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Sample records for algebra differential equations

  1. Lie algebras and linear differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, R. W.; Rahimi, A.

    1972-01-01

    Certain symmetry properties possessed by the solutions of linear differential equations are examined. For this purpose, some basic ideas from the theory of finite dimensional linear systems are used together with the work of Wei and Norman on the use of Lie algebraic methods in differential equation theory.

  2. Fault Detection in Differential Algebraic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jason Roderick

    Fault detection and identification (FDI) is important in almost all real systems. Fault detection is the supervision of technical processes aimed at detecting undesired or unpermitted states (faults) and taking appropriate actions to avoid dangerous situations, or to ensure efficiency in a system. This dissertation develops and extends fault detection techniques for systems modeled by differential algebraic equations (DAEs). First, a passive, observer-based approach is developed and linear filters are constructed to identify faults by filtering residual information. The method presented here uses the least squares completion to compute an ordinary differential equation (ODE) that contains the solution of the DAE and applies the observer directly to this ODE. While observers have been applied to ODE models for the purpose of fault detection in the past, the use of observers on completions of DAEs is a new idea. Moreover, the resulting residuals are modified requiring additional analysis. Robustness with respect to disturbances is also addressed by a novel frequency filtering technique. Active detection, as opposed to passive detection where outputs are passively monitored, allows the injection of an auxiliary control signal to test the system. These algorithms compute an auxiliary input signal guaranteeing fault detection, assuming bounded noise. In the second part of this dissertation, a novel active detection approach for DAE models is developed by taking linear transformations of the DAEs and solving a bi-layer optimization problem. An efficient real-time detection algorithm is also provided, as is the extension to model uncertainty. The existence of a class of problems where the algorithm breaks down is revealed and an alternative algorithm that finds a nearly minimal auxiliary signal is presented. Finally, asynchronous signal design, that is, applying the test signal on a different interval than the observation window, is explored and discussed.

  3. Note on parallel processing techniques for algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Allidina, A.Y.; Malinowski, K.; Singh, M.G.

    1982-12-01

    The possibilities were explored for enhancing parallelism in the simulation of systems described by algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations. These techniques, using multiprocessors, were developed to speed up simulations, e.g. for nuclear accidents. Issues involved in their design included suitable approximations to bring the problem into a numerically manageable form and a numerical procedure to perform the computations necessary to solve the problem accurately. Parallel processing techniques used as simulation procedures, and a design of a simulation scheme and simulation procedure employing parallel computer facilities, were both considered.

  4. Affine Vertex Operator Algebras and Modular Linear Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arike, Yusuke; Kaneko, Masanobu; Nagatomo, Kiyokazu; Sakai, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we list all affine vertex operator algebras of positive integral levels whose dimensions of spaces of characters are at most 5 and show that a basis of the space of characters of each affine vertex operator algebra in the list gives a fundamental system of solutions of a modular linear differential equation. Further, we determine the dimensions of the spaces of characters of affine vertex operator algebras whose numbers of inequivalent simple modules are not exceeding 20.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Differential-Algebraic Equations and Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, L; Cao, Y; Li, S; Serban, R

    2005-08-09

    Sensitivity analysis generates essential information for model development, design optimization, parameter estimation, optimal control, model reduction and experimental design. In this paper we describe the forward and adjoint methods for sensitivity analysis, and outline some of our recent work on theory, algorithms and software for sensitivity analysis of differential-algebraic equation (DAE) and time-dependent partial differential equation (PDE) systems.

  6. Algebraic Riccati equations in zero-sum differential games

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. L.; Chao, A.

    1974-01-01

    The procedure for finding the closed-loop Nash equilibrium solution of two-player zero-sum linear time-invariant differential games with quadratic performance criteria and classical information pattern may be reduced in most cases to the solution of an algebraic Riccati equation. Based on the results obtained by Willems, necessary and sufficient conditions for existence of solutions to these equations are derived, and explicit conditions for a scalar example are given.

  7. Algebraic calculation of stroboscopic maps of ordinary, nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Wackerbauer, R. ); Huebler, A. . Center for Complex Systems Research); Mayer-Kress, G. California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1991-07-25

    The relation between the parameters of a differential equation and corresponding discrete maps are becoming increasingly important in the study of nonlinear dynamical systems. Maps are well adopted for numerical computation and several universal properties of them are known. Therefore some perturbation methods have been proposed to deduce them for physical systems, which can be modeled by an ordinary differential equation (ODE) with a small nonlinearity. A new iterative, rigorous algebraic method for the calculation of the coefficients of a Taylor expansion of a stroboscopic map from ODE's with not necessarily small nonlinearities is presented. It is shown analytically that most of the coefficients are small for a small integration time and grow slowly in the course of time if the flow vector field of the ODE is polynomial and if the ODE has fixed point in the origin. Approximations of different orders respectively of the rest term are investigated for several nonlinear systems. 31 refs., 16 figs.

  8. Computing spacetime curvature via differential-algebraic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Lee, S.L.; Petzold, L.R.; Saylor, P.E.; Seidel, E.

    1996-01-01

    The equations that govern the behavior of physical systems can often solved numerically using a method of lines approach and differential-algebraic equation (DAE) solvers. For example, such an approach can be used to solve the Einstein field equations of general relativity, and thereby simulate significant astrophysical events. In this paper, we describe some preliminary work in which two model problems in general relativity are formulated, spatially discretized, and then numerically solved as a DAE. In particular, we seek to reproduce the solution to the spherically symmetric Schwarzschild spacetime. This is an important testbed calculation in numerical relativity since the solution is the steady-state for the collision of two (or more) non-rotating black holes. Moreover, analytic late-time properties of the Schwarzschild spacetime are well known and can be used the accuracy of the simulation.

  9. The coquaternion algebra and complex partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiev, Stancho; Konstantinov, Mihail; Todorov, Vladimir

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of differentiation of coquaternionic functions. Let us recall that coquaternions are elements of an associative non-commutative real algebra with zero divisor, introduced by James Cockle (1849) under the name of split-quaternions or coquaternions. Developing two type complex representations for Cockle algebra (complex and paracomplex ones) we present the problem in a non-commutative form of the δ¯-type holomorphy. We prove that corresponding differentiable coquaternionic functions, smooth and analytic, satisfy PDE of complex, and respectively of real variables. Applications for coquaternionic polynomials are sketched.

  10. Exploring Students' Understanding of Ordinary Differential Equations Using Computer Algebraic System (CAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maat, Siti Mistima; Zakaria, Effandi

    2011-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are one of the important topics in engineering mathematics that lead to the understanding of technical concepts among students. This study was conducted to explore the students' understanding of ODEs when they solve ODE questions using a traditional method as well as a computer algebraic system, particularly…

  11. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: On the Liouvillian solution of second-order linear differential equations and algebraic invariant curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Yiu-Kwong

    2010-10-01

    In this communication, we present a method for computing the Liouvillian solution of second-order linear differential equations via algebraic invariant curves. The main idea is to integrate Kovacic's results on second-order linear differential equations with the Prelle-Singer method for computing first integrals of differential equations. Some examples on using this approach are provided.

  12. Modeling boyciana-fish-human interaction with partial differential algebraic equations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yushan; Zhang, Qingling; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-07-01

    Under the influence of human population distribution, the boyciana-fish ecological system is considered. First, the system can be described as a nonlinear partial differential algebraic equations system (PDAEs) with Neumann boundary conditions and ratio-dependent functional response. Second, we examine the system's persistence properties: the loacl stabilities of positive steady states, the absorbtion region and the global stability. And the proposed approach is illustrated by numerical simulation. Finally, by using the realistic data collected in the past fourteen years, the PDAEs parameter optimization model is built to predict the boyciana population. PMID:27155570

  13. A novel technique to solve nonlinear higher-index Hessenberg differential-algebraic equations by Adomian decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Benhammouda, Brahim

    2016-01-01

    Since 1980, the Adomian decomposition method (ADM) has been extensively used as a simple powerful tool that applies directly to solve different kinds of nonlinear equations including functional, differential, integro-differential and algebraic equations. However, for differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) the ADM is applied only in four earlier works. There, the DAEs are first pre-processed by some transformations like index reductions before applying the ADM. The drawback of such transformations is that they can involve complex algorithms, can be computationally expensive and may lead to non-physical solutions. The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel technique that applies the ADM directly to solve a class of nonlinear higher-index Hessenberg DAEs systems efficiently. The main advantage of this technique is that; firstly it avoids complex transformations like index reductions and leads to a simple general algorithm. Secondly, it reduces the computational work by solving only linear algebraic systems with a constant coefficient matrix at each iteration, except for the first iteration where the algebraic system is nonlinear (if the DAE is nonlinear with respect to the algebraic variable). To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique, we apply it to a nonlinear index-three Hessenberg DAEs system with nonlinear algebraic constraints. This technique is straightforward and can be programmed in Maple or Mathematica to simulate real application problems. PMID:27330880

  14. Analyzing the nonlinear vibrational wave differential equation for the simplified model of Tower Cranes by Algebraic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, M. R.; Ganji, D. D.; Ahmadi, A. R.; Kachapi, Sayyid H. Hashemi

    2014-03-01

    In the current paper, a simplified model of Tower Cranes has been presented in order to investigate and analyze the nonlinear differential equation governing on the presented system in three different cases by Algebraic Method (AGM). Comparisons have been made between AGM and Numerical Solution, and these results have been indicated that this approach is very efficient and easy so it can be applied for other nonlinear equations. It is citable that there are some valuable advantages in this way of solving differential equations and also the answer of various sets of complicated differential equations can be achieved in this manner which in the other methods, so far, they have not had acceptable solutions. The simplification of the solution procedure in Algebraic Method and its application for solving a wide variety of differential equations not only in Vibrations but also in different fields of study such as fluid mechanics, chemical engineering, etc. make AGM be a powerful and useful role model for researchers in order to solve complicated nonlinear differential equations.

  15. The moser type reduction of integrable Riccati differential equations and its Lie-algebraic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napora, Jolanta

    2000-10-01

    A given Riccati equation, as is well known, can be naturally reduced to a system of nonlinear evolution equations on an infinite-dimensional functional manifold with Cauchy-Goursat initial data. We describe the Lie algebraic reduction procedure of nonlocal type for this infinite-dimensional dynamical system upon the set of critical points of an invariant Lagrangian functional. As one of our main results, we show that the reduced dynamical system generates the completely integrable Hamiltonian flow on this submanifold with respect to the canonical symplectic structure upon it. The above also makes it possible to find effectively its finite-dimensional Lax type representation via both the well known Moser type reduction procedure and the dual momentum mapping scheme on some matrix manifold.

  16. A functional realization of 𝔰𝔩(3, ℝ) providing minimal Vessiot-Guldberg-Lie algebras of nonlinear second-order ordinary differential equations as proper subalgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campoamor-Stursberg, R.

    2016-06-01

    A functional realization of the Lie algebra s l (" separators=" 3 , R) as a Vessiot-Guldberg-Lie algebra of second order differential equation (SODE) Lie systems is proposed. It is shown that a minimal Vessiot-Guldberg-Lie algebra L V G is obtained from proper subalgebras of s l (" separators=" 3 , R) for each of the SODE Lie systems of this type by particularization of one functional and two scalar parameters of the s l (" separators=" 3 , R) -realization. The relation between the various Vessiot-Guldberg-Lie algebras by means of a limiting process in the scalar parameters further allows to define a notion of contraction of SODE Lie systems.

  17. Symmetry Lie algebras and properties of linear ordinary differential equations with maximal dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folly-Gbetoula, Mensah; Kara, A. H.

    2015-04-01

    Solutions of linear iterative equations and expressions for these solutions in terms of the parameters of the first-order source equation are obtained. Based on certain properties of iterative equations, finding the solutions is reduced to finding solutions of the second-order source equation. We have therefore found classes of solutions to the source equations by letting the parameters of the source equation be functions of a specific type such as monomials, functions of exponential and logarithmic type.

  18. Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper I discuss Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations. This paper starts with an introduction to Hopf algebras, followed by a review of the contribution and application of Hopf algebras to particle physics. The final part of the paper is devoted to the relation between Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations.

  19. Optical systolic solutions of linear algebraic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, C. P.; Casasent, D.

    1984-01-01

    The philosophy and data encoding possible in systolic array optical processor (SAOP) were reviewed. The multitude of linear algebraic operations achievable on this architecture is examined. These operations include such linear algebraic algorithms as: matrix-decomposition, direct and indirect solutions, implicit and explicit methods for partial differential equations, eigenvalue and eigenvector calculations, and singular value decomposition. This architecture can be utilized to realize general techniques for solving matrix linear and nonlinear algebraic equations, least mean square error solutions, FIR filters, and nested-loop algorithms for control engineering applications. The data flow and pipelining of operations, design of parallel algorithms and flexible architectures, application of these architectures to computationally intensive physical problems, error source modeling of optical processors, and matching of the computational needs of practical engineering problems to the capabilities of optical processors are emphasized.

  20. Application of reduced order modeling techniques to problems in heat conduction, isoelectric focusing and differential algebraic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathai, Pramod P.

    the uncertainty in the parameters of the differential equations. There is a clear need to design better experiments for IEF without the current overhead of expensive chemicals and labor. We show how with a simpler modeling of the underlying chemistry, we can still achieve the accuracy that has been achieved in existing literature for modeling small ranges of pH (hydrogen ion concentration) in IEF, but with far less computational time. We investigate a further reduction of time by modeling the IEF problem using the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) technique and show why POD may not be sufficient due to the underlying constraints. The final problem that we address in this thesis addresses a certain class of dynamics with high stiffness - in particular, differential algebraic equations. With the help of simple examples, we show how the traditional POD procedure will fail to model certain high stiffness problems due to a particular behavior of the vector field which we will denote as twist. We further show how a novel augmentation to the traditional POD algorithm can model-reduce problems with twist in a computationally cheap manner without any additional data requirements.

  1. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  2. A modular approach to modeling an isolated power system on a finite voltage bus using a differential algebraic equation solving routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipps, Mark R.

    1994-03-01

    The modeling of power systems has been primarily driven by the commercial power utility industry. These models usually involve the assumption that system bus voltage and frequency are constant. However, in applications such as shipboard power systems this infinite bus assumption is not valid. This thesis investigates the modeling of a synchronous generator and various loads in a modular fashion on a finite bus. The simulation presented allows the interconnection of multiple state-space models via a bus voltage model. The major difficulty encountered in building a model which computes bus voltage at each time step is that bus voltage is a function of current and current derivative terms. Bus voltage is also an input to the state equations which produce the current and current derivatives. This creates an algebraic loop which is a form of implicit differential equation. A routine has been developed by Linda Petzold of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for solving these types of equations. The routine, called Differential Algebraic System Solver (DASSL), has been implemented in a pre-release version of the software Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) and has been made available to the Naval Postgraduate School on a trial basis. An isolated power system is modeled using this software and the DASSL routine. The system response to several dynamic situations is studied and the results are presented.

  3. Conservation laws, differential identities, and constraints of partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharinov, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We consider specific cohomological properties such as low-dimensional conservation laws and differential identities of systems of partial differential equations (PDEs). We show that such properties are inherent to complex systems such as evolution systems with constraints. The mathematical tools used here are the algebraic analysis of PDEs and cohomologies over differential algebras and modules.

  4. One-Equation Algebraic Model Of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, B. S.; Barth, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    One-equation model of turbulence based on standard equations of k-epsilon model of turbulence, where k is turbulent energy and e is rate of dissipation of k. Derivation of one-equation model motivated partly by inaccuracies of flows computed by some Navier-Stokes-equations-solving algorithms incorporating algebraic models of turbulence. Satisfies need to avoid having to determine algebraic length scales.

  5. An algebraic approach to the scattering equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rijun; Rao, Junjie; Feng, Bo; He, Yang-Hui

    2015-12-01

    We employ the so-called companion matrix method from computational algebraic geometry, tailored for zero-dimensional ideals, to study the scattering equations. The method renders the CHY-integrand of scattering amplitudes computable using simple linear algebra and is amenable to an algorithmic approach. Certain identities in the amplitudes as well as rationality of the final integrand become immediate in this formalism.

  6. On a Equation in Finite Algebraically Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valcan, Dumitru

    2013-01-01

    Solving equations in finite algebraically structures (semigroups with identity, groups, rings or fields) many times is not easy. Even the professionals can have trouble in such cases. Therefore, in this paper we proposed to solve in the various finite groups or fields, a binomial equation of the form (1). We specify that this equation has been…

  7. Description of DASSL: a differential/algebraic system solver

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, L.R.

    1982-09-01

    This paper describes a new code DASSL, for the numerical solution of implicit systems of differential/algebraic equations. These equations are written in the form F(t,y,y') = 0, and they can include systems which are substantially more complex than standard form ODE systems y' = f(t,y). Differential/algebraic equations occur in several diverse applications in the physical world. We outline the algorithms and strategies used in DASSL, and explain some of the features of the code. In addition, we outline briefly what needs to be done to solve a problem using DASSL.

  8. The kinematic algebras from the scattering equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Ricardo; O'Connell, Donal

    2014-03-01

    We study kinematic algebras associated to the recently proposed scattering equations, which arise in the description of the scattering of massless particles. In particular, we describe the role that these algebras play in the BCJ duality between colour and kinematics in gauge theory, and its relation to gravity. We find that the scattering equations are a consistency condition for a self-dual-type vertex which is associated to each solution of those equations. We also identify an extension of the anti-self-dual vertex, such that the two vertices are not conjugate in general. Both vertices correspond to the structure constants of Lie algebras. We give a prescription for the use of the generators of these Lie algebras in trivalent graphs that leads to a natural set of BCJ numerators. In particular, we write BCJ numerators for each contribution to the amplitude associated to a solution of the scattering equations. This leads to a decomposition of the determinant of a certain kinematic matrix, which appears naturally in the amplitudes, in terms of trivalent graphs. We also present the kinematic analogues of colour traces, according to these algebras, and the associated decomposition of that determinant.

  9. Partial Differential Algebraic Sensitivity Analysis Code

    1995-05-15

    PDASAC solves stiff, nonlinear initial-boundary-value in a timelike dimension t and a space dimension x. Plane, circular cylindrical or spherical boundaries can be handled. Mixed-order systems of partial differential and algebraic equations can be analyzed with members of order or 0 or 1 in t, 0,1 or 2 in x. Parametric sensitivities of the calculated states are compted simultaneously on request, via the Jacobian of the state equations. Initial and boundary conditions are efficiently reconciled.more » Local error control (in the max-norm or the 2-norm) is provided for the state vector and can include the parametric sensitivites if desired.« less

  10. The Dirac equation and Hestenes' geometric algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. Dwayne

    1984-06-01

    Hestenes' geometric algebra and Dirac spinors are reviewed and united into a common mathematical formalism, a unification that establishes the Dirac equation as being manifestly covariant under the Lorentz group, and one that needs no matrix representation of the Dirac algebra. New and simple methods of amplitude or ``trace'' calculations are then described. A number of problems are then considered within the context of the new approach, such as relativistic spin projections, new and covariant C and T-transformations and spinors for massless and Majorana fields.

  11. A Unified Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutzer, Carl V.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes how a presentation from the point of view of differential operators can be used to (partially) unify the myriad techniques in an introductory course in ordinary differential equations by providing students with a powerful, flexible paradigm that extends into (or from) linear algebra. (Contains 1 footnote.)

  12. Solving Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Initial-value ordinary differential equation solution via variable order Adams method (SIVA/DIVA) package is collection of subroutines for solution of nonstiff ordinary differential equations. There are versions for single-precision and double-precision arithmetic. Requires fewer evaluations of derivatives than other variable-order Adams predictor/ corrector methods. Option for direct integration of second-order equations makes integration of trajectory problems significantly more efficient. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  13. Nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  14. Laurent phenomenon algebras and the discrete BKP equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    We construct the Laurent phenomenon algebras the cluster variables of which satisfy the discrete BKP equation, the discrete Sawada–Kotera equation and other difference equations obtained by its reduction. These Laurent phenomenon algebras are constructed from seeds with a generalization of mutation-period property. We show that a reduction of a seed corresponds to a reduction of a difference equation.

  15. Confluences of the Painlevé equations, Cherednik algebras and q-Askey scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we produce seven new algebras as confluences of the Cherednik algebra of type \\check {{{{C}1}}} {{C}1} and we characterise their spherical-sub-algebras. The limit of the spherical sub-algebra of the Cherednik algebra of type \\check {{{{C}1}}} {{C}1} is the monodromy manifold of the Painlevé VI equation (Oblomkov 2004 Int. Math. Res. Not. 2004 877–912). Here we prove that by considering the limits of the spherical sub-algebras of our new confluent algebras, one obtains the monodromy manifolds of all other Painlevé differential equations. Moreover, we introduce confluent versions of the Zhedanov algebra and prove that each of them (quotiented by their Casimir) is isomorphic to the corresponding spherical sub-algebra of our new confluent Cherednik algebras. We show that in the basic representation our confluent Zhedanov algebras act as symmetries of certain elements of the q-Askey scheme, thus setting a stepping stone towards the solution of the open problem of finding the corresponding quantum algebra for each element of the q-Askey scheme. These results establish a new link between the theory of the Painlevé equations and the theory of the q-Askey scheme making a step towards the construction of a representation theoretic approach for the Painlevé theory.

  16. Solving Differential Equations in R: Package deSolve

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we present the R package deSolve to solve initial value problems (IVP) written as ordinary differential equations (ODE), differential algebraic equations (DAE) of index 0 or 1 and partial differential equations (PDE), the latter solved using the method of lines appr...

  17. Double Precision Differential/Algebraic Sensitivity Analysis Code

    1995-06-02

    DDASAC solves nonlinear initial-value problems involving stiff implicit systems of ordinary differential and algebraic equations. Purely algebraic nonlinear systems can also be solved, given an initial guess within the region of attraction of a solution. Options include automatic reconciliation of inconsistent initial states and derivatives, automatic initial step selection, direct concurrent parametric sensitivity analysis, and stopping at a prescribed value of any user-defined functional of the current solution vector. Local error control (in the max-normmore » or the 2-norm) is provided for the state vector and can include the sensitivities on request.« less

  18. SIMULTANEOUS DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1960-05-10

    A description is given for an electronic simulator for a system of simultaneous differential equations, including nonlinear equations. As a specific example, a homogeneous nuclear reactor system including a reactor fluid, heat exchanger, and a steam boiler may be simulated, with the nonlinearity resulting from a consideration of temperature effects taken into account. The simulator includes three operational amplifiers, a multiplier, appropriate potential sources, and interconnecting R-C networks.

  19. A New Reynolds Stress Algebraic Equation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Lumley, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A general turbulent constitutive relation is directly applied to propose a new Reynolds stress algebraic equation model. In the development of this model, the constraints based on rapid distortion theory and realizability (i.e. the positivity of the normal Reynolds stresses and the Schwarz' inequality between turbulent velocity correlations) are imposed. Model coefficients are calibrated using well-studied basic flows such as homogeneous shear flow and the surface flow in the inertial sublayer. The performance of this model is then tested in complex turbulent flows including the separated flow over a backward-facing step and the flow in a confined jet. The calculation results are encouraging and point to the success of the present model in modeling turbulent flows with complex geometries.

  20. Modelling by Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

  1. Do Differential Equations Swing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    One of the units of in a standard differential equations course is a discussion of the oscillatory motion of a spring and the associated material on forcing functions and resonance. During the presentation on practical resonance, the instructor may tell students that it is similar to when they take their siblings to the playground and help them on…

  2. Symmetries of stochastic differential equations: A geometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vecchi, Francesco C.; Morando, Paola; Ugolini, Stefania

    2016-06-01

    A new notion of stochastic transformation is proposed and applied to the study of both weak and strong symmetries of stochastic differential equations (SDEs). The correspondence between an algebra of weak symmetries for a given SDE and an algebra of strong symmetries for a modified SDE is proved under suitable regularity assumptions. This general approach is applied to a stochastic version of a two dimensional symmetric ordinary differential equation and to the case of two dimensional Brownian motion.

  3. Dual algebraic formulation of differential GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannes, A.; Dur, S.

    2003-05-01

    A new approach to differential GPS is presented. The corresponding theoretical framework calls on elementary concepts of algebraic graph theory. The notion of double difference, which is related to that of closure in the sense of Kirchhoff, is revisited in this context. The Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse of the closure operator plays a key role in the corresponding dual formulation. This approach, which is very attractive from a conceptual point of view, sheds a new light on the Teunissen formulation.

  4. Algebraic methods for the solution of some linear matrix equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djaferis, T. E.; Mitter, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    The characterization of polynomials whose zeros lie in certain algebraic domains (and the unification of the ideas of Hermite and Lyapunov) is the basis for developing finite algorithms for the solution of linear matrix equations. Particular attention is given to equations PA + A'P = Q (the Lyapunov equation) and P - A'PA = Q the (discrete Lyapunov equation). The Lyapunov equation appears in several areas of control theory such as stability theory, optimal control (evaluation of quadratic integrals), stochastic control (evaluation of covariance matrices) and in the solution of the algebraic Riccati equation using Newton's method.

  5. Differential geometry on Hopf algebras and quantum groups

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, P.

    1994-12-15

    The differential geometry on a Hopf algebra is constructed, by using the basic axioms of Hopf algebras and noncommutative differential geometry. The space of generalized derivations on a Hopf algebra of functions is presented via the smash product, and used to define and discuss quantum Lie algebras and their properties. The Cartan calculus of the exterior derivative, Lie derivative, and inner derivation is found for both the universal and general differential calculi of an arbitrary Hopf algebra, and, by restricting to the quasitriangular case and using the numerical R-matrix formalism, the aforementioned structures for quantum groups are determined.

  6. Exact solution of some linear matrix equations using algebraic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djaferis, T. E.; Mitter, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A study is done of solution methods for Linear Matrix Equations including Lyapunov's equation, using methods of modern algebra. The emphasis is on the use of finite algebraic procedures which are easily implemented on a digital computer and which lead to an explicit solution to the problem. The action f sub BA is introduced a Basic Lemma is proven. The equation PA + BP = -C as well as the Lyapunov equation are analyzed. Algorithms are given for the solution of the Lyapunov and comment is given on its arithmetic complexity. The equation P - A'PA = Q is studied and numerical examples are given.

  7. Dual spaces of differential Lie algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Kupershmidt, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    We present a mathematical scheme which serves as an infinite-dimensional generalization of Poisson structures on dual spaces of finite-dimensional Lie algebras, which are well known and widely used in classical mechanics. These structures have recently appeared in the theory of Lax equations, long waves in hydrodynamics, and various other physical models: compressible hydrodynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, multifluid plasmas, elasticity, superfluid /sup 4/He and /sup 3/He-A, Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductors, and classical chromohydrodynamics (the generalization of plasma physics to Yang-Mills interactions).

  8. Differential equations, associators, and recurrences for amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhlfürst, Georg; Stieberger, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We provide new methods to straightforwardly obtain compact and analytic expressions for ɛ-expansions of functions appearing in both field and string theory amplitudes. An algebraic method is presented to explicitly solve for recurrence relations connecting different ɛ-orders of a power series solution in ɛ of a differential equation. This strategy generalizes the usual iteration by Picard's method. Our tools are demonstrated for generalized hypergeometric functions. Furthermore, we match the ɛ-expansion of specific generalized hypergeometric functions with the underlying Drinfeld associator with proper Lie algebra and monodromy representations. We also apply our tools for computing ɛ-expansions for solutions to generic first-order Fuchsian equations (Schlesinger system). Finally, we set up our methods to systematically get compact and explicit α‧-expansions of tree-level superstring amplitudes to any order in α‧.

  9. Stability of Linear Equations--Algebraic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherif, Chokri; Goldstein, Avraham; Prado, Lucio M. G.

    2012-01-01

    This article could be of interest to teachers of applied mathematics as well as to people who are interested in applications of linear algebra. We give a comprehensive study of linear systems from an application point of view. Specifically, we give an overview of linear systems and problems that can occur with the computed solution when the…

  10. Exact solution of some linear matrix equations using algebraic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djaferis, T. E.; Mitter, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    Algebraic methods are used to construct the exact solution P of the linear matrix equation PA + BP = - C, where A, B, and C are matrices with real entries. The emphasis of this equation is on the use of finite algebraic procedures which are easily implemented on a digital computer and which lead to an explicit solution to the problem. The paper is divided into six sections which include the proof of the basic lemma, the Liapunov equation, and the computer implementation for the rational, integer and modular algorithms. Two numerical examples are given and the entire calculation process is depicted.

  11. Zeta functional equation on Jordan algebras of type II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayoya, J. B.

    2005-02-01

    Using the Jordan algebras methods, specially the properties of Peirce decomposition and the Frobenius transformation, we compute the coefficients of the zeta functional equation, in the case of Jordan algebras of type II. As particular cases of our result, we can cite the case of studied by Gelbart [Mem. Amer. Math. Soc. 108 (1971)] and Godement and Jacquet [Zeta functions of simple algebras, Lecture Notes in Math., vol. 260, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1972], and the case of studied by Muro [Adv. Stud. Pure Math. 15 (1989) 429]. Let us also mention, that recently, Bopp and Rubenthaler have obtained a more general result on the zeta functional equation by using methods based on the algebraic properties of regular graded algebras which are in one-to-one correspondence with simple Jordan algebras [Local Zeta Functions Attached to the Minimal Spherical Series for a Class of Symmetric Spaces, IRMA, Strasbourg, 2003]. The method used in this paper is a direct application of specific properties of Jordan algebras of type II.

  12. Integrable maps from Galois differential algebras, Borel transforms and number sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempesta, Piergiulio

    A new class of integrable maps, obtained as lattice versions of polynomial dynamical systems is introduced. These systems are obtained by means of a discretization procedure that preserves several analytic and algebraic properties of a given differential equation, in particular symmetries and integrability (see Tempesta, 2010 [40]). Our approach is based on the properties of a suitable Galois differential algebra, that we shall call a Rota algebra. A formulation of the procedure in terms of category theory is proposed. In order to render the lattice dynamics confined, a Borel regularization is also adopted. As a byproduct of the theory, a connection between number sequences and integrability is discussed.

  13. Algebraic Approach to the Computation of the Defining Polynomial of the Algebraic Riccati Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamoto, Takuya

    The algebraic Riccati equation, which we denote by ’ARE’ in the rest of the paper, is one of the most important equations of the post modern control theory. It plays important role for solving H 2 and H ∞ optimal control problems.

  14. Algebraic Reasoning in the Middle Grades: A View of Student Strategies in Pictorial and Algebraic System of Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcon, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Teachers use action research in order to improve their teaching and student learning. This action research will analyze students' algebraic reasoning in finding values of variables in systems of equations pictorially and algebraically. This research will look at students solving linear systems of equations without knowing the algebraic algorithms.…

  15. Differential/algebraic systems and matrix pencils

    SciTech Connect

    Gear, C.W.; Petzold, L.R.

    1982-04-01

    In this paper we study the numerical solution of the differential/algebraic systems F(t, y, y') = 0. Many of these systems can be solved conveniently and economically using a range of ODE methods. Others can be solved only by a small subset of ODE methods, and still others present insurmountable difficulty for all current ODE methods. We examine the first two groups of problems and indicate which methods we believe to be best for them. Then we explore the properties of the third group which cause the methods to fail. The important factor which determines the solvability of systems of linear problems is a quantity called the global nilpotency. This differs from the usual nilpotency for matrix pencils when the problem is time dependent, so that techniques based on matrix transformations are unlikely to be successful.

  16. On some differential transformations of hypergeometric equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounkonnou, M. N.; Ronveaux, A.

    2015-04-01

    Many algebraic transformations of the hypergeometric equation σ(x)z"(x) + τ(x)z'(x) + lz(x) = 0, where σ, τ, l are polynomial functions of degrees 2 (at most), 1, 0, respectively, are well known. Some of them involve x = x(t), a polynomial of degree r, in order to recover the Heun equation, extension of the hypergeometric equation by one more singularity. The case r = 2 was investigated by K. Kuiken (see 1979 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 10 (3) 655-657) and extended to r = 3,4, 5 by R. S. Maier (see 2005 J. Differ. Equat. 213 171 - 203). The transformations engendered by the function y(x) = A(x)z(x), also very popular in mathematics and physics, are used to get from the hypergeometric equation, for instance, the Schroedinger equation with appropriate potentials, as well as Heun and confluent Heun equations. This work addresses a generalization of Kimura's approach proposed in 1971, based on differential transformations of the hypergeometric equations involving y(x) = A(x)z(x) + B(x)z'(x). Appropriate choices of A(x) and B(x) permit to retrieve the Heun equations as well as equations for some exceptional polynomials. New relations are obtained for Laguerre and Hermite polynomials.

  17. Differential algebras without differentials: An easy C++ implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Automated differentiation can be motivated and explained rather plainly without any reference to infinitesimals or differentials whatsoever. We shall describe one possible approach in this paper. The method which we shall use will suggest its own implementation. However, FORTRAN is not the most natural language in which to carry it out. In the second section we shall describe an almost trivial implementation using C++. (Indeed, one of the motivations for writing this paper is to persuade militant FORTRAN extremists to invest the four or five days necessary to learn this powerful and easy language.) Take heed, however, that what we describe below is only a stripped-down implementation, written in three days, of differential algebra's most essential features; it is not as robust as and does not contain the battery of tools available in Berz's DA package, the product of a significant amount of work. 10 refs.

  18. Reconstruction of symmetric Dirac-Maxwell equations using nonassociative algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalauni, Pushpa; Barata, J. C. A.

    2015-01-01

    In the presence of sources, the usual Maxwell equations are neither symmetric nor invariant with respect to the duality transformation between electric and magnetic fields. Dirac proposed the existence of magnetic monopoles for symmetrizing the Maxwell equations. In the present work, we obtain the fully symmetric Dirac-Maxwell's equations (i.e. with electric and magnetic charges and currents) as a single equation by using 4 × 4 matrix presentation of fields and derivative operators. This matrix representation has been derived with the help of the algebraic properties of quaternions and octonions. Such description gives a compact representation of electric and magnetic counterparts of the field in a single equation.

