GaN MQWs grown on Si (111) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeya; Yoshida, Hisashi; Ito, Toshihide; Okada, Aoi; Uesugi, Kenjiro; Nunoue, Shinya

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate high-efficiency blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with thin AlGaN interlayers in InGaN/GaN multiquantum wells (MQWs) grown on Si (111) substrates. The peak external quantum efficiency (EQE) ηEQE of 82% at room temperature and the hot/cold factor (HCF) of 94% have been obtained by using the functional thin AlGaN interlayers in the MQWs in addition to reducing threading dislocation densities (TDDs) in the blue LEDs. An HCF is defined as ηEQE(85°C)/ηEQE(25°C). The blue LED structures were grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on Si (111) substrates. The MQWs applied as an active layer have 8- pairs of InGaN/AlyGa1-yN/GaN (0<=y<=1) heterostructures. Thinfilm LEDs were fabricated by removing the Si (111) substrates from the grown layers. It is observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and three-dimensional atom probe analysis that the 1 nm-thick AlyGa1-yN interlayers, whose Al content is y=0.3 or less, are continuously formed. EQE and the HCFs of the LEDs with thin Al0.15Ga0.85N interlayers are enhanced compared with those of the samples without the interlayers in the low-current-density region. We consider that the enhancement is due to both the reduction of the nonradiative recombination centers and the increase of the radiative recombination rate mediated by the strain-induced hole carriers indicated by the simulation of the energy band diagram.

  16. Surface-plasmon-enhanced deep-UV light emitting diodes based on AlGaN multi-quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Na; Huang, Kai; Li, Jinchai; Li, Shuping; Yang, Xu; Kang, Junyong

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of complete structural AlGaN-based deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with an aluminum thin layer for increasing light extraction efficiency. A 217% enhancement in peak photoluminescence intensity at 294 nm is observed. Cathodoluminescence measurement demonstrates that the internal quantum efficiency of the deep-UV LEDs coated with Al layer is not enhanced. The emission enhancement of deep-UV LEDs is attributed to the higher LEE by the surface plasmon-transverse magnetic wave coupling. When the proportion of the TM wave to the Al layer increases with the Al content in the AlxGa1-xN multiple quantum wells, i.e., the band edge emission energy, the enhancement ratio of the Al-coated deep-UV LEDs increases. PMID:23150780

  17. AlGaN Ultraviolet Detectors for Dual-Band UV Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miko, Laddawan; Franz, David; Stahle, Carl M.; Yan, Feng; Guan, Bing

    2010-01-01

    This innovation comprises technology that has the ability to measure at least two ultraviolet (UV) bands using one detector without relying on any external optical filters. This allows users to build a miniature UVA and UVB monitor, as well as to develop compact, multicolor imaging technologies for flame temperature sensing, air-quality control, and terrestrial/counter-camouflage/biosensing applications.

  18. High-power UV-B LEDs with long lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rass, Jens; Kolbe, Tim; Lobo-Ploch, Neysha; Wernicke, Tim; Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian; Enslin, Johannes; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Mogilatenko, Anna; Glaab, Johannes; Stoelmacker, Christoph; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2015-03-01

    UV light emitters in the UV-B spectral range between 280 nm and 320 nm are of great interest for applications such as phototherapy, gas sensing, plant growth lighting, and UV curing. In this paper we present high power UV-B LEDs grown by MOVPE on sapphire substrates. By optimizing the heterostructure design, growth parameters and processing technologies, significant progress was achieved with respect to internal efficiency, injection efficiency and light extraction. LED chips emitting at 310 nm with maximum output powers of up to 18 mW have been realized. Lifetime measurements show approximately 20% decrease in emission power after 1,000 operating hours at 100 mA and 5 mW output power and less than 30% after 3,500 hours of operation, thus indicating an L50 lifetime beyond 10,000 hours.

  19. Effect of UV irradiation on the apoptosis and necrosis of Jurkat cells using UV LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Shunko A.; Amano, Hiroshi; Akasaki, Isamu; Morita, Akimichi; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2009-02-01

    Phototherapy is a very effective method for treating most of the incurable skin diseases. A fluorescent light bulb is used as a conventional UV light source for this type of therapy. However, infrared radiation from the light source sometimes causes serious problems on patient's health. In addition, the normal part of the skin is irradiated when a large fluorescent light bulb is used. Moreover, a conventional UV irradiation system is heavy and has a short lifetime and a high electrical power consumption. Therefore, a new UV light source for solving the problems of phototherapy is required. To realize low-power-consumption, lightweight and long-lifetime systems, group III nitride-based UV-A1 light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were investigated. We examined the UV LED irradiation of Jurkat cell, which is a tumor cell and more sensitive to UV light than a healthy cell. The numbers of apoptotic and necrotic cells were confirmed to be the same using a UV LED and a conventional lamp system. The UV LED showed the possibility of realizing a new UV light source for phototherapy.

  20. Charge management for gravitational-wave observatories using UV LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S. E.; Turner, M. D.; Schlamminger, S.; Hagedorn, C. A.; Gundlach, J. H.

    2010-01-15

    Accumulation of electrical charge on the end mirrors of gravitational-wave observatories can become a source of noise limiting the sensitivity of such detectors through electronic couplings to nearby surfaces. Torsion balances provide an ideal means for testing gravitational-wave technologies due to their high sensitivity to small forces. Our torsion pendulum apparatus consists of a movable plate brought near a plate pendulum suspended from a nonconducting quartz fiber. A UV LED located near the pendulum photoejects electrons from the surface, and a UV LED driven electron gun directs photoelectrons towards the pendulum surface. We have demonstrated both charging and discharging of the pendulum with equivalent charging rates of {approx}10{sup 5}e/s, as well as spectral measurements of the pendulum charge resulting in a white noise level equivalent to 3x10{sup 5}e/{radical}(Hz).

  1. UV-LED-based charge control for LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olatunde, Taiwo; Shelley, Ryan; Chilton, Andrew; Ciani, Giacomo; Mueller, Guido; Conklin, John

    2014-03-01

    The test masses inside the LISA gravitational reference sensors (GRS) must maintain almost pure geodesic motion for gravitational waves to be successfully detected. The residual accelerations have to stay below 3fm/s2/rtHz at all frequencies between 0.1 and 3 mHz. One of the well known noise sources is associated with the charges on the test masses which couple to stray electrical potentials and external electro-magnetic fields. The LISA pathfinder (LPF) will use Hg-discharge lamps emitting mostly around 253 nm to discharge the test masses via photoemission in its 2015/16 flight. A future LISA mission launched around 2030 will likely replace the lamps with newer UV-LEDs. UV-LEDs have a lower mass, a better power efficiency, and are smaller than their Hg counterparts. Furthermore, the latest generation produces light at 240 nm, with energy well above the work function of pure gold. I will describe a preliminary design for effective charge control through photoelectric effect by using these LEDs. The effectiveness of this method is verified by taking Quantum Efficiency (QE) measurements which relate the number of electrons emitted to the number of photons incident on the Au test mass surface. This presentation addresses our initial results and future plans which includes implementation and testing in the UF torsion pendulum and space-qualification in a small satellite mission which will launch in the summer of 2014, through a collaboration with Stanford, KACST, and NASA Ames Research Center.

  2. UV LED fiber optic detection System for DNA and protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, Mathias; Klein, Felix A.; Habhegger, Heidi

    2007-02-01

    Concentrations of DNA and proteins are traditionally detected at 260/280nm using laboratory spectrophotometers. Recently, AlGaN/GaN ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes (LED) became available in the 250 nm to 350 nm wavelength region. An inexpensive fiber optic detection system based on these UV LEDs and photodiodes has been developed. It allows concentration measurements of such popular biochemistry samples. Measurement stability and noise will be discussed. The performance of the system in comparison to a standard spectrophotometer will be evaluated. In particular, the effect of decreasing the spectral resolution from usually used 2-3 nm to 10-20 nm Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) is simulated and experimentally confirmed.

  3. Application of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) for water disinfection: A review.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Mohseni, Madjid; Taghipour, Fariborz

    2016-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection is an effective technology for the inactivation of pathogens in water and is of growing interest for industrial application. A new UV source - ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV-LED) - has emerged in the past decade with a number of advantages compared to traditional UV mercury lamps. This promising alternative raises great interest in the research on application of UV-LEDs for water treatment. Studies on UV-LED water disinfection have increased during the past few years. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent studies on UV-LEDs with various wavelengths for the inactivation of different microorganisms. Many inconsistent and incomparable data were found from published studies, which underscores the importance of establishing a standard protocol for studying UV-LED inactivation of microorganisms. Different UV sensitivities to UV-LEDs and traditional UV lamps were observed in the literature for some microorganisms, which requires further investigation for a better understanding of microorganism response to UV-LEDs. The unique aspects of UV-LEDs improve inactivation effectiveness by applying LED special features, such as multiple wavelengths and pulsed illumination; however, more studies are needed to investigate the influencing factors and mechanisms. The special features of UV-LEDs offer the flexibility of novel reactor designs for a broad application of UV-LED reactors. PMID:26971809

  4. 240 nm UV LEDs for LISA test mass charge control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olatunde, Taiwo; Shelley, Ryan; Chilton, Andrew; Serra, Paul; Ciani, Giacomo; Mueller, Guido; Conklin, John

    2015-05-01

    Test Masses inside the LISA Gravitational Reference Sensor must maintain almost pure geodesic motion for gravitational waves to be successfully detected. LISA requires residual test mass accelerations below 3 fm/s2/√Hz at all frequencies between 0.1 and 3 mHz. One of the well-known noise sources is associated with the charges on the test masses which couple to stray electrical potentials and external electromagnetic fields. LISA Pathfinder will use Hg-discharge lamps emitting mostly around 254 nm to discharge the test masses via photoemission in its 2015/16 flight. A future LISA mission launched around 2030 will likely replace the lamps with newer UV-LEDs. Presented here is a preliminary study of the effectiveness of charge control using latest generation UV-LEDs which produce light at 240 nm with energy above the work function of pure Au. Their lower mass, better power efficiency and small size make them an ideal replacement for Hg lamps.

  5. Radiation Hard AlGaN Detectors and Imager

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-01

    Radiation hardness of AlGaN photodiodes was tested using a 65 MeV proton beam with a total proton fluence of 3x10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN Deep UV Photodiode have extremely high radiation hardness. These new devices have mission critical applications in high energy density physics (HEDP) and space explorations. These new devices satisfy radiation hardness requirements by NIF. NSTec is developing next generation AlGaN optoelectronics and imagers.

  6. Investigation of light output uniformity and performance using a UV transmitting glass optic for a multi-UV LED array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasenak, Brian; Willsey, Rachel; Willsey, Adam; Forish, James

    2016-03-01

    Ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV LED) adoption is accelerating; they are being used in new applications such as UV curing, germicidal irradiation, nondestructive testing, and forensic analysis. In many of these applications, it is critically important to produce a uniform light distribution and consistent surface irradiance. Flat panes of fused quartz, silica, or glass are commonly used to cover and protect multi-UV LED arrays. However, they don't offer the advantages of an optical lens design. An investigation was conducted to determine the effect of a secondary glass optic on the uniformity of the light distribution and irradiance. Glass optics capable of transmitting UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C wavelengths can improve light distribution and intensity. In this study, a UV transmitting glass formulation and secondary linear optic were designed and manufactured to demonstrate their effects on achievable irradiance intensity and uniformity. Prismatic patterning on the light source surface of the lens was used to minimize reflection losses on the incident surface of the glass. Fresnel optics were molded into the opposite side of the UV transmitting glass to control the refraction of the light and to gain the desired light intensity distribution from two multi-UV LED arrays. A 20% increase in relative irradiance was observed while maintaining the same coverage area. This work discusses the optical design and the resulting benefits of controlled light output on UV LED systems, which include reduced driving current, decreased thermal deterioration, improved energy efficiency, and longer LED lifetime.

  7. Kinetics of AlGaN metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy for deep-UV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanova, Anna; Yakovlev, Eugene; Jeschke, Joerg; Knauer, Arne; Weyers, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Al x Ga1‑ x N layers with high aluminum content of x ∼ 0.68–0.73 were grown in an 11 × 2-in. AIX 2400 G3 HT planetary reactor by metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy. Growth trends are analyzed by reaction-transport modeling in a wide range of growth conditions. Gas-phase nucleation resulting in both Al and Ga consumption into nanoparticles is a major mechanism affecting the growth efficiencies of AlN and GaN. Process windows suitable to grow multiple quantum wells (MQWs) for deep UV applications are found for a range of pressures, temperatures, and V/III ratios.

  8. High CRI phosphor blends for near-UV LED lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radkov, Emil; Setlur, Anant; Brown, Zena; Reginelli, James

    2004-10-01

    Currently, the highest color rendering index (CRI) value obtained in commercially available LED devices is around 90. This falls short of the CRI values typical for incandescent lamps (defined at 100). Similarly, the commercially available LEDs for higher color temperature have CRI values of 65-85, well below the theoretical maximum of 100. New phosphor blends are proposed for use with LED chips emitting in the 350-450 nm range. The application of such blends can afford CRI values greater than 95, over the entire range of color temperatures of interest for general illumination (2500K - 8000K). In some cases, the CRI values approach the theoretical maximum of 100. LED based lamps with a steady state performance of 23 LPW and 25 lumens per chip at 3000K, with a general CRI (Ra) of 97 and a mean CRI (R1-R14) of 96 are demonstrated.

  9. Enhanced light extraction in tunnel junction-enabled top emitting UV LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuewei; Allerman, Andrew A.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Moseley, Michael W.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Rajan, Siddharth

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is critically limited by absorption losses in p-type and metal layers. In this work, surface-roughening-based light extraction structures were combined with tunneling-based top-layer contacts to achieve highly efficient top-side light extraction in UV LEDs. By using self-assembled Ni nanoclusters as an etch mask, the top surface-roughened LEDs were found to enhance the external quantum efficiency by over 40% for UV LEDs with a peak emission wavelength of 326 nm. The method described here can be used for fabricating highly efficient UV LEDs without the need for complex manufacturing techniques such as flip chip bonding.

  10. High-power UV-LED degradation: Continuous and cycled working condition influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arques-Orobon, F. J.; Nuñez, N.; Vazquez, M.; Segura-Antunez, C.; González-Posadas, V.

    2015-09-01

    High-power (HP) UV-LEDs can replace UV lamps for real-time fluoro-sensing applications by allowing portable and autonomous systems. However, HP UV-LEDs are not a mature technology, and there are still open issues regarding their performance evolution over time. This paper presents a reliability study of 3 W UV-LEDs, with special focus on LED degradation for two working conditions: continuous and cycled (30 s ON and 30 s OFF). Accelerated life tests are developed to evaluate the influence of temperature and electrical working conditions in high-power LEDs degradation, being the predominant failure mechanism the degradation of the package. An analysis that includes dynamic thermal and optical HP UV-LED measurements has been performed. Static thermal and stress simulation analysis with the finite element method (FEM) identifies the causes of package degradation. Accelerated life test results prove that HP UV-LEDs working in cycled condition have a better performance than those working in continuous condition.

  11. Investigation of uniformity field generated from freeform lens with UV LED exposure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciou, F. Y.; Chen, Y. C.; Pan, C. T.; Lin, P. H.; Lin, P. H.; Hsu, F. T.

    2015-03-01

    In the exposure process, the intensity and uniformity of light in the exposure area directly influenced the precision of products. UV-LED (Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diode) exposure system was established to reduce the radiation leakage and increase the energy efficiency for energy saving. It is a trend that conventional mercury lamp could be replaced with UV-LED exposure system. This study was based on the law of conservation of energy and law of refraction of optical field distributing on the target plane. With these, a freeform lens with uniform light field of main exposure area could be designed. The light outside the exposure area could be concentrated into the area to improve the intensity of light. The refraction index and UV transmittance of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is 1.43 at 385 nm wavelength and 85-90%, respectively. The PDMS was used to fabricate the optics lens for UV-LEDs. The average illumination and the uniformity could be obtained by increasing the number of UV-LEDs and the spacing of different arrangement modes. After exposure process with PDMS lens, about 5% inaccuracy was obtained. Comparing to 10% inaccuracy of general exposure system, it shows that it is available to replace conventional exposure lamp with using UV-LEDs.

  12. UV LED array based NLOS UV turbulence channel modeling and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Liao, Linchao; Li, Zening; Lang, Tian; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-24

    In this paper, we comprehensively study the NLOV UV turbulence effect through simulated and experimental results. A Monte Carlo NLOS UV turbulence channel model, which incorporates the effects of multiple scattering and turbulence attenuation, is proposed based on previous work. To validate this model, a series of outdoor experiments is conducted to investigate the received-signal energy distribution and channel path loss under the turbulence circumstance for the first time. These experimental and simulated results are valuable for studying NLOS UV channel and communication system design. PMID:26368159

  13. Development of UV-LED Phosphor Coatings for High Efficiency Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    U. Happek

    2005-01-01

    The University of Georgia, in collaboration with GE Global Research, is investigating the relevant quenching mechanism of phosphor coatings used in white light devices based on UV LEDs in a focused eighteen month program. The final goal is the design of high-efficacy white UV-LEDs through improved and optimized phosphor coatings. At the end of the first year, we have reached a fundamental understanding of quenching processes in UV-LED phosphors and have observed severe quenching in standard devices under extreme operating conditions. Relationships are being established that describe the performance of the phosphor as a function of photon flux, temperature, and phosphor composition. These relationships will provide a road map for the design of efficient white light LEDs during the final six months of the project.

  14. Influence of the LED heterostructure on the degradation behavior of (InAlGa)N-based UV-B LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaab, Johannes; Lobo Ploch, Neysha; Rass, Jens; Kolbe, Tim; Wernicke, Tim; Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian; Enslin, Johannes; Stölmacker, Christoph; Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we report on the influence of the heterostructure design of (InAlGa)N-based UV-B LEDs grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on sapphire substrates on the degradation behavior of the device. Two types of LEDs with different heterostructure design, resulting in peak-wavelengths of about 290 nm and 310 nm, respectively, were stressed at a constant operation current of 100 mA and a heat sink temperature of 20°C. Electro-optical characterization of the LEDs over 1.000 h of operation shows two different degradation modes with respect to the change of the emission spectrum and leakage current. The first mode during the initial hours (290 nm LED: 0 h - 500 h, 310 nm LED: 0 h - 100 h) of operation is represented by a fast reduction of the quantum well (QW) luminescence, a constant or increasing parasitic luminescence between 310 nm and 450 nm and a fast increase of the reverse- and forward-bias leakage current. These changes are more pronounced (higher degradation rate) in the 290 nm LEDs and can therefore be attributed to the different heterostructure design. In contrast, the second degradation mode at longer operation times (290 nm LED: >500 h, 310 nm LED: >100 h) is marked by a slow reduction of both the QW and the parasitic luminescence, as well as a slow increase of the leakage current which are similar for both types of LEDs. Furthermore, the second mode is marked by a square-root time dependence of the QW luminescence intensity, indicating a diffusion process to be involved.

  15. Development of Efficient UV-LED Phosphor Coatings for Energy Saving Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Uwe Happek

    2006-05-15

    The University of Georgia, in collaboration with GE Global Research, has investigated the relevant quenching mechanism of phosphor coatings used in white light devices based on UV LEDs. The final goal of the project was the design and fabrication of a high-efficacy white light UV-LED device through improved geometry and optimized phosphor coatings. At the end of the research period, which was extended to seamlessly carry over the research to a follow-up program, we have demonstrated a two-fold improvement in the conversion efficiency of a white light LED device, where the increase efficacy is due to both improved phosphor quantum efficiency and lamp geometry. Working prototypes have been displayed at DOE sponsored meetings and during the final presentation at the DOE Headquarters in Washington, DC. During the first phase of the project, a fundamental understanding of quenching processes in UV-LEDs was obtained, and the relationships that describe the performance of the phosphor as a function of photon flux, temperature, and phosphor composition were established. In the second phase of the project, these findings were then implemented to design the improved UV-LED lamp. In addition, our research provides a road map for the design of efficient white light LEDs, which will be an important asset during a follow-up project led by GE.

  16. Characterising and testing deep UV LEDs for use in space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollington, D.; Baird, J. T.; Sumner, T. J.; Wass, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) light sources are used to neutralise isolated test masses in highly sensitive space-based gravitational experiments. An example is the LISA Pathfinder charge management system, which uses low-pressure mercury lamps. A future gravitational-wave observatory such as eLISA will use UV light-emitting diodes (UV LEDs), which offer numerous advantages over traditional discharge lamps. Such devices have limited space heritage but are now available from a number of commercial suppliers. Here we report on a test campaign that was carried out to quantify the general properties of three types of commercially available UV LEDs and demonstrate their suitability for use in space. Testing included general electrical and UV output power measurements, spectral stability, pulsed performance and temperature dependence, as well as thermal vacuum, radiation and vibration survivability.

  17. N-Vinylcarbazole as Versatile Photoinaddimer of Photopolymerization under Household UV LED Bulb (392 nm).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Pu; Lalevée, Jacques; Zhao, Jiacheng; Stenzel, Martina H

    2015-09-01

    N-vinylcarbazole (NVK) can act simultaneously as a photoinitiator, an additive, and a mono-mer (photoinaddimer) of photopolymerization upon exposure to the household ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diode (LED) bulb (emission wavelength centered at 392 nm). Even though the light absorption spectrum of NVK exhibits weak overlapping with the emission spectrum of the UV LED, the active species (i.e., radicals and cations) can be generated from the interaction between NVK and diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate (Iod) under irradiation of this LED device, which is investigated by steady state photolysis and electron spin resonance spin-trapping methods. Interestingly, the generated radicals and cations from the NVK/Iod system demonstrate high efficiency to initiate the free radical photopolymerization of (meth)acrylates and the cationic photopolymerization of epoxide and divinyl ether under the UV LED irradiation, and the one-step simultaneous catonic/radical photopolymerization of expoxide/acrylate blend can lead to the formation of tack free polyacrylate/polyether-based interpenetrated polymer network film within 10 min even when the polymerization process is exposed to the atmosphere highlighting the high efficiency of the system to reduce the oxygen inhibition effect. More interestingly, NVK/Iod system can also initiate the photopolymerization of NVK under the UV LED irradiation to produce polyvinylcarbazole, and NVK acts as both a photoinitiator and a monomer in the system. PMID:26174706

  18. UV LEDs for fluorescence detection of biological particles: from materials to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherasimova, M.; Han, J.; Song, Y.-K.; Nurmikko, A. V.; Pan, Y.-L.; Chang, R. K.

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrate a compact system, incorporating a 32-element linear array of ultraviolet (290 nm and 340 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a multi-anode photomultiplier tube, to the in-flight fluorescence detection of aerosolized particles, here containing the biological molecules tryptophan and NADH. This system illustrates substantial advances in the growth and fabrication of new semiconductor UV light emitting devices and an evolution in packaging details for LEDs tailored to the bio-aerosol warning problem.

  19. Lens of controllable optical field with thin film metallic glasses for UV-LEDs.

    PubMed

    Pan, C T; Chen, Y C; Lin, Po-Hung; Hsieh, C C; Hsu, F T; Lin, Po-Hsun; Chang, C M; Hsu, J H; Huang, J C

    2014-06-16

    In the exposure process of photolithography, a free-form lens is designed and fabricated for UV-LED (Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diode). Thin film metallic glasses (TFMG) are adopted as UV reflection layers to enhance the irradiance and uniformity. The Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with high transmittance is used as the lens material. The 3-D fast printing is attempted to make the mold of the lens. The results show that the average irradiance can be enhanced by 6.5~6.7%, and high uniformity of 85~86% can be obtained. Exposure on commercial thick photoresist using this UV-LED system shows 3~5% dimensional deviation, lower than the 6~8% deviation for commercial mercury lamp system. This current system shows promising potential to replace the conventional mercury exposure systems. PMID:24977538

  20. Extreme Radiation Hardness and Space Qualification of AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ke-Xun; Balakrishnan, Kathik; Hultgren, Eric; Goebel, John; Bilenko, Yuri; Yang, Jinwei; Sun, Wenhong; Shatalov, Max; Hu, Xuhong; Gaska, Remis

    2010-09-21

    Unprecedented radiation hardness and environment robustness are required in the new generation of high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and deep space exploration. National Ignition Facility (NIF) break-even shots will have a neutron yield of 1015 or higher. The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) mission instruments will be irradiated with a total fluence of 1012 protons/cm2 during the space journey. In addition, large temperature variations and mechanical shocks are expected in these applications under extreme conditions. Hefty radiation and thermal shields are required for Si and GaAs based electronics and optoelectronics devices. However, for direct illumination and imaging applications, shielding is not a viable option. It is an urgent task to search for new semiconductor technologies and to develop radiation hard and environmentally robust optoelectronic devices. We will report on our latest systematic experimental studies on radiation hardness and space qualifications of AlGaN optoelectronic devices: Deep UV Light Emitting Diodes (DUV LEDs) and solarblind UV Photodiodes (PDs). For custom designed AlGaN DUV LEDs with a central emission wavelength of 255 nm, we have demonstrated its extreme radiation hardness up to 2x1012 protons/cm2 with 63.9 MeV proton beams. We have demonstrated an operation lifetime of over 26,000 hours in a nitrogen rich environment, and 23,000 hours of operation in vacuum without significant power drop and spectral shift. The DUV LEDs with multiple packaging styles have passed stringent space qualifications with 14 g random vibrations, and 21 cycles of 100K temperature cycles. The driving voltage, current, emission spectra and optical power (V-I-P) operation characteristics exhibited no significant changes after the space environmental tests. The DUV LEDs will be used for photoelectric charge management in space flights. For custom designed AlGaN UV photodiodes with a central response wavelength of 255 nm, we have demonstrated

  1. Phosphors for near UV-Emitting LED's for Efficacious Generation of White Light

    SciTech Connect

    McKittrick, Joanna

    2013-09-30

    1) We studied phosphors for near-UV (nUV) LED application as an alternative to blue LEDs currently being used in SSL systems. We have shown that nUV light sources could be very efficient at high current and will have significantly less binning at both the chip and phosphor levels. We identified phosphor blends that could yield 4100K lamps with a CRI of approximately 80 and LPWnUV,opt equal to 179 for the best performing phosphor blend. Considering the fact that the lamps were not optimized for light coupling, the results are quite impressive. The main bottleneck is an optimum blue phosphor with a peak near 440 nm with a full width half maximum of about 25 nm and a quantum efficiency of >95%. Unfortunately, that may be a very difficult task when we want to excite a phosphor at ~400 nm with a very small margin for Stokes shift. Another way is to have all the phosphors in the blend having the excitation peak at 400 nm or slightly shorter wavelength. This could lead to a white light source with no body color and optimum efficacy due to no self-absorption effects by phosphors in the blend. This is even harder than finding an ideal blue phosphor, but not necessarily impossible. 2) With the phosphor blends identified, light sources using nUV LEDs at high current could be designed with comparable efficacy to those using blue LEDs. It will allow us to design light sources with multiple wattages using the same chips and phosphor blends simply by varying the input current. In the case of blue LEDs, this is not currently possible because varying the current will lower the efficacy at high current and alter the color point. With improvement of phosphor blends, control over CRI could improve. Less binning at the chip level and also at the phosphor blend level could reduce the cost of SSL light sources. 3) This study provided a deeper understanding of phosphor characteristics needed for LEDs in general and nUV LEDs in particular. Two students received Ph.D. degrees and three

  2. PVP capped CdS nanoparticles for UV-LED applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaram, H.; Selvakumar, D.; Jayavel, R.

    2015-06-24

    Polyvinlypyrrolidone (PVP) capped cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles are synthesized by wet chemical method. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) result indicates that the nanoparticles are crystallized in cubic phase. The optical properties are characterized by UV-Vis absorption. The morphology of CdS nanoparticles are studied using Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The thermal behavior of the as prepared nanoparticles has been examined by Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The optical absorption study of pvp capped CdS reveal a red shift confirms the UV-LED applications.

  3. 290 and 340 nm UV LED arrays for fluorescence detection from single airborne particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davitt, Kristina; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Patterson, William R., III; Nurmikko, Arto V.; Gherasimova, Maria; Han, Jung; Pan, Yong-Le; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-11-01

    We demonstrate a compact system, incorporating a 32-element linear array of ultraviolet (290 nm and 340 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a multi-anode photomultiplier tube, to the in-flight fluorescence detection of aerosolized particles, here containing the biological molecules tryptophan and NADH. This system illustrates substantial advances in the growth and fabrication of new semiconductor UV light emitting devices and an evolution in packaging details for LEDs tailored to the bio-aerosol warning problem. Optical engineering strategies are employed which take advantage of the size and versatility of light-emitting diodes to develop a truly compact fluorescence detector.

  4. 290 and 340 nm UV LED arrays for fluorescence detection from single airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Kristina; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Patterson Iii, William; Nurmikko, Arto; Gherasimova, Maria; Han, Jung; Pan, Yong-Le; Chang, Richard

    2005-11-14

    We demonstrate a compact system, incorporating a 32-element linear array of ultraviolet (290 nm and 340 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a multi-anode photomultiplier tube, to the in-flight fluorescence detection of aerosolized particles, here containing the biological molecules tryptophan and NADH. This system illustrates substantial advances in the growth and fabrication of new semiconductor UV light emitting devices and an evolution in packaging details for LEDs tailored to the bio-aerosol warning problem. Optical engineering strategies are employed which take advantage of the size and versatility of light-emitting diodes to develop a truly compact fluorescence detector. PMID:19503158

  5. Direct Blue Dye Degradation Using Titanium Nanostructures Under Energy-Efficient UV-LED Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Wan-Kuen; Tayade, Rajesh J.

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) morphology on the photocatalytic activity under irradiation of ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV-LED). Different TiO2 nanostructures were synthesized using hydrothermal (nanotubes and nanospheres) and solvothermal (nanoflowers) methods. The morphology, phase composition, bandgap, and chemical properties of the synthesized different TiO2 nanostructures were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. The surface area of the nanotubes was larger than that of the nanospheres and nanoflowers by four- and three-fold, respectively. The photocatalytic activity of the photocatalysts was evaluated by degradation of direct blue-15 dye under UV-LED irradiation in a slurry-type reactor. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 nanoflowers was higher than that of TiO2 nanotubes or nanospheres, suggesting that nanoflowers can serve as efficient photocatalysts for dye degradation.

  6. Efficient charge carrier injection into sub-250 nm AlGaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Kolbe, Tim; Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2014-08-01

    The design and Mg-doping profile of AlN/Al0.7Ga0.3N electron blocking heterostructures (EBH) for AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting below 250 nm was investigated. By inserting an AlN electron blocking layer (EBL) into the EBH, we were able to increase the quantum well emission power and significantly reduce long wavelength parasitic luminescence. Furthermore, electron leakage was suppressed by optimizing the thickness of the AlN EBL while still maintaining sufficient hole injection. Ultraviolet (UV)-C LEDs with very low parasitic luminescence (7% of total emission power) and external quantum efficiencies of 0.19% at 246 nm have been realized. This concept was applied to AlGaN MQW LEDs emitting between 235 nm and 263 nm with external quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.002% to 0.93%. After processing, we were able to demonstrate an UV-C LED emitting at 234 nm with 14.5 μW integrated optical output power and an external quantum efficiency of 0.012% at 18.2 A/cm2.

  7. Efficient charge carrier injection into sub-250 nm AlGaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mehnke, Frank Kuhn, Christian; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Kolbe, Tim; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim; Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2014-08-04

    The design and Mg-doping profile of AlN/Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N electron blocking heterostructures (EBH) for AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting below 250 nm was investigated. By inserting an AlN electron blocking layer (EBL) into the EBH, we were able to increase the quantum well emission power and significantly reduce long wavelength parasitic luminescence. Furthermore, electron leakage was suppressed by optimizing the thickness of the AlN EBL while still maintaining sufficient hole injection. Ultraviolet (UV)-C LEDs with very low parasitic luminescence (7% of total emission power) and external quantum efficiencies of 0.19% at 246 nm have been realized. This concept was applied to AlGaN MQW LEDs emitting between 235 nm and 263 nm with external quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.002% to 0.93%. After processing, we were able to demonstrate an UV-C LED emitting at 234 nm with 14.5 μW integrated optical output power and an external quantum efficiency of 0.012% at 18.2 A/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Analysis of Photosynthetic Characteristics and UV-B Absorbing Compounds in Mung Bean Using UV-B and Red LED Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang-Min; Lu, Zhi-Guo; Yue, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Mung bean has been reported to have antioxidant, antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor activities. Various factors have important effects on the types and contents of plant chemical components. In order to study quality of mung bean from different light sources, mung bean seedlings were exposed to red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and ultraviolet-B (UV-B). Changes in the growth parameters, photosynthetic characteristics, the concentrations of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b and the content of UV-B absorbing compounds were measured. The results showed that photosynthetic characteristics and chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b concentrations were enhanced by red LEDs. The concentrations of UV-B absorbing compounds were enhanced by UV-B on the 20th day, while photosynthetic characteristics, plant length, and the concentrations of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b were reduced by UV-B on the 40th day; at the same time the values of the stem diameter, plant fresh weight, dry weight, and the concentrations of UV-B absorbing compounds were enhanced. It is suggested that red LEDs promote the elongation of plant root growth and photosynthetic characteristics, while UV-B promotes horizontal growth of stems and the synthesis of UV-B absorbing compounds. PMID:24678424

  9. Ultraviolet light stable and transparent sol-gel methyl siloxane hybrid material for UV light-emitting diode (UV LED) encapsulant.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jun-Young; Kim, YongHo; Kim, HweaYoon; Kim, YuBae; Jin, Jungho; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2015-01-21

    An ultraviolet (UV) transparent and stable methyl-siloxane hybrid material was prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The transparency and stability of a UV-LED encapsulant is an important issue because it affects UV light extraction efficiency and long-term reliability. We introduced a novel concept for UV-LED encapsulation using a thermally curable oligosiloxane resin. The encapsulant was fabricated by a hydrosilylation of hydrogen-methyl oligosiloxane resin and vinyl-methyl siloxane resin, and showed a comparable transmittance to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) in the UVB (∼300 nm) region. Most remarkably, the methyl-siloxane hybrid materials exhibited long-term UV stability under light soaking in UVB (∼300 nm) for 1000 h. PMID:25564875

  10. Dual Band Deep Ultraviolet AlGaN Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, S.; Miko, L.; Stahle, C.; Franz, D.; Pugel, D.; Guan, B.; Zhang, J. P.; Gaska, R.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of a back-illuminated voltage bias selectable dual-band AlGaN UV photodetector. The photodetector can separate UVA and W-B band radiation by bias switching a two terminal n-p-n homojunction structure that is fabricated in the same pixel. When a forward bias is applied between the top and bottom electrodes, the detector can sense UV-A and reject W-B band radiation. Alternatively, under reverse bias, the photodetector can sense UV-B and reject UV-A band radiation.

  11. Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkwun; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Allen, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a computer-numerical-controlled ultraviolet light-emitting diode (CNC UV-LED) lithography scheme for three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication. The CNC lithography scheme utilizes sequential multi-angled UV light exposures along with a synchronized switchable UV light source to create arbitrary 3D light traces, which are transferred into the photosensitive resist. The system comprises a switchable, movable UV-LED array as a light source, a motorized tilt-rotational sample holder, and a computer-control unit. System operation is such that the tilt-rotational sample holder moves in a pre-programmed routine, and the UV-LED is illuminated only at desired positions of the sample holder during the desired time period, enabling the formation of complex 3D microstructures. This facilitates easy fabrication of complex 3D structures, which otherwise would have required multiple manual exposure steps as in the previous multidirectional 3D UV lithography approach. Since it is batch processed, processing time is far less than that of the 3D printing approach at the expense of some reduction in the degree of achievable 3D structure complexity. In order to produce uniform light intensity from the arrayed LED light source, the UV-LED array stage has been kept rotating during exposure. UV-LED 3D fabrication capability was demonstrated through a plurality of complex structures such as V-shaped micropillars, micropanels, a micro-‘hi’ structure, a micro-‘cat’s claw,’ a micro-‘horn,’ a micro-‘calla lily,’ a micro-‘cowboy’s hat,’ and a micro-‘table napkin’ array.

  12. Design and evaluation of a UV LED Photocatalytic Reactor Using Anodized TiO2 Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Jyoti P; Achari, Gopal; Langford, Cooper H

    2016-08-01

    A bench-scale flow-through photocatalytic reactor using light emitting diodes (LED) as light source and a TiO2 nanotube array (TN) as immobilized catalyst has been designed, fabricated and tested on commonly studied contaminants. The photoreactor is comprised of 144, 365-nm UV-LED lamps mounted along the inner periphery of an annular cylinder. An ordered array of TN, as catalyst, was immobilized by electrochemical anodization of a titanium cylinder and placed in the center of the reactor. Synthesized TN was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Laboratory investigations were conducted on the photoreactor to treat 4-chlorophenol (4-CP), atrazine and methylene blue. The performance of the photoreactor at different flow rates and at varying distances of photocatalyst from the light source was monitored. The photocatalytic reaction rates increased with bubbling oxygen into the reservoir. Significant improvement was observed when H2O2 was added and degradation to detection limits was observed. PMID:26488573

  13. LED-based UV absorption detector with low detection limits for capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonika; Tolley, H Dennis; Farnsworth, Paul B; Lee, Milton L

    2015-01-20

    A 260 nm deep UV LED-based absorption detector with low detection limits was developed and integrated with a small nanoflow pumping system. The detector is small in size (5.2 × 3.0 cm) and weighs only 85 g (without electronics). This detector was specifically designed and optimized for on-column detection to minimize extra-column band broadening. No optical reference was included due to the low drift in the signal. Two ball lenses, one of which was integrated with the LED, were used to increase light throughput through the capillary column. Stray light was minimized by the use of a band-pass filter and an adjustable slit. Signals down to the parts per billion level (nanomolar) were easily detected with a short-term noise level of 4.4 μAU, confirming a low limit of detection and low noise. The detection limit for adenosine-5'-monophosphate was 230 times lower than any previously reported values. Good linearities (3 orders of magnitude) were obtained using sodium anthraquinone-2-sulfonate, adenosine-5'-monophosphate, dl-tryptophan, and phenol. The LC system was demonstrated by performing isocratic separation of phenolic compounds using a monolithic capillary column (16.5 cm × 150 μm i.d.) synthesized from poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate. PMID:25496031

  14. Enhancement of optical polarization degree of AlGaN quantum wells by using staggered structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiying; Lu, Huimin; Fu, Lei; He, Chenguang; Wang, Mingxing; Tang, Ning; Xu, Fujun; Yu, Tongjun; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Staggered AlGaN quantum wells (QWs) are designed to enhance the transverse-electric (TE) polarized optical emission in deep ultraviolet (DUV) light- emitting diodes (LED). The optical polarization properties of the conventional and staggered AlGaN QWs are investigated by a theoretical model based on the k·p method as well as polarized photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Based on an analysis of the valence subbands and momentum matrix elements, it is found that AlGaN QWs with step-function-like Al content in QWs offers much stronger TE polarized emission in comparison to that from conventional AlGaN QWs. Experimental results show that the degree of the PL polarization at room temperature can be enhanced from 20.8% of conventional AlGaN QWs to 40.2% of staggered AlGaN QWs grown by MOCVD, which is in good agreement with the theoretical simulation. It suggests that polarization band engineering via staggered AlGaN QWs can be well applied in high efficiency AlGaN-based DUV LEDs. PMID:27505782

  15. Heuristic optimization of a continuous flow point-of-use UV-LED disinfection reactor using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Richard M; Jasper, Micah N; Simmons, Otto D; Shatalov, Max; Ducoste, Joel J

    2015-10-15

    Alternative disinfection sources such as ultraviolet light (UV) are being pursued to inactivate pathogenic microorganisms such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia, while simultaneously reducing the risk of exposure to carcinogenic disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. UV-LEDs offer a UV disinfecting source that do not contain mercury, have the potential for long lifetimes, are robust, and have a high degree of design flexibility. However, the increased flexibility in design options will add a substantial level of complexity when developing a UV-LED reactor, particularly with regards to reactor shape, size, spatial orientation of light, and germicidal emission wavelength. Anticipating that LEDs are the future of UV disinfection, new methods are needed for designing such reactors. In this research study, the evaluation of a new design paradigm using a point-of-use UV-LED disinfection reactor has been performed. ModeFrontier, a numerical optimization platform, was coupled with COMSOL Multi-physics, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package, to generate an optimized UV-LED continuous flow reactor. Three optimality conditions were considered: 1) single objective analysis minimizing input supply power while achieving at least (2.0) log10 inactivation of Escherichia coli ATCC 11229; and 2) two multi-objective analyses (one of which maximized the log10 inactivation of E. coli ATCC 11229 and minimized the supply power). All tests were completed at a flow rate of 109 mL/min and 92% UVT (measured at 254 nm). The numerical solution for the first objective was validated experimentally using biodosimetry. The optimal design predictions displayed good agreement with the experimental data and contained several non-intuitive features, particularly with the UV-LED spatial arrangement, where the lights were unevenly populated throughout the reactor. The optimal designs may not have been developed from experienced designers due to the increased degrees of

  16. Developing LED UV fluorescence sensors for online monitoring DOM and predicting DBPs formation potential during water treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Tao; Jin, Jing; Li, Qiang; Wu, Chen-Fei; Lu, Hai; Zhou, Qing; Li, Ai-Min

    2016-04-15

    Online monitoring dissolved organic matter (DOM) is urgent for water treatment management. In this study, high performance size exclusion chromatography with multi-UV absorbance and multi-emission fluorescence scans were applied to spectrally characterize samples from 16 drinking water sources across Yangzi River and Huai River Watersheds. The UV absorbance indices at 254 nm and 280 nm referred to the same DOM components and concentration, and the 280 nm UV light could excite both protein-like and humic-like fluorescence. Hence a novel UV fluorescence sensor was developed out using only one UV280 light-emitting diode (LED) as light source. For all samples, enhanced coagulation was mainly effective for large molecular weight biopolymers; while anion exchange further substantially removed humic substances. During chlorination tests, UVA280 and UVA254 showed similar correlations with yields of disinfection byproducts (DBPs); the humic-like fluorescence obtained from LED sensors correlated well with both trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids yields, while the correlation between protein-like fluorescence and trihalomethanes was relatively poor. Anion exchange exhibited more reduction of DBPs yields as well as UV absorbance and fluorescence signals than enhanced coagulation. The results suggest that the LED UV fluorescence sensors are very promising for online monitoring DOM and predicting DBPs formation potential during water treatment. PMID:26874469

  17. Atmospheric HONO and NO2 measurement based on a broadband cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Zha, Qiaozhi; Chen, Weidong; Xu, Zheng; Wang, Tao; He, Xingdao

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is a key component in tropospheric oxidant chemistry due to its contribution to the cycles of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and hydrogen oxides (HOx). Though numerous laboratory, field, and modeling studies were performed to explain the observed HONO concentrations in the atmosphere, the knowledge of atmospheric HONO chemistry is still not well understood and sometimes controversial [1]. Accurate measurements of HONO and its precursors with high precision should aid in understanding the HONO chemistry. In this paper we report on the measurements of HONO and NO2 concentrations at a suburban site of Tung Chung in Hong Kong during a field intercomparison campaign using a broadband cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer. 1σ detection limits of 0.3 ppbv for HONO and 1 ppbv for NO2 were achieved with an optimum acquisition time of 120 s. The measured HONO and NO2 concentrations were compared with the data from commercial HONO (LOPAP) and NO2 (NOX-analyzer) measurement instrument. Typical diurnal pattern of HONO have been observed and the potential formation sources have been analyzed [2]. Acknowledgements The supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41265011), Educational Commission of Jiangxi Province of China (No.GJJ14548) and Environment and Conservation Fund of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (No. 7/2009). The support of the IRENI program of the Région Nord-Pas de Calaisn, is acknowledged. References [1] W. Chen, R. Maamary, X. Cui, T. Wu, E. Fertein, D. Dewaele, F. Cazier, Q. Zha, Z. Xu, T. Wang, Y. Wang, W. Zhang, X. Gao, W. Liu, F. Dong, 'Photonic Sensing of Environmental Gaseous Nitrous Acid (HONO): Opportunities and Challenges' in The Wonder of Nanotechnology: Quantum Optoelectronic Devices and Applications, M. Razeghi. L. Esaki, and K. von Klitzing, Eds., SPIE Press, Bellingham, WA, 2013, pp. 693-737 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, 'Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED

  18. Mechanoluminescence torque transducer integrated with cost-effective luminescence sensor and UV LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gi-Woo; Kim, Ji-Sik; Yun, Jong-Hwan; Cho, Min-Young

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study investigating the development of a new type of non-contacting torque sensor based on the mechanoluminescence (ML) of a microparticles, such as ZnS:Cu. Typically, applications of ML microparticles have been used in a stress sensor applications successfully, in which these particles are applied to realtime visualization of the stress distribution of cracks, impacts, and ML light generation. Kim et al. demonstrated their potentials of ML microparticles by successfully measuring the sinusoidal torque applied to a rotational shaft through the measurement of the ML intensity signature using a photomultiplier tube (PMT) sensor, which can be widely used in various industrial areas such as automotives, robotics, rotors, and turbines. To show their further potential applications, a cost-effective luminescence sensor and UV LEDs are integrated, and used for detecting the variation of ML intensity in this study. In addition, precision sinusoidal torque waveform with high frequency up to 15 Hz is used to investigate the frequency-dependent hysteresis phenomenon.

  19. Efficacy of Inactivation of Human Enteroviruses by Multiple-Wavelength UV LEDs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has been successfully used for treating a broad suite of pathogens without the concomitant formation of carcinogenic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, conventional mercury UV lamps have some practical limitations in water treatment applications, suc...

  20. Efficacy of Inactivation of Human Enteroviruses by Multiple-Wavelength UV LEDs - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Ultraviolet (UV) light has been successfully used for treating a broad suite of pathogens without the concomitant formation of carcinogenic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, conventional mercury UV lamps have some practical limitations in water treatment appli...

  1. Bias Selectable Dual Band AlGaN Ultra-violet Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Feng; Miko, Laddawan; Franz, David; Guan, Bing; Stahle, Carl M.

    2007-01-01

    Bias selectable dual band AlGaN ultra-violet (UV) detectors, which can separate UV-A and UV-B using one detector in the same pixel by bias switching, have been designed, fabricated and characterized. A two-terminal n-p-n photo-transistor-like structure was used. When a forward bias is applied between the top electrode and the bottom electrode, the detectors can successfully detect W-A and reject UV-B. Under reverse bias, they can detect UV-B and reject UV-A. The proof of concept design shows that it is feasible to fabricate high performance dual-band UV detectors based on the current AlGaN material growth and fabrication technologies.

  2. Investigation of the effect of UV-LED exposure conditions on the production of vitamin D in pig skin.

    PubMed

    Barnkob, Line Lundbæk; Argyraki, Aikaterini; Petersen, Paul Michael; Jakobsen, Jette

    2016-12-01

    The dietary intake of vitamin D is currently below the recommended intake of 10-20μg vitamin D/day. Foods with increased content of vitamin D or new products with enhanced vitamin D are warranted. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a potential new resource in food production lines. In the present study the exposure conditions with ultraviolet (UV) LEDs were systematically investigated in the wavelength range 280-340nm for achieving optimal vitamin D bio-fortification in pig skin. A wavelength of 296nm was found to be optimal for vitamin D3 production. The maximum dose of 20kJ/m(2) produced 3.5-4μg vitamin D3/cm(2) pig skin. Vitamin D3 produced was independent on the combination of time and intensity of the LED source. The increased UV exposure by UV-LEDs may be readily implemented in existing food production facilities, without major modifications to the process or processing equipment, for bio-fortifying food products containing pork skin. PMID:27374546

  3. Treatment of crystallized-fruit wastewater by UV-A LED photo-Fenton and coagulation-flocculation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Chueca, Jorge; Amor, Carlos; Fernandes, José R; Tavares, Pedro B; Lucas, Marco S; Peres, José A

    2016-02-01

    This work reports the treatment of crystallized-fruit effluents, characterized by a very low biodegradability (BOD5/COD <0.19), through the application of a UV-A LED photo-Fenton process. Firstly, a Box-Behnken design of Response Surface Methodology was applied to achieve the optimal conditions for the UV-A LED photo-Fenton process, trying to maximize the efficiency by saving chemicals and time. Under the optimal conditions ([H2O2] = 5459 mg/L; [Fe(3+)] = 286 mg/L; time >180 min), a COD removal of 45, 64 and 74% was achieved after 360 min, using an irradiance of 23, 70 and 85 W/m(2) respectively. Then a combination of UV-A LED photo-Fenton with coagulation-flocculation-decantation attained a higher COD removal (80%), as well as almost total removal of turbidity (99%) and total suspended solids (95%). Subsequent biodegradability of treated effluents increased, allowing the application of a biological treatment step after the photochemical/CFD with 85 W/m(2). PMID:26692512

  4. Final LDRD report : science-based solutions to achieve high-performance deep-UV laser diodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Alessi, Leonard J.; Smith, Michael L.; Henry, Tanya A.; Westlake, Karl R.; Cross, Karen Charlene; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Lee, Stephen Roger

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project that has focused on overcoming major materials roadblocks to achieving AlGaN-based deep-UV laser diodes. We describe our growth approach to achieving AlGaN templates with greater than ten times reduction of threading dislocations which resulted in greater than seven times enhancement of AlGaN quantum well photoluminescence and 15 times increase in electroluminescence from LED test structures. We describe the application of deep-level optical spectroscopy to AlGaN epilayers to quantify deep level energies and densities and further correlate defect properties with AlGaN luminescence efficiency. We further review our development of p-type short period superlattice structures as an approach to mitigate the high acceptor activation energies in AlGaN alloys. Finally, we describe our laser diode fabrication process, highlighting the development of highly vertical and smooth etched laser facets, as well as characterization of resulting laser heterostructures.

  5. Improved UV LED performance using transparent conductive films embedded with plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Shih-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Yi; Ou, Sin-Liang; Tsung, Cheng-Sheng; Chen, Ching-Ho; Wuu, Dong-Sing

    2015-03-01

    Recently, near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (NUV-LEDs) have been used in many applications such as light sources for ultraviolet curing, environmental cleaning, biomedical instrumentation, counterfeit bill detection and phosphor-based white LEDs. However, it is difficult to fabricate NUV-LEDs with high emission efficiency. As the wavelength of NUVLEDs decreases, the most dominant emission will be photons with transverse-magnetic (TM) polarization. For LED structures grown on a c-plane substrate, TM-light propagates mainly in the lateral direction, and it suffers strong effects of total internal reflection (TIR) due to the large incident angle on the interface. Therefore, light extraction efficiency (LEE) of NUV-LEDs is still lower than that of visible LEDs. In this study, a spin coating process in which the grating structure comprises the metallic nanoparticle layer coated on a p-GaN top layer was developed. Various sizes of metallic nanoparticles forming a suspended nanoparticle layer (SNL) embedded in a transparent conductive layer were clearly observed after the deposition of indium tin oxide (ITO). The SNL enhanced the light extraction efficiency of NUVLEDs. Light output power was 1.4 times the magnitude of that of conventional NUV-LEDs operating at 350 mA, but retained nearly the same current-voltage characteristic. Unlike in previous research on surface-plasmon-enhanced LEDs, the metallic nanoparticles were consistently distributed over the surface area. Device performance can be improved substantially by using the three-dimensional distribution of metallic nanoparticles in the SNL, which scatters the propagating light randomly and is coupled between the localized surface plasmon and incident light internally trapped in the LED structure through TIR.

  6. Measuring response of extruded scintillator to UV LED in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Rykalin, V.; Tartaglia, M.; Zutshi, V.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-05-01

    The experimental results on the performance of the extruded scintillator and WLS fiber, and various LEDs in the magnetic fields of 1.8T and 2.3T respectively, are reported. The methodic used is being described.

  7. InGaN-based UV/blue/green/amber LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Takashi; Yamada, Motokazu; Nakamura, Shuji

    1999-04-01

    High-efficient light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting red, amber, green, blue, and ultraviolet light have been obtained through the use of an InGaN active layers instead of GaN active layers. Red LEDs with an emission wavelength of 680 nm which emission energy was smaller than the band-gap energy of InN were fabricated mainly resulting from the piezoelectric field due to the strain. The localized energy states caused by In composition fluctuation in the InGaN active layer seem to be related to the high efficiency of the InGaN-based emitting devices in spite of having a large number of threading dislocations. InGaN single-quantum-well- structure blue LEDs were grown on epitaxially laterally overgrown GaN and sapphire substrates. The emission spectra showed the similar blue shift with increasing forward currents between both LEDs. The output power of both LEDs was almost the same, as high as 6 mW at a current of 20 mA. These results indicate that the In composition fluctuation is not caused by dislocations, the dislocations are not effective to reduce the efficiency of the emission, and that the dislocations from the leakage current pathway in InGaN.

  8. Monitoring of TiO2-catalytic UV-LED photo-oxidation of cyanide contained in mine wastewater and leachate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Hee; Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Gye Min; Lee, Byung-Tae; Yun, Seong-Taek; Kim, Soon-Oh

    2016-01-01

    A photo-oxidation process using UV-LEDs and TiO2 was studied for removal of cyanide contained in mine wastewater and leachates. This study focused on monitoring of a TiO2-catalyzed LED photo-oxidation process, particularly emphasizing the effects of TiO2 form and light source on the efficiency of cyanide removal. The generation of hydroxyl radicals was also examined during the process to evaluate the mechanism of the photo-catalytic process. The apparent removal efficiency of UV-LEDs was lower than that achieved using a UV-lamp, but cyanide removal in response to irradiation as well as consumption of electrical energy was observed to be higher for UV-LEDs than for UV-lamps. The Degussa P25 TiO2 showed the highest performance of the TiO2 photo-catalysts tested. The experimental results indicate that hydroxyl radicals oxidize cyanide to OCN(-), NO2(-), NO3(-), HCO3(-), and CO3(2-), which have lower toxicity than cyanide. In addition, the overall efficacy of the process appeared to be significantly affected by diverse operational parameters, such as the mixing ratio of anatase and rutile, the type of gas injected, and the number of UV-LEDs used. PMID:26195431

  9. Color-Transformable Silicone Elastomers Prepared by Thiol-Ene Reaction with Potential Application in UV-LEDs.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yujing; Gou, Zhiming; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Shengyu

    2016-04-01

    A series of high-efficiency, full-color fluorescent elastomers based on polysiloxane matrix prepared by an easy thiol-ene "click" reaction is reported here. It is found for the first time that the same elastomer can emit transformable colors by conveniently altering the excitation wavelength because of the effect of energy transfer and the "fluorescence switch" of lanthanide ions. A fluent change in emission colors can also be feasible and conveniently reproducible by varying the stoichiometric ratio of lanthanide ions and rhodamine-B in solution and in polymer elastomers. The obtained elastomers are further coated onto commercially available UV-LED cells from the solution medium followed by an in situ cross-linking step. PMID:26847367

  10. Laser diodes with 353 nm wavelength enabled by reduced-dislocation-density AlGaN templates

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Smith, Michael L.; Cross, Karen C.

    2015-10-30

    We fabricated optically pumped and electrically injected ultraviolet (UV) lasers on reduced-threading-dislocation-density (reduced-TDD) AlGaN templates. The overgrowth of sub-micron-wide mesas in the Al0.32Ga0.68N templates enabled a tenfold reduction in TDD, to (2–3) × 108 cm–2. Optical pumping of AlGaN hetero-structures grown on the reduced-TDD templates yielded a low lasing threshold of 34 kW/cm2 at 346 nm. Room-temperature pulsed operation of laser diodes at 353 nm was demonstrated, with a threshold of 22.5 kA/cm2. Furthermore, reduced-TDD templates have been developed across the entire range of AlGaN compositions, presenting a promising approach for extending laser diodes into the deep UV.

  11. Laser diodes with 353 nm wavelength enabled by reduced-dislocation-density AlGaN templates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Smith, Michael L.; Cross, Karen C.

    2015-10-30

    We fabricated optically pumped and electrically injected ultraviolet (UV) lasers on reduced-threading-dislocation-density (reduced-TDD) AlGaN templates. The overgrowth of sub-micron-wide mesas in the Al0.32Ga0.68N templates enabled a tenfold reduction in TDD, to (2–3) × 108 cm–2. Optical pumping of AlGaN hetero-structures grown on the reduced-TDD templates yielded a low lasing threshold of 34 kW/cm2 at 346 nm. Room-temperature pulsed operation of laser diodes at 353 nm was demonstrated, with a threshold of 22.5 kA/cm2. Furthermore, reduced-TDD templates have been developed across the entire range of AlGaN compositions, presenting a promising approach for extending laser diodes into the deep UV.

  12. Strongly transverse-electric-polarized emission from deep ultraviolet AlGaN quantum well light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, Christoph Guttmann, Martin; Wernicke, Tim; Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian; Feneberg, Martin; Goldhahn, Rüdiger; Rass, Jens; Kneissl, Michael; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Knauer, Arne; Kueller, Viola; Weyers, Markus

    2015-10-05

    The optical polarization of emission from ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on (0001)-oriented Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N multiple quantum wells (MQWs) has been studied by simulations and electroluminescence measurements. With increasing aluminum mole fraction in the quantum well x, the in-plane intensity of transverse-electric (TE) polarized light decreases relative to that of the transverse-magnetic polarized light, attributed to a reordering of the valence bands in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N. Using k ⋅ p theoretical model calculations, the AlGaN MQW active region design has been optimized, yielding increased TE polarization and thus higher extraction efficiency for bottom-emitting LEDs in the deep UV spectral range. Using (i) narrow quantum wells, (ii) barriers with high aluminum mole fractions, and (iii) compressive growth on patterned aluminum nitride sapphire templates, strongly TE-polarized emission was observed at wavelengths as short as 239 nm.

  13. Suppressing spontaneous polarization of p-GaN by graphene oxide passivation: Augmented light output of GaN UV-LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyun; Jeong, Seung Yol; Park, Doo Jae; Jeong, Hyeon Jun; Jeong, Sooyeon; Han, Joong Tark; Jeong, Hee Jin; Yang, Sunhye; Kim, Ho Young; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Park, Sae June; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Geon-Woong; Lee, Young Hee; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2015-01-01

    GaN-based ultraviolet (UV) LEDs are widely used in numerous applications, including white light pump sources and high-density optical data storage. However, one notorious issue is low hole injection rate in p-type transport layer due to poorly activated holes and spontaneous polarization, giving rise to insufficient light emission efficiency. Therefore, improving hole injection rate is a key step towards high performance UV-LEDs. Here, we report a new method of suppressing spontaneous polarization in p-type region to augment light output of UV-LEDs. This was achieved by simply passivating graphene oxide (GO) on top of the fully fabricated LED. The dipole layer formed by the passivated GO enhanced hole injection rate by suppressing spontaneous polarization in p-type region. The homogeneity of electroluminescence intensity in active layers was improved due to band filling effect. As a consequence, the light output was enhanced by 60% in linear current region. Our simple approach of suppressing spontaneous polarization of p-GaN using GO passivation disrupts the current state of the art technology and will be useful for high-efficiency UV-LED technology.