  19. Solving Nonlinear Coupled Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, L.; David, J.

    1986-01-01

    Harmonic balance method developed to obtain approximate steady-state solutions for nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations. Method usable with transfer matrices commonly used to analyze shaft systems. Solution to nonlinear equation, with periodic forcing function represented as sum of series similar to Fourier series but with form of terms suggested by equation itself.

  20. Solving Differential Equations in R

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although R is still predominantly applied for statistical analysis and graphical representation, it is rapidly becoming more suitable for mathematical computing. One of the fields where considerable progress has been made recently is the solution of differential equations. Here w...

  1. Rational approximations to solutions of linear differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Chudnovsky, D. V.; Chudnovsky, G. V.

    1983-01-01

    Rational approximations of Padé and Padé type to solutions of differential equations are considered. One of the main results is a theorem stating that a simultaneous approximation to arbitrary solutions of linear differential equations over C(x) cannot be “better” than trivial ones implied by the Dirichlet box principle. This constitutes, in particular, the solution in the linear case of Kolchin's problem that the “Roth's theorem” holds for arbitrary solutions of algebraic differential equations. Complete effective proofs for several valuations are presented based on the Wronskian methods and graded subrings of Picard-Vessiot extensions. PMID:16593357

  2. Cauchy problem and Green's functions for first order differential operators and algebraic quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlhoff, Rainer

    2011-02-15

    Existence and uniqueness of advanced and retarded fundamental solutions (Green's functions) and of global solutions to the Cauchy problem is proved for a general class of first order linear differential operators on vector bundles over globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifolds. This is a core ingredient to CAR-/CCR-algebraic constructions of quantum field theories on curved spacetimes, particularly for higher spin field equations.

  3. A Realizable Reynolds Stress Algebraic Equation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Lumley, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The invariance theory in continuum mechanics is applied to analyze Reynolds stresses in high Reynolds number turbulent flows. The analysis leads to a turbulent constitutive relation that relates the Reynolds stresses to the mean velocity gradients in a more general form in which the classical isotropic eddy viscosity model is just the linear approximation of the general form. On the basis of realizability analysis, a set of model coefficients are obtained which are functions of the time scale ratios of the turbulence to the mean strain rate and the mean rotation rate. The coefficients will ensure the positivity of each component of the mean rotation rate. These coefficients will ensure the positivity of each component of the turbulent kinetic energy - realizability that most existing turbulence models fail to satisfy. Separated flows over backward-facing step configurations are taken as applications. The calculations are performed with a conservative finite-volume method. Grid-independent and numerical diffusion-free solutions are obtained by using differencing schemes of second-order accuracy on sufficiently fine grids. The calculated results are compared in detail with the experimental data for both mean and turbulent quantities. The comparison shows that the present proposal significantly improves the predictive capability of K-epsilon based two equation models. In addition, the proposed model is able to simulate rotational homogeneous shear flows with large rotation rates which all conventional eddy viscosity models fail to simulate.

  4. On Generating Discrete Integrable Systems via Lie Algebras and Commutator Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Feng; Honwah, Tam

    2016-03-01

    In the paper, we introduce the Lie algebras and the commutator equations to rewrite the Tu-d scheme for generating discrete integrable systems regularly. By the approach the various loop algebras of the Lie algebra A1 are defined so that the well-known Toda hierarchy and a novel discrete integrable system are obtained, respectively. A reduction of the later hierarchy is just right the famous Ablowitz-Ladik hierarchy. Finally, via two different enlarging Lie algebras of the Lie algebra A1, we derive two resulting differential-difference integrable couplings of the Toda hierarchy, of course, they are all various discrete expanding integrable models of the Toda hierarchy. When the introduced spectral matrices are higher degrees, the way presented in the paper is more convenient to generate discrete integrable equations than the Tu-d scheme by using the software Maple. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11371361, the Innovation Team of Jiangsu Province hosted by China University of Mining and Technology (2014), and Hong Kong Research Grant Council under Grant No. HKBU202512, as well as the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province under Grant No. ZR2013AL016

  5. On Generating Discrete Integrable Systems via Lie Algebras and Commutator Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Feng; Tam, Honwah

    2016-03-01

    In the paper, we introduce the Lie algebras and the commutator equations to rewrite the Tu-d scheme for generating discrete integrable systems regularly. By the approach the various loop algebras of the Lie algebra A1 are defined so that the well-known Toda hierarchy and a novel discrete integrable system are obtained, respectively. A reduction of the later hierarchy is just right the famous Ablowitz–Ladik hierarchy. Finally, via two different enlarging Lie algebras of the Lie algebra A1, we derive two resulting differential-difference integrable couplings of the Toda hierarchy, of course, they are all various discrete expanding integrable models of the Toda hierarchy. When the introduced spectral matrices are higher degrees, the way presented in the paper is more convenient to generate discrete integrable equations than the Tu-d scheme by using the software Maple. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11371361, the Innovation Team of Jiangsu Province hosted by China University of Mining and Technology (2014), and Hong Kong Research Grant Council under Grant No. HKBU202512, as well as the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province under Grant No. ZR2013AL016

  6. Using trees to compute approximate solutions to ordinary differential equations exactly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Some recent work is reviewed which relates families of trees to symbolic algorithms for the exact computation of series which approximate solutions of ordinary differential equations. It turns out that the vector space whose basis is the set of finite, rooted trees carries a natural multiplication related to the composition of differential operators, making the space of trees an algebra. This algebraic structure can be exploited to yield a variety of algorithms for manipulating vector fields and the series and algebras they generate.

  7. Invariant differential operators for non-compact Lie algebras parabolically related to conformal Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrev, V. K.

    2013-02-01

    In the present paper we continue the project of systematic construction of invariant differential operators for non-compact semisimple Lie groups. Our starting points is the class of algebras, which we call 'conformal Lie algebras' (CLA), which have very similar properties to the conformal algebras of Minkowski space-time, though our aim is to go beyond this class in a natural way. For this we introduce the new notion of parabolic relation between two non-compact semisimple Lie algebras G and G ' that have the same complexification and possess maximal parabolic subalgebras with the same complexification. Thus, we consider the exceptional algebra E 7(7) which is parabolically related to the CLA E 7(-25) , the parabolic subalgebras including E 6(6) and E 6(-26). Other interesting examples are the orthogonal algebras so(p, q) all of which are parabolically related to the conformal algebra so( n, 2) with p + q = n + 2, the parabolic subalgebras including the Lorentz subalgebra so( n - 1, 1) and its analogs so( p - 1, q - 1). We consider also E6(6) and E6(2) which are parabolically related to the hermitian symmetric case E6(-14) , the parabolic subalgebras including real forms of sl(6). We also give a formula for the number of representations in the main multiplets valid for CLAs and all algebras that are parabolically related to them. In all considered cases we give the main multiplets of indecomposable elementary representations including the necessary data for all relevant invariant differential operators. In the case of so( p, q) we give also the reduced multiplets. We should stress that the multiplets are given in the most economic way in pairs of shadow fields. Furthermore we should stress that the classification of all invariant differential operators includes as special cases all possible conservation laws and conserved currents, unitary or not.

  8. Similarity analysis of differential equations by Lie group.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Na, T. Y.; Hansen, A. G.

    1971-01-01

    Methods for transforming partial differential equations into forms more suitable for analysis and solution are investigated. The idea of Lie's infinitesimal contact transformation group is introduced to develop a systematic method which involves mostly algebraic manipulations. A thorough presentation of the application of this general method to the problem of similarity analysis in a broader sense - namely, the similarity between partial and ordinary differential equations, boundary value and initial value problems, and nonlinear and linear equations - is given with new and very general methods evolved for deriving the possible groups of transformations.

  9. The Differential Graded Odd NilHecke Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Alexander P.; Qi, You

    2016-05-01

    We equip the odd nilHecke algebra and its associated thick calculus category with diagrammatically local differentials. The resulting differential graded Grothendieck groups are isomorphic to two different forms of the positive part of quantum {{{sl}_2}} at a fourth root of unity.

  10. How Structure Sense for Algebraic Expressions or Equations Is Related to Structure Sense for Abstract Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotna, Jarmila; Hoch, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Many students have difficulties with basic algebraic concepts at high school and at university. In this paper two levels of algebraic structure sense are defined: for high school algebra and for university algebra. We suggest that high school algebra structure sense components are sub-components of some university algebra structure sense…

  11. Pendulum Motion and Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Thomas F.; King, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    A common example of real-world motion that can be modeled by a differential equation, and one easily understood by the student, is the simple pendulum. Simplifying assumptions are necessary for closed-form solutions to exist, and frequently there is little discussion of the impact if those assumptions are not met. This article presents a…

  12. Ordinary Differential Equation System Solver

    1992-03-05

    LSODE is a package of subroutines for the numerical solution of the initial value problem for systems of first order ordinary differential equations. The package is suitable for either stiff or nonstiff systems. For stiff systems the Jacobian matrix may be treated in either full or banded form. LSODE can also be used when the Jacobian can be approximated by a band matrix.

  13. Equivalence groupoids of classes of linear ordinary differential equations and their group classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Vyacheslav M.; Popovych, Roman O.; Shapoval, Nataliya M.

    2015-06-01

    Admissible point transformations of classes of rth order linear ordinary differential equations (in particular, the whole class of such equations and its subclasses of equations in the rational form, the Laguerre-Forsyth form, the first and second Arnold forms) are exhaustively described. Using these results, the group classification of such equations is carried out within the algebraic approach in three different ways.

  14. Symbolic computation of recurrence equations for the Chebyshev series solution of linear ODE's. [ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geddes, K. O.

    1977-01-01

    If a linear ordinary differential equation with polynomial coefficients is converted into integrated form then the formal substitution of a Chebyshev series leads to recurrence equations defining the Chebyshev coefficients of the solution function. An explicit formula is presented for the polynomial coefficients of the integrated form in terms of the polynomial coefficients of the differential form. The symmetries arising from multiplication and integration of Chebyshev polynomials are exploited in deriving a general recurrence equation from which can be derived all of the linear equations defining the Chebyshev coefficients. Procedures for deriving the general recurrence equation are specified in a precise algorithmic notation suitable for translation into any of the languages for symbolic computation. The method is algebraic and it can therefore be applied to differential equations containing indeterminates.

  15. Solving the generalized Langevin equation with the algebraically correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srokowski, T.; Płoszajczak, M.

    1998-04-01

    We solve the Langevin equation with the memory kernel. The stochastic force possesses algebraic correlations, proportional to 1/t. The velocity autocorrelation function and related quantities characterizing transport properties are calculated with the assumption that the system is in thermal equilibrium. Stochastic trajectories are simulated numerically, using the kangaroo process as a noise generator. Results of this simulation resemble Lévy walks with divergent moments of the velocity distribution. We consider motion of a Brownian particle, both without any external potential and in the harmonic oscillator field, in particular the escape from a potential well. The results are compared with memory-free calculations for the Brownian particle.

  16. Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Vyacheslav M; Popovych, Roman O; Shapoval, Nataliya M

    2013-01-01

    Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients are exhaustively described over both the complex and real fields. The exact lower and upper bounds for the dimensions of the maximal Lie invariance algebras possessed by such systems are obtained using an effective algebraic approach. PMID:23564972

  17. Bilinear equations and q-discrete Painlevé equations satisfied by variables and coefficients in cluster algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Naoto

    2015-08-01

    We construct cluster algebras the variables and coefficients of which satisfy the discrete mKdV equation, the discrete Toda equation and other integrable bilinear equations, several of which lead to q-discrete Painlevé equations. These cluster algebras are obtained from quivers with an infinite number of vertices or with the mutation-period property. We will also show that a suitable transformation of quivers corresponds to a reduction of the difference equation.

  18. Hopf-algebraic structure of combinatorial objects and differential operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Robert; Larson, Richard G.

    1989-01-01

    A Hopf-algebraic structure on a vector space which has as basis a family of trees is described. Some applications of this structure to combinatorics and to differential operators are surveyed. Some possible future directions for this work are indicated.

  19. Introducing Algebraic Structures through Solving Equations: Vertical Content Knowledge for K-12 Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.

    2014-01-01

    Algebraic structures are a necessary aspect of algebraic thinking for K-12 students and teachers. An approach for introducing the algebraic structure of groups and fields through the arithmetic properties required for solving simple equations is summarized; the collective (not individual) importance of these axioms as a foundation for algebraic…

  20. Algebraic Equations: Can Middle-School Students Meaningfully Translate from Words to Mathematical Symbols?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capraro, Mary Margaret; Joffrion, Heather

    2006-01-01

    Using symbolic algebra to represent and solve linear equations is one of the expectations within the "Algebra" content standard for the 6-8-grade band in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) "Principles and Standards for School Mathematics" (2000). Students' understanding of these concepts, even before a formal algebra course,…

  1. Reconsidering harmonic and anharmonic coherent states: Partial differential equations approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2015-02-01

    This article presents a new approach to dealing with time dependent quantities such as autocorrelation function of harmonic and anharmonic systems using coherent states and partial differential equations. The approach that is normally used to evaluate dynamical quantities involves formidable operator algebra. That operator algebra becomes insurmountable when employing Morse oscillator coherent states. This problem becomes even more complicated in case of Morse oscillator as it tends to exhibit divergent dynamics. This approach employs linear partial differential equations, some of which may be solved exactly and analytically, thereby avoiding the cumbersome noncommutative algebra required to manipulate coherent states of Morse oscillator. Additionally, the arising integrals while using the herein presented method feature stability and high numerical efficiency. The correctness, applicability, and utility of the above approach are tested by reproducing the partition and optical autocorrelation function of the harmonic oscillator. A closed-form expression for the equilibrium canonical partition function of the Morse oscillator is derived using its coherent states and partial differential equations. Also, a nonequilibrium autocorrelation function expression for weak electron-phonon coupling in condensed systems is derived for displaced Morse oscillator in electronic state. Finally, the utility of the method is demonstrated through further simplifying the Morse oscillator partition function or autocorrelation function expressions reported by other researchers in unevaluated form of second-order derivative exponential. Comparison with exact dynamics shows identical results.

  2. Reconsidering harmonic and anharmonic coherent states: Partial differential equations approach

    SciTech Connect

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2015-02-15

    This article presents a new approach to dealing with time dependent quantities such as autocorrelation function of harmonic and anharmonic systems using coherent states and partial differential equations. The approach that is normally used to evaluate dynamical quantities involves formidable operator algebra. That operator algebra becomes insurmountable when employing Morse oscillator coherent states. This problem becomes even more complicated in case of Morse oscillator as it tends to exhibit divergent dynamics. This approach employs linear partial differential equations, some of which may be solved exactly and analytically, thereby avoiding the cumbersome noncommutative algebra required to manipulate coherent states of Morse oscillator. Additionally, the arising integrals while using the herein presented method feature stability and high numerical efficiency. The correctness, applicability, and utility of the above approach are tested by reproducing the partition and optical autocorrelation function of the harmonic oscillator. A closed-form expression for the equilibrium canonical partition function of the Morse oscillator is derived using its coherent states and partial differential equations. Also, a nonequilibrium autocorrelation function expression for weak electron–phonon coupling in condensed systems is derived for displaced Morse oscillator in electronic state. Finally, the utility of the method is demonstrated through further simplifying the Morse oscillator partition function or autocorrelation function expressions reported by other researchers in unevaluated form of second-order derivative exponential. Comparison with exact dynamics shows identical results.

  3. Commutator identities on associative algebras, the non-Abelian Hirota difference equation and its reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebkov, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    We show that the non-Abelian Hirota difference equation is directly related to a commutator identity on an associative algebra. Evolutions generated by similarity transformations of elements of this algebra lead to a linear difference equation. We develop a special dressing procedure that results in an integrable non-Abelian Hirota difference equation and propose two regular reduction procedures that lead to a set of known equations, Abelian or non-Abelian, and also to some new integrable equations.

  4. Symmetries of the Schrödinger equation and algebra/superalgebra duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppan, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Some key features of the symmetries of the Schrodinger equation that are common to a much broader class of dynamical systems (some under construction) are illustrated. I discuss the algebra/superalgebra duality involving first and second-order differential operators. It provides different viewpoints for the spectrum-generating subalgebras. The representation- dependent notion of on-shell symmetry is introduced. The difference in associating the time-derivative symmetry operator with either a root or a Cartan generator of the sl(2) subalgebra is discussed. In application to one-dimensional Lagrangian superconformal sigma-models it implies superconformal actions which are either supersymmetric or non-supersymmetric.

  5. Solution of the Dirac equation with some superintegrable potentials by the quadratic algebra approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, S.; Chenaghlou, A.

    2014-02-01

    The Dirac equation with scalar and vector potentials of equal magnitude is considered. For the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator superintegrable potential, the superintegrable potentials of E8 (case (3b)), S4 and S2, the Schrödinger-like equations are studied. The quadratic algebras of these quasi-Hamiltonians are derived. By using the realization of the quadratic algebras in a deformed oscillator algebra, the structure function and the energy eigenvalues are obtained.

  6. Supporting Students' Understanding of Linear Equations with One Variable Using Algebra Tiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saraswati, Sari; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Somakim

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to describe how algebra tiles can support students' understanding of linear equations with one variable. This article is a part of a larger research on learning design of linear equations with one variable using algebra tiles combined with balancing method. Therefore, it will merely discuss one activity focused on how students…

  7. Differential operator multiplication method for fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaoqiang; Ying, Yuping; Lian, Yanping; Lin, Stephen; Yang, Yibo; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-08-01

    Fractional derivatives play a very important role in modeling physical phenomena involving long-range correlation effects. However, they raise challenges of computational cost and memory storage requirements when solved using current well developed numerical methods. In this paper, the differential operator multiplication method is proposed to address the issues by considering a reaction-advection-diffusion equation with a fractional derivative in time. The linear fractional differential equation is transformed into an integer order differential equation by the proposed method, which can fundamentally fix the aforementioned issues for select fractional differential equations. In such a transform, special attention should be paid to the initial conditions for the resulting differential equation of higher integer order. Through numerical experiments, we verify the proposed method for both fractional ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations.

  8. An electric-analog simulation of elliptic partial differential equations using finite element theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franke, O.L.; Pinder, G.F.; Patten, E.P.

    1982-01-01

    Elliptic partial differential equations can be solved using the Galerkin-finite element method to generate the approximating algebraic equations, and an electrical network to solve the resulting matrices. Some element configurations require the use of networks containing negative resistances which, while physically realizable, are more expensive and time-consuming to construct. ?? 1982.

  9. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  10. Differential algebraic method for aberration analysis of typical electrostatic lenses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhixiong

    2006-02-01

    In this paper up to fifth-order geometric and third-order chromatic aberration coefficients of typical electrostatic lenses are calculated by means of the charged particle optics code, COSY INFINITY, based on the differential algebraic (DA) method. A two-tube immersion lens and a symmetric einzel lens have been chosen as two examples, whose axial potential distributions are numerically calculated by a FORTRAN program using the finite difference method. The DA results are in good agreement with those evaluated by the aberration integrals in electron optics. The DA method presented here can easily be extended to aberration analysis of other numerically computed electron lenses, including magnetic lenses. PMID:16125845

  11. Modeling Projects in a Differential Equations Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claus-McGahan, Elly

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the value of student-designed, in-depth, modeling projects in a differential equations course and how to prepare students. Provides excerpts from worksheets, a list of computer software for Macintosh that can be used in teaching differential equations, and an annotated bibliography. (Author/ASK)

  12. Solving Differential Equations Using Modified Picard Iteration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many classes of differential equations are shown to be open to solution through a method involving a combination of a direct integration approach with suitably modified Picard iterative procedures. The classes of differential equations considered include typical initial value, boundary value and eigenvalue problems arising in physics and…

  13. MACSYMA's symbolic ordinary differential equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The MACSYMA's symbolic ordinary differential equation solver ODE2 is described. The code for this routine is delineated, which is of interest because it is written in top-level MACSYMA language, and may serve as a good example of programming in that language. Other symbolic ordinary differential equation solvers are mentioned.

  14. Symbolic Solution of Linear Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, R. B.; Grooms, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations is presented. The computational complexity of the algorithm is discussed and its implementation in the FORMAC system is described. A comparison is made between the algorithm and some classical algorithms for solving differential equations.

  15. Stochastic differential equation model to Prendiville processes

    SciTech Connect

    Granita; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-10-22

    The Prendiville process is another variation of the logistic model which assumes linearly decreasing population growth rate. It is a continuous time Markov chain (CTMC) taking integer values in the finite interval. The continuous time Markov chain can be approximated by stochastic differential equation (SDE). This paper discusses the stochastic differential equation of Prendiville process. The work started with the forward Kolmogorov equation in continuous time Markov chain of Prendiville process. Then it was formulated in the form of a central-difference approximation. The approximation was then used in Fokker-Planck equation in relation to the stochastic differential equation of the Prendiville process. The explicit solution of the Prendiville process was obtained from the stochastic differential equation. Therefore, the mean and variance function of the Prendiville process could be easily found from the explicit solution.

  16. Sparse dynamics for partial differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Hayden; Caflisch, Russel; Hauck, Cory D.; Osher, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the approximate dynamics of several differential equations when the solutions are restricted to a sparse subset of a given basis. The restriction is enforced at every time step by simply applying soft thresholding to the coefficients of the basis approximation. By reducing or compressing the information needed to represent the solution at every step, only the essential dynamics are represented. In many cases, there are natural bases derived from the differential equations, which promote sparsity. We find that our method successfully reduces the dynamics of convection equations, diffusion equations, weak shocks, and vorticity equations with high-frequency source terms. PMID:23533273

  17. Strong convergence and convergence rates of approximating solutions for algebraic Riccati equations in Hilbert spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Kazufumi

    1987-01-01

    The linear quadratic optimal control problem on infinite time interval for linear time-invariant systems defined on Hilbert spaces is considered. The optimal control is given by a feedback form in terms of solution pi to the associated algebraic Riccati equation (ARE). A Ritz type approximation is used to obtain a sequence pi sup N of finite dimensional approximations of the solution to ARE. A sufficient condition that shows pi sup N converges strongly to pi is obtained. Under this condition, a formula is derived which can be used to obtain a rate of convergence of pi sup N to pi. The results of the Galerkin approximation is demonstrated and applied for parabolic systems and the averaging approximation for hereditary differential systems.

  18. An efficient computer based wavelets approximation method to solve Fuzzy boundary value differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam Khan, Najeeb; Razzaq, Oyoon Abdul

    2016-03-01

    In the present work a wavelets approximation method is employed to solve fuzzy boundary value differential equations (FBVDEs). Essentially, a truncated Legendre wavelets series together with the Legendre wavelets operational matrix of derivative are utilized to convert FB- VDE into a simple computational problem by reducing it into a system of fuzzy algebraic linear equations. The capability of scheme is investigated on second order FB- VDE considered under generalized H-differentiability. Solutions are represented graphically showing competency and accuracy of this method.

  19. Adaptice-step time integration package for stiff, nonstiff and multi-rate systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs)

    2014-06-01

    ARKode is part of a software family called SUNDIALS: SUite of Nonlinear and Differential/ALgebraic equation Solvers [1]. The ARKode solver library provides an adaptive-step time integration package for stiff, nonstiff and multi-rate systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) using Runge Kutta methods [2].

  20. Connecting Related Rates and Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Keith

    2012-01-01

    This article points out a simple connection between related rates and differential equations. The connection can be used for in-class examples or homework exercises, and it is accessible to students who are familiar with separation of variables.

  1. Normal Forms for Nonautonomous Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    We extend Henry Poincarés normal form theory for autonomous differential equations x=f(x) to nonautonomous differential equations x=f(t, x). Poincarés nonresonance condition λj-∑ni=1 ℓiλi≠0 for eigenvalues is generalized to the new nonresonance condition λj∩∑ni=1 ℓiλi=∅ for spectral intervals.

  2. Program for solution of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloate, H.

    1973-01-01

    A program for the solution of linear and nonlinear first order ordinary differential equations is described and user instructions are included. The program contains a new integration algorithm for the solution of initial value problems which is particularly efficient for the solution of differential equations with a wide range of eigenvalues. The program in its present form handles up to ten state variables, but expansion to handle up to fifty state variables is being investigated.

  3. ODE methods for the solution of differential/algebraic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gear, C.W.; Petzold, L.R.

    1982-09-01

    In this paper we study the numerical solution of the differential/algebraic systems F(t, y, y') = 0. Many of these systems can be solved conveniently and economically using a range of ODE methods. Others can be solved only by a small subset of ODE methods, and still others present insurmountable difficulty for all current ODE methods. We examine the first two groups of problems and indicate which methods we believe to be best for them. Then we explore the properties of the third group which cause the methods to fail. We describe a reduction technique which allows systems to be reduced to ones that can be solved. It also provides a tool for the analytical study of the structure of systems.

  4. The Algebra Solution to Mathematics Reform: Completing the Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielhagen, Frances R.

    2011-01-01

    How can we increase mathematics achievement among all students? This book provides a straightforward explanation of how changing mathematics tracking policies to provide algebra instruction to all students by at least eighth grade can bring about changes in both student achievement and teacher performance. Spielhagen chronicles the success of a…

  5. Computer Algebra Systems in Undergraduate Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Don; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Computer algebra systems (such as MACSYMA and muMath) can carry out many of the operations of calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations. Use of them with sketching graphs of rational functions and with other topics is discussed. (MNS)

  6. Extended trigonometric Cherednik algebras and nonstationary Schroedinger equations with delta-potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, J. T.; Stokman, J. V.

    2013-02-15

    We realize an extended version of the trigonometric Cherednik algebra as affine Dunkl operators involving Heaviside functions. We use the quadratic Casimir element of the extended trigonometric Cherednik algebra to define an explicit nonstationary Schroedinger equation with delta-potential. We use coordinate Bethe ansatz methods to construct solutions of the nonstationary Schroedinger equation in terms of generalized Bethe wave functions. It is shown that the generalized Bethe wave functions satisfy affine difference Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations as functions of the momenta. The relation to the vector valued root system analogs of the quantum Bose gas on the circle with delta-function interactions is indicated.

  7. Extended Trial Equation Method for Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gepreel, Khaled A.; Nofal, Taher A.

    2015-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to use the extended trial equation method to construct a series of some new solutions for some nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) in mathematical physics. We will construct the solutions in many different functions such as hyperbolic function solutions, trigonometric function solutions, Jacobi elliptic function solutions, and rational functional solutions for the nonlinear PDEs when the balance number is a real number via the Zhiber-Shabat nonlinear differential equation. The balance number of this method is not constant as we shown in other methods, but it is changed by changing the trial equation derivative definition. This method allowed us to construct many new types of solutions. It is shown by using the Maple software package that all obtained solutions satisfy the original PDEs.

  8. Cognitive Load in Algebra: Element Interactivity in Solving Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Chung, Siu Fung; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing

    2015-01-01

    Central to equation solving is the maintenance of equivalence on both sides of the equation. However, when the process involves an interaction of multiple elements, solving an equation can impose a high cognitive load. The balance method requires operations on both sides of the equation, whereas the inverse method involves operations on one side…

  9. Some problems in fractal differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weiyi

    2016-06-01

    Based upon the fractal calculus on local fields, or p-type calculus, or Gibbs-Butzer calculus ([1],[2]), we suggest a constructive idea for "fractal differential equations", beginning from some special examples to a general theory. However, this is just an original idea, it needs lots of later work to support. In [3], we show example "two dimension wave equations with fractal boundaries", and in this note, other examples, as well as an idea to construct fractal differential equations are shown.

  10. Exploring the Phase Space of a System of Differential Equations: Different Mathematical Registers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, Thierry; Kidron, Ivy

    2008-01-01

    We describe and analyze a situation involving symbolic representation and graphical visualization of the solution of a system of two linear differential equations, using a computer algebra system. Symbolic solution and graphical representation complement each other. Graphical representation helps to understand the behavior of the symbolic…

  11. The Mathlet Toolkit: Creating Dynamic Applets for Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic/interactive graphing applets can be used to supplement standard computer algebra systems such as Maple, Mathematica, Derive, or TI calculators, in courses such as Calculus, Differential Equations, and Dynamical Systems. The addition of this type of software can lead to discovery learning, with students developing their own conjectures, and…

  12. Solving the Langevin equation with stochastic algebraically correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płoszajczak, M.; Srokowski, T.

    1997-05-01

    The long time tail in the velocity and force autocorrelation function has been found recently in molecular dynamics simulations of peripheral collisions of ions. Simulation of those slowly decaying correlations in the stochastic transport theory requires the development of new methods of generating stochastic force of arbitrarily long correlation times. In this paper we propose a Markovian process, the multidimensional kangaroo process, which permits the description of various algebraically correlated stochastic processes.

  13. Differential geometry techniques for sets of nonlinear partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Frank B.

    1990-01-01

    An attempt is made to show that the Cartan theory of partial differential equations can be a useful technique for applied mathematics. Techniques for finding consistent subfamilies of solutions that are generically rich and well-posed and for introducing potentials or other usefully consistent auxiliary fields are introduced. An extended sample calculation involving the Korteweg-de Vries equation is given.

  14. Differential equation models for sharp threshold dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Harrison C; Dimitrov, Nedialko B

    2014-01-01

    We develop an extension to differential equation models of dynamical systems to allow us to analyze probabilistic threshold dynamics that fundamentally and globally change system behavior. We apply our novel modeling approach to two cases of interest: a model of infectious disease modified for malware where a detection event drastically changes dynamics by introducing a new class in competition with the original infection; and the Lanchester model of armed conflict, where the loss of a key capability drastically changes the effectiveness of one of the sides. We derive and demonstrate a step-by-step, repeatable method for applying our novel modeling approach to an arbitrary system, and we compare the resulting differential equations to simulations of the system's random progression. Our work leads to a simple and easily implemented method for analyzing probabilistic threshold dynamics using differential equations. PMID:24184349

  15. Stochastic Differential Equation of Earthquakes Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Maria C.; Tweneboah, Osei K.; Gonzalez-Huizar, Hector; Serpa, Laura

    2016-07-01

    This work is devoted to modeling earthquake time series. We propose a stochastic differential equation based on the superposition of independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes driven by a Γ (α, β ) process. Superposition of independent Γ (α, β ) Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes offer analytic flexibility and provides a class of continuous time processes capable of exhibiting long memory behavior. The stochastic differential equation is applied to the study of earthquakes by fitting the superposed Γ (α, β ) Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model to earthquake sequences in South America containing very large events (Mw ≥ 8). We obtained very good fit of the observed magnitudes of the earthquakes with the stochastic differential equations, which supports the use of this methodology for the study of earthquakes sequence.

  16. Stochastic Differential Equation of Earthquakes Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Maria C.; Tweneboah, Osei K.; Gonzalez-Huizar, Hector; Serpa, Laura

    2016-05-01

    This work is devoted to modeling earthquake time series. We propose a stochastic differential equation based on the superposition of independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes driven by a Γ (α, β ) process. Superposition of independent Γ (α, β ) Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes offer analytic flexibility and provides a class of continuous time processes capable of exhibiting long memory behavior. The stochastic differential equation is applied to the study of earthquakes by fitting the superposed Γ (α, β ) Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model to earthquake sequences in South America containing very large events (Mw ≥ 8). We obtained very good fit of the observed magnitudes of the earthquakes with the stochastic differential equations, which supports the use of this methodology for the study of earthquakes sequence.

  17. Radiative Damping and Functional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Suvrat; Raju, C. K.

    We propose a general technique to solve the classical many-body problem with radiative damping. We modify the short-distance structure of Maxwell electrodynamics. This allows us to avoid runaway solutions as if we had a covariant model of extended particles. The resulting equations of motion are functional differential equations (FDEs) rather than ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Using recently developed numerical techniques for stiff, retarded FDEs, we solve these equations for the one-body central force problem with radiative damping. Our results indicate that locally the magnitude of radiation damping may be well approximated by the standard third-order expression but the global properties of our solutions are dramatically different. We comment on the two-body problem and applications to quantum field theory and quantum mechanics.

  18. The ATOMFT integrator - Using Taylor series to solve ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berryman, Kenneth W.; Stanford, Richard H.; Breckheimer, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of ATOMFT, an integration package based on Taylor series solution with a sophisticated user interface. ATOMFT has the capabilities to allow the implementation of user defined functions and the solution of stiff and algebraic equations. Detailed examples, including the solutions to several astrodynamics problems, are presented. Comparisons with its predecessor ATOMCC and other modern integrators indicate that ATOMFT is a fast, accurate, and easy method to use to solve many differential equation problems.

  19. Algorithms For Integrating Nonlinear Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Walker, K. P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved algorithms developed for use in numerical integration of systems of nonhomogenous, nonlinear, first-order, ordinary differential equations. In comparison with integration algorithms, these algorithms offer greater stability and accuracy. Several asymptotically correct, thereby enabling retention of stability and accuracy when large increments of independent variable used. Accuracies attainable demonstrated by applying them to systems of nonlinear, first-order, differential equations that arise in study of viscoplastic behavior, spread of acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus and predator/prey populations.

  20. Numerical solution of fractional differential equations using cubic B-spline wavelet collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinxiu

    2012-10-01

    Physical processes with memory and hereditary properties can be best described by fractional differential equations due to the memory effect of fractional derivatives. For that reason reliable and efficient techniques for the solution of fractional differential equations are needed. Our aim is to generalize the wavelet collocation method to fractional differential equations using cubic B-spline wavelet. Analytical expressions of fractional derivatives in Caputo sense for cubic B-spline functions are presented. The main characteristic of the approach is that it converts such problems into a system of algebraic equations which is suitable for computer programming. It not only simplifies the problem but also speeds up the computation. Numerical results demonstrate the validity and applicability of the method to solve fractional differential equation.