  14. Suppressing spontaneous polarization of p-GaN by graphene oxide passivation: Augmented light output of GaN UV-LED

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun; Jeong, Seung Yol; Park, Doo Jae; Jeong, Hyeon Jun; Jeong, Sooyeon; Han, Joong Tark; Jeong, Hee Jin; Yang, Sunhye; Kim, Ho Young; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Park, Sae June; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Geon-Woong; Lee, Young Hee; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2015-01-01

    GaN-based ultraviolet (UV) LEDs are widely used in numerous applications, including white light pump sources and high-density optical data storage. However, one notorious issue is low hole injection rate in p-type transport layer due to poorly activated holes and spontaneous polarization, giving rise to insufficient light emission efficiency. Therefore, improving hole injection rate is a key step towards high performance UV-LEDs. Here, we report a new method of suppressing spontaneous polarization in p-type region to augment light output of UV-LEDs. This was achieved by simply passivating graphene oxide (GO) on top of the fully fabricated LED. The dipole layer formed by the passivated GO enhanced hole injection rate by suppressing spontaneous polarization in p-type region. The homogeneity of electroluminescence intensity in active layers was improved due to band filling effect. As a consequence, the light output was enhanced by 60% in linear current region. Our simple approach of suppressing spontaneous polarization of p-GaN using GO passivation disrupts the current state of the art technology and will be useful for high-efficiency UV-LED technology. PMID:25586148

  15. Suppressing spontaneous polarization of p-GaN by graphene oxide passivation: augmented light output of GaN UV-LED.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyun; Jeong, Seung Yol; Park, Doo Jae; Jeong, Hyeon Jun; Jeong, Sooyeon; Han, Joong Tark; Jeong, Hee Jin; Yang, Sunhye; Kim, Ho Young; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Park, Sae June; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Geon-Woong; Lee, Young Hee; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2015-01-01

    GaN-based ultraviolet (UV) LEDs are widely used in numerous applications, including white light pump sources and high-density optical data storage. However, one notorious issue is low hole injection rate in p-type transport layer due to poorly activated holes and spontaneous polarization, giving rise to insufficient light emission efficiency. Therefore, improving hole injection rate is a key step towards high performance UV-LEDs. Here, we report a new method of suppressing spontaneous polarization in p-type region to augment light output of UV-LEDs. This was achieved by simply passivating graphene oxide (GO) on top of the fully fabricated LED. The dipole layer formed by the passivated GO enhanced hole injection rate by suppressing spontaneous polarization in p-type region. The homogeneity of electroluminescence intensity in active layers was improved due to band filling effect. As a consequence, the light output was enhanced by 60% in linear current region. Our simple approach of suppressing spontaneous polarization of p-GaN using GO passivation disrupts the current state of the art technology and will be useful for high-efficiency UV-LED technology. PMID:25586148

  16. Eu2+ and Eu3+ based "concentrated phosphors" as converters for UV LED light: two approaches and two new examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batentschuk, M.; Geisler, R.; Hum, J.; Iqbal, F.; Meister, F.; Osvet, A.; Stiegelschmitt, A.; Winnacker, A.

    2012-01-01

    The absolute majority of phosphors are composed of a host lattice and some percentage of an activator. At higher activator concentrations the concentration quenching occurs. However, there are phosphors in which only minor quenching of the emission occurs with increasing of the activator content. Based on the existence of two different valence states of the Eu ion (2+ and 3+), two approaches for the development of "concentrated phosphors", i.e. light emitting materials in which the activator ion is a main part of the crystal lattice, are discussed. In both approaches, reduced energy migration leading to the luminescence quenching is considered as a main condition to reach a high quantum efficiency of a concentrated phosphor. Two kinds of phosphors—Eu2+-doped alumosilicate and Eu3+-doped oxyfluoride—are used as an experimental basis for this discussion. Starting from the stoichiometric Ca_{1-x}Eux^{2+}Al2Si2O8 anorthite and Eu3+OF oxyfluorides, the non-stoichiometric powders with Eu^{2+}_{0.92}Al_{1.76}Si_{2.24}O8, Eu3+(O, F)2,35 and Eu3+(O, F)2,16 compositions were synthesized by a solid state reaction and investigated. It was shown that—in spite of the almost 100% Eu concentration—light converters with high quantum efficiency of more than 45% can be realized. A possible application of these materials as UV LED light converters for white light emitting diodes are discussed as well.

  17. Recent progress and future prospect of high-performance near-UV based white LEDs: from ECO lighting to medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Tsunemasa

    2009-08-01

    Near ultraviolet (n-UV) LED-based white light source (LS) can provide the excellent illuminant properties that show high-luminous efficacy (Le>80 lm/W) of radiation and high-color rendering index (CRI or Ra>99). Recent progress and future advantages of the n-UV white LED technology on the basis of our direct flip-chip bonding and stacked multi-layer structure methods will be described. Particularly, the fabrication process, and electrical and illuminant properties in the low-correlated color temperature (CCT or Tc~3452K) white LED with a high-luminous flux (~500 lm/PKG) are discussed, and its lighting and medical applications such as ecological street lighting and gastrointestinal digestive endoscope will be introduced. Furthermore, a color tunable white LS which is composed of multi-phosphor conversion LEDs and its characterization are described. Differences on the quality of light between the n-UV white LED and the conventional blue-YAG white LED will be clarified.

  18. Development of ultra-high sensitivity wide-band gap UV-EUV detectors at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, S.; Yan, F.; Pugel, D. E.; Franz, D.; Miko, L.; Herrero, F.; Matsumara, M.; Babu, S.; Stahle, C. M.

    2005-08-01

    Rapid progress in the AlGaN (Eg=3.4-6.2eV), 4H-SiC (Eg=3.2eV) and ZnMgO (Eg=2.8-7.9eV) material systems over the last five years has led to the demonstration of a number of opto-electronic devices. These wide energy band gap devices offer several key advantages for space applications, over conventional Si (Eg=1.1eV) based devices, such as visible-blind detection, high thermal stability, better radiation hardness, high breakdown electric field, high chemical inertness and greater mechanical strength. Furthermore, the shorter cut-off wavelength of these material systems eliminates the need for bulky and expensive optical filtering components mitigating risk and allowing for simpler optical design of instrumentation. In this paper, we report on the development at NASA/Goddard of ultra-sensitive, high quantum efficiency AlGaN and 4H-SiC Schottky barrier UV-EUV photodiodes, 4H-SiC UV single photon avalanche diodes, large format 256x256 AlGaN UV p-i-n photodiode arrays and recent progress in elemental substitution for p-type and enhanced n-type doping of ZnO.

  19. Functional Analysis in Long-Term Operation of High Power UV-LEDs in Continuous Fluoro-Sensing Systems for Hydrocarbon Pollution.

    PubMed

    Arques-Orobon, Francisco Jose; Nuñez, Neftali; Vazquez, Manuel; Gonzalez-Posadas, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    This work analyzes the long-term functionality of HP (High-power) UV-LEDs (Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes) as the exciting light source in non-contact, continuous 24/7 real-time fluoro-sensing pollutant identification in inland water. Fluorescence is an effective alternative in the detection and identification of hydrocarbons. The HP UV-LEDs are more advantageous than classical light sources (xenon and mercury lamps) and helps in the development of a low cost, non-contact, and compact system for continuous real-time fieldwork. This work analyzes the wavelength, output optical power, and the effects of viscosity, temperature of the water pollutants, and the functional consistency for long-term HP UV-LED working operation. To accomplish the latter, an analysis of the influence of two types 365 nm HP UV-LEDs degradation under two continuous real-system working mode conditions was done, by temperature Accelerated Life Tests (ALTs). These tests estimate the mean life under continuous working conditions of 6200 h and for cycled working conditions (30 s ON & 30 s OFF) of 66,000 h, over 7 years of 24/7 operating life of hydrocarbon pollution monitoring. In addition, the durability in the face of the internal and external parameter system variations is evaluated. PMID:26927113

  20. Functional Analysis in Long-Term Operation of High Power UV-LEDs in Continuous Fluoro-Sensing Systems for Hydrocarbon Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Arques-Orobon, Francisco Jose; Nuñez, Neftali; Vazquez, Manuel; Gonzalez-Posadas, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    This work analyzes the long-term functionality of HP (High-power) UV-LEDs (Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes) as the exciting light source in non-contact, continuous 24/7 real-time fluoro-sensing pollutant identification in inland water. Fluorescence is an effective alternative in the detection and identification of hydrocarbons. The HP UV-LEDs are more advantageous than classical light sources (xenon and mercury lamps) and helps in the development of a low cost, non-contact, and compact system for continuous real-time fieldwork. This work analyzes the wavelength, output optical power, and the effects of viscosity, temperature of the water pollutants, and the functional consistency for long-term HP UV-LED working operation. To accomplish the latter, an analysis of the influence of two types 365 nm HP UV-LEDs degradation under two continuous real-system working mode conditions was done, by temperature Accelerated Life Tests (ALTs). These tests estimate the mean life under continuous working conditions of 6200 h and for cycled working conditions (30 s ON & 30 s OFF) of 66,000 h, over 7 years of 24/7 operating life of hydrocarbon pollution monitoring. In addition, the durability in the face of the internal and external parameter system variations is evaluated. PMID:26927113

  1. Straightforward fabrication of stable white LEDs by embedding of inorganic UV-LEDs into bulk polymerized polymethyl-methacrylate doped with organic dyes

    PubMed Central

    Di Martino, Daniela; Beverina, Luca; Sassi, Mauro; Brovelli, Sergio; Tubino, Riccardo; Meinardi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Stable white-emitting down-converted LEDs are straightforwardly prepared by bulk polymerization of an organic dye doped polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) shell directly on top of a highly efficient commercial blue-emitting InGaN LED. Our optimized polymerization procedure allows for extending the form factor of achievable luminescence converter (LUCO) material beyond the conventional thin film form and to directly produce devices with light bulb design. The selected organic dyes, the blue-emitting Coumarin 30 and a red-emitting diketopyrrolopyrrole derivative, exhibit high compatibility with the free radical polymerization reaction of the PMMA matrix and ensure high stability of the final hybrid device. The control of both the thickness of the PMMA shell and the concentration of the dopant dyes allow for fine tuning of the emission color of the LUCO LED and to obtain white light with CIE chromatic coordinates x = 0.32 and y = 0.33, with rendering index as high as 80. This simple and versatile procedure is not dye-exclusive and is therefore extendable to other molecular systems for color-tunable efficient solid-state lighting sources. PMID:24638041

  2. Straightforward fabrication of stable white LEDs by embedding of inorganic UV-LEDs into bulk polymerized polymethyl-methacrylate doped with organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Daniela; Beverina, Luca; Sassi, Mauro; Brovelli, Sergio; Tubino, Riccardo; Meinardi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Stable white-emitting down-converted LEDs are straightforwardly prepared by bulk polymerization of an organic dye doped polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) shell directly on top of a highly efficient commercial blue-emitting InGaN LED. Our optimized polymerization procedure allows for extending the form factor of achievable luminescence converter (LUCO) material beyond the conventional thin film form and to directly produce devices with light bulb design. The selected organic dyes, the blue-emitting Coumarin 30 and a red-emitting diketopyrrolopyrrole derivative, exhibit high compatibility with the free radical polymerization reaction of the PMMA matrix and ensure high stability of the final hybrid device. The control of both the thickness of the PMMA shell and the concentration of the dopant dyes allow for fine tuning of the emission color of the LUCO LED and to obtain white light with CIE chromatic coordinates x = 0.32 and y = 0.33, with rendering index as high as 80. This simple and versatile procedure is not dye-exclusive and is therefore extendable to other molecular systems for color-tunable efficient solid-state lighting sources. PMID:24638041

  3. Straightforward fabrication of stable white LEDs by embedding of inorganic UV-LEDs into bulk polymerized polymethyl-methacrylate doped with organic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Martino, Daniela; Beverina, Luca; Sassi, Mauro; Brovelli, Sergio; Tubino, Riccardo; Meinardi, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Stable white-emitting down-converted LEDs are straightforwardly prepared by bulk polymerization of an organic dye doped polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) shell directly on top of a highly efficient commercial blue-emitting InGaN LED. Our optimized polymerization procedure allows for extending the form factor of achievable luminescence converter (LUCO) material beyond the conventional thin film form and to directly produce devices with light bulb design. The selected organic dyes, the blue-emitting Coumarin 30 and a red-emitting diketopyrrolopyrrole derivative, exhibit high compatibility with the free radical polymerization reaction of the PMMA matrix and ensure high stability of the final hybrid device. The control of both the thickness of the PMMA shell and the concentration of the dopant dyes allow for fine tuning of the emission color of the LUCO LED and to obtain white light with CIE chromatic coordinates x = 0.32 and y = 0.33, with rendering index as high as 80. This simple and versatile procedure is not dye-exclusive and is therefore extendable to other molecular systems for color-tunable efficient solid-state lighting sources.

  4. Performance of a simple UV LED light source in the capillary electrophoresis of inorganic anions with indirect detection using a chromate background electrolyte.

    PubMed

    King, Marion; Paull, Brett; Haddad, Paul R; Macka, Miroslav

    2002-12-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are known to be excellent light sources for detectors in liquid chromatography and capillary electromigration separation techniques, but to date only LEDs emitting in the visible range have been used. In this work, a UV LED was investigated as a simple alternative light source to standard mercury or deuterium lamps for use in indirect photometric detection of inorganic anions using capillary electrophoresis with a chromate background electrolyte (BGE). The UV LED used had an emission maximum at 379.5 nm, a wavelength at which chromate absorbs strongly and exhibits a 47% higher molar absorptivity than at 254 nm when using a standard mercury light source. The noise, sensitivity and linearity of the LED detector were evaluated and all exhibited superior performance to the mercury light source (up to 70% decrease in noise, up to 26.2% increase in sensitivity, and over 100% increase in linear range). Using the LED detector with a simple chromate-diethanolamine background electrolyte, limits of detection for the common inorganic anions, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-), F- and PO4(3-) ranged from 3 to 14 microg L(-1), using electrostatic injection at -5 kV for 5 s. PMID:12537359

  5. Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K.

    2011-05-04

    This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

  6. Solar-blind AlGaN 256x256 p-i-n detectors and focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reine, M. B.; Hairston, A.; Lamarre, P.; Wong, K. K.; Tobin, S. P.; Sood, A. K.; Cooke, C.; Pophristic, M.; Guo, S.; Peres, B.; Singh, R.; Eddy, C. R., Jr.; Chowdhury, U.; Wong, M. M.; Dupuis, R. D.; Li, T.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports the development of aluminum-gallium nitride (AlGaN or Al xGa 1-xN) photodiode technology for high-operability 256×256 hybrid Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) for solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection in the 260-280 nm spectral region. These hybrid UV FPAs consist of a 256×256 back-illuminated AlGaN p-i-n photodiode array, operating at zero bias voltage, bump-mounted to a matching 256×256 silicon CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) chip. The unit cell size is 30×30 μm2. The photodiode arrays were fabricated from multilayer AlGaN films grown by MOCVD on 2" dia. UV-transparent sapphire substrates. Improvements in AlGaN material growth and device design enabled high quantum efficiency and extremely low leakage current to be achieved in high-operability 256×256 p-i-n photodiode arrays with cuton and cutoff wavelengths of 260 and 280 nm, placing the response in the solar-blind wavelength region (less than about 280 nm) where solar radiation is heavily absorbed by the ozone layer. External quantum efficiencies (at V=0, 270 nm, no antireflection coating) as high as 58% were measured in backilluminated devices. A number of 256×256 FPAs, with the AlGaN arrays fabricated from films grown at three different facilities, achieved response operabilities as high as 99.8%, response nonuniformities (σ/μ) as low as 2.5%, and zero-bias resistance median values as high as 1×10 16 ohm, corresponding to R 0A products of 7×10 10 ohm-cm2. Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI) data were measured on these FPAs. Median NEI values at 1 Hz are 250-500 photons/pixel-s, with best-element values as low as 90 photons/pixel-s at 1 Hz.

  7. Deep ultraviolet photoluminescence of Tm-doped AlGaN alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nepal, N.; Zavada, J. M.; Lee, D. S.; Steckl, A. J.; Sedhain, A.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2009-03-16

    The ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence (PL) properties of Tm-doped Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (0.39{<=}x{<=}1) alloys grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy were probed using above-bandgap excitation from a laser source at 197 nm. The PL spectra show dominant UV emissions at 298 and 358 nm only for samples with x=1 and 0.81. Temperature dependence of the PL intensities of these emission lines reveals exciton binding energies of 150 and 57 meV, respectively. The quenching of these UV emissions appears related to the thermal activation of the excitons bound to rare-earth structured isovalent (RESI) charge traps, which transfer excitonic energy to Tm{sup 3+} ions resulting in the UV emissions. A model of the RESI trap levels in AlGaN alloys is presented.

  8. Synthesis and Luminescence Properties of Rare Earth Activated Phosphors for near UV-Emitting LEDs for Efficacious Generation of White Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinkyu

    Solid state white-emitting lighting devices based on LEDs outperform conventional light sources in terms of lifetime, durability, and luminous efficiency. Near UV-LEDs in combination with blue-, green-, and red-emitting phosphors show superior luminescence properties over the commercialized blue-emitting LED with yellow-emitting phosphors. However, phosphor development for near UV LEDs is a challenging problem and a vibrant area of research. In addition, using the proper synthesis technique is an important consideration in the development of phosphors. In this research, efficient blue-, green-yellow, red-emitting, and color tunable phosphors for near UV LEDs based white light are identified and prepared by various synthetic methods such as solid state reaction, sol-gel/Pechini, co-precipitation, hydrothermal, combustion and spray-pyrolysis. Blue-emittingLiCaPO4:Eu2+, Green/yellow-emitting (Ba,Sr)2SiO4:Eu2+, color tunable solid solutions of KSrPO4-(Ba,Ca)2SiO4:Eu 2+, and red-emitting (Ba,Sr,Ca)3MgSi2O 8:Eu2+,Mn2+ show excellent excitation profile in the near UV region, high quantum efficiency, and good thermal stability for use in solid state lighting applications. In addition, different synthesis methods are analyzed and compared, with the goal of obtaining ideal phosphors, which should have not only have high luminous output but also optimal particle size (˜150--400 nm) and spherical morphology. For Sr2SiO 4:Eu2+, the sol-gel method appears to be the best method. For Ba2SiO4:Eu2+, the co-precipitation method is be the best. Lastly, the fabrication of core/SiO2 shell particles alleviate surface defects and improve luminescence output and moisture stability of nano and micron sized phosphors. For nano-sized Y2O 3:Eu3+, Y2SiO5:Ce3+,Tb 3+, and (Ba,Sr)2SiO4, the luminescence emission intensity of the core/shell particles were significantly higher than that of bare cores. Additionally, the moisture stability is also improved by SiO 2 shells, the luminescence output of

  9. Luminescent properties of near UV excitable Ba2ZnS3 : Mn red emitting phosphor blend for white LED and display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Kottaisamy, M.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2006-07-01

    A bright red colour emitting Mn doped Ba2ZnS3 phosphor was prepared by an ecologically acceptable carbothermal reduction method without an inert gas or hazardous gas (H2S) environment. The phosphor can be excited with UV wavelength radiation to realize emission in the visible range. X-ray diffraction studies confirm an orthorhombic structure with phase group, pnam. The photoluminescence (PL) emission spectrum shows a broad band with emission maximum at 625 nm under the host excitation of 358 nm, which lies in the near UV region. The concentration of Mn was varied from 0.0025 to 0.20 mole with respect to Zn and the optimum PL emission intensity was obtained at the concentration of 0.01 mole of Mn. The CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) colour coordinates measurement (x = 0.654 and y = 0.321) shows that the primary emission is in the red region. The triband phosphors blend containing Sr5(PO4)3Cl : Eu2+ (blue), ZnS : Cu,Al (green) and Ba2ZnS3 : Mn (red) shows white light emission under 365 nm excitation having CIE chromaticity (x = 0.292 and y = 0.251). Since phosphor excitation lies in the near UV excitable region, giving a bright red emission, it can be used for applications in near UV phosphor converted white LED lighting and display devices.

  10. Structure and fluorescent properties of Ba3Sc(PO4)3:Sm3+ red-orange phosphor for n-UV w-LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoxue; Mei, Lefu; Liu, Haikun; Liao, Libing; Liu, Yuqin; Nie, Kun; Li, Zhaohui

    2016-06-01

    An appropriate solid-state route was adopted to synthesize a series of related Ba3Sc(PO4)3:xSm3+ red-orange phosphors. The Rietveld method was used to explore the structure of the phosphor. At present the PL, PLE, diffuse reflection and decay curves have been investigated in detail. These phosphors can be accurately excited by the 406 nm n-UV light and produce the emitted red-orange light whose peaks locate at about 566 nm, 603 nm and 650 nm. The quantum efficiency of Ba3Sc0.95(PO4)3:0.05Sm3+ was 53.5%. All above results indicate that Ba3Sc(PO4)3:Sm3+ phosphor can act as a suitable candidate of the warm components of n-UV w-LEDs.

  11. Application of portable online LED UV fluorescence sensor to predict the degradation of dissolved organic matter and trace organic contaminants during ozonation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Tao; Majewsky, Marius; Abbt-Braun, Gudrun; Horn, Harald; Jin, Jing; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Qing; Li, Ai-Min

    2016-09-15

    This work aims to correlate signals of LED UV/fluorescence sensor with the degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and trace-level organic contaminants (TOrCs) during ozonation process. Six sets of bench-scale ozonation kinetic experiments incorporated with three different water matrices and 14 TOrCs of different reactivity (group I ∼ V) were conducted. Calibrated by tryptophan and humic substances standards and verified by the lab benchtop spectroscopy, the newly developed portable/online LED sensor, which measures the UV280 absorbance, protein-like and humic-like fluorescence simultaneously, was feasible to monitor chromophores and fluorophores with good sensitivity and accuracy. The liquid chromatography with organic carbon detector combined with 2D synchronous correlation analysis further demonstrated how the DOM components of large molecular weight were transformed into small moieties as a function of the decrease of humic-like fluorescence. For TOrCs, their removal rates were well correlated with the decrease of the LED UV/fluorescence signals, and their elimination patterns were mainly determined by their reactivity with O3 and hydroxyl radicals. At approximately 50% reduction of humic-like fluorescence almost complete oxidation of TOrCs of group I and II was reached, a similar removal percentage (25-75%) of TOrCs of group III and IV, and a poor removal percentage (<25%) of group V. This study might contribute to the smart control of advanced oxidation processes for the water and wastewater treatment in the future. PMID:27267474

  12. Photocatalytic decomposition of selected estrogens and their estrogenic activity by UV-LED irradiated TiO2 immobilized on porous titanium sheets via thermal-chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Arlos, Maricor J; Liang, Robert; Hatat-Fraile, Melisa M; Bragg, Leslie M; Zhou, Norman Y; Servos, Mark R; Andrews, Susan A

    2016-11-15

    The removal of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) remains a big challenge in water treatment. Risks associated with these compounds are not clearly defined and it is important that the water industry has additional options to increase the resiliency of water treatment systems. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has potential applications for the removal of EDCs from water. TiO2 has been immobilized on supports using a variety of synthesis methods to increase its feasibility for water treatment. In this study, we immobilized TiO2 through the thermal-chemical oxidation of porous titania sheets. The efficiency of the material to degrade target EDCs under UV-LED irradiation was examined under a wide range of pH conditions. A yeast-estrogen screen assay was used to complement chemical analysis in assessing removal efficiency. All compounds but 17β-estradiol were degraded and followed a pseudo first-order kinetics at all pH conditions tested, with pH 4 and pH 11 showing the most and the least efficient treatments respectively. In addition, the total estrogenic activity was substantially reduced even with the inefficient degradation of 17β-estradiol. Additional studies will be required to optimize different treatment conditions, UV-LED configurations, and membrane fouling mitigation measures to make this technology a more viable option for water treatment. PMID:27469042

  13. Does an additional UV LED improve the degree of conversion and Knoop Hardness of light-shade composite resins?

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Maria Cecília Caldas; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane Suzy; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) using FT-Raman spectroscopy and the Knoop hardness (KHN) of composites cured by second and third-generation LED light curing-units (LCU), Radii Cal and Ultralume 5. Methods: Three composites (Filtek Supreme XT, Filtek Z350, and Esthet X) were selected for this study. KHN testing (n=10) was performed with 10 indentations for the top (T) and bottom (B) surfaces. For DC (n=10), both the T and B surfaces were analyzed. Results: For KHN, the three composites differed in hardens. There was a “LCU-surface” interaction, in which Radii Cal showed significantly greater hardens in the B surface. For DC, there was a “composite-surface-LCU” interaction. For the “composite” factor, there was no significant difference between the groups, except for Supreme XT-Radii Cal (T or B surfaces). For the “LCU” factor there was a significant difference for Supreme XT T surface, Ultralume 5 obtained a higher DC. For the Z350 T surface, a significant difference in the DC in which Radii Cal obtained better results. For the “surface” factor, all groups presented T surfaces with a higher DC than the B surfaces, the sole exceptions involved Esthet X-Radii Cal and Z350-Ultralume 5. Conclusion: Knowledge regarding composite composition and the characteristics of LCUs are important for effective polymerization. PMID:23077419

  14. Low-ohmic-contact-resistance V-based electrode for n-type AlGaN with high AlN molar fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kazuki; Takeda, Kunihiro; Kusafuka, Toshiki; Iwaya, Motoaki; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Akasaki, Isamu; Amano, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    We investigated a V-based electrode for the realization of low ohmic-contact resistivity in n-type AlGaN with a high AlN molar fraction characterized by the circular transmission line model. The contact resistivity of n-type Al0.62Ga0.38N prepared using the V/Al/Ni/Au electrode reached 1.13 × 10‑6 Ω cm2. Using this electrode, we also demonstrated the fabrication of UV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with an emission wavelength of approximately 300 nm. An operating voltage of LED prepared using a V/Al/Ni/Au electrode was 1.6 V lower at 100 mA current injection than that prepared using a Ti/Al/Ti/Au electrode, with a specific contact resistance of approximately 2.36 × 10‑4 Ω cm2 for n-type Al0.62Ga0.38N.

  15. Synthesis and luminescent properties of UV-excited thermal stable red-emitting phosphor Ba3Lu(PO4)3: Eu3+ for NUV LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinguo; Zhang, Jilin; Gong, Menglian

    2014-02-01

    A series of Ba3Lu(PO4)3: Eu3+ phosphors were synthesized by high-temperature solid-state method, and their UV-vis luminescent properties were investigated. The f-f transitions of Eu3+ in the host lattice were assigned and discussed. The excitation and emission spectra indicate that this phosphor can be excited by near ultraviolet (NUV) light, and exhibits strong red emission. The concentration quenching on Eu3+ emission and its mechanism were investigated. This phosphor shows a good thermal stability at high temperature (˜180 °C). The fabricated prototype LEDs with Ba3Lu(PO4)3: Eu3+ and 395 nm-emitting InGaN chips exhibit bright red emission. The present study suggests that Ba3Lu(PO4)3: Eu3+ can be a potential red phosphor for NUV light-emitting diodes.

  16. An elegant route to overcome fundamentally-limited light extraction in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes: Preferential outcoupling of strong in-plane emission

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Dong Yeong; Park, Jun Hyuk; Schubert, E. Fred; Kim, Jungsub; Lee, Jinsub; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Youngsoo; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    While there is an urgent need for semiconductor-based efficient deep ultraviolet (DUV) sources, the efficiency of AlGaN DUV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) remains very low because the extraction of DUV photons is significantly limited by intrinsic material properties of AlGaN. Here, we present an elegant approach based on a DUV LED having multiple mesa stripes whose inclined sidewalls are covered by a MgF2/Al omni-directional mirror to take advantage of the strongly anisotropic transverse-magnetic polarized emission pattern of AlGaN quantum wells. The sidewall-emission-enhanced DUV LED breaks through the fundamental limitations caused by the intrinsic properties of AlGaN, thus shows a remarkable improvement in light extraction as well as operating voltage. Furthermore, an analytic model is developed to understand and precisely estimate the extraction of DUV photons from AlGaN DUV LEDs, and hence to provide promising routes for maximizing the power conversion efficiency. PMID:26935402

  17. An elegant route to overcome fundamentally-limited light extraction in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes: Preferential outcoupling of strong in-plane emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Dong Yeong; Park, Jun Hyuk; Schubert, E. Fred; Kim, Jungsub; Lee, Jinsub; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Youngsoo; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2016-03-01

    While there is an urgent need for semiconductor-based efficient deep ultraviolet (DUV) sources, the efficiency of AlGaN DUV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) remains very low because the extraction of DUV photons is significantly limited by intrinsic material properties of AlGaN. Here, we present an elegant approach based on a DUV LED having multiple mesa stripes whose inclined sidewalls are covered by a MgF2/Al omni-directional mirror to take advantage of the strongly anisotropic transverse-magnetic polarized emission pattern of AlGaN quantum wells. The sidewall-emission-enhanced DUV LED breaks through the fundamental limitations caused by the intrinsic properties of AlGaN, thus shows a remarkable improvement in light extraction as well as operating voltage. Furthermore, an analytic model is developed to understand and precisely estimate the extraction of DUV photons from AlGaN DUV LEDs, and hence to provide promising routes for maximizing the power conversion efficiency.

  18. An elegant route to overcome fundamentally-limited light extraction in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes: Preferential outcoupling of strong in-plane emission.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Dong Yeong; Park, Jun Hyuk; Schubert, E Fred; Kim, Jungsub; Lee, Jinsub; Kim, Yong-Il; Park, Youngsoo; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    While there is an urgent need for semiconductor-based efficient deep ultraviolet (DUV) sources, the efficiency of AlGaN DUV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) remains very low because the extraction of DUV photons is significantly limited by intrinsic material properties of AlGaN. Here, we present an elegant approach based on a DUV LED having multiple mesa stripes whose inclined sidewalls are covered by a MgF2/Al omni-directional mirror to take advantage of the strongly anisotropic transverse-magnetic polarized emission pattern of AlGaN quantum wells. The sidewall-emission-enhanced DUV LED breaks through the fundamental limitations caused by the intrinsic properties of AlGaN, thus shows a remarkable improvement in light extraction as well as operating voltage. Furthermore, an analytic model is developed to understand and precisely estimate the extraction of DUV photons from AlGaN DUV LEDs, and hence to provide promising routes for maximizing the power conversion efficiency. PMID:26935402

  19. BPO4@B2O3 and (BPO4@B2O3):Eu3+: The novel single-emitting-component phosphors for near UV-white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiyu; Liu, Wei; Jiang, Yu; Cao, Lixin; Su, Ge; Gao, Rongjie

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays much effort has been devoted to exploring novel luminescent materials with low-cost, high stability and excellent luminescent properties. In this paper, a new kind of luminescent material BPO4@B2O3 was prepared by using a facile method. The as-obtained samples contain numerous BPO4 nanoparticles enclosed by amorphous and crystalline B2O3 homogeneously, which exhibits a broad emission band ranging from 380 to 700 nm under near-UV irradiation. More importantly, it is worth noting that the BPO4@B2O3 phosphor exhibits the excellent thermal quenching property, which endows it with a promising prospect as phosphors for high power white LEDs. To further promote its application as white light phosphors, Eu3+ ions were doped into the BPO4@B2O3 samples and prepared the (BPO4@B2O3):Eu3+ phosphors with chromaticity coordinates (0.3022, 0.3122). The corresponding packaging of LEDs indicates that both BPO4@B2O3 and (BPO4@B2O3):Eu3+ can be considered as the promising phosphors for WLEDs.

  20. Solar-blind AlGaN 256×256 p-i-n detectors and focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reine, M. B.; Hairston, A.; Lamarre, P.; Wong, K. K.; Tobin, S. P.; Sood, A. K.; Cooke, C.; Pophristic, M.; Guo, S.; Peres, B.; Singh, R.; Eddy, C. R. _Jr., Jr.; Chowdhury, U.; Wong, M. M.; Dupuis, R. D.; Li, T.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports the development of aluminum-gallium nitride (AlGaN or Al xGa 1-xN) photodiode technology for high-operability 256×256 hybrid Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) for solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection in the 260-280 nm spectral region. These hybrid UV FPAs consist of a 256×256 back-illuminated AlGaN p-i-n photodiode array, operating at zero bias voltage, bump-mounted to a matching 256×256 silicon CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) chip. The unit cell size is 30×30 μm2. The photodiode arrays were fabricated from multilayer AlGaN films grown by MOCVD on 2" dia. UV-transparent sapphire substrates. Improvements in AlGaN material growth and device design enabled high quantum efficiency and extremely low leakage current to be achieved in high-operability 256×256 p-i-n photodiode arrays with cuton and cutoff wavelengths of 260 and 280 nm, placing the response in the solar-blind wavelength region (less than about 280 nm) where solar radiation is heavily absorbed by the ozone layer. External quantum efficiencies (at V=0, 270 nm, no antireflection coating) as high as 58% were measured in back-illuminated devices. A number of 256×256 FPAs, with the AlGaN arrays fabricated from films grown at three different facilities, achieved response operabilities as high as 99.8%, response nonuniformities (σ/μ) as low as 2.5%, and zero-bias resistance median values as high as 1×10 16 ohm, corresponding to R0A products of 7×10 10 ohm-cm2. Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI) data were measured on these FPAs. Median NEI values at 1 Hz are 250-500 photons/pixel-s, with best-element values as low as 90 photons/pixel-s at 1 Hz.

  1. Enhancement of blue InGaN light-emitting diodes by using AlGaN increased composition-graded barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lei; Zhiqiang, Liu; Miao, He; Xiaoyan, Yi; Junxi, Wang; Jinmin, Li; Shuwen, Zheng; Shuti, Li

    2015-05-01

    The characteristics of nitride-based blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with AlGaN composition-graded barriers are analyzed numerically. The carrier concentrations in the quantum wells (QWs), the energy band diagrams, the electrostatic fields, and the light output power are investigated by APSYS software. The simulation results show that the LED with AlGaN composition-graded barriers has a better performance than its AlGaN/InGaN counterpart owing to the increase of hole injection and the enhancement of electron confinement. The simulation results also suggest that the output power is enhanced significantly and the efficiency droop is markedly improved when the AlGaN barriers are replaced by AlGaN composition-graded barriers. Project supported by the National High Technology Program of China (Nos. 2011AA03A105, 2013AA03A101), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61306051, 61306050, 11474105), the Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Project (No. D12110300140000), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2011CB301902), the Industry-Academia-Research Union Special Fund of Guangdong Province of China (No. 2012B091000169), the Science & Technology Innovation Platform of Industry-Academia-Research Union of Guangdong Province-Ministry Cooperation Special Fund of China (No. 2012B090600038), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (No. 20134407110008), and the Science research innovation foundation of South China Normal University of China (No. 2013kyjj041).

  2. CBED study of grain misorientations in AlGaN epilayers.

    PubMed

    Sahonta, S-L; Cherns, D; Liu, R; Ponce, F A; Amano, H; Akasaki, I

    2005-04-01

    Large angle convergent beam electron diffraction (LACBED) has been used to examine AlGaN epilayers grown by facet-controlled epitaxial lateral overgrowth on GaN/(0001) sapphire substrates in prototype UV laser structures. The substrates, defined by masks with seed openings along a <10-10> stripe direction, had GaN seed columns with {11-22} surfaces. Studies were carried out on cross-sectional samples cut perpendicular to the stripe axis. An LACBED analysis of the orientation of (000 2) planes, and of the (11-20) planes parallel to the stripe axis, revealed that the AlGaN wings were both rotated by angles of 1-2 x 10(-2)radians about the 10-10 stripe axis with respect to the underlying GaN, and distorted due to misfit strains. It is shown that the results are consistent with the observed structure of the AlGaN/GaN and the wing/wing boundaries, and with a new model for the generation of a-type misfit dislocations at the AlGaN/GaN interface. PMID:15777597

  3. Eu2+ & Mn(2+)-coactivated Ba3Gd(PO4)3 orange-yellow-emitting phosphor with tunable color tone for UV-excited white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ning; Lü, Wei; Jia, Yongchao; Lv, Wenzhen; Zhao, Qi; You, Hongpeng

    2013-01-14

    A novel orange-yellow-emitting Ba(3)Gd(PO(4))(3):xEu(2+),yMn(2+) phosphor is prepared by high-temperature solid-state reaction. The crystal structure of Ba(3)Gd(PO(4))(3):0.005 Eu(2+),0.04 Mn(2+) is determined by Rietveld refinement analysis on powder X-ray diffraction data, which shows that the cations are disordered on a single crystallographic site and the oxygen atoms are distributed over two partially occupied sites. The photoluminescence excitation spectra show that the developed phosphor has an efficient broad absorption band ranging from 230 to 420 nm, perfectly matching the characteristic emission of UV-light emitting diode (LED) chips. The emission spectra show that the obtained phosphors possess tunable color emissions from yellowish-green through yellow and ultimately to reddish-orange by simply adjusting the Mn(2+) content (y) in Ba(3)Gd(PO(4))(3):0.005 Eu(2+),y Mn(2+) host. The tunable color emissions origin from the change in intensity between the 4f-5d transitions in the Eu(2+) ions and the (4)T(1)-(6)A(1) transitions of the Mn(2+) ions through the energy transfer from the Eu(2+) to the Mn(2+) ions. In addition, the mechanism of the energy transfer between the Eu(2+) and Mn(2+) ions are also studied in terms of the Inokuti-Hirayama theoretical model. The present results indicate that this novel orange-yellow-emitting phosphor can be used as a potential candidate for the application in white LEDs. PMID:23161526

  4. Photoluminescence and phosphorescence properties of SrZn(PO):Eux2+,Mny2+ phosphor for UV-based white-LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Junho; Jayasimhadri, M.; Sueb Lee, Ho; Jang, Kiwan; Soo Yi, Soung; Hyun Jeong, Jung; Kim, Changdae

    2009-07-01

    SrZn(PO)2:Eux2+,Mny2+ (SZP: Eux2+, Mny2+) phosphors ( x=0, 0.01 and y=0, 0.01) were prepared by using a stoichiometric solid-state reaction method and their photoluminescence and phosphorescence decay properties were investigated. The emission spectrum of SrZn 2(PO 4) 2: Eu0.012+, Mn0.012+ measured under 400 nm excitation was composed of the violettish blue and the emerald green emissioins centered at 421 and 547 nm, respectively. The excitation wavelength of the emission peak at 547 nm was about 421 nm in the excitation spectrum of SZP: Mn0.012+. Since, this value is equal to the transition energy of Eu 2+, the energy transfer from Eu 2+ to Mn 2+ in SZP: Eu0.012+, Mn0.012+ phosphor has been demonstrated. The CIE chromaticity coordinates of SZP: Eu0.012+, Mn0.012+ phosphor were (0.330, 0.328) under the excitation wavelength 375 nm at room temperature. The phosphorescence from SZP: Eu0.012+, Mn0.012+ could be seen by naked eyes for few seconds and it has persisted for about 4.4 h while monitoring by using a PMT spectrometer. Therefore, SZP: Eux2+, Mny2+phosphor may be a potential candidate for the UV-based white light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

  5. A novel orange-yellow-emitting Ba3Lu(PO4)3:Eu2+,Mn2+ phosphor with energy transfer for UV-excited white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ning; Huang, Yeju; Jia, Yongchao; Lv, Wenzhen; Zhao, Qi; Lü, Wei; Xia, Zhiguo; You, Hongpeng

    2013-01-28

    Eu(2+)-Mn(2+) codoped orange-yellow-emitting Ba(3)Lu(PO(4))(3) phosphors were synthesized by a solid-state reaction. The synthesis, structure refinement, and luminescence properties of the obtained phosphor were first investigated in detail. The crystal structure was refined with a split-atom model, where the oxygen atoms are distributed over two partially occupied sites. The refinement confirmed that BLuP:0.005Eu(2+),0.06Mn(2+) has a cubic unit cell with space group I43d (no. 220), cell parameters a = b = c = 10.4025 Å and Z = 4. The luminescent properties reveal that the developed phosphor can efficiently convert UV photons in a broad range from 230 to 430 nm into orange-yellow emission. On the basis of the luminescence spectra and fluorescence decay curves, we confirm that the energy transfer process from the Eu(2+) to Mn(2+) ions takes place in the codoped Ba(3)Lu(PO(4))(3):Eu(2+),Mn(2+) phosphor, and the energy transfer efficiency increases with an increase in the Mn(2+) content. The possible energy transfer mechanism was proposed in terms of the experimental results and analysis. In particular, our developed phosphor contains a larger amount of the red-emitting component, compared with the commercial YAG:Ce phosphor, possessing favorable properties for application in warm white LEDs with low correlated color temperature. PMID:23108262

  6. Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinjuan; Ji, Cheng; Xiang, Yong; Kang, Xiangning; Shen, Bo; Yu, Tongjun

    2016-05-16

    Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency (LEE) in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated in this paper. A united picture is presented to describe polarized light's emission and propagation processes. It is found that the electron-hole recombinations in AlGaN multiple quantum wells produce three kinds of angularly distributed polarized emissions and propagation process can change their intensity distributions. By investigation the change of angular distributions in 277nm and 215nm LEDs, this work reveals that LEE can be significantly enhanced by modulating the angular distributions of polarized light of DUV LEDs. PMID:27409966

  7. Improved performance in vertical GaN Schottky diode assisted by AlGaN tunneling barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y.; Chu, R.; Li, R.; Chen, M.; Williams, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    In a vertical GaN Schottky barrier diode, the free electron concentration n in the 6-μm-thick drift layer was found to greatly impact the diode reverse leakage current, which increased from 2.1 × 10-7 A to 3.9 × 10-4 A as n increased from 7.5 × 1014 cm-3 to 6.3 × 1015 cm-3 at a reverse bias of 100 V. By capping the drift layer with an ultrathin 5-nm graded AlGaN layer, reverse leakage was reduced by more than three orders of magnitude with the same n in the drift layer. We attribute this to the increased Schottky barrier height with the AlGaN at the surface. Meanwhile, the polarization field within the graded AlGaN effectively shortened the depletion depth, which led to the formation of tunneling current at a relatively small forward bias. The turn-on voltage in the vertical Schottky diodes was reduced from 0.77 V to 0.67 V—an advantage in reducing conduction loss in power switching applications.

  8. Development of an enzymatic assay system of D-lactate using D-lactate dehydrogenase and a UV-LED fluorescent spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Ming; Chen, Shih-Ming; Chien, Po-Jen; Yu, Han-Yin

    2015-12-10

    In this study, we aimed to develop a new enzymatic assay system of d-lactate with good precision, accuracy, and sensitivity for the determination of D-lactate concentrations in rat serum. D-Lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) was utilized to catalyze D-lactate and NAD(+) to pyruvate and NADH, respectively. The generated NADH was excited by using a 340-nm UV-light-emitting diode (LED), and the fluorescence at 491 nm was detected to determine the concentration of D-lactate in rat serum. The optics, consisting of the sample cuvette, were set on three-dimensional stages to receive the most intensive fluorescence signal into the spectrometer. The optimal conditions of the D-LDH reaction were pH 8.5 and 25 °C for 90 min. The results showed that the new D-lactate assay system had good linearity (R(2)=0.9964) in the calibration range from 5 to 150 μM. Intra-day and inter-day accuracies were in the range of 103.96-109.09% and 102.84-104.59%, respectively, and the intra-day and inter-day precision was 4.28-6.82% and 4.04-12.40%, respectively. Finally, serum D-lactate concentrations determined by the proposed enzymatic assay system were compared with those obtained by a conventional HPLC method. The newly developed D-lactate assay system could detect 10-15 samples in 90 min, whereas the HPLC method could detect only one sample over the same time period. PMID:26265307

  9. Growth of AlGaN on silicon substrates: a novel way to make back-illuminated ultraviolet photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2015-08-01

    AlGaN, with its tunable wide-bandgap is a good choice for the realization of ultraviolet photodetectors. AlGaN films tend to be grown on foreign substrates such as sapphire, which is the most common choice for back-illuminated devices. However, even ultraviolet opaque substrates like silicon holds promise because, silicon can be removed by chemical treatment to allow back-illumination,1 and it is a very low-cost substrate which is available in large diameters up to 300 mm. However, Implementation of silicon as the solar-blind PD substrates requires overcoming the lattice-mismatch (17%) with the AlxGa1-xN that leads to high density of dislocation and crack-initiating stress. In this talk, we report the growth of thick crack-free AlGaN films on (111) silicon substrates through the use of a substrate patterning and mask-less selective area regrowth. This technique is critical as it decouples the epilayers and the substrate and allows for crack-free growth; however, the masking also helps to reduce the dislocation density by inclining the growth direction and encouraging dislocations to annihilate. A back-illuminated p-i-n PD structure is subsequently grown on this high quality template layer. After processing and hybridizing the device we use a chemical process to selectively remove the silicon substrate. This removal has minimal effect on the device, but it removes the UV-opaque silicon and allows back-illumination of the photodetector. We report our latest results of back-illuminated solar-blind photodetectors growth on silicon.

  10. Development of aluminum gallium nitride based optoelectronic devices operating in deep UV and terahertz spectrum ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei

    In this research project I have investigated AlGaN alloys and their quantum structures for applications in deep UV and terahertz optoelectronic devices. For the deep UV emitter applications the materials and devices were grown by rf plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on 4H-SiC, 6H-SiC and c-plane sapphire substrates. In the growth of AlGaN/AlN multiple quantum wells on SiC substrates, the AlGaN wells were grown under excess Ga, far beyond than what is required for the growth of stoichiometric AlGaN films, which resulted in liquid phase epitaxy growth mode. Due to the statistical variations of the excess Ga on the growth front we found that this growth mode leads to films with lateral variations in the composition and thus, band structure potential fluctuations. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the wells in such structures are not homogeneous but have the appearance of quantum dots. We find by temperature dependent photoluminescence measurements that the multiple quantum wells with band structure potential fluctuations emit at 240 nm and have room temperature internal quantum efficiency as high as 68%. Furthermore, they were found to have a maximum net modal optical gain of 118 cm-1 at a transparency threshold corresponding to 1.4 x 1017 cm-3 excited carriers. We attribute this low transparency threshold to population inversion of only the regions of the potential fluctuations rather than of the entire matrix. Some prototype deep UV emitting LED structures were also grown by the same method on sapphire substrates. Optoelectronic devices for terahertz light emission and detection, based on intersubband transitions in III-nitride semiconductor quantum wells, were grown on single crystal c-plane GaN substrates. Growth conditions such the ratio of group III to active nitrogen fluxes, which determines the appropriate Ga-coverage for atomically smooth growth without requiring growth interruptions were employed. Emitters designed in the quantum cascade

  11. Fabrication of ZnO nanorod/p-GaN high-brightness UV LED by microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition with Zn(OH)2-PVA nanocomposites as seed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, J. J.; Mahdi, M. A.; Yusof, Y.; Abu-Hassan, H.; Hassan, Z.; Al-Attar, H. A.; Monkman, A. P.

    2013-03-01

    Chemical solution deposition is a low-temperature and possibly the lowest-cost method of growing ZnO nanorods on a GaN substrate. However, most reported methods leave an interface layer between the grown ZnO nanorods and substrate, which can interfere with light emission and extraction. Here we report the growth of high-quality, vertically aligned ZnO nanorods directly on a p-type GaN substrate, with no interface layer, by microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition using a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-Zn(OH)2 nanocomposites as the seed layer. X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy confirmed the high quality of the nanorods in addition to the narrow and high-intensity UV peak of the photoluminescence spectrum. Three different filling insulator materials, poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), SiO2, and PVA, were used to fabricate n-ZnO nanorod/p-GaN thin film LED structures. The electroluminescence (EL) properties for these three devices showed different emission peaks, which mainly originated from the recombination of free carriers at the two sides of the heterojunction. All devices showed excellent LED performance under forward and reverse bias; the PMMA device showed EL peaks in the UV-blue region, and the SiO2 device displayed EL peaks in the UV and green regions, respectively.

  12. Persistent photoconductivity in AlGaN/GaN heterojunction channels caused by the ionization of deep levels in the AlGaN barrier layer

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, H.; Akiyama, Y.; Niwa, R.; Sakashita, H.; Sakaki, H.; Kachi, T.; Sugimoto, M.

    2013-12-04

    Time-dependent responses of drain current (I{sub d}) in an AlGaN/GaN HEMT under UV (3.3 eV) and red (2.0 eV) light illumination have been studied at 300 K and 250 K. UV illumination enhances I{sub d} by about 10 %, indicating that the density of two-dimensional electrons is raised by about 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. When UV light is turned off at 300 K, a part of increased I{sub d} decays quickly but the other part of increment is persistent, showing a slow decay. At 250 K, the majority of increment remains persistent. It is found that such a persistent increase of I{sub d} at 250 K can be partially erased by the illumination of red light. These photo-responses are explained by a simple band-bending model in which deep levels in the AlGaN barrier get positively charged by the UV light, resulting in a parabolic band bending in the AlGaN layer, while some potion of those deep levels are neutralized by the red light.

  13. Tunable blue-green-emitting Ba3LaNa(PO4)3F:Eu2+,Tb3+ phosphor with energy transfer for near-UV white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Mengmeng; Guo, Ning; Lü, Wei; Jia, Yongchao; Lv, Wenzhen; Zhao, Qi; Shao, Baiqi; You, Hongpeng

    2013-09-16

    A series of Eu(2+) and Eu(2+)/Tb(3+) activated novel Ba3LaNa(PO4)3F phosphors have been synthesized by traditional solid state reaction. Rietveld structure refinement of the obtained phosphor indicates that the Ba3LaNa(PO4)3F host contains three kinds of Ba sites. The photoluminescence properties exhibit that the obtained phosphors can be efficiently excited in the range from 320 to 430 nm, which matches perfectly with the commercial n-UV LED chips. The critical distance of the Eu(2+) ions in Ba3LaNa(PO4)3F:Eu(2+) is calculated and the energy quenching mechanism is proven to be dipole-dipole interaction. Tunable blue-green emitting Ba3LaNa(PO4)3F:Eu(2+),Tb(3+) phosphor has been obtained by co-doping Eu(2+) and Tb(3+) ions into the host and varying their relative ratios. Compared with the Tb(3+) singly doped phosphor, the codoped phosphors have more intense absorption in the n-UV range and stronger emission of the Tb(3+) ions, which are attributed to the effective energy transfer from the Eu(2+) to Tb(3+) ions. The energy transfer from the Eu(2+) to Tb(3+) ions is demonstrated to be a dipole-quadrupole mechanism by the Inokuti-Hirayama (I-H) model. The Eu(2+) and Tb(3+) activated phosphor may be good candidates for blue-green components in n-UV white LEDs. PMID:23992135

  14. Deep ultraviolet detection dynamics of AlGaN based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, G.; Conte, G.; Reverchon, J.-L.; Dussaigne, A.; Duboz, J.-Y.

    2006-11-01

    The photoconductive response of AlGaN based UV detectors to 193nm excimer laser radiation is presented. Two devices have been tested: a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) planar structure and a Schottky diode. The transient response of the MSM device closely follows the laser pulses, with a photoconductive decay time constant shorter than 3ns. Conversely, the Schottky diode shows a slower photoconductive rise and decay kinetics due to the material series resistance coupled with the junction capacitance. Moreover, a longer time constant tail is also evident in this case with a characteristic time of about 40ns, due to the presence of trap states localized at 0.2-0.3eV from the band edge. The detection dynamics has been evaluated by changing the beam energy density between 2×10-5 and 0.2mJ/mm2. The signal increases linearly in the case of the MSM device up to 0.001mJ/mm2, whereas, for a further intensity rise, the response shows a sublinear behavior. On the contrary, the Schottky diode showed a linear trend inside the reduced 2×10-3-1.5×10-2mJ/mm2 range.

  15. An electrically injected AlGaN nanowire laser operating in the ultraviolet-C band

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Liu, X.; Kang, J.; Mi, Z.; Woo, S. Y.; Botton, G. A.

    2015-07-27

    We have investigated the molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of nearly defect-free AlGaN nanowire heterostructures grown directly on Si substrate. By exploiting the Anderson localization of light, we have demonstrated electrically injected AlGaN nanowire lasers that can operate at 262.1 nm. The threshold current density is 200 A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K. The relatively low threshold current is attributed to the high Q-factor of the random cavity and the three-dimensional quantum confinement offered by the atomic-scale composition modulation in self-organized AlGaN nanowires.

  16. The effect of mold materials on the overlay accuracy of a roll-to-roll imprinting system using UV LED illumination within a transparent mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Kook, YunHo; Kim, ChulHo; Yoo, SoonSung; Park, Kwon-Shik; Kim, Seok-min; Kang, Shinill

    2016-06-01

    Although several studies on the roll-to-roll (R2R) imprinting process have reported achieving flexible electronics, improving the alignment accuracy in the overlay process of R2R imprinting is recognized as the biggest problem for the commercialization of this technology. For an overlay technique with high alignment accuracy, it is essential to develop a roll mold with high positional accuracy. In this study, a method for fabricating a roll mold with high positional accuracy is proposed by wrapping a thin glass substrate flexible mold around the transparent roll base, because it can provide higher mechanical strength and thermal stability than a conventional polymer substrate. To confirm the usability of the proposed process, the prepared roll mold was used to fabricate a test pattern of thin-film transistor backplane for a rollable display. The positional and overlay accuracy of the roll mold with the proposed thin glass substrate flexible mold were compared with the roll mold with a conventional polymer substrate flexible mold. Large-area transparent flexible molds with a size of 470  ×  370 mm were fabricated by an ultraviolet (UV) imprinting process on thin glass and polyethylene terephthalate substrates, and these flexible molds were wrapped around a roll base of 125 mm radius through a precision alignment process. After an anti-adhesion treatment and the wrapping process, the roll mold with the polymer substrate showed a ~180 μm positional error, whereas the thin glass substrate showed a ~30 μm positional error. After the overlay process using the R2R imprinting system with the alignment system, an average overlay error of ~3 μm was obtained when the thin glass flexible wrapped roll mold was used, whereas a ~22 μm overlay error was obtained when the polymer substrate flexible wrapped roll mold was used.

  17. Polarization engineering of back-illuminated separate absorption and multiplication AlGaN avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guofeng; Wang, Fuxue

    2016-08-01

    The back-illuminated separate absorption and multiplication AlGaN avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with a p-type graded AlGaN layer have been designed to investigate the polarization engineering on the performance of the devices. The calculated results show that the APD with p-graded AlGaN layer exhibits lower avalanche breakdown voltage and increased maximum multiplication gain compared to the structure with conventional p-type AlGaN layer. The improved performance of the designed APD is numerically explained by the polarization-assisted enhancement of the ionization electric field in the multiplication region and polarization doping effect caused by the p-type graded layer.

  18. On the importance of AlGaN electron blocking layer design for GaN-based light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Xia, Chang Simon Li, Z. M.; Sheng, Yang

    2013-12-02

    There has been confusion regarding the usefulness of AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL) in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with some published experimental data indicating that the LEDs without EBL performed better than those with it. InGaN/GaN LEDs have been investigated numerically to analyze its actual effect in these devices. Simulation results show that hole blocking effect of EBL mainly determines the effectiveness of using it which is more sensitive to its Al composition, band offset ratio, and polarization charges. It is found that the choice of Al composition is critical for EBL to improve the optical performance of GaN-based LEDs.

  19. Electrical and optical properties of Fe doped AlGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Kozhukhova, E. A.; Dabiran, A. M.; Chow, P. P.; Wowchak, A. M.; Pearton, S. J.

    2010-01-15

    Electrical and optical properties of AlGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy were studied in the Al composition range 15%-45%. Undoped films were semi-insulating, with the Fermi level pinned near E{sub c}-0.6-0.7 eV. Si doping to (5-7)x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} rendered the 15% Al films conducting n-type, but a large portion of the donors were relatively deep (activation energy 95 meV), with a 0.15 eV barrier for capture of electrons giving rise to strong persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effects. The optical threshold of this effect was {approx}1 eV. Doping with Fe to a concentration of {approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} led to decrease in concentration of uncompensated donors, suggesting compensation by Fe acceptors. Addition of Fe strongly suppressed the formation of PPC-active centers in favor of ordinary shallow donors. For higher Al compositions, Si doping of (5-7)x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} did not lead to n-type conductivity. Fe doping shifted the bandedge luminescence by 25-50 meV depending on Al composition. The dominant defect band in microcathodoluminescence spectra was the blue band near 3 eV, with the energy weakly dependent on composition.

  20. Color-tunable properties and energy transfer in Ba3GdNa(PO4)3F:Eu2+, Tb3+ phosphor pumped for n-UV w-LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chao; Liu, Haikun; Hu, Yingmo; Liao, Libing; Mei, Lefu

    2015-11-01

    A series of Eu2+ and Eu2+/Tb3+ co-doped Ba3GdNa(PO4)3F phosphors have been synthesized via a high temperature solid-state reaction. The relative intensity of PL spectra of Ba3GdNa(PO4)3F:xEu2+ increases with increasing x value, and reaches a maximum at x=0.04. Ba3GdNa(PO4)3F:Eu2+, Tb3+ phosphors exhibit a broad excitation band ranging from 220 to 450 nm, which matches perfectly with the characteristic emission of n-UV light-emitting diode (LED) chips. Upon 365 nm excitation, the Ba3GdNa(PO4)3F:Eu2+, Tb3+ phosphors show two dominating bands peaked at 466 and 543 nm, which are assigned to the 4f7→4f65d1 transition of the Eu2+ ions and the 5D4→7F5 transition of the Tb3+ ions, respectively. In view of the energy transfer mechanism between Eu2+ and Tb3+, the Ba3GdNa(PO4)3F:Eu2+, Tb3+ emission color can adjust from blue to green, and their chromatic coordinates (x, y) vary from (0.16, 0.135) to (0.254, 0.398). The critical distance was also calculated to be 16.90 Å. The above results indicate that the Ba3GdNa(PO4)3F: Eu2+, Tb3+ phosphors are a candidate for blue-green components in the application of n-UV w-LEDs.

  1. Ultralow-threshold electrically injected AlGaN nanowire ultraviolet lasers on Si operating at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, K H; Liu, X; Wang, Q; Zhao, S; Mi, Z

    2015-02-01

    Ultraviolet laser radiation has been adopted in a wide range of applications as diverse as water purification, flexible displays, data storage, sterilization, diagnosis and bioagent detection. Success in developing semiconductor-based, compact ultraviolet laser sources, however, has been extremely limited. Here, we report that defect-free disordered AlGaN core-shell nanowire arrays, formed directly on a Si substrate, can be used to achieve highly stable, electrically pumped lasers across the entire ultraviolet AII (UV-AII) band (∼320-340 nm) at low temperatures. The laser threshold is in the range of tens of amps per centimetre squared, which is nearly three orders of magnitude lower than those of previously reported quantum-well lasers. This work also reports the first demonstration of electrically injected AlGaN-based ultraviolet lasers monolithically grown on a Si substrate, and offers a new avenue for achieving semiconductor lasers in the ultraviolet B (UV-B) (280-320 nm) and ultraviolet C (UV-C) (<280 nm) bands. PMID:25599190

  2. Ultralow-threshold electrically injected AlGaN nanowire ultraviolet lasers on Si operating at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. H.; Liu, X.; Wang, Q.; Zhao, S.; Mi, Z.

    2015-02-01

    Ultraviolet laser radiation has been adopted in a wide range of applications as diverse as water purification, flexible displays, data storage, sterilization, diagnosis and bioagent detection. Success in developing semiconductor-based, compact ultraviolet laser sources, however, has been extremely limited. Here, we report that defect-free disordered AlGaN core-shell nanowire arrays, formed directly on a Si substrate, can be used to achieve highly stable, electrically pumped lasers across the entire ultraviolet AII (UV-AII) band (˜320-340 nm) at low temperatures. The laser threshold is in the range of tens of amps per centimetre squared, which is nearly three orders of magnitude lower than those of previously reported quantum-well lasers. This work also reports the first demonstration of electrically injected AlGaN-based ultraviolet lasers monolithically grown on a Si substrate, and offers a new avenue for achieving semiconductor lasers in the ultraviolet B (UV-B) (280-320 nm) and ultraviolet C (UV-C) (<280 nm) bands.