  1. Numerical solution of distributed order fractional differential equations by hybrid functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, S.; Razzaghi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new numerical method for solving the distributed fractional differential equations is presented. The method is based upon hybrid functions approximation. The properties of hybrid functions consisting of block-pulse functions and Bernoulli polynomials are presented. The Riemann-Liouville fractional integral operator for hybrid functions is introduced. This operator is then utilized to reduce the solution of the distributed fractional differential equations to a system of algebraic equations. Illustrative examples are included to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the technique.

  2. Numerical solution of differential-difference equations in large intervals using a Taylor collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirani, M. Dadkhah; Sohrabi, F.; Almasieh, H.; Kajani, M. Tavassoli

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a collocation method based on Taylor polynomials is developed for solving systems linear differential-difference equations with variable coefficients defined in large intervals. By using Taylor polynomials and their properties in obtaining operational matrices, the solution of the differential-difference equation system with given conditions is reduced to the solution of a system of linear algebraic equations. We first divide the large interval into M equal subintervals and then Taylor polynomials solutions are obtained in each interval, separately. Some numerical examples are given and results are compared with analytical solutions and other techniques in the literature to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the proposed method.

  3. Mellin transform approach for the solution of coupled systems of fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butera, Salvatore; Di Paola, Mario

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the solution of a multi-order, multi-degree-of-freedom fractional differential equation is addressed by using the Mellin integral transform. By taking advantage of a technique that relates the transformed function, in points of the complex plane differing in the value of their real part, the solution is found in the Mellin domain by solving a linear set of algebraic equations. The approximate solution of the differential (or integral) equation is restored, in the time domain, by using the inverse Mellin transform in its discretized form.

  4. Computational Differential Equations: A Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roubides, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    The following article presents a proposal for the redesign of a traditional course in Differential Equations at Middle Georgia College. The redesign of the course involves a new approach to teaching traditional concepts: one where the understanding of the physical aspects of each problem takes precedence over the actual mechanics of solving the…

  5. Parallel Algorithm Solves Coupled Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, A.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical methods adapted to concurrent processing. Algorithm solves set of coupled partial differential equations by numerical integration. Adapted to run on hypercube computer, algorithm separates problem into smaller problems solved concurrently. Increase in computing speed with concurrent processing over that achievable with conventional sequential processing appreciable, especially for large problems.

  6. Classification of Invariant Differential Operators for Non-Compact Lie Algebras via Parabolic Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrev, V. K.

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper we review the progress of the project of classification and construction of invariant differential operators for non-compact semisimple Lie groups. Our starting points is the class of algebras, which we called earlier 'conformal Lie algebras' (CLA), which have very similar properties to the conformal algebras of Minkowski space-time, though our aim is to go beyond this class in a natural way. For this we introduced recently the new notion of parabolic relation between two non-compact semisimple Lie algebras G and G' that have the same complexification and possess maximal parabolic subalgebras with the same complexification. Thus, we consider the exceptional algebra E7(7) which is parabolically related to the CLA E7(-25). Other interesting examples are the orthogonal algebras so(p, q) all of which are parabolically related to the conformal algebra so(n, 2) with p + q = n + 2, the parabolic subalgebras including the Lorentz subalgebra so(n - 1,1) and its analogs so(p - 1, q - 1). Further we consider the algebras sl(2n, Bbb R) and for n = 2k the algebras su* (4k) which are parabolically related to the CLA su(n,n). Further we consider the algebras sp(r,r) which are parabolically related to the CLA sp(2r, Bbb R). We consider also E6(6) and E6(2) which are parabolically related to the hermitian symmetric case E6(-14),

  7. Applications of differential algebra to single-particle dynamics in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.

    1991-09-01

    Recent developments in the use of differential algebra to study single-particle beam dynamics in charged-particle storage rings are the subject of this paper. Chapter 2 gives a brief review of storage rings. The concepts of betatron motion and synchrotron motion, and their associated resonances, are introduced. Also introduced are the concepts of imperfections, such as off-momentum, misalignment, and random and systematic errors, and their associated corrections. The chapter concludes with a discussion of numerical simulation principles and the concept of one-turn periodic maps. In Chapter 3, the discussion becomes more focused with the introduction of differential algebras. The most critical test for differential algebraic mapping techniques -- their application to long-term stability studies -- is discussed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 presents a discussion of differential algebraic treatment of dispersed betatron motion. The paper concludes in Chapter 6 with a discussion of parameterization of high-order maps.

  8. A Fresh Look at Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as…

  9. Differences between Expected Answers and the Answers Given by Computer Algebra Systems to School Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonisson, Eno

    2015-01-01

    Sometimes Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) offer an answer that is somewhat different from the answer that is probably expected by the student or teacher. These (somewhat unexpected) answers could serve as a catalyst for rich mathematical discussion. In this study, over 120 equations from school mathematics were solved using 8 different CAS. Many…

  10. Flipping an Algebra Classroom: Analyzing, Modeling, and Solving Systems of Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirvan, Rebecca; Rakes, Christopher R.; Zamora, Regie

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated whether flipping an algebra classroom led to a stronger focus on conceptual understanding and improved learning of systems of linear equations for 54 seventh- and eighth-grade students using teacher journal data and district-mandated unit exam items. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to compare scores on…

  11. Using Spreadsheets to Make Algebra More Accessible--Part 2: Solutions to Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John

    2009-01-01

    This article is the second in a series of two papers which suggest some practical, spreadsheet-based ideas for helping students to make appropriate connections between particular algebraic concepts. Solving equations has traditionally been taught as a pen-and-paper process. Spreadsheets, such as that of Excel, provide a contemporary, and powerful…

  12. Alternative Representations for Algebraic Problem Solving: When Are Graphs Better than Equations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielicki, Marta K.; Wiley, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Successful algebraic problem solving entails adaptability of solution methods using different representations. Prior research has suggested that students are more likely to prefer symbolic solution methods (equations) over graphical ones, even when graphical methods should be more efficient. However, this research has not tested how representation…

  13. Solution of the Schrodinger Equation for a Diatomic Oscillator Using Linear Algebra: An Undergraduate Computational Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasyna, Zbigniew L.

    2008-01-01

    Computational experiment is proposed in which a linear algebra method is applied to the solution of the Schrodinger equation for a diatomic oscillator. Calculations of the vibration-rotation spectrum for the HCl molecule are presented and the results show excellent agreement with experimental data. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

  14. Translation of Algebraic Equations and Its Relation to Formal Operational Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor

    A large proportion of college students majoring in science are unable to translate even simple sentences into algebraic equations. Given the following sentence, "There are six times as many students (S) as professors (P) at this university," 37% of 150 freshmen engineering students in a study conducted in 1981 by Clement, Lockhead, and Monk wrote…

  15. New solutions of reflection equation derived from type B BMW algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häring-Oldenburg, Reinhard

    1996-09-01

    We use B-type knot theory to find new solutions of Sklyanin's reflection equation in a systematic way. This generalizes the well known Baxterization of Birman - Wenzl algebras and should describe integrable systems which are restricted to a half plane.

  16. Solution of Algebraic Equations in the Analysis, Design, and Optimization of Continuous Ultrafiltration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Continuous feed and bleed ultrafiltration, modeled with the gel polarization model for the limiting flux, is shown to provide a rich source of non-linear algebraic equations that can be readily solved using numerical and graphical techniques familiar to undergraduate students. We present a variety of numerical problems in the design, analysis, and…

  17. Solving Parker's transport equation with stochastic differential equations on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunzlaff, P.; Strauss, R. D.; Potgieter, M. S.

    2015-07-01

    The numerical solution of transport equations for energetic charged particles in space is generally very costly in terms of time. Besides the use of multi-core CPUs and computer clusters in order to decrease the computation times, high performance calculations on graphics processing units (GPUs) have become available during the last years. In this work we introduce and describe a GPU-accelerated implementation of Parker's equation using Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs) for the simulation of the transport of energetic charged particles with the CUDA toolkit, which is the focus of this work. We briefly discuss the set of SDEs arising from Parker's transport equation and their application to boundary value problems such as that of the Jovian magnetosphere. We compare the runtimes of the GPU code with a CPU version of the same algorithm. Compared to the CPU implementation (using OpenMP and eight threads) we find a performance increase of about a factor of 10-60, depending on the assumed set of parameters. Furthermore, we benchmark our simulation using the results of an existing SDE implementation of Parker's transport equation.

  18. Phase noise in oscillators as differential-algebraic systems with colored noise sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Alper

    2004-05-01

    Oscillators are key components of many kinds of systems, particularly electronic and opto-electronic systems. Undesired perturbations, i.e. noise, in practical systems adversely affect the spectral and timing properties of the signals generated by oscillators resulting in phase noise and timing jitter, which are key performance limiting factors, being major contributors to bit-error-rate (BER) of RF and possibly optical communication systems, and creating synchronization problems in clocked and sampled-data electronic systems. In this paper, we review our work on the theory and numerical methods for nonlinear perturbation and noise analysis of oscillators described by a system of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) with white and colored noise sources. The bulk of the work reviewed in this paper first appeared in [1], then in [2] and [3]. Prior to the work mentioned above, we developed a theory and numerical methods for nonlinear perturbation and noise analysis of oscillators described by a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with white noise sources only [4, 5]. In this paper, we also discuss some open problems and issues in the modeling and analysis of phase noise both in free running oscillators and in phase/injection-locked ones.

  19. Differential equation-based seismic data filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianchao; Larner, K.

    1992-05-01

    Suppressing noise and enhancing useful seismic signal by filtering is one of the important tasks of seismic data processing. conventional filtering methods are implemented through either the convolution operation or various mathematical transforms. In this paper, we describe a methodology for studying and implementing filters, which, unlike those conventional filtering methods, is based on solving differential equations in the time and space domain. We call this kind of filtering differential equation-based filtering (DEBF). DEBF does not require that seismic data be stationary, so filtering parameters can vary with every time and space point. Also, in 2-D and 3-D, DEBF has higher computational efficiency than do conventional multiple-trace filtering methods. Examples with synthetic and field seismic data show the DEBF methods presented here to be efficient and effective.

  20. On the Inclusion of Difference Equation Problems and Z Transform Methods in Sophomore Differential Equation Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savoye, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, I started covering difference equations and z transform methods in my introductory differential equations course. This allowed my students to extend the "classical" methods for (ordinary differential equation) ODE's to discrete time problems arising in many applications.

  1. LORENE: Spectral methods differential equations solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgoulhon, Eric; Grandclément, Philippe; Marck, Jean-Alain; Novak, Jérôme; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2016-08-01

    LORENE (Langage Objet pour la RElativité NumériquE) solves various problems arising in numerical relativity, and more generally in computational astrophysics. It is a set of C++ classes and provides tools to solve partial differential equations by means of multi-domain spectral methods. LORENE classes implement basic structures such as arrays and matrices, but also abstract mathematical objects, such as tensors, and astrophysical objects, such as stars and black holes.

  2. Partial differential equation models in macroeconomics.

    PubMed

    Achdou, Yves; Buera, Francisco J; Lasry, Jean-Michel; Lions, Pierre-Louis; Moll, Benjamin

    2014-11-13

    The purpose of this article is to get mathematicians interested in studying a number of partial differential equations (PDEs) that naturally arise in macroeconomics. These PDEs come from models designed to study some of the most important questions in economics. At the same time, they are highly interesting for mathematicians because their structure is often quite difficult. We present a number of examples of such PDEs, discuss what is known about their properties, and list some open questions for future research. PMID:25288811

  3. Observability of discretized partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Dee, Dick P.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that complete observability of the discrete model used to assimilate data from a linear partial differential equation (PDE) system is necessary and sufficient for asymptotic stability of the data assimilation process. The observability theory for discrete systems is reviewed and applied to obtain simple observability tests for discretized constant-coefficient PDEs. Examples are used to show how numerical dispersion can result in discrete dynamics with multiple eigenvalues, thereby detracting from observability.

  4. Spurious Numerical Solutions Of Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafon, A.; Yee, H. C.

    1995-01-01

    Paper presents detailed study of spurious steady-state numerical solutions of differential equations that contain nonlinear source terms. Main objectives of this study are (1) to investigate how well numerical steady-state solutions of model nonlinear reaction/convection boundary-value problem mimic true steady-state solutions and (2) to relate findings of this investigation to implications for interpretation of numerical results from computational-fluid-dynamics algorithms and computer codes used to simulate reacting flows.

  5. Spurious Solutions Of Nonlinear Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.; Griffiths, D. F.

    1992-01-01

    Report utilizes nonlinear-dynamics approach to investigate possible sources of errors and slow convergence and non-convergence of steady-state numerical solutions when using time-dependent approach for problems containing nonlinear source terms. Emphasizes implications for development of algorithms in CFD and computational sciences in general. Main fundamental conclusion of study is that qualitative features of nonlinear differential equations cannot be adequately represented by finite-difference method and vice versa.

  6. Teaching Modeling with Partial Differential Equations: Several Successful Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Joseph; Trubatch, David; Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the introduction and teaching of partial differential equations (heat and wave equations) via modeling physical phenomena, using a new approach that encompasses constructing difference equations and implementing these in a spreadsheet, numerically solving the partial differential equations using the numerical differential equation…

  7. Synchronization with propagation - The functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rǎsvan, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    The structure represented by one or several oscillators couple to a one-dimensional transmission environment (e.g. a vibrating string in the mechanical case or a lossless transmission line in the electrical case) turned to be attractive for the research in the field of complex structures and/or complex behavior. This is due to the fact that such a structure represents some generalization of various interconnection modes with lumped parameters for the oscillators. On the other hand the lossless and distortionless propagation along transmission lines has generated several research in electrical, thermal, hydro and control engineering leading to the association of some functional differential equations to the basic initial boundary value problems. The present research is performed at the crossroad of the aforementioned directions. We shall associate to the starting models some functional differential equations - in most cases of neutral type - and make use of the general theorems for existence and stability of forced oscillations for functional differential equations. The challenges introduced by the analyzed problems for the general theory are emphasized, together with the implication of the results for various applications.

  8. Soliton equations related to the affine Kac-Moody algebra D{4/(1)}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdjikov, V. S.; Mladenov, D. M.; Stefanov, A. A.; Varbev, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    We have derived the hierarchy of soliton equations associated with the untwisted affine Kac-Moody algebra D {4/(1)} by calculating the corresponding recursion operators. The Hamiltonian formulation of the equations from the hierarchy is also considered. As an example we have explicitly presented the first non-trivial member of the hierarchy, which is an one-parameter family of mKdV equations. We have also considered the spectral properties of the Lax operator and introduced a minimal set of scattering data.

  9. Generalized Halanay inequalities for dissipativity of Volterra functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liping; Yu, Yuexin; Wang, Wansheng

    2008-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the dissipativity of theoretical solutions to nonlinear Volterra functional differential equations (VFDEs). At first, we give some generalizations of Halanay's inequality which play an important role in study of dissipativity and stability of differential equations. Then, by applying the generalization of Halanay's inequality, the dissipativity results of VFDEs are obtained, which provides unified theoretical foundation for the dissipativity analysis of systems in ordinary differential equations (ODEs), delay differential equations (DDEs), integro-differential equations (IDEs), Volterra delay-integro-differential equations (VDIDEs) and VFDEs of other type which appear in practice.

  10. Lie group analysis of a generalized Krichever-Novikov differential-difference equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Decio; Ricca, Eugenio; Thomova, Zora; Winternitz, Pavel

    2014-10-01

    The symmetry algebra of the differential-difference equation dot{u}_n = N/D with D = un+1 - un-1 and N = P(un)un+1un-1 + Q(un)(un+1 + un-1) + R(un), where P, Q, and R are arbitrary analytic functions is shown to have the dimension 1 ⩽ dimL ⩽ 5. When P, Q, and R are specific second order polynomials in un (depending on 6 constants) this is the integrable discretization of the Krichever-Novikov equation. We find 3 cases when the arbitrary functions are not polynomials and the symmetry algebra satisfies dimL = 2. These cases are shown not to be integrable. The symmetry algebras are used to reduce the equations to purely difference ones. The symmetry group is also used to impose periodicity un+N = un and thus to reduce the differential-difference equation to a system of N coupled ordinary three points difference equations.

  11. Exact solutions for the fractional differential equations by using the first integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminikhah, Hossein; Sheikhani, A. Refahi; Rezazadeh, Hadi

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we apply the first integral method to study the solutions of the nonlinear fractional modified Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation, the nonlinear fractional modified Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation and the nonlinear fractional Whitham-Broer-Kaup-Like systems. This method is based on the ring theory of commutative algebra. The results obtained by the proposed method show that the approach is effective and general. This approach can also be applied to other nonlinear fractional differential equations, which are arising in the theory of solitons and other areas.

  12. Kaluza-Klein theory revisited: projective structures and differential operators on algebra of densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudaverdian, H. M.

    2014-03-01

    We consider differential operators acting on densities of arbitrary weights on manifold M identifying pencils of such operators with operators on algebra of densities of all weights. This algebra can be identified with the special subalgebra of functions on extended manifold . On one hand there is a canonical lift of projective structures on M to affine structures on extended manifold . On the other hand the restriction of algebra of all functions on extended manifold to this special subalgebra of functions implies the canonical scalar product. This leads in particular to classification of second order operators with use of Kaluza-Klein-like mechanisms.

  13. Tracking children's mental states while solving algebra equations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Betts, Shawn; Ferris, Jennifer L; Fincham, Jon M

    2012-11-01

    Behavioral and function magnetic resonance imagery (fMRI) data were combined to infer the mental states of students as they interacted with an intelligent tutoring system. Sixteen children interacted with a computer tutor for solving linear equations over a six-day period (days 0-5), with days 1 and 5 occurring in an fMRI scanner. Hidden Markov model algorithms combined a model of student behavior with multi-voxel imaging pattern data to predict the mental states of students. We separately assessed the algorithms' ability to predict which step in a problem-solving sequence was performed and whether the step was performed correctly. For day 1, the data patterns of other students were used to predict the mental states of a target student. These predictions were improved on day 5 by adding information about the target student's behavioral and imaging data from day 1. Successful tracking of mental states depended on using the combination of a behavioral model and multi-voxel pattern analysis, illustrating the effectiveness of an integrated approach to tracking the cognition of individuals in real time as they perform complex tasks. PMID:21932262

  14. Obtaining General Relativity's N-body non-linear Lagrangian from iterative, linear algebraic scaling equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordtvedt, K.

    2015-11-01

    A local system of bodies in General Relativity whose exterior metric field asymptotically approaches the Minkowski metric effaces any effects of the matter distribution exterior to its Minkowski boundary condition. To enforce to all orders this property of gravity which appears to hold in nature, a method using linear algebraic scaling equations is developed which generates by an iterative process an N-body Lagrangian expansion for gravity's motion-independent potentials which fulfills exterior effacement along with needed metric potential expansions. Then additional properties of gravity - interior effacement and Lorentz time dilation and spatial contraction - produce additional iterative, linear algebraic equations for obtaining the full non-linear and motion-dependent N-body gravity Lagrangian potentials as well.

  15. Algorithmic framework for group analysis of differential equations and its application to generalized Zakharov-Kuznetsov equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ding-jiang; Ivanova, Nataliya M.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we explain in more details the modern treatment of the problem of group classification of (systems of) partial differential equations (PDEs) from the algorithmic point of view. More precisely, we revise the classical Lie algorithm of construction of symmetries of differential equations, describe the group classification algorithm and discuss the process of reduction of (systems of) PDEs to (systems of) equations with smaller number of independent variables in order to construct invariant solutions. The group classification algorithm and reduction process are illustrated by the example of the generalized Zakharov-Kuznetsov (GZK) equations of form ut +(F (u)) xxx +(G (u)) xyy +(H (u)) x = 0. As a result, a complete group classification of the GZK equations is performed and a number of new interesting nonlinear invariant models which have non-trivial invariance algebras are obtained. Lie symmetry reductions and exact solutions for two important invariant models, i.e., the classical and modified Zakharov-Kuznetsov equations, are constructed. The algorithmic framework for group analysis of differential equations presented in this paper can also be applied to other nonlinear PDEs.

  16. Explicit travelling waves and invariant algebraic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasull, Armengol; Giacomini, Hector

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a precise definition of algebraic travelling wave solution of n-th order partial differential equations and prove that the only algebraic travelling waves solutions for the celebrated Fisher-Kolmogorov equation are the ones found in 1979 by Ablowitz and Zeppetella. This question is equivalent to study when an associated one-parameter family of planar ordinary differential systems has invariant algebraic curves.

  17. Stability at systems of usual differential equations in virus dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, H.

    In this paper we discuss different models of differential equations systems, that describe virus dynamics in different situations (HIV-virus and Hepatitis B-virus). We inquire the stability of differential equations. We use theorems of the stability theory.

  18. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  19. Modeling scalar dissipation and scalar variance in large eddy simulation: Algebraic and transport equation closures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, E.; Richardson, E. S.; Doran, E. M.; Pitsch, H.; Chen, J. H.

    2012-05-01

    Scalar dissipation rates and subfilter scalar variances are important modeling parameters in large eddy simulations (LES) of reacting flows. Currently available models capture the general behavior of these parameters, but these models do not always perform with the degree of accuracy that is needed for predictive LES. Here, two direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to analyze LES dissipation rate and variance models, and to propose a new model for the dissipation rate that is based on a transport equation. The first DNS that is considered is a non-premixed auto-igniting C2H4 jet flame simulation originally performed by Yoo et al. [Proc. Combust. Inst. 33, 1619-1627 (2011)], 10.1016/j.proci.2010.06.147. A LES of this case is run using algebraic models for the dissipation rate and subfilter variance. It is shown that the algebraic models fail to adequately reproduce the DNS results. This motivates the introduction of a transport equation model for the LES dissipation rate. Closure of the equation is addressed by formulating a new adapted dynamic approach. This approach borrows dynamically computed information from LES quantities that, unlike the dissipation rate, do not reside on the smallest flow length scales. The adapted dynamic approach is analyzed by considering a second DNS of scalar mixing in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Data from this second DNS are used to confirm that the adapted dynamic approach successfully closes the dissipation rate equation over a wide range of LES filter widths. The first reacting jet case is then returned to and used to test the LES transport equation models. The transport equation model for the dissipation rate is shown to be more accurate than its algebraic counterpoint, and the dissipation rate is eliminated as a source of error in the transported variance model.

  20. Kalman Duality Principle for a Class of Ill-Posed Minimax Control Problems with Linear Differential-Algebraic Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuk, Sergiy

    2013-10-15

    In this paper we present Kalman duality principle for a class of linear Differential-Algebraic Equations (DAE) with arbitrary index and time-varying coefficients. We apply it to an ill-posed minimax control problem with DAE constraint and derive a corresponding dual control problem. It turns out that the dual problem is ill-posed as well and so classical optimality conditions are not applicable in the general case. We construct a minimizing sequence u-circumflex{sub {epsilon}} for the dual problem applying Tikhonov method. Finally we represent u-circumflex{sub {epsilon}} in the feedback form using Riccati equation on a subspace which corresponds to the differential part of the DAE.

  1. The existence of solutions of q-difference-differential equations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Li; Wang, Hua; Xu, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    By using the Nevanlinna theory of value distribution, we investigate the existence of solutions of some types of non-linear q-difference differential equations. In particular, we generalize the Rellich-Wittich-type theorem and Malmquist-type theorem about differential equations to the case of q-difference differential equations (system). PMID:27218006

  2. Parabolic orbit determination. Comparison of the Olbers method and algebraic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the Olbers method for the preliminary parabolic orbit determination (in the Lagrange-Subbotin modification) and the method based on systems of algebraic equations for two or three variables proposed by the author are compared. The maximum number of possible solutions is estimated. The problem of selection of the true solution from the set of solutions obtained both using additional equations and by the problem reduction to finding the objective function minimum is considered. The results of orbit determination of the comets 153P/Ikeya-Zhang and 2007 N3 Lulin are cited as examples.

  3. New developments in the numerical solution of differential/algebraic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, L.R.

    1987-04-01

    In this paper we survey some recent developments in the numerical solution of nonlinear differential/algebraic equation (DAE) systems of the form 0 = F(t,y,y'), where the initial values of y are known and par. deltaF/par. deltay' may be singular. These systems arise in the simulation of electrical networks, as well as in many other applications. DAE systems include standard form ODEs as a special case, but they also include problems which are in many ways quite different from ODEs. We examine the classification of DAE systems according to the degree of singularity of the system, and present some results on the analytical structure of these systems. We give convergence results for backward differentiation formulas applied to DAEs and examine some of the software issues involved in the numerical solution of DAEs. One-step methods are potentially advantageous for solving DAE systems with frequent discontinuities. However, recent results indicate that there is a reduction in the order of accuracy of many implicit Runge-Kutta methods even for simple DAE systems. We examine the current state of solving DAE systems by implicit Runge-Kutta methods. Finding a consistent set of initial conditions is often a problem for DAEs arising in applications. We explore some numerical methods for obtaining a consistent set of initial conditions. 21 refs.

  4. Crossing the Cognitive Gap between Arithmetic and Algebra: Operating on the Unknown in the Context of Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linchevski, Liora; Herscovics, Nicolas

    1996-01-01

    Reports the results of a teaching experiment involving like terms and equations in algebra. Seventh-grade students (n=6) experienced difficulties in decomposing an additive term into a difference. (Author/MKR)

  5. Hierarchies of finite-dimensional Lax equations with a spectral parameter on a Riemann surface and semisimple Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinman, O. K.

    2015-12-01

    Based on ℤ-gradings of semisimple Lie algebras and invariant polynomials on them, we construct hierarchies of Lax equations with a spectral parameter on a Riemann surface and prove the commutativity of the corresponding flows.

  6. Characteristic exponents of impulsive differential equations in a Banach space

    SciTech Connect

    Zabreiko, P.P.; Bainov, D.D.; Kostadinov, S.I.

    1988-06-01

    The notion of general exponent of impulsive homogeneous differential equations is defined. A formula for the solution of impulsive nonhomogeneous differential equations is obtained and is used to establish a dependence between the existence of bounded solutions of such equations and the general exponent of the respective homogeneous equation.

  7. Spherical harmonics approach to parabolic partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SenGupta, Indranil; Mariani, Maria C.

    2012-12-01

    This paper is devoted to extend the spherical harmonics technique to the solution of parabolic differential equations and to integro-differential equations. The heat equation and the Black-Scholes equation are solved by using the method of spherical harmonics.

  8. A differential equation for specific catchment area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, John C.; Hutchinson, Michael F.

    2011-05-01

    Analysis of the behavior of specific catchment area in a stream tube leads to a simple nonlinear differential equation describing the rate of change of specific catchment area along a flow path. The differential equation can be integrated numerically along a flow path to calculate specific catchment area at any point on a digital elevation model without requiring the usual estimates of catchment area and width. The method is more computationally intensive than most grid-based methods for calculating specific catchment area, so its main application is as a reference against which conventional methods can be tested. This is the first method that provides a benchmark for more approximate methods in complex terrain with both convergent and divergent areas, not just on simple surfaces for which analytical solutions are known. Preliminary evaluation of the D8, M8, digital elevation model networks (DEMON), and D∞ methods indicate that the D∞ method is the best of those methods for estimating specific catchment area, but all methods overestimate in divergent terrain.

  9. A reliable iterative method for solving Volterra integro-differential equations and some applications for the Lane-Emden equations of the first kind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Jawary, M. A.; AL-Qaissy, H. R.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we implement the new iterative method proposed by Daftardar-Gejji and Jafari namely new iterative method (DJM) to solve the linear and non-linear Volterra integro-differential equations and systems of linear and non-linear Volterra integro-differential equations. The applications of the DJM for solving the resulting equations of the non-linear Volterra integro-differential equations forms of the Lane-Emden equations are presented. The Volterra integro-differential equations forms of the Lane-Emden equation overcome the singular behaviour at the origin x = 0 of the original differential equation. Some examples are solved and different cases of the Lane-Emden equations of first kind are presented. Moreover, the DJM is applied to solve the system of the linear and non-linear Volterra integro-differential forms of the Lane-Emden equations. The results demonstrate that the method has many merits such as being derivative-free, and overcoming the difficulty arising in calculating Adomian polynomials to handle the non-linear terms in Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM). It does not require to calculate Lagrange multiplier in Variational Iteration Method (VIM) and no need to construct a homotopy in Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) and solve the corresponding algebraic equations.

  10. Numerical Methods for Stochastic Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, D.H.; Habib, S.; Mineev, M.B.

    1999-07-08

    This is the final report of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this proposal were (1) the development of methods for understanding and control of spacetime discretization errors in nonlinear stochastic partial differential equations, and (2) the development of new and improved practical numerical methods for the solutions of these equations. The authors have succeeded in establishing two methods for error control: the functional Fokker-Planck equation for calculating the time discretization error and the transfer integral method for calculating the spatial discretization error. In addition they have developed a new second-order stochastic algorithm for multiplicative noise applicable to the case of colored noises, and which requires only a single random sequence generation per time step. All of these results have been verified via high-resolution numerical simulations and have been successfully applied to physical test cases. They have also made substantial progress on a longstanding problem in the dynamics of unstable fluid interfaces in porous media. This work has lead to highly accurate quasi-analytic solutions of idealized versions of this problem. These may be of use in benchmarking numerical solutions of the full stochastic PDEs that govern real-world problems.

  11. Parallels between control PDE's (Partial Differential Equations) and systems of ODE's (Ordinary Differential Equations)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Villarreal, Ramiro

    1987-01-01

    System theorists understand that the same mathematical objects which determine controllability for nonlinear control systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) also determine hypoellipticity for linear partial differentail equations (PDEs). Moreover, almost any study of ODE systems begins with linear systems. It is remarkable that Hormander's paper on hypoellipticity of second order linear p.d.e.'s starts with equations due to Kolmogorov, which are shown to be analogous to the linear PDEs. Eigenvalue placement by state feedback for a controllable linear system can be paralleled for a Kolmogorov equation if an appropriate type of feedback is introduced. Results concerning transformations of nonlinear systems to linear systems are similar to results for transforming a linear PDE to a Kolmogorov equation.

  12. Solving nonlinear differential equation governing on the rigid beams on viscoelastic foundation by AGM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, M. R.; Ganji, D. D.; Rostami, A. K.; Nimafar, M.

    2015-03-01

    In the present paper a vibrational differential equation governing on a rigid beam on viscoelastic foundation has been investigated. The nonlinear differential equation governing on this vibrating system is solved by a simple and innovative approach, which has been called Akbari-Ganji's method (AGM). AGM is a very suitable computational process and is usable for solving various nonlinear differential equations. Moreover, using AGM which solving a set of algebraic equations, complicated nonlinear equations can easily be solved without any mathematical operations. Also, the damping ratio and energy lost per cycle for three cycles have been investigated. Furthermore, comparisons have been made between the obtained results by numerical method (Runk45) and AGM. Results showed the high accuracy of AGM. The results also showed that by increasing the amount of initial amplitude of vibration ( A), the value of damping ratio will be increased, and the energy lost per cycle decreases by increasing the number of cycle. It is concluded that AGM is a reliable and precise approach for solving differential equations. On the other hand, it is better to say that AGM is able to solve linear and nonlinear differential equations directly in most of the situations. This means that the final solution can be obtained without any dimensionless procedure. Therefore, AGM can be considered as a significant progress in nonlinear sciences.

  13. About one special boundary value problem for multidimensional parabolic integro-differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairullin, Ermek

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider a special boundary value problem for multidimensional parabolic integro-differential equation with boundary conditions that contains as a boundary condition containing derivatives of order higher than the order of the equation. The solution is sought in the form of a thermal potential of a double layer. Shows lemma of finding the limits of the derivatives of the unknown function in the neighborhood of the hyperplane. Using the boundary condition and lemma obtained integral-differential equation (IDE) of parabolic operators, whĐţre an unknown function under the integral contains higher-order space variables derivatives. IDE is reduced to a singular integral equation (SIE), when an unknown function in the spatial variables satisfies the Holder. The characteristic part is solved in the class of distribution function using method of transformation of Fourier-Laplace. Found an algebraic condition for the transition to the classical generalized solution. Integral equation of the resolvent for the characteristic part of SIE is obtained. Integro-differential equation is reduced to the Volterra-Fredholm type integral equation of the second kind by method of regularization. It is shown that the solution of SIE is a solution of IDE. Obtain a theorem on the solvability of the boundary value problem of multidimensional parabolic integro-differential equation, when a known function of the spatial variables belongs to the Holder class and satisfies the solvability conditions.

  14. Solving nonlinear differential equations of Vanderpol, Rayleigh and Duffing by AGM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, M. R.; Ganji, D. D.; Majidian, A.; Ahmadi, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, three complicated nonlinear differential equations in the field of vibration, which are Vanderpol, Rayleigh and Duffing equations, have been analyzed and solved completely by Algebraic Method (AGM). Investigating this kind of equations is a very hard task to do and the obtained solution is not accurate and reliable. This issue will be emerged after comparing the achieved solutions by numerical method (Runge-Kutte 4th). Based on the comparisons which have been made between the gained solutions by AGM and numerical method, it is possible to indicate that AGM can be successfully applied for various differential equations particularly for difficult ones. The results reveal that this method is not only very effective and simple, but also reliable, and can be applied for other complicated nonlinear problems.

  15. Analytical solutions for non-linear differential equations with the help of a digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, P. C.

    1964-01-01

    A technique was developed with the help of a digital computer for analytic (algebraic) solutions of autonomous and nonautonomous equations. Two operational transform techniques have been programmed for the solution of these equations. Only relatively simple nonlinear differential equations have been considered. In the cases considered it has been possible to assimilate the secular terms into the solutions. For cases where f(t) is not a bounded function, a direct series solution is developed which can be shown to be an analytic function. All solutions have been checked against results obtained by numerical integration for given initial conditions and constants. It is evident that certain nonlinear differential equations can be solved with the help of a digital computer.

  16. Extrapolation methods for dynamic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.

    1978-01-01

    Several extrapolation procedures are presented for increasing the order of accuracy in time for evolutionary partial differential equations. These formulas are based on finite difference schemes in both the spatial and temporal directions. On practical grounds the methods are restricted to schemes that are fourth order in time and either second, fourth or sixth order in space. For hyperbolic problems the second order in space methods are not useful while the fourth order methods offer no advantage over the Kreiss-Oliger method unless very fine meshes are used. Advantages are first achieved using sixth order methods in space coupled with fourth order accuracy in time. Computational results are presented confirming the analytic discussions.

  17. Symbolic computation of conservation laws of nonlinear partial differential equations in multi-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hereman, Willy

    A direct method for the computation of polynomial conservation laws of polynomial systems of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) in multi-dimensions is presented. The method avoids advanced differential-geometric tools. Instead, it is solely based on calculus, variational calculus, and linear algebra. Densities are constructed as linear combinations of scaling homogeneous terms with undetermined coefficients. The variational derivative (Euler operator) is used to compute the undetermined coefficients. The homotopy operator is used to compute the fluxes. The method is illustrated with nonlinear PDEs describing wave phenomena in fluid dynamics, plasma physics, and quantum physics. For PDEs with parameters, the method determines the conditions on the parameters so that a sequence of conserved densities might exist. The existence of a large number of conservation laws is a predictor of complete integrability. The method is algorithmic, applicable to a variety of PDEs, and can be implemented in computer algebra systems such as Mathematica, Maple, and REDUCE.

  18. Introduction to Adaptive Methods for Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Kenneth; Estep, Don; Hansbo, Peter; Johnson, Claes

    Knowing thus the Algorithm of this calculus, which I call Differential Calculus, all differential equations can be solved by a common method (Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz, 1646-1719).When, several years ago, I saw for the first time an instrument which, when carried, automatically records the number of steps taken by a pedestrian, it occurred to me at once that the entire arithmetic could be subjected to a similar kind of machinery so that not only addition and subtraction, but also multiplication and division, could be accomplished by a suitably arranged machine easily, promptly and with sure results. For it is unworthy of excellent men to lose hours like slaves in the labour of calculations, which could safely be left to anyone else if the machine was used. And now that we may give final praise to the machine, we may say that it will be desirable to all who are engaged in computations which, as is well known, are the managers of financial affairs, the administrators of others estates, merchants, surveyors, navigators, astronomers, and those connected with any of the crafts that use mathematics (Leibniz).

  19. First-order partial differential equations in classical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. R.

    2009-12-01

    Carathèodory's classic work on the calculus of variations explores in depth the connection between ordinary differential equations and first-order partial differential equations. The n second-order ordinary differential equations of a classical dynamical system reduce to a single first-order differential equation in 2n independent variables. The general solution of first-order partial differential equations touches on many concepts central to graduate-level courses in analytical dynamics including the Hamiltonian, Lagrange and Poisson brackets, and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. For all but the simplest dynamical systems the solution requires one or more of these techniques. Three elementary dynamical problems (uniform acceleration, harmonic motion, and cyclotron motion) can be solved directly from the appropriate first-order partial differential equation without the use of advanced methods. The process offers an unusual perspective on classical dynamics, which is readily accessible to intermediate students who are not yet fully conversant with advanced approaches.

  20. Grid generation for the solution of partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1987-01-01

    A general survey of grid generators is presented with a concern for understanding why grids are necessary, how they are applied, and how they are generated. After an examination of the need for meshes, the overall applications setting is established with a categorization of the various connectivity patterns. This is split between structured grids and unstructured meshes. Altogether, the categorization establishes the foundation upon which grid generation techniques are developed. The two primary categories are algebraic techniques and partial differential equation techniques. These are each split into basic parts, and accordingly are individually examined in some detail. In the process, the interrelations between the various parts are accented. From the established background in the primary techniques, consideration is shifted to the topic of interactive grid generation and then to adaptive meshes. The setting for adaptivity is established with a suitable means to monitor severe solution behavior. Adaptive grids are considered first and are followed by adaptive triangular meshes. Then the consideration shifts to the temporal coupling between grid generators and PDE-solvers. To conclude, a reflection upon the discussion, herein, is given.

  1. Grid generation for the solution of partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    A general survey of grid generators is presented with a concern for understanding why grids are necessary, how they are applied, and how they are generated. After an examination of the need for meshes, the overall applications setting is established with a categorization of the various connectivity patterns. This is split between structured grids and unstructured meshes. Altogether, the categorization establishes the foundation upon which grid generation techniques are developed. The two primary categories are algebraic techniques and partial differential equation techniques. These are each split into basic parts, and accordingly are individually examined in some detail. In the process, the interrelations between the various parts are accented. From the established background in the primary techniques, consideration is shifted to the topic of interactive grid generation and then to adaptive meshes. The setting for adaptivity is established with a suitable means to monitor severe solution behavior. Adaptive grids are considered first and are followed by adaptive triangular meshes. Then the consideration shifts to the temporal coupling between grid generators and PDE-solvers. To conclude, a reflection upon the discussion, herein, is given.

  2. Legendre-tau approximations for functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Teglas, R.

    1986-01-01

    The numerical approximation of solutions to linear retarded functional differential equations are considered using the so-called Legendre-tau method. The functional differential equation is first reformulated as a partial differential equation with a nonlocal boundary condition involving time-differentiation. The approximate solution is then represented as a truncated Legendre series with time-varying coefficients which satisfy a certain system of ordinary differential equations. The method is very easy to code and yields very accurate approximations. Convergence is established, various numerical examples are presented, and comparison between the latter and cubic spline approximation is made.

  3. Legendre-Tau approximations for functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Teglas, R.

    1983-01-01

    The numerical approximation of solutions to linear functional differential equations are considered using the so called Legendre tau method. The functional differential equation is first reformulated as a partial differential equation with a nonlocal boundary condition involving time differentiation. The approximate solution is then represented as a truncated Legendre series with time varying coefficients which satisfy a certain system of ordinary differential equations. The method is very easy to code and yields very accurate approximations. Convergence is established, various numerical examples are presented, and comparison between the latter and cubic spline approximations is made.

  4. Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Douglas, N, ed.

    2004-11-25

    From May 11--15, 2004, the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications held a hot topics workshop on Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations. The numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDE) is a fundamental task in science and engineering. The goal of the workshop was to bring together a spectrum of scientists at the forefront of the research in the numerical solution of PDEs to discuss compatible spatial discretizations. We define compatible spatial discretizations as those that inherit or mimic fundamental properties of the PDE such as topology, conservation, symmetries, and positivity structures and maximum principles. A wide variety of discretization methods applied across a wide range of scientific and engineering applications have been designed to or found to inherit or mimic intrinsic spatial structure and reproduce fundamental properties of the solution of the continuous PDE model at the finite dimensional level. A profusion of such methods and concepts relevant to understanding them have been developed and explored: mixed finite element methods, mimetic finite differences, support operator methods, control volume methods, discrete differential forms, Whitney forms, conservative differencing, discrete Hodge operators, discrete Helmholtz decomposition, finite integration techniques, staggered grid and dual grid methods, etc. This workshop seeks to foster communication among the diverse groups of researchers designing, applying, and studying such methods as well as researchers involved in practical solution of large scale problems that may benefit from advancements in such discretizations; to help elucidate the relations between the different methods and concepts; and to generally advance our understanding in the area of compatible spatial discretization methods for PDE. Particular points of emphasis included: + Identification of intrinsic properties of PDE models that are critical for the fidelity of numerical

  5. Differential Equations Compatible with Boundary Rational qKZ Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Yoshihiro

    2011-10-01

    We give diffierential equations compatible with the rational qKZ equation with boundary reflection. The total system contains the trigonometric degeneration of the bispectral qKZ equation of type (Cěen, Cn) which in the case of type GLn was studied by van Meer and Stokman. We construct an integral formula for solutions to our compatible system in a special case.

  6. Construction of the first-order stochastic nonlinear differential equations in the modeling of stimulated scattering of optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, Vasile D.; Grigore, Maria; Cojocaru, Laurentiu; Ersen, Simion; Moldovan, Adrian

    1998-07-01

    In this work we use a technique inspired by the inverse problem in the scattering theory, that is, the calculation of partial derivatives along the characteristic directions of the D'Alembert solution of the wave equation (Maxwell and Euler). In this way, we construct a system of stochastic non-linear differential equations. The analysis of this system, using algebraic invariants, gives more information in comparison with that given by Ghelfand-Levitan-Marcenko, in the inverse problem in the scattering theory.

  7. Writing in a Reformed Differential Equations Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habre, Samer

    In an attempt to promote the development of understanding over rote memorization, writing in mathematics has received increased attention in recent years. In Calculus, the Rule of Three (based on communicating ideas thorough algebraic, graphical and numerical means) has been replaced by the Rule of Four in which writing plays a central role.…

  8. Computational methods and software for differential equations and their applications. Annual report, November 16, 1984-November 15, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Gear, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress on the project over the last twelve months. Work has continued in two areas: numerical techniques for differential equations and software tools for scientific problem solving. Within these areas we have been working on the following: (1) Syntax-directed editors for mathematical software, (2) Polylith: a system for module interconnection, (3) mathematical expression input and editing, (4) a tool for examining fill-in in Gauss elimination, (5) a theoretical examination of fill-in, (6) a technique for determining the structural index of a differential-algebraic system, (7) invariant-conserving methods for differential equations, (9) iterative methods for stiff equations, (10) singular two-point boundary value problems, (11) initial value problems in Banach spaces, (12) computational error estimates for stiff ODEs, (13); multigrid solution of collocation equations, and (14) parallel techniques for ordinary differential equations.

  9. From differential to difference equations for first order ODEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Walker, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    When constructing an algorithm for the numerical integration of a differential equation, one should first convert the known ordinary differential equation (ODE) into an ordinary difference equation. Given this difference equation, one can develop an appropriate numerical algorithm. This technical note describes the derivation of two such ordinary difference equations applicable to a first order ODE. The implicit ordinary difference equation has the same asymptotic expansion as the ODE itself, whereas the explicit ordinary difference equation has an asymptotic that is similar in structure but different in value when compared with that of the ODE.

  10. Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid for Finite Element Elliptic Equations with Random Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchev, D

    2012-04-02

    This thesis presents a two-grid algorithm based on Smoothed Aggregation Spectral Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid (SA-{rho}AMGe) combined with adaptation. The aim is to build an efficient solver for the linear systems arising from discretization of second-order elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) with stochastic coefficients. Examples include PDEs that model subsurface flow with random permeability field. During a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation process, that draws PDE coefficient samples from a certain distribution, the PDE coefficients change, hence the resulting linear systems to be solved change. At every such step the system (discretized PDE) needs to be solved and the computed solution used to evaluate some functional(s) of interest that then determine if the coefficient sample is acceptable or not. The MCMC process is hence computationally intensive and requires the solvers used to be efficient and fast. This fact that at every step of MCMC the resulting linear system changes, makes an already existing solver built for the old problem perhaps not as efficient for the problem corresponding to the new sampled coefficient. This motivates the main goal of our study, namely, to adapt an already existing solver to handle the problem (with changed coefficient) with the objective to achieve this goal to be faster and more efficient than building a completely new solver from scratch. Our approach utilizes the local element matrices (for the problem with changed coefficients) to build local problems associated with constructed by the method agglomerated elements (a set of subdomains that cover the given computational domain). We solve a generalized eigenproblem for each set in a subspace spanned by the previous local coarse space (used for the old solver) and a vector, component of the error, that the old solver cannot handle. A portion of the spectrum of these local eigen-problems (corresponding to eigenvalues close to zero) form the

  11. Differential form of the Skornyakov-Ter-Martirosyan Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen'Kov, F. M.; Sandhas, W.

    2005-12-01

    The Skornyakov-Ter-Martirosyan three-boson integral equations in momentum space are transformed into differential equations. This allows us to take into account quite directly the Danilov condition providing self-adjointness of the underlying three-body Hamiltonian with zero-range pair interactions. For the helium trimer the numerical solutions of the resulting differential equations are compared with those of the Faddeev-type AGS equations.

  12. Differential form of the Skornyakov-Ter-Martirosyan Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Pen'kov, F. M.; Sandhas, W.

    2005-12-15

    The Skornyakov-Ter-Martirosyan three-boson integral equations in momentum space are transformed into differential equations. This allows us to take into account quite directly the Danilov condition providing self-adjointness of the underlying three-body Hamiltonian with zero-range pair interactions. For the helium trimer the numerical solutions of the resulting differential equations are compared with those of the Faddeev-type AGS equations.

  13. Parameter Estimation of Partial Differential Equation Models

    PubMed Central

    Xun, Xiaolei; Cao, Jiguo; Mallick, Bani; Carroll, Raymond J.; Maity, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) models are commonly used to model complex dynamic systems in applied sciences such as biology and finance. The forms of these PDE models are usually proposed by experts based on their prior knowledge and understanding of the dynamic system. Parameters in PDE models often have interesting scientific interpretations, but their values are often unknown, and need to be estimated from the measurements of the dynamic system in the present of measurement errors. Most PDEs used in practice have no analytic solutions, and can only be solved with numerical methods. Currently, methods for estimating PDE parameters require repeatedly solving PDEs numerically under thousands of candidate parameter values, and thus the computational load is high. In this article, we propose two methods to estimate parameters in PDE models: a parameter cascading method and a Bayesian approach. In both methods, the underlying dynamic process modeled with the PDE model is represented via basis function expansion. For the parameter cascading method, we develop two nested levels of optimization to estimate the PDE parameters. For the Bayesian method, we develop a joint model for data and the PDE, and develop a novel hierarchical model allowing us to employ Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to make posterior inference. Simulation studies show that the Bayesian method and parameter cascading method are comparable, and both outperform other available methods in terms of estimation accuracy. The two methods are demonstrated by estimating parameters in a PDE model from LIDAR data. PMID:24363476

  14. Parameter Estimation of Partial Differential Equation Models.

    PubMed

    Xun, Xiaolei; Cao, Jiguo; Mallick, Bani; Carroll, Raymond J; Maity, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) models are commonly used to model complex dynamic systems in applied sciences such as biology and finance. The forms of these PDE models are usually proposed by experts based on their prior knowledge and understanding of the dynamic system. Parameters in PDE models often have interesting scientific interpretations, but their values are often unknown, and need to be estimated from the measurements of the dynamic system in the present of measurement errors. Most PDEs used in practice have no analytic solutions, and can only be solved with numerical methods. Currently, methods for estimating PDE parameters require repeatedly solving PDEs numerically under thousands of candidate parameter values, and thus the computational load is high. In this article, we propose two methods to estimate parameters in PDE models: a parameter cascading method and a Bayesian approach. In both methods, the underlying dynamic process modeled with the PDE model is represented via basis function expansion. For the parameter cascading method, we develop two nested levels of optimization to estimate the PDE parameters. For the Bayesian method, we develop a joint model for data and the PDE, and develop a novel hierarchical model allowing us to employ Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to make posterior inference. Simulation studies show that the Bayesian method and parameter cascading method are comparable, and both outperform other available methods in terms of estimation accuracy. The two methods are demonstrated by estimating parameters in a PDE model from LIDAR data. PMID:24363476

  15. Robust estimation for ordinary differential equation models.

    PubMed

    Cao, J; Wang, L; Xu, J

    2011-12-01

    Applied scientists often like to use ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to model complex dynamic processes that arise in biology, engineering, medicine, and many other areas. It is interesting but challenging to estimate ODE parameters from noisy data, especially when the data have some outliers. We propose a robust method to address this problem. The dynamic process is represented with a nonparametric function, which is a linear combination of basis functions. The nonparametric function is estimated by a robust penalized smoothing method. The penalty term is defined with the parametric ODE model, which controls the roughness of the nonparametric function and maintains the fidelity of the nonparametric function to the ODE model. The basis coefficients and ODE parameters are estimated in two nested levels of optimization. The coefficient estimates are treated as an implicit function of ODE parameters, which enables one to derive the analytic gradients for optimization using the implicit function theorem. Simulation studies show that the robust method gives satisfactory estimates for the ODE parameters from noisy data with outliers. The robust method is demonstrated by estimating a predator-prey ODE model from real ecological data. PMID:21401565

  16. Patchwork sampling of stochastic differential equations.

    PubMed

    Kürsten, Rüdiger; Behn, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method to sample stationary properties of solutions of stochastic differential equations, which is accurate and efficient if there are rarely visited regions or rare transitions between distinct regions of the state space. The method is based on a complete, nonoverlapping partition of the state space into patches on which the stochastic process is ergodic. On each of these patches we run simulations of the process strictly truncated to the corresponding patch, which allows effective simulations also in rarely visited regions. The correct weight for each patch is obtained by counting the attempted transitions between all different patches. The results are patchworked to cover the whole state space. We extend the concept of truncated Markov chains which is originally formulated for processes which obey detailed balance to processes not fulfilling detailed balance. The method is illustrated by three examples, describing the one-dimensional diffusion of an overdamped particle in a double-well potential, a system of many globally coupled overdamped particles in double-well potentials subject to additive Gaussian white noise, and the overdamped motion of a particle on the circle in a periodic potential subject to a deterministic drift and additive noise. In an appendix we explain how other well-known Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms can be related to truncated Markov chains. PMID:27078484

  17. Electrocardiogram classification using delay differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainscsek, Claudia; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2013-06-01

    Time series analysis with nonlinear delay differential equations (DDEs) reveals nonlinear as well as spectral properties of the underlying dynamical system. Here, global DDE models were used to analyze 5 min data segments of electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings in order to capture distinguishing features for different heart conditions such as normal heart beat, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. The number of terms and delays in the model as well as the order of nonlinearity of the model have to be selected that are the most discriminative. The DDE model form that best separates the three classes of data was chosen by exhaustive search up to third order polynomials. Such an approach can provide deep insight into the nature of the data since linear terms of a DDE correspond to the main time-scales in the signal and the nonlinear terms in the DDE are related to nonlinear couplings between the harmonic signal parts. The DDEs were able to detect atrial fibrillation with an accuracy of 72%, congestive heart failure with an accuracy of 88%, and normal heart beat with an accuracy of 97% from 5 min of ECG, a much shorter time interval than required to achieve comparable performance with other methods.

  18. Patchwork sampling of stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürsten, Rüdiger; Behn, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method to sample stationary properties of solutions of stochastic differential equations, which is accurate and efficient if there are rarely visited regions or rare transitions between distinct regions of the state space. The method is based on a complete, nonoverlapping partition of the state space into patches on which the stochastic process is ergodic. On each of these patches we run simulations of the process strictly truncated to the corresponding patch, which allows effective simulations also in rarely visited regions. The correct weight for each patch is obtained by counting the attempted transitions between all different patches. The results are patchworked to cover the whole state space. We extend the concept of truncated Markov chains which is originally formulated for processes which obey detailed balance to processes not fulfilling detailed balance. The method is illustrated by three examples, describing the one-dimensional diffusion of an overdamped particle in a double-well potential, a system of many globally coupled overdamped particles in double-well potentials subject to additive Gaussian white noise, and the overdamped motion of a particle on the circle in a periodic potential subject to a deterministic drift and additive noise. In an appendix we explain how other well-known Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms can be related to truncated Markov chains.

  19. Regularized Semiparametric Estimation for Ordinary Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Zhu, Ji; Wang, Naisyin

    2015-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are widely used in modeling dynamic systems and have ample applications in the fields of physics, engineering, economics and biological sciences. The ODE parameters often possess physiological meanings and can help scientists gain better understanding of the system. One key interest is thus to well estimate these parameters. Ideally, constant parameters are preferred due to their easy interpretation. In reality, however, constant parameters can be too restrictive such that even after incorporating error terms, there could still be unknown sources of disturbance that lead to poor agreement between observed data and the estimated ODE system. In this paper, we address this issue and accommodate short-term interferences by allowing parameters to vary with time. We propose a new regularized estimation procedure on the time-varying parameters of an ODE system so that these parameters could change with time during transitions but remain constants within stable stages. We found, through simulation studies, that the proposed method performs well and tends to have less variation in comparison to the non-regularized approach. On the theoretical front, we derive finite-sample estimation error bounds for the proposed method. Applications of the proposed method to modeling the hare-lynx relationship and the measles incidence dynamic in Ontario, Canada lead to satisfactory and meaningful results. PMID:26392639

  20. A complex Noether approach for variational partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, R.; Mahomed, F. M.

    2015-10-01

    Scalar complex partial differential equations which admit variational formulations are studied. Such a complex partial differential equation, via a complex dependent variable, splits into a system of two real partial differential equations. The decomposition of the Lagrangian of the complex partial differential equation in the real domain is shown to yield two real Lagrangians for the split system. The complex Maxwellian distribution, transonic gas flow, Maxwellian tails, dissipative wave and Klein-Gordon equations are considered. The Noether symmetries and gauge terms of the split system that correspond to both the Lagrangians are constructed by the Noether approach. In the case of coupled split systems, the same Noether symmetries are obtained. The Noether symmetries for the uncoupled split systems are different. The conserved vectors of the split system which correspond to both the Lagrangians are compared to the split conserved vectors of the complex partial differential equation for the examples. The split conserved vectors of the complex partial differential equation are the same as the conserved vectors of the split system of real partial differential equations in the case of coupled systems. Moreover a Noether-like theorem for the split system is proved which provides the Noether-like conserved quantities of the split system from knowledge of the Noether-like operators. An interesting result on the split characteristics and the conservation laws is shown as well. The Noether symmetries and gauge terms of the Lagrangian of the split system with the split Noether-like operators and gauge terms of the Lagrangian of the given complex partial differential equation are compared. Folklore suggests that the split Noether-like operators of a Lagrangian of a complex Euler-Lagrange partial differential equation are symmetries of the Lagrangian of the split system of real partial differential equations. This is not the case. They are proved to be the same if the

  1. Stochastic partial differential equations in turbulence related problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, P.-L.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of stochastic partial differential equations (PDEs) and problems relating to turbulence are discussed by employing the theories of Brownian motion and diffusion in infinite dimensions, functional differential equations, and functional integration. Relevant results in probablistic analysis, especially Gaussian measures in function spaces and the theory of stochastic PDEs of Ito type, are taken into account. Linear stochastic PDEs are analyzed through linearized Navier-Stokes equations with a random forcing. Stochastic equations for waves in random media as well as model equations in turbulent transport theory are considered. Markovian models in fully developed turbulence are discussed from a stochastic equation viewpoint.

  2. Invertible linear transformations and the Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Tam, Honwah; Guo, Fukui

    2008-07-01

    With the help of invertible linear transformations and the known Lie algebras, a way to generate new Lie algebras is given. These Lie algebras obtained have a common feature, i.e. integrable couplings of solitary hierarchies could be obtained by using them, specially, the Hamiltonian structures of them could be worked out. Some ways to construct the loop algebras of the Lie algebras are presented. It follows that some various loop algebras are given. In addition, a few new Lie algebras are explicitly constructed in terms of the classification of Lie algebras proposed by Ma Wen-Xiu, which are bases for obtaining new Lie algebras by using invertible linear transformations. Finally, some solutions of a (2 + 1)-dimensional partial-differential equation hierarchy are obtained, whose Hamiltonian form-expressions are manifested by using the quadratic-form identity.

  3. 3D Algebraic Iterative Reconstruction for Cone-Beam X-Ray Differential Phase-Contrast Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications. PMID:25775480

  4. Solving Space-Time Fractional Differential Equations by Using Modified Simple Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Melike; Akbulut, Arzu; Bekir, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we establish new and more general traveling wave solutions of space-time fractional Klein–Gordon equation with quadratic nonlinearity and the space-time fractional breaking soliton equations using the modified simple equation method. The proposed method is so powerful and effective to solve nonlinear space-time fractional differential equations by with modified Riemann–Liouville derivative.

  5. BIFURCATIONS OF RANDOM DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH BOUNDED NOISE ON SURFACES.

    PubMed

    Homburg, Ale Jan; Young, Todd R

    2010-03-01

    In random differential equations with bounded noise minimal forward invariant (MFI) sets play a central role since they support stationary measures. We study the stability and possible bifurcations of MFI sets. In dimensions 1 and 2 we classify all minimal forward invariant sets and their codimension one bifurcations in bounded noise random differential equations. PMID:22211081

  6. Undergraduate Students' Mental Operations in Systems of Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Karen; Rasmussen, Chris

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on research conducted to understand undergraduate students' ways of reasoning about systems of differential equations (SDEs). As part of a semester long classroom teaching experiment in a first course in differential equations, we conducted task-based interviews with six students after their study of first order differential…

  7. Parameter Estimates in Differential Equation Models for Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the need for devoting time in differential equations courses to modelling and the completion of the modelling process with efforts to estimate the parameters in the models using data. We estimate the parameters present in several differential equation models of chemical reactions of order n, where n = 0, 1, 2, and apply more general…

  8. Sourcing for Parameter Estimation and Study of Logistic Differential Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    This article offers modelling opportunities in which the phenomena of the spread of disease, perception of changing mass, growth of technology, and dissemination of information can be described by one differential equation--the logistic differential equation. It presents two simulation activities for students to generate real data, as well as…

  9. Monograph - The Numerical Integration of Ordinary Differential Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, T. E.

    The materials presented in this monograph are intended to be included in a course on ordinary differential equations at the upper division level in a college mathematics program. These materials provide an introduction to the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations, and they can be used to supplement a regular text on this…

  10. Nonstandard Topics for Student Presentations in Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMasurier, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    An interesting and effective way to showcase the wide variety of fields to which differential equations can be applied is to have students give short oral presentations on a specific application. These talks, which have been presented by 30-40 students per year in our differential equations classes, provide exposure to a diverse array of topics…

  11. Stochastic fuzzy differential equations of a nonincreasing type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Marek T.

    2016-04-01

    Stochastic fuzzy differential equations constitute an apparatus in modeling dynamic systems operating in fuzzy environment and governed by stochastic noises. In this paper we introduce a new kind of such the equations. Namely, the stochastic fuzzy differential of nonincreasing type are considered. The fuzzy stochastic processes which are solutions to these equations have trajectories with nonincreasing fuzziness in their values. In our previous papers, as a first natural extension of crisp stochastic differential equations, stochastic fuzzy differential equations of nondecreasing type were studied. In this paper we show that under suitable conditions each of the equations has a unique solution which possesses property of continuous dependence on data of the equation. To prove existence of the solutions we use sequences of successive approximate solutions. An estimation of an error of the approximate solution is established as well. Some examples of equations are solved and their solutions are simulated to illustrate the theory of stochastic fuzzy differential equations. All the achieved results apply to stochastic set-valued differential equations.

  12. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of partial differential equation solutions in the least squares norm.

  13. Real-time optical laboratory solution of parabolic differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Jackson, James

    1988-01-01

    An optical laboratory matrix-vector processor is used to solve parabolic differential equations (the transient diffusion equation with two space variables and time) by an explicit algorithm. This includes optical matrix-vector nonbase-2 encoded laboratory data, the combination of nonbase-2 and frequency-multiplexed data on such processors, a high-accuracy optical laboratory solution of a partial differential equation, new data partitioning techniques, and a discussion of a multiprocessor optical matrix-vector architecture.

  14. Intuitive Understanding of Solutions of Partially Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses diagrams that help the observer see how solutions of the wave equation and heat conduction equation are obtained. The analytical approach cannot necessarily show the mechanisms of the key to the solution without transforming the differential equation into a more convenient form by separation of variables. The visual clues based…

  15. A New Factorisation of a General Second Order Differential Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Janet

    2006-01-01

    A factorisation of a general second order ordinary differential equation is introduced from which the full solution to the equation can be obtained by performing two integrations. The method is compared with traditional methods for solving these type of equations. It is shown how the Green's function can be derived directly from the factorisation…

  16. Partial differential equation-based localization of a monopole source from a circular array.

    PubMed

    Ando, Shigeru; Nara, Takaaki; Levy, Tsukassa

    2013-10-01

    Wave source localization from a sensor array has long been the most active research topics in both theory and application. In this paper, an explicit and time-domain inversion method for the direction and distance of a monopole source from a circular array is proposed. The approach is based on a mathematical technique, the weighted integral method, for signal/source parameter estimation. It begins with an exact form of the source-constraint partial differential equation that describes the unilateral propagation of wide-band waves from a single source, and leads to exact algebraic equations that include circular Fourier coefficients (phase mode measurements) as their coefficients. From them, nearly closed-form, single-shot and multishot algorithms are obtained that is suitable for use with band-pass/differential filter banks. Numerical evaluation and several experimental results obtained using a 16-element circular microphone array are presented to verify the validity of the proposed method. PMID:24116418

  17. Solving Differential Equations Analytically. Elementary Differential Equations. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Unit 335.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldston, J. W.

    This unit introduces analytic solutions of ordinary differential equations. The objective is to enable the student to decide whether a given function solves a given differential equation. Examples of problems from biology and chemistry are covered. Problem sets, quizzes, and a model exam are included, and answers to all items are provided. The…

  18. Novel insights on the stabilising solution to the continuous-time algebraic Riccati equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    In the present paper we present a closed-form solution, as a function of the closed-loop poles, for the continuous-time algebraic Riccati equations (CAREs) related to single-input single-output systems with non-repeated poles. The proposed solution trades the standard numerical algorithm approach for one based on a spectral factorisation argument, offering potential insight into any control technique based on a CARE and its solution. As an example, we present the equivalence of two fairly recent control over network results. Furthermore we apply the proposed result to the formula for the optimal regulator gain matrix k (or equivalently the Luenberger's observer gain l) and present an example. Finally, we conclude by discussing the possible extension of the proposed closed-form solution to the repeated eigenvalues case and to the case when the CARE is related to multiple-input multiple-output systems.

  19. Generalized Directional Gradients, Backward Stochastic Differential Equations and Mild Solutions of Semilinear Parabolic Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrman, Marco Tessitore, Gianmario

    2005-05-15

    We study a forward-backward system of stochastic differential equations in an infinite-dimensional framework and its relationships with a semilinear parabolic differential equation on a Hilbert space, in the spirit of the approach of Pardoux-Peng. We prove that the stochastic system allows us to construct a unique solution of the parabolic equation in a suitable class of locally Lipschitz real functions. The parabolic equation is understood in a mild sense which requires the notion of a generalized directional gradient, that we introduce by a probabilistic approach and prove to exist for locally Lipschitz functions.The use of the generalized directional gradient allows us to cover various applications to option pricing problems and to optimal stochastic control problems (including control of delay equations and reaction-diffusion equations),where the lack of differentiability of the coefficients precludes differentiability of solutions to the associated parabolic equations of Black-Scholes or Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman type.

  20. Hirota equations associated with simply laced affine Lie algebras: The cuspidal class E6 of {{e}}_6^{(1)}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, R. K.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we derive Hirota equations associated with the simply laced affine Lie algebras {{g}}^{(1)}, where {{g}} is one of the simply laced complex Lie algebras {{a}}_n, {{d}}_n, {{e}}_6, {{e}}_7 or {{e}}_8, defined by finite order automorphisms of {{g}} which we call Lepowsky automorphisms. In particular, we investigate the Hirota equations for Lepowsky automorphisms of {{e}}_6 defined by the cuspidal class E6 of the Weyl group W(E6) of {{e}}_6. We also investigate the relationship between the Lepowsky automorphisms of the simply laced complex Lie algebras {{g}} and the conjugate canonical automorphisms defined by Kac. This analysis is applied to identify the canonical automorphisms for the cuspidal class E6 of {{e}}_6.

  1. New exact solutions to some difference differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Hong-Qing

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, we use our method to solve the extended Lotka-Volterra equation and discrete KdV equation. With the help of Maple, we obtain a number of exact solutions to the two equations including soliton solutions presented by hyperbolic functions of sinh and cosh, periodic solutions presented by trigonometric functions of sin and cos, and rational solutions. This method can be used to solve some other nonlinear difference-differential equations.

  2. Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, M; Falgout, R; MacLachlan, S; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J

    2004-04-09

    Our ability to simulate physical processes numerically is constrained by our ability to solve the resulting linear systems, prompting substantial research into the development of multiscale iterative methods capable of solving these linear systems with an optimal amount of effort. Overcoming the limitations of geometric multigrid methods to simple geometries and differential equations, algebraic multigrid methods construct the multigrid hierarchy based only on the given matrix. While this allows for efficient black-box solution of the linear systems associated with discretizations of many elliptic differential equations, it also results in a lack of robustness due to assumptions made on the near-null spaces of these matrices. This paper introduces an extension to algebraic multigrid methods that removes the need to make such assumptions by utilizing an adaptive process. The principles which guide the adaptivity are highlighted, as well as their application to algebraic multigrid solution of certain symmetric positive-definite linear systems.

  3. Alternative to the Kohn-Sham equations: The Pauli potential differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levämäki, H.; Nagy, Á.; Kokko, K.; Vitos, L.

    2015-12-01

    A recently developed theoretical framework of performing self-consistent orbital-free (OF) density functional theory (DFT) calculations at Kohn-Sham DFT level accuracy is tested in practice. The framework is valid for spherically symmetric systems. Numerical results for the Beryllium atom are presented and compared to accurate Kohn-Sham data. These calculations make use of a differential equation that we have developed for the so called Pauli potential, a key quantity in OF-DFT. The Pauli potential differential equation and the OF Euler equation form a system of two coupled differential equations, which have to be solved simultaneously within the DFT self-consistent loop.