  3. LED Update

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Mark L.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2006-09-01

    This article, which will appear in RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING MAGAZINE, interviews PNNL's Kelly Gordon and presents the interview in question and answer format. The topic is a light emitting diode (LED) lighting also known as solid state lighting. Solid state lighting will be a new category in an energy efficient lighting fixture design competition called Lighting for Tomorrow sponsored by the US Department of Energy Emerging Technologies Office, the American Institute for Lighting, and the Consortium for Energy Efficiency. LED technology has been around since the ’60s, but it has been used mostly for indicator lights on electronics equipment. The big breakthrough was the development in the 1990s of blue LEDs which can be combined with the red and green LEDs that already existed to make white light. LEDs produce 25 to 40 lumens of light per watt of energy used, almost as much as a CFL (50 lumens per watt) and much more efficient than incandescent sources, which are around 15 lumens per watt. They are much longer lived and practical in harsh environments unsuitable for incandescent lighting. They are ready for niche applications now, like under-counter lighting and may be practical for additional applications as technological challenges are worked out and the technology is advancing in leaps and bounds.

  4. LED lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Galvez, Miguel; Grossman, Kenneth; Betts, David

    2013-11-12

    There is herein described a lamp for providing white light comprising a plurality of light sources positioned on a substrate. Each of said light sources comprises a blue light emitting diode (LED) and a dome that substantially covers said LED. A first portion of said blue light from said LEDs is transmitted through said domes and a second portion of said blue light is converted into a red light by a first phosphor contained in said domes. A cover is disposed over all of said light sources that transmits at least a portion of said red and blue light emitted by said light sources. The cover contains a second phosphor that emits a yellow light in response to said blue light. The red, blue and yellow light combining to form the white light and the white light having a color rendering index (CRI) of at least about 80.

  5. Piezoelectric domains in the AlGaN hexagonal microrods: Effect of crystal orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivadasan, A. K.; Mangamma, G.; Bera, Santanu; Kamruddin, M.; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-05-01

    Presently, the piezoelectric materials are finding tremendous applications in the micro-mechanical actuators, sensors, and self-powered devices. In this context, the studies pertaining to piezoelectric properties of materials in the different size ranges are very important for the scientific community. The III-nitrides are exceptionally important, not only for optoelectronic but also for their piezoelectric applications. In the present study, we synthesized AlGaN via self-catalytic vapor-solid mechanism by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique on AlN base layer over intrinsic Si(100) substrate. The growth process is substantiated using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Raman and photoluminescence studies reveal the formation of AlGaN microrods in the wurtzite phase and ensure the high optical quality of the crystalline material. The single crystalline, direct wide band gap and hexagonally shaped AlGaN microrods are studied for understanding the behavior of the crystallites under the application of constant external electric field using the piezoresponse force microscopy. The present study is mainly focused on understanding the behavior of induced polarization for the determination of piezoelectric coefficient of AlGaN microrod along the c-axis and imaging of piezoelectric domains in the sample originating because of the angular inclination of AlGaN microrods with respect to its AlN base layers.

  6. Electrical properties of n-type AlGaN with high Si concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kunihiro; Iwaya, Motoaki; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-05-01

    The electrical properties of Si-doped AlGaN layers (AlN molar fractions: 0.03-0.06) with the donor concentrations (N D) from 8.8 × 1017 to 4.5 × 1020 cm-3 were investigated by variable-temperature Hall effect measurement using the van der Pauw method. A minimum resistivity of 3.6 × 10-4 Ω cm was obtained for Si-doped AlGaN with a smooth surface at room temperature. We found that the activation energy of the Si donor is affected by the Coulomb interaction in the AlGaN layer with N D values from 8.8 × 1017 to 2.5 × 1020 cm-3. In several AlGaN layers, the free-electron concentration did not vary with sample temperature, as expected in the case of degeneracy. The localization of GaN in the AlGaN layer was speculated as a cause of degeneracy of samples.

  7. Modeling of high composition AlGaN channel high electron mobility transistors with large threshold voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Akyol, Fatih; Nath, Digbijoy; Rajan, Siddharth

    2014-12-29

    We report on the potential of high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) consisting of high composition AlGaN channel and barrier layers for power switching applications. Detailed two-dimensional (2D) simulations show that threshold voltages in excess of 3 V can be achieved through the use of AlGaN channel layers. We also calculate the 2D electron gas mobility in AlGaN channel HEMTs and evaluate their power figures of merit as a function of device operating temperature and Al mole fraction in the channel. Our models show that power switching transistors with AlGaN channels would have comparable on-resistance to GaN-channel based transistors for the same operation voltage. The modeling in this paper shows the potential of high composition AlGaN as a channel material for future high threshold enhancement mode transistors.

  8. Prostate specific antigen detection using AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Lele, T. P.; Tseng, Y.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-09-01

    Antibody-functionalized Au-gated AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA). The PSA antibody was anchored to the gate area through the formation of carboxylate succinimdyl ester bonds with immobilized thioglycolic acid. The AlGaN /GaN HEMT drain-source current showed a rapid response of less than 5s when target PSA in a buffer at clinical concentrations was added to the antibody-immobilized surface. The authors could detect a wide range of concentrations from 10pg/mlto1μg/ml. The lowest detectable concentration was two orders of magnitude lower than the cutoff value of PSA measurements for clinical detection of prostate cancer. These results clearly demonstrate the promise of portable electronic biological sensors based on AlGaN /GaN HEMTs for PSA screening.

  9. Leakage mechanism in GaN and AlGaN Schottky interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Tamotsu; Kotani, Junji; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2004-06-01

    Based on detailed temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V-T) measurements the mechanism of leakage currents through GaN and AlGaN Schottky interfaces is discussed. The experiments were compared to calculations based on thin surface barrier model in which the effects of surface defects were taken into account. Our simulation method reproduced the experimental I-V-T characteristics of the GaN and AlGaN Schottky diodes, and gave excellent fitting results to the reported Schottky I-V curves in GaN for both forward and reverse biases at different temperatures. The present results indicate that the barrier thinning caused by unintentional surface-defect donors enhances the tunneling transport processes, leading to large leakage currents through GaN and AlGaN Schottky interfaces.

  10. An analysis of temperature dependent piezoelectric Franz-Keldysh effect in AlGaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y. T.; Teo, K. L.; Li, M. F.; Uchida, Kazuo; Tokunaga, Hiroki; Akutsu, Nakao; Matsumoto, Koh

    2000-02-01

    Strong Franz-Keldysh oscillations near the band gap of AlGaN are observed in the contactless electroreflectance (CER) studies of a GaN/InGaN/AlGaN multilayer structure. The line shape analysis of the CER spectra at different temperatures provides an accurate determination of the AlGaN band gap energies and the built-in electric fields. Using the existing data of the thermal expansion coefficients of GaN and sapphire, and the piezoelectric constants of AlGaN, the temperature dependence of the electric field is estimated and is in good agreement with the experimental results between 15 and 300 K. We attribute such electric field to the piezoelectric strain effect.

  11. Investigation of the thickness effect to impedance analysis results AlGaN acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özen, Soner; Bilgiç, Eyüp; Gülmez, Gülay; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan; Mohammadigharehbagh, Reza

    2016-03-01

    In this study, AlGaN acoustic sensors were deposited on aluminum metal substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method, for the first time. Impedance analyses of the fabricated acoustic sensors were investigated for the determining of effect of the nano layer thickness. Thickness values are very close to each others. Fabricated sensors have been fabricated from AlGaN deposited on aluminum substrates. Gallium materials are used in many applications for optoelectronic device and semiconductor technology. Thermionic vacuum arc is the deposition technology for the variously materials and applications field. TVA production parameters and some properties of the deposited layers were investigated. TVA is the fast deposition technology for the gallium compounds and doped gallium compounds. Obtained results that AlGaN layer are very promising material for an acoustic sensor but also TVA is proper fast technology for the production.

  12. AlGaN Channel Transistors for Power Management and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanHove, James M.

    1996-01-01

    Contained within is the Final report of a Phase 1 SBIR program to develop AlGaN channel junction field effect transistors (JFET). The report summarizes our work to design, deposit, and fabricate JFETS using molecular beam epitaxy growth AlGaN. Nitride growth is described using a RF atomic nitrogen plasma source. Processing steps needed to fabricate the device such as ohmic source-drain contacts, reactive ion etching, gate formation, and air bride fabrication are documented. SEM photographs of fabricated power FETS are shown. Recommendations are made to continue the effort in a Phase 2 Program.

  13. Strain dependence on polarization properties of AlGaN and AlGaN-based ultraviolet lasers grown on AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Zachary Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Collazo, Ramón; Mita, Seiji; Tweedie, James

    2015-06-08

    Since the band ordering in AlGaN has a profound effect on the performance of UVC light emitting diodes (LEDs) and even determines the feasibility of surface emitting lasers, the polarization properties of emitted light from c-oriented AlGaN and AlGaN-based laser structures were studied over the whole composition range, as well as various strain states, quantum confinements, and carrier densities. A quantitative relationship between the theoretical valence band separation, determined using k•p theory, and the experimentally measured degree of polarization is presented. Next to composition, strain was found to have the largest influence on the degree of polarization while all other factors were practically insignificant. The lowest crossover point from the transverse electric to transverse magnetic polarized emission of 245 nm was found for structures pseudomorphically grown on AlN substrates. This finding has significant implications toward the efficiency and feasibility of surface emitting devices below this wavelength.

  14. Abnormal anti-quenching and controllable multi-transitions of Bi3+ luminescence by temperature in a yellow-emitting LuVO4 :Bi3+ phosphor for UV-converted white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Kang, Fengwen; Peng, Mingying; Zhang, Qinyuan; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-09-01

    Phosphors with an efficient yellow-emitting color play a crucial role in phosphor-converted white LEDs (pc-WLEDs), but popular yellow phosphors such as YAG:Ce or Eu(2+) -doped (oxy)nitrides cannot smoothly meet this seemingly simple requirement due to their strong absorptions in the visible range. Herein, we report a novel yellow-emitting LuVO(4) :Bi(3+) phosphor that can solve this shortcoming. The emission from LuVO(4) :Bi(3+) shows a peak at 576 nm with a quantum efficiency (QE) of up to 68 %, good resistance to thermal quenching (T(50 %) =573 K), and no severe thermal degradation after heating-cooling cycles upon UV excitation. The yellow emission, as verified by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), originates from the ((3)P(0),(3)P(1))→(1) S0 transitions of Bi(3+). Increasing the temperature from 10 to 300 K produces a temperature-dependent energy-transfer process between VO(4)(3-) groups and Bi(3+), and further heating of the samples to 573 K intensifies the emission. However, it subsequently weakens, accompanied by blueshifts of the emission peaks. This abnormal anti-thermal quenching can be ascribed to temperature-dependent energy transfer from VO(4)(3-) groups to Bi(3+), a population redistribution between the excited states of (3)P(0) and (3)P(1) upon thermal stimulation, and discharge of electrons trapped in defects with a trap depth of 359 K. Device fabrication with the as-prepared phosphor LuVO(4) :Bi(3+) has proved that it can act as a good yellow phosphor for pc-WLEDs. PMID:25048156

  15. Aluminum incorporation efficiencies in A- and C-plane AlGaN grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-Yue, Han; Hui-Jie, Li; Gui-Juan, Zhao; Hong-Yuan, Wei; Shao-Yan, Yang; Lian-Shan, Wang

    2016-04-01

    The aluminum incorporation efficiencies in nonpolar A-plane and polar C-plane AlGaN films grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) are investigated. It is found that the aluminum content in A-plane AlGaN film is obviously higher than that in the C-plane sample when the growth temperature is above 1070 °C. The high aluminum incorporation efficiency is beneficial to fabricating deep ultraviolet optoelectronic devices. Moreover, the influences of the gas inlet ratio, the V/III ratio, and the chamber pressure on the aluminum content are studied. The results are important for growing the AlGaN films, especially nonpolar AlGaN epilayers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61504128, 61504129, 61274041, and 11275228), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB619305), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014AA032603, 2014AA032609, and 2015AA010801), and the Guangdong Provincial Scientific and Technologic Planning Program, China (Grant No. 2014B010119002).

  16. Analysis of HVPE grown AlGaN layers on honeycomb patterned sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Simon; Mogilatenko, Anna; Hagedorn, Sylvia; Richter, Eberhard; Goran, Daniel; Schäfer, Peter; Zeimer, Ute; Weyers, Markus; Tränkle, Günther

    2015-03-01

    Thick AlxGa1-xN layers were grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on hexagonally patterned sapphire substrates. Non-c-planar growth is found inside the etched honeycombs which in part hinders coalescence of the c-plane AlGaN layer growing on top of the ridges. From X-ray diffraction, electron backscatter diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, the orientations of the parasitic crystallites were identified as {11-22} and {1-103} AlGaN growing on m-plane sapphire sidewalls as well as c-plane oriented AlGaN growing on n-plane sidewall facets which are located in the corners of the combs. According to the geometry of parasitic crystallites, it is further observed, that the semipolar growth occurring on sapphire m-plane sidewalls does not hinder the coalescence of c-plane AlGaN growing on top of the ridges, whereas fast propagation of parasitic crystallites nucleating on n-plane sidewall facets leads to delayed layer coalescence.

  17. Effect of stress on the Al composition evolution in AlGaN grown using metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chenguang; Qin, Zhixin; Xu, Fujun; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Jiaming; Hou, Mengjun; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Xinqiang; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Two series of AlGaN samples with different stresses were designed to investigate the effect of stress on the Al composition. X-ray diffraction reciprocal space mapping (XRD RSM) demonstrated that the AlGaN epilayers with different stresses have large Al composition differences despite the same growth conditions. The largest Al composition difference reached up to 21.3%, which was also confirmed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). This result is attributed to a large stress discrepancy in the AlGaN epilayers. Finally, the dependences of the solid-phase Al composition on the gas-phase Al composition under different stresses were systematically analyzed.

  18. Influence of substrate miscut angle on surface morphology and luminescence properties of AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Kusch, Gunnar Edwards, Paul R.; Bruckbauer, Jochen; Martin, Robert W.; Li, Haoning; Parbrook, Peter J.; Sadler, Thomas C.

    2014-03-03

    The influence of substrate miscut on Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} N layers was investigated using cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging and secondary electron imaging in an environmental scanning electron microscope. The samples were also characterized using atomic force microscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction. It was found that small changes in substrate miscut have a strong influence on the morphology and luminescence properties of the AlGaN layers. Two different types are resolved. For low miscut angle, a crack-free morphology consisting of randomly sized domains is observed, between which there are notable shifts in the AlGaN near band edge emission energy. For high miscut angle, a morphology with step bunches and compositional inhomogeneities along the step bunches, evidenced by an additional CL peak along the step bunches, are observed.

  19. Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of GaN and AlGaN semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppulingam, B. Singh, Shubra Baskar, K.

    2014-04-24

    Hexagonal Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) complex route. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis confirms the hexagonal wurtzite structure of GaN and Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N nanoparticles. Surface morphology and elemental analysis were carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) study shows the near band edge emission for GaN at 3.35 eV and at 3.59 eV for AlGaN nanoparticles. The Aluminum (Al) composition of 20% has been obtained from PL emission around 345 nm.

  20. Growth of AlGaN epilayers related gas-phase reactions using TPIS-MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunwoon; Seo, Junho; Lee, Kyuhan; Lee, Haeseok; Park, Keunseop; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2002-11-01

    AlGaN epilayers on GaN/sapphire were successfully grown under various growth conditions using a thermally pre-cracked ion-supplied metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The Al composition in the solid was affected by the gas-phase parasitic reaction between NH 3 and trimethylaluminum (TMAl). As the operating pressure decreased, the Al composition in the solid increased over the ideal incorporation efficiency. This is due to a scavenging effect and a site-blocking effect. As the TMAl flow rate increased with fixed flow rates of NH 3 and trimethylgallium (TMGa), the Al concentration in the solid increased but started to saturate. As the TMGa flow rate decreased, the solid Al composition increased linearly, which means different parasitic reactions between TMGa:NH 3 and TMAl:NH 3. In addition, we found that the separating plate that was inserted to the reactor in front of the heated susceptor to separate ammonia gas flow from MO source input played an important role in the AlGaN growth. Particularly, the separating plate was more attractive under high operating pressure. When it was inserted, a white crystalline solid formed by the adduct (TMAl:NH 3) of parasitic reaction in the gas phase disappeared. It also increased the Al concentration in the solid. SEM images of AlGaN epilayer's surface showed many small islands due to the lack of surface mobility of adatoms.

  1. Strain and defects in Si-doped (Al)GaN epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forghani, Kamran; Schade, Lukas; Schwarz, Ulrich T.; Lipski, Frank; Klein, Oliver; Kaiser, Ute; Scholz, Ferdinand

    2012-11-01

    Si is the most common dopant in (Al)GaN based devices acting as a donor. It has been observed that Si induces tensile strain in (Al)GaN films, which leads to an increasing tendency for cracking of such films with the increase of Si content and/or the increase of Al content. Based on x-ray investigations, the Si-doped films have a larger in-plane lattice constant than their undoped buffer layers, indicating involvement of a mechanism other than the change of lattice constants expected from an alloying effect. In this work, we present a model about Si dislocation interaction while debating other proposed models in the literature. According to our model, Si atoms are attracted to the strain dipole of edge-type dislocations in (Al)GaN films. It is expected that Si is more incorporated on that side of the dislocation, which is under compression leading to the formation of off-balanced dipoles with reduced compressive component. In response to such off-balanced dipoles—appearing as tensile dominant strain dipoles—the dislocation lines climb in order to accommodate the excess tensile strain. However, this dislocation climb mechanism is hindered by forces exerted by vacancies created due to the climb process. Accordingly, we have observed a lower strain level in our Si doped layers when they contain fewer dislocations. These findings were further supported by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and micro-photoluminescence investigations.

  2. Relaxation of compressively strained AlGaN by inclined threading dislocations.

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, David Martin; Lee, Stephen Roger; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Floro, Jerrold Anthony

    2005-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to assess the microstructure and strain of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N(x = 0.61-0.64) layers grown on AlN. The compressively-strained AlGaN is partially relaxed by inclined threading dislocations, similar to observations on Si-doped AlGaN by P. Cantu, F. Wu, P. Waltereit, S. Keller, A. E. Romanov, U. K. Mishra, S. P. DenBaars, and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 674 (2003) ]; however, in our material, the dislocations bend before the introduction of any Si. The bending may be initiated by the greater lattice mismatch or the lower dislocation density of our material, but the presence of Si is not necessarily required. The relaxation by inclined dislocations is quantitatively accounted for with the model of A. E. Romanov and J. S. Speck [Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 2569 (2003)], and we demonstrate the predicted linear dependence of relaxation on layer thickness. Notably, such relaxation was not found in tensile strained AlGaN grown on GaN [J. A. Floro, D. M. Follstaedt, P. Provencio, S. J. Hearne, and S. R. Lee, J. Appl. Phys. 96, 7087 (2004)], even though the same mechanism appears applicable.

  3. Growth of AlGaN alloys exhibiting enhanced luminescence efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, A. V.; Garrett, G. A.; Collins, C. J.; Sarney, W. L.; Readinger, E. D.; Newman, P. G.; Shen, H.; Wraback, M.

    2006-04-01

    Interest in developing ultraviolet emitters using the III-Nitride family of semiconductors has sparked considerable effort in fabricating AlGaN alloys that exhibit enhanced luminescence based on strong carrier localization, similar to their InGaN brethren. In this paper, we report on the growth of such alloys by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE) without the use of indium. This enhancement is attributed to the presence of nanoscale compositional inhomogeneities (NCIs) in these materials. The emission wavelength in these materials has been tuned between 275 nm and 340 nm by varying growth conditions. The effects of dislocations on double heterostructures (DHs) that employ an NCI AlGaN active region has been investigated, with an internal quantum efficiency as high as 32% obtained for the lowest dislocation density samples (3×1010 cm-2). Prototype DH-ultraviolet light emitting diodes (DH-UVLEDs) emitting at 324 nm were fabricated employing an NCI AlGaN alloy as the active region.

  4. LEDs for Efficient Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, David A.

    1978-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are described and three classroom experiments are given, one to prove the, low power requirements and efficiency of LEDs, an LED on-off detector circuit, and the third an LED photoelectric smoke detector. (BB)

  5. Wafer-scale crack-free AlGaN on GaN through two-step selective-area growth for optically pumped stimulated emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Young-Ho; Bae, Sung-Bum; Kim, Sung-Bock; Kim, Dong Churl; Leem, Young Ahn; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Nam, Eun-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Crack-free AlGaN template has been successfully grown over entire 2-in. wafer by using 2-step selective-area growth (SAG). The GaN truncated structure was obtained by vertical growth mode with low growth temperature. AlGaN of second step was grown under lateral growth mode. Low pressure enhanced the relative ratio of lateral to vertical growth rate as well as absolute overall growth rate. High V/III ratio was favorable for lateral growth mode. Crack-free planar AlGaN was obtained under low pressure of 30 Torr and high V/III ratio of 4400. The AlGaN was crack-free over entire 2-in. wafer and had quite uniform Al-mole fraction. The dislocation density of the AlGaN with 20% Al-composition was as low as ~7.6×108 /cm2, measured by cathodoluminescence. GaN/AlGaN multi-quantum well (MQW) with cladding and waveguide layers were grown on the crack-free AlGaN template with low dislocation density. It was confirmed that the MQW on the AlGaN template emitted the stimulated emission at 355.5 nm through optical pumping experiment. The AlGaN obtained by 2-step SAG would provide high crystal quality for highly-efficient optoelectronic devices as well as the ultraviolet laser diode.

  6. The generation of misfit dislocations in facet-controlled growth of AlGaN /GaN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherns, D.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Liu, R.; Ponce, F. A.; Amano, H.; Akasaki, I.

    2004-11-01

    The relaxation of tensile stresses in AlGaN layers grown on GaN /(0001)sapphire by facet-controlled epitaxial lateral overgrowth is reported. It is shown that a-type misfit dislocations are introduced at inclined {112¯2} AlGaN /GaN interfaces, with strong evidence for a half-loop nucleation and glide mechanism driven by shear stresses present on the (0001) slip plane. In addition to relieving misfit stresses, these dislocations introduce grain rotations of up to 10-2rad across the AlGaN /GaN boundaries, leading to tilt boundaries at the meeting front between laterally growing wings and between regions growing in the lateral and [0001] directions. The effects of these processes on the defect density in subsequent layers are examined.

  7. Mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution during hetero-epitaxy in a ternary AlGaN system

    PubMed Central

    He, Chenguang; Qin, Zhixin; Xu, Fujun; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Jiaming; Hou, Mengjun; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Xinqiang; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Two AlGaN samples with different strain were designed to investigate mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution. It is discovered that AlGaN grown on AlN or (AlN/GaN superlattices (SLs))/GaN both consist of two distinct regions with different compositions: transition region and uniform region, which is attributed to the compositional pulling effect. The formation of the transition region is due to the partial stress release caused by the generation of misfit dislocations near the hetero-interface. And the Al composition in the uniform region depends on the magnitude of residual strain. The difference in relaxation degree is 80.5% for the AlGaN epilayers grown on different underlayers, leading to a large Al composition difference of 22%. The evolutionary process of Al composition along [0001] direction was investigated in detail. PMID:27112969

  8. Mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution during hetero-epitaxy in a ternary AlGaN system.

    PubMed

    He, Chenguang; Qin, Zhixin; Xu, Fujun; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Jiaming; Hou, Mengjun; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Xinqiang; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Two AlGaN samples with different strain were designed to investigate mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution. It is discovered that AlGaN grown on AlN or (AlN/GaN superlattices (SLs))/GaN both consist of two distinct regions with different compositions: transition region and uniform region, which is attributed to the compositional pulling effect. The formation of the transition region is due to the partial stress release caused by the generation of misfit dislocations near the hetero-interface. And the Al composition in the uniform region depends on the magnitude of residual strain. The difference in relaxation degree is 80.5% for the AlGaN epilayers grown on different underlayers, leading to a large Al composition difference of 22%. The evolutionary process of Al composition along [0001] direction was investigated in detail. PMID:27112969

  9. Mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution during hetero-epitaxy in a ternary AlGaN system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chenguang; Qin, Zhixin; Xu, Fujun; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Jiaming; Hou, Mengjun; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Xinqiang; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Two AlGaN samples with different strain were designed to investigate mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution. It is discovered that AlGaN grown on AlN or (AlN/GaN superlattices (SLs))/GaN both consist of two distinct regions with different compositions: transition region and uniform region, which is attributed to the compositional pulling effect. The formation of the transition region is due to the partial stress release caused by the generation of misfit dislocations near the hetero-interface. And the Al composition in the uniform region depends on the magnitude of residual strain. The difference in relaxation degree is 80.5% for the AlGaN epilayers grown on different underlayers, leading to a large Al composition difference of 22%. The evolutionary process of Al composition along [0001] direction was investigated in detail.

  10. Hybrid UV Imager Containing Face-Up AlGaN/GaN Photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xinyu; Pain, Bedabrata

    2005-01-01

    A proposed hybrid ultraviolet (UV) image sensor would comprise a planar membrane array of face-up AlGaN/GaN photodiodes integrated with a complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) readout-circuit chip. Each pixel in the hybrid image sensor would contain a UV photodiode on the AlGaN/GaN membrane, metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) readout circuitry on the CMOS chip underneath the photodiode, and a metal via connection between the photodiode and the readout circuitry (see figure). The proposed sensor design would offer all the advantages of comparable prior CMOS active-pixel sensors and AlGaN UV detectors while overcoming some of the limitations of prior (AlGaN/sapphire)/CMOS hybrid image sensors that have been designed and fabricated according to the methodology of flip-chip integration. AlGaN is a nearly ideal UV-detector material because its bandgap is wide and adjustable and it offers the potential to attain extremely low dark current. Integration of AlGaN with CMOS is necessary because at present there are no practical means of realizing readout circuitry in the AlGaN/GaN material system, whereas the means of realizing readout circuitry in CMOS are well established. In one variant of the flip-chip approach to integration, an AlGaN chip on a sapphire substrate is inverted (flipped) and then bump-bonded to a CMOS readout circuit chip; this variant results in poor quantum efficiency. In another variant of the flip-chip approach, an AlGaN chip on a crystalline AlN substrate would be bonded to a CMOS readout circuit chip; this variant is expected to result in narrow spectral response, which would be undesirable in many applications. Two other major disadvantages of flip-chip integration are large pixel size (a consequence of the need to devote sufficient area to each bump bond) and severe restriction on the photodetector structure. The membrane array of AlGaN/GaN photodiodes and the CMOS readout circuit for the proposed image sensor would

  11. Synthesis and photoluminescence characteristics of (Y,Gd)BO3:RE (RE = Eu(3+), Ce(3+), Dy(3+) and Tb(3+)) phosphors for blue chip and near-UV white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Rangari, V V; Singh, V; Dhoble, S J

    2016-03-01

    A series of Eu(3+)-, Ce(3+)-, Dy(3+)- and Tb(3+)-doped (Y,Gd)BO3 phosphors was synthesized by a solid-state diffusion method. X-Ray diffraction confirmed their hexagonal structure and the scanning electron microscopy results showed crystalline particles. The excitation spectra revealed that (Y,Gd)BO3 phosphors doped with Eu(3+), Ce(3+), Dy(3+) and Tb(3+) are effectively excited with near UV-light of 395 nm/blue light, 364, 351 and 314 nm, respectively. Photoluminescence spectra of Eu(3+)-, Ce(3+)- and Tb(3+)/Dy(3+)-doped phosphor showed intense emission of reddish orange, blue and white light, respectively. The phosphor Y0.60Gd0.38BO3:Ce0.02 showed CIE 1931 color coordinates of (0.158, 0.031) and better color purity compared with commercially available blue BAM:Eu(2+) phosphor. The phosphor (Y,Gd)BO3 doped with Eu(3+), Dy(3+) and Tb(3+) showed CIE 1931 color coordinates of (0.667, 0.332), (0.251, 0.299) and (0.333, 0.391) respectively. Significant photoluminescence characteristics of the prepared phosphors indicate that they might serve as potential candidates for blue chip and near-UV white light-emitting diode applications. PMID:25991566

  12. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  13. Quantum chemical mechanism in parasitic reaction of AlGaN alloys formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Osamu; Nakamura, Koichi; Tachibana, Akitomo; Tokunaga, Hiroki; Akutsu, Nakao; Matsumoto, Koh

    2000-06-01

    The mechanism of parasitic reactions among trimethylaluminum (TMA), trimethylgallium (TMG), and NH 3 in atmospheric pressure (AP) MOVPE for growth of AlGaN is theoretically studied using the quantum chemical method. The calculations show that metal-nitrogen chain growth reaction easily proceeds through the successive reactions of 'complex formation with NH 3' and 'CH 4 elimination by the bimolecular mechanism'. Additionally, a parasitic reaction in APMOVPE using other raw material is also investigated. The calculated result shows that small change of raw material raises activation energy of parasitic reaction, and, thus, the parasitic reaction is suppressed. This result suggests a way to improve APMOVPE by a suitable choice of substituent.

  14. Persistent photoconductivity study in AlGaN superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-wei; Xu, Jin-tong; Wang, Nili; Xu, Peng-xiao; Li, Xiangyang

    2014-11-01

    The transport properties of GaN and its alloys are attracting increasing interest due to the potential application of these materials for solar blind photodetectors and high mobility transistors. Because of the large band gap, the applications of AlxGa1-xN are extensive, such as for visible-blind ultraviolet detectors, laser diodes, and short-wave light emitting diodes (LEDs). However, the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) of GaN based photoconductive devices affects its applications. In order to study the origin of PPC, we designed solar blind ultraviolet photoconductive detector, which consists of n - Al0.65Ga0.35N top contact layer (100nm), n-Al0.42Ga0.58N/i-Al0.65Ga0.35N superlattice layers (200nm), i- Al0.65Ga0.35N layer (600nm), AlN buffer layer and double polished sapphire substrate. Moreover, there are photoconductive devices with different photosensitive areas. Investigations of electric-field effects and thermal effects on PPC in n-Al0.42Ga0.58N/i-Al0.65Ga0.35N superlattice are presented. We have observed that, by applying a high-voltage pulse, the course of PPC was effectively accelerated: With the same pulse width and different voltage, in the appropriate range, the higher of the voltage, the course of PPC was more effectively accelerated; with the same voltage and different pulse width, in the appropriate range, the wider of the pulse width, the course of PPC was more effectively accelerated. And PPC effect strongly depends on the temperature. The decay time of the PPC depend on the temperature and become longer with a decreasing temperature.

  15. Predominant growth of non-polar a-plane (Al,Ga)N on patterned c-plane sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilatenko, A.; Hagedorn, S.; Richter, E.; Zeimer, U.; Goran, D.; Weyers, M.; Tränkle, G.

    2013-03-01

    We report for the first time on predominant growth of non-polar a-plane (Al,Ga)N layers on patterned c-plane AlN/sapphire templates with ridges oriented along the [11¯00]Al2O3 direction. The layers were grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. During the first stages of the growth (Al,Ga)N nucleates simultaneously on top of the ridges, inside the trenches and on the trench sidewalls. As a result, two different (Al,Ga)N orientations are formed with respect to the horizontal growth front: c-plane (Al,Ga)N on the c-plane ridges as well as inside the trenches and a-plane (Al,Ga)N on the trench sidewalls. The growth rate of a-plane (Al,Ga)N exceeds that of c-plane regions, which leads to the complete overgrowth of c-plane (Al,Ga)N by the a-plane oriented material.

  16. Assembly of phosphonic acids on GaN and AlGaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, B. S.; Hong, S.; Stine, R.; Mäkinen, A. J.; Theodore, N. D.; Mastro, M. A.; Eddy, C. R., Jr.; Pehrsson, P. E.

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers of octadecylphosphonic acid and 16-phosphonohexadecanoic acid (PHDA) were formed on the semiconductor substrates gallium nitride (GaN) and aluminium gallium nitride (AlGaN). The presence of the molecular layers was verified through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Structural information was acquired with infrared spectroscopy which verified the bonding orientation of the carboxyl-containing PHDA. The impact of the molecular layers on the channel conductivity and the surface electronic structure of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure was measured. Our results indicate that pinning of the surface Fermi level prohibits modification of the channel conductivity by the layer. However, a surface dipole of ~0.8 eV is present and associated with both phosphonic acid layers. These results are of direct relevance to field-effect-based biochemical sensors and metal-semiconductor contact formation for this system and provide a fundamental basis for further applications of GaN and AlGaN technology in the fields of biosensing and microelectronics.

  17. Eu{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+} co-doped Ba{sub 9}Y{sub 2}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24} phosphors based on near-UV-excitable LED lights

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoejin; Park, Sangmoon

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • New near-ultraviolet (NUV)-excitable materials composed of Ba{sub 9}Eu{sub m}Mn{sub n}Y{sub 2}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24} (m = 0.01–0.5, n = 0–0.7) were prepared. • High energy-transfer from Eu{sup 2+} to Mn{sup 2+} and their energy-transfer mechanism were discussed. • The co-doping of Eu{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} in the orthosilicate structure resulted in the emission of white light under NUV LED light. - Abstract: New single-phase and near-ultraviolet (NUV)-excitable materials composed of Ba{sub 9}Eu{sub m}Mn{sub n}Y{sub 2}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24} (m = 0.01–0.5, n = 0–0.7) were prepared via a solid-state reaction in reducing atmosphere. X-ray diffraction patterns of the obtained phosphors were examined to index the peak positions. After doping the host structure with Eu{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} emitters, the intense green, white, and orange emission lights that were observed in the photoluminescence spectra under NUV excitation were monitored. The dependence of the luminescent intensity of the Mn{sup 2+} co-doped (n = 0.1–0.7) host lattices on the fixed Eu{sup 2+} content (m = 0.1, 0.3, 0.5) is also investigated. Co-doping Mn{sup 2+} into the Eu{sup 2+}-doped host structure enabled a high energy-transfer from Eu{sup 2+} to Mn{sup 2+} and their energy-transfer mechanism were discussed. Using these phosphors, the desired CIE values including emissions throughout the green to orange regions of the spectra were achieved. Efficient white-light light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated using Eu{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} co-doped phosphors based on NUV-excitable LED lights.

  18. Simulation for spectral response of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shiwei; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we introduced how to build a physical model of refer to the device structure and parameters. Simulations for solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes spectral characteristics were conducted in use of Silvaco TCAD, where device structure and parameters are comprehensively considered. In simulation, the effects of polarization, Urbach tail, mobility, saturated velocities and lifetime in AlGaN device was considered. Especially, we focused on how the concentration-dependent Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination model affects simulation results. By simulating, we analyzed the effects in spectral response caused by TAUN0 and TAUP0, and got the values of TAUN0 and TAUP0 which can bring a result coincides with test results. After that, we changed their values and made the simulation results especially the part under 255 nm performed better. In conclusion, the spectral response between 200 nm and 320 nm of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes were simulated and compared with test results. We also found that TAUN0 and TAUP0 have a large impact on spectral response of AlGaN material.

  19. An extrinsic fmax > 100 GHz InAlN/GaN HEMT with AlGaN back barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Liu; Zhihong, Feng; Shaobo, Dun; Xiongwen, Zhang; Guodong, Gu; Yuangang, Wang; Peng, Xu; Zezhao, He; Shujun, Cai

    2013-04-01

    We report the DC and RF performance of InAlN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors with AlGaN back barrier grown on SiC substrates. These presented results confirm the high performance that is reachable by InAlN-based technology. The InAlN/GaN HEMT sample showed a high 2DEG mobility of 1550 cm2/(V·s) at a 2DEG density of 1.7 × 1013 cm-2. DC and RF measurements were performed on the unpassivated device with 0.2 μm “T“ gate. The maximum drain current density at VGS = 2 V is close to 1.05 A/mm in a reproducible way. The reduction in gate leakage current helps to increase the frequency performance of AlGaN back barrier devices. The power gain cut-off frequency of a transistor with an AlGaN back barrier is 105 GHz, which is much higher than that of the device without an AlGaN back barrier at the same gate length. These results indicate InAlN/GaN HEMT is a promising candidate for millimeter-wave application.

  20. Radiation damage resistance of AlGaN detectors for applications in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Barkusky, Frank; Peth, Christian; Bayer, Armin; Mann, Klaus; John, Joachim; Malinowski, Pawel E.

    2009-09-15

    We report on the fabrication of aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) Schottky-photodiode-based detectors. AlGaN layers were grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si(111) wafers. The diodes were characterized at a wavelength of 13.5 nm using a table-top extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation source, consisting of a laser-produced xenon plasma and a Schwarzschild objective. The responsivity of the diodes was tested between EUV energies ranging from 320 nJ down to several picojoules. For low fluences, a linear responsivity of 7.14 mAs/J could be determined. Saturation starts at approximately 1 nJ, merging into a linear response of 0.113 mAs/J, which could be attributed to the photoeffect on the Au electrodes on top of the diode. Furthermore, degradation tests were performed up to an absolute dose of 3.3x10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN photodiodes were compared to commercially available silicon-based photodetectors. For AlGaN diodes, responsivity does not change even for the highest EUV dose, whereas the response of the Si diode decreases linearly to {approx}93% after 2x10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}.

  1. Impact of photonic crystals on LED light extraction efficiency: approaches and limits to vertical structure designs

    SciTech Connect

    Matioli, Elison; Weisbuch, Claude

    2010-08-19

    The enhancement of the extraction efficiency in light emitting diodes (LEDs) through the use of photonic crystals (PhCs) requires a structure design that optimizes the interaction of the guided modes with the PhCs. The main optimization parameters are related to the vertical structure of the LED, such as the thickness of layers, depth of the PhCs, position of the quantum wells as well as the PhC period and fill factor. We review the impact of the vertical design of different approaches of PhC LEDs through a theoretical and experimental standpoint, assessing quantitatively the competing mechanisms that act over each guided mode. Three approaches are described to overcome the main limitation of LEDs with surface PhCs, i.e. the insufficient interaction of low order guided modes with the PhCs. The introduction of an AlGaN confining layer in such structure is shown to be effective in extracting a fraction of the optical energy of low order modes; however, this approach is limited by the growth of the lattice mismatched AlGaN layer on GaN. The second approach, based on thin-film LEDs with PhCs, is limited by the presence of an absorbing reflective metal layer close to the guided modes that plays a major role in the competition between PhC extraction and metal dissipation. Finally, we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically the superior extraction of the guided light in embedded PhC LEDs due to the higher interaction between all optical modes and the PhCs, which resulted in a close to unity extraction efficiency for this device. The use of high-resolution angle-resolved measurements to experimentally determine the PhC extraction parameters was an essential tool for corroborating the theoretical models and quantifying the competing absorption and extraction mechanisms in LEDs.

  2. Hybrid AlGaN-SiC Avalanche Photodiode for Deep-UV Photon Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, Shahid; Herrero, Federico A.; Sigwarth, John; Goldsman, Neil; Akturk, Akin

    2010-01-01

    The proposed device is capable of counting ultraviolet (UV) photons, is compatible for inclusion into space instruments, and has applications as deep- UV detectors for calibration systems, curing systems, and crack detection. The device is based on a Separate Absorption and Charge Multiplication (SACM) structure. It is based on aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) absorber on a silicon carbide APD (avalanche photodiode). The AlGaN layer absorbs incident UV photons and injects photogenerated carriers into an underlying SiC APD that is operated in Geiger mode and provides current multiplication via avalanche breakdown. The solid-state detector is capable of sensing 100-to-365-nanometer wavelength radiation at a flux level as low as 6 photons/pixel/s. Advantages include, visible-light blindness, operation in harsh environments (e.g., high temperatures), deep-UV detection response, high gain, and Geiger mode operation at low voltage. Furthermore, the device can also be designed in array formats, e.g., linear arrays or 2D arrays (micropixels inside a superpixel).

  3. The Latest Trends in LED Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, Makoto; Shimizu, Keiichi

    LED is regarded as the latest and the fourth generation of light sources following incandescent lamps as the first generation, fluorescent lamps as the second generation, and HID lamps as the third generation. Excellent characteristics, such as high efficiency, long life, compactness, light weight, mercury free, very weak IR and UV emission, etc. are their advantage in comparison with the conventional light sources. With the progress of LED lighting technologies, their application is spreading in sign and display device, spot lighting, base lighting, security lighting, and further, new market, which is impossible to realize by the conventional light sources, is expected. This article reports the latest trend in LED lighting.

  4. LED Color Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Color quality is an important consideration when evaluating LED-based products for general illumination. This fact sheet reviews the basics regarding light and color and summarizes the most important color issues related to white-light LED systems.

  5. Electrical Properties of Recessed Algan/Gan Schottky Diodes Under off-State Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florovič, Martin; Kováč, Jaroslav; Benko, Peter; Chvála, Aleš; Škriniarová, Jaroslava; Kordó, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Electrical properties of recessed and non-recessed AlGaN/GaN Schottky diodes under off-state stress were investigated. The samples were consecutively stressed by the stepped negative bias (-60 V). Before and after the stress I-V and C-V characteristics were evaluated to verify the device degradation process. Finally, the degradation mechanism and the influence of AlGaN recessed layer thickness on the electrical properties of the Schottky diodes were analysed. It was found that the short time stress influence on I-V characteristics was most negligible for the non-recessed sample. Shallow and deep recessed samples exhibited initial trap filling and reverse current decrease. Generally it was found that the stress voltage near 60 V caused recoverable device degradation

  6. Determination of gain in AlGaN cladding free nitride laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Muziol, G.; Turski, H.; Wolny, P.

    2013-08-05

    The optical gain spectra of InGaN-based multiple-quantum-well (MQW) laser diodes (LDs) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are compared for different emission wavelengths. Two AlGaN cladding free LDs with similar epitaxial structures but with different In compositions in MQW were grown to study the dependence of material gain on lasing wavelength. As the emission wavelength increased from 432 to 458 nm, the differential modal gain decreased from 5.7 to 4.7 cm/kA, and the optical losses increased from 40 to 46 cm{sup −1} resulting in an increase in threshold current density. This dependence is attributed to lower optical mode confinement of LD emitting at longer wavelength. We found a strong decrease of confinement factor with increasing wavelength.

  7. Anisotropic optical properties of semipolar AlGaN layers grown on m-plane sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feneberg, Martin; Winkler, Michael; Klamser, Juliane; Stellmach, Joachim; Frentrup, Martin; Ploch, Simon; Mehnke, Frank; Wernicke, Tim; Kneissl, Michael; Goldhahn, Rüdiger

    2015-05-01

    The valence band order of AlxGa 1 -x N is investigated experimentally by analyzing the anisotropic dielectric functions of semipolar (11 2 ¯ 2 ) AlGaN thin films grown on m-plane Al2O3. Point-by-point fitted dielectric functions are obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry and corresponding inter-band transition energies are extracted. The known strain situation of the sample layers is used to correct for the small strain-induced energy shifts within k . p perturbation theory. It also is used to identify transitions related to the three valence bands. Transitions with E ⊥ c from the Γ9 valence band verify an inter-band bowing parameter of b =0.9 eV . The transitions with E || c allow determining the crystal field splitting energy which can be described by a linear interpolation between the values for GaN and AlN satisfactorily.

  8. Novel silicone materials for LED packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Ann W.; Bahadur, Maneesh; Yoshitake, Makoto

    2005-09-01

    Silicone based materials have attracted considerable attention from Light Emitting Diode (LED) manufacturers for use as encapsulants and lenses for many next generation LED device designs. Silicones can function in several roles that include protective lenses, stress relieving encapsulants, mechanical protection and light path materials. The key attributes of silicones that make them attractive materials for high brightness (HB) LEDs include their high transparency in the UV-visible region, controlled refractive index (RI), stable thermo-mechanical properties, and tuneable hardness from soft gels to hard resins. The high current and high operating temperatures of HB-LEDs present a significant materials challenge for traditional organic materials such as epoxies, acrylics and cyclo olefin copolymers (COC) that lack the thermal and molecular stability needed to provide optical clarity and mechanical performance required for next generation devices. In addition, the retention of optical clarity over the lifetime of the device, which involves long term exposure to high flux in the UV-visible wavelength region, is a critical requirement. Silicones have been demonstrated to provide the required stability. This paper will describe recent silicone materials development efforts directed towards providing LED manufacturers with silicone materials solutions for LED device fabrication. Injection molding of novel silicone resin based materials will be discussed as a surmountable challenge for high throughput LED device manufacturing.

  9. LEDs in automotive lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Karsten

    2006-02-01

    Light emitting diodes (LED) are becoming more and more significant in interior and exterior automotive lighting. The long service life, energy and space savings, shock and vibration resistance and new styling potential are the main advantages of using LEDs in automotive applications. Today, most central high mounted stop lamps use LEDs. In rear combination lamps the number of LEDs in amber and red is increasing rapidly. This year, a first rear combination lamp using LEDs for all functionalities including the back-up lamp function was realized. In addition, first signal functions in headlamps using white High Power LEDs were launched onto the market. The long service life characteristic makes LEDs especially predestined for the DRL function combined with the position/parking light. Exterior automotive applications, including requirements and performance will be discussed and an outlook will be given on future scenarios.

  10. Impedance analysis of nano thickness layered AlGaN acoustic sensor deposited by thermionic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özen, Soner; Bilgiç, Eyüp; Gülmez, Gülay; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan; Mohammadigharehbagh, Reza

    2016-03-01

    In this study, AlGaN acoustic sensor was deposited on aluminum metal substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method for the first time. Gallium materials are used in many applications for optoelectronic device and semiconductor technology. Thermionic vacuum arc is the deposition technology for the variously materials and applications field. The thickness of the acoustic sensor is in deposited as nano layer. Impedance analyses were realized. Also, TVA production parameters and some properties of the deposited layers were investigated. TVA is a fast deposition technology for the gallium compounds and doped gallium compounds. Obtained results show that AlGaN materials are very promising materials. Moreover, these acoustic sensors have been produced by TVA technology.

  11. AlGaN Channel High Electron Mobility Transistors: Device Performance and Power-Switching Figure of Merit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Ajay; Dasgupta, Sansaptak; Rajan, Siddharth; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, AlGaN channels for high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have been evaluated based on a power device figure of merit. AlGaN-channel HEMTs grown on SiC substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) were fabricated. Maximum saturation current of 0.55 A/mm was obtained at VGS=1 V. Current-gain cutoff ( ft) and power-gain cutoff ( fmax) frequencies obtained from small signal measurements were ft=13.2 GHz and fmax=41 GHz. Pulsed current-voltage (I-V) measurements at 200 ns showed no dispersion in I-V curves. Large signal continuous wave (CW) measurement yielded an output power density of 4.5 W/mm with power added efficiency (PAE) of 59% at 4 GHz. This work demonstrates the potential of AlGaN channel HEMTs for high voltage switching and microwave power applications.

  12. Near-ultraviolet LED of the External Quantum Efficiency Over 45% and its Application to High-color Rendering Phosphor Conversion White LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuta, Hiroaki; Fukui, Takeshi; Miyachi, Tsutomu; Kamon, Kunihito; Hayashi, Hideki; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Uchida, Yuji; Kurai, Satoshi; Taguchi, Tsunemasa

    Highly luminous efficiency and color rendering index (CRI) of 70 lm/W and 95 under low correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3177 K has been obtained by phosphor conversion (PC) white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using near-ultra violet (n-UV) LEDs with the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 46.7%. The homogeneous spatial color uniformity on chromaticity of PC white LEDs excited by n-UV LEDs are particularly adequate to the general lighting applications.

  13. Strain-compensated AlGaN /GaN/InGaN cladding layers in homoepitaxial nitride devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernecki, R.; Krukowski, S.; Targowski, G.; Prystawko, P.; Sarzynski, M.; Krysko, M.; Kamler, G.; Grzegory, I.; Leszczynski, M.; Porowski, S.

    2007-12-01

    One of the most important problems in III-nitride violet laser diode technology is the lattice mismatch between the AlGaN cladding layers and the rest of the epitaxial structure. For efficiently working devices, it is necessary to have both a high Al content and thick claddings. This leads, however, to severe sample bowing and even cracking of the upper layer. In this work, we propose a cladding structure of strain-compensated AlGaN /GaN/InGaN superlattice grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on bulk GaN substrates. Various thicknesses and compositions of the layers were employed. We measured the radius of bowing, lattice mismatches, aluminum and indium contents, and densities of threading dislocations. The proposed cladding structures suppress bowing and cracking, which are the two parasitic effects commonly experienced in laser diodes with bulk AlGaN claddings. The suppression of cracking and bowing is shown to occur due to modified strain energy distribution of the superlattices structure.

  14. Onset of surface stimulated emission at 260 nm from AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohang E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A.; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D. E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrated onset of deep-ultraviolet (DUV) surface stimulated emission (SE) from c-plane AlGaN multiple-quantum well (MQW) heterostructures grown on a sapphire substrate by optical pumping at room temperature. The onset of SE became observable at a pumping power density of 630 kW/cm{sup 2}. Spectral deconvolution revealed superposition of a linearly amplified spontaneous emission peak at λ ∼ 257.0 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ∼12 nm and a superlinearly amplified SE peak at λ ∼ 260 nm with a narrow FWHM of less than 2 nm. In particular, the wavelength of ∼260 nm is the shortest wavelength of surface SE from III-nitride MQW heterostructures to date. Atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements were employed to investigate the material and structural quality of the AlGaN heterostructures, showing smooth surface and sharp layer interfaces. This study offers promising results for AlGaN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrates for the development of DUV vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)

  15. Performance enhancement of AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with varied superlattice barrier electron blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songqing; Ye, Chunya; Cai, Xuefen; Li, Shuping; Lin, Wei; Kang, Junyong

    2016-05-01

    The AlGaN-based deep-UV LEDs with specific design of varied superlattice barrier electron blocking layer (EBL) has been investigated numerically by APSYS software. The proposed structure exhibits significant improvement in the light output power, internal quantum efficiency, current-voltage curve and electroluminescence intensity. After analyzing the profiles of energy band diagrams, carriers concentration and radiative recombination rate, we find the main advantages of proposed structure are ascribed to higher barrier suppressing electron leakage and reduced barrier for hole injection. Thus, compared with reference sample, the proposed EBL design may be a good method for improving the whole performance of UV LEDs.

  16. Complementary LED technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reineke, Sebastian

    2015-05-01

    Organic semiconducting molecules and colloidal quantum dots both make for excellent luminescent materials. Compared with the more established solid-state light-emitting technologies, organic LEDs and quantum-dot LEDs are in their infancy, yet they offer unique properties.

  17. Diodes stabilize LED output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deters, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Small-signal diodes are placed in series with light-emitting diodes (LED's) to stabilize LED output against temperature fluctuations. Simple inexpensive method compensates for thermal fluctuations over a broad temperature range. Requiring few components, technique is particularly useful where circuit-board space is limited.

  18. LED and Semiconductor Photo-effects on Living Things

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiyasu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takemitsu; Fujiyasu, Kentarou; Ujihara, Shirou; Watanabe, Naoharu; Sunayama, Shunji; Ikoma, Shuuji

    We have studied LED irradiation effects on plants and animals in the visible to UV region of light from GaN LEDs. The results are as follows. Blue light considers to be effective for pearl cultivation or for attraction of small fishes living in near the surface of sea such as Pompano or Sardine, white light radiation is effective for cultivation of botanical plankton for shells. Other experiments of UV light irradiation attracting effect on baby sea turtle and the germination UV effect of mushroom, green light weight enhance effect on baby pigs, light vernalization effect of vegitable and Ge far infrared therapic effect on human body are also given.

  19. Large area LED package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goullon, L.; Jordan, R.; Braun, T.; Bauer, J.; Becker, F.; Hutter, M.; Schneider-Ramelow, M.; Lang, K.-D.

    2015-03-01

    Solid state lighting using LED-dies is a rapidly growing market. LED-dies with the needed increasing luminous flux per chip area produce a lot of heat. Therefore an appropriate thermal management is required for general lighting with LEDdies. One way to avoid overheating and shorter lifetime is the use of many small LED-dies on a large area heat sink (down to 70 μm edge length), so that heat can spread into a large area while at the same time light also appears on a larger area. The handling with such small LED-dies is very difficult because they are too small to be picked with common equipment. Therefore a new concept called collective transfer bonding using a temporary carrier chip was developed. A further benefit of this new technology is the high precision assembly as well as the plane parallel assembly of the LED-dies which is necessary for wire bonding. It has been shown that hundred functional LED-dies were transferred and soldered at the same time. After the assembly a cost effective established PCB-technology was applied to produce a large-area light source consisting of many small LED-dies and electrically connected on a PCB-substrate. The top contacts of the LED-dies were realized by laminating an adhesive copper sheet followed by LDI structuring as known from PCB-via-technology. This assembly can be completed by adding converting and light forming optical elements. In summary two technologies based on standard SMD and PCB technology have been developed for panel level LED packaging up to 610x 457 mm2 area size.

  20. Advantages of the AlGaN spacer in InAlN high-electron-mobility transistors grown using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Atsushi; Ishiguro, Tetsuro; Kotani, Junji; Tomabechi, Shuichi; Nakamura, Norikazu; Watanabe, Keiji

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the advantages of an AlGaN spacer layer in an InAlN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT). We investigated the effects of the growth parameters of the spacer layer on electron mobility in InAlN HEMTs grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, focusing on the surface roughness of the spacer layer and sharpness of the interface with the GaN channel layer. The electron mobility degraded, as evidenced by the formation of a graded AlGaN layer at the top of the GaN channel layer and the surface roughness of the AlN spacer layer. We believe that the short migration length of aluminum atoms is responsible for the observed degradation. An AlGaN spacer layer was employed to suppress the formation of the graded AlGaN layer and improve surface morphology. A high electron mobility of 1550 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and a low sheet resistance of 211 Ω/sq were achieved for an InAlN HEMT with an AlGaN spacer layer.

  1. Fabrication of Very High Efficiency 5.8 GHz Power Amplifiers using AlGaN HFETs on SiC Substrates for Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gerry

    2001-01-01

    For wireless power transmission using microwave energy, very efficient conversion of the DC power into microwave power is extremely important. Class E amplifiers have the attractive feature that they can, in theory, be 100% efficient at converting, DC power to RF power. Aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) semiconductor material has many advantageous properties, relative to silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and silicon carbide (SiC), such as a much larger bandgap, and the ability to form AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions. The large bandgap of AlGaN also allows for device operation at higher temperatures than could be tolerated by a smaller bandgap transistor. This could reduce the cooling requirements. While it is unlikely that the AlGaN transistors in a 5.8 GHz class E amplifier can operate efficiently at temperatures in excess of 300 or 400 C, AlGaN based amplifiers could operate at temperatures that are higher than a GaAs or Si based amplifier could tolerate. Under this program, AlGaN microwave power HFETs have been fabricated and characterized. Hybrid class E amplifiers were designed and modeled. Unfortunately, within the time frame of this program, good quality HFETs were not available from either the RSC laboratories or commercially, and so the class E amplifiers were not constructed.

  2. LEDs Are Diodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisensky, George C.; Condren, S. Michael; Widstrand, Cynthia G.; Breitzer, Jonathan; Ellis, Arthur B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an activity comparing incandescent bulbs and LEDs powered by dc and ac voltage sources to illustrate properties of matter and the interactions of energy and matter. Includes both instructor information and student activity sheet. (Author/YDS)

  3. White LED performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yimin; Narendran, Nadarajah; Freyssinier, Jean Paul

    2004-10-01

    Two life tests were conducted to compare the effects of drive current and ambient temperature on the degradation rate of 5 mm and high-flux white LEDs. Tests of 5 mm white LED arrays showed that junction temperature increases produced by drive current had a greater effect on the rate of light output degradation than junction temperature increases from ambient heat. A preliminary test of high-flux white LEDs showed the opposite effect, with junction temperature increases from ambient heat leading to a faster depreciation. However, a second life test is necessary to verify this finding. The dissimilarity in temperature effect among 5 mm and high-flux LEDs is likely caused by packaging differences between the two device types.

  4. Energy Efficiency of LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    Solid-state lighting program technology fact sheet on energy efficiency of LEDs, characterizing the current state of the market and discussing package efficacy, luminaire efficacy, and application efficacy.

  5. Development of lighting system for hologram using high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Junko; Yaeda, Asami; Asakawa, Hisashi; Shibuya, Takehisa; Wakaki, Moriaki

    2007-02-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) became popular rapidly by the appearance of blue LED. Three color (R, G, B) emitting LEDs are utilized for the image display system by the development of multi color emitting LED. White LEDs became to commercial base by combining blue or UV light sources for excitation and materials for fluorescence. White LEDs are prevailing for general lighting applications. A single tip with the power of 5W became line up for commercial market owing to the research for high intensity LEDs. As a result, LEDs are replacing the market of conventional incandescent lighting and even head lights of the automobile. In this study, we aim to fabricate the white and R, G, B lighting system using high brightness LEDs for the lighting of holograms instead of a conventional halogen lamp.

  6. Light emission and microstructure of Mg-doped AlGaN grown on patterned sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, A.; Liu, R.; Ponce, F. A.; Amano, H.; Akasaki, I.; Cherns, D.

    2003-01-01

    Distinct crystalline and optical properties have been observed in Mg-doped Al0.03Ga0.97N grown on a patterned sapphire substrate; the pattern consisting of etched trenches along the sapphire <112¯0> direction. The epilayer has two distinct regions: one grown directly onto the sapphire mesa and the other an epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) region that overhangs the trench. Transmission electron microscopy shows the presence of pyramidal defects as well as large dislocation densities in the region grown directly on sapphire. In contrast, the ELO region is defect free and contains no Mg-related pyramidal defects. Cathodoluminescence measurements show superior near-band-edge emission in the ELO region, suggesting that the emission is susceptible to nonradiative centers caused by the high defect density in the rest of the sample. The Mg-related donor-acceptor-pair emission is fairly uniform throughout the film, indicating that it is not affected by the nonradiative centers. These optical and structural properties of AlGaN are closely related to the direction of the growth front.

  7. Detection of halide ions with AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Ren, F.; Kang, M. C.; Lofton, C.; Tan, Weihong; Pearton, S. J.; Dabiran, A.; Osinsky, A.; Chow, P. P.

    2005-04-01

    AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) both with and without a Au gate are found to exhibit significant changes in channel conductance upon exposing the gate region to various halide ions. The polar nature of the halide ions leads to a change of surface charge in the gate region on the HEMT, producing a change in the surface potential at the semiconductor/liquid interface. HEMTs with a Au-gate electrode not only doubled the sensitivity of changing the channel conductance as compared to gateless HEMT, but also showed the opposite conductance behavior. When anions adsorbed on the Au, they produced a counter charge for electrovalence. These anions drag some counter ions from the bulk solution or create an image positive charge on the metal for the required neutrality. The gateless HEMTs can be used as sensors for a range of chemicals through appropriate modification with covalently bonded halide functional groups on the Au surface. This creates many possibilities to functionalize the surface for a wide range of integrated biological, chemical, and fluid monitoring sensors.

  8. Composition dependent valence band order in c-oriented wurtzite AlGaN layers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuschl, B. Helbing, J.; Knab, M.; Lauer, H.; Madel, M.; Thonke, K.; Feneberg, M.