  4. A neuro approach to solve fuzzy Riccati differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrir, Mohammad Shazri; Kumaresan, N.; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ratnavelu, Kurunathan

    2015-10-01

    There are many applications of optimal control theory especially in the area of control systems in engineering. In this paper, fuzzy quadratic Riccati differential equation is estimated using neural networks (NN). Previous works have shown reliable results using Runge-Kutta 4th order (RK4). The solution can be achieved by solving the 1st Order Non-linear Differential Equation (ODE) that is found commonly in Riccati differential equation. Research has shown improved results relatively to the RK4 method. It can be said that NN approach shows promising results with the advantage of continuous estimation and improved accuracy that can be produced over RK4.

  5. A neuro approach to solve fuzzy Riccati differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrir, Mohammad Shazri; Kumaresan, N. Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ratnavelu, Kurunathan

    2015-10-22

    There are many applications of optimal control theory especially in the area of control systems in engineering. In this paper, fuzzy quadratic Riccati differential equation is estimated using neural networks (NN). Previous works have shown reliable results using Runge-Kutta 4th order (RK4). The solution can be achieved by solving the 1st Order Non-linear Differential Equation (ODE) that is found commonly in Riccati differential equation. Research has shown improved results relatively to the RK4 method. It can be said that NN approach shows promising results with the advantage of continuous estimation and improved accuracy that can be produced over RK4.

  6. On the singular perturbations for fractional differential equation.

    PubMed

    Atangana, Abdon

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the possible extension of the singular perturbation differential equation to the concept of fractional order derivative. To achieve this, we presented a review of the concept of fractional calculus. We make use of the Laplace transform operator to derive exact solution of singular perturbation fractional linear differential equations. We make use of the methodology of three analytical methods to present exact and approximate solution of the singular perturbation fractional, nonlinear, nonhomogeneous differential equation. These methods are including the regular perturbation method, the new development of the variational iteration method, and the homotopy decomposition method. PMID:24683357

  7. Almost automorphic solutions for some partial functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzinbi, Khalil; N'guerekata, Gaston Mandata

    2007-04-01

    In this work, we study the existence of almost automorphic solutions for some partial functional differential equations. We prove that the existence of a bounded solution on implies the existence of an almost automorphic solution. Our results extend the classical known theorem by Bohr and Neugebauer on the existence of almost periodic solutions for inhomegeneous linear almost periodic differential equations. We give some applications to hyperbolic equations and Lotka-Volterra type equations used to describe the evolution of a single diffusive animal species.

  8. Solutions to Class of Linear and Nonlinear Fractional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Salam, Emad A.-B.; Hassan, Gamal F.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the fractional auxiliary sub-equation expansion method is proposed to solve nonlinear fractional differential equations. To illustrate the effectiveness of the method, we discuss the space-time fractional KdV equation, the space-time fractional RLW equation, the space-time fractional Boussinesq equation, and the (3+1)-space-time fractional ZK equation. The solutions are expressed in terms of fractional hyperbolic and fractional trigonometric functions. These solutions are useful to understand the mechanisms of the complicated nonlinear physical phenomena and fractional differential equations. Among these solutions, some are found for the first time. The analytical solution of homogenous linear FDEs with constant coefficients are obtained by using the series and the Mittag–Leffler function methods. The obtained results recover the well-know solutions when α = 1.

  9. Solutions to Class of Linear and Nonlinear Fractional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emad A-B., Abdel-Salam; Gamal, F. Hassan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the fractional auxiliary sub-equation expansion method is proposed to solve nonlinear fractional differential equations. To illustrate the effectiveness of the method, we discuss the space-time fractional KdV equation, the space-time fractional RLW equation, the space-time fractional Boussinesq equation, and the (3+1)-space-time fractional ZK equation. The solutions are expressed in terms of fractional hyperbolic and fractional trigonometric functions. These solutions are useful to understand the mechanisms of the complicated nonlinear physical phenomena and fractional differential equations. Among these solutions, some are found for the first time. The analytical solution of homogenous linear FDEs with constant coefficients are obtained by using the series and the Mittag-Leffler function methods. The obtained results recover the well-know solutions when α = 1.

  10. Solving singular perturbation problem of second order ordinary differential equation using the method of matched asymptotic expansion (MMAE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Firdawati binti; Karim, Mohamad Faisal bin Abd

    2015-10-01

    Modelling physical problems in mathematical form yields the governing equations that may be linear or nonlinear for known and unknown boundaries. The exact solution for those equations may or may not be obtained easily. Hence we seek an analytical approximation solution in terms of asymptotic expansion. In this study, we focus on a singular perturbation in second order ordinary differential equations. Solutions to several perturbed ordinary differential equations are obtained in terms of asymptotic expansion. The aim of this work is to find an approximate analytical solution using the classical method of matched asymptotic expansion (MMAE). The Mathematica computer algebra system is used to perform the algebraic computations. The details procedures will be discussed and the underlying concepts and principles of the MMAE will be clarified. Perturbation problem for linear equation that occurs at one boundary and two boundary layers are discussed. Approximate analytical solution obtained for both cases are illustrated by graph using selected parameter by showing the outer, inner and composite solution separately. Then, the composite solution will be compare to the exact solution to show their accuracy by graph. By comparison, MMAE is found to be one of the best methods to solve singular perturbation problems in second order ordinary differential equation since the results obtained are very close to the exact solution.

  11. Renormalized Traces and Cocycles on the Algebra of S 1-Pseudo-differential Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnot, Jean-Pierre

    2006-02-01

    Using renormalized (or weighted) traces of classical pseudo-differential operators and calculus on formal symbols. We exhibit three cocycles on the Lie algebra of classical pseudo-differential operators Cl(S^1,mathbb{C}^n) acting on L^2(S^1,mathbb{C}^n). We first show that the Schwinger functional c_S^D associated to the Dirac operator is a cocycle on Cl(S^1,mathbb{C}^n), and not only on a restricted algebra Cl(S^1,mathbb{C}^n)^D_res. Then, we investigate two bilinear functionals c+^D and c_{++}^D, which satisfies {1 over 2}c_S^D = c_+^D - c_{++}^D. We show that c+^D and c_{++}^D are two cocycles in Cl(S^1,mathbb{C}^n), and {1 over 2}c_S^D and c_+^D have the same nonvanishing cohomology class. We finaly calculate c+^D on classical pseudo-differential operators of order 1 and on differential operators of order 1, in terms of partial symbols. By this last computation, we recover the Virasoro cocyle and the Kähler form of the loop group.

  12. Existence of anti-periodic (differentiable) mild solutions to semilinear differential equations with nondense domain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinghuai; Zhang, Litao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the existence of anti-periodic (or anti-periodic differentiable) mild solutions to the semilinear differential equation [Formula: see text] with nondense domain. Furthermore, an example is given to illustrate our results. PMID:27350933

  13. Oscillation theorems for second order nonlinear forced differential equations.

    PubMed

    Salhin, Ambarka A; Din, Ummul Khair Salma; Ahmad, Rokiah Rozita; Noorani, Mohd Salmi Md

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a class of second order forced nonlinear differential equation is considered and several new oscillation theorems are obtained. Our results generalize and improve those known ones in the literature. PMID:25077054

  14. Systems of Differential Equations with Skew-Symmetric, Orthogonal Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaister, P.

    2008-01-01

    The solution of a system of linear, inhomogeneous differential equations is discussed. The particular class considered is where the coefficient matrix is skew-symmetric and orthogonal, and where the forcing terms are sinusoidal. More general matrices are also considered.

  15. Numerical integration of ordinary differential equations of various orders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gear, C. W.

    1969-01-01

    Report describes techniques for the numerical integration of differential equations of various orders. Modified multistep predictor-corrector methods for general initial-value problems are discussed and new methods are introduced.

  16. Nonlinear ordinary differential equations: A discussion on symmetries and singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos; Leach, P. G. L.

    2016-06-01

    Two essential methods, the symmetry analysis and the singularity analysis, for the study of the integrability of nonlinear ordinary differential equations is the purpose of this work. The main similarities and the differences of these two different methods are discussed.

  17. Long-Term Dynamics of Autonomous Fractional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Xu, Wei; Xu, Yong; Han, Qun

    This paper aims to investigate long-term dynamic behaviors of autonomous fractional differential equations with effective numerical method. The long-term dynamic behaviors predict where systems are heading after long-term evolution. We make some modification and transplant cell mapping methods to autonomous fractional differential equations. The mapping time duration of cell mapping is enlarged to deal with the long memory effect. Three illustrative examples, i.e. fractional Lotka-Volterra equation, fractional van der Pol oscillator and fractional Duffing equation, are studied with our revised generalized cell mapping method. We obtain long-term dynamics, such as attractors, basins of attraction, and saddles. Compared with some existing stability and numerical results, the validity of our method is verified. Furthermore, we find that the fractional order has its effect on the long-term dynamics of autonomous fractional differential equations.

  18. Transformation matrices between non-linear and linear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sartain, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    In the linearization of systems of non-linear differential equations, those systems which can be exactly transformed into the second order linear differential equation Y"-AY'-BY=0 where Y, Y', and Y" are n x 1 vectors and A and B are constant n x n matrices of real numbers were considered. The 2n x 2n matrix was used to transform the above matrix equation into the first order matrix equation X' = MX. Specially the matrix M and the conditions which will diagonalize or triangularize M were studied. Transformation matrices P and P sub -1 were used to accomplish this diagonalization or triangularization to return to the solution of the second order matrix differential equation system from the first order system.

  19. Canonical coordinates for partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Villarreal, Ramiro

    1987-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions are found under which operators of the form Sigma(m, j=1) X(2)sub j + X sub 0 can be made constant coefficient. In addition, necessary and sufficient conditions are derived which classify those linear partial differential operators that can be moved to the Kolmogorov type.

  20. Canonical coordinates for partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Villarreal, Ramiro

    1988-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions are found under which operators of the form Sigma (m, j=1) x (2) sub j + X sub O can be made constant coefficient. In addition, necessary and sufficient conditions are derived which classify those linear partial differential operators that can be moved to the Kolmogorov type.

  1. International Conference on Multiscale Methods and Partial Differential Equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Hou

    2006-12-12

    The International Conference on Multiscale Methods and Partial Differential Equations (ICMMPDE for short) was held at IPAM, UCLA on August 26-27, 2005. The conference brought together researchers, students and practitioners with interest in the theoretical, computational and practical aspects of multiscale problems and related partial differential equations. The conference provided a forum to exchange and stimulate new ideas from different disciplines, and to formulate new challenging multiscale problems that will have impact in applications.

  2. Rough differential equations driven by signals in Besov spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prömel, David J.; Trabs, Mathias

    2016-03-01

    Rough differential equations are solved for signals in general Besov spaces unifying in particular the known results in Hölder and p-variation topology. To this end the paracontrolled distribution approach, which has been introduced by Gubinelli, Imkeller and Perkowski [24] to analyze singular stochastic PDEs, is extended from Hölder to Besov spaces. As an application we solve stochastic differential equations driven by random functions in Besov spaces and Gaussian processes in a pathwise sense.

  3. Stability of algebraically unstable dispersive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Kristina; Zaretzky, Paula; Weinstein, Steven; Cromer, Michael; Barlow, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    A widely unexplored type of hydrodynamic instability is examined - large-time algebraic growth. Such growth occurs on the threshold of (exponentially) neutral stability. A methodology is provided for predicting the algebraic growth rate of an initial disturbance, when applied to a class of partial differential equations describing wave propagation in dispersive media. There are several morphological differences between algebraically growing disturbances and the exponentially growing wave packets inherent to classical linear stability analysis, and these are elucidated in this study.

  4. Symmetry and Lie-Frobenius reduction of differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeta, G.

    2015-01-01

    Twisted symmetries, widely studied in the last decade, have proved to be as effective as standard ones in the analysis and reduction of nonlinear equations. We explain this effectiveness in terms of a Lie-Frobenius reduction; this requires focus not just on the prolonged (symmetry) vector fields, but on the distributions spanned by these and on systems of vector fields in involution in the Frobenius sense, not necessarily spanning a Lie algebra. Research partially supported by MIUR-PRIN program under project 2010-JJ4KPA.

  5. Chaotic Dynamics in Partial Differential Equations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanguang

    The existence of chaotic behavior, for a certain damped and driven perturbation of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation under even periodic boundary conditions, is established. More specifically, the existence of a symmetric pair of homoclinic orbits is established for the perturbed NLS equation through two main arguments: Argument 1 is a combination of Melnikov analysis and a geometric singular perturbation theory for the pde. The geometric singular perturbation theory involves the theory of persistence of invariant manifolds for the pde and the theory of Hadamard-Fenichel fiber coordinatization for those invariant manifolds. Argument 2 is a purely geometric argument. Finally, an argument is sketched which, we believe, provides a core of an existence proof for Smale "horseshoes" and a symbolic dynamics in a neighborhood of the persistent homoclinic orbits.

  6. Local Analytic Solutions of a Functional Differential Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingxia

    This paper is concerned with the existence of analytic solutions of an iterative functional differential equation. Employing the method of majorant series, we need to discuss the constant α given in Schröder transformation. we study analytic solutions of the equation in the case of α at resonance and the case of α near resonance under the Brjuno condition.

  7. Variational Iteration Method for Delay Differential Equations Using He's Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohyud-Din, Syed Tauseef; Yildirim, Ahmet

    2010-12-01

    January 21, 2010 In this paper, we apply the variational iteration method using He's polynomials (VIMHP) for solving delay differential equations which are otherwise too difficult to solve. These equations arise very frequently in signal processing, digital images, physics, and applied sciences. Numerical results reveal the complete reliability and efficiency of the proposed combination.

  8. The Use of Kruskal-Newton Diagrams for Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    T. Fishaleck and R.B. White

    2008-02-19

    The method of Kruskal-Newton diagrams for the solution of differential equations with boundary layers is shown to provide rapid intuitive understanding of layer scaling and can result in the conceptual simplification of some problems. The method is illustrated using equations arising in the theory of pattern formation and in plasma physics.

  9. Student Difficulties with Units in Differential Equations in Modelling Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2006-01-01

    First-year undergraduate engineering students' understanding of the units of factors and terms in first-order ordinary differential equations used in modelling contexts was investigated using diagnostic quiz questions. Few students appeared to realize that the units of each term in such equations must be the same, or if they did, nevertheless…

  10. FORSIM. Solution of Partial or Ordinary Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, P.

    1980-10-10

    FORSIM is a FORTRAN oriented simulation program which automates the continuous transient solution of systems of ordinary and/or partial differential equations. The user writes equations in a FORTRAN subroutine, following prescribed rules, and loads this routine along with the executive routines. The executive routines then read in initial data supplied by the user and proceed with the integration.

  11. Integro-differential diffusion equation and neutron scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau Fa, Kwok

    2015-02-01

    An integro-differential diffusion equation with linear force, based on the continuous time random walk model, is considered. The equation generalizes the ordinary and fractional diffusion equations which includes short, intermediate and long-time memory effects. Analytical expression for the intermediate scattering function is obtained and applied to ribonucleic acid (RNA) hydration water data from torula yeast. The model can capture the dynamics of hydrogen atoms in RNA hydration water, including the long-relaxation times.

  12. Stochastic differential equations for non-linear hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Español, Pep

    1998-02-01

    We formulate the stochastic differential equations for non-linear hydrodynamic fluctuations. The equations incorporate the random forces through a random stres tensor and random heat flux as in the Landau and Lifshitz theory. However, the equations are non-linear and the random forces are non-Gaussian. We provide explicit expressions for these random quantities in terms of the well-defined increments of the Wienner process.

  13. Algebraic integrability: a survey.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecke, Pol

    2008-03-28

    We give a concise introduction to the notion of algebraic integrability. Our exposition is based on examples and phenomena, rather than on detailed proofs of abstract theorems. We mainly focus on algebraic integrability in the sense of Adler-van Moerbeke, where the fibres of the momentum map are affine parts of Abelian varieties; as it turns out, most examples from classical mechanics are of this form. Two criteria are given for such systems (Kowalevski-Painlevé and Lyapunov) and each is illustrated in one example. We show in the case of a relatively simple example how one proves algebraic integrability, starting from the differential equations for the integrable vector field. For Hamiltonian systems that are algebraically integrable in the generalized sense, two examples are given, which illustrate the non-compact analogues of Abelian varieties which typically appear in such systems. PMID:17588863

  14. Differential algebraic methods for space charge modeling and applications to the University of Maryland Electron Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, Edward W.

    2011-12-01

    The future of particle accelerators is moving towards the intensity frontier; the need to place more particles into a smaller space is a common requirement of nearly all applications of particle accelerators. Putting large numbers of particles in a small space means that the mutual repulsion of these charged particles becomes a significant factor, this effect is called space charge. In this work we develop a series of differential algebra based methods to simulate the effects of space charge in particle accelerators. These methods were used to model the University of Maryland Electron Ring, a small 3.8 meter diameter 10 KeV electron storage ring designed to observe the effects of space charge in a safe, cost effective manner. The methods developed here are designed to not only simulate the effects of space charge on the motions of the test particles in the system but to add their effects to the transfer map of the system. Once they have been added useful information about the beam, such as tune shifts and chromaticities, can be extracted directly from the map. In order to make the simulation self consistent, the statistical moments of the distribution are used to create a self consistent Taylor series representing the distribution function, which is combined with pre-stored integrals solved using a Duffy transformation to find the potential. This method can not only find the map of the system, but also advance the particles under most conditions. For conditions where it cannot be used to accurately advance the particles a differential algebra based fast multipole method is implemented. By using differential algebras to create local expansions, noticeable time savings are found.

  15. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of PDE solutions in the least-squares norm are reported.

  16. Generating functionals and Lagrangian partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Vankerschaver, Joris; Liao, Cuicui; Leok, Melvin

    2013-08-15

    The main goal of this paper is to derive an alternative characterization of the multisymplectic form formula for classical field theories using the geometry of the space of boundary values. We review the concept of Type-I/II generating functionals defined on the space of boundary data of a Lagrangian field theory. On the Lagrangian side, we define an analogue of Jacobi's solution to the Hamilton–Jacobi equation for field theories, and we show that by taking variational derivatives of this functional, we obtain an isotropic submanifold of the space of Cauchy data, described by the so-called multisymplectic form formula. As an example of the latter, we show that Lorentz's reciprocity principle in electromagnetism is a particular instance of the multisymplectic form formula. We also define a Hamiltonian analogue of Jacobi's solution, and we show that this functional is a Type-II generating functional. We finish the paper by defining a similar framework of generating functions for discrete field theories, and we show that for the linear wave equation, we recover the multisymplectic conservation law of Bridges.

  17. Solving constant-coefficient differential equations with dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weixuan; Qu, Che; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the concept of metamaterial analog computing has been proposed (Silva et al 2014 Science 343 160–3). Some mathematical operations such as spatial differentiation, integration, and convolution, have been performed by using designed metamaterial blocks. Motivated by this work, we propose a practical approach based on dielectric metamaterial to solve differential equations. The ordinary differential equation can be solved accurately by the correctly designed metamaterial system. The numerical simulations using well-established numerical routines have been performed to successfully verify all theoretical analyses.

  18. Numerical integration of ordinary differential equations on manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, P. E.; Grossman, R.

    1993-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of developing numerical integration algorithms for differential equations that, when viewed as equations in some Euclidean space, naturally evolve on some embedded submanifold. It is desired to construct algorithms whose iterates also evolve on the same manifold. These algorithms can therefore be viewed as integrating ordinary differential equations on manifolds. The basic method “decouples” the computation of flows on the submanifold from the numerical integration process. It is shown that two classes of single-step and multistep algorithms can be posed and analyzed theoretically, using the concept of “freezing” the coefficients of differential operators obtained from the defining vector field. Explicit third-order algorithms are derived, with additional equations augmenting those of their classical counterparts, obtained from “obstructions” defined by nonvanishing Lie brackets.

  19. Quadratic Algebra Approach to the Dirac Equation with Spin and Pseudospin Symmetry for the 4D Harmonic Oscillator and U(1) Monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, S.; Chenaghlou, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Dirac equation with spin and pseudospin symmetry by the quadratic algebra approach for the 4-dimensional harmonic oscillator. By realization of the quadratic algebras in the deformed oscillator algebra, we obtain the relativistic energy spectrum. Also, by regarding the generalized Kustaanheimo-Stiefel transformation, we obtain the relativistic energy spectrum for the charge-dyon system with the U(1) monopole.

  20. From Function to Equations: Introduction of Algebraic Thinking to 13 Year-Old Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmaki, Vasiliki; Klaoudatos, Nikos; Verikios, Petros

    2004-01-01

    The various difficulties and cognitive obstacles that students face when they are introduced to algebra are well documented and described in the relevant bibliography. If it is possible, in order to avoid these difficulties, we have adopted the functional approach widening the meaning of algebraic thinking. In this paper, which is part of wider…

  1. Balancing the Equation: Do Course Variations in Algebra 1 Provide Equal Student Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenfield, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, algebra has served as a gatekeeper that divides students into academic programs with varying opportunities to learn and controls access to higher education and career opportunities. Successful completion of Algebra 1 demonstrates mathematical proficiency and allows access to a sequential and progressive path of advanced study that…

  2. Young Students Learning Formal Algebraic Notation and Solving Linear Equations: Are Commonly Experienced Difficulties Avoidable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Dave

    2012-01-01

    This study looks at a mixed ability group of 21 Year 5 primary students (aged 9-10 years old) who had previously never had formal instruction using letters to stand for unknowns or variables in a mathematics context; nor had they been introduced to formal algebraic notation. Three lessons were taught using the computer software "Grid Algebra"…

  3. Activities for Students: Biology as a Source for Algebra Equations--The Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, Virginia M.

    2005-01-01

    The high school course that integrated first year algebra with an introductory environmental biology/anatomy and physiology course, in order to solve algebra problems is discussed. Lessons and activities for the course were taken by identifying the areas where mathematics and biology content intervenes may help students understand biology concepts…

  4. ICM: an Integrated Compartment Method for numerically solving partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1981-05-01

    An integrated compartment method (ICM) is proposed to construct a set of algebraic equations from a system of partial differential equations. The ICM combines the utility of integral formulation of finite element approach, the simplicity of interpolation of finite difference approximation, and the flexibility of compartment analyses. The integral formulation eases the treatment of boundary conditions, in particular, the Neumann-type boundary conditions. The simplicity of interpolation provides great economy in computation. The flexibility of discretization with irregular compartments of various shapes and sizes offers advantages in resolving complex boundaries enclosing compound regions of interest. The basic procedures of ICM are first to discretize the region of interest into compartments, then to apply three integral theorems of vectors to transform the volume integral to the surface integral, and finally to use interpolation to relate the interfacial values in terms of compartment values to close the system. The Navier-Stokes equations are used as an example of how to derive the corresponding ICM alogrithm for a given set of partial differential equations. Because of the structure of the algorithm, the basic computer program remains the same for cases in one-, two-, or three-dimensional problems.

  5. Construction and accuracy of partial differential equation approximations to the chemical master equation.

    PubMed

    Grima, Ramon

    2011-11-01

    The mesoscopic description of chemical kinetics, the chemical master equation, can be exactly solved in only a few simple cases. The analytical intractability stems from the discrete character of the equation, and hence considerable effort has been invested in the development of Fokker-Planck equations, second-order partial differential equation approximations to the master equation. We here consider two different types of higher-order partial differential approximations, one derived from the system-size expansion and the other from the Kramers-Moyal expansion, and derive the accuracy of their predictions for chemical reactive networks composed of arbitrary numbers of unimolecular and bimolecular reactions. In particular, we show that the partial differential equation approximation of order Q from the Kramers-Moyal expansion leads to estimates of the mean number of molecules accurate to order Ω(-(2Q-3)/2), of the variance of the fluctuations in the number of molecules accurate to order Ω(-(2Q-5)/2), and of skewness accurate to order Ω(-(Q-2)). We also show that for large Q, the accuracy in the estimates can be matched only by a partial differential equation approximation from the system-size expansion of approximate order 2Q. Hence, we conclude that partial differential approximations based on the Kramers-Moyal expansion generally lead to considerably more accurate estimates in the mean, variance, and skewness than approximations of the same order derived from the system-size expansion. PMID:22181475

  6. Multiscale functions, scale dynamics, and applications to partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, Jacky; Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Modeling phenomena from experimental data always begins with a choice of hypothesis on the observed dynamics such as determinism, randomness, and differentiability. Depending on these choices, different behaviors can be observed. The natural question associated to the modeling problem is the following: "With a finite set of data concerning a phenomenon, can we recover its underlying nature? From this problem, we introduce in this paper the definition of multi-scale functions, scale calculus, and scale dynamics based on the time scale calculus [see Bohner, M. and Peterson, A., Dynamic Equations on Time Scales: An Introduction with Applications (Springer Science & Business Media, 2001)] which is used to introduce the notion of scale equations. These definitions will be illustrated on the multi-scale Okamoto's functions. Scale equations are analysed using scale regimes and the notion of asymptotic model for a scale equation under a particular scale regime. The introduced formalism explains why a single scale equation can produce distinct continuous models even if the equation is scale invariant. Typical examples of such equations are given by the scale Euler-Lagrange equation. We illustrate our results using the scale Newton's equation which gives rise to a non-linear diffusion equation or a non-linear Schrödinger equation as asymptotic continuous models depending on the particular fractional scale regime which is considered.

  7. Dedalus: Flexible framework for spectrally solving differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Keaton; Brown, Ben; Lecoanet, Daniel; Oishi, Jeff; Vasil, Geoff

    2016-03-01

    Dedalus solves differential equations using spectral methods. It is designed to solve initial-value, boundary-value, and eigenvalue problems involving nearly arbitrary equations sets and implements a highly flexible spectral framework that can simulate many domains and custom equations. Its primary features include symbolic equation entry, spectral domain discretization, multidimensional parallelization, implicit-explicit timestepping, and flexible analysis with HDF5. The code is written primarily in Python and features an easy-to-use interface, including text-based equation entry. The numerical algorithm produces highly sparse systems for a wide variety of equations on spectrally-discretized domains; these systems are efficiently solved by Dedalus using compiled libraries and multidimensional parallelization through MPI.

  8. A perturbative solution to metadynamics ordinary differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Dama, James F.; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-12-01

    Metadynamics is a popular enhanced sampling scheme wherein by periodic application of a repulsive bias, one can surmount high free energy barriers and explore complex landscapes. Recently, metadynamics was shown to be mathematically well founded, in the sense that the biasing procedure is guaranteed to converge to the true free energy surface in the long time limit irrespective of the precise choice of biasing parameters. A differential equation governing the post-transient convergence behavior of metadynamics was also derived. In this short communication, we revisit this differential equation, expressing it in a convenient and elegant Riccati-like form. A perturbative solution scheme is then developed for solving this differential equation, which is valid for any generic biasing kernel. The solution clearly demonstrates the robustness of metadynamics to choice of biasing parameters and gives further confidence in the widely used method.

  9. Stabilized multilevel Monte Carlo method for stiff stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulle, Assyr; Blumenthal, Adrian

    2013-10-01

    A multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method for mean square stable stochastic differential equations with multiple scales is proposed. For such problems, that we call stiff, the performance of MLMC methods based on classical explicit methods deteriorates because of the time step restriction to resolve the fastest scales that prevents to exploit all the levels of the MLMC approach. We show that by switching to explicit stabilized stochastic methods and balancing the stabilization procedure simultaneously with the hierarchical sampling strategy of MLMC methods, the computational cost for stiff systems is significantly reduced, while keeping the computational algorithm fully explicit and easy to implement. Numerical experiments on linear and nonlinear stochastic differential equations and on a stochastic partial differential equation illustrate the performance of the stabilized MLMC method and corroborate our theoretical findings.

  10. A perturbative solution to metadynamics ordinary differential equation.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Dama, James F; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-12-21

    Metadynamics is a popular enhanced sampling scheme wherein by periodic application of a repulsive bias, one can surmount high free energy barriers and explore complex landscapes. Recently, metadynamics was shown to be mathematically well founded, in the sense that the biasing procedure is guaranteed to converge to the true free energy surface in the long time limit irrespective of the precise choice of biasing parameters. A differential equation governing the post-transient convergence behavior of metadynamics was also derived. In this short communication, we revisit this differential equation, expressing it in a convenient and elegant Riccati-like form. A perturbative solution scheme is then developed for solving this differential equation, which is valid for any generic biasing kernel. The solution clearly demonstrates the robustness of metadynamics to choice of biasing parameters and gives further confidence in the widely used method. PMID:26696051

  11. Entropy and convexity for nonlinear partial differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Ball, John M.; Chen, Gui-Qiang G.

    2013-01-01

    Partial differential equations are ubiquitous in almost all applications of mathematics, where they provide a natural mathematical description of many phenomena involving change in physical, chemical, biological and social processes. The concept of entropy originated in thermodynamics and statistical physics during the nineteenth century to describe the heat exchanges that occur in the thermal processes in a thermodynamic system, while the original notion of convexity is for sets and functions in mathematics. Since then, entropy and convexity have become two of the most important concepts in mathematics. In particular, nonlinear methods via entropy and convexity have been playing an increasingly important role in the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations in recent decades. This opening article of the Theme Issue is intended to provide an introduction to entropy, convexity and related nonlinear methods for the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations. We also provide a brief discussion about the content and contributions of the papers that make up this Theme Issue. PMID:24249768

  12. Difference methods for stiff delay differential equations. [DDESUB, in FORTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Mitchell G.

    1980-12-01

    Delay differential equations of the form y'(t) = f(y(t), z(t)), where z(t) = (y/sub 1/(..cap alpha../sub 1/(y(t))),..., y/sub n/(..cap alpha../sub n/(y(t))))/sup T/ and ..cap alpha../sub i/(y(t)) less than or equal to t, arise in many scientific and engineering fields when transport lags and propagation times are physically significant in a dynamic process. Difference methods for approximating the solution of stiff delay systems require special stability properties that are generalizations of those employed for stiff ordinary differential equations. By use of the model equation y'(t) = py(t) + qy(t-1), with complex p and q, the definitions of A-stability, A( )-stability, and stiff stability have been generalize to delay equations. For linear multistep difference formulas, these properties extend directly from ordinary to delay equations. This straight forward extension is not true for implicit Runge-Kutta methods, as illustrated by the midpoint formula, which is A-stable for ordinary equations, but not for delay equations. A computer code for stiff delay equations was developed using the BDF. 24 figures, 5 tables.

  13. Optimal Variational Asymptotic Method for Nonlinear Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Vipul K.; Pandey, Ram K.

    2014-01-01

    We propose optimal variational asymptotic method to solve time fractional nonlinear partial differential equations. In the proposed method, an arbitrary number of auxiliary parameters γ0, γ1, γ2,… and auxiliary functions H0(x), H1(x), H2(x),… are introduced in the correction functional of the standard variational iteration method. The optimal values of these parameters are obtained by minimizing the square residual error. To test the method, we apply it to solve two important classes of nonlinear partial differential equations: (1) the fractional advection-diffusion equation with nonlinear source term and (2) the fractional Swift-Hohenberg equation. Only few iterations are required to achieve fairly accurate solutions of both the first and second problems.

  14. Stability of solutions to stochastic partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gess, Benjamin; Tölle, Jonas M.

    2016-03-01

    We provide a general framework for the stability of solutions to stochastic partial differential equations with respect to perturbations of the drift. More precisely, we consider stochastic partial differential equations with drift given as the subdifferential of a convex function and prove continuous dependence of the solutions with regard to random Mosco convergence of the convex potentials. In particular, we identify the concept of stochastic variational inequalities (SVI) as a well-suited framework to study such stability properties. The generality of the developed framework is then laid out by deducing Trotter type and homogenization results for stochastic fast diffusion and stochastic singular p-Laplace equations. In addition, we provide an SVI treatment for stochastic nonlocal p-Laplace equations and prove their convergence to the respective local models.

  15. Lipschitz regularity of solutions for mixed integro-differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barles, Guy; Chasseigne, Emmanuel; Ciomaga, Adina; Imbert, Cyril

    We establish new Hölder and Lipschitz estimates for viscosity solutions of a large class of elliptic and parabolic nonlinear integro-differential equations, by the classical Ishii-Lions's method. We thus extend the Hölder regularity results recently obtained by Barles, Chasseigne and Imbert (2011). In addition, we deal with a new class of nonlocal equations that we term mixed integro-differential equations. These equations are particularly interesting, as they are degenerate both in the local and nonlocal term, but their overall behavior is driven by the local-nonlocal interaction, e.g. the fractional diffusion may give the ellipticity in one direction and the classical diffusion in the complementary one.

  16. Higher dimensional systems of differential equations obtainable by iterative use of complex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadir, Asghar; Mahomed, Fazal M.

    2015-04-01

    A procedure had been developed to solve systems of two ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) that could be obtained from scalar complex ODEs by splitting into their real and imaginary parts. The procedure was extended to four dimensional systems obtainable by splitting complex systems of two ODEs into their real and imaginary parts. As it stood, this procedure could be extended to any even dimension but not to odd dimensional systems. In this paper, the complex splitting is used iteratively to obtain three and four dimensional systems of ODEs and four dimensional systems of PDEs for four functions of two and four variables that correspond to a scalar base equation. We also provide characterization criteria for such systems to correspond to the base equation and a clear procedure to construct the base equation. The new systems of four ODEs are distinct from the class obtained by the single split of a two dimensional system. The previous complex methods split each infinitesimal symmetry generator into a pair of operators such that the entire set of operators do not form a Lie algebra. The iterative procedure sheds some light on the emergence of these "Lie-like" operators. In this procedure the higher dimensional system may not have any or the required symmetry for being directly solvable by symmetry and other methods although the base equation can have sufficient symmetry properties. Illustrative examples are provided.

  17. Legendre wavelet operational matrix of fractional derivative through wavelet-polynomial transformation and its applications on non-linear system of fractional order differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isah, Abdulnasir; Chang, Phang

    2016-06-01

    In this article we propose the wavelet operational method based on shifted Legendre polynomial to obtain the numerical solutions of non-linear systems of fractional order differential equations (NSFDEs). The operational matrix of fractional derivative derived through wavelet-polynomial transformation are used together with the collocation method to turn the NSFDEs to a system of non-linear algebraic equations. Illustrative examples are given in order to demonstrate the accuracy and simplicity of the proposed techniques.

  18. A Dirac-Dunkl Equation on S 2 and the Bannai-Ito Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bie, Hendrik; Genest, Vincent X.; Vinet, Luc

    2016-05-01

    The Dirac-Dunkl operator on the two-sphere associated to the Z23 reflection group is considered. Its symmetries are found and are shown to generate the Bannai-Ito algebra. Representations of the Bannai-Ito algebra are constructed using ladder operators. Eigenfunctions of the spherical Dirac-Dunkl operator are obtained using a Cauchy-Kovalevskaia extension theorem. These eigenfunctions, which correspond to Dunkl monogenics, are seen to support finite-dimensional irreducible representations of the Bannai-Ito algebra.

  19. Advanced methods for the solution of differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Braun, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    This book is based on a course presented at the Lewis Research Center for engineers and scientists who were interested in increasing their knowledge of differential equations. Those results which can actually be used to solve equations are therefore emphasized; and detailed proofs of theorems are, for the most part, omitted. However, the conclusions of the theorems are stated in a precise manner, and enough references are given so that the interested reader can find the steps of the proofs.

  20. Numerical integration of asymptotic solutions of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1989-01-01

    Classical asymptotic analysis of ordinary differential equations derives approximate solutions that are numerically stable. However, the analysis also leads to tedious expansions in powers of the relevant parameter for a particular problem. The expansions are replaced with integrals that can be evaluated by numerical integration. The resulting numerical solutions retain the linear independence that is the main advantage of asymptotic solutions. Examples, including the Falkner-Skan equation from laminar boundary layer theory, illustrate the method of asymptotic analysis with numerical integration.

  1. Numerical solvers to the stabilizing solution of perturbed algebraic Riccati equations in LQ zero-sum games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. G.; Netov, N. C.; Bogdanova, B. C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of solving a generalized algebraic Riccati equation with an indefinite sign of its quadratic term. We extend the approach introduced by Lanzon, Feng, Anderson and Rotkowitz (2008) for solving similar Riccati equations. We numerically investigate two types of iterative methods for computing the stabilizing solution. The first type of iterative methods constructs two matrix sequences, where the sum of them converges to the stabilizing solution. The second type of methods defines one matrix sequence which converges to the stabilizing solution. Computer realizations of the presented methods are numerically tested and compared on the test of family examples. Based on the experiments some conclusions are derived.

  2. Improving multilevel Monte Carlo for stochastic differential equations with application to the Langevin equation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Eike H.; Scheichl, Rob; Shardlow, Tony

    2015-01-01

    This paper applies several well-known tricks from the numerical treatment of deterministic differential equations to improve the efficiency of the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method for stochastic differential equations (SDEs) and especially the Langevin equation. We use modified equations analysis as an alternative to strong-approximation theory for the integrator, and we apply this to introduce MLMC for Langevin-type equations with integrators based on operator splitting. We combine this with extrapolation and investigate the use of discrete random variables in place of the Gaussian increments, which is a well-known technique for the weak approximation of SDEs. We show that, for small-noise problems, discrete random variables can lead to an increase in efficiency of almost two orders of magnitude for practical levels of accuracy.

  3. Bethe subalgebras in affine Birman–Murakami–Wenzl algebras and flat connections for q-KZ equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A. P.; Kirillov, A. N.; Tarasov, V. O.

    2016-05-01

    Commutative sets of Jucys–Murphy elements for affine braid groups of {A}(1),{B}(1),{C}(1),{D}(1) types were defined. Construction of R-matrix representations of the affine braid group of type {C}(1) and its distinguished commutative subgroup generated by the {C}(1)-type Jucys–Murphy elements are given. We describe a general method to produce flat connections for the two-boundary quantum Knizhnik–Zamolodchikov equations as necessary conditions for Sklyanin's type transfer matrix associated with the two-boundary multicomponent Zamolodchikov algebra to be invariant under the action of the {C}(1)-type Jucys–Murphy elements. We specify our general construction to the case of the Birman–Murakami–Wenzl algebras (BMW algebras for short). As an application we suggest a baxterization of the Dunkl–Cherednik elements {Y}\\prime {{s}} in the double affine Hecke algebra of type A. Dedicated to Professor Rodney Baxter on the occasion of his 75th Birthday.

  4. Existence of a coupled system of fractional differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Rabha W.; Siri, Zailan

    2015-10-22

    We manage the existence and uniqueness of a fractional coupled system containing Schrödinger equations. Such a system appears in quantum mechanics. We confirm that the fractional system under consideration admits a global solution in appropriate functional spaces. The solution is shown to be unique. The method is based on analytic technique of the fixed point theory. The fractional differential operator is considered from the virtue of the Riemann-Liouville differential operator.

  5. An alternative approach to systems of second-order ordinary differential equations with maximal symmetry. Realizations of sl(n + 2 , R) by special functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campoamor-Stursberg, R.

    2016-08-01

    Using the general solution of the differential equation x¨(t) +g1(t) x˙ +g2(t) x = 0 , a generic basis of the point-symmetry algebra sl(3 , R) is constructed. Deriving the equation from a time-dependent Lagrangian, the basis elements corresponding to Noether symmetries are deduced. The generalized Lewis invariant is constructed explicitly using a linear combination of Noether symmetries. The procedure is generalized to the case of systems of second-order ordinary differential equations with maximal sl(n + 2 , R) -symmetry, and its possible adaptation to the inhomogeneous non-linear case illustrated by an example.

  6. Power series solutions of ordinary differential equations in MACSYMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafferty, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    A program is described which extends the differential equation solving capability of MACSYMA to power series solutions and is available via the SHARE library. The program is directed toward those classes of equations with variable coefficients (in particular, those with singularities) and uses the method of Frobenius. Probably the most important distinction between this package and others currently available or being developed is that, wherever possible, this program will attempt to provide a complete solution to the equation rather than an approximation, i.e., a finite number of terms. This solution will take the form of a sum of infinite series.

  7. A numerical method for solving systems of higher order linear functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüzbasi, Suayip; Gök, Emrah; Sezer, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Functional differential equations have importance in many areas of science such as mathematical physics. These systems are difficult to solve analytically.In this paper we consider the systems of linear functional differential equations [1-9] including the term y(αx + β) and advance-delay in derivatives of y .To obtain the approximate solutions of those systems, we present a matrix-collocation method by using Müntz-Legendre polynomials and the collocation points. For this purpose, to obtain the approximate solutions of those systems, we present a matrix-collocation method by using Müntz-Legendre polynomials and the collocation points. This method transform the problem into a system of linear algebraic equations. The solutions of last system determine unknown co-efficients of original problem. Also, an error estimation technique is presented and the approximate solutions are improved by using it. The program of method is written in Matlab and the approximate solutions can be obtained easily. Also some examples are given to illustrate the validity of the method.

  8. Cosets of meromorphic CFTs and modular differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaberdiel, Matthias R.; Hampapura, Harsha R.; Mukhi, Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Some relations between families of two-character CFTs are explained using a slightly generalised coset construction, and the underlying theories (whose existence was only conjectured based on the modular differential equation) are constructed. The same method also gives rise to interesting new examples of CFTs with three and four characters.

  9. Parameter Estimates in Differential Equation Models for Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    We estimate the parameters present in several differential equation models of population growth, specifically logistic growth models and two-species competition models. We discuss student-evolved strategies and offer "Mathematica" code for a gradient search approach. We use historical (1930s) data from microbial studies of the Russian biologist,…

  10. Climate Modeling in the Calculus and Differential Equations Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kose, Emek; Kunze, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Students in college-level mathematics classes can build the differential equations of an energy balance model of the Earth's climate themselves, from a basic understanding of the background science. Here we use variable albedo and qualitative analysis to find stable and unstable equilibria of such a model, providing a problem or perhaps a…

  11. A Simple Derivation of Kepler's Laws without Solving Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provost, J.-P.; Bracco, C.

    2009-01-01

    Proceeding like Newton with a discrete time approach of motion and a geometrical representation of velocity and acceleration, we obtain Kepler's laws without solving differential equations. The difficult part of Newton's work, when it calls for non-trivial properties of ellipses, is avoided by the introduction of polar coordinates. Then a simple…

  12. Bounded and periodic solutions of nonlinear functional differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Slyusarchuk, Vasilii E

    2012-05-31

    Conditions for the existence of bounded and periodic solutions of the nonlinear functional differential equation d{sup m}x(t)/dt{sup m} + (Fx)(t) = h(t), t element of R, are presented, involving local linear approximations to the operator F. Bibliography: 23 titles.

  13. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  14. Asymptotics of Sample Entropy Production Rate for Stochastic Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-Yu; Xiong, Jie; Xu, Lihu

    2016-06-01

    Using the dimension-free Harnack inequality and the integration by parts formula for the associated diffusion semigroup, we prove the central limit theorem, the moderate deviation principle, and the logarithmic iteration law for the sample entropy production rate of a family of stochastic differential equations.

  15. Integration of CAS in the Didactics of Differential Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balderas Puga, Angel

    In this paper are described some features of the intensive use of math software, primarily DERIVE, in the context of modeling in an introductory university course in differential equations. Different aspects are detailed: changes in the curriculum that included not only course contents, but also the sequence of introduction to various topics and…

  16. Phaser-Based Courseware for Ordinary Differential Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zia, Lee l.

    1991-01-01

    Presented are classroom-tested examples of instructional materials (courseware) for ordinary differential equations using the software package PHASER. All of the examples include in-class demonstration techniques and commentaries for instructor use, student homework and laboratory exercises, and suggestions for in-class examination questions. (JJK)

  17. A Second-Year Undergraduate Course in Applied Differential Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahidy, Thomas Z.

    1991-01-01

    Presents the framework for a chemical engineering course using ordinary differential equations to solve problems with the underlying strategy of concisely discussing the theory behind each solution technique without extensions to formal proofs. Includes typical class illustrations, student responses to this strategy, and reaction of the…

  18. Do Students Really Understand What an Ordinary Differential Equation Is?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Selahattin

    2010-01-01

    Differential equations (DEs) are important in mathematics as well as in science and the social sciences. Thus, the study of DEs has been included in various courses in different departments in higher education. The importance of DEs has attracted the attention of many researchers who have generally focussed on the content and instruction of DEs.…

  19. Numerical Aspects of Solving Differential Equations: Laboratory Approach for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Ana

    1997-01-01

    Describes three labs designed to help students in a first course on ordinary differential equations with three of the most common numerical difficulties they might encounter when solving initial value problems with a numerical software package. The goal of these labs is to help students advance to independent work on common numerical anomalies.…

  20. Solving Second-Order Differential Equations with Variable Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmer, A., III; Costa, G. B.

    2008-01-01

    A method is developed in which an analytical solution is obtained for certain classes of second-order differential equations with variable coefficients. By the use of transformations and by repeated iterated integration, a desired solution is obtained. This alternative method represents a different way to acquire a solution from classic power…

  1. Solutions of differential equations in a Bernstein polynomial basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrees Bhatti, M.; Bracken, P.

    2007-08-01

    An algorithm for approximating solutions to differential equations in a modified new Bernstein polynomial basis is introduced. The algorithm expands the desired solution in terms of a set of continuous polynomials over a closed interval and then makes use of the Galerkin method to determine the expansion coefficients to construct a solution. Matrix formulation is used throughout the entire procedure. However, accuracy and efficiency are dependent on the size of the set of Bernstein polynomials and the procedure is much simpler compared to the piecewise B spline method for solving differential equations. A recursive definition of the Bernstein polynomials and their derivatives are also presented. The current procedure is implemented to solve three linear equations and one nonlinear equation, and excellent agreement is found between the exact and approximate solutions. In addition, the algorithm improves the accuracy and efficiency of the traditional methods for solving differential equations that rely on much more complicated numerical techniques. This procedure has great potential to be implemented in more complex systems where there are no exact solutions available except approximations.

  2. Final report: Efficient and user friendly C++ library for differential algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlana G. Shasharina

    1998-09-29

    In Phase I we proposed the following tasks: Task 1: Identify the units of the Differential Algebra (DA) library, i.e. determine the abstract data types of the DA and the relations between them. Develop the interfaces (.h files) for the DA vectors. Task 2: Implement the DA vector class with garbage collection and expression templates for optimizing all overloaded operators by minimizing creation of temporaries and fusing loops. Task 3: Implement the prototype GUI for instantiating systems from files and invoking the DA methods. Task 4: Develop a suite of tests for the DA vector class and the needed utilities classes. Task 5: Write the final report on this work. This will include documentation on the use of the code. We have completed these tasks. In this section we discuss the results of our work.

  3. Spatial complexity of solutions of higher order partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukavica, Igor

    2004-03-01

    We address spatial oscillation properties of solutions of higher order parabolic partial differential equations. In the case of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation ut + uxxxx + uxx + u ux = 0, we prove that for solutions u on the global attractor, the quantity card {x epsi [0, L]:u(x, t) = lgr}, where L > 0 is the spatial period, can be bounded by a polynomial function of L for all \\lambda\\in{\\Bbb R} . A similar property is proven for a general higher order partial differential equation u_t+(-1)^{s}\\partial_x^{2s}u+ \\sum_{k=0}^{2s-1}v_k(x,t)\\partial_x^k u =0 .

  4. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    A method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response is described. The key to this method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in most cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacements are used to approximate bending stresses.

  5. Comparison of numerical techniques for integration of stiff ordinary differential equations arising in combustion chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency and accuracy of several algorithms recently developed for the efficient numerical integration of stiff ordinary differential equations are compared. The methods examined include two general-purpose codes, EPISODE and LSODE, and three codes (CHEMEQ, CREK1D, and GCKP84) developed specifically to integrate chemical kinetic rate equations. The codes are applied to two test problems drawn from combustion kinetics. The comparisons show that LSODE is the fastest code currently available for the integration of combustion kinetic rate equations. An important finding is that an interactive solution of the algebraic energy conservation equation to compute the temperature does not result in significant errors. In addition, this method is more efficient than evaluating the temperature by integrating its time derivative. Significant reductions in computational work are realized by updating the rate constants (k = at(supra N) N exp(-E/RT) only when the temperature change exceeds an amount delta T that is problem dependent. An approximate expression for the automatic evaluation of delta T is derived and is shown to result in increased efficiency.

  6. The method of patches for solving stiff nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydon, David Van George, Jr.

    1998-12-01

    This dissertation describes a new method for solving very stiff sets of ordinary differential equations. The basic idea is to replace the original nonlinear equations with a set of equally stiff equations that are piecewise linear, and therefore can be solved exactly. We demonstrate the value of the method on small systems of equations for which some other methods are inefficient or produce spurious solutions, estimate error bounds, and discuss extensions of the method to larger systems of equations and to partial differential equations. Putzer's method is developed in a novel way for efficient and accurate solution of dx/dt = Ax+b. The physical problem of interest is spatial pattern formation in open reaction-diffusion chemical systems, as studied in the experiments of Kyoung Lee, Harry Swinney, et al. I develop a new experiment model that agrees reasonably well with experimental results. I solve the model, applying the new method to the two-variable Gaspar- Showalter chemical kinetics in two space dimensions. Because of time and computer limitations, only preliminary pattern-formation results are achieved and reported.

  7. The Effects of Funding Changes upon the Rate of Knowledge Growth in Algebraic and Differential Topology, 1955-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Steven F.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses effects of funding variations upon the rate of knowledge growth in algebraic and differential topology. Results based on a marginal productivity model indicated that funding variations had little or no effect upon the rate of knowledge growth. Lists 150 of the field's most highly rated papers. (ML)

  8. [Series: Utilization of Differential Equations and Methods for Solving Them in Medical Physics (1)].

    PubMed

    Murase, Kenya

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of differential equations and methods for solving them in medical physics are presented. First, the basic concept and the kinds of differential equations were overviewed. Second, separable differential equations and well-known first-order and second-order differential equations were introduced, and the methods for solving them were described together with several examples. In the next issue, the symbolic and series expansion methods for solving differential equations will be mainly introduced. PMID:26502494

  9. A differential equation for the Generalized Born radii.

    PubMed

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Esposito, Gennaro

    2013-06-28

    The Generalized Born (GB) model offers a convenient way of representing electrostatics in complex macromolecules like proteins or nucleic acids. The computation of atomic GB radii is currently performed by different non-local approaches involving volume or surface integrals. Here we obtain a non-linear second-order partial differential equation for the Generalized Born radius, which may be solved using local iterative algorithms. The equation is derived under the assumption that the usual GB approximation to the reaction field obeys Laplace's equation. The equation admits as particular solutions the correct GB radii for the sphere and the plane. The tests performed on a set of 55 different proteins show an overall agreement with other reference GB models and "perfect" Poisson-Boltzmann based values. PMID:23676843

  10. Solution of Some Types of Differential Equations: Operational Calculus and Inverse Differential Operators

    PubMed Central

    Zhukovsky, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a general method of operational nature to analyze and obtain solutions for a variety of equations of mathematical physics and related mathematical problems. We construct inverse differential operators and produce operational identities, involving inverse derivatives and families of generalised orthogonal polynomials, such as Hermite and Laguerre polynomial families. We develop the methodology of inverse and exponential operators, employing them for the study of partial differential equations. Advantages of the operational technique, combined with the use of integral transforms, generating functions with exponentials and their integrals, for solving a wide class of partial derivative equations, related to heat, wave, and transport problems, are demonstrated. PMID:24892051

  11. Solution of some types of differential equations: operational calculus and inverse differential operators.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, K

    2014-01-01

    We present a general method of operational nature to analyze and obtain solutions for a variety of equations of mathematical physics and related mathematical problems. We construct inverse differential operators and produce operational identities, involving inverse derivatives and families of generalised orthogonal polynomials, such as Hermite and Laguerre polynomial families. We develop the methodology of inverse and exponential operators, employing them for the study of partial differential equations. Advantages of the operational technique, combined with the use of integral transforms, generating functions with exponentials and their integrals, for solving a wide class of partial derivative equations, related to heat, wave, and transport problems, are demonstrated. PMID:24892051

  12. Invariant partial differential equations with two-dimensional exotic centrally extended conformal Galilei symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, N.; Kuznetsova, Z.; Toppan, F.

    2016-04-01

    Conformal Galilei algebras (CGAs) labeled by d, ℓ (where d is the number of space dimensions and ℓ denotes a spin-ℓ representation w.r.t. the 𝔰𝔩(2) subalgebra) admit two types of central extensions, the ordinary one (for any d and half-integer ℓ) and the exotic central extension which only exists for d = 2 and ℓ ∈ ℕ. For both types of central extensions, invariant second-order partial differential equations (PDEs) with continuous spectrum were constructed by Aizawa et al. [J. Phys. A 46, 405204 (2013)]. It was later proved by Aizawa et al. [J. Math. Phys. 3, 031701 (2015)] that the ordinary central extensions also lead to oscillator-like PDEs with discrete spectrum. We close in this paper the existing gap, constructing a new class of second-order invariant PDEs for the exotic centrally extended CGAs; they admit a discrete and bounded spectrum when applied to a lowest weight representation. These PDEs are markedly different with respect to their ordinary counterparts. The ℓ = 1 case (which is the prototype of this class of extensions, just like the ℓ = /1 2 Schrödinger algebra is the prototype of the ordinary centrally extended CGAs) is analyzed in detail.

  13. The reservoir model: a differential equation model of psychological regulation.

    PubMed

    Deboeck, Pascal R; Bergeman, C S

    2013-06-01

    Differential equation models can be used to describe the relationships between the current state of a system of constructs (e.g., stress) and how those constructs are changing (e.g., based on variable-like experiences). The following article describes a differential equation model based on the concept of a reservoir. With a physical reservoir, such as one for water, the level of the liquid in the reservoir at any time depends on the contributions to the reservoir (inputs) and the amount of liquid removed from the reservoir (outputs). This reservoir model might be useful for constructs such as stress, where events might "add up" over time (e.g., life stressors, inputs), but individuals simultaneously take action to "blow off steam" (e.g., engage coping resources, outputs). The reservoir model can provide descriptive statistics of the inputs that contribute to the "height" (level) of a construct and a parameter that describes a person's ability to dissipate the construct. After discussing the model, we describe a method of fitting the model as a structural equation model using latent differential equation modeling and latent distribution modeling. A simulation study is presented to examine recovery of the input distribution and output parameter. The model is then applied to the daily self-reports of negative affect and stress from a sample of older adults from the Notre Dame Longitudinal Study on Aging. PMID:23527605

  14. Constructing general partial differential equations using polynomial and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zjavka, Ladislav; Pedrycz, Witold

    2016-01-01

    Sum fraction terms can approximate multi-variable functions on the basis of discrete observations, replacing a partial differential equation definition with polynomial elementary data relation descriptions. Artificial neural networks commonly transform the weighted sum of inputs to describe overall similarity relationships of trained and new testing input patterns. Differential polynomial neural networks form a new class of neural networks, which construct and solve an unknown general partial differential equation of a function of interest with selected substitution relative terms using non-linear multi-variable composite polynomials. The layers of the network generate simple and composite relative substitution terms whose convergent series combinations can describe partial dependent derivative changes of the input variables. This regression is based on trained generalized partial derivative data relations, decomposed into a multi-layer polynomial network structure. The sigmoidal function, commonly used as a nonlinear activation of artificial neurons, may transform some polynomial items together with the parameters with the aim to improve the polynomial derivative term series ability to approximate complicated periodic functions, as simple low order polynomials are not able to fully make up for the complete cycles. The similarity analysis facilitates substitutions for differential equations or can form dimensional units from data samples to describe real-world problems. PMID:26547244

  15. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology: (II). Calculus and differential equations.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-04-01

    This is the second in a series of four articles developed for the readers of Coronary Artery Disease. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas. This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to

  16. Algebraic method for finding equivalence groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihlo, Alexander; Dos Santos Cardoso-Bihlo, Elsa; Popovych, Roman O.

    2015-06-01

    The algebraic method for computing the complete point symmetry group of a system of differential equations is extended to finding the complete equivalence group of a class of such systems. The extended method uses the knowledge of the corresponding equivalence algebra. Two versions of the method are presented, where the first involves the automorphism group of this algebra and the second is based on a list of its megaideals. We illustrate the megaideal-based version of the method with the computation of the complete equivalence group of a class of nonlinear wave equations with applications in nonlinear elasticity.

  17. Scrutiny of non-linear differential equations Euler-Bernoulli beam with large rotational deviation by AGM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, M. R.; Nimafar, M.; Ganji, D. D.; Akbarzade, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The kinematic assumptions upon which the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is founded allow it to be extended to more advanced analysis. Simple superposition allows for three-dimensional transverse loading. Using alternative constitutive equations can allow for viscoelastic or plastic beam deformation. Euler-Bernoulli beam theory can also be extended to the analysis of curved beams, beam buckling, composite beams and geometrically nonlinear beam deflection. In this study, solving the nonlinear differential equation governing the calculation of the large rotation deviation of the beam (or column) has been discussed. Previously to calculate the rotational deviation of the beam, the assumption is made that the angular deviation of the beam is small. By considering the small slope in the linearization of the governing differential equation, the solving is easy. The result of this simplification in some cases will lead to an excessive error. In this paper nonlinear differential equations governing on this system are solved analytically by Akbari-Ganji's method (AGM). Moreover, in AGM by solving a set of algebraic equations, complicated nonlinear equations can easily be solved and without any mathematical operations such as integration solving. The solution of the problem can be obtained very simply and easily. Furthermore, to enhance the accuracy of the results, the Taylor expansion is not needed in most cases via AGM manner. Also, comparisons are made between AGM and numerical method (Runge-Kutta 4th). The results reveal that this method is very effective and simple, and can be applied for other nonlinear problems.

  18. [Feature extraction for breast cancer data based on geometric algebra theory and feature selection using differential evolution].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hong, Wenxue

    2014-12-01

    The feature extraction and feature selection are the important issues in pattern recognition. Based on the geometric algebra representation of vector, a new feature extraction method using blade coefficient of geometric algebra was proposed in this study. At the same time, an improved differential evolution (DE) feature selection method was proposed to solve the elevated high dimension issue. The simple linear discriminant analysis was used as the classifier. The result of the 10-fold cross-validation (10 CV) classification of public breast cancer biomedical dataset was more than 96% and proved superior to that of the original features and traditional feature extraction method. PMID:25868233

  19. Solution of partial differential equations on vector and parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, J. M.; Voigt, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    The present status of numerical methods for partial differential equations on vector and parallel computers was reviewed. The relevant aspects of these computers are discussed and a brief review of their development is included, with particular attention paid to those characteristics that influence algorithm selection. Both direct and iterative methods are given for elliptic equations as well as explicit and implicit methods for initial boundary value problems. The intent is to point out attractive methods as well as areas where this class of computer architecture cannot be fully utilized because of either hardware restrictions or the lack of adequate algorithms. Application areas utilizing these computers are briefly discussed.

  20. Computer transformation of partial differential equations into any coordinate system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The use of tensors to provide a compact way of writing partial differential equations in a form valid in all coordinate systems is discussed. In order to find solutions to the equations with their boundary conditions they must be expressed in terms of the coordinate system under consideration. The process of arriving at these expressions from the tensor formulation was automated by a software system, TENSR. An allied system that analyzes the resulting expressions term by term and drops those that are negligible is also described.

  1. Constructive Development of the Solutions of Linear Equations in Introductory Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallet, D. G.; McCue, S. W.

    2009-01-01

    The solution of linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is commonly taught in first-year undergraduate mathematics classrooms, but the understanding of the concept of a solution is not always grasped by students until much later. Recognizing what it is to be a solution of a linear ODE and how to postulate such solutions, without resorting to…

  2. PREFACE: Seventh International Workshop: Group Analysis of Differential Equations and Integrable Systems (GADEISVII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaneeva, Olena; Sophocleous, Christodoulos; Popovych, Roman; Boyko, Vyacheslav; Damianou, Pantelis

    2015-06-01

    The Seventh International Workshop "Group Analysis of Differential Equations and Integrable Systems" (GADEIS-VII) took place at Flamingo Beach Hotel, Larnaca, Cyprus during the period June 15-19, 2014. Fifty nine scientists from nineteen countries participated in the Workshop, and forty one lectures were presented. The Workshop topics ranged from theoretical developments of group analysis of differential equations, hypersymplectic structures, theory of Lie algebras, integrability and superintegrability to their applications in various fields. The Series of Workshops is a joint initiative by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Cyprus, and the Department of Applied Research of the Institute of Mathematics, National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine. The Workshops evolved from close collaboration among Cypriot and Ukrainian scientists. The first three meetings were held at the Athalassa campus of the University of Cyprus (October 27, 2005, September 25-28, 2006, and October 4-5, 2007). The fourth (October 26-30, 2008), the fifth (June 6-10, 2010) and the sixth (June 17-21, 2012) meetings were held at the coastal resort of Protaras. We would like to thank all the authors who have published papers in the Proceedings. All of the papers have been reviewed by at least two independent referees. We express our appreciation of the care taken by the referees. Their constructive suggestions have improved most of the papers. The importance of peer review in the maintenance of high standards of scientific research can never be overstated. Olena Vaneeva, Christodoulos Sophocleous, Roman Popovych, Vyacheslav Boyko, Pantelis Damianou

  3. Middle School Students' Reading Comprehension of Mathematical Texts and Algebraic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duru, Adem; Koklu, Onder

    2011-01-01

    In this study, middle school students' abilities to translate mathematical texts into algebraic representations and vice versa were investigated. In addition, students' difficulties in making such translations and the potential sources for these difficulties were also explored. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to collect data…

  4. Analytic solution of differential equation for gyroscope's motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurekhodjaev, Abibulla N.; Mamatova, Gulnar U.

    2016-08-01

    Problems of motion of a rigid body with a fixed point are one of the urgent problems in classical mechanics. A feature of this problem is that, despite the important results achieved by outstanding mathematicians in the last two centuries, there is still no complete solution. This paper obtains an analytical solution of the problem of motion of an axisymmetric rigid body with variable inertia moments in resistant environment described by the system of nonlinear differential equations of L. Euler, involving the partial discretization method for nonlinear differential equations, which was built by A. N. Tyurekhodjaev based on the theory of generalized functions. To such problems belong gyroscopic instruments, in particular, and especially gyroscopes.

  5. Numerical modelling in biosciences using delay differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, Gennadii A.; Rihan, Fathalla A.

    2000-12-01

    Our principal purposes here are (i) to consider, from the perspective of applied mathematics, models of phenomena in the biosciences that are based on delay differential equations and for which numerical approaches are a major tool in understanding their dynamics, (ii) to review the application of numerical techniques to investigate these models. We show that there are prima facie reasons for using such models: (i) they have a richer mathematical framework (compared with ordinary differential equations) for the analysis of biosystem dynamics, (ii) they display better consistency with the nature of certain biological processes and predictive results. We analyze both the qualitative and quantitative role that delays play in basic time-lag models proposed in population dynamics, epidemiology, physiology, immunology, neural networks and cell kinetics. We then indicate suitable computational techniques for the numerical treatment of mathematical problems emerging in the biosciences, comparing them with those implemented by the bio-modellers.

  6. Multigrid methods for differential equations with highly oscillatory coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engquist, Bjorn; Luo, Erding

    1993-01-01

    New coarse grid multigrid operators for problems with highly oscillatory coefficients are developed. These types of operators are necessary when the characters of the differential equations on coarser grids or longer wavelengths are different from that on the fine grid. Elliptic problems for composite materials and different classes of hyperbolic problems are practical examples. The new coarse grid operators can be constructed directly based on the homogenized differential operators or hierarchically computed from the finest grid. Convergence analysis based on the homogenization theory is given for elliptic problems with periodic coefficients and some hyperbolic problems. These are classes of equations for which there exists a fairly complete theory for the interaction between shorter and longer wavelengths in the problems. Numerical examples are presented.

  7. Some recent advances in the numerical solution of differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrosio, Raffaele

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the talk is the presentation of some recent advances in the numerical solution of differential equations, with special emphasis to reaction-diffusion problems, Hamiltonian problems and ordinary differential equations with discontinuous right-hand side. As a special case, in this short paper we focus on the solution of reaction-diffusion problems by means of special purpose numerical methods particularly adapted to the problem: indeed, following a problem oriented approach, we propose a modified method of lines based on the employ of finite differences shaped on the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Constructive issues and a brief analysis are presented, together with some numerical experiments showing the effectiveness of the approach and a comparison with existing solvers.

  8. Stochastic Computational Approach for Complex Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junaid, Ali Khan; Muhammad, Asif Zahoor Raja; Ijaz Mansoor, Qureshi

    2011-02-01

    We present an evolutionary computational approach for the solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (NLODEs). The mathematical modeling is performed by a feed-forward artificial neural network that defines an unsupervised error. The training of these networks is achieved by a hybrid intelligent algorithm, a combination of global search with genetic algorithm and local search by pattern search technique. The applicability of this approach ranges from single order NLODEs, to systems of coupled differential equations. We illustrate the method by solving a variety of model problems and present comparisons with solutions obtained by exact methods and classical numerical methods. The solution is provided on a continuous finite time interval unlike the other numerical techniques with comparable accuracy. With the advent of neuroprocessors and digital signal processors the method becomes particularly interesting due to the expected essential gains in the execution speed.

  9. An ordinary differential equation based solution path algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yichao

    2011-01-01

    Efron, Hastie, Johnstone and Tibshirani (2004) proposed Least Angle Regression (LAR), a solution path algorithm for the least squares regression. They pointed out that a slight modification of the LAR gives the LASSO (Tibshirani, 1996) solution path. However it is largely unknown how to extend this solution path algorithm to models beyond the least squares regression. In this work, we propose an extension of the LAR for generalized linear models and the quasi-likelihood model by showing that the corresponding solution path is piecewise given by solutions of ordinary differential equation systems. Our contribution is twofold. First, we provide a theoretical understanding on how the corresponding solution path propagates. Second, we propose an ordinary differential equation based algorithm to obtain the whole solution path. PMID:21532936

  10. A convex penalty for switching control of partial differential equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clason, Christian; Rund, Armin; Kunisch, Karl; Barnard, Richard C.

    2016-01-19

    A convex penalty for promoting switching controls for partial differential equations is introduced; such controls consist of an arbitrary number of components of which at most one should be simultaneously active. Using a Moreau–Yosida approximation, a family of approximating problems is obtained that is amenable to solution by a semismooth Newton method. In conclusion, the efficiency of this approach and the structure of the obtained controls are demonstrated by numerical examples.

  11. Approximate solutions for non-linear iterative fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damag, Faten H.; Kiliçman, Adem; Ibrahim, Rabha W.

    2016-06-01

    This paper establishes approximate solution for non-linear iterative fractional differential equations: d/γv (s ) d sγ =ℵ (s ,v ,v (v )), where γ ∈ (0, 1], s ∈ I := [0, 1]. Our method is based on some convergence tools for analytic solution in a connected region. We show that the suggested solution is unique and convergent by some well known geometric functions.

  12. A differential delay equation arising from the sieve of Eratosthenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheer, A. Y.; Goldston, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the differential delay equation introduced by Buchstab (1937) in connection with an asymptotic formula for the uncanceled terms in the sieve of Eratosthenes. Maier (1985) used this result to show there is unexpected irreqularity in the distribution of primes in short intervals. The function omega(u) is studied in this paper using numerical and analytical techniques. The results are applied to give some numerical constants in Maier's theorem.

  13. Higher order matrix differential equations with singular coefficient matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Fragkoulis, V. C.; Kougioumtzoglou, I. A.; Pantelous, A. A.; Pirrotta, A.