    2014-09-21

    The valence band order of polar wurtzite aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) layers is analyzed for a dense series of samples, grown heteroepitaxially on sapphire substrates, covering the complete composition range. The excitonic transition energies, found by temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, were corrected to the unstrained state using input from X-ray diffraction. k∙p theory yields a critical relative aluminum concentration x{sub c}=(0.09±0.05) for the crossing of the uppermost two valence bands for strain free material, shifting to higher values for compressively strained samples, as supported by polarization dependent PL. The analysis of the strain dependent valence band crossing reconciles the findings of other research groups, where sample strain was neglected. We found a bowing for the energy band gap to the valence band with Γ₉ symmetry of b{sub Γ₉}=0.85eV, and propose a possible bowing for the crystal field energy of b{sub cf}=-0.12eV. A comparison of the light extraction efficiency perpendicular and parallel to the c axis of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}N quantum well structures is discussed for different compositions.

  9. Electrical defects in AlGaN and InAlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, D.; Leach, Jacob H.; Kovalskii, Vladimir A.; Fan, Qian; Xie, Jingqiao; Morkoç, Hadis

    2009-02-01

    Compound semiconductors based on GaN have multiple functional applications. Useful compositions include GaN, and ternary and quaternary compositions of (AlGaIn)N. Defects arising from lattice mismatch, point defects, or impurities may act as electrical trapping centers and degrade device efficiency. Current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, thermal admittance spectroscopy (TAS), and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements are applied to characterize the defects in Al0.40Ga0.80N and In0.18Al0.82N in this report. Broad peaks with a shoulder at high temperature dominate the DLTS spectra in each of the materials. An acceptor trap associated with a dislocation appears at 340 K in AlGaN. The defect has an energy of 0.2 eV and capture cross section of 10-21 cm2. A second trap at 0.35 eV, 10-14 cm2 appears in the TAS measurements in addition to the trap at 0.2 eV. Defects in InAlN are dominated by a peak near 150 K. Two traps appear in the TAS measurements. Both traps in the InAlN are acceptors, based on a lack of field dependent emission rates using double pulse DLTS (DDLTS). The two energy levels in InAlN appear to be coupled, with only one state occupied at a time.

  10. LED applications in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Huang, Ping; Liu, Jiang; Yin, Jian-Ling; Fan, Guang-Han; Liu, Song-Hao

    2003-12-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology has provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths which are biologically optimal for cancer treatment, wound healing and other clinical applications. In this paper, a simple review on the clinical use in therapeutic applications as well as in laboratory work of LEDs is given in view of low intensity laser irradiation effects in biomedicine.

  11. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique, called Photodynamic Therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny, pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source that releases long wavelengths of light ) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. 'A young woman operated on in May 1999 has fully recovered with no complications and no evidence of the tumor coming back,' said Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Medical Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The LEDs, developed and managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, have been used on seven Space Shuttle flights inside the Microgravity Astroculture Facility. This technology has also been successfully used to further commercial research in crop growth.

  12. Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique called photodynamic therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source releasing long wavelengths of light) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can also be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED probe consists of 144 tiny pinhead-size diodes, is 9-inches long, and about one-half-inch in diameter. The small balloon aids in even distribution of the light source. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy by the Marshall Space Flight Center under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research program grant.

  13. LED flicker pulsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mark A.; Cote, Paul J.

    2001-08-01

    There is need to replace hazardous radioluminescent light sources with a means of illumination that is environmentally friendly. This paper describes an electronic source that was developed as a potential candidate to replace low intensity tritium in a military system. It employs an LED for illumination and a 3-volt coin cell battery as a power source. This new light source is electronically invisible, requires minimal maintenance, and provides the lowest practical illumination to preclude detection by optical means. The low intensity requires that the LED be driven at DC current levels resulting in poor luminous efficiency. Therefore, in an effort to maximize battery life, the LED is pulsed into a more optically efficient mode of operation. However, conventional pulsing techniques are not employed because of concerns the electronics could be identified by conspicuous power spectral density (PSD) components in the electromagnetic spectrum generated by a pulsed LED. Therefore, flicker noise concepts have been employed to efficiently drive the LED while generating a virtually undetectable spectral signature. Although ideally the pulse durations, magnitudes, and spacings should be random, a significant reduction in conspicuous PSD components can be achieved when imposing practical constraints. The dominant components of the power spectrum are significantly reduced using fixed pulse durations and magnitudes while varying only the pulse spacing. The mean duty cycle is set to provide the same effective illumination as DC operation while generating a PSD normally associated with natural phenomena.

  14. Effects of Si-doping on structural, electrical, and optical properties of polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiong; Wang, Shuchang; Wang, Yi; Luan, Huakai; Dai, Qian; Wu, Zili; Zhao, Jianguo; Cui, Yiping

    2016-08-01

    The polar (0001)-oriented c-plane and non-polar (11 2 bar 0) -oriented a-plane wurtzite AlGaN epi-layers were successfully grown on polar (0001)-oriented c-plane and semi-polar (1 1 bar 02) -oriented r-plane sapphire substrates, respectively with various Si-doping levels in a low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The morphological, structural, electrical, and optical properties of the polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Hall effect, and Raman spectroscopy. The characterization results show that Si dopants incorporated into the polar and non-polar AlGaN films induced a relaxation of compressive residual strain and a generation of biaxial tensile strain on the surface in consequence of the dislocation climbing. In particular, it was found that the Si-induced compressive strain relaxation in the non-polar AlGaN samples can be promoted by the structural anisotropy as compared with the polar counterparts. The gradually increased relaxation of compressive residual strain in both polar and non-polar AlGaN samples with increasing Si-doping level was attributed to the Si-induced enhancement in the opportunity for the dislocations to interact and annihilate. This implies that the crystal quality for both polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers can be remarkably improved by Si-doping.

  15. On the increased efficiency in InGaN-based multiple quantum wells emitting at 530-590 nm with AlGaN interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleske, D. D.; Fischer, A. J.; Bryant, B. N.; Kotula, P. G.; Wierer, J. J.

    2015-04-01

    InGaN/AlGaN/GaN-based multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with AlGaN interlayers (ILs) are investigated, specifically to examine the fundamental mechanisms behind their increased radiative efficiency at wavelengths of 530-590 nm. The AlzGa1-zN (z~0.38) IL is ~1-2 nm thick, and is grown after and at the same growth temperature as the ~3 nm thick InGaN quantum well (QW). This is followed by an increase in temperature for the growth of a ~10 nm thick GaN barrier layer. The insertion of the AlGaN IL within the MQW provides various benefits. First, the AlGaN IL allows for growth of the InxGa1-xN QW well below typical growth temperatures to achieve higher x (up to~0.25). Second, annealing the IL capped QW prior to the GaN barrier growth improves the AlGaN IL smoothness as determined by atomic force microscopy, improves the InGaN/AlGaN/GaN interface quality as determined from scanning transmission electron microscope images and x-ray diffraction, and increases the radiative efficiency by reducing non-radiative defects as determined by time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. Finally, the AlGaN IL increases the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization induced electric fields acting on the InGaN QW, providing an additional red-shift to the emission wavelength as determined by Schrodinger-Poisson modeling and fitting to the experimental data. The relative impact of increased indium concentration and polarization fields on the radiative efficiency of MQWs with AlGaN ILs is explored along with implications to conventional longer wavelength emitters.

  16. The influence of growth conditions on the surface morphology and development of mechanical stresses in Al(Ga)N layers during metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, W. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Brunkov, P. N.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Troshkov, S. I.; Sakharov, A. V.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Tsatsulnikov, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the influence of technological parameters on the surface morphology and development of mechanical stresses in Al(Ga)N layers during their growth by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on sapphire substrates. Minimization of tensile stresses under conditions of a retained atomically smooth surface can be achieved by using a combination of factors including (i) nitridation of substrate in ammonia flow, (ii) formation of two-layer AlN-Al(Ga)N structures by introducing a small amount (several percent) of Ga after growth of a thin AlN layer, and (iii) reduction of ammonia flow during growth of an Al(Ga)N layer.

  17. Increased Efficiency LED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O. (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    In an LED a large portion of the light produced is lost due to total internal reflection at the air-semiconductor interface. A reverse taper of the semiconductor is used to change the angle at which light strikes the interface so that a greater portion of the light is transmitted.

  18. Nurse-led discharge.

    PubMed

    Page, Carole

    2010-12-01

    Delayed discharges have financial implications for hospital trusts and cause dissatisfaction for patients and their families. This article looks at nurse-led discharge pathways at Milton Keynes Hospital's ambulatory care unit. It explains how giving nurses the responsibility to discharge has improved the patient experience, made nurses more accountable and saved money for the trust. PMID:21229868

  19. Influences of stress on the properties of GaN/InGaN multiple quantum well LEDs grown on Si (111) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Gang; Yang, Yi-Bin; Xiang, Peng; Chen, Wei-Jie; Han, Xiao-Biao; Lin, Xiu-Qi; Lin, Jia-Li; Luo, Hui; Liao, Qiang; Zang, Wen-Jie; Wu, Zhi-Sheng; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Bai-Jun

    2015-06-01

    The influences of stress on the properties of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown on silicon substrate were investigated. The different stresses were induced by growing InGaN and AlGaN insertion layers (IL) respectively before the growth of MQWs in metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. High resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements demonstrated that the InGaN IL introduced an additional tensile stress in n-GaN, which released the strain in MQWs. It is helpful to increase the indium incorporation in MQWs. In comparison with MQWs without the IL, the wavelength shows a red-shift. AlGaN IL introduced a compressive stress to compensate the tensile stress, which reduces the indium composition in MQWs. PL measurement shows a blue-shift of wavelength. The two kinds of ILs were adopted to InGaN/GaN MQWs LED structures. The same wavelength shifts were also observed in the electroluminescence (EL) measurements of the LEDs. Improved indium homogeneity with InGaN IL, and phase separation with AlGaN IL were observed in the light images of the LEDs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274039 and 51177175), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2010CB923201 and 2011CB301903), the Ph. D. Program Foundation of the Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20110171110021), the International Science and Technology Collaboration Program of China (Grant No. 2012DFG52260), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA032606), the International Science and Technology Collaboration Program of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2013B051000041), and the Opened Fund of the State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics (Grant No. IOSKL2014KF17).

  20. Design of Knight LED system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wen; Lou, Yuna; Xiao, Zhihong

    2010-02-01

    This design introduces a used car on the design of LED decorative light strip. This LED named Knight LED. In This system we use ATMEGA8 as the Master MCU Chip. Through the microcontroller to implement the wireless remote control receiver and the LED lights of different modes of switching, different brightness control. Also we use ULN2803 as the LED driver.

  1. High internal quantum efficiency in AlGaN multiple quantum wells grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Zachary Bryan, Isaac; Sitar, Zlatko; Collazo, Ramón; Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji

    2015-04-06

    The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of Al{sub 0.55}Ga{sub 0.45}N/AlN and Al{sub 0.55}Ga{sub 0.45}N/Al{sub 0.85}Ga{sub 0.15}N UVC MQW structures was analyzed. The use of bulk AlN substrates enabled us to undoubtedly distinguish the effect of growth conditions, such as V/III ratio, on the optical quality of AlGaN based MQWs from the influence of dislocations. At a high V/III ratio, a record high IQE of ∼80% at a carrier density of 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} was achieved at ∼258 nm. The high IQE was correlated with the decrease of the non-radiative coefficient A and a reduction of midgap defect luminescence, all suggesting that, in addition to dislocations, point defects are another major factor that strongly influences optical quality of AlGaN MQW structures.

  2. Optically confined polarized resonance Raman studies in identifying crystalline orientation of sub-diffraction limited AlGaN nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Sivadasan, A. K. Patsha, Avinash; Dhara, Sandip

    2015-04-27

    An optical characterization tool of Raman spectroscopy with extremely weak scattering cross section tool is not popular to analyze scattered signal from a single nanostructure in the sub-diffraction regime. In this regard, plasmonic assisted characterization tools are only relevant in spectroscopic studies of nanoscale object in the sub-diffraction limit. We have reported polarized resonance Raman spectroscopic (RRS) studies with strong electron-phonon coupling to understand the crystalline orientation of a single AlGaN nanowire of diameter ∼100 nm. AlGaN nanowire is grown by chemical vapor deposition technique using the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. The results are compared with the high resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis. As a matter of fact, optical confinement effect due to the dielectric contrast of nanowire with respect to that of surrounding media assisted with electron-phonon coupling of RRS is useful for the spectroscopic analysis in the sub-diffraction limit of 325 nm (λ/2N.A.) using an excitation wavelength (λ) of 325 nm and near ultraviolet 40× far field objective with a numerical aperture (N.A.) value of 0.50.

  3. Organic LED system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropper, A. D.; Cok, Ronald S.; Feldman, Rodney D.

    2001-02-01

    Organic LED (OLED) technology promises superior performance in brightness and color resolution, wider viewing angles, lower power consumption, thin displays, and robust physical characteristics. These advantages make OLED displays attractive for next-generation flat panel displays. This paper describes the state-of-the-art in OLED technology and addresses some of the benefits and difficulties facing the integration of OLED devices into a range of imaging equipment applications. We will review OLED performance from a systems perspective and will compare it to OLED material and panel properties. We will also describe the competitive attributes of a flat panel display and recent work done at Kodak on interfacing to OLED devices.

  4. Biodetection of DNA and proteins using enhanced UV absorption by structuration of the chip surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, K.; Reverchon, J. L.; Mugherli, L.; Fromant, M.; Benisty, H.

    2009-02-01

    DNA and protein absorption at 260 and 280 nm can be used to reveal theses species on a biochip UV image. A first study including the design and fabrication of UV reflective multilayer biochips designed for UV contrast enhancement (factor of 4.0) together with spectrally selective AlGaN detectors demonstrated the control of chip biological coating, or Antigen/Antibody complexation with fairly good signals for typical probe density of 4x1012 molecules/cm2. Detection of fractional monolayer molecular binding requires a higher contrast enhancement which can be obtained with structured chips. Grating structures enable, at resonance, a confinement of light at the biochip surface, and thus a large interaction between the biological molecule and the lightwave field. The highest sensitivity obtained with grating-based biochip usually concerns a resonance shift, in wavelength or diffraction angle. Diffraction efficiency is also affected by UV absorption, due to enhanced light-matter interaction, and this mechanism is equally able to produce biochip images in parallel. By adjusting grating parameters, we will see how a biochip that is highly sensitive to UV absorption at its surface can be obtained. Based on the Ewald construction and diffraction diagram, instrumental resolution and smarter experimental configurations are considered. Notably, in conjunction with the 2D UV-sensitive detectors recently developed in-house, we discuss the obtainment of large contrast and good signals in a diffraction order emerging around the sample normal.

  5. Sub-250nm room temperature optical gain from AlGaN materials with strong compositional fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Emanuele; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Haiding; Nikiforov, A.; Yin, Jian; Paiella, Roberto; Moustakas, Theodore; Dal Negro, Luca

    2013-03-01

    Compact and portable deep-UV LEDs and laser sources are needed for a number of engineering applications including optical communications, gas sensing, biochemical agent detection, disinfection, biotechnology and medical diagnostics. We investigate the deep-UV optical emission and gain properties of AlxGa1-xN/AlyGa1-yN multiple quantum wells structure. These structures were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on 6H-SiC substrates resulting in either homogeneous wells or various degrees of band-structure compositional fluctuations in the form of cluster-like features within the wells. We measured the TE-polarized amplified spontaneous emission in the sample with cluster-like features and quantified the optical absorption/gain coefficients and gain spectra by the Variable Stripe Length (VSL) technique under ultrafast optical pumping. We report blue-shift and narrowing of the emission, VSL traces, gain spectra, polarization studies, and the validity of the Schalow-Townes relation to demonstrate a maximum net modal gain of 120 cm-1 at 250 nm in the sample with strong compositional fluctuations. Moreover, we measure a very low gain threshold (15 μJ/cm2) . On the other hand, we found that samples with homogeneous quantum wells lead to absorption only. In addition, we report gain measurements in graded-index-separate-confined heterostructure (GRINSCH) designed to increase the device optical confinement factor.

  6. High temperature and low pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride on AlGaN: Band offsets and passivation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Pramod; Washiyama, Shun; Kaess, Felix; Hayden Breckenridge, M.; Hernandez-Balderrama, Luis H.; Haidet, Brian B.; Alden, Dorian; Franke, Alexander; Sarkar, Biplab; Kohn, Erhard; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the band offsets and interface Fermi level at the heterojunction formed by stoichiometric silicon nitride deposited on AlxGa1-xN (of varying Al composition "x") via low pressure chemical vapor deposition. Silicon nitride is found to form a type II staggered band alignment with AlGaN for all Al compositions (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) and present an electron barrier into AlGaN even at higher Al compositions, where Eg(AlGaN) > Eg(Si3N4). Further, no band bending is observed in AlGaN for x ≤ 0.6 and a reduced band bending (by ˜1 eV in comparison to that at free surface) is observed for x > 0.6. The Fermi level in silicon nitride is found to be at 3 eV with respect to its valence band, which is likely due to silicon (≡Si0/-1) dangling bonds. The presence of band bending for x > 0.6 is seen as a likely consequence of Fermi level alignment at Si3N4/AlGaN hetero-interface and not due to interface states. Photoelectron spectroscopy results are corroborated by current-voltage-temperature and capacitance-voltage measurements. A shift in the interface Fermi level (before band bending at equilibrium) from the conduction band in Si3N4/n-GaN to the valence band in Si3N4/p-GaN is observed, which strongly indicates a reduction in mid-gap interface states. Hence, stoichiometric silicon nitride is found to be a feasible passivation and dielectric insulation material for AlGaN at any composition.

  7. Sources of Error in UV Radiation Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Larason, Thomas C.; Cromer, Christopher L.

    2001-01-01

    Increasing commercial, scientific, and technical applications involving ultraviolet (UV) radiation have led to the demand for improved understanding of the performance of instrumentation used to measure this radiation. There has been an effort by manufacturers of UV measuring devices (meters) to produce simple, optically filtered sensor systems to accomplish the varied measurement needs. We address common sources of measurement errors using these meters. The uncertainty in the calibration of the instrument depends on the response of the UV meter to the spectrum of the sources used and its similarity to the spectrum of the quantity to be measured. In addition, large errors can occur due to out-of-band, non-linear, and non-ideal geometric or spatial response of the UV meters. Finally, in many applications, how well the response of the UV meter approximates the presumed action spectrum needs to be understood for optimal use of the meters.

  8. Personal UV biodosimeter for healthy indoor tanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terenetskaya, I. P.; Orlova, T. N.

    2008-04-01

    The practice of indoor tanning has led to the development of a large artificial tanning industry. In addition to psychological benefits, exposure to UVB light helps the body produce the activated form of vitamin D, which is necessary for many cellular functions. But uncontrolled tanning and UV overexposure can increase the risk of skin cancer. For direct checkout of the vitamin D synthetic capacity of a UV source the bio-equivalent UV dosimeter has been developed that is based on the same molecular photochemistry from which vitamin D is photosynthesized in human skin and makes possible both instrumental and visual indication of vitamin D synthesis.

  9. All AlGaN epitaxial structure solar-blind avalanche photodiodes with high efficiency and high gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hualong; Wu, Weicong; Zhang, Hongxian; Chen, Yingda; Wu, Zhisheng; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Hao

    2016-05-01

    Solar-blind avalanche photodiodes were fabricated with an all AlGaN-based epitaxial structure on sapphire by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. The devices demonstrate a maximum responsivity of 114.1 mA/W at 278 nm and zero bias, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 52.7%. The EQE improves to 64.8% under a bias of ‑10 V. Avalanche gain higher than 2 × 104 was obtained at a bias of ‑140 V. The high performance is attributed to the all AlGaN-based p–i–n structure comprised of undoped and Si-doped n-type Al0.4Ga0.6N on a high quality AlN layer and highly conductive p-type AlGaN grown with In-surfactant-assisted Mg-delta doping.

  10. Stimulated emission and optical gain in AlGaN heterostructures grown on bulk AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei Bryan, Zachary; Kirste, Ronny; Bryan, Isaac; Hussey, Lindsay; Bobea, Milena; Haidet, Brian; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Xie, Jinqiao; Mita, Seiji; Gerhold, Michael

    2014-03-14

    Optical gain spectra for ∼250 nm stimulated emission were compared in three different AlGaN-based structures grown on single crystalline AlN substrates: a single AlGaN film, a double heterostructure (DH), and a Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) structure; respective threshold pumping power densities of 700, 250, and 150 kW/cm{sup 2} were observed. Above threshold, the emission was transverse-electric polarized and as narrow as 1.8 nm without a cavity. The DH and MQW structures showed gain values of 50–60 cm{sup −1} when pumped at 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. The results demonstrated the excellent optical quality of the AlGaN-based heterostructures grown on AlN substrates and their potential for realizing electrically pumped sub-280 nm laser diodes.

  11. Dependence of radiative and nonradiative recombination on carrier density and Al content in thick AlGaN epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlipskas, Ž.; Aleksiejūnas, R.; Kadys, A.; Mickevičius, J.; Jurkevičius, J.; Tamulaitis, G.; Shur, M.; Shatalov, M.; Yang, J.; Gaska, R.

    2016-04-01

    Dynamics of radiative and nonradiative recombination of non-equilibrium carriers is investigated in thick AlGaN epitaxial layers with Al content ranging from 0.11 to 0.71. The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) in the epilayers was obtained using two approaches: either estimated from PL measurements or calculated using the recombination coefficients of a simple ABC model, retrieved by fitting the kinetics of light induced transient gratings (LITG). At photoexcited carrier densities below ~1019 cm-3, both approaches provided similar IQE values indicating that the simple ABC model is applicable to analyze carrier recombination at such carrier densities. The increase in IQE at higher carrier densities slowed down for the values extracted from PL considerably faster than for those obtained from LITG transients. This discrepancy is explained in terms of the mixed nature of the rate coefficient B caused by the onset of the density-activated nonradiative recombination at high carrier densities.

  12. In situ atomic layer deposition half cycle study of Al2O3 growth on AlGaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Barry; Qin, Xiaoye; Dong, Hong; Kim, Jiyoung; Wallace, Robert M.

    2012-11-01

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 on the native oxide and hydrofluoric acid treated Al0.25Ga0.75 N surface was studied using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), after each individual "half cycle" of the ALD process. Initially, Al2O3, Ga2O3, and N-O states were detected on both surfaces at differing concentrations. During the course of the deposition process, the N-O bonds are seen to decrease to within XPS detection limits, as well as a small decrease in the Ga2O3 concentration. The Al2O3 growth rate initially is seen to be very low, indication of low reactivity between the trimethyl-aluminum molecule and the AlGaN surface.

  13. Catalytic activity of enzymes immobilized on AlGaN /GaN solution gate field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, B.; Howgate, J.; von Ribbeck, H.-G.; Gawlina, Y.; Bandalo, V.; Steinhoff, G.; Stutzmann, M.; Eickhoff, M.

    2006-10-01

    Enzyme-modified field-effect transistors (EnFETs) were prepared by immobilization of penicillinase on AlGaN /GaN solution gate field-effect transistors. The influence of the immobilization process on enzyme functionality was analyzed by comparing covalent immobilization and physisorption. Covalent immobilization by Schiff base formation on GaN surfaces modified with an aminopropyltriethoxysilane monolayer exhibits high reproducibility with respect to the enzyme/substrate affinity. Reductive amination of the Schiff base bonds to secondary amines significantly increases the stability of the enzyme layer. Electronic characterization of the EnFET response to penicillin G indicates that covalent immobilization leads to the formation of an enzyme (sub)monolayer.

  14. Turbulence channel test and analysis for NLOS UV communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Linchao; Li, Zening; Lang, Tian; Sadler, Brian M.; Chen, Gang

    2014-10-01

    Short range non-line-of-sight (NLOS) ultraviolet (UV) communication, with its solar blind and Non-Line-of- Sight characteristic, received grant interest. However as the communication range increases, the communication performance deteriotes due to NLOS UV turbulence, even with special UV turbulence mitigation. In this work, we conducted a series of outdoor experiments to investigate the received signal energy distribution, which is the product of the complex interaction of transmitted UV radiation, by utlizing both a UV LED array and a UV laser, with the atmosphere. Separation distance, pointing angles and UV light source were taken into considerate as key parameters to affect the distribution. These experimental results will be valuable for studying NLOS UV communication performance.

  15. The light-matter interaction of a single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire and noble metal Au nanoparticles in the sub-diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, A K; Madapu, Kishore K; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-08-24

    Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is not only a tool for imaging of sub-diffraction limited objects but also a prominent characteristic tool for understanding the intrinsic properties of nanostructures. In order to understand light-matter interactions in the near field regime using a NSOM technique with an excitation of 532 nm (2.33 eV), we selected an isolated single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∼120 nm grown via a vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism along with a metallic Au nanoparticle (NP) catalyst. The role of electronic transitions from different native defect related energy states of AlGaN is discussed in understanding the NSOM images for the semiconducting NW. The effect of strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of an excitation laser on the NSOM images for Au NPs, involved in the VLS growth mechanism of NWs, is also observed. PMID:27511614

  16. Improved mobility of AlGaN channel heterojunction material using an AlGaN/GaN composite buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hui-Juan; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Lu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Zhi-Zhe; Ha, Wei; Ge, Sha-Sha; Cao, Rong-Tao; Hao, Yue

    2014-03-01

    The quality of an AlGaN channel heterojunction on a sapphire substrate is massively improved by using an AlGaN/GaN composite buffer layer. We demonstrate an Al0.4Ga0.5N/Al0.18Ga0.82N heterojunction with a state-of-the-art mobility of 815 cm2/(V·s) and a sheet resistance of 890 Ω/□ under room temperature. The crystalline quality and the electrical properties of the AlGaN heterojunction material are analyzed by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and van der Pauw Hall and capacitance—voltage (C—V) measurements. The results indicate that the improved electrical properties should derive from the reduced surface roughness and low dislocation density.

  17. Traps and defects in pre- and post-proton irradiated AlGaN-GaN high electron mobility transistors and AlGaN Schottky diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Yongkun; Foran, Brendan; Presser, Nathan; LaLumondiere, Stephen; Lotshaw, William; Moss, Steven C.

    2013-03-01

    High electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) based on AlGaN-GaN hetero-structures are promising for both commercial and military applications that require high voltage, high power, and high efficiency operation. Study of reliability and radiation effects of AlGaN-GaN HEMTs is necessary before solid state power amplifiers based on GaN HEMT technology are successfully deployed in satellite communication systems. Several AlGaN HEMT manufacturers have recently reported encouraging reliability data, but long-term reliability of these devices in the space environment still remains a major concern because a large number of traps and defects are present both in the bulk as well as at the surface leading to undesirable characteristics. This study is to investigate the effects of the AlGaN-GaN HEMTs and AlGaN Schottky diodes irradiated with protons.

  18. Impact of post-deposition annealing on interfacial chemical bonding states between AlGaN and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-03-02

    The effect of post-deposition annealing on chemical bonding states at interface between Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N and ZrO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is studied by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that both of Al-O/Al 2p and Ga-O/Ga 3d area ratio decrease at annealing temperatures lower than 500 °C, which could be attributed to “clean up” effect of ALD-ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN. Compared to Ga spectra, a much larger decrease in Al-O/Al 2p ratio at a smaller take-off angle θ is observed, which indicates higher effectiveness of the passivation of Al-O bond than Ga-O bond through “clean up” effect near the interface. However, degradation of ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface quality due to re-oxidation at higher annealing temperature (>500 °C) is also found. The XPS spectra clearly reveal that Al atoms at ZrO{sub 2}/AlGaN interface are easier to get oxidized as compared with Ga atoms.

  19. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO{sub 2} on AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-09-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO{sub 2} on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO{sub 2} and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications.

  20. Deformation potentials in AlGaN and InGaN alloys and their impact on optical polarization properties of nitride quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łepkowski, S. P.; Gorczyca, I.; Stefańska-Skrobas, K.; Christensen, N. E.; Svane, A.

    2013-08-01

    The deformation potentials acz-D1, act-D2, D3, D4, and D5 are determined for random AlGaN and InGaN alloys using electronic band structure calculations based on the density functional theory. A sublinear composition dependence is obtained for acz-D1 and D3 in AlGaN, and D3 in InGaN, whereas superlinear behavior on composition is found for act-D2, D4, and D5 in AlGaN, and act-D2 and D5 in InGaN. The optical polarization properties of nitride quantum wells are very well described by the k·p method when the obtained deformation potentials are included. In m-plane AlGaN/AlN and InGaN/GaN quantum wells, the difference between the interband transition energies for light polarized parallel and orthogonal to the crystalline c axis compares more favorably to experimental data, than when deformation potentials previously reported in literature are used.

  1. New Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN high electron mobility transistor with partial etched AlGaN layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Song; Duan, Baoxing; Yuan, Xiaoning; Cao, Zhen; Guo, Haijun; Yang, Yintang

    2016-05-01

    In this letter, a new Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with the AlGaN layer is partial etched is reported for the first time. The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density in the HEMTs is changed by partially etching the AlGaN layer. A new electric field peak is introduced along the interface between the AlGaN layer and the GaN buffer by the electric field modulation effect. The high electric field near the gate in the proposed Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN HEMT is effectively decreased, which makes the surface electric field more uniform. Compared with the conventional structure, the breakdown voltage can be improved by 58% for the proposed Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN HEMT and the current collapse can be reduced resulting from the more uniform surface electric field.

  2. Effect of V/III ratio on the growth of (11 2 bar 2) AlGaN by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Duc V.; Alam, S. N.; Parbrook, P. J.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of V/III ratio on the growth and properties of AlGaN layers grown on (112bar2) AlN templates grown on (101bar0) sapphire by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy was studied. The surface morphology of the (112bar2) AlGaN layers and the (112bar2) AlN templates showed an undulation along [ 1 1 bar 00 ] AlGaN , AlN. The Al-content and thickness of the layers increased with decreasing V/III ratio due to a reduction in the parasitic reactions of the precursors. The Al-content of the (112bar2) layers was found to be in the range of 29.5-47.9%, which is lower than the composition of the simultaneously grown (0001) reference layers (30.4-58.0%). This was attributed to a higher density of cation (nitrogen) dangling bonds on the (112bar2) surface. Low temperature photoluminescence measurements of the (112bar2) layers showed an emission wavelength that shifts gradually from 273 nm to 306 nm with increasing V/III ratio. A decreased PL intensity of the layers with decreasing V/III ratio was attributed to an increase in cation vacancies. The Stokes-shift of the (112bar2) layers was estimated to be about 60-194 meV, and this shift increases with increasing Al-content (decreasing V/III ratio) correlated to an increased exciton localization.

  3. UV water disinfector

    DOEpatents

    Gadgil, A.; Garud, V.

    1998-07-14

    A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system and an air-suspended bare UV lamp are disclosed. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir. 7 figs.

  4. UV water disinfector

    DOEpatents

    Gadgil, Ashok; Garud, Vikas

    1998-07-14

    A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system, and an air-suspended bare UV lamp. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir.

  5. A compact signal transmitter for UV communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongyang; Yuan, Yonggang; Li, Chao; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiangyang

    2011-02-01

    Three LED-based signal transmitting schemes were presented to build the transmitter of UV communication system. Microprogrammed Control Unit (MCU) was taken to generate digital driving signal and to accomplish modulation with Keil C51 development tool. The modulated signal with a certain pulse width was sent to a LED driving circuit. High power 365nm UV LED was adopted according to the trade-off between its scattering coefficient and price. Utilization of high power UV LED improved the integration density of printed circuit board (PCB), which was beneficial to assemble a beam shaping system. The whole transmitter was installed on a four-dimensional optical stage for system adjustments and measurements. The radiant optical power of UV LED was measured. Some issues about the PCB design were also discussed. The MCU output waveforms were demonstrated on an oscilloscope and the UV LED output optical pulse were verified by a Hamamatsu APD module. Different modulation data rates were investigated. Experimental result showed that this signal transmitter for UV communication system could transmit optical signal well and greatly shorten the system development cycle.

  6. Comparison of different LED Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieker, Henning; Miesner, Christian; Püttjer, Dirk; Bachl, Bernhard

    2007-09-01

    In this paper different technologies for LED packaging are compared, focusing on Chip on Board (COB) and SMD technology. The package technology which is used depends on the LED application. A critical fact in LED technology is the thermal management, especially for high brightness LED applications because the thermal management is important for reliability, lifetime and electrooptical performance of the LED module. To design certain and long life LED applications knowledge of the heat flow from LEDs to the complete application is required. High sophisticated FEM simulations are indispensable for modern development of high power LED applications. We compare simulations of various substrate materials and packaging technologies simulated using FLOTHERM software. Thereby different substrates such as standard FR4, ceramic and metal core printed circuit boards are considered. For the verification of the simulated results and the testing of manufactured modules, advanced measurement tools are required. We show different ways to experimentally characterize the thermal behavior of LED modules. The thermal path is determined by the transient thermal analysis using the MicReD T3Ster analyzer. Afterwards it will be compared to the conventional method using thermocouples. The heat distribution over the module is investigated by an IR-Camera. We demonstrate and compare simulation and measurement results of Chip-on-Board (COB) and Sub-Mounted Devices (SMD) technology. The results reveal that for different applications certain packages are ideal.

  7. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations.

  8. UV-B Perception and Acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Tilbrook, Kimberley; Dubois, Marine; Crocco, Carlos D; Yin, Ruohe; Chappuis, Richard; Allorent, Guillaume; Schmid-Siegert, Emanuel; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel; Ulm, Roman

    2016-04-01

    Plants perceive UV-B, an intrinsic component of sunlight, via a signaling pathway that is mediated by the photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and induces UV-B acclimation. To test whether similar UV-B perception mechanisms exist in the evolutionarily distant green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we identified Chlamydomonas orthologs of UVR8 and the key signaling factor CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1). Cr-UVR8 shares sequence and structural similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana UVR8, has conserved tryptophan residues for UV-B photoreception, monomerizes upon UV-B exposure, and interacts with Cr-COP1 in a UV-B-dependent manner. Moreover, Cr-UVR8 can interact with At-COP1 and complement the Arabidopsis uvr8 mutant, demonstrating that it is a functional UV-B photoreceptor. Chlamydomonas shows apparent UV-B acclimation in colony survival and photosynthetic efficiency assays. UV-B exposure, at low levels that induce acclimation, led to broad changes in the Chlamydomonas transcriptome, including in genes related to photosynthesis. Impaired UV-B-induced activation in the Cr-COP1 mutant hit1 indicates that UVR8-COP1 signaling induces transcriptome changes in response to UV-B. Also, hit1 mutants are impaired in UV-B acclimation. Chlamydomonas UV-B acclimation preserved the photosystem II core proteins D1 and D2 under UV-B stress, which mitigated UV-B-induced photoinhibition. These findings highlight the early evolution of UVR8 photoreceptor signaling in the green lineage to induce UV-B acclimation and protection. PMID:27020958

  9. Structural and optical investigations of AlGaN MQWs grown on a relaxed AlGaN buffer on AlN templates for emission at 280 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Le Gac, G.; Bouchoule, S.; El Gmili, Y.; Patriarche, G.; Sundaram, S.; Disseix, P.; Réveret, F.; Leymarie, J.; Streque, J.; Genty, F.; Salvestrini, J.-P.; Dupuis, R. D.; Li, X.-H.; Voss, P. L.; Ougazzaden, A.

    2015-12-01

    10-period Al0.57Ga0.43N/Al0.38Ga0.62N multi-quantum wells (MQWs) were grown on a relaxed Al0.58Ga0.42N buffer on AlN templates on sapphire. The threading dislocations and V-pits were characterized and their origin is discussed. The influence of V-pits on the structural quality of the MQWs and on optical emission at 280 nm was analyzed. It was observed that near-surface V-pits were always associated with grain boundaries consisting of edge threading dislocations originating from the AlN/Al2O3 interface. Although the high density of V-pits disrupted MQWs growth, it did not affect the internal quantum efficiency which was measured to be ~1% at room temperature even when V-pit density was increased from 7×107 cm-2 to 2×109 cm-2. The results help to understand the origin, propagation and influences of the typical defects in AlGaN MQWs grown on AlN/Al2O3 templates which may lead to further improvement of the performance of DUV devices.

  10. Advanced poly-LED displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Mark; Nisato, Giovanni; Fish, D.; Giraldo, Andrea; Jenkins, A. J.; Johnson, Mark T.

    2003-05-01

    Philips have been actively developing polymer OLED (poly-LED) displays as a future display technology. Their emissive nature leads to a very attractive visual appearance, with wide viewing angle, high brightness and fast response speed. Whilst the first generation of poly-LED displays are likely to be passive-matrix driven, power reduction and resolution increase will lead to the use of active-matrix poly-LED displays. Philips Research have designed, fabricated and characterized five different designs of active-matrix polymer-LED display. Each of the five displays makes use of a distinct pixel programming- or pixel drive-technique, including current programming, threshold voltage measurement and photodiode feedback. It will be shown that hte simplest voltage-programmed current-source pixel suffers from potentially unacceptable brightness non-uniformity, and that advanced pixel circuits can provide a solution to this. Optical-feedback pixel circuits will be discussed, showing that they can be used to improve uniformity and compensate for image burn-in due to polymer-LED material degradation, improving display lifetime. Philips research has also been active in developing technologies required to implement poly-LED displays on flexible substrates, including materials, processing and testing methods. The fabrication of flexible passive-matrix poly-LED displays will be presented, as well as the ongoing work to assess the suitability of processing flexible next-generation poly-LED displays.

  11. Advanced oxidation degradation kinetics as a function of ultraviolet LED duty cycle.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Kelsey; Spencer, Michael; Bates, Christopher; Miller, Michael E; Almquist, Catherine; Grimaila, Michael; Magnuson, Matthew; Willison, Stuart; Phillips, Rebecca; Racz, LeeAnn

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) may be a viable option as a UV light source for advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) utilizing photocatalysts or oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide. The effect of UV-LED duty cycle, expressed as the percentage of time the LED is powered, was investigated in an AOP with hydrogen peroxide, using methylene blue (MB) to assess contaminant degradation. The UV-LED AOP degraded the MB at all duty cycles. However, adsorption of MB onto the LED emitting surface caused a linear decline in reactor performance over time. With regard to the effect of duty cycle, the observed rate constant of MB degradation, after being adjusted to account for the duty cycle, was greater for 5 and 10% duty cycles than higher duty cycles, providing a value approximately 160% higher at 5% duty cycle than continuous operation. This increase in adjusted rate constant at low duty cycles, as well as contaminant fouling of the LED surface, may impact design and operational considerations for pulsed UV-LED AOP systems. PMID:25945855

  12. Protective effect of UV-A radiation during acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to UV-B treatment.

    PubMed

    Štroch, Michal; Materová, Zuzana; Vrábl, Daniel; Karlický, Václav; Šigut, Ladislav; Nezval, Jakub; Špunda, Vladimír

    2015-11-01

    We examined the acclimation response of the photosynthetic apparatus of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) to a combination of UV-A and UV-B radiation (UVAB) and to UV-B radiation alone. Our aim was to evaluate whether UV-A radiation prevents UV-B-induced damage to the photosynthetic apparatus and whether UV-A pre-acclimation is required to mitigate the negative influence of UV-B radiation. Barley plants were grown from seeds under low photosynthetically active radiation (50 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) either in the absence or presence of UV-A radiation (UVA- and UVA+ plants, respectively). After 8 days of development, plants were exposed simultaneously to UV-A and UV-B radiation for the next 6 days. Additionally, UVA- plants were exposed to UV-B radiation alone. The UVA+ plants had a higher CO2 assimilation rate near the light-saturation region (A(N)) and a higher content of both total chlorophylls (Chls) and total carotenoids than the UVA- plants. Chls content, A(N), the potential quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (F(V)/F(M)), the capacity of light-induced thermal energy dissipation and the efficiency of excitation energy transfer within PSII remained the same or even increased in both UVA+ and UVA- plants after UVAB treatment. On the contrary, exposure of UVA- plants to UV-B radiation itself led to a reduction in all these characteristics. We revealed that the presence of UV-A radiation during UVAB treatment not only mitigated but completely eliminated the negative effect of UV-B radiation on the functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus and that UV-A pre-acclimation was not crucial for development of this UV-A-induced resistance against UV-B irradiation. PMID:26233710

  13. Improved p-type conductivity in Al-rich AlGaN using multidimensional Mg-doped superlattices.

    PubMed

    Zheng, T C; Lin, W; Liu, R; Cai, D J; Li, J C; Li, S P; Kang, J Y

    2016-01-01

    A novel multidimensional Mg-doped superlattice (SL) is proposed to enhance vertical hole conductivity in conventional Mg-doped AlGaN SL which generally suffers from large potential barrier for holes. Electronic structure calculations within the first-principle theoretical framework indicate that the densities of states (DOS) of the valence band nearby the Fermi level are more delocalized along the c-axis than that in conventional SL, and the potential barrier significantly decreases. Hole concentration is greatly enhanced in the barrier of multidimensional SL. Detailed comparisons of partial charges and decomposed DOS reveal that the improvement of vertical conductance may be ascribed to the stronger pz hybridization between Mg and N. Based on the theoretical analysis, highly conductive p-type multidimensional Al0.63Ga0.37N/Al0.51Ga0.49N SLs are grown with identified steps via metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The hole concentration reaches up to 3.5 × 10(18) cm(-3), while the corresponding resistivity reduces to 0.7 Ω cm at room temperature, which is tens times improvement in conductivity compared with that of conventional SLs. High hole concentration can be maintained even at 100 K. High p-type conductivity in Al-rich structural material is an important step for the future design of superior AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet devices. PMID:26906334

  14. Improved p-type conductivity in Al-rich AlGaN using multidimensional Mg-doped superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, T. C.; Lin, W.; Liu, R.; Cai, D. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, S. P.; Kang, J. Y.

    2016-02-01

    A novel multidimensional Mg-doped superlattice (SL) is proposed to enhance vertical hole conductivity in conventional Mg-doped AlGaN SL which generally suffers from large potential barrier for holes. Electronic structure calculations within the first-principle theoretical framework indicate that the densities of states (DOS) of the valence band nearby the Fermi level are more delocalized along the c-axis than that in conventional SL, and the potential barrier significantly decreases. Hole concentration is greatly enhanced in the barrier of multidimensional SL. Detailed comparisons of partial charges and decomposed DOS reveal that the improvement of vertical conductance may be ascribed to the stronger pz hybridization between Mg and N. Based on the theoretical analysis, highly conductive p-type multidimensional Al0.63Ga0.37N/Al0.51Ga0.49N SLs are grown with identified steps via metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The hole concentration reaches up to 3.5 × 1018 cm-3, while the corresponding resistivity reduces to 0.7 Ω cm at room temperature, which is tens times improvement in conductivity compared with that of conventional SLs. High hole concentration can be maintained even at 100 K. High p-type conductivity in Al-rich structural material is an important step for the future design of superior AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet devices.

  15. High growth rate of AlGaN for buffer structures for GaN on Si to increase throughput

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koh; Ubukata, Akinori; Ikenaga, Kazutada; Naito, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Jun; Yano, Yoshiki; Tabuchi, Toshiya; Yamaguchi, Akira; Ban, Yuzaburo; Uchiyama, Kosuke

    2012-03-01

    Throughput requirement of the epitaxial process of GaN on Si is described. The impact of the growth rate of AlGaN for the buffer layer of GaN on Si is highlighted. In the attempt of growing GaN on Si, we have tested a production scale high flow speed MOVPE reactor (TAIYO NIPPON SANSO UR25k) for 6 inch X 7 wafers. Al0.58Ga0.42N was grown with the growth rate of 1.85μm/hr at 30 kPa. AlN was grown with the growth rate of 1.4μm/hr at 13kPa. AlN/GaN SLS (5nm/20nm) was also grown at the growth rate of 1.4μm/hr. An excellent uniformity of aluminum concentration of less than 0.5% was also obtained for Al0.58Ga0.42N. The challenge which we are facing to further increase of the throughput is summarized.

  16. Improved p-type conductivity in Al-rich AlGaN using multidimensional Mg-doped superlattices

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, T. C.; Lin, W.; Liu, R.; Cai, D. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, S. P.; Kang, J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    A novel multidimensional Mg-doped superlattice (SL) is proposed to enhance vertical hole conductivity in conventional Mg-doped AlGaN SL which generally suffers from large potential barrier for holes. Electronic structure calculations within the first-principle theoretical framework indicate that the densities of states (DOS) of the valence band nearby the Fermi level are more delocalized along the c-axis than that in conventional SL, and the potential barrier significantly decreases. Hole concentration is greatly enhanced in the barrier of multidimensional SL. Detailed comparisons of partial charges and decomposed DOS reveal that the improvement of vertical conductance may be ascribed to the stronger pz hybridization between Mg and N. Based on the theoretical analysis, highly conductive p-type multidimensional Al0.63Ga0.37N/Al0.51Ga0.49N SLs are grown with identified steps via metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The hole concentration reaches up to 3.5 × 1018 cm−3, while the corresponding resistivity reduces to 0.7 Ω cm at room temperature, which is tens times improvement in conductivity compared with that of conventional SLs. High hole concentration can be maintained even at 100 K. High p-type conductivity in Al-rich structural material is an important step for the future design of superior AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet devices. PMID:26906334

  17. Binary complementary white LED illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John K.

    2001-12-01

    For widespread adoption in general-purpose illumination applications, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) must reliably produce a substantial amount of white light at a reasonable cost. While several white LED technologies appear capable of meeting the implicit technical requirements for illumination, their high purchase price (relative to traditional light sources) has heretofore impeded their market advancement. Binary complementary white (BCW) LED illuminators, first introduced commercially in late 1997, appear to offer great potential for addressing the commercial and technical demands of general-purpose illumination applications. Many properties of BCW LED systems derive from AlInGaP LED chips, the source of up to 80% of the luminous flux projected from BCW devices. This configuration yields a number of benefits, relative to other white LED approaches, including high luminous efficacy, low cost per lumen, and high luminous flux per discrete component. This document describes BCW illumination systems in detail, beginning with a review of generic LED attributes, basic illumination requirements and applied photometric and colorimetric techniques.

  18. Metacapacitors for LED Lighting: Metacapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-02

    ADEPT Project: The CUNY Energy Institute is developing less expensive, more efficient, smaller, and longer-lasting power converters for energy-efficient LED lights. LEDs produce light more efficiently than incandescent lights and last significantly longer than compact fluorescent bulbs, but they require more sophisticated power converter technology, which increases their cost. LEDs need more sophisticated converters because they require a different type of power (low voltage direct current, or DC) than what's generally supplied by power outlets. The CUNY Energy Institute is developing sophisticated power converters for LEDs that contain capacitors made from new, nanoscale materials. Capacitors are electrical components that are used to store energy. CUNY's unique capacitors are configured with advanced power circuits to more efficiently control and convert power to the LED lighting source. They also eliminate the need for large magnetic components, instead relying on networks of capacitors that can be easily printed on plastic substrate. CUNY's prototype LED power converter already meets DOE's 2020 projections for the energy efficiency of LED power converters.

  19. Protection against methanol-induced retinal toxicity by LED photostimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, Harry T.; Wong-Riley, Margaret T. T.; Eells, Janis T.

    2002-06-01

    We have initiated experiments designed to test the hypothesis that 670-nm Light-Emitting Diode (LED) exposure will attenuate formate-induced retinal dysfunction in a rodent model of methanol toxicity. Methanol intoxication produces toxic injury to the retina. The toxic metabolite formed in methanol intoxication is formic acid, a mitochondrial toxin known to inhibit cytochrome oxidase activity. 670-nm LED light has been hypothesized to act by stimulating cytochrome oxidase activity. To test this hypothesis, one group of animals was intoxicated with methanol, a second group was intoxicated with methanol and LED-treated and a third group was untreated. LED treatment (670 nm for 1 min 45 seconds equals 50 mW/cm2, 4 joules/cm2) was administered at 5, 25, and 50 hours after the initial dose of methanol. At 72 hours of methanol intoxication, retinal function was assessed by measurement of ERG responses and retinas were prepared for histologic analysis. ERG responses recorded in methanol-intoxicated animals revealed profound attenuation of both rod-dominated and UV-cone mediated responses. In contrast, methanol- intoxicated animals exposed to LED treatment exhibited a nearly complete recovery of rod-dominated ERG responses and a slight improvement of UV-cone mediated ERG responses. LED treatment also protected the retina against the histopathologic changes produced by formate in methanol intoxication. These data provide evidence that LED phototherapy protects the retina against the cytotoxic actions of formate and are consistent with the hypothesis that LED photostimulation improves mitochondrial respiratory chain function.

  20. Light pipes for LED measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, S. R.; Thomas, E. F., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Light pipe directly couples LED optical output to single detector. Small area detector measures total optical output of diode. Technique eliminates thermal measurement problems and channels optical output to remote detector.

  1. [Light-emitting diodes (LED)].

    PubMed

    Cartier, H; Le Pillouer-Prost, A; Grognard, C

    2009-10-01

    LED home-use is now widely spread. In dermatology, numerous reports have stated their results for many indications: wound healing process, rejuvenation, acne and, of course, photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, fluence, pulse duration and color of the LED are so variable as it is difficult to bring well codified results. But how should you not be interested in this field? It is already any more a near future but well and truly a therapeutic reality... PMID:19931696

  2. Solar UV variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, Richard F.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements from the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) provide solar UV flux in the 160 to 400 nm wavelength range, backed up by independent measurement in the 115 to 305 nm range from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME). The full disc UV flux from spatially resolved measurements of solar activity was modeled, which provides a better understanding of why the UV variations have their observed temporal and wavelength dependencies. Long term, intermediate term, and short term variations are briefly examined.

  3. Improved characteristics of ultraviolet AlGaN multiple-quantum-well laser diodes with step-graded quantum barriers close to waveguide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xuefen; Li, Shuping; Kang, Junyong

    2016-09-01

    Ultraviolet AlGaN multiple-quantum-well laser diodes (LDs) with step-graded quantum barriers (QBs) instead of conventional first and last QBs close to waveguide layers are proposed. The characteristics of this type of laser diodes are numerically investigated by using the software PICS3D and it is found that the performances of these LDs are greatly improved. The results indicates that the structure with step-graded QBs exhibits higher output light power, slope efficiency and emission intensity, as well as lower series resistance and threshold current density under the identical condition, compared with conventional LD structure.

  4. Modelling UV sky for future UV missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, A. G.; Safanova, M.; Mohan, R.; Murthy, Jayant

    Software simulators are now widely used in all areas of science, especially in application to astronomical missions: from instrument design to mission planning, and to data interpretation. We present a simulator to model the diffuse ultraviolet sky, where the different contributors are separately calculated and added together to produce a sky image of the size specified by the instrument requirements. Each of the contributors to the background, instrumental dark current, airglow, zodiacal light and diffuse galactic light, is dependent on various factors. Airglow is dependent on the time of day, zodiacal light on the time of year, angle from the Sun and from the ecliptic, and diffuse UV emission depends on the look direction. To provide a full description of any line of sight, we have also added stars. The diffuse UV background light can dominate in many areas of the sky and severely impact space telescopes viewing directions due to over brightness. The simulator, available as a downloadable package and as a simple web-based tool, can be applied to separate missions and instruments. For demonstration, we present the example used for two UV missions: the UVIT instrument on the Indian ASTROSAT mission to be launched in the next year and a prospective wide-field mission to search for transients in the UV.

  5. WSO-UV project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachkov, Mikhail; Shustov, Boris; Gómez de Castro, Ana Ines

    2014-03-01

    During last three decades, astronomers have enjoyed continuous access to the 100-300 nm ultraviolet (UV) spectral range where the resonance transitions of the most abundant atoms and ions (at temperatures between 3000 and 300 000 K) reside. This UV range is not accessible from ground-based facilities. The successful International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observatory, the Russian ASTRON mission and successor instruments such as the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) mission or the COS and STIS spectrographs on-board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) prove the major impact of observations in the UV wavelength range in modern astronomy. Future access to space-based observatories is expected to be very limited. For the next decade, the post-HST era, the World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) will be the only 2-m class UV telescope with capabilities similar to the HST. WSO-UV will be equipped with instruments for imaging and spectroscopy and it will be a facility dedicated, full-time, to UV astronomy. In this article, we briefly outline the current status of the WSO-UV mission and the science management plan.

  6. Optical characterization of ultrabright LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Benavides, Juan Manuel; Webb, Robert H

    2005-07-01

    Ultrabright light emitting diodes (LEDs) are a new light source for visual psychophysics and microscopy. The new LEDs are intended primarily for room and exterior illumination, and the manufacturers' specifications are adequate for that. However, we use them as light sources in situations where a more complete characterization may be useful. For one set of LEDs we have measured the radiometric intensity and its distribution in space and wavelength, and we have tested for interactions of these variables and their dependence on driver configuration. We describe techniques for making these measurements and give a link to a simple calculator for converting among radiometric and photometric measures, as well as an evaluation of the safety considerations these very bright sources demand.

  7. [Erythemogenic UV rays].

    PubMed

    Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2011-07-01

    The UV-index is an international standard measurement of the strength of erythemogenic ultraviolet radiation. It is often published in the media and then refers to the highest expected UV radiation for that day. The highest UV-index value measured in Iceland is seven. Although this is similar to the maximum values from southern Scandinavia, the average UV-index is lower in Iceland compared to other Nordic countries. Around solar noon the UV index is roughly equivalent to the Standard Erythema Dose (SED). During a bright summer day in Iceland the number of Standard Erythema doses can go as high as 32, but is on average in June around twenty. The typical Icelander gets red after 4-6 SED and it is obvious that during solar noon it is easy to sunburn in Iceland if you stay outside without sun protection. PMID:21849709

  8. White LED motorcycle headlamp design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Shing

    2015-09-01

    The motorcycle headlamp is composed of a white LED module, an elliptical reflector, a parabolic reflector and a toric lens. We use non-sequential ray to improve the optical efficiency of the compound reflectors. Using the toric lens can meet ECE_113 regulation and obtain a good uniformity.

  9. Multicolor, High Efficiency, Nanotextured LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Jung Han; Arto Nurmikko

    2011-09-30

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and green for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the duration of the contract period include (i) heteroepitaxy of nitrogen-polar LEDs on sapphire, (ii) heteroepitaxy of semipolar (11{bar 2}2) green LEDs on sapphire, (iii) synthesis of quantum-dot loaded nanoporous GaN that emits white light without phosphor conversion, (iv) demonstration of the highest quality semipolar (11{bar 2}2) GaN on sapphire using orientation-controlled epitaxy, (v) synthesis of nanoscale GaN and InGaN medium, and (vi) development of a novel liftoff process for manufacturing GaN thin-film vertical LEDs. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  10. LED lamp power management system and method

    DOEpatents

    Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A. M.

    2013-03-19

    An LED lamp power management system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 reduces power loss in one of the channel switch 62 and the shunt switch 68 when LED lamp electronics power loss (P.sub.loss) exceeds an LED lamp electronics power loss limit (P.sub.lim); and each of the channel switches 62 receives a channel switch control signal 63 from the LED controller 58 and each of the shunt switches 68 receives a shunt switch control signal 69 from the LED controller 58.

  11. LED lamp color control system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A.M.

    2013-02-05

    An LED lamp color control system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; and a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 determines whether the LED source 80 is in a feedback controllable range, stores measured optical flux for the LED source 80 when the LED source 80 is in the feedback controllable range, and bypasses storing the measured optical flux when the LED source 80 is not in the feedback controllable range.

  12. UV, stress and aging.

    PubMed

    Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Leduc, Cedric; Verbeke, Alix; Toussaint, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Skin is a model of choice in studies on aging. Indeed, skin aging can be modulated by internal and external factors, reflecting its complexity. Two types of skin aging have been identified: intrinsic, mainly genetically determined and extrinsic-also called "photo-aging"-resulting on the impact of environmental stress and more precisely of UV rays. Simplified in vitro models, based on cellular senescence, have been developed to study the relationship between UV and aging. These models vary on the cell type (fibroblasts or keratinocytes, normal or immortalized) and the type of UV used (UVA or UVB). PMID:23467762

  13. Demonstration of transverse-magnetic deep-ultraviolet stimulated emission from AlGaN multiple-quantum-well lasers grown on a sapphire substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Hang E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu; Kao, Tsung-Ting; Satter, Md. Mahbub; Shen, Shyh-Chiang; Yoder, P. Douglas; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D. E-mail: dupuis@gatech.edu; Wei, Yong O.; Wang, Shuo; Xie, Hongen; Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate transverse-magnetic (TM) dominant deep-ultraviolet (DUV) stimulated emission from photo-pumped AlGaN multiple-quantum-well lasers grown pseudomorphically on an AlN/sapphire template by means of photoluminescence at room temperature. The TM-dominant stimulated emission was observed at wavelengths of 239, 242, and 243 nm with low thresholds of 280, 250, and 290 kW/cm{sup 2}, respectively. In particular, the lasing wavelength of 239 nm is shorter compared to other reports for AlGaN lasers grown on foreign substrates including sapphire and SiC. The peak wavelength difference between the transverse-electric (TE)-polarized emission and TM-polarized emission was approximately zero for the lasers in this study, indicating the crossover of crystal-field split-off hole and heavy-hole valence bands. The rapid variation of polarization between TE- and TM-dominance versus the change in lasing wavelength from 243 to 249 nm can be attributed to a dramatic change in the TE-to-TM gain coefficient ratio for the sapphire-based DUV lasers in the vicinity of TE-TM switch.

  14. High-performance AlGaN metal-semiconductor-metal solar-blind ultraviolet photodetectors by localized surface plasmon enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jin; Ye, Wei; Li, Yang; Qi, Zhiqiang; Dai, Jiangnan; Wu, Zhihao; Chen, Changqing; Yin, Jun; Li, Jing; Jiang, Hao; Fang, Yanyan

    2015-01-01

    AlGaN-based solar-blind ultraviolet photodetectors have attractive potential applications in the fields of missile plume detection, biochemical sensing, solar astronomy, etc. In this work, significant deep ultraviolet detection enhancement is demonstrated on AlGaN-based metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) solar-blind ultraviolet photodetectors by introducing the coupling of localized surface plasmon from Al nanoparticles with the high-Al-content AlGaN epilayer. The size-controlled Al nanoparticle arrays fabricated by nanosphere lithography can not only reduce the detectors' dark current but also bring about greatly enhanced responsivity. The peak responsivity of AlGaN-based MSM solar-blind ultraviolet photodetectors with Al nanoparticles can reach 2.34 A/W at 269 nm under 20 V bias, enhanced more than 25 times than that without Al nanoparticles. Our approach shows an efficient fabrication technique of high-performance and low-cost plasmonic enhanced AlGaN solar-blind MSM ultraviolet photodetectors.

  15. Measurement and simulation of top- and bottom-illuminated solar-blind AlGaN metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors with high external quantum efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel, Moritz Helbling, Markus; Knigge, Andrea; Brunner, Frank; Weyers, Markus

    2015-12-28

    A comprehensive study on top- and bottom-illuminated Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N/AlN metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors having different AlGaN absorber layer thickness is presented. The measured external quantum efficiency (EQE) shows pronounced threshold and saturation behavior as a function of applied bias voltage up to 50 V reaching about 50% for 0.1 μm and 67% for 0.5 μm thick absorber layers under bottom illumination. All experimental findings are in very good accordance with two-dimensional drift-diffusion modeling results. By taking into account macroscopic polarization effects in the hexagonal metal-polar +c-plane AlGaN/AlN heterostructures, new insights into the general device functionality of AlGaN-based MSM photodetectors are obtained. The observed threshold/saturation behavior is caused by a bias-dependent extraction of photoexcited holes from the Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N/AlN interface. While present under bottom illumination for any AlGaN layer thickness, under top illumination this mechanism influences the EQE-bias characteristics only for thin layers.