    2015-03-10

    In this article, the class of higher order linear matrix differential equations with constant coefficient matrices and stochastic process terms is studied. The coefficient of the highest order is considered to be singular; thus, rendering the response determination of such systems in a straightforward manner a difficult task. In this regard, the notion of the generalized inverse of a singular matrix is used for determining response statistics. Further, an application relevant to engineering dynamics problems is included.

  14. The pentabox Master Integrals with the Simplified Differential Equations approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Costas G.; Tommasini, Damiano; Wever, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We present the calculation of massless two-loop Master Integrals relevant to five-point amplitudes with one off-shell external leg and derive the complete set of planar Master Integrals with five on-mass-shell legs, that contribute to many 2 → 3 amplitudes of interest at the LHC, as for instance three jet production, γ , V, H + 2 jets etc., based on the Simplified Differential Equations approach.

  15. Polynomial Solutions of Nth Order Non-Homogeneous Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Lawrence E.; Maleh, Ray

    2002-01-01

    It was shown by Costa and Levine that the homogeneous differential equation (1-x[superscript N])y([superscript N]) + A[subscript N-1]x[superscript N-1)y([superscript N-1]) + A[subscript N-2]x[superscript N-2])y([superscript N-2]) + ... + A[subscript 1]xy[prime] + A[subscript 0]y = 0 has a finite polynomial solution if and only if [for…

  16. On approximating hereditary dynamics by systems of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, E. M.; Burns, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with methods of obtaining approximate solutions to linear retarded functional differential equations (hereditary systems). The basic notion is to project the infinite dimensional space of initial functions for the hereditary system onto a finite dimensional subspace. Within this framework, two particular schemes are discussed. The first uses well-known piecewise constant approximations, while the second is a new method based on piecewise linear approximating functions. Numerical results are given.

  17. A stability analysis for a semilinear parabolic partial differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafee, N.

    1973-01-01

    The parabolic partial differential equation considered is u sub t = u sub xx + f(u), where minus infinity x plus infinity and o t plus infinity. Under suitable hypotheses pertaining to f, a class of initial data is exhibited: phi(x), minus infinity x plus infinity, for which the corresponding solutions u(x,t) appraoch zero as t approaches the limit of plus infinity. This convergence is uniform with respect to x on any compact subinterval of the real axis.

  18. ISDEP: Integrator of stochastic differential equations for plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, J. L.; Bustos, A.; Castejón, F.; Fernández, L. A.; Martin-Mayor, V.; Tarancón, A.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we present a general description of the ISDEP code (Integrator of Stochastic Differential Equations for Plasmas) and a brief overview of its physical results and applications so far. ISDEP is a Monte Carlo code that calculates the distribution function of a minority population of ions in a magnetized plasma. It solves the ion equations of motion taking into account the complex 3D structure of fusion devices, the confining electromagnetic field and collisions with other plasma species. The Monte Carlo method used is based on the equivalence between the Fokker-Planck and Langevin equations. This allows ISDEP to run in distributed computing platforms without communication between nodes with almost linear scaling. This paper intends to be a general description and a reference paper in ISDEP.

  19. Three semi-direct sum Lie algebras and three discrete integrable couplings associated with the modified KdV lattice equation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhang; Zhang, Yufeng

    2009-01-30

    Three semi-direct sum Lie algebras are constructed, which is an efficient and new way to obtain discrete integrable couplings. As its applications, three discrete integrable couplings associated with the modified KdV lattice equation are worked out. The approach can be used to produce other discrete integrable couplings of the discrete hierarchies of solition equations. PMID:20119478

  20. Modelling biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we gave a new framework for modelling and simulating biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection not in a heuristic way but in a mathematical way. The model is computationally efficient compared with the discrete-state Markov chain approach, and it ensures that both analytic and numerical solutions remain in a biologically plausible region. Specifically, our model mathematically ensures that species numbers lie in the domain D, which is a physical constraint for biochemical reactions, in contrast to the previous models. The domain D is actually obtained according to the structure of the corresponding chemical Langevin equations, i.e., the boundary is inherent in the biochemical reaction system. A variant of projection method was employed to solve the reflected stochastic differential equation model, and it includes three simple steps, i.e., Euler-Maruyama method was applied to the equations first, and then check whether or not the point lies within the domain D, and if not perform an orthogonal projection. It is found that the projection onto the closure D¯ is the solution to a convex quadratic programming problem. Thus, existing methods for the convex quadratic programming problem can be employed for the orthogonal projection map. Numerical tests on several important problems in biological systems confirmed the efficiency and accuracy of this approach. PMID:26920245

  1. A Procedure to Construct Exact Solutions of Nonlinear Fractional Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    Güner, Özkan; Cevikel, Adem C.

    2014-01-01

    We use the fractional transformation to convert the nonlinear partial fractional differential equations with the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The Exp-function method is extended to solve fractional partial differential equations in the sense of the modified Riemann-Liouville derivative. We apply the Exp-function method to the time fractional Sharma-Tasso-Olver equation, the space fractional Burgers equation, and the time fractional fmKdV equation. As a result, we obtain some new exact solutions. PMID:24737972

  2. Shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra and shifted Hurwitz numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Quan

    2016-05-01

    We construct the shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra, which is isomorphic to the central subalgebra A ∞ of infinite symmetric group algebra and to the shifted Schur symmetrical function algebra Λ* defined by Okounkov and Olshanskii. As an application, we get some differential equations for the generating functions of the shifted Hurwitz numbers; thus, we can express the generating functions in terms of the shifted genus expanded cut-and-join operators.

  3. Quasifinite highest weight modules over the Lie algebra of differential operators on the circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kac, Victor; Radul, Andrey

    1993-11-01

    We classify positive energy representations with finite degeneracies of the Lie algebra W 1+∞ and construct them in terms of representation theory of the Lie algebrahat gl(infty ,R_m ) of infinites matrices with finite number of non-zero diagonals over the algebra R m =ℂ[ t]/( t m+1). The unitary ones are classified as well. Similar results are obtained for the sin-algebras.

  4. A Wave Equation including Leptons and Quarks for the Standard Model of Quantum Physics in Clifford Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daviau, Claude; Bertrand, Jacques

    A wave equation with mass term is studied for all particles and antiparticles of the first generation: electron and its neutrino, positron and antineutrino, quarks $u$ and $d$ with three states of color and antiquarks $\\overline{u}$ and $\\overline{d}$. This wave equation is form invariant under the $Cl_3^*$ group generalizing the relativistic invariance. It is gauge invariant under the $U(1)\\times SU(2) \\times SU(3)$ group of the standard model of quantum physics. The wave is a function of space and time with value in the Clifford algebra $Cl_{1,5}$. All features of the standard model, charge conjugation, color, left waves, Lagrangian formalism, are linked to the geometry of this extended space-time.

  5. The condition of regular degeneration for singularly perturbed systems of linear differential-difference equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, K. L.; Meyer, K. R.

    1966-01-01

    Extension of problem of singular perturbation for linear scalar constant coefficient differential- difference equation with single retardation to several retardations, noting degenerate equation solution

  6. Computations of Wall Distances Based on Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Paul G.; Rumsey, Chris L.; Spalart, Philippe R.; Bartels, Robert E.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2004-01-01

    The use of differential equations such as Eikonal, Hamilton-Jacobi and Poisson for the economical calculation of the nearest wall distance d, which is needed by some turbulence models, is explored. Modifications that could palliate some turbulence-modeling anomalies are also discussed. Economy is of especial value for deforming/adaptive grid problems. For these, ideally, d is repeatedly computed. It is shown that the Eikonal and Hamilton-Jacobi equations can be easy to implement when written in implicit (or iterated) advection and advection-diffusion equation analogous forms, respectively. These, like the Poisson Laplacian term, are commonly occurring in CFD solvers, allowing the re-use of efficient algorithms and code components. The use of the NASA CFL3D CFD program to solve the implicit Eikonal and Hamilton-Jacobi equations is explored. The re-formulated d equations are easy to implement, and are found to have robust convergence. For accurate Eikonal solutions, upwind metric differences are required. The Poisson approach is also found effective, and easiest to implement. Modified distances are not found to affect global outputs such as lift and drag significantly, at least in common situations such as airfoil flows.

  7. Maxwell Equations and the Redundant Gauge Degree of Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Chun Wa

    2009-01-01

    On transformation to the Fourier space (k,[omega]), the partial differential Maxwell equations simplify to algebraic equations, and the Helmholtz theorem of vector calculus reduces to vector algebraic projections. Maxwell equations and their solutions can then be separated readily into longitudinal and transverse components relative to the…

  8. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response. The key to this new method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in msot cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacement are used to approximate bending stresses.

  9. Minimal parameter solution of the orthogonal matrix differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baritzhack, Itzhack Y.; Markley, F. Landis

    1988-01-01

    As demonstrated in this work, all orthogonal matrices solve a first order differential equation. The straightforward solution of this equation requires n sup 2 integrations to obtain the element of the nth order matrix. There are, however, only n(n-1)/2 independent parameters which determine an orthogonal matrix. The questions of choosing them, finding their differential equation and expressing the orthogonal matrix in terms of these parameters are considered. Several possibilities which are based on attitude determination in three dimensions are examined. It is shown that not all 3-D methods have useful extensions to higher dimensions. It is also shown why the rate of change of the matrix elements, which are the elements of the angular rate vector in 3-D, are the elements of a tensor of the second rank (dyadic) in spaces other than three dimensional. It is proven that the 3-D Gibbs vector (or Cayley Parameters) are extendable to other dimensions. An algorithm is developed employing the resulting parameters, which are termed Extended Rodrigues Parameters, and numerical results are presented of the application of the algorithm to a fourth order matrix.

  10. Minimal parameter solution of the orthogonal matrix differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Markley, F. Landis

    1990-01-01

    As demonstrated in this work, all orthogonal matrices solve a first order differential equation. The straightforward solution of this equation requires n sup 2 integrations to obtain the element of the nth order matrix. There are, however, only n(n-1)/2 independent parameters which determine an orthogonal matrix. The questions of choosing them, finding their differential equation and expressing the orthogonal matrix in terms of these parameters are considered. Several possibilities which are based on attitude determination in three dimensions are examined. It is shown that not all 3-D methods have useful extensions to higher dimensions. It is also shown why the rate of change of the matrix elements, which are the elements of the angular rate vector in 3-D, are the elements of a tensor of the second rank (dyadic) in spaces other than three dimensional. It is proven that the 3-D Gibbs vector (or Cayley Parameters) are extendable to other dimensions. An algorithm is developed emplying the resulting parameters, which are termed Extended Rodrigues Parameters, and numerical results are presented of the application of the algorithm to a fourth order matrix.

  11. Using Example Problems to Improve Student Learning in Algebra: Differentiating between Correct and Incorrect Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Julie L.; Lange, Karin E.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.; Newton, Kristie J.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of two in vivo experiments, we examine whether correct and incorrect examples with prompts for self-explanation can be effective for improving students' conceptual understanding and procedural skill in Algebra when combined with guided practice. In Experiment 1, students working with the Algebra I Cognitive Tutor were randomly assigned…

  12. Using Example Problems to Improve Student Learning in Algebra: Differentiating between Correct and Incorrect Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Julie L.; Lange, Karin E.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.; Newton, Kristie J.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of two "in vivo" experiments, we examine whether correct and incorrect examples with prompts for self-explanation can be effective for improving students' conceptual understanding and procedural skill in Algebra when combined with guided practice. In Experiment 1, students working with the Algebra I Cognitive Tutor were randomly…

  13. Filtering Algebraic Multigrid and Adaptive Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, A; Falgout, R D; Wittum, G

    2006-01-31

    Solving linear systems arising from systems of partial differential equations, multigrid and multilevel methods have proven optimal complexity and efficiency properties. Due to shortcomings of geometric approaches, algebraic multigrid methods have been developed. One example is the filtering algebraic multigrid method introduced by C. Wagner. This paper proposes a variant of Wagner's method with substantially improved robustness properties. The method is used in an adaptive, self-correcting framework and tested numerically.

  14. Paraconformal structures, ordinary differential equations and totally geodesic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryński, Wojciech

    2016-05-01

    We construct point invariants of ordinary differential equations of arbitrary order that generalise the Tresse and Cartan invariants of equations of order two and three, respectively. The vanishing of the invariants is equivalent to the existence of a totally geodesic paraconformal structure which consists of a paraconformal structure, an adapted GL(2 , R) -connection and a two-parameter family of totally geodesic hypersurfaces on the solution space. The structures coincide with the projective structures in dimension 2 and with the Einstein-Weyl structures of Lorentzian signature in dimension 3. We show that the totally geodesic paraconformal structures in higher dimensions can be described by a natural analogue of the Hitchin twistor construction. We present a general example of Veronese webs that generalise the hyper-CR Einstein-Weyl structures in dimension 3. The Veronese webs are described by a hierarchy of integrable systems.

  15. Modeling tree crown dynamics with 3D partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Robert; Letort, Véronique; Cournède, Paul-Henry

    2014-01-01

    We characterize a tree's spatial foliage distribution by the local leaf area density. Considering this spatially continuous variable allows to describe the spatiotemporal evolution of the tree crown by means of 3D partial differential equations. These offer a framework to rigorously take locally and adaptively acting effects into account, notably the growth toward light. Biomass production through photosynthesis and the allocation to foliage and wood are readily included in this model framework. The system of equations stands out due to its inherent dynamic property of self-organization and spontaneous adaptation, generating complex behavior from even only a few parameters. The density-based approach yields spatially structured tree crowns without relying on detailed geometry. We present the methodological fundamentals of such a modeling approach and discuss further prospects and applications. PMID:25101095

  16. Dynamical properties of non-Markovian stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Machado, A.; San Miguel, M.

    1984-04-01

    We study nonstationary non-Markovian processes defined by Langevin-type stochastic differential equations with an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck driving force. We concentrate on the long time limit of the dynamical evolution. We derive an approximate equation for the correlation function of a nonlinear nonstationary non-Markovian process, and we discuss its consequences. Non-Markovicity can introduce a dependence on noise parameters in the dynamics of the correlation function in cases in which it becomes independent of these parameters in the Markovian limit. Several examples are discussed in which the relaxation time increases with respect to the Markovian limit. For a Brownian harmonic oscillator with fluctuating frequency, the non-Markovicity of the process decreases the domain of stability of the system, and it can change an infradamped evolution into an overdamped one.

  17. Bringing partial differential equations to life for students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Cano, María; Chacón-Vera, Eliseo; Esquembre, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Teaching partial differential equations (PDEs) carries inherent difficulties that an interactive visualization might help overcome in an active learning process. However, the generation of this kind of teaching material implies serious difficulties, mainly in terms of coding efforts. This work describes how to use an authoring tool, Easy Java Simulations, to build interactive simulations using FreeFem++ (Hecht F 2012 J. Numer. Math. 20 251) as a PDE solver engine. It makes possible to build simulations where students can change parameters, the geometry and the equations themselves getting an immediate feedback. But it is also possible for them to edit the simulations to set deeper changes. The process is ilustrated with some basic examples. These simulations show PDEs in a pedagogic manner and can be tuned by no experts in the field, teachers or students. Finally, we report a classroom experience and a survey from the third year students in the Degree of Mathematics at the University of Murcia.

  18. Two-derivative Runge-Kutta methods for differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Robert P. K.; Wang, Shixiao; Tsai, Angela Y. J.

    2012-09-01

    Two-derivative Runge-Kutta (TDRK) methods are a special case of multi-derivative Runge-Kutta methods first studied by Kastlunger and Wanner [1, 2]. These methods incorporate derivatives of order higher than the first in their formulation but we consider only the first and second derivatives. In this paper we first present our study of both explicit [3] and implicit TDRK methods on stiff ODE problems. We then extend the applications of these TDRK methods to various partial differential equations [4]. In particular, we show how a 2-stage implicit TDRK method of order 4 and stage order 4 can be adapted to solve diffusion equations more efficiently than the popular Crank-Nicolson method.

  19. A unique transformation from ordinary differential equations to reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Sylvain; Heiner, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Many models in Systems Biology are described as a system of Ordinary Differential Equations, which allows for transient, steady-state or bifurcation analysis when kinetic information is available. Complementary structure-related qualitative analysis techniques have become increasingly popular in recent years, like qualitative model checking or pathway analysis (elementary modes, invariants, flux balance analysis, graph-based analyses, chemical organization theory, etc.). They do not rely on kinetic information but require a well-defined structure as stochastic analysis techniques equally do. In this article, we look into the structure inference problem for a model described by a system of Ordinary Differential Equations and provide conditions for the uniqueness of its solution. We describe a method to extract a structured reaction network model, represented as a bipartite multigraph, for example, a continuous Petri net (CPN), from a system of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs). A CPN uniquely defines an ODE, and each ODE can be transformed into a CPN. However, it is not obvious under which conditions the transformation of an ODE into a CPN is unique, that is, when a given ODE defines exactly one CPN. We provide biochemically relevant sufficient conditions under which the derived structure is unique and counterexamples showing the necessity of each condition. Our method is implemented and available; we illustrate it on some signal transduction models from the BioModels database. A prototype implementation of the method is made available to modellers at http://contraintes.inria.fr/~soliman/ode2pn.html, and the data mentioned in the "Results" section at http://contraintes.inria.fr/~soliman/ode2pn_data/. Our results yield a new recommendation for the import/export feature of tools supporting the SBML exchange format. PMID:21203560

  20. A class of nonlinear differential equations with fractional integrable impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, JinRong; Zhang, Yuruo

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new class of impulsive differential equations, which is more suitable to characterize memory processes of the drugs in the bloodstream and the consequent absorption for the body. This fact offers many difficulties in applying the usual methods to analysis and novel techniques in Bielecki's normed Banach spaces and thus makes the study of existence and uniqueness theorems interesting. Meanwhile, new concepts of Bielecki-Ulam's type stability are introduced and generalized Ulam-Hyers-Rassias stability results on a compact interval are established. This is another novelty of this paper. Finally, an interesting example is given to illustrate our theory results.

  1. State-Constrained Optimal Control Problems of Impulsive Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Forcadel, Nicolas; Rao Zhiping Zidani, Hasnaa

    2013-08-01

    The present paper studies an optimal control problem governed by measure driven differential systems and in presence of state constraints. The first result shows that using the graph completion of the measure, the optimal solutions can be obtained by solving a reparametrized control problem of absolutely continuous trajectories but with time-dependent state-constraints. The second result shows that it is possible to characterize the epigraph of the reparametrized value function by a Hamilton-Jacobi equation without assuming any controllability assumption.

  2. Population Uncertainty in Model Ecosystem: Analysis by Stochastic Differential Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Satoru; Tainaka, Kei-ichi; Nagata, Hiroyasu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2008-09-01

    Perturbation experiments are carried out by the numerical simulations of a contact process and its mean-field version. Here, the mortality rate increases or decreases suddenly. It is known that fluctuation enhancement (FE) occurs after perturbation, where FE indicates population uncertainty. In the present paper, we develop a new theory of stochastic differential equation. The agreement between the theory and the mean-field simulation is almost perfect. This theory enables us to find a much stronger FE than that reported previously. We discuss the population uncertainty in the recovering process of endangered species.

  3. Partial differential equation models in the socio-economic sciences

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Martin; Caffarelli, Luis; Markowich, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models based on partial differential equations (PDEs) have become an integral part of quantitative analysis in most branches of science and engineering, recently expanding also towards biomedicine and socio-economic sciences. The application of PDEs in the latter is a promising field, but widely quite open and leading to a variety of novel mathematical challenges. In this introductory article of the Theme Issue, we will provide an overview of the field and its recent boosting topics. Moreover, we will put the contributions to the Theme Issue in an appropriate perspective. PMID:25288814

  4. Neural network error correction for solving coupled ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. O.; Darsey, J. A.; Sumpter, B. G.; Noid, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    A neural network is presented to learn errors generated by a numerical algorithm for solving coupled nonlinear differential equations. The method is based on using a neural network to correctly learn the error generated by, for example, Runge-Kutta on a model molecular dynamics (MD) problem. The neural network programs used in this study were developed by NASA. Comparisons are made for training the neural network using backpropagation and a new method which was found to converge with fewer iterations. The neural net programs, the MD model and the calculations are discussed.

  5. Investigation of ODE integrators using interactive graphics. [Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Two FORTRAN programs using an interactive graphic terminal to generate accuracy and stability plots for given multistep ordinary differential equation (ODE) integrators are described. The first treats the fixed stepsize linear case with complex variable solutions, and generates plots to show accuracy and error response to step driving function of a numerical solution, as well as the linear stability region. The second generates an analog to the stability region for classes of non-linear ODE's as well as accuracy plots. Both systems can compute method coefficients from a simple specification of the method. Example plots are given.

  6. A Solution to the Fundamental Linear Fractional Order Differential Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides a solution to the fundamental linear fractional order differential equation, namely, (sub c)d(sup q, sub t) + ax(t) = bu(t). The impulse response solution is shown to be a series, named the F-function, which generalizes the normal exponential function. The F-function provides the basis for a qth order "fractional pole". Complex plane behavior is elucidated and a simple example, the inductor terminated semi- infinite lossy line, is used to demonstrate the theory.

  7. A differential delay equation arising from the sieve of Eratosthenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, A. Y.; Goldston, D. A.

    1990-07-01

    The differential delay equation defined by ω (u) = 1/u for 1 ≤ u ≤ 2 and (uω (u))' = ω (u - 1) for u ≥ 2 was introduced by Buchstab in connection with an asymptotic formula for the number of uncanceled terms in the sieve of Eratosthenes. Maier has recently used this result to show there is unexpected irregularity in the distribution of primes in short intervals. The function ω (u) is studied in this paper using numerical and analytical techniques. The results are applied to give some numerical constants in Maier's theorem.

  8. Informed Conjecturing of Solutions for Differential Equations in a Modeling Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We examine two differential equations. (i) first-order exponential growth or decay; and (ii) second order, linear, constant coefficient differential equations, and show the advantage of learning differential equations in a modeling context for informed conjectures of their solution. We follow with a discussion of the complete analysis afforded by…

  9. On almost periodic solutions of logistic delay differential equations with almost periodic time dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Rong

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we study almost periodic logistic delay differential equations. The existence and module of almost periodic solutions are investigated. In particular, we extend some results of Seifert in [G. Seifert, Almost periodic solutions of certain differential equations with piecewise constant delays and almost periodic time dependence, J. Differential Equations 164 (2000) 451-458].

  10. Generalized Flip-Flop Input Equations Based on a Four-Valued Boolean Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Jerry H.; Tapia, Moiez A.

    1996-01-01

    A procedure is developed for obtaining generalized flip-flop input equations, and a concise method is presented for representing these equations. The procedure is based on solving a four-valued characteristic equation of the flip-flop, and can encompass flip-flops that are too complex to approach intuitively. The technique is presented using Karnaugh maps, but could easily be implemented in software.

  11. Variations in the Solution of Linear First-Order Differential Equations. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaman, Brian; Osler, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    A special project which can be given to students of ordinary differential equations is described in detail. Students create new differential equations by changing the dependent variable in the familiar linear first-order equation (dv/dx)+p(x)v=q(x) by means of a substitution v=f(y). The student then creates a table of the new equations and…

  12. Runge-Kutta Methods for Linear Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, David W.; Chisholm, Todd T.

    1997-01-01

    Three new Runge-Kutta methods are presented for numerical integration of systems of linear inhomogeneous ordinary differential equations (ODES) with constant coefficients. Such ODEs arise in the numerical solution of the partial differential equations governing linear wave phenomena. The restriction to linear ODEs with constant coefficients reduces the number of conditions which the coefficients of the Runge-Kutta method must satisfy. This freedom is used to develop methods which are more efficient than conventional Runge-Kutta methods. A fourth-order method is presented which uses only two memory locations per dependent variable, while the classical fourth-order Runge-Kutta method uses three. This method is an excellent choice for simulations of linear wave phenomena if memory is a primary concern. In addition, fifth- and sixth-order methods are presented which require five and six stages, respectively, one fewer than their conventional counterparts, and are therefore more efficient. These methods are an excellent option for use with high-order spatial discretizations.

  13. Partial differential equations and fractal analysis to plant leaf identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandoli Machado, Bruno; Casanova, Dalcimar; Nunes Gonçalves, Wesley; Martinez Bruno, Odemir

    2013-02-01

    Texture is an important visual attribute used to plant leaf identification. Although there are many methods of texture analysis, some of them specifically for interpreting leaf images is still a challenging task because of the huge pattern variation found in nature. In this paper, we investigate the leaf texture modeling based on the partial differential equations and fractal dimension theory. Here, we are first interested in decomposing the original texture image into two components f = u + v, such that u represents a cartoon component, while v represents the oscillatory component. We demonstrate how this procedure enhance the texture component on images. Our modeling uses the non-linear partial differential equation (PDE) of Perona-Malik. Based on the enhanced texture component, we estimated the fractal dimension by the Bouligand-Minkowski method due to its precision in quantifying structural properties of images. The feature vectors are then used as inputs to our classification system, based on linear discriminant analysis. We validate our approach on a benchmark with 8000 leaf samples. Experimental results indicate that the proposed approach improves average classification rates in comparison with traditional methods. The results suggest that the proposed approach can be a feasible step for plant leaf identification, as well as different real-world applications.

  14. A hybrid Pade-Galerkin technique for differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, James F.; Andersen, Carl M.

    1993-01-01

    A three-step hybrid analysis technique, which successively uses the regular perturbation expansion method, the Pade expansion method, and then a Galerkin approximation, is presented and applied to some model boundary value problems. In the first step of the method, the regular perturbation method is used to construct an approximation to the solution in the form of a finite power series in a small parameter epsilon associated with the problem. In the second step of the method, the series approximation obtained in step one is used to construct a Pade approximation in the form of a rational function in the parameter epsilon. In the third step, the various powers of epsilon which appear in the Pade approximation are replaced by new (unknown) parameters (delta(sub j)). These new parameters are determined by requiring that the residual formed by substituting the new approximation into the governing differential equation is orthogonal to each of the perturbation coordinate functions used in step one. The technique is applied to model problems involving ordinary or partial differential equations. In general, the technique appears to provide good approximations to the solution even when the perturbation and Pade approximations fail to do so. The method is discussed and topics for future investigations are indicated.

  15. Quantifying uncertainty, variability and likelihood for ordinary differential equation models

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In many applications, ordinary differential equation (ODE) models are subject to uncertainty or variability in initial conditions and parameters. Both, uncertainty and variability can be quantified in terms of a probability density function on the state and parameter space. Results The partial differential equation that describes the evolution of this probability density function has a form that is particularly amenable to application of the well-known method of characteristics. The value of the density at some point in time is directly accessible by the solution of the original ODE extended by a single extra dimension (for the value of the density). This leads to simple methods for studying uncertainty, variability and likelihood, with significant advantages over more traditional Monte Carlo and related approaches especially when studying regions with low probability. Conclusions While such approaches based on the method of characteristics are common practice in other disciplines, their advantages for the study of biological systems have so far remained unrecognized. Several examples illustrate performance and accuracy of the approach and its limitations. PMID:21029410

  16. Pseudospectral collocation methods for fourth order differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malek, Alaeddin; Phillips, Timothy N.

    1994-01-01

    Collocation schemes are presented for solving linear fourth order differential equations in one and two dimensions. The variational formulation of the model fourth order problem is discretized by approximating the integrals by a Gaussian quadrature rule generalized to include the values of the derivative of the integrand at the boundary points. Collocation schemes are derived which are equivalent to this discrete variational problem. An efficient preconditioner based on a low-order finite difference approximation to the same differential operator is presented. The corresponding multidomain problem is also considered and interface conditions are derived. Pseudospectral approximations which are C1 continuous at the interfaces are used in each subdomain to approximate the solution. The approximations are also shown to be C3 continuous at the interfaces asymptotically. A complete analysis of the collocation scheme for the multidomain problem is provided. The extension of the method to the biharmonic equation in two dimensions is discussed and results are presented for a problem defined in a nonrectangular domain.

  17. Algebraic Equations and Inequalities: Issues for Research and Teaching. Research Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzini, Luciana; Tsamir, Pessia

    2004-01-01

    The presentations address a variety of difficulties occurring in students' solutions of equations and inequalities, and suggest different reasons for these difficulties. When analyzing students' performances, [BB] and [TTT] mention students' tendencies to make irrelevant connections between equations and inequalities as a problematic phenomenon.…

  18. Differential Forms Basis Functions for Better Conditioned Integral Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B; White, D; Stowell, M; Rieben, R; Sharpe, R; Madsen, N; Rockway, J D; Champagne, N J; Jandhyala, V; Pingenot, J

    2005-01-13

    Differential forms offer a convenient way to classify physical quantities and set up computational problems. By observing the dimensionality and type of derivatives (divergence,curl,gradient) applied to a quantity, an appropriate differential form can be chosen for that quantity. To use these differential forms in a simulation, the forms must be discretized using basis functions. The 0-form through 2-form basis functions are formed for surfaces. Twisted 1-form and 2-form bases will be presented in this paper. Twisted 1-form (1-forms) basis functions ({Lambda}) are divergence-conforming edge basis functions with units m{sup -1}. They are appropriate for representing vector quantities with continuous normal components, and they belong to the same function space as the commonly used RWG bases [1]. They are used here to formulate the frequency-domain EFIE with Galerkin testing. The 2-form basis functions (f) are scalar basis functions with units m{sup -2} and with no enforced continuity between elements. At lowest order, the 2-form basis functions are similar to pulse basis functions. They are used here to formulate an electrostatic integral equation. It should be noted that the derivative of an n-form differential form basis function is an (n+1)-form, i.e. the derivative of a 1-form basis function is a 2-form. Because the basis functions are constructed such that they have spatial units, the spatial units are removed from the degrees of freedom, leading to a better-conditioned system matrix. In this conference paper, we look at the performance of these differential forms and bases by examining the conditioning of matrix systems for electrostatics and the EFIE. The meshes used were refined across the object to consider the behavior of these basis transforms for elements of different sizes.

  19. Lie group analysis method for two classes of fractional partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Jiang, Yao-Lin

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we deal with two classes of fractional partial differential equation: n order linear fractional partial differential equation and nonlinear fractional reaction diffusion convection equation, by using the Lie group analysis method. The infinitesimal generators general formula of n order linear fractional partial differential equation is obtained. For nonlinear fractional reaction diffusion convection equation, the properties of their infinitesimal generators are considered. The four special cases are exhaustively investigated respectively. At the same time some examples of the corresponding case are also given. So it is very convenient to solve the infinitesimal generator of some fractional partial differential equation.

  20. The Dirac equation in an external electromagnetic field: symmetry algebra and exact integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breev, A. I.; Shapovalov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Integration of the Dirac equation with an external electromagnetic field is explored in the framework of the method of separation of variables and of the method of noncommutative integration. We have found a new type of solutions that are not obtained by separation of variables for several external electromagnetic fields. We have considered an example of crossed electric and magnetic fields of a special type for which the Dirac equation admits a nonlocal symmetry operator.

  1. The Effects of Schema-Broadening Instruction on Second Graders' Word-Problem Performance and Their Ability to Represent Word Problems with Algebraic Equations: A Randomized Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Zumeta, Rebecca O.; Schumacher, Robin Finelli; Powell, Sarah R.; Seethaler, Pamela M.; Hamlett, Carol L.; Fuchs, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of schema-broadening instruction (SBI) on second graders' word-problem-solving skills and their ability to represent the structure of word problems using algebraic equations. Teachers (n = 18) were randomly assigned to conventional word-problem instruction or SBI word-problem instruction, which…

  2. New Solutions of Three Nonlinear Space- and Time-Fractional Partial Differential Equations in Mathematical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ruo-Xia; Wang, Wei; Chen, Ting-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Motivated by the widely used ansätz method and starting from the modified Riemann—Liouville derivative together with a fractional complex transformation that can be utilized to transform nonlinear fractional partial differential equations to nonlinear ordinary differential equations, new types of exact traveling wave solutions to three important nonlinear space- and time-fractional partial differential equations are obtained simultaneously in terms of solutions of a Riccati equation. The results are new and first reported in this paper.

  3. Quasi-Newton methods for parameter estimation in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Dennis W.

    1988-01-01

    A state-space approach to parameter estimation in linear functional differential equations is developed using the theory of linear evolution equations. A locally convergent quasi-Newton type algorithm is applied to distributed systems with particular emphasis on parameters that induce unbounded perturbations of the state. The algorithm is computationally implemented on several functional differential equations, including coefficient and delay estimation in linear delay-differential equations.

  4. Computationally efficient statistical differential equation modeling using homogenization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, Mevin B.; Garlick, Martha J.; Powell, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Statistical models using partial differential equations (PDEs) to describe dynamically evolving natural systems are appearing in the scientific literature with some regularity in recent years. Often such studies seek to characterize the dynamics of temporal or spatio-temporal phenomena such as invasive species, consumer-resource interactions, community evolution, and resource selection. Specifically, in the spatial setting, data are often available at varying spatial and temporal scales. Additionally, the necessary numerical integration of a PDE may be computationally infeasible over the spatial support of interest. We present an approach to impose computationally advantageous changes of support in statistical implementations of PDE models and demonstrate its utility through simulation using a form of PDE known as “ecological diffusion.” We also apply a statistical ecological diffusion model to a data set involving the spread of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) in Idaho, USA.

  5. A data storage model for novel partial differential equation descretizations.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Wendy S.K.; Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to define a standard interface for storing and retrieving novel, non-traditional partial differential equation (PDE) discretizations. Although it focuses specifically on finite elements where state is associated with edges and faces of volumetric elements rather than nodes and the elements themselves (as implemented in ALEGRA), the proposed interface should be general enough to accommodate most discretizations, including hp-adaptive finite elements and even mimetic techniques that define fields over arbitrary polyhedra. This report reviews the representation of edge and face elements as implemented by ALEGRA. It then specifies a convention for storing these elements in EXODUS files by extending the EXODUS API to include edge and face blocks in addition to element blocks. Finally, it presents several techniques for rendering edge and face elements using VTK and ParaView, including the use of VTK's generic dataset interface for interpolating values interior to edges and faces.