  16. Inhomogeneous distribution of defect-related emission in Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers with different Al content and Si concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Kurai, Satoshi Ushijima, Fumitaka; Yamada, Yoichi; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa

    2014-02-07

    The spatial distribution of luminescence in Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers that differ in Al content and Si concentration has been studied by cathodoluminescence (CL) mapping in combination with scanning electron microscopy. The density of surface hillocks increased with decreasing Al content and with increasing Si concentration. The mechanisms giving rise to those hillocks are likely different. The hillocks induced surface roughening, and the compositional fluctuation and local donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) emission at hillock edges in AlGaN epitaxial layers were enhanced irrespective of the origin of the hillocks. The intensity of local DAP emission was related to Si concentration, as well as to hillock density. CL observation revealed that DAP emission areas were present inside the samples and were likely related to dislocations concentrated at hillock edges. Possible candidates for acceptors in the observed DAP emission that are closely related in terms of both Si concentration and hillock edges with large deformations are a V{sub III}-Si{sub III} complex and Si{sub N}, which are unfavorable in ordinary III-nitrides.

  17. Two coexisting mechanisms of dislocation reduction in an AlGaN layer grown using a thin GaN interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, J.; Wang, T.; Parbrook, P. J.; Wang, Q.; Lee, K. B.; Cullis, A. G.

    2007-09-24

    A significant dislocation reduction is achieved in an AlGaN layer grown on an AlN buffer by introducing a thin GaN interlayer. The mechanisms for the dislocation reduction are explored by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The GaN interlayer grown on the AlN takes the form of platelets. The mechanisms of dislocation reduction in the platelet area and the area between the platelets are different. In the GaN platelets, due to the large misfit strain, the threading dislocations (TDs) in the AlN layer migrate into the interface and annihilate with each other. However, the GaN between the platelets is highly strained so that a higher density of TDs from AlN is incorporated into the upper layer. The coalescing of the platelets induced by the AlGaN growth makes the TDs in the areas between the platelets assemble and annihilate, resulting in additional dislocation reduction.

  18. Nanowire LEDs grown directly on flexible metal foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Brelon J.; Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; Myers, Roberto C.

    2016-04-01

    Using molecular beam epitaxy, self-assembled AlGaN nanowires are grown directly on Ta and Ti foils. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the nanowires are locally textured with the underlying metallic grains. Photoluminescence spectra of GaN nanowires grown on metal foils are comparable to GaN nanowires grown on single crystal Si wafers. Similarly, photoluminescence lifetimes do not vary significantly between these samples. Operational AlGaN light emitting diodes are grown directly on flexible Ta foil with an electroluminescence peak emission of ˜350 nm and a turn-on voltage of ˜5 V. These results pave the way for roll-to-roll manufacturing of solid state optoelectronics.

  19. Color-tunable photoluminescence phosphors of Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} co-doped Sr{sub 2}La{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} for UV w-LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Qingfeng; Liao, Libing Mei, Lefu; Liu, Haikun; Hai, Yun

    2015-05-15

    A series of new luminescent emission-tunable phosphors Sr{sub 2}La{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}:Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} with apatite structure have been synthesized by a high temperature solid-state reaction. The phase structure, photoluminescence emission and excitation spectra, lifetime, as well as the effect of Tb{sup 3+} concentration are investigated to characterize the resulting samples. The critical distance was calculated to be 8.26 Å by using the concentration quenching method. The intense green emission was observed in the Sr{sub 2}La{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}:Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} phosphors on the basis of the efficient energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+} with an efficiency of 68.55%. And a possible mechanism of the energy-transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+} ion is also proposed. The results indicate that Sr{sub 2}La{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}:Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} phosphors have potential applications to be used as near UV-convertible phosphors for white light-emitting diodes because of the broad excitation in the near-ultraviolet range and the efficient green emission light. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure and luminescence properties of Sr{sub 2}La{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+} phosphors have been discussed. - Highlights: • Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions entered both La sites in SLSO. • The energy transfer efficiency can reach at 68.55%. • The emitting color of SLSO phosphors shifted from the blue to green region.

  20. A comparison of the 60Co gamma radiation hardness, breakdown characteristics and the effect of SiN x capping on InAlN and AlGaN HEMTs for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.; O'Mahony, D.; Vitobello, F.; Muschitiello, M.; Costantino, A.; Barnes, A. R.; Parbrook, P. J.

    2016-02-01

    Electrical performance and stability of InAlN and AlGaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) subjected 9.1 mrad of 60Co gamma radiation and off-state voltage step-stressing until breakdown are reported. Comparison with commercially available production-level AlGaN HEMT devices, which showed negligible drift in DC performance throughout all experiments, suggests degradation mechanisms must be managed and suppressed through development of advanced epitaxial and surface passivation techniques in order to fully exploit the robustness of the III-nitride material system. Of the research level devices without dielectric layer surface capping, InAlN HEMTs exhibited the greater stability compared with AlGaN under off-state bias stressing and gamma irradiation in terms of their DC characteristics, although AlGaN HEMTs had significantly higher breakdown voltages. The effect of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition SiN x surface capping is explored, highlighting the sensitivity of InAlN HEMT performance to surface passivation techniques. InAlN-SiN x HEMTs suffered more from trap related degradation than AlGaN-SiN x devices in terms of radiation hardness and step-stress characteristics, attributed to an increased capturing of carriers in traps at the InAlN/SiN x interface.

  1. LED instrument approach instruction display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Kelly, W. L., IV; Crouch, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A display employing light emitting diodes (LED's) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for presenting landing and navigation information to reduce the workload of general aviation pilots during IFR flight. The display consists of a paper tape reader, digital memory, control electronics, digital latches, and LED alphanumeric displays. A presentable digital countdown clock-timer is included as part of the system to provide a convenient means of monitoring time intervals for precise flight navigation. The system is a limited capability prototype assembled to test pilot reaction to such a device under simulated IFR operation. Pilot opinion indicates that the display is helpful in reducing the IFR pilots workload when used with a runway approach plate. However, the development of a compact, low power second generation display was recommended which could present several instructions simultaneously and provide information update capability. A microprocessor-based display could fulfill these requirements.

  2. UV Completion of Axion

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kang-Sin

    2008-11-23

    A multiple number of global U(1)s, arising from accidental symmetries up to a certain order of the potential, enjoy lowering the axion decay constant from UV-scale and evading supersymmetric Fayet-Illiopoulos term constraints.

  3. Colorimetric characterization of LED luminaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, C. L. M.; Vieira, R. R.; Pereira, R. C.; Silva, P. V. M.; Oliveira, I. A. A.; Sardinha, A. S.; Viana, D. D.; Barbosa, A. H.; Souza, L. P.; Alvarenga, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    The Optical Metrology Division of Inmetro - National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology has recently started the colorimetric characterization of lamps by implementing Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) and Color Rendering Index (CRI) measurements of incandescent lamps, followed by the CFL, and LED lamps and luminaires. Here we present the results for the verification of the color characterization of samples of SSL luminaires for public as well as indoor illumination that are sold in Brazil.

  4. Luminescent ceramics for LED conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raukas, M.; Wei, G.; Bergenek, K.; Kelso, J.; Zink, N.; Zheng, Y.; Hannah, M.; Stough, M.; Wirth, R.; Linkov, A.; Jermann, F.; Eisert, D.

    2011-03-01

    Many LED-based applications would benefit from more efficient and/or high lumen output devices that enable usage in both white and single color illumination schemes. In the present article we briefly review the materials research history leading to optical ceramic converters and discuss their typical characteristics. Recently demonstrated high performance values in terms of efficacy and external quantum efficiency in orange (amber) spectral region are described.

  5. UV Signature Mutations †

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  6. UV signature mutations.

    PubMed

    Brash, Douglas E

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations—deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen—and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the nontranscribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; UV's nonsignature mutations may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  7. Digitally Alloyed Modulated Precursor Flow Epitaxial Growth of Ternary AlGaN with Binary AlN and GaN Sub-Layers and Observation of Compositional Inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Choi, Suk; Yoo, Dongwon; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Hawkridge, Michael E.; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Dupuis, Russell D.

    2010-05-01

    We report the growth of ternary aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) layers on AlN/sapphire template/substrates by digitally alloyed modulated precursor flow epitaxial growth (DA-MPEG), which combined an MPEG AlN sub-layer with a conventional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown GaN sub-layer. The overall composition in DA-MPEG Al x Ga1- x N was controlled by adjustment of the growth time (i.e., the thickness) of the GaN sub-layer. As the GaN sub-layer growth time increased, the Al composition in AlGaN decreased to 50%, but the surface morphology of the AlGaN layer became rough, and a three-dimensional structure with islands appeared for the DA-MPEG AlGaN with relatively thick GaN sub-layers, possibly resulting from the Ga adatom surface migration behavior and/or the strain built up from lattice mismatch between AlN and GaN sub-layers with increasing GaN sub-layer growth time. Through strain analysis by high-resolution x-ray diffraction, reciprocal space mapping, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, it was found that there was compositional inhomogeneity in the DA-MPEG AlGaN with AlN and GaN binary sub-layers for the case of the layer with relatively thick GaN sub-layers.

  8. Monitoring LED-induced carotenoid increase in grapes by Transmission Resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzálvez, Alicia G.; Martínez, Nerea L.; Telle, Helmut H.; Ureña, Ángel González

    2013-02-01

    Transmission Resonance Raman (TRR) spectroscopy combines increased signal-to-noise ratio with enhanced analytical sensibility. TRR was applied to directly monitor, without any sample preparation, the enhancement of β-carotene content in table grapes when they are irradiated by low power UV-LEDs. It was shown that, with respect to control samples, the carotenoid content in the grapes increased about five-fold, using UV-LED irradiation doses being two orders of magnitude lower than the maximum limit allowed by United States Food and Drug Administration. These promising results may pave the way for the development of easy, non-invasive techniques to improve food quality.

  9. Disinfection of Spacecraft Potable Water Systems by Photocatalytic Oxidation Using UV-A Light Emitting Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmele, Michele N.; O'Neal, Jeremy A.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has long been used in terrestrial water treatment systems for photodisinfection and the removal of organic compounds by several processes including photoadsorption, photolysis, and photocatalytic oxidation/reduction. Despite its effectiveness for water treatment, UV has not been explored for spacecraft applications because of concerns about the safety and reliability of mercury-containing UV lamps. However, recent advances in ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have enabled the utilization of nanomaterials that possess the appropriate optical properties for the manufacture of LEDs capable of producing monochromatic light at germicidal wavelengths. This report describes the testing of a commercial-off-the-shelf, high power Nichia UV-A LED (250mW A365nnJ for the excitation of titanium dioxide as a point-of-use (POD) disinfection device in a potable water system. The combination of an immobilized, high surface area photocatalyst with a UV-A LED is promising for potable water system disinfection since toxic chemicals and resupply requirements are reduced. No additional consumables like chemical biocides, absorption columns, or filters are required to disinfect and/or remove potentially toxic disinfectants from the potable water prior to use. Experiments were conducted in a static test stand consisting of a polypropylene microtiter plate containing 3mm glass balls coated with titanium dioxide. Wells filled with water were exposed to ultraviolet light from an actively-cooled UV-A LED positioned above each well and inoculated with six individual challenge microorganisms recovered from the International Space Station (ISS): Burkholderia cepacia, Cupriavidus metallidurans, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Wautersia basilensis. Exposure to the Nichia UV-A LED with photocatalytic oxidation resulted in a complete (>7-log) reduction of each challenge bacteria population in <180 minutes of contact

  10. DWD HYPERSENSITIVE TO UV-B 1 is negatively involved in UV-B mediated cellular responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Hani; Seo, Kyoung-In; Kim, Soon-Hee; Chung, Sunglan; Huang, Xi; Yang, Panyu; Deng, Xing Wang; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    Among T-DNA insertion mutants of various cullin4-RING ubiquitin E3 ligase (CRL4) substrate receptors, one mutant that exhibits enhanced sensitivity in response to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) illumination has been isolated and its corresponding gene has been named DWD HYPERSENSITIVE TO UV-B 1 (DHU1) in Arabidopsis. dhu1 lines showed much shorter hypocotyls than those in wild type under low doses of UV-B. Other light did not alter hypocotyl growth patterns in dhu1, indicating the hypersensitivity of dhu1 is restricted to UV-B. DHU1 was upregulated by more than two times in response to UV-B application of 1.5 μmol m(-2) s(-1), implying its possible involvement in UV-B signaling. DHU1 is able to bind to DDB1, an adaptor of CRL4; accordingly, DHU1 is thought to act as a substrate receptor of CRL4. Microarray data generated from wild-type and dhu1 under low doses of UV-B revealed that 209 or 124 genes were upregulated or downregulated by more than two times in dhu1 relative to wild type, respectively. About 23.4 % of the total upregulated genes in dhu1 were upregulated by more than five times in response to UV-B based on the AtGenExpress Visualization Tool data, while only about 1.4 % were downregulated to the same degree by UV-B, indicating that loss of DHU1 led to the overall enhancement of the upregulation of UV-B inducible genes. dhu1 also showed altered responsiveness under high doses of UV-B. Taken together, these findings indicate that DHU1 is a potent CRL4 substrate receptor that may function as a negative regulator of UV-B response in Arabidopsis. PMID:25193399

  11. UV actinometer film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.; Gupta, A.; Pitts, J.

    1980-01-01

    Cumulative UV radiation can be measured by low-cost polymer film that is unaffacted by visible light. Useful for virtually any surface, film can help paint and plastics manufacturers determine how well their products stand up against UV radiation. Actinometer film uses photochemically sensitive compound that changes its chemical composition in response to solar radiation. Extent of chemical conversion depends on length exposure and can be measured by examining film sample with spectrophotometer. Film can be exposed from several seconds up to month.

  12. Developing Successful International Faculty Led Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabregas Janeiro, Maria G.; Fabre, Ricardo Lopez; Rosete, Rodrigo Tello

    2012-01-01

    Faculty Led Programs are study abroad experiences led by university professors. Faculty Led Programs are considered as an opportunity for college students, especially in the United States to attend a short-term international experience (Mills, 2010). Faculty Led Program is an international experience which is different from the traditional…

  13. Influence of optical polarization on the improvement of light extraction efficiency from reflective scattering structures in AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wierer, J. J. Allerman, A. A.; Montaño, I.; Moseley, M. W.

    2014-08-11

    The improvement in light extraction efficiency from reflective scattering structures in AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UVLEDs) emitting at ∼270 nm is shown to be influenced by optical polarization. Three UVLEDs with different reflective scattering structures are investigated and compared to standard UVLEDs without scattering structures. The optical polarization and therefore the direction of light propagation within the various UVLEDs are altered by changes in the quantum well (QW) thickness. The improvement in light extraction efficiency of the UVLEDs with reflective scattering structures increases, compared to the UVLEDs without scattering structures, as the fraction of emitted light propagating parallel to the QW plane increases. Additionally, the light extraction efficiency increases as the average distance to the reflective scattering structures decreases.

  14. Migration enhanced lateral epitaxial overgrowth of AlN and AlGaN for high reliability deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, R.; Sun, W.; Yang, J.; Shatalov, M.; Hu, X.; Sattu, A.; Lunev, A.; Deng, J.; Shturm, I.; Bilenko, Y.; Gaska, R.; Shur, M. S.

    2008-08-01

    We report on the growth of low-defect thick films of AlN and AlGaN on trenched AlGaN/sapphire templates using migration enhanced lateral epitaxial overgrowth. Incoherent coalescence-related defects were alleviated by controlling the tilt angle of growth fronts and by allowing Al adatoms sufficient residence time to incorporate at the most energetically favorable lattice sites. Deep ultraviolet light emitting diode structures (310nm) deposited over fully coalesced thick AlN films exhibited cw output power of 1.6mW at 50mA current with extrapolated lifetime in excess of 5000hours. The results demonstrate substantial improvement in the device lifetime, primarily due to the reduced density of growth defects.

  15. [Research on the influence of LED temperature shifts on differential optical absorption spectroscopy for measuring NO2].

    PubMed

    Ling, Liu-Yi; Xie, Pin-Hua; Qin, Min; Zheng, Ni-Na; Ye, Cong-Lei; Li, Ang; Hu, Ren-Zhi

    2012-11-01

    Influences of LEDs (without etalon structure and center wavelengths are respectively 370 nm (near-UV), 452 nm (blue) and 660 nm(red)) temperature shifts on differential optical absorption spectroscopy(DOAS) for measuring NO2 were studied. NO2 absorption spectra were formed using LED emitting spectra at 10 degrees C. The measured LED spectra at other temperatures were used as reference spectra of DOAS. Thus, NO2 differential optical densities under different LED temperature shifts were acquired and then NO2 differential cross-sections were fitted to the acquired differential optical densities. From fitting results, the linear relations of 0.995, 0.945 and 0.989 correlation between delta of fitting residual and near-UV, blue and red LEDs temperature shifts were found and their slopes are respectively 1.12 x 10(-3), 5.25 x 10(-5) and 7.45 x 10(-4) degrees C(-1). The fitting results show that the influence of temperature shifts of blue LED on DOAS retrieval is negligible and the temperature shifts of near-UV and red LED are impressible to DOAS measurement resulting in degradation of detection sensitivity. The retrieval results of blue LED with and without etalon with similar temperature properties were compared and showed that etalon of LED will greatly increase the influence of temperature shifts of LED on DOAS retrieval. PMID:23387143

  16. Microscopic potential fluctuations in Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers with various AlN molar fractions and Si concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurai, Satoshi; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Yamada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscopic potential fluctuations of Si-doped AlGaN epitaxial layers with the AlN molar fraction varying from 0.42 to 0.95 and Si-doped Al0.61Ga0.39N epitaxial layers with Si concentrations of 3.0-37 × 1017 cm-3 were investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging combined with scanning electron microscopy. The spot CL linewidths of AlGaN epitaxial layers broadened as the AlN molar fraction was increased to 0.7, and then narrowed at higher AlN molar fractions. The experimental linewidths were compared with the theoretical prediction from the alloy broadening model. The trends displayed by our spot CL linewidths were consistent with calculated results at AlN molar fractions of less than about 0.60, but the spot CL linewidths were markedly broader than the calculated linewidths at higher AlN molar fractions. The dependence of the difference between the spot CL linewidth and calculated line broadening on AlN molar fraction was found to be similar to the dependence of reported S values, indicating that the vacancy clusters acted as the origin of additional line broadening at high AlN molar fractions. The spot CL linewidths of Al0.61Ga0.39N epitaxial layers with the same Al concentration and different Si concentrations were nearly constant in the entire Si concentration range tested. From the comparison of reported S values, the increase of VAl did not contribute to the linewidth broadening, unlike the case of the VAl clusters.

  17. Low temperature p-type doping of (Al)GaN layers using ammonia molecular beam epitaxy for InGaN laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Malinverni, M. Lamy, J.-M.; Martin, D.; Grandjean, N.; Feltin, E.; Dorsaz, J.; Castiglia, A.; Rossetti, M.; Duelk, M.; Vélez, C.

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate state-of-the-art p-type (Al)GaN layers deposited at low temperature (740 °C) by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-MBE) to be used as top cladding of laser diodes (LDs) with the aim of further reducing the thermal budget on the InGaN quantum well active region. Typical p-type GaN resistivities and contact resistances are 0.4 Ω cm and 5 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm{sup 2}, respectively. As a test bed, we fabricated a hybrid laser structure emitting at 400 nm combining n-type AlGaN cladding and InGaN active region grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, with the p-doped waveguide and cladding layers grown by NH{sub 3}-MBE. Single-mode ridge-waveguide LD exhibits a threshold voltage as low as 4.3 V for an 800 × 2 μm{sup 2} ridge dimension and a threshold current density of ∼5 kA cm{sup −2} in continuous wave operation. The series resistance of the device is 6 Ω and the resistivity is 1.5 Ω cm, confirming thereby the excellent electrical properties of p-type Al{sub 0.06}Ga{sub 0.94}N:Mg despite the low growth temperature.

  18. Are You UV Safe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capobianco, Brenda; Thiel, Elizabeth Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Students may be slathered with SPF 30 sunscreen all summer at the beach or pool, but what do they know about ultraviolet (UV) light radiation and absorption? The authors of this article found the perfect opportunity to help students find out the science behind this important health precaution, when they developed a series of practical strategies…

  19. Color tunable LED spot lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelen, C.; Ansems, J.; Deurenberg, P.; van Duijneveldt, W.; Peeters, M.; Steenbruggen, G.; Treurniet, T.; Valster, A.; ter Weeme, J. W.

    2006-08-01

    A new trend in illumination is to use dynamic light to set or dynamically vary the ambience of a room or office. For this we need color tunable spots that can reliably vary over at least a wide range of color temperatures, and preferably also more saturated colors. LEDs are in principle ideally suited for this application thanks to their nature of emitting light in a relatively narrow band. For color tunable spot lighting based on the concept of mixing RGB LED colors, the key results have been presented before. Limitations of these 3-intrinsic-color mixing systems with high color rendering properties are found in a limited operating temperature range due to wavelength shifts, a limited color temperature range, and a low maximum operating temperature due to a strong flux decrease with increasing temperature. To overcome these limitations, a 3-color R pcGB system with phosphor-converted red (R pc) and a 4-color RAGB system have been investigated. With both systems, a CRI of at least 80 can be maintained over the relevant color temperature range of approximately 2700 K to 6500 K. In this paper we compare these concepts on overall system aspects and report on the performance of prototype spot lamps. The main features of the RAGB and R pcGB spot lamp concepts can be summarized as: 1) The RAGB spot overcomes CRI and gamut shortcomings of RGB light sources and gives much freedom in wavelength selection, but suffers from temperature sensitivity and complex controls; 2) The R pcGB spot overcomes shortcomings concerning CRI and thermal dependence of RGB sources and enables relatively simple controls, but needs an improved overall red efficacy. With both color concepts, prototype spot lamps have been built. The amber to red emitting nitridosilicate-based phosphors can be wavelength-tuned for optimal performance, which is found at a peak emission around 610 nm for high color quality systems. This results in a simple and very robust system with good color consistency. For the

  20. Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Lahowe, D A; Vogtlin, G E; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    insulator to flash was earlier in time for the cathode-half beam illumination case than the anode-half illumination case which led us to believe that the flashover mechanism for the UV illumination is initiated from the cathode side of the insulator. Qualitatively stated, the testing revealed that the shielding of the cathode triple point against UV is more important than the anode triple junction in the design of vacuum insulators and electrodes. The goal of this work was to acquire empirical data on critical UV fluence (energy per unit area) required to induce surface flashover of vacuum insulators for some candid insulator materials: High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex. This work was a clarification and extension of studies performed by C.L. Enloe, et. al. in the 80's [1-3]. Additionally, to gain an understanding of the physical mechanism of flashover, we experimented with UV illumination of a portion of the insulator's surface near the cathode and subsequently near the anode. The results of these experiments are covered in detail.

  1. Action spectra for validation of pathogen disinfection in medium-pressure ultraviolet (UV) systems.

    PubMed

    Beck, Sara E; Wright, Harold B; Hargy, Thomas M; Larason, Thomas C; Linden, Karl G

    2015-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) reactors used for disinfecting water and wastewater must be validated and monitored over time. The validation process requires understanding the photochemical properties of the pathogens of concern and the challenge microorganisms used to represent them. Specifically for polychromatic UV systems, the organisms' dose responses to UV light and their sensitivity across the UV spectrum must be known. This research measured the UV spectral sensitivity, called action spectra, of Cryptosporidium parvum, and MS2, T1UV, Q Beta, T7, and T7m Coliphages, as well as Bacillus pumilus spores. A tunable laser from the National Institute of Standards and Technology was used to isolate single UV wavelengths at 10 nm intervals between 210 and 290 nm. Above 240 nm, all bacteria and viruses tested exhibited a relative peak sensitivity between 260 and 270 nm. Of the coliphage, MS2 exhibited the highest relative sensitivity below 240 nm, relative to its sensitivity at 254 nm, followed by Q Beta, T1UV, T7m and T7 coliphage. B. pumilus spores were more sensitive to UV light at 220 nm than any of the coliphage. These spectra are required for calculating action spectra correction factors for medium pressure UV system validation, for matching appropriate challenge microorganisms to pathogens, and for improving UV dose monitoring. Additionally, understanding the dose response of these organisms at multiple wavelengths can improve polychromatic UV dose calculations and enable prediction of pathogen inactivation from wavelength-specific disinfection technologies such as UV light emitting diodes (LEDs). PMID:25506761

  2. Portable tetracycline analyzer based on LED-excitation europium-sensitized luminescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A portable specific tetracycline (TC) analyzer was developed based on europium-sensitized luminescence (ESL) to perform field analysis. A 385 nm UV light emitting diode (LED) operated in pulsed mode is used as excitation source. In comparison to a conventional xenon flashlamp, its monochromatic em...

  3. Color temperature tunable white light LED system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speier, Ingo; Salsbury, Marc

    2006-08-01

    Efficient white light LED systems with continuously tunable color temperature (CT) over a range of 3000 K to 6500 K are reviewed. Typically, white light sources have a fixed CT and color rendering index (CRI). White light with user-specified color temperatures is currently generated by solid-state systems with red green blue ("R/G/B"), red green blue amber ("R/G/B/A"), and warm white cool white ("WW/CW") LED combinations, but their performance is suboptimal for architectural lighting applications. We propose and discuss an LED module with a combination of warm white, green and blue ("WW/G/B") LEDs. In this scenario, the white LEDs have fixed intensity, while the blue and green LED intensities are adjusted to shift the LED module chromaticity along the blackbody locus. We also propose and discuss an LED module with a combination of red, green, blue, and cool white ("R/G/B/CW") LEDs. The white LEDs still have a fixed intensity, while the intensities of the red, green, and blue LEDs are again adjusted to shift the LED module chromaticity along the blackbody locus. The white LEDs ensure that an improved CRI is maintained in comparison to a simple "R/G/B" solution.

  4. Comprehensive study of the electronic and optical behavior of highly degenerate p-type Mg-doped GaN and AlGaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Fabien, Chloe A. M.; Merola, Joseph J.; Clinton, Evan A.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Wang, Shuo; Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-01-01

    The bulk and 2-dimensional (2D) electrical transport properties of heavily Mg-doped p-type GaN films grown on AlN buffer layers by Metal Modulated Epitaxy are explored. Distinctions are made between three primary p-type conduction mechanisms: traditional valence band conduction, impurity band conduction, and 2D conduction within a 2D hole gas at a hetero-interface. The bulk and 2D contributions to the overall carrier transport are identified and the relative contributions are found to vary strongly with growth conditions. Films grown with III/V ratio less than 1.5 exhibit high hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 1019 cm-3 with effective acceptor activation energies of 51 meV. Films with III/V ratios greater than 1.5 exhibit lower overall hole concentrations and significant contributions from 2D transport at the hetero-interface. Films grown with III/V ratio of 1.2 and Mg concentrations exceeding 2 × 1020 cm-3 show no detectable inversion domains or Mg precipitation. Highly Mg-doped p-GaN and p-AlGaN with Al fractions up to 27% similarly exhibit hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 1019 cm-3. The p-GaN and p-Al0.11Ga0.89N films show broad ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence peaks, which intercept the valence band, supporting the presence of a Mg acceptor band. Finally, a multi-quantum-well light-emitting diode (LED) and p-i-n diode are grown, both of which demonstrate rectifying behavior with turn-on voltages of 3-3.5 V and series resistances of 6-10 Ω without the need for any post-metallization annealing. The LED exhibits violet-blue luminescence at 425 nm, while the p-i-n diode shows UV luminescence at 381 nm, and both devices still show substantial light emission even when submerged in liquid nitrogen at 77 K.

  5. Comprehensive study of the electronic and optical behavior of highly degenerate p-type Mg-doped GaN and AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Fabien, Chloe A. M.; Merola, Joseph J.; Clinton, Evan A.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Wang, Shuo; Fischer, Alec M.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-01-28

    The bulk and 2-dimensional (2D) electrical transport properties of heavily Mg-doped p-type GaN films grown on AlN buffer layers by Metal Modulated Epitaxy are explored. Distinctions are made between three primary p-type conduction mechanisms: traditional valence band conduction, impurity band conduction, and 2D conduction within a 2D hole gas at a hetero-interface. The bulk and 2D contributions to the overall carrier transport are identified and the relative contributions are found to vary strongly with growth conditions. Films grown with III/V ratio less than 1.5 exhibit high hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} with effective acceptor activation energies of 51 meV. Films with III/V ratios greater than 1.5 exhibit lower overall hole concentrations and significant contributions from 2D transport at the hetero-interface. Films grown with III/V ratio of 1.2 and Mg concentrations exceeding 2 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} show no detectable inversion domains or Mg precipitation. Highly Mg-doped p-GaN and p-AlGaN with Al fractions up to 27% similarly exhibit hole concentrations exceeding 2 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. The p-GaN and p-Al{sub 0.11}Ga{sub 0.89}N films show broad ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence peaks, which intercept the valence band, supporting the presence of a Mg acceptor band. Finally, a multi-quantum-well light-emitting diode (LED) and p-i-n diode are grown, both of which demonstrate rectifying behavior with turn-on voltages of 3–3.5 V and series resistances of 6–10 Ω without the need for any post-metallization annealing. The LED exhibits violet-blue luminescence at 425 nm, while the p-i-n diode shows UV luminescence at 381 nm, and both devices still show substantial light emission even when submerged in liquid nitrogen at 77 K.

  6. Comprehensive study of the electronic and optical behavior of highly degenerate p-type Mg-doped GaN and AlGaN

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, BP; Fabien, CAM; Merola, JJ; Clinton, EA; Doolittle, WA; Wang, S; Fischer, AM; Ponce, FA

    2015-01-28

    The bulk and 2-dimensional (2D) electrical transport properties of heavily Mg-doped p-type GaN films grown on AlN buffer layers by Metal Modulated Epitaxy are explored. Distinctions are made between three primary p-type conduction mechanisms: traditional valence band conduction, impurity band conduction, and 2D conduction within a 2D hole gas at a hetero-interface. The bulk and 2D contributions to the overall carrier transport are identified and the relative contributions are found to vary strongly with growth conditions. Films grown with III/V ratio less than 1.5 exhibit high hole concentrations exceeding 2 x 10(19) cm(-3) with effective acceptor activation energies of 51 meV. Films with III/V ratios greater than 1.5 exhibit lower overall hole concentrations and significant contributions from 2D transport at the hetero-interface. Films grown with III/V ratio of 1.2 and Mg concentrations exceeding 2 x 10(20) cm(-3) show no detectable inversion domains or Mg precipitation. Highly Mg-doped p-GaN and p-AlGaN with Al fractions up to 27% similarly exhibit hole concentrations exceeding 2 x 10(19) cm(-3). The p-GaN and p-Al0.11Ga0.89N films show broad ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence peaks, which intercept the valence band, supporting the presence of a Mg acceptor band. Finally, a multi-quantum-well light-emitting diode (LED) and p-i-n diode are grown, both of which demonstrate rectifying behavior with turn-on voltages of 3-3.5V and series resistances of 6-10 Omega without the need for any post-metallization annealing. The LED exhibits violet-blue luminescence at 425 nm, while the p-i-n diode shows UV luminescence at 381 nm, and both devices still show substantial light emission even when submerged in liquid nitrogen at 77 K. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  7. Research on APD-based non-line-of-sight UV communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongyang; Wang, Ling; Li, Chao; Zhang, Wenjing; Yuan, Yonggang; Xu, Jintong; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiangyang

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, specific issues in designing an avalanche photodiode (APD)-based non-line-of-sight (NLOS) ultraviolet (UV) communication system are investigated. A proper wavelength of the UV LEDs and a system configuration should be considered carefully to assure the feasibility of this system. Using the single scattering model, the received optical power at the sensitive area of the APD can be calculated. According to the calculation, it revealed that the scattered ultraviolet signal level was very low; therefore, a post signal processing circuit was necessary. The authors put forward the key components of the circuit based on the compromise between signal bandwidth and gain. The performance of this circuit was evaluated by means of software simulation, and continued work was involved to improve its signal noise ratio (SNR). The transmitter used in this system was 365 nm UV LED array. Strictly speaking, this was not the practical outdoor UV communication system. Since the scattering coefficient of 365 nm UV only drops a little compared with solar blind UV, the research-grade UV communication could be carried out in a darkroom without a great influence. By combining an APD with a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) optical system, the effective collection area and field of view (FOV) of the detector could be adjusted. Several issues were also raised to improve the performance of UV communication system, including using more powerful UV LEDs and choosing suitable modulation schemes.

  8. Multiple functional UV devices based on III-Nitride quantum wells for biological warfare agent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Savage, Susan; Persson, Sirpa; Noharet, Bertrand; Junique, Stéphane; Andersson, Jan Y.; Liuolia, Vytautas; Marcinkevicius, Saulius

    2009-02-01

    We have demonstrated surface normal detecting/filtering/emitting multiple functional ultraviolet (UV) optoelectronic devices based on InGaN/GaN, InGaN/AlGaN and AlxGa1-xN/AlyGa1-yN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures with operation wavelengths ranging from 270 nm to 450 nm. Utilizing MQW structure as device active layer offers a flexibility to tune its long cut-off wavelength in a wide UV range from solar-blind to visible by adjusting the well width, well composition and barrier height. Similarly, its short cut-off wavelength can be adjusted by using a GaN or AlGaN block layer on a sapphire substrate when the device is illuminated from its backside, which further provides an optical filtering effect. When a current injects into the device under forward bias the device acts as an UV light emitter, whereas the device performs as a typical photodetector under reverse biases. With applying an alternating external bias the device might be used as electroabsorption modulator due to quantum confined Stark effect. In present work fabricated devices have been characterized by transmission/absorption spectra, photoresponsivity, electroluminescence, and photoluminescence measurements under various forward and reverse biases. The piezoelectric effect, alloy broadening and Stokes shift between the emission and absorption spectra in different InGaN- and AlGaN-based QW structures have been investigated and compared. Possibilities of monolithic or hybrid integration using such multiple functional devices for biological warfare agents sensing application have also be discussed.

  9. UV curable materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.G.

    1996-12-01

    Adhesives, coatings, and inks were selected for evaluation based on literature search and possible production applications. A differential photocalorimeter was used to measure degree of cure and allow prediction of optimum processing conditions. UV cure equipment were characterized and the ability to size equipment to specific materials cure needs established. Adhesion tests procedures were developed for the adhesives and solvent resistance testing procedures developed for the coatings and inks.

  10. uv preilluminated gas switches

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, L.P.; Orham, E.L.; Stowers, I.F.; Braucht, J.R.

    1980-06-03

    We have designed, built, and characterized uv preilluminated gas switches for a trigger circuit and a low inductance discharge circuit. These switches have been incorporated into a 54 x 76 x 150 cm pulser module to produce a 1 Ma output current rising at 5 x 10/sup 12/ amps/sec with 1 ns jitter. Twenty such modules will be used on the Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser System for plasma retropulse shutters.

  11. Alloy inhomogeneity and carrier localization in AlGaN sections and AlGaN/AlN nanodisks in nanowires with 240–350 nm emission

    SciTech Connect

    Himwas, C.; Hertog, M. den; Dang, Le Si; Songmuang, R.; Monroy, E.

    2014-12-15

    We present structural and optical studies of AlGaN sections and AlGaN/AlN nanodisks (NDs) in nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The Al-Ga intermixing at Al(Ga)N/GaN interfaces and the chemical inhomogeneity in AlGaN NDs evidenced by scanning transmission electron microscopy are attributed to the strain relaxation process. This interpretation is supported by the three-dimensional strain distribution calculated by minimizing the elastic energy in the structure. The alloy inhomogeneity increases with the Al content, leading to enhanced carrier localization signatures in the luminescence characteristics, i.e., red shift of the emission, s-shaped temperature dependence, and linewidth broadening. Despite these effects, the emission energy of AlGaN/AlN NDs can be tuned in the 240–350 nm range with internal quantum efficiencies around 30%.

  12. LEDs for Street Lighting—Here Today

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-29

    Fact sheet that provides a brief overview of the viability of LED street lighting in municipalities and highlights case studies of two cities—Los Angeles and Seattle—that have invested in LED street lighting.

  13. UV communications channel modeling incorporating multiple scattering interactions.

    PubMed

    Drost, Robert J; Moore, Terrence J; Sadler, Brian M

    2011-04-01

    In large part because of advancements in the design and fabrication of UV LEDs, photodetectors, and filters, significant research interest has recently been focused on non-line-of-sight UV communication systems. This research in, for example, system design and performance prediction, can be greatly aided by accurate channel models that allow for the reproducibility of results, thus facilitating the fair and consistent comparison of different communication approaches. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive derivation of a multiple-scattering Monte Carlo UV channel model, addressing weaknesses in previous treatments. The resulting model can be used to study the contribution of different orders of scattering to the path loss and impulse response functions associated with general UV communication system geometries. Simulation results are provided that demonstrate the benefit of this approach. PMID:21478967

  14. Transverse effects in UV FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Small, D.W.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    In an ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL), the electron beam size can be approximately the same as the optical mode size. The performance of a UV FEL is studied including the effect of emittance, betatron focusing, and external focusing of the electron beam on the transverse optical mode. The results are applied to the Industrial Laser Consortium`s UV FEL.

  15. Status update of the WSO-UV project in 2012: The Spanish participation in WSO-UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez de Castro, A. I.; Sestito, P.; Sanchez Doreste, N.; López-Martínez, F.; Seijas, J.; Rodríguez, P.; Gómez, M.; Lozano, J. M.; Shustov, B.; Sachkov, M.; Moisheev, A.

    2013-05-01

    The World Space Observatory-Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) is a space telescope developed to guarantee access to the ultraviolet range (1150-3200 Å) in the post Hubble Space Telescope (HST) epoch. WSO-UV is a medium size scientific mission with a telescope of 170 cm primary diameter, equipped with instrumentation for astronomical imaging and spectroscopy. It will be in a geosynchronous orbit ideally suited for monitoring programs and the observation of weak UV sources. Its expected lifetime is 5+5 years with foreseen launch date at the beginning of 2016. The project has entered into phase C. WSO-UV is a Russian led program. Spain contributes to it with the imaging and slitless spectroscopy instrument (ISSIS) as well as a fraction of the ground segment development and operation. This article summarizes the current status of the project as presented in the Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society.

  16. Key inventions in the history of nitride-based blue LED and LD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasaki, Isamu

    2007-03-01

    It was quite difficult to grow high quality single crystals of nitrides and impossible to control their electric conduction. These problems prevented the development of nitride-based devices for many years. In 1986, a dramatic improvement in the crystalline quality of GaN was achieved by use of low-temperature-deposited (LT) buffer layer technology in metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. In 1989, the high quality GaN enabled us to produce p-type conduction in nitrides and to control the conductivity of n-type nitrides. These achievements led to the invention of the world's first GaN p-n junction blue/UV LED in 1989. Room temperature UV stimulated emission, which is indispensable for laser operation, was also achieved in 1990 by use of high quality GaN films grown with the LT-buffer layers. These breakthroughs inspired nitride researchers around the world to greater efforts, and eventually led to the commercialization of high-performance blue LEDs and long-life violet LDs as well as the development of nitride-based devices such as high-speed transistors. Furthermore, unique properties such as a large piezoelectric effect were also clarified due to the marked improvements in crystal quality of nitrides. In this paper, key inventions during the development of nitride-based blue LED and LD are reviewed and a recent advance in UV devices is also described.

  17. Enhanced light extraction from UV LEDs using spin-on glass microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chi-Min; Su, Guo-Dung J.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a cost-effective method for fabricating spin-on glass (SOG) microlens arrays (MLAs) on ultra-violet light-emitting diodes. The SOG MLA is formed using thermal reflow molds and multiple replication processes, which can reduce the cost of the solution process. In this paper, we fabricate SOG MLA of different sizes, where the diameter of each microlens is approximately 50, 100, 150, and 200 μm. In each case, the light extraction efficiency is improved by 21.86%, 14.01%, 10.35%, and 7.31%, respectively. We also discuss the effects of different-shaped SOG microlenses, namely circular, square, and hexagonal. The light extraction efficiency is improved by 7.31%, 9.60%, and 13.80% for the circular, square, and hexagonal SOG MLAs, respectively. By applying an optimized lens pattern, an increase in light extraction efficiency of 21.86% is achieved.

  18. UV-B Perception and Acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chappuis, Richard; Allorent, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Plants perceive UV-B, an intrinsic component of sunlight, via a signaling pathway that is mediated by the photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and induces UV-B acclimation. To test whether similar UV-B perception mechanisms exist in the evolutionarily distant green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we identified Chlamydomonas orthologs of UVR8 and the key signaling factor CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1). Cr-UVR8 shares sequence and structural similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana UVR8, has conserved tryptophan residues for UV-B photoreception, monomerizes upon UV-B exposure, and interacts with Cr-COP1 in a UV-B-dependent manner. Moreover, Cr-UVR8 can interact with At-COP1 and complement the Arabidopsis uvr8 mutant, demonstrating that it is a functional UV-B photoreceptor. Chlamydomonas shows apparent UV-B acclimation in colony survival and photosynthetic efficiency assays. UV-B exposure, at low levels that induce acclimation, led to broad changes in the Chlamydomonas transcriptome, including in genes related to photosynthesis. Impaired UV-B-induced activation in the Cr-COP1 mutant hit1 indicates that UVR8-COP1 signaling induces transcriptome changes in response to UV-B. Also, hit1 mutants are impaired in UV-B acclimation. Chlamydomonas UV-B acclimation preserved the photosystem II core proteins D1 and D2 under UV-B stress, which mitigated UV-B-induced photoinhibition. These findings highlight the early evolution of UVR8 photoreceptor signaling in the green lineage to induce UV-B acclimation and protection. PMID:27020958

  19. Dual LED/incandescent security fixture

    DOEpatents

    Gauna, Kevin Wayne

    2005-06-21

    A dual LED and incandescent security lighting system uses a hybrid approach to LED illumination. It combines an ambient LED illuminator with a standard incandescent lamp on a motion control sensor. The LED illuminator will activate with the onset of darkness (daylight control) and typically remain on during the course of the night ("always on"). The LED illumination, typically amber, is sufficient to provide low to moderate level lighting coverage to the wall and ground area adjacent to and under the fixture. The incandescent lamp is integrated with a motion control circuit and sensor. When movement in the field of view is detected (after darkness), the incandescent lamp is switched on, providing an increased level of illumination to the area. Instead of an "always on" LED illuminator, the LEDs may also be switched off when the incandescent lamp is switched on.

  20. UV-Excited Fluorescence of Rocks in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisk, M. R.; Pommerenck, J.; Watkins-Brandt, K.; Edgett, K. S.; Minitti, M. E.; Hardgrove, C. J.; Popa, R.; Goetz, W.; Cloutis, E.; Nixon, B.; Kennedy, M. R.; Treiman, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Curiosity, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, landed in Gale crater in 2012. The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on Curiosity's robotic arm, can be placed as close as 0.2 cm from targets. At this distance it has a pixel scale of ~13 µm/pixel. MAHLI usually images in daylight, but light emitting diodes (LEDs) located around the lens make nighttime imaging possible. Two of the six LEDs produce 365 nm long wave UV and near-UV light and small amounts of green and red light. On Mars MAHLI has taken images of UV-illuminated rocks, drill tailings, and a fluorescent calibration standard. In a lab test bed we took images of UV-illuminated terrestrial minerals. The test bed UV LEDs are equivalent to those on MAHLI. Fluorescence in the test bed was inferred when the color of the mineral in UV light was shifted from the color of the reflected incident UV light on non-fluorescing targets. We demonstrate this shift with terrestrial minerals: willemite (ZnSiO4) is green, fluorite (CaF2) is blue, fluorapatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) is yellow, and (some) calcites are red (Figure). Bassanite (CaSO4•½H2O) has been identified in sedimentary rock in Gale, and under long wave UV illumination, terrestrial bassanite fluoresces blue. In addition to bassanite, fluorite and apatite are candidate minerals in Gale crater. Portions of a bassanite-bearing target in Gale appear to fluoresce blue under MAHLI UV illumination. Adjacent to the bassanite is a dark mineral that yields a signal with more blue and less red and green than the bassanite suggesting a second fluorescing mineral. If these findings are supported by additional MAHLI and test bed measurements, then this will be the first fluorescence detection of its kind on Mars. This will be a step toward using UV light for the detection of organic compounds as has been proposed for the Mars 2020 mission.

  1. Autofluorescence detection using UV diode laser simultaneous excitation of multiple wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Geoffrey A.; DeFreez, Richard K.

    2003-09-01

    America faces the threat of biological attack. Stopping such attacks requires the fast detection of pathogens. Fluorescence of key biological substances provides a real-time technique for detecting airborne pathogens. Pacific Scientific Instruments has already demonstrated that Bioni, a bio-aerosol sensor based on a CW UV-emitting AlGaN diode laser, can detect within seconds the dispersal of threat organisms in postal sorting facilities and other settings. Minimization of false positives is especially important in bio-threat detection, since false positives can lead to undue public alarm, stoppages of work, and costly clean-ups. Although Bioni has proven itself as a fast and sensitive trigger, its selectivity is limited by its single-wavelength excitation and single-band fluorescence detection. In this paper, we describe the development of BioLert, which uses simultaneous excitation and detection at multiple wavelengths to improve specificity and guard against false positives. Initial experimental results on the detection of individual spores of Bacillus globigii (BG), as well as discrimination against inert aerosols, will be discussed.

  2. Eu2+/Eu3+-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics with LaF3 for white LED color conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Hun; Bae, Suk-Rok; Choi, Yong Gyu; Chung, Woon Jin

    2015-03-01

    SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3-LaF3 glasses doped with Eu2+ and Eu3+ were synthesized to realize an inorganic color converter for white LED using 400 nm UV LED. Among various rare earth ions, Eu2+ and Eu3+ showed prominent emission under 400 nm LED excitation. Carbon and EuF3 content were varied to control the ratio of Eu2+ and Eu3+ during the melting process. When the ratio of Eu2+ and Eu3+ within the glass matrix was properly controlled, color coordinates of the photoluminescence spectra could be adjusted to make white colors under 400 nm LED excitation. The emission intensity was increased with subsequent heat treatment which led to the formation of LaF3 nano-crystals. However, almost no conversion was observed when the glasses were actually mounted on UV-LED to make a white LED. Heavy crystallization of the oxyfluoride glasses was thus investigated to improve its scattering of the light source and color conversion efficiency, and its practical feasibility as an inorganic UV-LED color converter was demonstrated.

  3. Uvs Nuur, Mongolia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Uvs Nuur Basin in Mongolia and the Russian Federation is the northernmost of the enclosed basins of Central Asia. It takes its name from Uvs Nuur Lake, a large, shallow and very saline lake, very important for migrating birds. Inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003, the site is made up of twelve protected areas representing major biomes of eastern Eurasia. The steppe ecosystem supports a rich diversity of birds and the desert is home to a number of rare gerbil, jerboas and the marbled polecat. The mountains are an important refuge for the endangered snow leopard, mountain sheep, and the Asiatic ibex.

    The image covers an area of 46 x 47.8 km, was acquired on September 4, 2001, and is located near 50.3 degrees north latitude, 90.7 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  4. UV Ozone Treatment for Improving Contact Resistance on Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chung Wei; Ren, F.; Chi, G.C.; Hung, S. C.; Huang, Y. P.; Kim, J.; Kravchenko, Ivan I

    2012-01-01

    Optimized UV ozone cleaning of graphene layers on SiO2/Si substrates is shown to improve contact resistance of e-beam evaporated Ti/Au contacts by three orders of magnitude (3x10-6 -cm2) compared to untreated surfaces (4x10-3 -cm2). Subsequent annealing at 300 C lowers the minimum value achieved to 7x10-7 -cm2. Ozone exposure beyond an optimum time (6 mins in these experiments) led to a sharp increase in sheet resistance of the graphene, producing degraded contact resistance. The UV ozone treatment is a simple and effective method for producing high quality contacts to graphene.

  5. Miniature LED endoilluminators for vitreoretinal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessling, M.; Koelbl, P. S.; Lingenfelder, C.; Koch, F.

    2015-07-01

    Two innovative approaches for intraocular illumination during vitreoretinal surgery by application of white LEDs are being developed. Both techniques are less harmful to the patient, more convenient for the surgeon and smaller and cheaper compared to conventional illumination by Xenon light sources and optical fibers. These two novel approaches are: I) The miniature LED chandelier endoilluminator consisting of a single white LED with a "light probe" on top of the LED housing that fits in a small incision in the wall of the eye. II) The alternative transscleral LED endoilluminator is integrated into an eye speculum that presses the flat LED top against the eye. The intraocular space is only illuminated by light transmitted through the sclera. In contrast to conventional illumination techniques for vitreoretinal surgery no incision is necessary. Both approaches are evaluated with regard to potential photochemical and thermal risks for the patient's retina and they are tested on porcine eyes.

  6. Flat detector ghost image reduction by UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeren, Rudolph M.; Steinhauser, Heidrun; Alving, Lex; Stouten, Hans; de With, Peter H. N.

    2009-02-01

    We study flat detectors for X-ray imaging performance degradation. In cone beam C-arm-CT, memory effects have a detrimental effect on image quality. Depending on the magnitude and history of irradiance differences, detector sensitivity variations may persist for a long period of time (days) and are visible as rings upon 3D reconstruction. A new method is proposed for reducing memory effects produced in CsI:Tl based Flat Detector X-ray imaging, which is based upon trap-filling by UV-light. For experiments, a commercial detector has been modified such that UV back-lighting is accomplished. A regular LED refresh light array for reducing photodiode temporal effects is interleaved with UV LED sub-arrays of different wavelengths in the near UV range. The array irradiates the scintillator through translucent parts of the detector substrate. In order to assess the efficacy of the method, ghost images are imprinted by well-defined transitions between direct radiation and attenuated or shuttered radiation. As an advantage, the new method accomplishes ghost-prevention, either by (1) continuous trap-filling at image-synchronous UV light pulsing, or (2) by applying a single dose of UV light. As a result, ring artefacts in reconstructed 3D-images are reduced to low levels. An effective wavelength has been found and an equilibrium UV dosage could be set for effective trap-filling. The overall sensitivity of the detector increases at saturated trap-filling. It was found that with optimised detector settings, i.e. optimum saturated trap-filling, the dependence on X-ray irradiation levels is low, so that the usage of the detector and its performance is robust.

  7. Nurse-led treatment for occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Pike, Denise; Amphlett, Alexander; Weatherby, Stuart

    Occipital neuralgia is a headache resulting from dysfunction of the occipital nerves. Medically resistant occipital neuralgia is treated by greater occipital nerve injection, which is traditionally performed by neurologists. A nurse-led clinic was developed to try to improve the service. Patient feedback showed that the clinic was positively perceived by patients, with most stating the nurse-led model was more efficient than the previous one, which had been led by consultants. PMID:26455130

  8. System Reliability for LED-Based Products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J Lynn; Mills, Karmann; Lamvik, Michael; Yaga, Robert; Shepherd, Sarah D; Bittle, James; Baldasaro, Nick; Solano, Eric; Bobashev, Georgiy; Johnson, Cortina; Evans, Amy

    2014-04-07

    Results from accelerated life tests (ALT) on mass-produced commercially available 6” downlights are reported along with results from commercial LEDs. The luminaires capture many of the design features found in modern luminaires. In general, a systems perspective is required to understand the reliability of these devices since LED failure is rare. In contrast, components such as drivers, lenses, and reflector are more likely to impact luminaire reliability than LEDs.

  9. Liquid explosive detection using near infrared LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itozaki, Hideo; Ito, Shiori; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Miyato, Yuji

    2015-10-01

    A bottle scanner to detect liquid explosive has been developed using technologies of near infrared. Its detection rate of liquid explosive is quite high and its false alarm rate of safe liquids quite low. It uses a light source with wide spectrum such as a halogen lamp. Recently a variety of LEDs have been developed and some of them have near infrared spectrum. Here a near infrared LED is tested as a light source of the liquid explosive detector. Three infrared LEDs that have a main peak of spectrum at 901nm, 936nm, and 1028 nm have been used as a light source to scan liquids. Spectrum widths of these LEDs are quite narrow typically less than 100 nm. Ten typical liquids have been evaluated by these LEDs and the correlation coefficients of a spectrum by an LED and a tungsten lamp were more than 0.98. This experiment shows that the infrared LED can be used as a light source for the liquid scanner. An LED has some merits, such as long life of more than some ten thousand hours and small consumption electric power of less than 0.2 W. When the LED is used as a light source for the liquid scanner, it is also more compact and handy.

  10. Solid State Lighting LED Manufacturing Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-03-31

    Summary of a meeting of LED experts to develop proposed priority tasks for the Manufacturing R&D initiative, including task descriptions, discussion points, recommendations, and presentation highlights.

  11. Blue LEDs feasibility for tissue fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dets, Sergiy M.; Denisov, Nikolay A.

    2000-04-01

    We considered the limited number of light-induced fluorescence applications for marketed ultra-bright blue LEDs where they can compete with versatile laser sources. Satisfactory optical output and miniature size as well as low power consumption of blue LEDs emitting at 470 nm allow to consider them as a promising alternatives to metal vapor or gas lasers used in many expires LIF applications. Available to authors LEDs form Hewlett-Packard, Micro Electronics Corp., Nichia Chemical Industries Ltd. and Toyoda Gosei Co. were tested to comply with demands to a tissue excitation source for portable spectroscopes. The optical performance of LEDs has shown that selected group of InGaN LEDs could be successfully used for that. The miniature illuminator that includes LED, focusing condenser, filter set and distal fiberoptic light concentrator was designed and tested in conjunction with portable CCD- equipped spectroscope. Operating in dark condition the proposed LED illuminator provides the level of fluorescence signal sufficient to detect spectral abnormalities in human Caucasian skin and excised gastrointestinal samples. All tissue autofluorescence data taken under LED illumination were compared with readings under He-Cd laser excitation and showed a good match. A new diagnostic designs based on LEDs were considered for clinical use.

  12. Color Degradation of Textiles with Natural Dyes and of Blue Scale Standards Exposed to White LED Lamps:Evaluation of White LED Lamps for Effectiveness as Museum Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Mie; Moriyama, Takayoshi; Toda, Masahiro; Kohmoto, Kohtaro; Saito, Masako

    White light-emitting diodes (LED) are well suited for museum lighting because they emit neither UV nor IR radiation, which damage artifacts. The color degradation of natural dyes and blue scale standards (JIS L 0841) by white LED lamps are examined, and the performance of white LED lamps for museum lighting is evaluated. Blue scale standard grades 1-6 and silk fabrics dyed with 22 types of natural dyes classified as mid to highly responsive in a CIE technical report (CIE157:2004) were exposed to five types of white LED lamps using different luminescence methods and color temperatures. Color changes were measured at each 15000 lx·hr (500 lx at fabric surface × 300 hr) interval ten times. The accumulated exposure totaled 150000 lx·hr. The data on conventional white LED lamps and previously reported white fluorescent (W) and museum fluorescent (NU) lamps was evaluated. All the white LED lamps showed lower fading rates compared with a W lamp on a blue scale grade 1. The fading rate of natural dyes in total was the same between an NU lamp (3000 K) and a white LED lamp (2869 K). However, yellow natural dyes showed higher fading rates with the white LED lamp. This tendency is due to the high power characteristic of the LED lamp around 400-500 nm, which possibly contributes to the photo-fading action on the dyes. The most faded yellow dyes were Ukon (Curcuma longa L.) and Kihada (Phellodendron amurense Rupr.), and these are frequently used in historic artifacts such as kimono, wood-block prints, and scrolls. From a conservation point of view, we need to continue research on white LED lamps for use in museum lighting.

  13. Comparison of milk oxidation by exposure to LED and fluorescent light.

    PubMed

    Brothersen, C; McMahon, D J; Legako, J; Martini, S

    2016-04-01

    Light-induced oxidation of milk has been well studied. Exposure of milk to UV light facilitates the oxidation of fats to aldehydes, and the degradation of sulfur-containing amino acids, both of which contribute to off-flavors. In addition, vitamin A and riboflavin are easily degraded by UV light. These reactions occur rapidly and are exacerbated by bright fluorescent lights in retail dairy cases. The invention of white light-emitting diodes (LED) may provide a solution to this oxidation problem. In this study, fresh milk containing 1% fat and fortified with vitamin A and riboflavin was exposed to LED at 4,000 lx, or fluorescent light at 2,200 lx for 24 h. Milk samples exposed to LED or fluorescent light, as well as milk protected from light, were analyzed by a consumer acceptance panel, and a trained flavor panel. In addition, vitamin A, riboflavin, and the production of volatile compounds were quantified. Exposure to light resulted in a reduction of cooked/sweet, milkfat, and sweet flavors and increased the intensity of butterscotch, cardboard, and astringency. In general, exposure to fluorescent light resulted in greater changes in the milk than exposure to LED even though the LED was at higher intensity. Consumers were able detect off-flavors in milk exposed to fluorescent light after 12 h and LED after 24 h of exposure. The riboflavin and vitamin A content was reduced by exposure to fluorescent light, whereas there was no significant reduction caused by LED compared with the non-light-exposed control. Production of hexanal, heptanal, 2-heptanal, octanal, 2-octanal nonanal, dimethyl sulfide, and caproic acid vinyl ester from the light-induced degradation of fats was significantly higher with fluorescent than LED. Production of these compounds was significantly higher with both light treatments than in the control milk. This study indicates that LED is less destructive to milk than fluorescent light. PMID:26874418

  14. Micro UV detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabalo, Jerry B.; Sickenberger, Richard; Underwood, William J.; Sickenberger, David W.

    2004-09-01

    A lightweight, tactical biological agent detection network offers the potential for a detect-to-warn capability against biological aerosol attacks. Ideally, this capability can be achieved by deploying the sensors upwind from the protected assets. The further the distance upwind, the greater the warning time. The technological challenge to this concept is the biological detection technology. Here, cost, size and power are major factors in selecting acceptable technologies. This is in part due to the increased field densities needed to cover the upwind area and the fact that the sensors, when deployed forward, must operate autonomously for long periods of time with little or no long-term logistical support. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency"s (DARPA) Solid-state Ultraviolet Optical Source (SUVOS) program offers an enabling technology to achieving a detector compatible with this mission. As an optical source, these devices emit excitation wavelengths known to be useful in the detection of biological aerosols. The wavelength band is absorbed by the biological aerosol and results in visible fluorescence. Detection of a biological aerosol is based on the observed intensity of this fluorescence signal compared to a background reference. Historically this has been accomplished with emission sources that are outside the boundaries for low cost, low power sensors. The SUVOS technology, on the other hand, provides the same basic wavelengths needed for the detection process in a small, low power package. ECBC has initiated an effort to develop a network array based on micro UV detectors that utilize the SUVOS technology. This paper presents an overview of the micro UV detector and some of the findings to date. This includes the overall design philosophy, fluid flow calculations to maximize presentation of aerosol particles to the sources, and the fluorescence measurements.

  15. Micro-UV detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabalo, Jerry B.; Sickenberger, Richard; Underwood, William J.; Sickenberger, David W.

    2004-12-01

    A lightweight, tactical biological agent detection network offers the potential for a detect-to-warn capability against biological aerosol attacks. Ideally, this capability can be achieved by deploying the sensors upwind from the protected assets. The further the distance upwind, the greater the warning time. The technological challenge to this concept is the biological detection technology. Here, cost, size and power are major factors in selecting acceptable technologies. This is in part due to the increased field densities needed to cover the upwind area and the fact that the sensors, when deployed forward, must operate autonomously for long periods of time with little or no long-term logistical support. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency"s (DARPA) Solid-state Ultraviolet Optical Source (SUVOS) program offers an enabling technology to achieving a detector compatible with this mission. As an optical source, these devices emit excitation wavelengths known to be useful in the detection of biological aerosols. The wavelength band is absorbed by the biological aerosol and results in visible fluorescence. Detection of a biological aerosol is based on the observed intensity of this fluorescence signal compared to a background reference. Historically this has been accomplished with emission sources that are outside the boundaries for low cost, low power sensors. The SUVOS technology, on the other hand, provides the same basic wavelengths needed for the detection process in a small, low power package. ECBC has initiated an effort to develop a network array based on micro UV detectors that utilize the SUVOS technology. This paper presents an overview of the micro UV detector and some of the findings to date. This includes the overall design philosophy, fluid flow calculations to maximize presentation of aerosol particles to the sources, and the fluorescence measurements.

  16. Growth of high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates using a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianpeng; Yang, Xuelin; Sang, Ling; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jiaming; He, Chenguang; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Maojun; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Qin, Zhixin; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    By employing a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition, high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures have been successfully grown on Si substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The heterostructures exhibit a high electron mobility of 2150 cm(2)/Vs with an electron density of 9.3 × 10(12) cm(-2). The sheet resistance is 313 ± 4 Ω/◻ with ±1.3% variation. The high uniformity is attributed to the reduced wafer bow resulting from the balance of the compressive stress induced and consumed during the growth, and the thermal tensile stress induced during the cooling down process. By a combination of theoretical calculations and in situ wafer curvature measurements, we find that the compressive stress consumed by the dislocation relaxation (~1.2 GPa) is comparable to the value of the thermal tensile stress (~1.4 GPa) and we should pay more attention to it during growth of GaN on Si substrates. Our results demonstrate a promising approach to simplifying the growth processes of GaN-on-Si to reduce the wafer bow and lower the cost while maintaining high material quality. PMID:26960730

  17. Growth of high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates using a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianpeng; Yang, Xuelin; Sang, Ling; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jiaming; He, Chenguang; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Maojun; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Qin, Zhixin; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-03-01

    By employing a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition, high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures have been successfully grown on Si substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The heterostructures exhibit a high electron mobility of 2150 cm2/Vs with an electron density of 9.3 × 1012 cm‑2. The sheet resistance is 313 ± 4 Ω/◻ with ±1.3% variation. The high uniformity is attributed to the reduced wafer bow resulting from the balance of the compressive stress induced and consumed during the growth, and the thermal tensile stress induced during the cooling down process. By a combination of theoretical calculations and in situ wafer curvature measurements, we find that the compressive stress consumed by the dislocation relaxation (~1.2 GPa) is comparable to the value of the thermal tensile stress (~1.4 GPa) and we should pay more attention to it during growth of GaN on Si substrates. Our results demonstrate a promising approach to simplifying the growth processes of GaN-on-Si to reduce the wafer bow and lower the cost while maintaining high material quality.

  18. Growth of high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on Si substrates using a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianpeng; Yang, Xuelin; Sang, Ling; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jiaming; He, Chenguang; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Maojun; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Qin, Zhixin; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    By employing a single AlGaN layer with low Al composition, high quality and uniformity AlGaN/GaN heterostructures have been successfully grown on Si substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The heterostructures exhibit a high electron mobility of 2150 cm2/Vs with an electron density of 9.3 × 1012 cm−2. The sheet resistance is 313 ± 4 Ω/◻ with ±1.3% variation. The high uniformity is attributed to the reduced wafer bow resulting from the balance of the compressive stress induced and consumed during the growth, and the thermal tensile stress induced during the cooling down process. By a combination of theoretical calculations and in situ wafer curvature measurements, we find that the compressive stress consumed by the dislocation relaxation (~1.2 GPa) is comparable to the value of the thermal tensile stress (~1.4 GPa) and we should pay more attention to it during growth of GaN on Si substrates. Our results demonstrate a promising approach to simplifying the growth processes of GaN-on-Si to reduce the wafer bow and lower the cost while maintaining high material quality. PMID:26960730

  19. Thermodynamic Stability and Redistribution of Charges in Ternary AlGaN, InGaN, and InAlN Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Deibuk, V.G.; Voznyi, A.V.

    2005-06-15

    A model of the delta lattice parameter is used to study the thermodynamics of AlGaN, InGaN, and InAlN alloys. The phase diagrams obtained indicate that Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N is stable in the entire range of x, whereas the miscibility gap corresponds to 0.2 < x < 0.69 for In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and to 0.16 < x < 0.7 for In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N at 1000 K. Biaxial stresses lower the critical temperature and narrow the miscibility gap. The charge-density distribution is analyzed using the pseudopotential method to obtain an approximation of 32-atom supercells. The results of the analysis show that the stability of these alloys is controlled by the competition between the destabilizing contribution of strains related to the mismatch between the lattice constants and a stabilizing charge exchange between various chemical bonds. Biaxial stress reduces the charge redistribution caused by strains and thus increases the stability of an alloy.

  20. LED illuminant on the ambient light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Anqing; Sandipan, Mishra; Shur, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We develop an approach for combining illuminance and spectral power distribution of the LED and ambient light and apply our technique for developing an LED camera flashlight balancing the illuminance contrast between object and background. Our method uses the closed loop, multiobjective optimization comprising: (1) characterizing the lighting task by illuminance, correlated color temperature (CCT), and statistical color quality indices that include a set of Statistical Color Quality Metrics and the Color Rendition Index (CRI) implemented with indexes of S (saturation) or D (dulling); (2) measuring the illuminance and the spectrum of the ambient light on the target lighting surface, which might depend on all the sources proving illumination and on the reflected light; (3) determining the desired illuminance of the LED source on the target lighting surface; (4) calculating the desired luminous flux of the LED source according to the desired illuminance; (5) constituting the SPD of the LED source; (6) calculating the relative spectra counts of the LED source and the ambient light on the target lighting surface (7) calculating the CCT and statistical color quality indexes of the combined light; (8) repeating the above steps until the resulting SPD is close enough to the expectation. Using the above method, an LED camera flashlight has been designed, which works together with usual fluorescent ambient light and generates working lighting environment with high fidelity and high CCT (6000K). The spectrum and luminous flux of the LED lamp is automatically tunable with a change of the ambient light.

  1. Today LED Holiday Lights, Tomorrow the World?

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Kelly L.

    2004-12-20

    This article for The APEM Advantage, the quarterly newsletter of the Association of Professional Energy Managers (APEM) describes the recent increase in the popularity of light emitting diode (LED) lighting and compares LED light output with that of incandescent and compact fluorescent lighting.

  2. Advances in LEDs for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Jy; Peddada, Rao; Spinger, Benno

    2016-03-01

    High power LEDs were introduced in automotive headlights in 2006-2007, for example as full LED headlights in the Audi R8 or low beam in Lexus. Since then, LED headlighting has become established in premium and volume automotive segments and beginning to enable new compact form factors such as distributed low beam and new functions such as adaptive driving beam. New generations of highly versatile high power LEDs are emerging to meet these application needs. In this paper, we will detail ongoing advances in LED technology that enable revolutionary styling, performance and adaptive control in automotive headlights. As the standards which govern the necessary lumens on the road are well established, increasing luminance enables not only more design freedom but also headlight cost reduction with space and weight saving through more compact optics. Adaptive headlighting is based on LED pixelation and requires high contrast, high luminance, smaller LEDs with high-packing density for pixelated Matrix Lighting sources. Matrix applications require an extremely tight tolerance on not only the X, Y placement accuracy, but also on the Z height of the LEDs given the precision optics used to image the LEDs onto the road. A new generation of chip scale packaged (CSP) LEDs based on Wafer Level Packaging (WLP) have been developed to meet these needs, offering a form factor less than 20% increase over the LED emitter surface footprint. These miniature LEDs are surface mount devices compatible with automated tools for L2 board direct attach (without the need for an interposer or L1 substrate), meeting the high position accuracy as well as the optical and thermal performance. To illustrate the versatility of the CSP LEDs, we will show the results of, firstly, a reflector-based distributed low beam using multiple individual cavities each with only 20mm height and secondly 3x4 to 3x28 Matrix arrays for adaptive full beam. Also a few key trends in rear lighting and impact on LED light

  3. 100 LPW 800 Lm Warm White LED

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Decai

    2010-10-31

    An illumination grade warm white (WW) LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2800 K and 3500K and capable of producing 800 lm output at 100 lm/W, has been developed in this program. The high power WW LED is an ideal source for use as replacement for incandescent, and Halogen reflector and general purpose lamps of similar lumen value. Over the two year period, we have made following accomplishments: developed a high power warm white LED product and made over 50% improvements in light output and efficacy. The new high power WW LED product is a die on ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 1x1 mm{sup 2} InGaN pump dice flip chip attached to a ceramic submount in 2x2 array, covered by warm white phosphor ceramic platelets called Lumiramica and an overmolded silicone lens encapsulating the LED array. The performance goal was achieved through breakthroughs in following key areas: (1) High efficiency pump LED development through pump LED active region design and epi growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs). (2) Increase in injection efficiency (IE) represented by reduction in forward voltage (V{sub f}) through the improvement of the silver-based p-contact and a reduction in spreading resistance. The injection efficiency was increased from 80% at the start of the program to 96% at the end of the program at 700 mA/mm{sup 2}. (3) Improvement in thermal design as represented by reduction in thermal resistance from junction to case, through improvement of the die to submount connection in the thin film flip chip (TFFC) LED and choosing the submount material of high thermal conductivity. A thermal resistance of 1.72 K/W was demonstrated for the high power LED package. (4) Improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN die level and package level optical extraction efficiency improvement. (5) Improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package

  4. High Performance Green LEDs by Homoepitaxial

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Christian; Schubert, E Fred

    2009-11-22

    This work's objective was the development of processes to double or triple the light output power from green and deep green (525 - 555 nm) AlGaInN light emitting diode (LED) dies within 3 years in reference to the Lumileds Luxeon II. The project paid particular effort to all aspects of the internal generation efficiency of light. LEDs in this spectral region show the highest potential for significant performance boosts and enable the realization of phosphor-free white LEDs comprised by red-green-blue LED modules. Such modules will perform at and outperform the efficacy target projections for white-light LED systems in the Department of Energy's accelerated roadmap of the SSL initiative.

  5. White LEDs with limit luminous efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitsyn, V. M.; Lukash, V. S.; Stepanov, S. A.; Yangyang, Ju

    2016-01-01

    In most promising widespread gallium nitride based LEDs emission is generated in the blue spectral region with a maximum at about 450 nm which is converted to visible light with the desired spectrum by means of phosphor. The thermal energy in the conversion is determined by the difference in the energies of excitation and emission quanta and the phosphor quantum yield. Heat losses manifest themselves as decrease in the luminous efficacy. LED heating significantly reduces its efficiency and life. In addition, while heating, the emission generation output and the efficiency of the emission conversion decrease. Therefore, the reduction of the energy losses caused by heating is crucial for LED development. In this paper, heat losses in phosphor-converted LEDs (hereinafter chips) during spectrum conversion are estimated. The limit values of the luminous efficacy for white LEDs are evaluated.

  6. Using LEDs to reduce energy consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eweni, Chukwuebuka E.

    The most popularly used light bulb in homes is the incandescent. It is also the least energy efficient. The filament in the bulb is so thin that it causes resistance in the electricity, which in turn causes the electricity's energy to form heat. This causes the incandescent to waste a lot of energy forming heat rather than forming the light. It uses 15 lumens per watt of input power. A recorded MATLAB demonstration showcased LED versatility and how it can be used by an Arduino UNO board. The objective of this thesis is to showcase how LEDs can reduce energy consumption through the use of an Arduino UNO board and MATLAB and to discuss the applications of LED. LED will be the future of lighting homes and will eventually completely incandescent bulbs when companies begin to make the necessary improvements to the LED.

  7. INVITED PAPER: Application of blue green and ultraviolet micro-LEDs to biological imaging and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Zhang, J.; Davitt, K. M.; Song, Y.-K.; Nurmikko, A. V.

    2008-05-01

    This paper reviews authors' laboratory's work on the development of nitride-based blue-green and ultraviolet microscale LED devices with particular classes of imaging and spectroscopic applications in cellular level biology. Starting from neuroscience, we illustrate the utility of blue-green micro-LEDs for voltage-sensitive dye imaging of individual neural cells, as well as their ultraviolet counterparts for photostimulation of neurons. Arrays of micro-LEDs are also shown to be useful in projecting spatiotemporal patterns of photoexcitation to study the visual system development in living animals. As another illustration of the utility of the emerging nitride microdevice technology, we demonstrate the application of UV micro-LED arrays in bio-sensing technology as the core of a real-time fluorescence spectroscopy biowarning system.

  8. White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Zheng; Matthew Stough

    2008-09-30

    The goal of this project is to develop a high efficiency phosphor converting (white) Light Emitting Diode (pcLED) 1-Watt package through an increase in package extraction efficiency. A transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor is proposed to replace the powdered phosphor to reduce the scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is proposed between blue LED die and phosphor layer to recover inward yellow emission. At the end of the project we expect to recycle approximately 50% of the unrecovered backward light in current package construction, and develop a pcLED device with 80 lm/W{sub e} using our technology improvements and commercially available chip/package source. The success of the project will benefit luminous efficacy of white LEDs by increasing package extraction efficiency. In most phosphor-converting white LEDs, the white color is obtained by combining a blue LED die (or chip) with a powdered phosphor layer. The phosphor partially absorbs the blue light from the LED die and converts it into a broad green-yellow emission. The mixture of the transmitted blue light and green-yellow light emerging gives white light. There are two major drawbacks for current pcLEDs in terms of package extraction efficiency. The first is light scattering caused by phosphor particles. When the blue photons from the chip strike the phosphor particles, some blue light will be scattered by phosphor particles. Converted yellow emission photons are also scattered. A portion of scattered light is in the backward direction toward the die. The amount of this backward light varies and depends in part on the particle size of phosphors. The other drawback is that yellow emission from phosphor powders is isotropic. Although some backward light can be recovered by the reflector in current LED packages, there is still a portion of backward light that will be absorbed inside the package and further converted to heat. Heat

  9. High-power LED package requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Frank; Martin, Paul S.; Harbers, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    Power LEDs have evolved from simple indicators into illumination devices. For general lighting applications, where the objective is to light up an area, white LED arrays have been utilized to serve that function. Cost constraints will soon drive the industry to provide a discrete lighting solution. Early on, that will mean increasing the power densities while quantum efficiencies are addressed. For applications such as automotive headlamps & projection, where light needs to be tightly collimated, or controlled, arrays of die or LEDs will not be able to satisfy the requirements & limitations defined by etendue. Ultimately, whether a luminaire requires a small source with high luminance, or light spread over a general area, economics will force the evolution of the illumination LED into a compact discrete high power package. How the customer interfaces with this new package should be an important element considered early on in the design cycle. If an LED footprint of adequate size is not provided, it may prove impossible for the customer, or end user, to get rid of the heat in a manner sufficient to prevent premature LED light output degradation. Therefore it is critical, for maintaining expected LED lifetime & light output, that thermal performance parameters be defined, by design, at the system level, which includes heat sinking methods & interface materials or methdology.

  10. LED-driven backlights for automotive displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, Frank

    2007-09-01

    As a light source the LED has some advantage over the traditionally used fluorescence tube such as longer life or lower space consumption. Consequently customers are asking for the LED lighting design in their products. We introduced in a company owned backlight the white LED technology. This step opens the possibility to have access to the components in the display market. Instead of having a finalized display product which needs to be integrated in the head unit of a car we assemble the backlight, the glass, own electronics and the housing. A major advantage of this concept is the better control of the heat flow generated by the LEDs to the outer side because only a common housing is used for all the components. Also the requirement for slim products can be fulfilled. As always a new technology doesn't come with advantages only. An LED represents a point source compared to the well-known tube thus requiring a mixing zone for the multiple point sources when they enter a light guide. This zone can't be used in displays because of the lack of homogeneity. It's a design goal to minimize this zone which can be helped by the right choice of the LED in terms of slimness. A step ahead is the implementation of RGB LEDs because of their higher color rendering abilities. This allows for the control of the chromaticity point under temperature change but as a drawback needs a larger mixing zone.

  11. Thermal management of LEDs: package to system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arik, Mehmet; Becker, Charles A.; Weaver, Stanton E.; Petroski, James

    2004-01-01

    Light emitting diodes, LEDs, historically have been used for indicators and produced low amounts of heat. The introduction of high brightness LEDs with white light and monochromatic colors have led to a movement towards general illumination. The increased electrical currents used to drive the LEDs have focused more attention on the thermal paths in the developments of LED power packaging. The luminous efficiency of LEDs is soon expected to reach over 80 lumens/W, this is approximately 6 times the efficiency of a conventional incandescent tungsten bulb. Thermal management for the solid-state lighting applications is a key design parameter for both package and system level. Package and system level thermal management is discussed in separate sections. Effect of chip packages on junction to board thermal resistance was compared for both SiC and Sapphire chips. The higher thermal conductivity of the SiC chip provided about 2 times better thermal performance than the latter, while the under-filled Sapphire chip package can only catch the SiC chip performance. Later, system level thermal management was studied based on established numerical models for a conceptual solid-state lighting system. A conceptual LED illumination system was chosen and CFD models were created to determine the availability and limitations of passive air-cooling.

  12. Impact of UV-A radiation on erythemal UV and UV-index estimation over Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Lee, Yun Gon; Kim, Jung Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Because total UV (TUV) in the UV-A region is 100 times higher than in the UV-B region, UV-A is a considerable component when calculating erythemal UV (EUV) and UV-index. The ratio of EUV to TUV in the UV-A value [EUV(A)/TUV(A)] is investigated to convert the EUV(A) from TUV(A) for broadband observation. The representative value of EUV(A)/TUV(A), from the simulation study, is 6.9×10-4, changing from 6.1×10-4 to 7.0×10-4 as aerosol optical depth, total ozone and solar zenith angle change. By adopting the observational data of EUV(B) and TUV(A) from UV-biometer measurements at Yonsei University [(37.57°N, 126.95°E), 84 m above sea level], the EUV irradiance increases to 15% of EUV(B) due to the consideration of EUV(A) from the data of TUV(A) observation. Compared to the total EUV observed from the Brewer spectrophotometer at the same site, the EUV(B) from the UV-biometer observes only 95% of total EUV, and its underestimation is caused by neglecting the effect of UV-A. However, the sum of EUV(B) and EUV(A) [EUV(A+B)] from two UV-biometers is 10% larger than the EUV from the Brewer spectrophotometer because of the spectral overlap effect in the range 320-340 nm. The correction factor for the overlap effect adjusts 8% of total EUV.

  13. Thermoresponsive scattering coating for smart white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Hugo J.; Yu, Joan; Cennini, Giovanni; Bauer, Jurica; Verbunt, Paul P. C.; Bastiaansen, Cees W. M.; Broer, Dirk J.

    2015-09-01

    A novel responsive lighting system is presented capable of lowering the color temperature of emitted light on dimming. It is based on a single white light emitting LED and a thermo-responsive scattering coating. The coated LED automatically emits light of lower correlated color temperature (CCT) when the power is reduced, while maintaining a chromaticity close to the black body curve. Existing systems all use multiple color LEDs, additional control circuitry and mixing optics. An optical ray tracing model can explain the experimental results.

  14. Grating micro-dot patterned light guide plates for LED backlights.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Ryong; Kwon, Oh Jang; Shin, Dongho; Song, Seok-Ho; Lee, Hong-Seok; Choi, Hwan Young

    2007-03-19

    A novel LED backlight unit implementing a light guide plate (LGP) with a two-dimensional array of grating micro-dots is proposed. By optimizing grating-vector orientations of local gratings and applying suitable grating-depth modulation in the array, taking into consideration of the radiation pattern of the LED source, uniform out-coupled light distribution within a narrow luminance angle was achieved without recognizable hot spots. Such a light guide plate was fabricated using a dot-matrix holographic interferometer setup and a UV embossing replication. Fabricated polycarbonate LGP showed ~62% intensity uniformity within ~8 degrees and ~20 degrees luminance angles in two main directions. PMID:19532524

  15. [Ozone decline and UV increase].

    PubMed

    Winkler, P; Trepte, S

    2004-02-01

    The following results have been obtained from long-term observations on the ozone layer and UV at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeigenberg:The seasonally varying decline of the ozone layer determines the maximum exposure to UV. Since ozone decline shows the highest rates in the spring months the UV exposure has most strongly increased in this time of the year. This is especially important because in spring the human skin is not adapted to UV exposure. Weather changes from day to day can induce rapid ozone reductions in spring about -30% which in turn is followed by an increase in UV of about 40%. Clouds, especially the transparent cirrus clouds (high clouds consisting of ice particles) have increased in frequency during spring and fall while a decrease is observed in summer. This change in cloudiness reduces the daily UV dose in spring and fall while it is enhanced in summer. With increasing height above sea level UV rises by roughly 10% per 1000 m (rule of thumb). Snow reflects the UV-radiation by up to 80% enhancing the UV-doses at relevant conditions. Strong volcano eruptions destroy ozone in the stratosphere additionally during 1-2 years after the eruption. Therafter the ozone layer recovers. In April 1993, after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (1991), the UV burden was still 40% higher than average. Miniholes and streamers can appear unexpected on a short-time scale and cross over Central Europe within 1-2 days, thus enhancing UV irradiation. The human skin reacts to UV exposure depending on the type of skin. The campaign "Sonne(n) mit Verstand" of the Bavarian Ministries for Environment, for Health and for Education informs about the danger of UV radiation (see www.sonne-mit-ver-stand.de). The German Weather Service informs the public on present developments of the ozone layer and relevant topics byits ozone bulletin, which is also available via internet under (www.dwd.de/deFundE/Observator/MOHp/hp2/ozon/bulletin.htm). PMID:14770335

  16. Peer-Led and Adult-Led Programs--Student Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erhard, Rachel

    1999-01-01

    Examines whether peer-led drug prevention programs are preferable to adult-led programs for students (N=2,447) in eighth through eleventh grades. Results show that all input measures and outcome measures were perceived as more positive in the peer-led model. Since the differences found were small this study does not prove with certainty that the…

  17. [Life style, sun-bathing and tanning--what about UV-A solariums?].

    PubMed

    Thune, P

    1991-06-30

    This article considers the effects of ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun and UV-A sun beds on the skin. Sun worshipping and sun therapy has been en vogue for centuries, but in another way than used today. A changing lifestyle has led to an increase of various skin diseases, including skin cancer. Short wave UV-light (UV-B) in particular has been blamed for inducing not only erythema and pigmentation but also more chronic skin lesions. Long wave UV-light (UV-A) has been shown to be the cause of similar changes to the skin but the pigmentation is of another quality and affords less protection against the harmful effects of UV-B. A concept of sun reactive skin typing has been created. This is based on self-reported responses to an initial exposure to sun as regards tanning ability and erythema reaction. These two factors have certain practical consequences, not only for UV-phototherapy but also for a person's risk of developing skin cancer. Recently, several research groups and dermatologist have discouraged extensive use of UV-A sun beds because of side effects of varying degrees of seriousness. The possible implications of these side effects for the organism are not fully elucidated and may be more profound than known today. The British Photodermatology Group has issued more stringent rules for persons who despite advice to the contrary, still wish to use UV-A sun beds. PMID:1871738

  18. LED Outdoor Area Lighting Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2008-06-01

    This fact sheet reviews the major design and specification concerns for outdoor area lighting, and discusses the potential for LED luminaires to save energy while providing high quality lighting for outdoor areas.

  19. Optimized design of LED plant lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-sheng; Cai, Ruhai; Zhao, Yunyun; Zhao, Fuli; Yang, Bowen

    2014-12-01

    In order to fabricate the optimized LED plant lamp we demonstrated an optical spectral exploration. According to the mechanism of higher plant photosynthesis process and the spectral analysis we demonstrate an optical design of the LED plant lamp. Furthermore we built two kins of prototypes of the LED plant lamps which are suitable for the photosynthesis of higher green vegetables. Based on the simulation of the lamp box of the different alignment of the plants we carried out the growing experiment of green vegetable and obtain the optimized light illumination as well as the spectral profile. The results show that only blue and red light are efficient for the green leave vegetables. Our work is undoubtedly helpful for the LED plant lamping design and manufacture.

  20. Heterostructure optimization for increasing LED efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Oleg; Legotin, Sergey; Didenko, Sergey; Yakimov, Evgeniy; Osipov, Yuriy; Fedorchenko, Irina

    2016-05-01

    Computer simulations were performed to increase the quantum efficiency of LED by optimizing the nanoheterostructure (NH). Furthermore, the InGaN and AlGaP NHs for LEDs were optimized. On the basis of the optimum NH, ways to further increase the efficiency and the influence of impurities and indium atoms doped into barriers between quantum wells were investigated. The optimum impurity and indium atom concentrations to achieve higher flux were determined.

  1. LED luminaire longevity strategy models comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemieux, Hugo; Thibault, Simon; Martel, Alain A.

    2010-08-01

    As energy efficiency becomes more and more important, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a promising alternative to traditional lighting. Indeed, the energy efficiency of LEDs is still improving as their luminosity is modulated by current. Moreover, for applications such as exterior lamp posts, their small size, directionality, colors and high frequency response allow to combine them and provide design possibilities which are impossible with any other light source. However, as any lamp, LEDs have a lumen depreciation which is a function of both current and temperature. Thus, to take advantage of the full characteristics of LEDs, LED luminaire longevity strategies must be carefully studied and planned, especially since the IES and CIE guidelines state clearly that the luminaire must maintain the rated recommended light level until the end of the system's operating life. The recommended approach for LED luminaire specification is therefore to use the end-of-life light level when evaluating the luminaire. Different power supply strategies have been simulated to determine which one maximizes energy saving and lifetime. With these results, it appears that active control can save at least 25% in energy, but the best strategy cannot be determined because of uncertainties in luminosity degradation models.

  2. Thermo-piezo-electro-mechanical simulation of AlGaN (aluminum gallium nitride) / GaN (gallium nitride) High Electron Mobility Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Lorin E.

    Due to the current public demand of faster, more powerful, and more reliable electronic devices, research is prolific these days in the area of high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) devices. This is because of their usefulness in RF (radio frequency) and microwave power amplifier applications including microwave vacuum tubes, cellular and personal communications services, and widespread broadband access. Although electrical transistor research has been ongoing since its inception in 1947, the transistor itself continues to evolve and improve much in part because of the many driven researchers and scientists throughout the world who are pushing the limits of what modern electronic devices can do. The purpose of the research outlined in this paper was to better understand the mechanical stresses and strains that are present in a hybrid AlGaN (Aluminum Gallium Nitride) / GaN (Gallium Nitride) HEMT, while under electrically-active conditions. One of the main issues currently being researched in these devices is their reliability, or their consistent ability to function properly, when subjected to high-power conditions. The researchers of this mechanical study have performed a static (i.e. frequency-independent) reliability analysis using powerful multiphysics computer modeling/simulation to get a better idea of what can cause failure in these devices. Because HEMT transistors are so small (micro/nano-sized), obtaining experimental measurements of stresses and strains during the active operation of these devices is extremely challenging. Physical mechanisms that cause stress/strain in these structures include thermo-structural phenomena due to mismatch in both coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and mechanical stiffness between different materials, as well as stress/strain caused by "piezoelectric" effects (i.e. mechanical deformation caused by an electric field, and conversely voltage induced by mechanical stress) in the AlGaN and GaN device portions (both

  3. An LED Approach for Measuring the Photocatalytic Breakdown of Crystal Violet Dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Underwood, Lauren W.; ONeal, Duane; Pagnutti, Mary; Davis, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    A simple technique to assess the reactivity of photocatalytic coatings sprayed onto transmissive glass surfaces was developed. This new method uses ultraviolet (UV) gallium nitride (GaN) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to drive a photocatalytic reaction (the photocatalytic breakdown of a UV-resistant dye applied to a surface coated with the semiconductor titanium dioxide); and then a combination of a stabilized white light LED and a spectrometer to track the dye degradation as a function of time. Simple, standardized evaluation techniques that assess photocatalytic materials over a variety of environmental conditions, including illumination level, are not generally available and are greatly needed prior to in situ application of photocatalytic technologies. To date, much research pertaining to this aspect of photocatalysis has been limited and has focused primarily on laboratory experiments using mercury lamps. Mercury lamp illumination levels are difficult to control over large ranges and are temporally modulated by line power, limiting their use in helping to understand and predict how photocatalytic materials will behave in natural environmental settings and conditions. The methodology described here, using steady-state LEDs and time series spectroradiometric techniques, is a novel approach to explore the effect of UV light on the photocatalytic degradation of a UV resistant dye (crystal violet). GaN UV LED arrays, centered around 365 nm with an adjustable DC power supply, are used to create a small, spatially uniform light field where the steady state light level can be varied over three to four orders of magnitude. For this study, a set of glass microscope slides was custom coated with a thinly sprayed layer of photocatalytic titanium dioxide. Crystal violet was then applied to these titanium-dioxide coated slides and to uncoated control slides. The slides were then illuminated at various light levels from the dye side of the slide by the UV LED array. To monitor

  4. LEDS GP Success Story: Fostering Coordinated LEDS Support in Kenya (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) strives to advance climate-resilient, low-emission development through catalyzing collaboration, information exchange, and action on the ground. The Government of Kenya is a key LEDS GP member and offers an inspiring example of how LEDS GP is having an impact globally. The 2012 LEDS Collaboration in Action workshop in London provided an interactive space for members to share experiences on cross-ministerial LEDS leadership and to learn about concrete development impacts of LEDS around the world. Inspired by these stories, the Kenya's Ministry of State for Planning, National Development and Vision 2030 (MPND) began to collaborate closely with the Ministry of Environment and Mineral Resources to create strong links between climate change action and development in the country, culminating in the integration of Kenya's National Climate Change Action Plan and the country's Medium Term Development Plan.

  5. Precision Control Module For UV Laser 3D Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Hong; Hung, Min-Wei; Chang, Chun-Li

    2011-01-01

    UV laser has been widely used in various micromachining such as micro-scribing or patterning processing. At present, most of the semiconductors, LEDs, photovoltaic solar panels and touch panels industries need the UV laser processing system. However, most of the UV laser processing applications in the industries utilize two dimensional (2D) plane processing. And there are tremendous business opportunities that can be developed, such as three dimensional (3D) structures of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) sensor or the precision depth control of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films edge insulation in touch panels. This research aims to develop a UV laser 3D micromachining module that can create the novel applications for industries. By special designed beam expender in optical system, the focal point of UV laser can be adjusted quickly and accurately through the optical path control lens of laser beam expender optical system. Furthermore, the integrated software for galvanometric scanner and focal point adjustment mechanism is developed as well, so as to carry out the precise 3D microstructure machining.

  6. Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D.; Miller, P.; Motau, C.; Stevens, F.

    1997-09-01

    A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

  7. Thermal Analysis of LED Phosphor Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Ukwatte Lokuliyanage Indika Upendra

    Solid-state lighting technology has progressed to a level where light-emitting diode (LED) products are either on par or better than their traditional lighting technology counterparts with respect to efficacy and lifetime. At present, the most common method to create "white" light from LEDs for illumination applications is by using the LED primary radiation and wavelength-converting materials. In this method, the re-emission from the wavelength-converting materials excited by the LED primary radiation is combined with the LED primary radiation to create the "white" light. During this conversion process, heat is generated as a result of conversion inefficiencies and other loss mechanisms in the LED and the wavelength-converting materials. This generated heat, if not properly dissipated, increases the operating temperature, thereby increasing the light output degradation of the system over both the short and long term. The heat generation of the LED and thermal management of the LED have been studied extensively. Methods to effectively dissipate heat from the LEDs and maintain lower LED operating temperature are well understood. However, investigation of factors driving heat generation, the resulting temperature distribution in the phosphor layer, and the influence of the phosphor layer temperature on LED performance and reliability have not received the same focus. The goal of this dissertation was to understand the main factors driving heat and light generation and the transport of light and heat in the wavelength-converting layer of an LED system. Another goal was to understand the interaction between heat and light in the system and to develop and analyze a solution to reduce the wavelength-converting layer operating temperature, thereby improving light output and reliability. Even though past studies have explored generation and transfer separately for light and heat, to the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first study that has analyzed both factors

  8. UV Observations of NGC 205

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcots, Eric M.; Hodge, Paul W.; Eskridge, Paul B.; Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Bertola, Francesco

    1989-01-01

    Low resolution IUE observations of the dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 205 show that the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of the galaxy is relatively flat. Spectra centered on the nucleus and on a region north of the nucleus show evidence of recent bursts of star formation which contribute strongly to the UV spectral energy distribution. The UV spectra was fit with a composite spectrum based on a Miller-Scalo initial mass function, an underlying older population (modelled using the UV spectrum of 47 Tuc), and an extinction based on a SMC-like extinction cure. This fit implies that the total mass of young stars (with M equal to or greater than 1 solar mass) in the galaxy is approx. 7x10(5) solar mass, which can be compared to the total mass of globular cluster like stars in the galaxy of approx. 8x10(7) solar mass.

  9. The Moon in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Amanda

    2014-11-01

    While the Moon has been observed in the UV for decades, the real utility of this spectral region for unlocking some of the Moon’s secrets has only recently been understood. Previously the domain of atmospheric studies, the UV has now emerged as an important spectral region for studying surfaces. The ultraviolet regime is very sensitive to both space weathering effects and composition, including hydration. This presentation will cover a review of early UV lunar observations (e.g., Apollo 17, International Ultraviolet Explorer), as well as early laboratory studies that first shone a light on the importance of this spectral region. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) instrument, currently in orbit on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft, is providing critical mapping capabilities of UV signatures, including signals from the permanently shadowed regions of the poles. I will discuss some of these exciting results, and extend these to implications for other airless bodies in the solar system.

  10. Affordable underwater wireless optical communication using LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, Vladimir; Arnon, Shlomi

    2013-09-01

    In recent years the need for high data rate underwater wireless communication (WC) has increased. Nowadays, the conventional technology for underwater communication is acoustic. However, the maximum data rate that acoustic technology can provide is a few kilobits per second. On the other hand, emerging applications such as underwater imaging, networks of sensors and swarms of underwater vehicles require much faster data rates. As a result, underwater optical WC, which can provide much higher data rates, has been proposed as an alternative means of communication. In addition to high data rates, affordable communication systems become an important feature in the development requirements. The outcome of these requirements is a new system design based on off-the-shelf components such as blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs). This is due to the fact that LEDs offer solutions characterized by low cost, high efficiency, reliability and compactness. However, there are some challenges to be met when incorporating LEDs as part of the optical transmitter, such as low modulation rates and non linearity. In this paper, we review the main challenges facing the incorporation of LEDs as an integral part of underwater WC systems and propose some techniques to mitigate the LED limitations in order to achieve high data rate communication

  11. Multi-chip color variable LED spot modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelen, C.; Ansems, J.; Deurenberg, P.; Treurniet, T.; van Lier, E.; Chao, O.; Mercier, V.; Calon, G.; van Os, K.; Lijten, G.; Sondag-Huethorst, J.

    2005-09-01

    The unique features of light emitting diodes (LEDs) such as intrinsic color generation and relative low temperature operation enable completely new lighting concepts. The ongoing increase in performance of LEDs reaching efficacy levels of more than 30 lm/W for illumination grade white light with the promise of reaching over 75 lm/W makes them also applicable for higher luminous applications such as spot and flood lighting, accent lighting and architectural lighting. For the new lighting feature of ambiance creation, which requires at least variation of the color temperature of the light and preferably also selection of more saturated colors, LEDs are ideally suited. In this paper we report on the overall system aspects to color variable LED spot lighting and on the performance of prototype spot modules. Mixing of the light is performed within the lighting module by a combination of dense packing of red/amber, green and blue emitting dice, and light collimation with facetted optics and small angle diffusion, resulting in a homogeneous appearance of the light source and a color point inhomogeneity Δu'v' in the beam (>90% of total flux) of less than 0.01. A color rendering index (Ra8) of over 80 can be obtained over a large temperature and color temperature range with the 3-color system for a specific combination of 5 nm wide wavelength bins. In the prototype spot modules, between 9 and 14 dice are mounted on a common substrate and integrated with the primary collimating optics that is based on total internal reflection. Nominal power of the spot module is 10W. The average thermal resistance between the die junctions and the housing is 2 K/W. The optical efficiency of the module is 70%. The maximum luminous flux in the beam, which has a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 20-25°, is about 200 lm. The system has thermal and optical sensors that provide the signals for a closed control loop to compensate for run-up and differential ageing effects. The resulting color

  12. LED illuminator for a microdisplay projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarill, Simon

    2012-10-01

    An illumination system for a microdisplay projector with a two-step imaging system is described here. In the first step, an imaging condenser creates an image of the LED at the color combiner entrance window. In the second step, we relay the image of the integrator exit window onto the micro-display. The illuminator demonstrates high collection efficiency, small footprint, and efficient mixing of light from RGB LEDs that provides required uniformity. A variety of approaches to collecting light emitted from LEDs of various types are compared, leading to the two-step design. A design example using a 0.55" diagonal DLP-based optical engine is presented with the following characteristics: Footprint: 3.9"x3.3"x2.0" (25.7 cubic inches) Light output: 338 white lumens Efficiency: 4.7 lm/watt

  13. LED-based NDIR natural gas analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanchenko, Sergey; Baranov, Alexander; Savkin, Alexey; Sleptsov, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    A new generation of the light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and photodiodes (PDs) was used recently to develop an open path non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) methane analyzer. The first open path detector prototype was constructed using LEDs for measurement and reference channels, accordingly, and first measurements for methane gas have been performed using optical paths of the order of several meters [3]. The natural gas consists of several first alkanes, mainly methane, and it is important to have a possibility of measuring all of them. In the present work we report the results of NDIR measurements for propane-butane mixture and new measurements of methane using LEDs for measurement and reference channels at 2300 and 1700 nm wavelengths, accordingly. The necessity of the double beam scheme is demonstrated and obtained results for methane and propane-butane mixture are compared.

  14. Laser and LED external teeth-bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-09-01

    Teeth-bleaching is an initial phase in the reproduction of an aesthetic smile; thus, it is very important that the dentist knows how to diagnose the causes of color changes and indicate whitening before proposing dental treatment. Technological advances in teeth-whitening lead to the development of new techniques, improving comfort, security and decreasing time of execution: argon laser, diode Laser, LED whitening, xenon light whitening. The clearing agent used in all techniques, including home whitening, is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different concentrations. In this study, the authors describe mechanisms of gel activation, the use of Laser and LED"s for teeth-bleaching, the importance of diagnosis and the comfort of the patient in in-office teeth-bleaching techniques.

  15. Zernike polynomials for photometric characterization of LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, J. L.; Ferrero, A.; Pons, A.; Campos, J.; Hernanz, M. L.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method based on Zernike polynomials to characterize photometric quantities and descriptors of light emitting diodes (LEDs) from measurements of the angular distribution of the luminous intensity, such as total luminous flux, BA, inhomogeneity, anisotropy, direction of the optical axis and Lambertianity of the source. The performance of this method was experimentally tested for 18 high-power LEDs from different manufacturers and with different photometric characteristics. A small set of Zernike coefficients can be used to calculate all the mentioned photometric quantities and descriptors. For applications not requiring a great accuracy such as those of lighting design, the angular distribution of the luminous intensity of most of the studied LEDs can be interpolated with only two Zernike polynomials.

  16. EDITORIAL: Micro-pixellated LEDs for science and instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Martin D.; Neil, Mark A. A.

    2008-05-01

    the work in an international context. Fan et al, who introduced the original forms of these devices in 2000, give a historical perspective as well as illustrating some recent trends in their work. Xu et al, another of the main international groups in this area, concentrate on biological imaging and detection applications. One of the most exciting prospects for this technology is its compatibility with CMOS, and Charbon reviews recent results with single-photon detection arrays which facilitate integrated optical lab-on-chip devices in conjunction with the micro-LEDs. Belton et al, from within the project partnership, overview the hybrid inorganic/organic semiconductor structures achieved by combining gallium nitride optoelectronics with organic semiconductor materials. The contributed papers cover many other aspects related to the devices themselves, their integration with polymers and CMOS, and also cover several associated developments such as UV-emitting nitride materials, new polymers, and the broader use of LEDs in microscopy. Images of LED fibres Emission patterns generated at the end of a multicore image fibre 600 μm in diameter, from article 094013 by H Xu et al of Brown University. We would like to thank Paul French for suggesting this special issue, the staff of IOP Publishing for their help and support, Dr Caroline Vance for her administration of the programme, and EPSRC (particularly Dr Lindsey Weston) for organizational and financial support.

  17. LED Device Illuminates New Path to Healing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Among NASA s research goals is increased understanding of factors affecting plant growth, including the effects of microgravity. Impeding such studies, traditional light sources used to grow plants on Earth are difficult to adapt to space flight, as they require considerable amounts of power and produce relatively large amounts of heat. As such, an optimized experimental system requires much less energy and reduces temperature variance without negatively affecting plant growth results. Ronald W. Ignatius, founder and chairman of the board at Quantum Devices Inc. (QDI), of Barneveld, Wisconsin, proposed using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as the photon source for plant growth experiments in space. This proposition was made at a meeting held by the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, a NASA-sponsored research center that facilitates the commercialization of robotics, automation, and other advanced technologies. The Wisconsin group teamed with QDI to determine whether an LED system could provide the necessary wavelengths and intensities for photosynthesis, and the resultant system proved successful. The center then produced the Astroculture3, a plant growth chamber that successfully incorporated this LED light source, which has now flown on several space shuttle missions. NASA subsequently identified another need that could be addressed with the use of LEDs: astronaut health. A central concern in astronaut health is maintaining healthy growth of cells, including preventing bone and muscle loss and boosting the body s ability to heal wounds all adversely affected by prolonged weightlessness. Thus, having determined that LEDs can be used to grow plants in space, NASA decided to investigate whether LEDs might be used for photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT).

  18. High-power LEDs for plant cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Duchovskis, Pavelas; Bliznikas, Zenius; Breive, Kestutis; Ulinskaite, Raimonda; Brazaityte, Ausra; Novickovas, Algirdas; Zukauskas, Arturas; Shur, Michael S.

    2004-10-01

    We report on high-power solid-state lighting facility for cultivation of greenhouse vegetables and on the results of the study of control of photosynthetic activity and growth morphology of radish and lettuce imposed by variation of the spectral composition of illumination. Experimental lighting modules (useful area of 0.22 m2) were designed based on 4 types of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with emission peaked in red at the wavelengths of 660 nm and 640 nm (predominantly absorbed by chlorophyll a and b for photosynthesis, respectively), in blue at 455 nm (phototropic function), and in far-red at 735 nm (important for photomorphology). Morphological characteristics, chlorophyll and phytohormone concentrations in radish and lettuce grown in phytotron chambers under lighting with different spectral composition of the LED-based illuminator and under illumination by high pressure sodium lamps with an equivalent photosynthetic photon flux density were compared. A well-balanced solid-state lighting was found to enhance production of green mass and to ensure healthy morphogenesis of plants compared to those grown using conventional lighting. We observed that the plant morphology and concentrations of morphologically active phytohormones is strongly affected by the spectral composition of light in the red region. Commercial application of the LED-based illumination for large-scale plant cultivation is discussed. This technology is favorable from the point of view of energy consumption, controllable growth, and food safety but is hindered by high cost of the LEDs. Large scale manufacturing of high-power red AlInGaP-based LEDs emitting at 650 nm and a further decrease of the photon price for the LEDs emitting in the vicinity of the absorption peak of chlorophylls have to be achieved to promote horticulture applications.

  19. Design of an Oximeter Based on LED-LED Configuration and FPGA Technology

    PubMed Central

    Stojanovic, Radovan; Karadaglic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    A fully digital photoplethysmographic (PPG) sensor and actuator has been developed. The sensing circuit uses one Light Emitting Diode (LED) for emitting light into human tissue and one LED for detecting the reflectance light from human tissue. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to control the LEDs and determine the PPG and Blood Oxygen Saturation (SpO2). The configurations with two LEDs and four LEDs are developed for measuring PPG signal and Blood Oxygen Saturation (SpO2). N-LEDs configuration is proposed for multichannel SpO2 measurements. The approach resulted in better spectral sensitivity, increased and adjustable resolution, reduced noise, small size, low cost and low power consumption. PMID:23291575

  20. Nano-lasers and nano-LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willander, Magnus

    2014-03-01

    One-dimensional nanostructures have been of great interest for photonic devices. In this talk I will give a review of the one-dimensional ZnO nanostructures for ultraviolet and visible regions. I will discuss earlier and last results regarding room temperature and low temperature spontaneous and stimulated emission. For lasers we will discuss both optically and electrically pumped lasers. For the LEDs particularly I will discuss the white light emission from LEDs. Substrates like graphene, paper, textile and semiconductors will be discussed. Finally, also results from other devices based on hybrid materials will be analyzed.

  1. LED luminaire with controlled light distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertler, Donald J.; Sales, Tasso R. M.; Chakmakjian, Stephen; Morris, G. Michael

    2006-08-01

    Unless coupled with some collimating optics, LED sources generally scatter with wide-angle Lambertian intensity profiles. The luminous output of such sources is not amenable to control and redistribution in an efficient manner. In this work we present the design and manufacturing of structures that are able to collect virtually all light from Lambertian LED sources and direct it towards diffusers engineered to illuminate specific regions of space in a controlled fashion. The resulting "engineered luminaire" is thus capable of highly efficient light control and can be applied to a wide variety of illumination situations such as general and architectural lighting.

  2. Nonintrusive Measurement Of Temperature Of LED Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Powers, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Temperature inferred from spectrum of emitted light. Method of determining temperature of junction based on two relevant characteristics of LED. Gap between valence and conduction electron-energy bands in LED material decreases with increasing temperature, causing wavelength of emitted photon to increase with temperature. Other, as temperature increases, non-radiative processes dissipate more of input electrical energy as heat and less as photons in band-gap wavelenth region; optical and quantum efficiencies decrease with increasing temperature. In principal, either characteristic alone used to determine temperature. However, desirable to use both to obtain indication of uncertainty.

  3. LED module with high index lens

    DOEpatents

    Bierhuizen, Serge J.; Wang, Nanze Patrick; Eng, Gregory W.; Sun, Decai; Wei, Yajun

    2016-07-05

    An array of housings with housing bodies and lenses is molded, or an array of housing bodies is molded and bonded with lenses to form an array of housings with housing bodies and lenses. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are attached to the housings in the array. An array of metal pads may be bonded to the back of the array or insert molded with the housing array to form bond pads on the back of the housings. The array is singulated to form individual LED modules.

  4. Improvement of process uniformity in recessed gate AlGaN/GaN HFET by selective etching of in-situ SixNy on AlGaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hwa-Young; Park, Jinhong; Lee, Hojung; Jo, Youngje; Song, Misun; Jang, T.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of in-situ SixNy etching were investigated by comparing the uniformity of threshold voltage on recessed gate AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistor (HFET) devices with in-situ grown SixNy passivation. By varying O2 ratio in total gas flow, etch rate and selectivity of SixNy and AlGaN were changed significantly. The etch rate of AlGaN was reduced by adding O2 in gas mixture, which caused the formation of AlOx and GaOx on the surface during etching process. The etch rate of in-situ SixNy was decreased with increasing O2 ratio. By this relationship, the highest selectivity was obtained with 30% O2 ratio in total gas flow and selectivity was increased from 5 : 1 to 100 : 1. Using this optimized etching condition, the standard deviation of threshold voltage on AlGaN/GaN recess gate HFET was improved from 0.60 to 0.18 on 6-in. processed wafer.

  5. Discrimination of reactively-dyed cotton fibres with thin layer chromatography and UV microspectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Van Dijck, K; Gason, F

    2015-12-01

    Reactively-dyed black, navy blue and medium red cotton samples showing metamerism under fluorescent tube illumination were examined. Optical microscopy (bright field, polarization and fluorescence microscopy) was used, followed by microspectrometry in the visible range (MSP Vis), to differentiate the samples in each block of colours. Additionally, the non-discriminated samples were subjected both to microspectrophotometry in the UV-range (MSP UV) and to enzymatic digestion followed by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) on the digests. While it was found that both methods may potentially result in higher discrimination, preparation of reactively-dyed cotton for HPTLC was found to be a very tedious and time-consuming step and HPTLC only led to a better discrimination than MSP UV for the red cotton samples. The results suggest that in order to increase the discrimination for reactively-dyed cotton fibres, measurement of the UV absorption spectrum (MSP UV) is preferred over HPTLC. PMID:26654077

  6. A novel crosslinker for UV copolymerization of N-vinyl pyrrolidone and methacrylates

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Yu-Chin

    1993-12-31

    Methacryloxyethyl vinyl carbonate, a novel crosslinker containing a vinyl carbonate and a methacrylate group which is capable of copolymerizing N-vinyl pyrrolidone and methacrylates, was prepared. With this crosslinker, N-vinyl pyrrolidone and methacrylates can copolymerize efficiently under strictly UV condition. Previously, polymeric systems containing N-vinyl pyrrolidone and methacrylates were prepared using thermal initiators, or a combination of thermal and UV initiators in the presence of crosslinkers such as allyl methacrylate or ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, These processes often led to polymers with inferior properties and less controllable quality. The use of this novel crosslinker represents a sharp improvement in polymerization conditions (UV vs heat) as well as product quality.

  7. Comparison of instructor-led versus peer-led debriefing in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Sook; Kelly, Michelle; Ha, Eun Ho

    2016-06-01

    Despite its widespread support, the most effective simulation-based debriefing method has little evidence to support its efficacy. In this study, we compared the effect of peer-led and instructor-led debriefing among nursing students. The study was conducted with a non-equivalent control group using a pretest-post-test design. A convenience sample of third-year nursing students was used for the study, where 65 students enrolled in a 2-week clinical placement rotation were randomly assigned to the instructor-led group or peer-led group. The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills, satisfaction with simulation, and quality of debriefing in the peer-led group were compared to those in the instructor-led group. Group differences at each testing interval were analyzed using independent t-test. Nursing students in the instructor-led debriefing group showed better subsequent cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance, more satisfaction with simulation experience, and higher debriefing scores compared to the peer-led group. From our study, instructor-led debriefing is an effective method in improving skills performance, inducing favorable satisfaction, and providing better quality of debriefing among nursing students. PMID:26833934

  8. Surgical retractor with RGB-WHITE LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Jun-ichi; Kato, Daishiro; Terauchi, Kunihiko; Itoh, Kazuhiro; Yanada, Masashi; Shimomura, Masanori; Tsuneduka, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2008-02-01

    Sufficient lighting is sometimes required when surgeons watch the mediastinum through the 7x7cm thoracic window in video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy. It is thus important to develop the "ultimately localized solid-statelighting" because the distance between the window and the surface of the lung is as short as 4-5 cm. Our new idea was to place the module composed of red, green and blue light emitting diodes (RGB LEDs) at the tip of the retractor. Compared to a conventional endoscopic lighting consisting of halogen lamp, this method has lead to the bright and shadowless illumination within the entire thoracic cavity since the white RGB LEDs are emitted unidirectionally from the cylinder-shaped camera component, moving the shadows from the surgical instruments to the side of the incision. It also should be noted that we found an effective principle for controlling the color rendering of each biomaterial through the synthesis of LED lighting spectra, by which the visual performance of surgeons can be coordinated. Therefore, we believe that "medical RGB LEDs" will contribute to the safe operation, and will be developed to a standard lighting system in clinical settings with bright surgical fields in the near future.

  9. LED structure with enhanced mirror reflectivity

    DOEpatents

    Bergmann, Michael; Donofrio, Matthew; Heikman, Sten; Schneider, Kevin S; Haberern, Kevin W; Edmond, John A

    2014-04-01

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally related to LED chips having improved overall emission by reducing the light-absorbing effects of barrier layers adjacent mirror contacts. In one embodiment, a LED chip comprises one or more LEDs, with each LED having an active region, a first contact under the active region having a highly reflective mirror, and a barrier layer adjacent the mirror. The barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that it does not extend beyond the periphery of the mirror. In another possible embodiment, an insulator is further provided, with the insulator adjacent the barrier layer and adjacent portions of the mirror not contacted by the active region or by the barrier layer. In yet another embodiment, a second contact is provided on the active region. In a further embodiment, the barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that the periphery of the mirror is at least 40% free of the barrier layer, and the second contact is below the first contact and accessible from the bottom of the chip.

  10. LED Lighting in a Performing Arts Building

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N. J.; Kaye, S. M.; Coleman, P. M.; Wilkerson, A. M.; Perrin, T. E.; Sullivan, G. P.

    2014-07-31

    At the University of Florida in Gainesville, the DOE Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY program evaluated LED architectural and theatrical lighting in four academic/performance-related spaces within the Nadine McGuire Theatre + Dance Pavilion. Due to a wise choice of products and luminaire light distributions, the change brought significant quality improvements including improved controllability and color.

  11. How One Thing Led to Another.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Irving

    2016-05-20

    I started research in high school, experimenting on immunological tolerance to transplantation antigens. This led to studies of the thymus as the site of maturation of T cells, which led to the discovery, isolation, and clinical transplantation of purified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The induction of immune tolerance with HSCs has led to isolation of other tissue-specific stem cells for regenerative medicine. Our studies of circulating competing germline stem cells in colonial protochordates led us to document competing HSCs. In human acute myelogenous leukemia we showed that all preleukemic mutations occur in HSCs, and determined their order; the final mutations occur in a multipotent progenitor derived from the preleukemic HSC clone. With these, we discovered that CD47 is an upregulated gene in all human cancers and is a "don't eat me" signal; blocking it with antibodies leads to cancer cell phagocytosis. CD47 is the first known gene common to all cancers and is a target for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27168238

  12. Challenges and opportunities in LED based lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, Allen

    2013-05-01

    Solid state lighting technology has made great advances over the last decade and has become the technology of choice to displace legacy incandescent and as well as the more efficient fluorescent lights. While efficiencies have been improved and cost of the LEDs has been steadily lowered still many challenges exist in the thermal, electrical, optical, and packaging implementations.

  13. Determination of radiative current in LED's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    Directly measureable quantity of radiative output in LED's is total forward current. When applied forward voltage is below 1.05 V the forward current is primarily nonradiative and varies with forward voltage as exp(qV/2kT), when q is the charge, V is applied voltage, K is Boltzmann's constant, and T is operating temperature.

  14. Portrait of a Teacher-Led School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazareno, Lori

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a school with no principal and with a leadership structure that holds teachers accountable for the learning of all students. About 50 such teacher-led schools currently operate across the United States, and this article tells the story of one of them. The Mathematics and Science Leadership Academy (MSLA) in Denver, Colorado, serves about…

  15. Child-Led Enquiry in Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlop, Lynda; Compton, Kirsty; Clarke, Linda; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    This research describes and evaluates the application of a child-led approach to scientific enquiry (the Community of Scientific Enquiry, CoSE) to children aged 8-11 (Key Stage 2) in Northern Ireland. Primary teachers were introduced to CoSE at a workshop and asked to evaluate its implementation with their class. Results from children (n = 364)…

  16. Neural networks for LED color control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashdown, Ian E.

    2004-01-01

    The design and implementation of an architectural dimming control for multicolor LED-based lighting fixtures is complicated by the need to maintain a consistent color balance under a wide variety of operating conditions. Factors to consider include nonlinear relationships between luminous flux intensity and drive current, junction temperature dependencies, LED manufacturing tolerances and binning parameters, device aging characteristics, variations in color sensor spectral responsitivities, and the approximations introduced by linear color space models. In this paper we formulate this problem as a nonlinear multidimensional function, where maintaining a consistent color balance is equivalent to determining the hyperplane representing constant chromaticity. To be useful for an architectural dimming control design, this determination must be made in real time as the lighting fixture intensity is adjusted. Further, the LED drive current must be continuously adjusted in response to color sensor inputs to maintain constant chromaticity for a given intensity setting. Neural networks are known to be universal approximators capable of representing any continuously differentiable bounded function. We therefore use a radial basis function neural network to represent the multidimensional function and provide the feedback signals needed to maintain constant chromaticity. The network can be trained on the factory floor using individual device measurements such as spectral radiant intensity and color sensor characteristics. This provides a flexible solution that is mostly independent of LED manufacturing tolerances and binning parameters.

  17. Student-Led Conferences: Students Taking Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nauss, Sherri A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the many challenges that face middle grade students, parents, and teachers is the student's lack of ownership of their academic achievements. Student-led conferences are a unique way to engage the student and the parent in the academic progress. Parents and teachers discuss the student's attitude toward the work, the student's work ethic in…

  18. Photomatrix LED therapy of extensive cutaneous pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Menyaev, Yulian A.; Zharova, I. Z.; Leviev, Dmitry O.; Tsarev, V. N.; Sarantsev, V. P.; Krusic, Joze

    2000-05-01

    Standard sources of radiation have not sufficient efficiency at treating spatially extended pathology, especially when pathologic areas involve opposite sides of the human being's body or when they are uneven in shape. The typical examples of such pathology are extensive burns, oedema, inflammatory processes, infectious wounds, actinic keratosis, psoriasis, arthritis and neurological diseases. Superbright LEDs gathered in a matrix and grasping the area of irradiation are the most suitable sources of radiation. This article presents the result of investigation of the effectiveness of various types of the blue-to-infrared spectrum range LED array that allow irradiating a surface with an area from several cm2 to several thousand cm2 including the whole human being's body with the intensity varying from 1 to 100 mW/cm2. Besides the matrixes, composed of separate light diodes, modular systems with separate monolithic hybrid chips with a high density of positioning the sources of radiation are considered. The peculiarities and results of applying such systems to treat oedema, cancer, weight regulation, neurological diseases, different infections diseases in combination with PDT, stomatitis and paradontosis are analyzed. The parameters of the photomatrix LED for different spectral regions and different geometry from flat shape to semispherical and cylindrical are presented. The perspective combination photomatrix LED with another therapeutical devices including photovacuum and photomagnetic therapy are considered.

  19. LED solution for E14 candle lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Liu, Ye; Boonekamp, Erik P.; Shi, Lei; Mei, Yi; Jiang, Tan; Guo, Qing; Wu, Huarong

    2009-08-01

    On a short to medium term, energy efficient retrofit LED products can offer an attractive solution for traditional lamps replacement in existing fixtures. To comply with user expectations, LED retrofit lamps should not only have the same mechanical interface to fit (socket and shape), but also have the similar light effect as the lamps they replace. The decorative lighting segment shows the best conditions to meet these requirements on short term. In 2008, Philips Lighting Shanghai started with the development of an LED candle lamp for the replacement of a 15W Candle shape (B35 E14) incandescent bulb, which is used in e.g. chandeliers. In this decorative application the main objective is not to generate as much light as possible, but the application requires the lamp to have a comparable look and, primarily, the same light effect as the incandescent candle lamp. This effect can be described as sparkling light, and it has to be directed sufficiently downwards (i.e., in the direction of the base of the lamp). These requirements leave very limited room for optics, electronics, mechanics and thermal design to play with in the small outline of this lamp. The main voltage AC LED concept is chosen to save the space for driver electronics. However the size of the AC LED is relatively big, which makes the optical design challenging. Several optical solutions to achieve the required light effect, to improve the optical efficiency, and to simplify the system are discussed. A novel prismatic lens has been developed which is capable of transforming the Lambertian light emission from typical high power LEDs into a butter-fly intensity distribution with the desired sparkling light effect. Thanks to this lens no reflecting chamber is needed, which improves the optical efficiency up to 70%, while maintaining the compact feature of the original optics. Together with advanced driver solution and thermal solution, the resulting LED candle lamp operates at 230V, consumes 1.8W, and

  20. Novel silicone materials for LED packaging and opto-electronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlathem, Eric; Norris, Ann W.; Bahadur, Maneesh; DeGroot, Jon; Yoshitake, Makoto

    2006-04-01

    Silicone based materials have attracted considerable attention from Light Emitting Diode (LED) manufacturers. In LEDs, silicones can function in several roles that include optical lenses, stress relieving encapsulants, mechanical protection and light path materials. The key attributes of silicones that make them attractive materials for high brightness (HB) LEDs include their excellent transparency in the UV-visible region, their non-discoloring behavior and their stable thermo-mechanical properties. The first part of this paper/presentation will describe recent silicone materials development efforts directed towards providing LED manufacturers with silicone materials solutions for LED device fabrication. Injection molding of novel silicone resin based materials will be discussed as a viable route for high throughput LED device manufacturing. For other portions of the light spectrum, specifically at telecom wavelengths, the performances of silicone based materials are also verified and this makes them attractive materials for numerous photonics device applications. The second part of this paper/presentation will describe recent demonstrations of siloxane for use as waveguides for datacom and telecom applications. A Variable Optical Attenuator (VOA) utilizing silicone based waveguides (exploiting dn/dT property) and an Optical Backplane built from silicone waveguides and out-of-plane mirrors built on glass and FR-4 substrates are discussed.

  1. Investigation of ultra violet (UV) resistance for high strength fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, M. A.; Dingwall, Brenda; Gupta, A.; Seyam, A. M.; Mock, G.; Theyson, T.

    Ultra long duration balloons (ULDB), currently under development by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), requires the use of high strength fibers in the selected super-pressure pumpkin design. The pumpkin shape balloon concept allows clear separation of the load transferring functions of the major structural elements of the pneumatic envelope, the tendons and the film. Essentially, the film provides the gas barrier and transfers only local pressure load to the tendons. The tendons, in the mean time, provide the global pressure containing strength. In that manner, the strength requirement for the film only depends on local parameters. The tendon is made of p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole (PBO) fibers, which is selected due to its high strength to weight ratio when compared to other high performance, commercially available, fibers. High strength fibers, however, are known to degrade upon exposure to light, particularly at short wavelengths. This paper reports the results of an investigation of the resistance of four commercial high strength fibers to ultra violet (UV) exposure. The results indicate that exposing high strength fibers in continuous yarn form to UV led to serious loss in strength of the fibers except for Spectra® fibers. The adverse changes in mechanical behavior occurred over short duration of exposure compared to the 100 day duration targeted for these missions. UV blocking finishes to improve the UV resistance of these fibers are being investigated. The application of these specially formulated coatings is expected to lead to significant improvement of the UV resistance of these high performance fibers. In this publication, we report on the mechanical behavior of the fibers pre- and post-exposure to UV, but without application of the blocking finishes.

  2. Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2011-06-30

    Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle – i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: • Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder – Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. • Environmental Impact Review – Designs are

  3. Low-Cost Illumination-Grade LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Epler, John

    2013-08-31

    Solid State Lighting is a cost-effective, energy-conserving technology serving a rapidly expand- ing multi-billion dollar market. This program was designed to accelerate this lighting revolution by reducing the manufacturing cost of Illumination-Grade LEDs. The technical strategy was to investigate growth substrate alternatives to standard planar sapphire, select the most effective and compatible option, and demonstrate a significant increase in Lumen/$ with a marketable LED. The most obvious alternate substrate, silicon, was extensively studied in the first two years of the program. The superior thermal and mechanical properties of Si were expected to improve wavelength uniformity and hence color yield in the manufacture of high-power illumination- grade LEDs. However, improvements in efficiency and epitaxy uniformity on standard c-plane sapphire diminished the advantages of switching to Si. Furthermore, the cost of sapphire decreased significantly and the cost of processing Si devices using our thin film process was higher than expected. We concluded that GaN on Si was a viable technology but not a practical option for Philips Lumileds. Therefore in 2012 and 2013, we sought and received amendments which broadened the scope to include other substrates and extended the time of execution. Proprietary engineered substrates, off-axis (non-c-plane) sapphire, and c-plane patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) were all investigated in the final 18 months of this program. Excellent epitaxy quality was achieved on all three candidates; however we eliminated engineered substrates and non-c-plane sapphire because of their higher combined cost of substrate, device fabrication and packaging. Ultimately, by fabricating a flip-chip (FC) LED based upon c-plane PSS we attained a 42% reduction in LED manufacturing cost relative to our LUXEON Rebel product (Q1-2012). Combined with a flux gain from 85 to 102 Lm, the LUXEON Q delivered a 210% increase in Lm/$ over this time period. The

  4. LED pumped polymer laser sensor for explosives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Morawska, Paulina O; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Skabara, Peter J; Turnbull, Graham A; Samuel, Ifor D W

    2013-01-01

    A very compact explosive vapor sensor is demonstrated based on a distributed feedback polymer laser pumped by a commercial InGaN light-emitting diode. The laser shows a two-stage turn on of the laser emission, for pulsed drive currents above 15.7 A. The ‘double-threshold’ phenomenon is attributed to the slow rise of the ∼30 ns duration LED pump pulses. The laser emits a 533 nm pulsed output beam of ∼10 ns duration perpendicular to the polymer film. When exposed to nitroaromatic model explosive vapors at ∼8 ppb concentration, the laser shows a 46% change in the surface-emitted output under optimized LED excitation. PMID:25821526

  5. Design of collimating system for LED source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanan; Huang, Yifan; Xing, Han

    2013-12-01

    Along with the development of semiconductor lighting technology, LED chip is widely used as the source of the glare flashlight. Collimating the light of the source and improving the utilization rate of light energy is crucial. The collimating lens is designed by the theory of geometrical optics and the theory of non-imaging optics. The small angle light from the source is collimated through the collimating lens surface, and the large angle light is collimated by the total reflection of the collimating lens. The collimating lens has a high light energy utilization and a good collimating performance. The collimation system is simulated and optimized in the Lighttools software. When the size of the LED chip is 1 mm*1 mm, the energy utilization rate of the collimating lens is more than 95%, and most lighting area radii are no more than 8 m when the illuminated plane is 500 m away from the light source.

  6. Laser and LED external teeth-bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-05-01

    Teeth-bleaching is an initial phase in the reproduction of an aesthetic smile; thus, it is very important that the dentist knows how to diagnose the causes of color changes and indicate whitening before proposing dental treatment. Technological advances in teeth-whitening lead to the development of new techniques, improving comfort, security and decreasing time of execution: argon laser, diode laser, LED whitening, xenon light whitening. The clearing agent used in all techniques, including home whitening, is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different concentrations. In this study, the authors describe mechanisms of gel activation, the use of Laser and LED's for teeth-bleaching, the importance of diagnosis and the comfort of the patient in in-office teeth-bleaching techniques.

  7. Business-led efforts to control costs.

    PubMed

    Kenkel, P J

    1991-07-29

    Business-led initiatives to compare medical quality and prices are becoming commonplace as employers seek ways to cap medical expenses. But employers are meeting with varying degrees of cooperation from hospitals. The tale of two cities' efforts to pry open the secrets of controlling costs provides a vivid contrast in the way purchasers have tried to solve the cost-containment puzzle. PMID:10111874

  8. Nurse led venesection: a quality improvement project

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chandni; Morgan, Dafydd

    2015-01-01

    Venesection is a widely practised procedure, involving the removal of a unit of blood in order to treat haemochromatosis and polycythaemia. It is still well regarded due to a lack of better alternatives and a small side effect profile. At Barnet General Hospital, venesection has recently been a physician led service, unlike its neighbouring hospital at Chase Farm Hospital, which has a well run nurse led service. The current service being run at Barnet Hospital was beset with problems, including delays in service provision and discharge, using junior doctors who may not be comfortable with or have knowledge of pre and post procedure checks. Furthermore, the medical day treatment unit is comprised of highly skilled nurses. 100% of nursing staff felt comfortable gaining venous access, but none had any formal training. Following a practical tutorial, followed by formal teaching, the nurses now run the venesection service. This has been done at no cost to the hospital, has sped up discharges and this has subsequently led to the capacity of the unit to venesect patients to increase by 100%. PMID:26734402

  9. ZnSe-based white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, K.; Matsubara, H.; Nakanishi, F.; Nakamura, T.; Doi, H.; Saegusa, A.; Mitsui, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Irikura, M.; Takebe, T.; Nishine, S.; Shirakawa, T.

    2000-06-01

    The first phosphor-free white LED based on II-IV compound materials is demonstrated. Our device utilizes a phenomenon unique to ZnSe homoepitaxy, where a portion of the main greenish-blue emission from the active layer of a pn junction diode is absorbed by the conductive substrate which in turn gives off an intense broad-band yellow emission centered around 585 nm by photoluminescence. These two emission bands combine to give a spectrum which appears white to the naked eye. A typical ZnSe-based white LED lamp exhibits a color temperature of approximately 3400 K with a CRI (color rendering index) of 68. The optical output power and operating voltage of such a device at a forward current of 20 mA is 2.0 mW and 2.7 V, respectively. The luminous efficiency estimated from these results is 10.4l m/W, which is comparable to the incandescent lamp as well as the commercial InGaN-based white LED. Device lifetimes (half-life) have exceeded 800 h at 20°C.

  10. LED color mixing with diffractive structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonenberger, Theresa; Baumgart, Jörg; Wendel, Simon; Neumann, Cornelius

    2013-03-01

    Lighting solutions with colored LEDs provide many opportunities for illumination. One of these opportunities is to create a color tunable light source. In this way different kinds of white light (color temperature) as well as discrete colors may be realized. This opens the field for applications as mood lighting. But there is always a spatial separation of the distinct LEDs that might get converted into an angular separation by any collimating optics. This angular separation causes such problems like color fringes and colored shadows that cannot be accepted in most applications. Conventional methods to solve these problems include e.g. mixing rods or dichroic filters. A new approach is the use of the dispersive effect of a diffractive structure to compensate the angular separation of the different colors. In this contribution the potential and limitations of diffractive structures in LED color mixing applications are discussed. Ray tracing simulations were performed to analyze such important parameters like efficiency, color performance and the cross section of the color mixing optics. New means for the estimation of color mixing performance were developed. A software tool makes it possible to detect the color distribution within ray trace data and it provides a quality factor to estimate the color mixing performance. It can be shown that the spectral band width has a large influence on the mixing process. Ray tracing simulations are compared with results of an experimental setup such that both measured as well as simulated data is presented.

  11. LED downlights with non-circular spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkyn, William A.; Pelka, David G.

    2005-09-01

    The ubiquitous downlight inhabits our ceilings by the millions. Hot, inefficient, and electrically wasteful, it is next in line for replacement by the latest high-brightness, high-efficacy white LEDs. The conventional downlight configuration of a large incandescent spotlight in a low-cost, ceiling-recessed metal can, represents the culmination of old technology, fated never to improve significantly. Incandescent downlights add greatly both to direct and indirect electrical consumption, with the lamps requiring relatively frequent replacement. The small size of LED emitters means small optical elements can produce much higher-quality beams than incandescent spotlight-lamps can produce. Herein we introduce compact high-luminosity LED downlights with lenses that deliver uniform illumination to delimited targets such as tables. One version utilizes circular lenses and micro-diffuser films to deliver square outputs. The other uses lenses cut to the target shape. In particular, one of these lenses is the first to offer a semicircular spot suitable for gambling tables.

  12. New design tools for LED headlamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domhardt, André; Rohlfing, Udo; Weingaertner, Simon; Klinger, Karsten; Kooß, Dieter; Manz, Karl; Lemmer, Uli

    2008-04-01

    The automotive lighting technology is in considerable progress due to new components, e.g., High-Power-LEDs and light guides, and new sophisticated production techniques. Furthermore, great importance is being attached to the appearance of front and tail lamps. White High-Power-LEDs have reached a development stage that affords its reasonable application to low beam headlamps. This challenging illumination function requires sophisticated design techniques in order to preserve the advantages associated with this source type. Thus, high efficiency and stylish appearance have to be reconciled, e.g., with the use of freeform surfaces. Beside the demands from manufacturers and customers, car lamps have to meet several regulations (ECE, SAE, etc.). This contribution describes the illumination design of a LED-based low beam headlamp using advanced mathematical methods, e.g., 3D-Tailoring, automatic optimization, and Virtually Reflecting/Refracting Surfaces (VRS). We propose this new surface type with non conventional reflection/refraction properties as an advantageous design tool for the first layout and for automatic optimization, as well. For efficiency reasons, special attention will be paid to the creation of the cut-off line without using additional stops.

  13. UV Treatment for Small Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Center for Environmental Education, Conservation and Research (CECIA) at InterAmerican University of Puerto Rico (IAUPR) has organized the 10th CECIA-IAUPR Biennial Symposium on Potable Water Issues in Puerto Rico. This presentation on UV Treatment for Small Systems will be ...

  14. Near UV Aerosol Group Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar

    2013-01-01

    2012-13 Report of research on aerosol and cloud remote sensing using UV observations. The document was presented at the 2013 AEROCENTER Annual Meeting held at the GSFC Visitors Center, May 31, 2013. The Organizers of the meeting are posting the talks to the public Aerocentr website, after the meeting.

  15. Resonant-enhanced full-color emission of quantum-dot-based micro LED display technology.

    PubMed

    Han, Hau-Vei; Lin, Huang-Yu; Lin, Chien-Chung; Chong, Wing-Cheung; Li, Jie-Ru; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Yu, Peichen; Chen, Teng-Ming; Chen, Huang-Ming; Lau, Kei-May; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2015-12-14

    Colloidal quantum dots which can emit red, green, and blue colors are incorporated with a micro-LED array to demonstrate a feasible choice for future display technology. The pitch of the micro-LED array is 40 μm, which is sufficient for high-resolution screen applications. The method that was used to spray the quantum dots in such tight space is called Aerosol Jet technology which uses atomizer and gas flow control to obtain uniform and controlled narrow spots. The ultra-violet LEDs are used in the array to excite the red, green and blue quantum dots on the top surface. To increase the utilization of the UV photons, a layer of distributed Bragg reflector was laid down on the device to reflect most of the leaked UV photons back to the quantum dot layers. With this mechanism, the enhanced luminous flux is 194% (blue), 173% (green) and 183% (red) more than that of the samples without the reflector. The luminous efficacy of radiation (LER) was measured under various currents and a value of 165 lm/Watt was recorded. PMID:26699040

  16. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits UV-induced MMP-1 expression in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Ho; Shin, Chung Min; Park, Chi-Hyun; Kim, Kyu Han; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Eun, Hee Chul; Chung, Jin Ho

    2005-08-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation regulates UV-responsive genes, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Moreover, UV-induced MMPs cause connective tissue damage and the skin to become wrinkled and aged. Here, we investigated the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a dietary omega-3 fatty acid, on UV-induced MMP-1 expression in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). We found that UV radiation increases MMP-1 expression and that this is mediated by p44 and p42 MAP kinase (ERK) and Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation but not by p38 activation. Pretreatment of HDFs with EPA inhibited UV-induced MMP-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner and also inhibited the UV-induced activation of ERK and JNK by inhibiting ERK kinase (MEK1) and SAPK/ERK kinase 1 (SEK1) activation, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of ERK and JNK by EPA resulted in the decrease of c-Fos expression and c-Jun phosphorylation/expression induced by UV, respectively, which led to the inhibition of UV-induced activator protein-1 DNA binding activity. This inhibitory effect of EPA on MMP-1 was not mediated by an antioxidant effect. We also found that EPA inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- or tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced MMP-1 expression in HDFs and UV-induced MMP-1 expression in HaCaT cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that EPA can inhibit UV-induced MMP-1 expression by inhibiting the MEK1/ERK/c-Fos and SEK1/JNK/c-Jun pathways. Therefore, EPA is a potential agent for the prevention and treatment of skin aging. PMID:15930517

  17. Influences of colorful LED emissions on spectrophotometric properties of a LED based white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sametoglu, F.; Celikel, O.

    2011-05-01

    A LED based white light source (WLS) is designed and constructed to determine the color characteristics of the samples having specular and diffuse reflectance properties at the standard measurement conditions of 0/45 and d/8. The light source is composed of high power cool white and ultraviolet light emitting diodes (LEDs) which are operable in adjustable current levels. In order to combine the light beams emerging from two LED sources, a 1x2 fiber optic combiner is used. Optical characterizations of the light source designed and influences of several colorful LEDs called Royal-Blue, Blue, Cyan, Green, Amber, Red-Orange and Red on spectrophotometric properties of the light source are investigated.

  18. Rapid fabrication of microfluidic chips based on the simplest LED lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Wu, Ping; Luo, Zhaofeng; Ren, Yuxuan; Liao, Meixiang; Feng, Lili; Li, Yuting; He, Liqun

    2015-05-01

    Microfluidic chips are generally fabricated by a soft lithography method employing commercial lithography equipment. These heavy machines require a critical room environment and high lamp power, and the cost remains too high for most normal laboratories. Here we present a novel microfluidics fabrication method utilizing a portable ultraviolet (UV) LED as an alternative UV source for photolithography. With this approach, we can repeat several common microchannels as do these conventional commercial exposure machines, and both the verticality of the channel sidewall and lithography resolution are proved to be acceptable. Further microfluidics applications such as mixing, blood typing and microdroplet generation are implemented to validate the practicability of the chips. This simple but innovative method decreases the cost and requirement of chip fabrication dramatically and may be more popular with ordinary laboratories.

  19. UV/chlorine process for ammonia removal and disinfection by-product reduction: comparison with chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinran; Li, Weiguang; Blatchley, Ernest R; Wang, Xiaoju; Ren, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    The combined application of UV irradiation at 254 nm and chlorination (UV/chlorine process) was investigated for ammonia removal in water treatment. The UV/chlorine process led to higher ammonia removal with less chlorine demand, as compared to breakpoint chlorination. Chlorination of NH₃ led to NH₂Cl formation in the first step. The photolysis of NH₂Cl and radical- mediated oxidation of ammonia appeared to represent the main pathways for ammonia removal. The trivalent nitrogen of ammonia was oxidized, presumably by reactions with aminyl radicals and chlorine radicals. Measured products included NO₃⁻and NO₂⁻; it is likely that N₂ and N₂O were also generated. In addition, UV irradiation appeared to have altered the reactivity of NOM toward free chlorine. The UV/chlorine process had lower chlorine demand, less C-DBPs (THMs and HAAs), but more HANs than chlorination. These results indicate that the UV/chlorine process could represent an alternative to conventional breakpoint chlorination for ammonia-containing water, with several advantages in terms of simplicity, short reaction time, and reduced chemical dosage. PMID:25466638

  20. The management of stress in MOCVD-grown InGaN/GaN LED multilayer structures on Si(1 1 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quanzhong; Allsopp, Duncan W. E.; Bowen, Chris R.; Wang, Wang N.

    2013-09-01

    The tensile stress in light-emitting diode (LED)-on-Si(1 1 1) multilayer structures must be reduced so that it does not compromise the multiple quantum well emission wavelength uniformity and structural stability. In this paper it is shown for non-optimized LED structures grown on Si(1 1 1) substrates that both emission wavelength uniformity and structural stability can be achieved within the same growth process. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the stress distribution within such a structure, cross-sectional Raman and photo-luminescence spectroscopy techniques were developed. It is observed that for a Si:GaN layer grown on a low-temperature (LT) AlN intermediate layer there is a decrease in compressive stress with increasing Si:GaN layer thickness during MOCVD growth which leads to a high level of tensile stress in the upper part of the layer. This may lead to the development of cracks during cooling to room temperature. Such a phenomenon may be associated with annihilation of defects such as dislocations. Therefore, a reduction of dislocation intensity should take place at the early stage of GaN growth on an AlN or AlGaN layer in order to reduce a build up of tensile stress with thickness. Furthermore, it is also shown that a prolonged three dimensional GaN island growth on a LT AlN interlayer for the reduction of dislocations may result in a reduction in the compressive stress in the resulting GaN layer.

  1. Radiation-damage-induced phasing: a case study using UV irradiation with light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Zubieta, Chloe; Felisaz, Franck; Caserotto, Hugo; Nanao, Max H

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to X-rays, high-intensity visible light or ultraviolet radiation results in alterations to protein structure such as the breakage of disulfide bonds, the loss of electron density at electron-rich centres and the movement of side chains. These specific changes can be exploited in order to obtain phase information. Here, a case study using insulin to illustrate each step of the radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP) method is presented. Unlike a traditional X-ray-induced damage step, specific damage is introduced via ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). In contrast to UV lasers, UV-LEDs have the advantages of small size, low cost and relative ease of use. PMID:26960126

  2. Child-led enquiry in primary science

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Lynda; Compton, Kirsty; Clarke, Linda; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    This research describes and evaluates the application of a child-led approach to scientific enquiry (the Community of Scientific Enquiry, CoSE) to children aged 8–11 (Key Stage 2) in Northern Ireland. Primary teachers were introduced to CoSE at a workshop and asked to evaluate its implementation with their class. Results from children (n = 364) and teachers (n = 19) found that CoSE engaged children with their science learning, and also developed confidence and oracy. However, teachers require more experience developing facilitation skills and in fitting science into a thematic teaching unit. PMID:27152060

  3. Wheat Under LED's (Light Emitting Diodes)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astroculture is a suite of technologies used to produce and maintain a closed controlled environment for plant growth. The two most recent missions supported growth of potato, dwarf wheat, and mustard plants, and provided scientists with the first opportunity to conduct true plant research in space. Light emitting diodes have particular usefulness for plant growth lighting because they emit a much smaller amount of radiant heat than do conventional lighting sources and because they have potential of directing a higher percentage of the emitted light onto plants surfaces. Furthermore, the high output LED's have emissions in the 600-700 nm waveband, which is of highest efficiency for photosynthesis by plants.

  4. Multiple LED camera for dynamic photoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, A.; Sajan, M. R.

    1995-05-01

    Dynamic photoelasticity involves the high-speed recording of rapidly moving fringe patterns in synchronization with loading. Cranz Schardin cameras are routinely utilized in the recording of dynamic photoelastic patterns. There are no moving components in these cameras, making the setup simple and attractive. A multiple LED camera based on the Cranz Schardin format is presented. High-speed instant polaroid film is used for recording the photoelastic fringes. Low cost, simplicity in the experimental setup, and rapid repeatability are the advantages of the camera.

  5. Tunable UV source for UV fluorescence remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, R.D.; Lowenthal, D.D.; Raymond, T.D.; Alford, W.J.; Smith, A.V.; Johnson, M.S.

    1994-08-01

    Efficient generation of ultraviolet radiation tunable over the 240--410 nm range has been achieved in a system suitable for ultraviolet (uv) fluorescence remote sensing. Light from an Optical Parametric Oscillator/Amplifier turning in the 0.7--2.1 {mu}m range is mixed with the second or third harmonic from a Nd:YAG laser, to obtain up to 30 mJ of broadly tunable output in the ultraviolet.

  6. Physics of Electrodeless UV Lamps and Applications of UV Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekic, Miodrag; Ruckman, Mark

    2004-12-01

    Electrodeless discharge microwave powered ultraviolet limps are a special class of high power incoherent UV sources, conceptualized forty years ago for industrial processing applications. Because of the nonimaging character of the applications, the need for measuring averaged properties of the lamps' exceeds the motivation to obtain detailed space-resolved discharge parameters. This writing discusses measurements of the average plasma temperature of a 5.8kW high pressure mercury bulb and a XeCl* excimer bulb driven by the microwaves of the same power. First method is based on the black body radiance fit to the self-absorbed 185nm and 254nm mercury lines. The second method is essentially Boltzmann plot method applied to the roto-vibrational levels of B1/2 - X1/2 XeCl* molecular transition with a maximum at 308nm. We also present a procedure for evaluation of effectiveness of different bulb spectra to the given UV curing chemistry system independent from the Beer-Lambert law. Conversely, the procedure can be used for the optimization of the chemistry to the chosen UV lamp radiance spectrum.

  7. The Response of Human Skin Commensal Bacteria as a Reflection of UV Radiation: UV-B Decreases Porphyrin Production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhan; Zhu, Wenhong; Shu, Muya; Jiang, Yong; Gallo, Richard L.; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Recent global radiation fears reflect the urgent need for a new modality that can simply determine if people are in a radiation risk of developing cancer and other illnesses. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been thought to be the major risk factor for most skin cancers. Although various biomarkers derived from the responses of human cells have been revealed, detection of these biomarkers is cumbersome, probably requires taking live human tissues, and varies significantly depending on human immune status. Here we hypothesize that the reaction of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), a human resident skin commensal, to UV radiation can serve as early surrogate markers for radiation risk because the bacteria are immediately responsive to radiation. In addition, the bacteria can be readily accessible and exposed to the same field of radiation as human body. To test our hypothesis, P. acnes was exposed to UV-B radiation. The production of porphyrins in P. acnes was significantly reduced with increasing doses of UV-B. The porphyrin reduction can be detected in both P. acnes and human skin bacterial isolates. Exposure of UV-B to P. acnes- inoculated mice led to a significant decrease in porphyrin production in a single colony of P. acnes and simultaneously induced the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) in the epidermal layers of mouse skin. Mass spectrometric analysis via a linear trap quadrupole (LTQ)-Orbitrap XL showed that five peptides including an internal peptide (THLPTGIVVSCQNER) of a peptide chain release factor 2 (RF2) were oxidized by UV-B. Seven peptides including three internal peptides of 60 kDa chaperonin 1 were de-oxidized by UV-B. When compared to UV-B, gamma radiation also decreased the porphyrin production of P. acnes in a dose-dependent manner, but induced a different signature of protein oxidation/de-oxidation. We highlight that uncovering response of skin microbiome to radiation will facilitate the development of pre-symptomatic diagnosis

  8. Desktop autostereoscopic display using compact LED projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Hiroki; Ohshima, Tetsuya; Ebina, Osamu; Arimoto, Akira

    2003-05-01

    A stereoscopic display using a curved directional reflection (CDR) screen and projectors is a promising approach towards realizing an immersive three-dimensional (3D) display system. The CDR screen consists of a corner reflective mirror sheet for horizontal focusing and an anisotropic diffuser sheet for vertical diffusion. The CDR 3D display can provide bright and large images without the need for special glasses. In this paper, we introduce this immersive 3D display technique onto the desktop display. To realize this concept, we have developed the compact projectors with light emitting diode (LED) light sources and a liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS). These have allowed the realization of 65 mm width projectors that are able to be put side by side at the interocular distance. The efficient optical system of an LED array as area-light-sources combined with an ultra high gain (>100) CDR screen have allowed for a desktop autostereoscopic display whose luminance is more than 100 cd/m2 with only 9 W power consumption. This system provides immersive 3D images for only the observer and keeps his privacy.

  9. Dimmable VLC demonstration systems based on LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, Seong-Su; Jung, Sung-Yoon

    2012-12-01

    Recently, there have been many attempts to converge LED with IT technology. Among them, Visible Light Communication (VLC), which is the convergence of illumination and communication, has emerged. In VLC system, both lighting and communication can be simultaneously implemented. By considering both terms together, VPPM(Variable Pulse Position Modulation) modulation scheme is proposed by the IEEE 802.15.7 standard group. It uses binary PPM (Pulse Position Modulation) for communication and PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) for dimming control. In this paper, we introduce the implementation of VLC demonstration system based on VPPM modulation scheme. By changing the pulse width of VPPM signal, we can support 25%, 50% and 75% dimming. In addition, our VLC demonstration system provides a new power system using solar cell. By receiving the VPPM modulated visible light signal in the receiver end, we turn on the receiver power and start the system operation to decode the transmitted signal. By using ATmega128 8bit Micro Controller Unit (MCU) by ATMEL and Q3 XLamp XP-E LEDs of Cree, our system provides about 2kbps data rate with 2.5kHz optical rate in more than 30cm distance. By implementing DM S/W, we show the bit error rate (BER) and achievable data rate (ADR) of our demonstration system.

  10. LED context lighting system in residential areas.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sook-Youn; Im, Kyoung-Mi; Lim, Jae-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    As issues of environment and energy draw keen interest around the globe due to such problems as global warming and the energy crisis, LED with high optical efficiency is brought to the fore as the next generation lighting. In addition, as the national income level gets higher and life expectancy is extended, interest in the enhancement of life quality is increasing. Accordingly, the trend of lightings is changing from mere adjustment of light intensity to system lighting in order to enhance the quality of one's life as well as reduce energy consumption. Thus, this study aims to design LED context lighting system that automatically recognizes the location and acts of a user in residential areas and creates an appropriate lighting environment. The proposed system designed in this study includes three types of processing: first, the creation of a lighting environment index suitable for the user's surroundings and lighting control scenarios and second, it measures and analyzes the optical characteristics that change depending on the dimming control of lighting and applies them to the index. Lastly, it adopts PIR, piezoelectric, and power sensor to grasp the location and acts of the user and create a lighting environment suitable for the current context. PMID:25101325

  11. LED Context Lighting System in Residential Areas

    PubMed Central

    Im, Kyoung-Mi

    2014-01-01

    As issues of environment and energy draw keen interest around the globe due to such problems as global warming and the energy crisis, LED with high optical efficiency is brought to the fore as the next generation lighting. In addition, as the national income level gets higher and life expectancy is extended, interest in the enhancement of life quality is increasing. Accordingly, the trend of lightings is changing from mere adjustment of light intensity to system lighting in order to enhance the quality of one's life as well as reduce energy consumption. Thus, this study aims to design LED context lighting system that automatically recognizes the location and acts of a user in residential areas and creates an appropriate lighting environment. The proposed system designed in this study includes three types of processing: first, the creation of a lighting environment index suitable for the user's surroundings and lighting control scenarios and second, it measures and analyzes the optical characteristics that change depending on the dimming control of lighting and applies them to the index. Lastly, it adopts PIR, piezoelectric, and power sensor to grasp the location and acts of the user and create a lighting environment suitable for the current context. PMID:25101325

  12. Studying Light Color using White LED Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Misako; Yamaba, Kazuo; Nagata, Manori; Kubo, Chiho; Nokura, Kunihiro

    Recently, white Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are receiving attention worldwide as new lighting devices. This study examined effects of a lighting application on performance using white LEDs. The light color—the correlated color temperature (CCT) —was assessed. It affected to psychological states and physiological conditions. Three CCT conditions were respectively set for the experiment: 2500 K, 5000 K, and 8200 K. In all, 20 younger subjects (20-30 years old), 15 middle-aged to elderly subjects (45-60 years old) and 12 elderly subjects (over 65 years-old) participated. They were presented a Numerical Verification (NV) task for performance measurement. The psychological states on performance were evaluated using the lighting assessment questionnaire. The physiological conditions were recorded using an electrocardiograph. Results show that the effects of CCT differ among age groups. Especially, the performance of younger subjects might differ from CCT conditions; elderly subjects are affected by CCT condition because of their visual acuity or response to contrast of objects.

  13. Freeform reflector design for LED street lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Schreiber, Peter; Walkling, Andreas; Schierz, Christoph; Schwede, Maik; Gühne, Volker

    2011-10-01

    Faceted freeform reflectors were designed for intelligent street lighting with LED cluster arrays for main traffic roads. Special attention was paid to achieve highly efficient illumination on both wet and dry road surfaces. CIE reflection tables W4 and C2 were applied in the simulation for these two conditions, respectively. The reflector design started with plane facets, then - to avoid artifacts from the images of the individual LEDs - plane facets were replaced with cylindrical facets. To get even more flexibility for the design and optimization, freeform facets were employed, modeled by extruding two different conic curves together. Besides of achieving well-proportioned road luminance distribution, the basic shapes of the reflectors were formed to control stray light caused by multiple reflections within the reflector and by reflection of light from neighbor clusters within the cluster array. The merit functions include useful transmission of light to the road as well as overall and lengthwise uniformity according to road illumination standards. Due to the large amount of variables, the optimization was carried out sequentially facet by facet. The design loops included compromising with manufacturing limitations for plastics molding and thorough analysis of conformity with DIN EN 13201 standards for ME road lighting classes. The calculated reflector profiles are realized by plastic injection molding.

  14. PULSED UV: REALITIES OF ENHANCED DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative measurements of the light output from low pressure (LP), medium pressure (MP) and the pulsed UV lamps were made using calibrated spectrometry, chemical actinometry and biodosimetry approaches to compare their relative efficiency in producing germicidal UV energy. Fur...

  15. UV curable pressure sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Glotfelter, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA`s) have become a ubiquitous element in our society, so much so, that the relative status of a society can be determined by the per capita consumption of PSA`s. We discuss new monomers as components of PSA formulations which enable adhesion to be achieved on a variety of substrates. Since solventless coating systems are desirable, the UV PSA market is of utmost importance to meeting the strict environmental guidelines now being imposed worldwide. In addition, highly ethoxylated monomers have shown promise in water dispersed PSA formulations, and a self-emulsifying acrylate monomer has been developed to offer dispersive abilities without using traditional emulsifying agents. This talk will focus on the effects of the materials described on properties of adhesive strength and shear strength in UV PSA formulations.

  16. UV SPECTRAL SYNTHESIS OF VEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, E. L.

    2010-12-20

    We show that the UV spectrum (1280-3200 A) of the 'superficially normal' A-star Vega, as observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite at a resolution comparable to the star's rotational broadening width, can be fit remarkably well by a single-temperature synthetic spectrum based on LTE atmosphere models and a newly constructed UV line list. If Vega were a normal, equator-on, slow-rotating star, then its spectrum and our analysis would indicate a temperature of T{sub eff} {approx_equal}9550 K, surface gravity of log g {approx_equal}3.7, general surface metallicity of [m/H] {approx_equal}-0.5, and a microturbulence velocity of v{sub turb} {approx_equal}2.0 km s{sup -1}. Given its rapid rotation and nearly pole-on orientation, however, these parameters must be regarded as representing averages across the observed hemisphere. Modeling the complex UV line spectrum has allowed us to determine the specific surface abundances for 17 different chemical elements, including CNO, the light metals, and the iron group elements. The resultant abundance pattern agrees in general with previous results, although there is considerable scatter in the literature. Despite its peculiarities, Vega has turned out to provide a powerful test of the extent of our abilities to model the atmospheric properties of the early A-stars, particularly the detailed UV line spectrum. The value of the measurements from this pilot study will increase as this analysis is extended to more objects in the rich high-dispersion IUE data archive, including both normal and peculiar objects.

  17. UV Irradiance and Albedo at Union Glacier Camp (Antarctica): A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Raul R.; Damiani, Alessandro; Ferrer, Jorge; Jorquera, Jose; Tobar, Mario; Labbe, Fernando; Carrasco, Jorge; Laroze, David

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first spectral measurements of ultraviolet (UV) irradiance and the albedo at a Camp located in the southern Ellsworth Mountains on the broad expanse of Union Glacier (700 m altitude, 79° 46′ S; 82° 52′W); about 1,000 km from the South Pole. The measurements were carried out by using a double monochromator-based spectroradiometer during a campaign (in December 2012) meant to weight up the effect of the local albedo on the UV irradiance. We found that the albedo measured at noon was about 0.95 in the UV and the visible part of the spectrum. This high surface reflectivity led to enhancements in the UV index under cloudless conditions of about 50% in comparison with snow free surfaces. Spectral measurements carried out elsewhere as well as estimates retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were used for further comparisons. PMID:24598906

  18. UV irradiance and albedo at Union Glacier Camp (Antarctica): a case study.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Raul R; Damiani, Alessandro; Ferrer, Jorge; Jorquera, Jose; Tobar, Mario; Labbe, Fernando; Carrasco, Jorge; Laroze, David

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first spectral measurements of ultraviolet (UV) irradiance and the albedo at a Camp located in the southern Ellsworth Mountains on the broad expanse of Union Glacier (700 m altitude, 79° 46' S; 82° 52'W); about 1,000 km from the South Pole. The measurements were carried out by using a double monochromator-based spectroradiometer during a campaign (in December 2012) meant to weight up the effect of the local albedo on the UV irradiance. We found that the albedo measured at noon was about 0.95 in the UV and the visible part of the spectrum. This high surface reflectivity led to enhancements in the UV index under cloudless conditions of about 50% in comparison with snow free surfaces. Spectral measurements carried out elsewhere as well as estimates retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were used for further comparisons. PMID:24598906

  19. EDITORIAL: LED light sources (light for the future) LED light sources (light for the future)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, N.

    2010-09-01

    Generating white light from electricity with maximum efficacy has been a long quest since the first incandescent lamp was invented by Edison at the end of the 19th century. Nowadays, semiconductors are making reality the holy grail of converting electrons into photons with 100% efficiency and with colours that can be mixed for white light illumination. The revolution in solid-state lighting (SSL) dates to 1994 when Nakamura reported the first high-brightness blue LED based on GaN semiconductors. Then, white light was produced by simply combining a blue dye with a yellow phosphor. After more than a decade of intensive research the performance of white LEDs is quite impressive, beating by far the luminous efficacy of compact fluorescent lamps. We are likely close to replacing our current lighting devices by SSL lamps. However, there are still technological and fabrication cost issues that could delay large market penetration of white LEDs. Interestingly, SSL may create novel ways of using light that could potentially limit electricity saving. Whatever the impact of SSL, it will be significant on our daily life. The purpose of this special cluster issue is to produce a snapshot of the current situation of SSL from different viewing angles. In an introductory paper, Tsao and co-workers from Sandia National Laboratories, present an energy-economics perspective of SSL considering societal changes and SSL technology evolution. In a second article, Narukawa et al working at Nichia Corporation—the pioneer and still the leading company in SSL—describe the state of the art of current research products. They demonstrate record performance with white LEDs exhibiting luminous efficacy of 183 lm W-1 at high-current injection. Then, a series of topical papers discuss in detail various aspects of the physics and technology of white LEDs Carrier localization in InGaN quantum wells has been considered the key to white LEDs' success despite the huge density of defects. A

  20. XI UV Laser Trigger System

    SciTech Connect

    Brickeen, B.K.; Morelli, G.L.; Paiva, R.A.; Powell, C.A.; Sundvold, P.D.

    1999-01-26

    The X1 accelerator project at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico utilizes SF6 insulated, multi-stage, UV laser triggered gas switches. A 265 nm UV laser system was designed and built to generate eight simultaneous output pulses of 10 mJ each with a 13 nsec pulse width. A 1061 nm solid-state Nd:Cr:GSGG laser was frequency quadrupled using a two-stage doubling process. The 1061 nm fundamental laser energy was frequency doubled with a KTP crystal to 530 nm, achieving 65% conversion efficiency. The 530 nm output was frequency doubled with KD*P crystal to 265 nm, achieving conversion efficiency of 31%. The 265 nm beam pulse was split into eight parallel channels with a system of partially reflecting mirrors. Low timing jitter and stable energy output were achieved. The entire optical system was packaged into a rugged, o-ring sealed, aluminum structure 10''x19''x2.75''. The size of the electronics was 12''x8''x8''. Subsequent accelerator system requirements dictated a redesign of the triggering system for an output beam with less angular divergence. An unstable, crossed porro prism resonator was designed and incorporated into the system. The beam divergence of the redesigned system was successfully decreased to 0.97 mrad in the UV. The resulting frequency doubling efficiencies were 55% to 530 nm and 25% to 265 nm. The optical output remained at 10 mJ in each channel with an 11 nsec pulse width.

  1. Over 1 W record-peak-power operation of a 338 nm AlGaN multiple-quantum-well laser diode on a GaN substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketomi, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Yuta; Takagi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Kuwabara, Masakazu; Yoshida, Harumasa

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated the high-peak-power operation of an AlGaN-based ultraviolet laser diode (UV-LD) with a lasing wavelength of 338.6 nm. The UV-LD structure was fabricated on a bulk GaN(0001) substrate. The broad-area and vertical conductive structure of the UV-LD, whose ridge width and cavity length were 50 and 600 µm, respectively, was employed. The threshold current density and differential external quantum efficiency were estimated to be 38.9 kA/cm2 and 8.5%, respectively. The characteristic temperature of threshold current was estimated to be 119 K, and the temperature dependence of lasing wavelength was obtained to be 0.033 nm K‑1. A peak power of over 1 W has been achieved in 338.6 nm under pulsed operation at room temperature, which is the highest peak power ever obtained for AlGaN-based UV-LDs.

  2. Studies and issues of thin-GaN LED process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. H.; Lin, C. L.; Lin, Y. H.; Chou, P. K.; Liu, C. Y.

    2007-09-01

    A newly developed thin-GaN LED structure has shown great advantages over traditional LED schemes in the lighting efficiency performance. Yet, in the fabrication process of thin-GaN LED chip, several processes still remain to be optimized. In this paper, the process issues of the promising thin-GaN LED chip will be discussed.

  3. Spectral optimization of the color temperature tunable white light-emitting diode (LED) cluster consisting of direct-emission blue and red LEDs and a diphosphor conversion LED.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ping; He, Guoxing; Zhang, Minhao

    2012-09-10

    The correlated color temperature (CCT) tunable white-light LED cluster, which consists of direct-emission blue and red LEDs as well as phosphor-conversion (PC) LEDs packaged by combining green and orange phosphors with a blue LED die, has been obtained by nonlinear program for maximizing luminous efficacy (LE) of radiation (LER) under conditions of both color rendering index (CRI) and special CRI of R9 for strong red above 90 at CCTs of 2700 K to 6500 K. The optimal peak wavelengths of blue LED, red LED, blue LED die, green and orange phosphors are 465 nm, 628 nm, 452 nm, 530 nm and 586 nm, respectively. The real CCT tunable PC/red/blue LED cluster with CRIs of 90~96, R9s of 90~96, CQSs of 89~94, LERs of 303~358 lm/W, and LEs of 105~119 lm/W has been realized at CCTs of 2722 K to 6464 K. The deviation of the peak wavelength should be less than ± 5 nm for blue LED die, ± 1 nm for red LED, and ± 2 nm for blue LED to achieve the PC/R/B LED cluster with high optical performance. PMID:23037535

  4. Development of Advanced LED Phosphors by Spray-based Processes for Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot Corporation

    2007-09-30

    The overarching goal of the project was to develop luminescent materials using aerosol processes for making improved LED devices for solid state lighting. In essence this means improving white light emitting phosphor based LEDs by improvement of the phosphor and phosphor layer. The structure of these types of light sources, displayed in Figure 1, comprises of a blue or UV LED under a phosphor layer that converts the blue or UV light to a broad visible (white) light. Traditionally, this is done with a blue emitting diode combined with a blue absorbing, broadly yellow emitting phosphor such as Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce (YAG). A similar result may be achieved by combining a UV emitting diode and at least three different UV absorbing phosphors: red, green, and blue emitting. These emitted colors mix to make white light. The efficiency of these LEDs is based on the combined efficiency of the LED, phosphor, and the interaction between the two. The Cabot SSL project attempted to improve the over all efficiency of the LED light source be improving the efficiency of the phosphor and the interaction between the LED light and the phosphor. Cabot's spray based process for producing phosphor powders is able to improve the brightness of the powder itself by increasing the activator (the species that emits the light) concentration without adverse quenching effects compared to conventional synthesis. This will allow less phosphor powder to be used, and will decrease the cost of the light source; thus lowering the barrier of entry to the lighting market. Cabot's process also allows for chemical flexibility of the phosphor particles, which may result in tunable emission spectra and so light sources with improved color rendering. Another benefit of Cabot's process is the resulting spherical morphology of the particles. Less light scattering results when spherical particles are used in the phosphor layer (Figure 1) compared to when conventional, irregular shaped phosphor particles

  5. Fluorescent Brighteners as Visible LED-Light Sensitive Photoinitiators for Free Radical Photopolymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiaoling; Morlet-Savary, Fabrice; Graff, Bernadette; Blanchard, Nicolas; Goddard, Jean-Philippe; Lalevée, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    The photochemical and electrochemical investigations of commercially available, safe, and cheap fluorescent brighteners, namely, triazinylstilbene (commercial name: fluorescent brightener 28) and 2,5-bis(5-tert-butyl-benzoxazol-2-yl)thiophene, as well as their original use as photoinitiators of polymerization upon light emitting diode (LED) irradiation are reported. Remarkably, their excellent near-UV-visible absorption properties combined with outstanding fluorescent properties allow them to act as high-performance photoinitiators when used in combination with diaryliodonium salt. These two-component photoinitiating systems can be employed for free radical polymerizations of acrylate. In addition, this brightener-initiated photopolymerization is able to overcome oxygen inhibition even upon irradiation with low LED light intensity. The underlying photochemical mechanisms are investigated by electron-spin resonance-spin trapping, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry, and steady-state photolysis techniques. PMID:27072016

  6. RGB color sensor implemented with LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filoteo-Razo, J. D.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Hernández-Garcia, J. C.; Trejo-Durán, M.; Muñoz-Lopez, A.; Jauregui-Vázquez, D.; Rojas-Laguna, R.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an optical sensor to detect color changes in fruit by means of white light reflection to measure fruit ripeness in industrial and agricultural applications. The system consists of a LED RGB array including photodetectors, a power source and plastic optic fiber (POF). By means of Labview ® graphic interface we can control the power emission of the diodes digitally mixing the colors at different intensities until we achieve white light to be used as a source for the color sensor. We used an ATmega2560 microcontroller as a data collection device to monitor the colors obtained and to show them as color models using Matlab ®. We show results from tests conducted using two guava samples, observing the evolution of the color change on the fruit skin until they became overripe.

  7. Scandium oxide antireflection coatings for superluminescent LEDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Zanzucchi, P. J.; Andrews, J. T.; Kane, J.; Depiano, E.

    1986-01-01

    For an employment of laser diodes as superluminescent LEDs (SLDs) or amplifiers, the facets of the diodes must be coated with antireflection films. In the work reported, scandium oxide was evaporated from an e-beam source onto Supersil II fused silica substrates. The obtained samples were used for measurements of absorption and reflectivity. Results of index measurements on e-beam evaporated films are presented. It is shown that excellent coatings with reflectivities of 0.00025 can be obtained using these films. Attention is given to the refractive indices for scandium oxide films as a function of wavelength, the power output vs current for laser before coating and after coating with Sc2O3.

  8. Switched-capacitor isolated LED driver

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, Seth R.; Kline, Mitchell

    2016-03-22

    A switched-capacitor voltage converter which is particularly well-suited for receiving a line voltage from which to drive current through a series of light emitting diodes (LEDs). Input voltage is rectified in a multi-level rectifier network having switched capacitors in an ascending-bank configuration for passing voltages in uniform steps between zero volts up to full received voltage V.sub.DC. A regulator section, operating on V.sub.DC, comprises switched-capacitor stages of H-bridge switching and flying capacitors. A current controlled oscillator drives the states of the switched-capacitor stages and changes its frequency to maintain a constant current to the load. Embodiments are described for isolating the load from the mains, utilizing an LC tank circuit or a multi-primary-winding transformer.

  9. Measurement of g Using a Flashing LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzella, T.; Sundermier, J.; Sinacore, J.; Owen, C.; Takai, H.

    2008-10-01

    In one of the classic free-fall experiments, a small mass is attached to a strip of paper tape and both are allowed to fall through a spark timer, where sparks are generated at regular time intervals. Students analyze marks (dots) left on the tape by the timer, thereby generating distance-versus-time data, which they analyze to extract the acceleration due to gravity g with good results. The apparatus, however, is cumbersome and often frustrating for students. High-tech versions of this experiment are done with an object dropped and followed by a motion sensor connected to a computer. The sensor relies on ultrasonic ranging to record distance and time data, which may then be displayed graphically. Students inspect the graphs to determine the value of g. Although the results are excellent, the emphasis on the computer's ability to collect and analyze data leaves little analysis for the students to perform.2 Furthermore, neither technique gives an intuitive display of what is happening. The motivation for our work was to overcome these issues by developing an innovative method for measuring g. In our version of the experiment, students drop a flashing LED at a known frequency and record its trajectory using long exposure photography with a digital camera. Proper choice of flashing LED timing parameters produces an image that allows for an accurate measurement of g and at the same time helps to explain what happens during free fall. The experiment remains high-tech in the sense that students learn to use updated equipment to record data and to carry out the analysis.

  10. Open LED Illuminator: A Simple and Inexpensive LED Illuminator for Fast Multicolor Particle Tracking in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Jens B.; Tanneti, Nikhila S.; Hogue, Ian B.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-color live cell fluorescence microscopy of fast intracellular trafficking processes, such as axonal transport, requires rapid switching of illumination channels. Typical broad-spectrum sources necessitate the use of mechanical filter switching, which introduces delays between acquisition of different fluorescence channels, impeding the interpretation and quantification of highly dynamic processes. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), however, allow modulation of excitation light in microseconds. Here we provide a step-by-step protocol to enable any scientist to build a research-grade LED illuminator for live cell microscopy, even without prior experience with electronics or optics. We quantify and compare components, discuss our design considerations, and demonstrate the performance of our LED illuminator by imaging axonal transport of herpes virus particles with high temporal resolution. PMID:26600461

  11. EFFECTS OF CLOUDS AND TROPOSPHERIC AIR QUALITY ON SURFACE UV AT 6 UV RESEARCH SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides a summary of results of the EPA STAR funded proposal “Effects of Clouds and Tropospheric Pollution on Surface UV at six EPA UV Research Sites”. This project worked to provide high quality UV spectral solar irradiance, erythema (UV Index), oz...

  12. Luminescence properties of Ba3Si6O9N4:Eu2+ green-emitting phosphors for white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lanlan; Hua, Youjie; Chen, Hong; Deng, Degang; Wang, Huanping; Ma, Hongping; Xu, Shiqing

    2014-03-01

    A green-emitting phosphor, Eu2+-activated Ba3Si6O9N4 phosphor, was synthesized by a conventional solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the synthesized phosphor sintered at 1300 °C for 6 h was a Ba3Si6O9N4 pure phase. It could be efficiently excited by UV-blue light (280-500 nm) and showed a single intense broad emission band (470-625 nm). Suitable excitation range makes it match well with the emission of near-UV or blue LEDs. Concentration quenching of the doped-Eu2+ ions occurred at x=0.15, and the critical distance is calculated to be about 1.807 nm by theory of energy transfer. The result indicates that Ba3Si6O9N4:Eu2+ is a promising green-emitting phosphor for white LEDs.

  13. Optical behavior of spirooxazine incorporated vinyl functional silicates thin film under UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazri, S. A.; Malek, M. Z. A.; Zainuddin, M. T.; Aziz, N. M. A.; Mohamed, N. Z. I.

    2013-06-01

    Photochromic film of Spirooxazine-incorporated organosillicates material was prepared by sol-gel method and deposited on quartz substrate. The film was examined through the variation of UV irradiation power and exposure time for optical behavior characterizations. Investigations have been carried out by UV-Vis spectrophotometry and spectroscopic reflectometry. It was found that the absorption spectra of film at the region of 230-250nm were decreased indicating the reduction of C=C to C-C bond with increased of power and exposure time of UV irradiation were increased. On the other hand, we observed that the photo transformation absorption peak was also change at the region of 610nm to 620nm when different duration of UV irradiation applied. In addition, this UV curing process also increased the refractive index of film since the structures become compacted due to reduction of pore size volume in the system. Thus it will limit the film ability to performed photo transformation which will contribute to the reduction of film coloration upon UV irradiation. It is concluded that consideration of power and duration of UV irradiation is significant for designing the function of photochromic film in led their successful use in various applications.

  14. Design of high power LED-based UVA emission system and a photosensitive substance for clinical application in corneal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Alessandro D.; Cestari, André M.; de Oliveira, André O.; Oliveira, Anselmo G.; Terruggi, Cristina H. B.; Rossi, Giuliano; Castro, Jarbas C.; Ligabô, João. P. B.; Ortega, Tiago A.; Rosa, Tiago

    2015-09-01

    This work presents an innovative cross-linking procedure to keratoconus treatment, a corneal disease. It includes the development of an ultraviolet controlled emission portable device based on LED source and a new formulation of a photosensitive drug called riboflavin. Thus new formulation improves drug administration by its transepithelial property. The UV reaction with riboflavin in corneal tissue leads to a modification of corneal collagen fibers, turning them more rigid and dense, and consequently restraining the advance of the disease. We present the control procedures to maintain UV output power stable up to 45mw/cm2, the optical architecture that leads to a homogeneous UV spot and the new formulation of Riboflavin.

  15. Benzotriazole UV-stabilizers and benzotriazole: Antiandrogenic activity in vitro and activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway in zebrafish eleuthero-embryos.

    PubMed

    Fent, Karl; Chew, Geraldine; Li, Jun; Gomez, Elena

    2014-06-01

    Benzotriazole UV-stabilizers (BUVs) are applied in materials for protection against UV-irradiation. They are widely used, bioaccumulate and share structural similarities to benzotriazole. Benzotriazole (1HBT) finds application as corrosion inhibitor in dishwashing detergents, antifreeze (vehicles) and aircraft de-icing agent. BUVs and 1HBT are persistent and ubiquitous in the aquatic environment, but there is little understanding of the ecotoxicological implications. Here, we comparatively analyze the hormonal activity in vitro and effects in zebrafish eleuthero-embryos in vivo. 2-(2-Hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)benzotriazole (UV-P), 2-(3-t-butyl-2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)-5-chlorobenzotriazole (UV-326), UV-327, UV-328, UV-329 and UV-320 showed no estrogenicity (YES assay) and androgenicity (YAS assay). However, UV-P and 1HBT showed significant antiandrogenic activity. We assessed the transcription profiles of up to 26 genes associated with different toxicological pathways in zebrafish eleuthero-embryos to elucidate potential modes of action of UV-P, UV-326 and 1HBT. Embryos were experimentally exposed for 144hpf to three measured concentrations of 15.8, 70.8, and 690μg/L UV-P, 7.5, 31.7, and 84.3μg/L UV-326 and 7.9, 97.3 and 1197.3μg/L 1HBT. Among the 26 transcripts, the induction of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) pathway by UV-P and UV-326 was the most significant finding. UV-P led to dose-related induction of AHR1, ARNT2 and cyp1a1, as well as of phase II enzymes glutathione-S-transferase (gstp1) and ugt1a. UV-326 led to a significant induction of cyp1a1 and AHR2, but down-regulation of gstp1 at 84μg/L. Only little transcriptional alterations occurred in genes related to apoptosis, oxidative stress, hormone receptors, and steroidogenesis including aromatase. 1HBT led to only a few expressional changes at 1197μg/L. Our data lead to the conclusion that UV-P and UV-326 activate the AHR-pathway, whereas 1HBT shows only little transcriptional alterations. It

  16. IR/UV and UV/UV double-resonance study of guaiacol and eugenol dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longarte, Asier; Redondo, Carolina; Fernández, José A.; Castaño, Fernando

    2005-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) molecules are biologically active phenol derivatives with an intramolecular -OH⋯OCH3 hydrogen bond (H bond). Pulsed supersonic expansions of mixtures of either of the two molecules with He yield weakly bound homodimers as well as other higher-order complexes. A number of complementary and powerful laser spectroscopic techniques, including UV-UV and IR-UV double resonances, have been employed to interrogate the species formed in the expansion in order to get information on their structures and spectroscopic properties. The interpretation of the spectra of eugenol dimer is complex and required a previous investigation on a similar but simpler molecule both to gain insight into the possible structures and support the conclusions. Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) has been used for that purpose. The combination of the broad laser study combined with ab initio calculations at the Becke 3 Lee-Yang-Parr/6-31+G(d) level has provided the isomer structures, the potential-energy wells, and shed light on the inter- and intramolecular interactions involved. Guaiacol homodimer has been shown to have a single isomer whereas eugenol dimer has at least two. The comparison between the computed geometries of the dimers, their respective energies, and the vibrational normal modes permits the identification of the spectra.

  17. UV irradiation responses in Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Einarsson, Elin; Svärd, Staffan G; Troell, Karin

    2015-07-01

    The response to ultraviolet light (UV) radiation, a natural stressor to the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis, was studied to deepen the understanding of how the surrounding environment affects the parasite during transmission. UV radiation at 10 mJ/cm(2) kills Giardia cysts effectively whereas trophozoites and encysting parasites can recover from UV treatment at 100 mJ/cm(2) and 50 mJ/cm(2) respectively. Staining for phosphorylated histone H2A showed that UV treatment induces double-stranded DNA breaks and flow cytometry analyses revealed that UV treatment of trophozoites induces DNA replication arrest. Active DNA replication coupled to DNA repair could be an explanation to why UV light does not kill trophozoites and encysting cells as efficiently as the non-replicating cysts. We also examined UV-induced gene expression responses in both trophozoites and cysts using RNA sequencing (RNA seq). UV radiation induces small overall changes in gene expression in Giardia but cysts show a stronger response than trophozoites. Heat shock proteins, kinesins and Nek kinases are up-regulated, whereas alpha-giardins and histones are down-regulated in UV treated trophozoites. Expression of variable surface proteins (VSPs) is changed in both trophozoites and cysts. Our data show that Giardia cysts have limited ability to repair UV-induced damage and this may have implications for drinking- and waste-water treatment when setting criteria for the use of UV disinfection to ensure safe water. PMID:25825252

  18. Diurnal changes in epidermal UV transmittance of plants in naturally high UV environments.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Paul W; Flint, Stephan D; Slusser, James R; Gao, Wei; Ryel, Ronald J

    2008-06-01

    Studies were conducted on three herbaceous plant species growing in naturally high solar UV environments in the subalpine of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA, to determine if diurnal changes in epidermal UV transmittance (T(UV)) occur in these species, and to test whether manipulation of the solar radiation regime could alter these diurnal patterns. Additional field studies were conducted at Logan, Utah, USA, to determine if solar UV was causing diurnal T(UV) changes and to evaluate the relationship between diurnal changes in T(UV) and UV-absorbing pigments. Under clear skies, T(UV), as measured with a UV-A-pulse amplitude modulation fluorometer for leaves of Verbascum thapsus and Oenothera stricta growing in native soils and Vicia faba growing in pots, was highest at predawn and sunset and lowest at midday. These patterns in T(UV) closely tracked diurnal changes in solar radiation and were the result of correlated changes in fluorescence induced by UV-A and blue radiation but not photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) or initial fluorescence yield (F(o)). The magnitude of the midday reduction in T(UV) was greater for young leaves than for older leaves of Verbascum. Imposition of artificial shade eliminated the diurnal changes in T(UV) in Verbascum, but reduction in solar UV had no effect on diurnal T(UV) changes in Vicia. In Vicia, the diurnal changes in T(UV) occurred without detectable changes in the concentration of whole-leaf UV-absorbing compounds. Results suggest that plants actively control diurnal changes in UV shielding, and these changes occur in response to signals other than solar UV; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for rapid changes in T(UV) remain unclear. PMID:18346077

  19. LEDs in frequency-omain spectroscopy of tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, Maria-Angela; Fantini, Sergio; Gratton, Enrico

    1994-05-01

    Light spectroscopy in the frequency-domain has been used to study the optical properties of biological tissues. We have analyzed the possibility of using LEDs as intensity modulated light sources for frequency-domain spectroscopy. The use of LEDs presents several advantages: one LED's output covers a spectral region of about 80 nm, and commercially available LEDs allow for the coverage of the spectral range from 550 to 900 nm, which is a region of interest in near-IR medical applications; the light output of an LED is stable with respect to that of lasers and lamps; the wide angular distribution make LEDs safe for in vivo studies. Furthermore, LED frequency-domain spectroscopy is a relatively inexpensive technique. We describe some circuits we used to modulate the intensity of LEDs at radio frequency, and point out the possibility of building a multisource spectrometer. Some applications of LED frequency-domain spectroscopy, both in vitro and in vivo, are shown.

  20. The LINUS UV imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, D. S.; Harkins, Richard M.; Olsen, Richard C.

    2003-09-01

    We present an overview of the Naval Postgraduate School's new LINUS instrument. This is a spectral imager designed to observe atmospheric gas plumes by means of absorption spectroscopy, using background Rayleigh-scattered daylight as an illumination source. It is a pushbroom instrument, incorporating a UV-intensified digital camera, interchangeable gratings and filters, and a DC servo-controlled image scanning system. LINUS has been developed to operate across both the near-ultraviolet and the short visible wavelength portions of the spectrum in overlapping passbands. This paper provides an outline of LINUS's design, operation and capabilities, and it summarizes results from initial laboratory and field trials.

  1. Small observatories for the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosch, Noah; Balabanov, Vladimir; Behar, Ehud

    2014-11-01

    We describe concepts for small space telescopes that are able to provide significant UV science and can be realized with small (but realistic) budgets. The concepts are based on nano-satellites carrying small optics, with no redundancy, without producing intermediate models prior to flight model, and using COTS (custom off-the-shelf) components. We describe a few concepts of deployable optics that could provide large collecting areas and high angular resolution while packaged in the small volume of a nano-satellite. We point out areas where technological development is still required.

  2. Factors that led to the Walkerton tragedy.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Marina I; Sontrop, Jessica M; Garg, Amit X; Moist, Louise M; Suri, Rita S; Clark, William F

    2009-02-01

    In May 2000, bacterial contamination of municipal water in Walkerton, Ontario, resulted in the worst public health disaster involving municipal water in Canadian history. At least seven people died and 2300 became ill. A public inquiry led by judge Dennis O'Connor examined the events and delineated the causes of the outbreak, including physical causes, the role of the public utilities operators, the public utilities commissioners, the Ministry of the Environment (MOE), and the provincial government. Improper practices and systemic fraudulence by the public utility operators, the recent privatization of municipal water testing, the absence of criteria governing quality of testing, and the lack of provisions made for notification of results to multiple authorities all contributed to the crisis. The MOE noted significant concerns 2 years before the outbreak; however, no changes resulted because voluntary guidelines as opposed to legally binding regulations governed water safety. The inquiry concluded that budgetary restrictions introduced by the provincial government 4 years before the outbreak were enacted with no assessment of risk to human health. The ministers and the cabinet had received warnings about serious risks. Budgetary cuts destroyed the checks and balances that were necessary to ensure municipal water safety. PMID:19180129

  3. Led Astray by Hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jean; Diesburg-Stanwood, Amy; Bodor, Geza; Rasouli, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (A1c) is used frequently to diagnose and treat diabetes mellitus. Therefore, it is important be aware of factors that may interfere with the accuracy of A1c measurements. This is a case of a rare hemoglobin variant that falsely elevated a nondiabetic patient’s A1c level and led to a misdiagnosis of diabetes. A 67-year-old male presented to endocrine clinic for further management after he was diagnosed with diabetes based on an elevated A1c of 10.7%, which is approximately equivalent to an average blood glucose of 260 mg/dL. Multiple repeat A1c levels remained >10%, but his home fasting and random glucose monitoring ranged from 92 to 130 mg/dL. Hemoglobin electrophoresis and subsequent genetic analysis diagnosed the patient with hemoglobin Wayne, a rare hemoglobin variant. This variant falsely elevates A1c levels when A1c is measured using cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. When the boronate affinity method was applied instead, the patient’s A1c level was actually 4.7%. Though hemoglobin Wayne is clinically silent, this patient was erroneously diagnosed with diabetes and started on an antiglycemic medication. Due to this misdiagnosis, the patient was at risk of escalation in his “diabetes management” and hypoglycemia. Therefore, it is important that providers are aware of factors that may result in hemoglobin A1c inaccuracy including hemoglobin variants. PMID:26848480

  4. Novel aplanatic designs for LED concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, Melissa; Winston, Roland; Jiang, Lun

    2014-09-01

    Aplanats make great concentrators because of their near perfect imaging. Aplanatic conditions can be satisfied using two surface curves (generally mirrored surfaces) in two dimensions (see Figure 1) which are constructed by successive approximation to create a highly efficient concentrator for both concentration and illumination. For concentration purposes, having a two mirror system would be impossible because the front mirror would block incoming light (see figure 2) so the idea is to replace the front mirror with a "one-way" mirror. Light from a lower index can be transmitted, so if the aplanat surface is a higher index light is allowed to enter, and be trapped. In the Jellyfish design, TIR takes place except for light striking the surface within the range of critical angles. To combat that, a small area of reflective coating is applied to the central top part of the Jellyfish, where TIR fails (In the middle) to keep the light there from directly escaping (see figure 3). The design works in both forwards and reverse. Light entering can be focused to a collecter, or the collecter can be replaced with a light source to concentrate light out. In this case, LEDs are used for their highly efficienct properties.

  5. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  6. LED-based digital diameter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleuver, Wolfram; Becker, Lothar

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a new industrial sensor for measuring diameters of extreme thin objects. The system is divided in two parts. The first is the emitter and the second the receiver. It is possible to use this system for the automatic inspection of files and wires in the textile industries and wire works. Another application for the sensor is the control of production of chemical files in an extruder. Furthermore we can measure more than one object in the lightbeam because we get information not only about the dimensions also about the position of the objects in the beam. The innovation in this system is the using of a light emitting diode (LED) as emitter and the realization of a long distance of about two or more meters between the two sensorheads. The results of this development are a special kind of optical layout in the emitter to reduce the loss of intensity and minimize the divergence of the lightbeam. It is not necessary to develop an intensity distribution, which is equal over the complete width of the sensorhead. We can show that we have a better dynamic in the system with this feature. The experiments prove that we get the same resolution as a laserbeamsensor. Furthermore one advantage is the eye-safety.

  7. Temporal variation of optimal UV exposure time over Korea: risks and benefits of surface UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. G.; Koo, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Solar UV radiation in a wavelength range between 280 to 400 nm has both positive and negative influences on human body. Surface UV radiation is the main natural source of vitamin D, providing the promotion of bone and musculoskeletal health and reducing the risk of a number of cancers and other medical conditions. However, overexposure to surface UV radiation is significantly related with the majority of skin cancer, in addition other negative health effects such as sunburn, skin aging, and some forms of eye cataracts. Therefore, it is important to estimate the optimal UV exposure time, representing a balance between reducing negative health effects and maximizing sufficient vitamin D production. Previous studies calculated erythemal UV and vitamin-D UV from the measured and modelled spectral irradiances, respectively, by weighting CIE Erythema and Vitamin D3 generation functions (Kazantzidis et al., 2009; Fioletov et al., 2010). In particular, McKenzie et al. (2009) suggested the algorithm to estimate vitamin-D production UV from erythemal UV (or UV index) and determined the optimum conditions of UV exposure based on skin type Ⅱ according to the Fitzpatrick (1988). Recently, there are various demands for risks and benefits of surface UV radiation on public health over Korea, thus it is necessary to estimate optimal UV exposure time suitable to skin type of East Asians. This study examined the relationship between erythemally weighted UV (UVEry) and vitamin D weighted UV (UVVitD) over Korea during 2004-2012. The temporal variations of the ratio (UVVitD/UVEry) were also analyzed and the ratio as a function of UV index was applied in estimating the optimal UV exposure time. In summer with high surface UV radiation, short exposure time leaded to sufficient vitamin D and erythema and vice versa in winter. Thus, the balancing time in winter was enough to maximize UV benefits and minimize UV risks.

  8. Development of substrate-removal-free vertical ultraviolet light-emitting diode (RefV-LED)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurose, N. Aoyagi, Y.; Shibano, K.; Araki, T.

    2014-02-15

    A vertical ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diode (LED) that does not require substrate removal is developed. Spontaneous via holes are formed in n-AlN layer epitaxially grown on a high conductive n+Si substrate and the injected current flows directly from the p-electrode to high doped n{sup +} Si substrate through p-AlGaN, multi-quantum wells, n-AlGaN and spontaneous via holes in n-AlN. The spontaneous via holes were formed by controlling feeding-sequence of metal-organic gas sources and NH{sub 3} and growth temperature in MOCVD. The via holes make insulating n-AlN to be conductive. We measured the current-voltage, current-light intensity and emission characteristics of this device. It exhibited a built-in voltage of 3.8 V and emission was stated at 350 nm from quantum wells with successive emission centered at 400 nm. This UV LED can be produced, including formation of n and p electrodes, without any resist process.

  9. Microorganisms in the Stratosphere (MIST): In-flight Sterilization with UVC Leds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Gregory Michael; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The stratosphere (10 km to 50 km above sea level) is a unique place on Earth for astrobiological studies of microbes in extreme environments due to the combination of harsh conditions (high ultraviolet radiation, low pressure, desiccation, and low temperatures). Microorganisms in the Stratosphere (MIST) will attempt to characterize the diversity of microbes at these altitudes using a balloon collection device on a meteorological weather balloon. A major challenge of such an aerobiology study is the potential for ground contamination that makes it difficult to distinguish between collected microbes and contaminants. One solution is to use germicidal ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) to sterilize the collection strip. To use this solution, an optimal spatial arrangement of the lights had to be determined to ensure the greatest chance of complete sterilization within the 30 to 60 minute time of balloon ascent. A novel, 3D-printed test stand was developed to experimentally determine viable Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spore reduction after exposure to ultraviolet radiation at various times, angles, and distances. Taken together, the experimental simulations suggested that the UV LEDs on the MIST flight hardware should be active for at least 15 minutes and mounted within 4 cm of the illuminated surface at any angle to achieve optimal sterilization. These findings will aid in the production of the balloon collection device to ensure pristine stratospheric microbial samples are collected. Flight hardware capable of in-flight self-sterilization will enable future life detection missions to minimize both forward contamination and false positives.

  10. Image-like illumination with LED arrays: design.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ivan

    2012-03-01

    An array of spatially distributed light-emitting diodes (LEDs) can produce an illumination pattern that approaches an image by individually modulating each LED. In this letter, I analyze the first-order design of such systems in order to achieve the best match between the illumination distribution and a desired image. In particular, simple formulas are given for the optimal number of LEDs, working distance, array size, and LED beam pattern. The analysis developed here may be applied to the design of LED systems such as architecture lighting, energy-efficient lighting, backlight local dimming for displays, and structured illumination microscopy with micro-LED arrays. PMID:22378411

  11. Application of LEDs to Fishing Lights for Pacific Saury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Tamotsu; Takahashi, Kunio; Ohsawa, Hiroshi; Fukuchi, Ken-Ichi; Hosogane, Koichi; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Moniwa, Masahiro; Sasa, Kimio; Yoshino, Hirotaka; Ishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Harada, Makoto; Asakura, Kenji; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    We attempted the development of highly efficient fishing lights using LEDs for saury fishing. Considering the spectral luminous efficacy characteristic of a Pacific saury, LED fishing lights were fabricated. Transmission properties in sea water in LED fishing lights were investigated, and it was found that the fabricated LED fishing lights sufficiently can be utilized even in sea water. Furthermore, we attempted the saury-fishing experiments by using the LED fishing lights, and comparable catch of Pacific saury was achieved by approximately 55% electric power by using both LED poles and incandescent lamp poles.

  12. Color Appearance under LED Illumination: The Visual Judgment of Observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viénot, Françoise; Mahler, Elodie; Ezrati, Jean-Jacques; Boust, Clotilde; Rambaud, Ablane; Bricoune, Alain

    The advantages of LED lighting are discussed. We report experiments where observers graded the quality of several light-emitting diode (LED) illuminations. One experiment is based on color discrimination and two experiments are based on the judgement of appearance. We conclude that clusters with red, green, blue, and/or amber LEDs impair color discrimination, although they seem to locally enhance the color gamut. We also conclude that LED clusters that include white LEDs and a few correcting color LED may render colors faithfully.

  13. Study of Perovskite QD Down-Converted LEDs and Six-Color White LEDs for Future Displays with Excellent Color Performance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hee Chang; Kang, Heejoon; Lee, Soyoung; Oh, Ji Hye; Yang, Heesun; Do, Young Rag

    2016-07-20

    A narrow-emitting red, green, and blue (RGB) perovskite quantum dot (PeQD)-based tricolored display system can widen the color gamut over the National Television System Committee (NTSC) to 120%, but this value is misleading with regard to the color perception of cyan and yellow reproduced in the narrow RGB spectra. We propose that a PeQD-based six-color display system can reproduce true-to-life spectral distributions with high fidelity, widen the color gamut, and close the cyan and yellow gap in the RGB tricolored display by adding cyan (Cy), yellowish green (Yg), and orange colors (Or). In this study, we demonstrated pure-colored CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I, or their halide mixtures; Cl/Br and Br/I) PeQD-based monochromatic down-converted light-emitting diodes (DC-LED) for the first time, and we incorporated PeQDs with UV-curable binders and long-wavelength-pass-dichroic filters (LPDFs). CsPbX3 PeQD-based pure Cy-, G-, Yg-, Or-, R-emitting monochromatic DC-LED provide luminous efficacy (LE) values of 81, 184, 79, 80, and 35 lm/W, respectively, at 20 mA. We also confirmed the suitability and the possibility of access to future color-by-blue backlights for field-sequential-color liquid crystal displays, using six-color multipackage white LEDs, as well as future six-colored light-emitting devices with high vision and color performance. The fabricated six-color multipackage white LEDs exhibited an appropriate LE (62 lm/W at total 120 mA), excellent color qualities (color rendering index (CRI) = 96, special CRI for red (R9) = 97) at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 6500 K, and a wide color gamut covering the NTSC up to 145% in the 1931 Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates space. PMID:27349270

  14. Use of double-layer ITO films in reflective contacts for blue and near-UV LEDs

    SciTech Connect

    Markov, L. K. Smirnova, I. P.; Pavluchenko, A. S.; Kukushkin, M. V.; Zakheim, D. A.; Pavlov, S. I.

    2014-12-15

    The structural and optical properties of multilayer ITO/SiO{sub 2}/Ag composites are studied. In these composites, the ITO (indium-tin oxide) layer is produced by two different methods: electron-beam evaporation and a combined method including electron-beam evaporation and subsequent magnetron sputtering. It is shown that the reflectance of the composite based on the ITO film produced by electron-beam evaporation is substantially lower. This can be attributed to the strong absorption of light at both boundaries of the SiO{sub 2} layer, which results from the complex surface profile of ITO films deposited by electron-beam evaporation. Samples with a film deposited by the combined method have a reflectance of about 90% at normal light incidence, which, combined with their higher electrical conductivity, makes these samples advantageous for use as reflective contacts to the p-type region of AlInGaN light-emitting diodes of the flip-chip design.

  15. UV-induced cutaneous photobiology.

    PubMed

    Beissert, S; Granstein, R D

    1996-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) present in sunlight is a major environmental factor capable of affecting human health and well being. The organ primarily affected by UVR is the skin, which is composed of a variety of different cell types. Here, UVR is needed for production of active vitamin D as well as producing undesirable effects such as sunburn, premature cutaneous photoaging, and promoting skin cancer development. Depending on the radiation dose, UVR influences virtually every cutaneous cell type investigated differently. Since the end of the nineteenth century, sun exposure has been known to induce skin cancer, which is now the human malignancy with the most rapidly increasing incidence. In several experimental models, mid-range UVR has been demonstrated to be the major cause of UV-induced cutaneous tumors. The stratospheric ozone layer protecting the terrestrial surface from higher quantum energy solar radiation is being damaged by industrial activities resulting in the possibility of increased UVR exposure in the future. Investigations in the field of experimental dermatology have shown that within the skin an immunosurveillance system exists that may be able to detect incipient neoplasms and to elicit a host responses against it. This article reviews the literature on studies designed to investigate the effects of UVR on cutaneous cellular components, with special focus on the immune system within the skin and the development of UV-induced cancer. PMID:8994803

  16. Validating Community-Led Forest Biomass Assessments.

    PubMed

    Venter, Michelle; Venter, Oscar; Edwards, Will; Bird, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    The lack of capacity to monitor forest carbon stocks in developing countries is undermining global efforts to reduce carbon emissions. Involving local people in monitoring forest carbon stocks could potentially address this capacity gap. This study conducts a complete expert remeasurement of community-led biomass inventories in remote tropical forests of Papua New Guinea. By fully remeasuring and isolating the effects of 4,481 field measurements, we demonstrate that programmes employing local people (non-experts) can produce forest monitoring data as reliable as those produced by scientists (experts). Overall, non-experts reported lower biomass estimates by an average of 9.1%, equivalent to 55.2 fewer tonnes of biomass ha(-1), which could have important financial implications for communities. However, there were no significant differences between forest biomass estimates of expert and non-expert, nor were there significant differences in some of the components used to calculate these estimates, such as tree diameter at breast height (DBH), tree counts and plot surface area, but were significant differences between tree heights. At the landscape level, the greatest biomass discrepancies resulted from height measurements (41%) and, unexpectedly, a few large missing trees contributing to a third of the overall discrepancies. We show that 85% of the biomass discrepancies at the tree level were caused by measurement taken on large trees (DBH ≥50 cm), even though they consisted of only 14% of the stems. We demonstrate that programmes that engage local people can provide high-quality forest carbon data that could help overcome barriers to reducing forest carbon emissions in developing countries. Nonetheless, community-based monitoring programmes should prioritise reducing errors in the field that lead to the most important discrepancies, notably; overcoming challenges to accurately measure large trees. PMID:26126186

  17. Validating Community-Led Forest Biomass Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Venter, Michelle; Venter, Oscar; Edwards, Will; Bird, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of capacity to monitor forest carbon stocks in developing countries is undermining global efforts to reduce carbon emissions. Involving local people in monitoring forest carbon stocks could potentially address this capacity gap. This study conducts a complete expert remeasurement of community-led biomass inventories in remote tropical forests of Papua New Guinea. By fully remeasuring and isolating the effects of 4,481 field measurements, we demonstrate that programmes employing local people (non-experts) can produce forest monitoring data as reliable as those produced by scientists (experts). Overall, non-experts reported lower biomass estimates by an average of 9.1%, equivalent to 55.2 fewer tonnes of biomass ha-1, which could have important financial implications for communities. However, there were no significant differences between forest biomass estimates of expert and non-expert, nor were there significant differences in some of the components used to calculate these estimates, such as tree diameter at breast height (DBH), tree counts and plot surface area, but were significant differences between tree heights. At the landscape level, the greatest biomass discrepancies resulted from height measurements (41%) and, unexpectedly, a few large missing trees contributing to a third of the overall discrepancies. We show that 85% of the biomass discrepancies at the tree level were caused by measurement taken on large trees (DBH ≥50cm), even though they consisted of only 14% of the stems. We demonstrate that programmes that engage local people can provide high-quality forest carbon data that could help overcome barriers to reducing forest carbon emissions in developing countries. Nonetheless, community-based monitoring programmes should prioritise reducing errors in the field that lead to the most important discrepancies, notably; overcoming challenges to accurately measure large trees. PMID:26126186

  18. Evaluation of a UV-light emitting diodes unit for the removal of micropollutants in water for low energy advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Autin, Olivier; Romelot, Christophe; Rust, Lena; Hart, Julie; Jarvis, Peter; MacAdam, Jitka; Parsons, Simon A; Jefferson, Bruce

    2013-07-01

    There is growing interest in using light emitting diodes (LEDs) as alternative to traditional mercury lamps for the removal of micropollutants by advanced oxidation processes due to their low energy consumption and potential for high efficiency and long lifetime. This study investigates the penetration and coverage of the light emitted by LEDs in order to build an optimised LED collimated beam apparatus. From the experimental data, cost analysis was conducted in order to identify when LEDs will become economically viable. It was observed that if their development follows the predictions, LEDs should be a viable alternative to traditional lamps within 7yr for both UV/H2O2 and UV/TiO2 processes. However, parameters such as wall plug efficiency and input power need to improve for LEDs to become competitive. PMID:23668964

  19. A Reexamination of the `UV Leak' of the High Resolution Imager on ROSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, J. D.; Kearns, K.; Harris, D. E.

    The `UV Leak' is apparent in observations of Vega which produce an HRI count rate of 0.1 cts/sec whereas a much lower rate is found by the PSPC. This discrepancy led Arp (1995) to interpret extended features adjacent to NGC 1097 (on a `soft' map) as evidence for extragalactic UV emission. We show that the majority of Arp's features are caused by a detector characteristic which produces a slightly higher noise level for PHA 1--3 in a region where the gain is lower, i.e., a higher fraction of background photons produce counts in the lower PHA channels for detector regions with lower gain.

  20. Improved wound healing in blue LED treated superficial abrasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Tatini, Francesca; Pini, Roberto; Bacci, Stefano; De Siena, Gaetano; Cicchi, Riccardo; Pavone, Francesco; Alfieri, Domenico

    2013-06-01

    A blue-LED photocoagulator device was designed in order to induce a selective photocoagulation effect in superficial bleeding. An in vivo study in rat back skin evidenced an improved healing process in the LED treated abrasions.

  1. The research of UV curing injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pengcheng; Chang, Le; Song, Le; Cai, Tianze; Ding, Yumei; Yang, Weimin

    2015-05-01

    The micro-injection molding technology and the UV (ultraviolet) curing technique are combined to bring about a new plastic forming method, UV curing injection molding. The mean weight of micro-product is an important process characteristic for UV curing injection molding as well as the surface quality of micro-features is another important process characteristic for this new plastic forming method. This research investigates three effects of processing factors on the mass-change rate of micro-product and the surface quality of micro-features. In every particular, the following two factors are considered: UV material system temperature and the packing pressure. The study revealed that as usual, the micro-products gain weight with the imported increasing UV material system temperature and the improved packing pressure. Meanwhile, the increasing packing pressure also improves the surface quality, yet, warming the UV system temperature up has no effect on the quality of the product.

  2. New technologies for UV detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Several technologies are currently being developed, leading to substantial improvements in the performance of UV detectors or significant reductions in power or weight. Four technologies discussed are (1) thin-film coatings to enhance the UV sensitivity of CCD's, (2) highly innovative magnet assemblies that dramatically reduce weight and result in virtually no external flux, (3) new techniques for curving microchannel plates (MCP's) so that single plates can be used to prevent ion feedback and present highly localized charge clouds to an anode structure, and (4) high-performance alternatives to glass-based MCP's. In item (2), for example, very robust magnets are made out of rare earth materials such as samarium cobalt, and cladding magnets are employed to prevent flux from escaping from the detector into the external environment. These new ultralight magnet assemblies are able to create strong, exceptionally uniform magnetic fields for image intensification and focusing of photoelectrons. The principle advantage of such detectors is the quantum efficiencies of 70-80 percent obtained throughout ultraviolet wavelengths (900-2000 A), the highest of any device. Despite the improvements achieved under item (3), high-performance alternatives to conventional glass-based MCP's potentially offer three distinct new advantages that include (1) a 30-100-fold improvement in dynamic range resulting in correspondingly higher signal-to-noise ratios, (2) the use of pure dielectric and semiconductor materials that will not outgas contaminants that eventually destroy photocathodes, and (3) channels that have constant spacing providing long-ranged order since the plates are made using photolithography techniques from the semiconductor industry. The manufacturers of these advanced-technology MCP's, however, are a couple of years away from actually producing a functioning image intensifier. In contrast to the use of CCD's for optical, ground based observations, there is no single

  3. UV filters for lighting of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doehring, T.; Koefferlein, M.; Thiel, S.; Seidlitz, H. K.; Payer, H. D.

    1994-01-01

    The wavelength dependent interaction of biological systems with radiation is commonly described by appropriate action spectra. Particularly effective plant responses are obtained for ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Excess shortwave UV-B radiation will induce genetic defects and plant damage. Besides the ecological discussion of the deleterious effects of the excess UV radiation there is increasing interest in horticultural applications of this spectral region. Several metabolic pathways leading to valuable secondary plant products like colors, odors, taste, or resulting in mechanical strength and vitality are triggered by UV radiation. Thus, in ecologically as well as in economically oriented experiments the exact generation and knowledge of the spectral irradiance, particularly near the UV absorption edge, is essential. The ideal filter 'material' to control the UV absorption edge would be ozone itself. However, due to problems in controlling the toxic and chemically aggressive, instable gas, only rather 'small ozone filters' have been realized so far. In artificial plant lighting conventional solid filter materials such as glass sheets and plastic foils (celluloseacetate or cellulosetriacetate) which can be easily handled have been used to absorb the UV-C and the excess shortwave UV-B radiation of the lamp emissions. Different filter glasses are available which provide absorption properties suitable for gradual changes of the spectral UV-B illumination of artificial lighting. Using a distinct set of lamps and filter glasses an acceptable simulation of the UV-B part of natural global radiation can be achieved. The aging of these and other filter materials under the extreme UV radiation in the lamphouse of a solar simulator is presently unavoidable. This instability can be dealt with only by a precise spectral monitoring and by replacing the filters accordingly. For this reason attempts would be useful to develop real ozone filters which can replace glass filters. In

  4. Mapping Student-Led Peer Learning in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Peer-led academic learning has increased in importance, but there is little sense of how many institutions support it, how they understand its purposes or what peer-led learning best practice is. This report examines the provision of peer-led learning in the UK. It identifies challenges and opportunities, including international perspectives and…

  5. Photorealistic rendering application to the design of LED flash lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jyh-Long

    2012-10-01

    LED flash module becomes popular in current mobile communication devices, such as for the smart phones and tablet. As a lighting apparatus for image taking, photo rendering performance is crucial. We explore the LED flash lens design with a stress of photorealistic rendering application toward a high-performance LED flash illumination.

  6. High Efficiency Driving Electronics for General Illumination LED Luminaires

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Anand

    2012-10-31

    New generation of standalone LED driver platforms developed, which are more efficient These LED Drivers are more efficient (≥90%), smaller in size ( 0.15 in3/watt), lower in cost ( 12 cents/watt in high volumes in millions of units). And these products are very reliable having an operating life of over 50,000 hours. This technology will enable growth of LED light sources in the use. This will also help in energy saving and reducing total life cycle cost of LED units. Two topologies selected for next generation of LED drivers: 1) Value engineered single stage Flyback topology. This is suitable for low powered LED drivers up to 50W power. 2) Two stage boost power factor correction (PFC) plus LLC half bridge platform for higher powers. This topology is suitable for 40W to 300W LED drivers. Three new product platforms were developed to cover a wide range of LED drivers: 1) 120V 40W LED driver, 2) Intellivolt 75W LED driver, & 3) Intellivolt 150W LED driver. These are standalone LED drivers for rugged outdoor lighting applications. Based on these platforms number of products are developed and successfully introduced in the market place meeting key performance, size and cost goals.

  7. Computer-Based Experiment for Determining Planck's Constant Using LEDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Feng; Cloninger, Todd

    2008-01-01

    Visible light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been widely used as power indicators. However, after the power is switched off, it takes a while for the LED to go off. Many students were fascinated by this simple demonstration. In this paper, by making use of computer-based data acquisition and modeling, we show the voltage across the LED undergoing an…

  8. LEDs: DOE Programs Add Credibility to a Developing Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conbere, Susan

    2009-01-01

    LED (light-emitting diode) technology is moving fast, and with justification, some facility managers have viewed it with a wary eye. Some LEDs on the market do not perform as promised, and the technology is changing rapidly. But new developments from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) now make it easier for facility managers to find LEDs that…

  9. Evaluating method for the double image phenomenon of LED lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Hong; Kuo, Chao-Hui; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    In recent years, the overriding advantages long life, high efficiency, small size and short reaction time have made LED become a viable alternative to conventional light sources. LED lighting sources are usually composed of several individual LED cells which must be mounted on a panel as a lighting module. Being composed of several individual LED cells, the LED sources will cause the double image phenomenon. The double image phenomenon is more obvious when the LED sources are more closer, such as LED table lamp, and limits the applications of LED sources. By using a proper secondary optical lens, the double image phenomenon can be reduced. In this research, an evaluating method based on image processing is developed for the double image phenomenon of a LED sources. By analyzing the gray-scale of the grabbed image which is obtained by putting a rob under a LED source, an index of double image can be established and be a criterion to judge different LED sources. Furthermore, a series of LED lighting simulations are shown in this paper and several type of secondary optical lens are compared and discussed in this paper as well.

  10. CALiPER Snapshot Report: Indoor LED Luminaires

    SciTech Connect

    2014-04-01

    Snapshot reports use data from DOE's LED Lighting Facts product list to compare the LED performance to standard technologies, and are designed to help lighting retailers, distributors, designers, utilities, energy efficiency program sponsors, and other stakeholders understand the current state of the LED market and its trajectory.

  11. Photoluminescent carbon quantum dots as a directly film-forming phosphor towards white LEDs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Feng, Xiaoting; Zhang, Yi; Yan, Lingpeng; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-04-28

    Photoluminescent organosilane-functionalized carbon quantum dots (CQDs), 3.0-3.5 nm in diameter, were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method using citric acid monohydrate as a precursor and N-(3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl) ethylenediamine as a coordinating and passivation agent. The optical properties of the as-obtained CQDs were investigated in detail. The CQD aqueous solution emits bright blue-white light under ultraviolet (UV) illumination with a quantum yield of 57.3% and high red-green-blue (RGB) spectral composition of 60.1%, and in particular the CQDs exhibit excitation-independent photoluminescence. The CQDs have a narrow size distribution around 3.1 nm and good film-forming ability through simple heat-treatment. By virtue of these excellent optical characteristics and good film-forming ability, a white light-emitting device (LED) was fabricated by combining a UV-LED chip with a single CQD phosphor film, which exhibited cool white light with a CIE coordinate of (0.31, 0.36), a color rendering index of 84 and a correlated color temperature of 6282 K. In addition, the white LED exhibits good optical stability under various working currents and for different working time intervals. Moreover, the interaction between the carbogenic core and surface groups was discussed using the DMol(3) program based on density functional theory. This research suggests the great potential of CQDs for solid-state lighting systems and reveals the effect of the surface state on the photoluminescent mechanism of CQDs. PMID:27049931

  12. Photoluminescent carbon quantum dots as a directly film-forming phosphor towards white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Feng, Xiaoting; Zhang, Yi; Yan, Lingpeng; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-04-01

    Photoluminescent organosilane-functionalized carbon quantum dots (CQDs), 3.0-3.5 nm in diameter, were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method using citric acid monohydrate as a precursor and N-(3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl) ethylenediamine as a coordinating and passivation agent. The optical properties of the as-obtained CQDs were investigated in detail. The CQD aqueous solution emits bright blue-white light under ultraviolet (UV) illumination with a quantum yield of 57.3% and high red-green-blue (RGB) spectral composition of 60.1%, and in particular the CQDs exhibit excitation-independent photoluminescence. The CQDs have a narrow size distribution around 3.1 nm and good film-forming ability through simple heat-treatment. By virtue of these excellent optical characteristics and good film-forming ability, a white light-emitting device (LED) was fabricated by combining a UV-LED chip with a single CQD phosphor film, which exhibited cool white light with a CIE coordinate of (0.31, 0.36), a color rendering index of 84 and a correlated color temperature of 6282 K. In addition, the white LED exhibits good optical stability under various working currents and for different working time intervals. Moreover, the interaction between the carbogenic core and surface groups was discussed using the DMol3 program based on density functional theory. This research suggests the great potential of CQDs for solid-state lighting systems and reveals the effect of the surface state on the photoluminescent mechanism of CQDs.

  13. UV-induced immunosuppression in the balance.

    PubMed

    de Gruijl, Frank R

    2008-01-01

    Around 1980, experiments with hairless mice showed us that UV-induced actinic keratoses (AK) and ensuing skin carcinomas did not arise independently: the rate of occurrence in one skin area was increased considerably if AKs had already been induced separately in another distant skin area, i.e. a systemic effect. The ground laying work of Margaret Kripke in the 1970s provided a fitting explanation: UV-induced immunosuppression and tolerance toward the UV-induced tumors. From Kripke's work a new discipline arose: "Photoimmunology." Enormous strides were made in exploring and expanding the effects from UV carcinogenesis to infectious diseases, and in elucidating the mechanisms involved. Stemming from concerns about a depletion of the ozone layer and the general impact of ambient UV radiation, the groups I worked in and closely collaborated with explored the anticipated adverse effects of UV-induced immunosuppression on healthy individuals. An important turning point was brought about in 1992 when the group of Kevin Cooper reported that immunosuppression could be induced by UV exposure in virtually all human subjects tested, suggesting that this is a normal and sound physiological reaction to UV exposure. This reaction could actually protect us from illicit immune responses against our UV-exposed skin, such as observed in idiopathic polymorphic light eruption. This premise has fruitfully rekindled the research on this common "sun allergy," affecting to widely varying degrees about one in five Europeans with indoor professions. PMID:18173695

  14. UV-extending ghost inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey E-mail: sergey.sibiryakov@cern.ch

    2014-05-01

    We present a setup that provides a partial UV-completion of the ghost inflation model up to a scale which can be almost as high as the Planck mass. This is achieved by coupling the inflaton to the Lorentz-violating sector described by the Einstein-aether theory or its khronometric version. Compared to previous works on ghost inflation our setup allows to go beyond the study of small perturbations and include the background dynamics in a unified framework. In the specific regime when the expansion of the Universe is dominated by the kinetic energy of the inflaton we find that the model predicts rather high tensor-to-scalar ratio r ∼ 0.02÷0.2 and non-Gaussianity of equilateral type with f{sub NL} in the range from -50 to -5.

  15. Personal monitoring of UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Joachim; Knuschke, Peter

    1994-06-01

    Personal monitoring of till-radiation (UVR) is important fo find out both overexposure and underexposure to UVR. At present polysulfone films seem to be most suitable for these purposes. They allow a reliable measurement of till-exposure to wavelengths between 250 and 330 nm if a number of influencing factors is respected. These are described in detail in a technical report of the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE). Own investigations with polysulphone films have shown that these polymers can help as well to detect an overexposure to UVR at workplaces as an UVR-deficiency of people living in an old peoples home. It could be demonstrated that this till-deficiency well correlates to the deficiency of serum 25(OH)D3 levels of these people. Furthermore after optimization of a new phototherapeutic equipment in uniformity of UV-exposure round patients body by polysulphone film dosimeters it got useable in therapy.

  16. Effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in air and under vacuum on low-k dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, F. A.; Ryan, E. T.; Nguyen, H. M.; Nishi, Y.; Shohet, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    This work addresses the effect of ultraviolet radiation of wavelengths longer than 250 nm on Si-CH3 bonds in porous low-k dielectrics. Porous low-k films (k = 2.3) were exposed to 4.9 eV (254 nm) ultraviolet (UV) radiation in both air and vacuum for one hour. Using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, the chemical structures of the dielectric films were analyzed before and after the UV exposure. UV irradiation in air led to Si-CH3 bond depletion in the low-k material and made the films hydrophilic. However, no change in Si-CH3 bond concentration was observed when the same samples were exposed to UV under vacuum with a similar fluence. These results indicate that UV exposures in vacuum with wavelengths longer than ˜250 nm do not result in Si-CH3 depletion in low-k films. However, if the irradiation takes place in air, the UV irradiation removes Si-CH3 although direct photolysis of air species does not occur above ˜242nm. We propose that photons along with molecular oxygen and, water, synergistically demethylate the low-k films.

  17. The bolometric and UV attenuation in normal spiral galaxies of the Herschel Reference Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaene, S.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Cortese, L.; De Looze, I.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Karczewski, O. Ł.; Madden, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.

    2016-02-01

    The dust in nearby galaxies absorbs a fraction of the UV-optical-near-infrared radiation produced by stars. This energy is consequently re-emitted in the infrared. We investigate the portion of the stellar radiation absorbed by spiral galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS) by modelling their UV-to-submillimetre spectral energy distributions. Our models provide an attenuated and intrinsic spectral energy distribution (SED), from which we find that on average 32% of all starlight is absorbed by dust. We define the UV heating fraction as the percentage of dust luminosity that comes from absorbed UV photons and find this to be 56%, on average. This percentage varies with morphological type, with later types having significantly higher UV heating fractions. We find a strong correlation between the UV heating fraction and specific star formation rate and provide a power-law fit. Our models allow us to revisit the IRX - AFUV relations, and derive these quantities directly within a self-consistent framework. We calibrate this relation for different bins of NUV - r colour and provide simple relations to relate these parameters. We investigated the robustness of our method and conclude that the derived parameters are reliable within the uncertainties that are inherent to the adopted SED model. This calls for a deeper investigation of how well extinction and attenuation can be determined through panchromatic SED modelling. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  18. On the application of CaF2:Eu and SrF2:Eu phosphors in LED based phototherapy lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belsare, P. D.; Moharil, S. V.; Joshi, C. P.; Omanwar, S. K.

    2013-06-01

    In the last few years the interest of scientific community has been increased towards solid state lighting based on LEDs because of their superior advantages over the conventional fluorescent lamps. As the GaN based LEDs are easily available efforts of the researchers are now on making the new phosphors which are excitable in the near UV region (360-400nm) for solid state lighting. This paper reports the photoluminescence characteristics of CaF2:Eu and SrF2:Eu phosphor prepared by wet chemical method. The violet emission of these phosphors with near UV excitation can be useful in making a phototherapy lamp based on LEDs for treating various skin diseases like acne vulgaris and hyperbilirubinemia.

  19. High power LEDs and the organization of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolini, Steve; Harbers, Gerard

    2006-02-01

    High-power Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) were introduced in the market in 1998 by Lumileds. High-power LEDs have unique properties, very different from conventional light sources, creating never before possible solutions available to lighting designers. In this paper we will give an update on these devices and discuss the main benefits of LEDs compared to more traditional light sources. We will show that the benefits of high-power LEDs also relate to the organization of light they emit. Comparisons of more and less organized light sources as well as applications for highpower LEDs will be discussed.

  20. Smart power supply system for LED street lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risteiu, Mircea; Ileana, Ioan; Marc, Gheorghe; Sofalca, Ionut

    2015-02-01

    The paper is focused on designing a smart LED power supply, with adjustable working point in accordance with local conditions, LED photometric characteristics. We have develop a flyback driver controlled by a signal which is a combination of the sensed LED forward current, and a PWM working regime. This method is used in order to increase the LED lighting efficiency at the same thermal regime. At the end of the implementation we have tested major issues related to the correct work of the LED, energetic and luminous efficiency, and the way of sensor integration into the smart system.

  1. Advanced packaging methods for high-power LED modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Rafael C.; Weber, Constanze; Ehrhardt, Christian; Wilke, Martin

    2014-02-01

    LED luminaires are already beyond retrofit systems, which are limited in heat dissipation due to the old fitting standards. Actual LED luminaries are based on new LED packages and modules. Heat dissipation through the first and second level interconnect is a key issue for a successful LED package. Therefore the impact of known bonding technologies as gluing and soldering and new technologies like sintering and transient liquid phase soldering were analyzed and compared. A realized hermetic high power LED package will be shown as example. The used new techniques result in a module extremely stable against further assembly processes and harsh operating conditions.

  2. Growth and Fabrication of III-Nitride Deep Ultraviolet Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahtamouni, T. M. Al

    2005-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a great effort to develop AlGaN based compact deep ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) (λ< 300 nm) for applications such as bio-chemical agent detection and medical research/health care. To obtain deep UV emission with λ< 300 nm, AlGaN quantum well (QW) based LED structures require an active layer with Al composition higher than 40%. As a result, the alloy composition for p- and n-cladding layers should be more than that of the active layer. The high Al composition introduces dislocations and leads to poor p- and n-type conductivity in the cladding layers, which limits current injection. We report here on the epitaxial growth of deep UV LEDs with operating wavelengths ranging from 300 nm to 270 nm by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Our UV LED structure was deposited on AlN/sapphire templates. We have achieved deep UV LEDs with an output power of 1.4 mW at 350 mA dc driving at 280 nm. The use of AlN epilayers as templates to reduce the dislocation density and enhance the LED performance will be discussed. Different device architectures for enhanced LED performances will also be presented.

  3. The influence of UV-irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties of chitosan and silk fibroin mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sionkowska, Alina; Płanecka, Anna; Lewandowska, Katarzyna; Michalska, Marta

    2014-11-01

    In the present paper the results regarding the influence of UV-irradiation with 254 nm wavelength on the thermal and mechanical properties and the intrinsic viscosity of chitosan/silk fibroin mixtures are presented. The mixture of chitosan and silk fibroin in solution and thin films made of chitosan/silk fibroin mixture obtained by solvent evaporation were submitted to the treatment with UV irradiation (wavelength 254 nm) for different time intervals. Mechanical properties of thin films made of chitosan/silk fibroin blends before and after UV-irradiation have been investigated by mechanical testing machine and compared with mechanical properties of chitosan films. The changes in such mechanical properties as ultimate breaking strength, percentage of elongation at break and Young Modulus have been investigated. The results have shown, that the mechanical properties of the blends were greatly affected by time of exposure to UV irradiation. Ultimate tensile strength and ultimate percentage of elongation decreased after UV irradiation of the blend. Increasing UV irradiation led to the decrease in Young's Modulus of the chitosan/silk fibroin blend. Viscosity of chitosan/silk fibroin mixtures decreased after UV-irradiation. Thermal properties of the mixtures have been only slightly altered by UV-irradiation. PMID:25218587

  4. High efficiency GaN-based LEDs and lasers on SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmond, John; Abare, Amber; Bergman, Mike; Bharathan, Jayesh; Lee Bunker, Kristin; Emerson, Dave; Haberern, Kevin; Ibbetson, James; Leung, Michael; Russel, Phil; Slater, David

    2004-12-01

    Group III-nitride layers have been grown via metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on single crystal-silicon carbide (SiC) substrates and fabricated into light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs). Deep ultraviolet (UV) LEDs from 321 to 343 nm operating at 20 mA and 4.1 V exhibit an output of 0.2-2.9 mW, respectively, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 0.26-4.0%. In the visible spectrum, an EQE of ˜47% was achieved in the blue at 455-460 nm corresponding to an output of 25.5 mW at 20 mA and 3.1 V. The value of EQE decreased to ˜30% at 395 nm (violet) and ˜22% at 535 nm (green). Interaction between defects and charge carriers is speculated to dominate the radiative recombination process at shorter wavelengths (<˜440 nm) whereas evidence is presented that piezoelectric polarization dominates at longer wavelengths, predominantly in the green. White LEDs have been fabricated using 24 mW blue chips via phosphor excitation and exhibit luminous efficacies of 78 lumens/W, which is considerably more efficient than standard incandescent bulbs. Continuous-wave (CW) LD operation from 348-410 nm, and pulsed operation as short as 343 nm were achieved.

  5. Degradation mechanisms of geosmin and 2-MIB during UV photolysis and UV/chlorine reactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kyoung; Moon, Bo-Ram; Kim, Taeyeon; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2016-11-01

    We conducted chlorination, UV photolysis, and UV/chlorin reactions to investigate the intermediate formation and degradation mechanisms of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) in water. Chlorination hardly removed geosmin and 2-MIB, while the UV/chlorine reaction at 254 nm completely removed geosmin and 2-MIB within 40 min and 1 h, respectively, with lesser removals of both compounds during UV photolysis. The kinetics during both UV photolysis and UV/chlorine reactions followed a pseudo first-order reaction. Chloroform was found as a chlorinated intermediate during the UV/chlorine reaction of both geosmin and 2-MIB. The pH affected both the degradation and chloroform production during the UV/chlorine reaction. The open ring and dehydration intermediates identified during UV/chlorine reactions were 1,4-dimethyl-adamantane, and 1,3-dimethyl-adamantane from geosmin, 2-methylenebornane, and 2-methyl-2-bornene from 2-MIB, respectively. Additionally, 2-methyl-3-pentanol, 2,4-dimethyl-1-heptene, 4-methyl-2-heptanone, and 1,1-dichloro-2,4-dimethyl-1-heptane were newly identified intermediates from UV/chlorine reactions of both geosmin and 2-MIB. These intermediates were degraded as the reaction progressed. We proposed possible degradation pathways during the UV photolysis and UV/chlorine reactions of both compounds using the identified intermediates. PMID:27494316

  6. Blue and white light emission in Tm3+ and Tm3+/Dy3+ doped zinc phosphate glasses upon UV light excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza-Rocha, A. N.; Speghini, A.; Lozada-Morales, R.; Caldiño, U.

    2016-08-01

    A spectroscopic study based on photoluminescence spectra and decay time profiles in Tm3+ and Tm3+/Dy3+ doped Zn(PO3)2 glasses is reported. The Tm3+ doped Zn(PO3)2 glass, upon 357 nm excitation, exhibits blue emission with CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, x = 0.157 and y = 0.030, and color purity of about 96%. Under excitations at 348, 352 and 363 nm, which match with the emissions of AlGaN and GaN based LEDs, the Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped Zn(PO3)2 glass displays natural white, bluish white and cool white overall emissions, with correlated color temperature values of 4523, 10700 and 7788 K, respectively, depending strongly on the excitation wavelength. The shortening of the Dy3+ emission decay time in presence of Tm3+ suggests that Dy3+→Tm3+ non-radiative energy transfer occurs. By using the Inokuti-Hirayama model, it is inferred that an electric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction might be the dominant mechanism involved in the energy transfer. The efficiency and probability of this energy transfer are 0.12 and 126.70 s-1, respectively.

  7. Improving UV Resistance of High Strength Fibers Used In Large Scientific Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Said, M.; Gupta, A.; Seyam, A.; Mock, G.; Theyson, T.

    2004-01-01

    For the last three decades, NASA has been involved in the development of giant balloons that are capable of lifting heavy payloads of equipment (such as large telescopes and scientific instruments) to the upper atmosphere. While the use of such balloons has led to scientific discoveries, the demand for competitive science payloads and observational programs continues to rise. The NASA Balloon Program Office has entered a new phase of research to develop an Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) that will lift payloads of up to 3,600 kg to altitudes of up to 40 km. The flight duration is targeted to ranges between 30 to 100 days. Attaining these target durations requires the development of a super-pressure balloon design. The use of textile structures have already been established in these missions in the form of high strength tendons essential for the super pressure pumpkin design. Unfortunately, high strength fibers lose significant strength upon exposure to Ultra Violet (UV) radiation. Such UV degradation poses a serious challenge for the development of the ULDB. To improve the mission performance of the ULDB, new methods for protecting the tendons from the environmental effects need to be developed. NASA and NC State University College of Textiles are undertaking a research program to address these issues. Four tracks have been identified to prepare finishes that are believed to enhance the resistance of high strength fibers to UV. These tracks are: (a) self-polymerizing, (b) diffusion application, (c) polymer-filled with 30-40% UV absorber, and (d) combination of dyeing plus surface application. Four high performance fibers have been selected for this research investigation. These are Vectran (trademark), Spectra (trademark), Kevlar (trademark) and, PBO (Zylon (trademark)). This work will address the current progress of evaluating the performance of the UV finishes. This will be accomplished by comparing the tensile properties (strength, breaking elongation

  8. Improving uv resistance of high strength fibers used in large scientific balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, M.; Gupta, A.; Seyam, A.; Mock, G.; Theyson, T.

    For the last three decades, NASA has been involved in the development of giant balloons that are capable of lifting heavy payloads of equipment (such as large telescopes and scientific instruments) to the upper atmosphere. While the use of such balloons has led to scientific discoveries, the demand for competitive science payloads and observational programs continues to rise. The NASA Balloon Program Office has entered a new phase of research to develop an Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) that will lift payloads of up to 3,600 kg to altitudes of up to 40 km. The flight duration is targeted to ranges between 30 to 100 days. Attaining these target durations requires the development of a super-pressure balloon design. The use of textile structures have already been established in these missions in the form of high strength tendons essential for the super pressure pumpkin design. Unfortunately, high strength fibers lose significant strength upon exposure to Ultra Violet (UV) radiation. Such UV degradation poses a serious challenge for the development of the ULDB. To improve the mission performance of the ULDB, new methods for protecting the tendons from the environmental effects need to be developed. NASA and NC State University College of Textiles are undertaking a research program to address these issues. Four tracks have been identified to prepare finishes that are believed to enhance the resistance of high strength fibers to UV. These tracks are: (a) self-polymerizing, (b) diffusion application, (c) polymer-filled with 30-40% UV absorber, and (d) combination of dyeing plus surface application. Four high performance fibers have been selected for this research investigation. These are Vectran, Spectra, Kevlar and, PBO (Zylon). This work will address the current progress of evaluating the performance of the UV finishes. This will be accomplished by comparing the tensile properties (strenthg, breaking elongation, modulus, etc) of untreated, unexposed to UV fibers

  9. A new colored beverage disinfection system using UV-A light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xin; Tetsutani, Kayo; Katayama, Mai; Nakano, Masayuki; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Harada, Nagakatsu; Hamamoto, Akiko; Yamato, Masayuki; Akutagawa, Masatake; Kinouchi, Yohsuke; Nakaya, Yutaka; Takahashi, Akira

    2010-03-01

    In this study we evaluated the ability of the UV-A-LED to eliminate bacteria in a colored beverage. Ten edible pigments were used to make a colored solution at concentrations of 1.0%, 0.1%, 0.01% and 0.001%. We used a colony-forming assay to monitor the bactericidal action against the bacteria. The bactericidal effect of UV-A-LED against Escherichia coli DH5 a decreased with the increasing concentration of almost all of the edible pigments. Although less effective in colored solutions and commercially available orange juice than in the positive control PBS, it holds potential for further development and use to ensure food and water safety. PMID:20361521

  10. UV-B EFFECTS ON TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dpeletion of stratospheric O3 layer should result in enhanced levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation at the earth's surface compared to present, with potentially damaging effects on biological systems. his paper briefly summarizes some key findings for UV-B effects on terrestri...

  11. TOMS UV Algorithm: Problems and Enhancements. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay; Herman, Jay; Bhartia, P. K.; Seftor, Colin; Arola, Antti; Kaurola, Jussi; Kroskinen, Lasse; Kalliskota, S.; Taalas, Petteri; Geogdzhaev, I.

    2002-01-01

    Satellite instruments provide global maps of surface ultraviolet (UV) irradiance by combining backscattered radiance measurements with radiative transfer models. The models are limited by uncertainties in input parameters of the atmosphere and the surface. We evaluate the effects of possible enhancements of the current Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) surface UV irradiance algorithm focusing on effects of diurnal variation of cloudiness and improved treatment of snow/ice. The emphasis is on comparison between the results of the current (version 1) TOMS UV algorithm and each of the changes proposed. We evaluate different approaches for improved treatment of pixel average cloud attenuation, with and without snow/ice on the ground. In addition to treating clouds based only on the measurements at the local time of the TOMS observations, the results from other satellites and weather assimilation models can be used to estimate attenuation of the incident UV irradiance throughout the day. A new method is proposed to obtain a more realistic treatment of snow covered terrain. The method is based on a statistical relation between UV reflectivity and snow depth. The new method reduced the bias between the TOMS UV estimations and ground-based UV measurements for snow periods. The improved (version 2) algorithm will be applied to re-process the existing TOMS UV data record (since 1978) and to the future satellite sensors (e.g., Quik/TOMS, GOME, OMI on EOS/Aura and Triana/EPIC).

  12. UV RADIATION MEASUREMENTS/ATMOSPHERIC CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an ecosystem stressor and poses a human health risk, the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has undertaken a research program to measure the intensity of UV-B radiation at various locations throughout the U.S. In Septem...

  13. Ultraviolet (UV) Disinfection for Drinking Water Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens in water with potential to serve as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. USEPA provided guidance on the validation of UV reactors nearly a decade ago. Since then, lesson...

  14. Trend towards low cost, low power, ultra-violet (UV) based biological agent detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickenberger, David

    2005-11-01

    Ultra-violet fluorescence remains a corner stone technique for the detection of biological agent aerosols. Historically, these UV based detectors have employed relatively costly and power demanding lasers that have influenced the exploitation of the technology to wider use. Recent advancements from the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency's (DARPA) Solid-state Ultra Violet Optical Sources (SUVOS) program has changed this. The UV light emitting diode (LED) devices based on Gallium Nitride offer a unique opportunity to produce small, low power, and inexpensive detectors. It may, in fact, be possible to extend the SUVOS technology into detectors that are potentially disposable. This report will present ongoing efforts to explore this possibility. It will present candidate UV fluorescence based detector designs along with the biological aerosol responses obtained from these designs.

  15. UV Observations of Hemispheric Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.; Wolven, B. C.; Zhang, Y.; Romeo, G.

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetry in the auroral patterns can be an important diagnostic for understanding the dynamics of solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system (e.g., Newel and Meng, 1998; Fillingrim et al., 2005). Molecular nitrogen emission in the UV Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands can be used to determine energy flux and electron mean energy (Sotirelis, et al, 2013) and thereby Hall and Pederson integrated conductances (Gjerloev, et al., 2014). UV imagery provided by the 4 SSUSI instruments on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16-F19 spacecraft provide two dimensional maps of this emission at different local times. Often there are near simultaneous observations of both poles by some combination of the satellites. (see figure 1) The SSUSI auroral data products are well suited to this study, as they have the following features.: - dayglow has been subtracted on dayside aurora - electron energy flux and mean energy are pre-calculated - individual arcs have been identified through image processing. In order to intercompare data from multiple satellites, we must first ensure that the instrument calibrations are consistent. In this work we show that the instruments are consistently calibrated, and that results generated from the SSUSI data products can be trusted. Several examples of storm time asymmetries captured by the SSUSI instruments will be discussed. Fillingim, M. O., G. K. Parks, H. U. Frey, T. J. Immel, and S. B. Mende (2005), Hemispheric asymmetry of the afternoon electron aurora, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L03113, doi:10.1029/2004GL021635. Gjerloev, J., Schaefer, R., Paxton, L, and Zhang, Y. (2014), A comprehensive empirical model of the ionospheric conductivity derived from SSUSI/GUVI, SuperMAG and SuperDARN data, SM51G-4339, Fall 2014 AGU meeting, San Francisco. Newell, P. T., and C.-I. Meng (1988), Hemispherical asymmetry in cusp precipitation near solstices, J. Geophys. Res., 93(A4), 2643-2648, doi:10.1029/JA093iA04p02643

  16. UV Induced Oxidation of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde, F. (Inventor); Luecke, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated at least in part using in situ UV radiation sources. The sources of the oxidizing species include oxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen may be a component of the gaseous stream or added to the gaseous stream, preferably near a UV radiation source, and is converted to ozone by the UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is decomposed through a combination of vaporization and UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50% by volume and increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding vaporization within the flow channel of the gaseous stream and in the presence of the UV radiation sources.

  17. UV sensors based on liquid crystals mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanishvili, Andro; Petriashvili, Gia; Chilaya, Guram; Barberi, Riccardo; De Santo, Maria P.; Matranga, Mario A.; Ciuchi, F.

    2006-04-01

    The Erythemal Response Spectrum is a scientific expression that describes the sensitivity of the skin to the ultraviolet radiation. The skin sensitivity strongly depends on the UV wavelength: a long exposition to UV radiation causes erythema once a threshold dose has been exceeded. In the past years several devices have been developed in order to monitor the UV exposure, most of them are based on inorganic materials that are able to mimic the human skin behaviour under UV radiation. We present a new device based on liquid crystals technology. The sensor is based on a liquid crystalline mixture that absorbs photons at UV wavelength and emits them at a longer one. This system presents several innovative features: the absorption range of the mixture can be varied to be sensitive to different wavelengths, the luminescence intensity can be tuned, the system can be implemented on flexible devices.

  18. Medical Applications of White LEDs for Surgical Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Junichi; Kawakami, Yoichi

    Everywhere in the world, the highest quality and quantity of lighting is required during the surgical operations. However, the surgical approach has had many types and various angles, common ceiling surgical halogen lighting system cannot provide an adequate amount of beams because the surgeons' heads hinder the illuminations from reaching the operation field. The evolution of solid-state-lighting is currently going to be developed due to the progress of white light emitting diodes (LEDs). We proposed and developed the new lighting equipment that is a surgical lighting goggle composed of InGaN-YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet):Ce3+-based white LEDs. Here, we newly design surgical lighting system composed of white LEDs equipped on both sides of goggles. In fact, we have succeeded in the first internal shunt operation in the left forearm using the surgical LED lighting system on 11th Sept 2000. Since the white LEDs used were composed of InGaN-blue-emitters and YAG-yellow-phosphors, the color rendering property was not sufficient in the reddish colors. After our first challenge for medical application of white LEDs, we have been trying to improve the luminance power of white LED, the color rendering in red colors and the spectral distribution of white LED to render inherent color of raw flesh such as skin, blood, fat tissue and internal organs. We have produced new concepts for LED lighting sources and new several generations of LED lighting goggles.

  19. LED light engine concept with ultra-high scalable luminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelen, Christoph; de Boer, Dick; Bruls, Dominique; van der Eyden, Joost; Koole, Rolf; Li, Yun; Mirsadeghi, Mo; Vanbroekhoven, Vincent; Van den Bergh, John-John; Van de Voorde, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Although LEDs have been introduced successfully in many general lighting applications during the past decade, high brightness light source applications are still suffering from the limited luminance of LEDs. High power LEDs are generally limited in luminance to ca 100 Mnit (108 lm/m2sr) or less, while dedicated devices for projection may achieve luminance values up to ca 300 Mnit with phosphor converted green. In particular for high luminous flux applications with limited étendue, like in front projection systems, only very modest luminous flux values in the beam can be achieved with LEDs compared to systems based on discharge lamps. In this paper we introduce a light engine concept based on a light converter rod pumped with blue LEDs that breaks through the étendue and brightness limits of LEDs, enabling LED light source luminance values that are more than 4 times higher than what can be achieved with LEDs so far. In LED front projection systems, green LEDs are the main limiting factor. With our green light emitting modules, peak luminance values well above 1.2 Gnit have been achieved, enabling doubling of the screen brightness of LED based DLP projection systems, and even more when this technology is applied to other colors as well. This light source concept, introduced as the ColorSpark High Lumen Density (HLD) LED technology, enables a breakthrough in the performance of LED-based light engines not only for projection, where >2700 ANSI lm was demonstrated, but for a wide variety of high brightness applications.

  20. Defined UV protection by apparel textiles.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, K; Laperre, J; Avermaete, A; Altmeyer, P; Gambichler, T

    2001-08-01

    This article was written to update information on test methods and standards for determining the UV protection of apparel textiles and on factors affecting UV protective properties of fabrics, from dermatological and textile technological viewpoints. Articles from dermatological and textile technological journals published from 1990 to 2001 were identified from MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, World Textiles, and Textile Technology Digest. Peer-reviewed dermatological articles, textile technological research articles, and normative publications were selected. Independent data extraction was performed by several observers. Spectrophotometry is the preferred method for determining UV protection factor of textile materials. Various textile qualities affect the UV protection factor of a finished garment; important elements are the fabric porosity, type, color, weight, and thickness. The application of UV absorbers in the yarns significantly improves the UV protection factor of a garment. With wear and use, several factors can alter the UV protective properties of a textile, including stretch, wetness, and degradation due to laundering. Standards in the field exist in Australia and Great Britain, and organizations such as the European Standardization Commission in Europe and the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists and the American Society for Testing and Materials in the United States are also establishing standards for the determination and labeling of sun protective clothing. Various textile qualities and conditions of wear and use affect UV protective properties of apparel textiles. The use of UV blocking fabrics can provide excellent protection against the hazards of sunlight; this is especially true for garments manufactured as UV protective clothing. PMID:11493104