  6. Numerical solution of differential equations by artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Conventionally programmed digital computers can process numbers with great speed and precision, but do not easily recognize patterns or imprecise or contradictory data. Instead of being programmed in the conventional sense, artificial neural networks (ANN's) are capable of self-learning through exposure to repeated examples. However, the training of an ANN can be a time consuming and unpredictable process. A general method is being developed by the author to mate the adaptability of the ANN with the speed and precision of the digital computer. This method has been successful in building feedforward networks that can approximate functions and their partial derivatives from examples in a single iteration. The general method also allows the formation of feedforward networks that can approximate the solution to nonlinear ordinary and partial differential equations to desired accuracy without the need of examples. It is believed that continued research will produce artificial neural networks that can be used with confidence in practical scientific computing and engineering applications.

  7. A partial differential equation model of metastasized prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Avner; Jain, Harsh Vardhan

    2013-06-01

    Biochemically failing metastatic prostate cancer is typically treated with androgen ablation. However, due to the emergence of castration-resistant cells that can survive in low androgen concentrations, such therapy eventually fails. Here, we develop a partial differential equation model of the growth and response to treatment of prostate cancer that has metastasized to the bone. Existence and uniqueness results are derived for the resulting free boundary problem. In particular, existence and uniqueness of solutions for all time are proven for the radially symmetric case. Finally, numerical simulations of a tumor growing in 2-dimensions with radial symmetry are carried in order to evaluate the therapeutic potential of different treatment strategies. These simulations are able to reproduce a variety of clinically observed responses to treatment, and suggest treatment strategies that may result in tumor remission, underscoring our model's potential to make a significant contribution in the field of prostate cancer therapeutics. PMID:23906138

  8. A fingerprint inpainting technique using improved partial differential equation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiukun; Wang, Dan; Yang, Zhigang

    2011-10-01

    In an automatic fingerprint identification system (AFIS), fingerprint inpainting is a critical step in the preprocessing procedures. Because partially fouled, breaking or scratched latent fingerprint is difficult to be correctly matched to a known fingerprint. However, fingerprint restoration proved to be a particularly challenging problem because conventional image restoration schemes can not be directly applied to fingerprint due to the unique ridge and valley structures in typical fingerprint images. Based on partial differential equations algorithm, this paper presents a fingerprint restoration algorithm composing gradient and orientation field. According to gradient and orientation field of the known pixel points, different weights are used in different orientation field in the restoration process. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed restoration algorithm can effectively reduce the false feature points.

  9. Workload Characterization of CFD Applications Using Partial Differential Equation Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Workload characterization is used for modeling and evaluating of computing systems at different levels of detail. We present workload characterization for a class of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications that solve Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). This workload characterization focuses on three high performance computing platforms: SGI Origin2000, EBM SP-2, a cluster of Intel Pentium Pro bases PCs. We execute extensive measurement-based experiments on these platforms to gather statistics of system resource usage, which results in workload characterization. Our workload characterization approach yields a coarse-grain resource utilization behavior that is being applied for performance modeling and evaluation of distributed high performance metacomputing systems. In addition, this study enhances our understanding of interactions between PDE solver workloads and high performance computing platforms and is useful for tuning these applications.

  10. Profiles of Algebraic Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humberstone, J.; Reeve, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The algebraic competence of 72 12-year-old female students was examined to identify profiles of understanding reflecting different algebraic knowledge states. Beginning algebraic competence (mapping abilities: word-to-symbol and vice versa, classifying, and solving equations) was assessed. One week later, the nature of assistance required to map…

  11. Bayesian Estimation and Uncertainty Quantification in Differential Equation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, Prithwish

    In engineering, physics, biomedical sciences, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PKPD) and many other fields the regression function is often specified as solution of a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) given by. dƒtheta(t) / dt = F(t), ƒtheta(, t),theta), t ∈ [0, 1]; here F is a known appropriately smooth vector valued function. Our interest lies in estimating theta from the noisy data. A two-step approach to solve this problem consists of the first step fitting the data nonparametrically, and the second step estimating the parameter by minimizing the distance between the nonparametrically estimated derivative and the derivative suggested by the system of ODEs. In Chapter 2 we consider a Bayesian analog of the two step approach by putting a finite random series prior on the regression function using B-spline basis. We establish a Bernstein-von Mises theorem for the posterior distribution of the parameter of interest induced from that on the regression function with the n --1/2 contraction rate. Although this approach is computationally fast, the Bayes estimator is not asymptotically efficient. This can be remedied by directly considering the distance between the function in the nonparametric model and a Runge-Kutta (RK4) approximate solution of the ODE while inducing the posterior distribution on the parameter as done in Chapter 3. We also study the asymptotic properties of a direct Bayesian method obtained from the approximate likelihood obtained by the RK4 method in Chapter 3. Chapters 4 and 5 contain the extensions of the methods discussed so far for higher order ODE's and partial differential equations (PDE's) respectively. We have mentioned the scopes of some future works in Chapter 6.

  12. On substructuring algorithms and solution techniques for the numerical approximation of partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.; Nicolaides, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Substructuring methods are in common use in mechanics problems where typically the associated linear systems of algebraic equations are positive definite. Here these methods are extended to problems which lead to nonpositive definite, nonsymmetric matrices. The extension is based on an algorithm which carries out the block Gauss elimination procedure without the need for interchanges even when a pivot matrix is singular. Examples are provided wherein the method is used in connection with finite element solutions of the stationary Stokes equations and the Helmholtz equation, and dual methods for second-order elliptic equations.

  13. ODE/IM correspondence and modified affine Toda field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Katsushi; Locke, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    We study the two-dimensional affine Toda field equations for affine Lie algebra gˆ modified by a conformal transformation and the associated linear equations. In the conformal limit, the associated linear problem reduces to a (pseudo-)differential equation. For classical affine Lie algebra gˆ, we obtain a (pseudo-)differential equation corresponding to the Bethe equations for the Langlands dual of the Lie algebra g, which were found by Dorey et al. in study of the ODE/IM correspondence.

  14. Novel determination of differential-equation solutions: universal approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leephakpreeda, Thananchai

    2002-09-01

    In a conventional approach to numerical computation, finite difference and finite element methods are usually implemented to determine the solution of a set of differential equations (DEs). This paper presents a novel approach to solve DEs by applying the universal approximation method through an artificial intelligence utility in a simple way. In this proposed method, neural network model (NNM) and fuzzy linguistic model (FLM) are applied as universal approximators for any nonlinear continuous functions. With this outstanding capability, the solutions of DEs can be approximated by the appropriate NNM or FLM within an arbitrary accuracy. The adjustable parameters of such NNM and FLM are determined by implementing the optimization algorithm. This systematic search yields sub-optimal adjustable parameters of NNM and FLM with the satisfactory conditions and with the minimum residual errors of the governing equations subject to the constraints of boundary conditions of DEs. The simulation results are investigated for the viability of efficiently determining the solutions of the ordinary and partial nonlinear DEs.

  15. Periodic differential equations with self-adjoint monodromy operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovich, V. I.

    2001-04-01

    A linear differential equation \\dot u=A(t)u with p-periodic (generally speaking, unbounded) operator coefficient in a Euclidean or a Hilbert space \\mathbb H is considered. It is proved under natural constraints that the monodromy operator U_p is self-adjoint and strictly positive if A^*(-t)=A(t) for all t\\in\\mathbb R.It is shown that Hamiltonian systems in the class under consideration are usually unstable and, if they are stable, then the operator U_p reduces to the identity and all solutions are p-periodic.For higher frequencies averaged equations are derived. Remarkably, high-frequency modulation may double the number of critical values.General results are applied to rotational flows with cylindrical components of the velocity a_r=a_z=0, a_\\theta=\\lambda c(t)r^\\beta, \\beta<-1, c(t) is an even p-periodic function, and also to several problems of free gravitational convection of fluids in periodic fields.

  16. Algebra Word Problem Solving Approaches in a Chemistry Context: Equation Worked Examples versus Text Editing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing

    2013-01-01

    Text editing directs students' attention to the problem structure as they classify whether the texts of word problems contain sufficient, missing or irrelevant information for working out a solution. Equation worked examples emphasize the formation of a coherent problem structure to generate a solution. Its focus is on the construction of three…

  17. Computer subroutine ISUDS accurately solves large system of simultaneous linear algebraic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, G.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program, an Iterative Scheme Using a Direct Solution, obtains double precision accuracy using a single-precision coefficient matrix. ISUDS solves a system of equations written in matrix form as AX equals B, where A is a square non-singular coefficient matrix, X is a vector, and B is a vector.

  18. The bi-Hamiltonian structure of some nonlinear fifth- and seventh-order differential equations and recursion formulas for their symmetries and conserved covariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchssteiner, Benno; Oevel, Walter

    1982-03-01

    Using a bi-Hamiltonian formulation we give explicit formulas for the conserved quantities and infinitesimal generators of symmetries for some nonlinear fifth- and seventh-order nonlinear partial differential equations; among them, the Caudrey-Dodd-Gibbon-Sawada-Kotera equation and the Kupershmidt equation. We show that the Lie algebras of the symmetry groups of these equations are of a very special form: Among the C∞ vector fields they are generated from two given commuting vector fields by a recursive application of a single operator. Furthermore, for some higher order equations, those multisoliton solutions, which for ||t||→∞ asymptotically decompose into traveling wave solutions, are characterized as eigenvector decompositions of certain operators.

  19. Realizations of Galilei algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, Maryna; Pošta, Severin; Vaneeva, Olena

    2016-03-01

    All inequivalent realizations of the Galilei algebras of dimensions not greater than five are constructed using the algebraic approach proposed by Shirokov. The varieties of the deformed Galilei algebras are discussed and families of one-parametric deformations are presented in explicit form. It is also shown that a number of well-known and physically interesting equations and systems are invariant with respect to the considered Galilei algebras or their deformations.

  20. A Solution Space for a System of Null-State Partial Differential Equations: Part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Steven M.; Kleban, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article is the third of four that completely and rigorously characterize a solution space for a homogeneous system of 2 N + 3 linear partial differential equations (PDEs) in 2 N variables that arises in conformal field theory (CFT) and multiple Schramm-Löwner evolution (SLE κ ). The system comprises 2 N null-state equations and three conformal Ward identities that govern CFT correlation functions of 2 N one-leg boundary operators. In the first two articles (Flores and Kleban, in Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1212.2301, 2012; Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1404.0035, 2014), we use methods of analysis and linear algebra to prove that dim , with C N the Nth Catalan number. Extending these results, we prove in this article that dim and entirely consists of (real-valued) solutions constructed with the CFT Coulomb gas (contour integral) formalism. In order to prove this claim, we show that a certain set of C N such solutions is linearly independent. Because the formulas for these solutions are complicated, we prove linear independence indirectly. We use the linear injective map of Lemma 15 in Flores and Kleban (Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1212.2301, 2012) to send each solution of the mentioned set to a vector in , whose components we find as inner products of elements in a Temperley-Lieb algebra. We gather these vectors together as columns of a symmetric matrix, with the form of a meander matrix. If the determinant of this matrix does not vanish, then the set of C N Coulomb gas solutions is linearly independent. And if this determinant does vanish, then we construct an alternative set of C N Coulomb gas solutions and follow a similar procedure to show that this set is linearly independent. The latter situation is closely related to CFT minimal models. We emphasize that, although the system of PDEs arises in CFT in away that is typically non-rigorous, our treatment of this system here and in Flores and Kleban (Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1212.2301, 2012; Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1404

  1. Mathematical and numerical studies of nonstandard difference equation models of differential equations. Final technical report, September 1995--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mickens, R.E.

    1997-12-12

    The major thrust of this proposal was to continue our investigations of so-called non-standard finite-difference schemes as formulated by other authors. These schemes do not follow the standard rules used to model continuous differential equations by discrete difference equations. The two major aspects of this procedure consist of generalizing the definition of the discrete derivative and using a nonlocal model (on the computational grid or lattice) for nonlinear terms that may occur in the differential equations. Our aim was to investigate the construction of nonstandard finite-difference schemes for several classes of ordinary and partial differential equations. These equations are simple enough to be tractable, yet, have enough complexity to be both mathematically and scientifically interesting. It should be noted that all of these equations differential equations model some physical phenomena under an appropriate set of experimental conditions. The major goal of the project was to better understand the process of constructing finite-difference models for differential equations. In particular, it demonstrates the value of using nonstandard finite-difference procedures. A secondary goal was to construct and study a variety of analytical techniques that can be used to investigate the mathematical properties of the obtained difference equations. These mathematical procedures are of interest in their own right and should be a valuable contribution to the mathematics research literature in difference equations. All of the results obtained from the research done under this project have been published in the relevant research/technical journals or submitted for publication. Our expectation is that these results will lead to improved finite difference schemes for the numerical integration of both ordinary and partial differential equations. Section G of the Appendix gives a concise summary of the major results obtained under funding by the grant.

  2. The fast multipole method in the differential algebra framework for the calculation of 3D space charge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He

    2013-01-01

    The space charge effect is one of the most important collective effects in beam dynamic studies. In many cases, numerical simulations are inevitable in order to get a clear understanding of this effect. The particle-particle interaction algorithms and the article-in-cell algorithms are widely used in space charge effect simulations. But they both have difficulties in dealing with highly correlated beams with abnormal distributions or complicated geometries. We developed a new algorithm to calculate the three dimensional self-field between charged particles by combining the differential algebra (DA) techniques with the fast multi-pole method (FMM). The FMM hierarchically decomposes the whole charged domain into many small regions. For each region it uses multipole expansions to represent the potential/field contributions from the particles far away from the region and then converts the multipole expansions into a local expansion inside the region. The potential/field due to the far away particles is calculated from the expansions and the potential/field due to the nearby particles is calculated from the Coulomb force law. The DA techniques are used in the calculation, translation and converting of the expansions. The new algorithm scales linearly with the total number of particles and it is suitable for any arbitrary charge distribution. Using the DA techniques, we can calculate both the potential/field and its high order derivatives, which will be useful for the purpose of including the space charge effect into transfer maps in the future. We first present the single level FMM, which decomposes the whole domain into boxes of the same size. It works best for charge distributions that are not overly non-uniform. Then we present the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA), which decomposes the whole domain into different sized boxes according to the charge density. Finer boxes are generated where the higher charge density exists; thus the algorithm works for any

  3. Invariant algebraic surfaces for a virus dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valls, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we provide a complete classification of the invariant algebraic surfaces and of the rational first integrals for a well-known virus system. In the proofs, we use the weight-homogeneous polynomials and the method of characteristic curves for solving linear partial differential equations.

  4. Adaptive Algebraic Smoothers

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Chartier, Dr Timothy

    2012-01-01

    methods based on Local Sensitivity Analysis (LSA). The method can be used in the context of geometric and algebraic multigrid methods for constructing smoothers, and in the context of Krylov methods for constructing block preconditioners. It is suitable for both constant and variable coecient problems. Furthermore, the method can be applied to systems arising from both scalar and coupled system partial differential equations (PDEs), as well as linear systems that do not arise from PDEs. The simplicity of the method will allow it to be easily incorporated into existing multigrid and Krylov solvers while providing a powerful tool for adaptively constructing methods tuned to a problem.

  5. Symmetry preserving discretization of ordinary differential equations. Large symmetry groups and higher order equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campoamor-Stursberg, R.; Rodríguez, M. A.; Winternitz, P.

    2016-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and ordinary difference systems (OΔSs) invariant under the actions of the Lie groups {{SL}}x(2),{{SL}}y(2) and {{SL}}x(2)× {{SL}}y(2) of projective transformations of the independent variables x and dependent variables y are constructed. The ODEs are continuous limits of the OΔSs, or conversely, the OΔSs are invariant discretizations of the ODEs. The invariant OΔSs are used to calculate numerical solutions of the invariant ODEs of order up to five. The solutions of the invariant numerical schemes are compared to numerical solutions obtained by standard Runge-Kutta methods and to exact solutions, when available. The invariant method performs at least as well as standard ones and much better in the vicinity of singularities of solutions.

  6. A constrained regularization method for inverting data represented by linear algebraic or integral equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencher, Stephen W.

    1982-09-01

    CONTIN is a portable Fortran IV package for inverting noisy linear operator equations. These problems occur in the analysis of data from a wide variety experiments. They are generally ill-posed problems, which means that errors in an unregularized inversion are unbounded. Instead, CONTIN seeks the optimal solution by incorporating parsimony and any statistical prior knowledge into the regularizor and absolute prior knowledge into equallity and inequality constraints. This can be greatly increase the resolution and accuracyh of the solution. CONTIN is very flexible, consisting of a core of about 50 subprograms plus 13 small "USER" subprograms, which the user can easily modify to specify special-purpose constraints, regularizors, operator equations, simulations, statistical weighting, etc. Specjial collections of USER subprograms are available for photon correlation spectroscopy, multicomponent spectra, and Fourier-Bessel, Fourier and Laplace transforms. Numerically stable algorithms are used throughout CONTIN. A fairly precise definition of information content in terms of degrees of freedom is given. The regularization parameter can be automatically chosen on the basis of an F-test and confidence region. The interpretation of the latter and of error estimates based on the covariance matrix of the constrained regularized solution are discussed. The strategies, methods and options in CONTIN are outlined. The program itself is described in the following paper.

  7. A new approach to the group analysis of one-dimensional stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, M. A.; Meleshko, S. V.; Nasyrov, F. S.

    2014-03-01

    Stochastic evolution equations are investigated using a new approach to the group analysis of stochastic differential equations. It is shown that the proposed approach reduces the problem of group analysis for this type of equations to the same problem of group analysis for evolution equations of special form without stochastic integrals.

  8. Construction of finite difference schemes having special properties for ordinary and partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Work on the construction of finite difference models of differential equations having zero truncation errors is summarized. Both linear and nonlinear unidirectional wave equations are discussed. Results regarding the construction of zero truncation error schemes for the full wave equation and Burger's equation are also briefly reported.

  9. Laplace and Z Transform Solutions of Differential and Difference Equations With the HP-41C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Richard C.; Simons, Fred O., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A previously developed program for the HP-41C programmable calculator is extended to handle models of differential and difference equations with multiple eigenvalues. How to obtain difference equation solutions via the Z transform is described. (MNS)

  10. A Study of Impulsive Multiterm Fractional Differential Equations with Single and Multiple Base Points and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuji; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the existence and uniqueness of solutions for initial value problems of nonlinear singular multiterm impulsive Caputo type fractional differential equations on the half line. Our study includes the cases for a single base point fractional differential equation as well as multiple base points fractional differential equation. The asymptotic behavior of solutions for the problems is also investigated. We demonstrate the utility of our work by applying the main results to fractional-order logistic models. PMID:24578623

  11. Partial differential equation transform — Variational formulation and Fourier analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) models are established approaches for image/signal processing, data analysis and surface construction. Most previous geometric PDEs are utilized as low-pass filters which give rise to image trend information. In an earlier work, we introduced mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs), which behave like high-pass filters and are able to systematically provide intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of signals and images. Due to their tunable time-frequency localization and perfect reconstruction, the operation of MoDEEs is called a PDE transform. By appropriate selection of PDE transform parameters, we can tune IMFs into trends, edges, textures, noise etc., which can be further utilized in the secondary processing for various purposes. This work introduces the variational formulation, performs the Fourier analysis, and conducts biomedical and biological applications of the proposed PDE transform. The variational formulation offers an algorithm to incorporate two image functions and two sets of low-pass PDE operators in the total energy functional. Two low-pass PDE operators have different signs, leading to energy disparity, while a coupling term, acting as a relative fidelity of two image functions, is introduced to reduce the disparity of two energy components. We construct variational PDE transforms by using Euler-Lagrange equation and artificial time propagation. Fourier analysis of a simplified PDE transform is presented to shed light on the filter properties of high order PDE transforms. Such an analysis also offers insight on the parameter selection of the PDE transform. The proposed PDE transform algorithm is validated by numerous benchmark tests. In one selected challenging example, we illustrate the ability of PDE transform to separate two adjacent frequencies of sin(x) and sin(1.1x). Such an ability is due to PDE transform’s controllable frequency localization obtained by adjusting the order of PDEs. The

  12. Analytic Solutions and Resonant Solutions of Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenmaker, Timothy Roger

    This dissertation contains two main subject areas. The first deals with solutions to the wave equation Du/Dt + a Du/Dx = 0, where D/Dt and D/Dx represent partial derivatives and a(t,x) is real valued. The question I studied, which arises in control theory, is whether solutions which are real analytic with respect to the time variable are dense in the space of all solutions. If a is real analytic in t and x, the Cauchy-Kovalevsky Theorem implies that the solutions real analytic in t and x are dense, since it suffices to approximate the initial data by polynomials. The same positive result is valid when a is continuously differentiable and independent of t. This is proved by regularization in time. The hypothesis that a is independent of t cannot be replaced by the weaker assumption that a is real analytic in t, even when it is infinitely smooth. I construct a(t,x) for which the solutions which are analytic in time are automatically periodic in time. In particular these solutions are not dense in the space of all solutions. The second area concerns the resonant interaction of oscillatory waves propagating in a compressible inviscid fluid. An asymptotic description given by Andrew Majda, Rodolfo Rosales, and Maria Schonbek (MRS) involves the genuinely nonlinear quasilinear hyperbolic system Du/Dt + D(uu/2)/Dt + v = 0, Dv/Dt - D(vv/2)/Dt - u = 0. They performed many numerical simulations which indicated that small amplitude solutions of this system tend to evade shock formation, and conjectured that "smooth initial data with a sufficiently small amplitude never develop shocks throughout a long time interval of integration.". I proved that for smooth periodic U(x), V(x) and initial data u(0,x) = epsilonU(x), v(0,x) = epsilonV(x), the solution is smooth for time at least constant times | ln epsilon| /epsilon. This is longer than the lifetime order 1/ epsilon of the solution to the decoupled Burgers equations. The decoupled equation describes nonresonant interaction of

  13. A discrete model of a modified Burgers' partial differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.; Shoosmith, J. N.

    1990-01-01

    A new finite-difference scheme is constructed for a modified Burger's equation. Three special cases of the equation are considered, and the 'exact' difference schemes for the space- and time-independent forms of the equation are presented, along with the diffusion-free case of Burger's equation modeled by a difference equation. The desired difference scheme is then obtained by imposing on any difference model of the initial equation the requirement that, in the appropriate limits, its difference scheme must reduce the results of the obtained equations.

  14. Green function of the double-fractional Fokker-Planck equation: path integral and stochastic differential equations.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, H; Zatloukal, V

    2013-11-01

    The statistics of rare events, the so-called black-swan events, is governed by non-Gaussian distributions with heavy power-like tails. We calculate the Green functions of the associated Fokker-Planck equations and solve the related stochastic differential equations. We also discuss the subject in the framework of path integration. PMID:24329213

  15. Multiple scattering of proton via stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kia, M. R.; Noshad, Houshyar

    2015-08-01

    Multiple scattering of protons through a target is explained by a set of coupled stochastic differential equations. The motion of protons in matter is calculated by analytical random sampling from Moliere and Landau probability density functions (PDF). To satisfy the Vavilov theory, the moments for energy distribution of a 49.1 MeV proton beam in aluminum target are obtained. The skewness for the PDF of energy demonstrates that the energy distribution of protons in thin thickness becomes a Landau function, whereas, by increasing the thickness of the target it does not follow a Gaussian function completely. Afterwards, the depth-dose distributions are calculated for a 60 MeV proton beam traversing soft tissue and for a 160 MeV proton beam travelling through water. The results prove that when elastic scattering is taken into account, the Bragg-peak position is decreased, while the dose deposited in the Bragg region is increased. The results obtained in this article are benchmarked by comparison of our results with the experimental data reported in the literature.

  16. A hybrid perturbation-Galerkin technique for partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, James F.; Anderson, Carl M.

    1990-01-01

    A two-step hybrid perturbation-Galerkin technique for improving the usefulness of perturbation solutions to partial differential equations which contain a parameter is presented and discussed. In the first step of the method, the leading terms in the asymptotic expansion(s) of the solution about one or more values of the perturbation parameter are obtained using standard perturbation methods. In the second step, the perturbation functions obtained in the first step are used as trial functions in a Bubnov-Galerkin approximation. This semi-analytical, semi-numerical hybrid technique appears to overcome some of the drawbacks of the perturbation and Galerkin methods when they are applied by themselves, while combining some of the good features of each. The technique is illustrated first by a simple example. It is then applied to the problem of determining the flow of a slightly compressible fluid past a circular cylinder and to the problem of determining the shape of a free surface due to a sink above the surface. Solutions obtained by the hybrid method are compared with other approximate solutions, and its possible application to certain problems associated with domain decomposition is discussed.

  17. Final Report: Symposium on Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, M.; Johnson, C.R.; Smith, P.J.; Fogelson, A.

    1998-12-10

    OAK-B135 Final Report: Symposium on Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations. Complex physical phenomena often include features that span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Accurate simulation of such phenomena can be difficult to obtain, and computations that are under-resolved can even exhibit spurious features. While it is possible to resolve small scale features by increasing the number of grid points, global grid refinement can quickly lead to problems that are intractable, even on the largest available computing facilities. These constraints are particularly severe for three dimensional problems that involve complex physics. One way to achieve the needed resolution is to refine the computational mesh locally, in only those regions where enhanced resolution is required. Adaptive solution methods concentrate computational effort in regions where it is most needed. These methods have been successfully applied to a wide variety of problems in computational science and engineering. Adaptive methods can be difficult to implement, prompting the development of tools and environments to facilitate their use. To ensure that the results of their efforts are useful, algorithm and tool developers must maintain close communication with application specialists. Conversely it remains difficult for application specialists who are unfamiliar with the methods to evaluate the trade-offs between the benefits of enhanced local resolution and the effort needed to implement an adaptive solution method.

  18. A Differential Equation Model for the Dynamics of Youth Gambling

    PubMed Central

    Do, Tae Sug; Lee, Young S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We examine the dynamics of gambling among young people aged 16–24 years, how prevalence rates of at-risk gambling and problem gambling change as adolescents enter young adulthood, and prevention and control strategies. Methods A simple epidemiological model is created using ordinary nonlinear differential equations, and a threshold condition that spreads gambling is identified through stability analysis. We estimate all the model parameters using a longitudinal prevalence study by Winters, Stinchfield, and Botzet to run numerical simulations. Parameters to which the system is most sensitive are isolated using sensitivity analysis. Results Problem gambling is endemic among young people, with a steady prevalence of approximately 4–5%. The prevalence of problem gambling is lower in young adults aged 18–24 years than in adolescents aged 16–18 years. At-risk gambling among young adults has increased. The parameters to which the system is most sensitive correspond to primary prevention. Conclusion Prevention and control strategies for gambling should involve school education. A mathematical model that includes the effect of early exposure to gambling would be helpful if a longitudinal study can provide data in the future. PMID:25379374

  19. A stochastic differential equation model of diurnal cortisol patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. N.; Meehan, P. M.; Dempster, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Circadian modulation of episodic bursts is recognized as the normal physiological pattern of diurnal variation in plasma cortisol levels. The primary physiological factors underlying these diurnal patterns are the ultradian timing of secretory events, circadian modulation of the amplitude of secretory events, infusion of the hormone from the adrenal gland into the plasma, and clearance of the hormone from the plasma by the liver. Each measured plasma cortisol level has an error arising from the cortisol immunoassay. We demonstrate that all of these three physiological principles can be succinctly summarized in a single stochastic differential equation plus measurement error model and show that physiologically consistent ranges of the model parameters can be determined from published reports. We summarize the model parameters in terms of the multivariate Gaussian probability density and establish the plausibility of the model with a series of simulation studies. Our framework makes possible a sensitivity analysis in which all model parameters are allowed to vary simultaneously. The model offers an approach for simultaneously representing cortisol's ultradian, circadian, and kinetic properties. Our modeling paradigm provides a framework for simulation studies and data analysis that should be readily adaptable to the analysis of other endocrine hormone systems.

  20. A stochastic differential equation model of diurnal cortisol patterns.

    PubMed

    Brown, E N; Meehan, P M; Dempster, A P

    2001-03-01

    Circadian modulation of episodic bursts is recognized as the normal physiological pattern of diurnal variation in plasma cortisol levels. The primary physiological factors underlying these diurnal patterns are the ultradian timing of secretory events, circadian modulation of the amplitude of secretory events, infusion of the hormone from the adrenal gland into the plasma, and clearance of the hormone from the plasma by the liver. Each measured plasma cortisol level has an error arising from the cortisol immunoassay. We demonstrate that all of these three physiological principles can be succinctly summarized in a single stochastic differential equation plus measurement error model and show that physiologically consistent ranges of the model parameters can be determined from published reports. We summarize the model parameters in terms of the multivariate Gaussian probability density and establish the plausibility of the model with a series of simulation studies. Our framework makes possible a sensitivity analysis in which all model parameters are allowed to vary simultaneously. The model offers an approach for simultaneously representing cortisol's ultradian, circadian, and kinetic properties. Our modeling paradigm provides a framework for simulation studies and data analysis that should be readily adaptable to the analysis of other endocrine hormone systems. PMID:11171600

  1. Exact Solutions of a Fractional-Type Differential-Difference Equation Related to Discrete MKdV Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İsmail, Aslan

    2014-05-01

    The extended simplest equation method is used to solve exactly a new differential-difference equation of fractional-type, proposed by Narita [J. Math. Anal. Appl. 381 (2011) 963] quite recently, related to the discrete MKdV equation. It is shown that the model supports three types of exact solutions with arbitrary parameters: hyperbolic, trigonometric and rational, which have not been reported before.

  2. A differential algebraic approach for the modeling of polycrystalline ferromagnetic hysteresis with minor loops and frequency dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Linxiang; Melnik, Roderick

    2016-07-01

    In the current paper, a nonlinear differential algebraic approach is proposed for the modeling of hysteretic dynamics of polycrystalline ferromagnetic materials. The model is constructed by employing a phenomenological theory to the magnetization orientation switching. For the modeling of hysteresis in polycrystalline ferromagnetic materials, the single crystal model is applied to each magnetic domain along its own principal axis. The overall dynamics of the polycrystalline materials is obtained by taking a weighted combination of the dynamics of all magnetic domains. The weight function for the combination is taken as the distribution function of the principal axes. Numerical simulations are performed and comparisons with its experimental counterparts are presented. The hysteretic dynamics caused by orientation switching processes is accurately captured by the proposed model. Minor hysteresis loops associated with partial-amplitude loadings are also captured. Rate dependence of the hysteresis loops are inherently incorporated into the model due to its differential nature.

  3. A Solution Space for a System of Null-State Partial Differential Equations: Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Steven M.; Kleban, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article is the second of four that completely and rigorously characterize a solution space for a homogeneous system of 2 N + 3 linear partial differential equations in 2 N variables that arises in conformal field theory (CFT) and multiple Schramm-Löwner evolution (SLE). The system comprises 2 N null-state equations and three conformal Ward identities which govern CFT correlation functions of 2 N one-leg boundary operators. In the first article (Flores and Kleban, Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1212.2301, 2012), we use methods of analysis and linear algebra to prove that dim , with C N the Nth Catalan number. The analysis of that article is complete except for the proof of a lemma that it invokes. The purpose of this article is to provide that proof. The lemma states that if every interval among ( x 2, x 3), ( x 3, x 4),…,( x 2 N-1, x 2 N ) is a two-leg interval of (defined in Flores and Kleban, Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1212.2301, 2012), then F vanishes. Proving this lemma by contradiction, we show that the existence of such a nonzero function implies the existence of a non-vanishing CFT two-point function involving primary operators with different conformal weights, an impossibility. This proof (which is rigorous in spite of our occasional reference to CFT) involves two different types of estimates, those that give the asymptotic behavior of F as the length of one interval vanishes, and those that give this behavior as the lengths of two intervals vanish simultaneously. We derive these estimates by using Green functions to rewrite certain null-state PDEs as integral equations, combining other null-state PDEs to obtain Schauder interior estimates, and then repeatedly integrating the integral equations with these estimates until we obtain optimal bounds. Estimates in which two interval lengths vanish simultaneously divide into two cases: two adjacent intervals and two non-adjacent intervals. The analysis of the latter case is similar to that for one vanishing

  4. Some operational tools for solving fractional and higher integer order differential equations: A survey on their mutual relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryakova, Virginia S.

    2012-11-01

    The Laplace Transform (LT) serves as a basis of the Operational Calculus (OC), widely explored by engineers and applied scientists in solving mathematical models for their practical needs. This transform is closely related to the exponential and trigonometric functions (exp, cos, sin) and to the classical differentiation and integration operators, reducing them to simple algebraic operations. Thus, the classical LT and the OC give useful tool to handle differential equations and systems with constant coefficients. Several generalizations of the LT have been introduced to allow solving, in a similar way, of differential equations with variable coefficients and of higher integer orders, as well as of fractional (arbitrary non-integer) orders. Note that fractional order mathematical models are recently widely used to describe better various systems and phenomena of the real world. This paper surveys briefly some of our results on classes of such integral transforms, that can be obtained from the LT by means of "transmutations" which are operators of the generalized fractional calculus (GFC). On the list of these Laplace-type integral transforms, we consider the Borel-Dzrbashjan, Meijer, Krätzel, Obrechkoff, generalized Obrechkoff (multi-index Borel-Dzrbashjan) transforms, etc. All of them are G- and H-integral transforms of convolutional type, having as kernels Meijer's G- or Fox's H-functions. Besides, some special functions (also being G- and H-functions), among them - the generalized Bessel-type and Mittag-Leffler (M-L) type functions, are generating Gel'fond-Leontiev (G-L) operators of generalized differentiation and integration, which happen to be also operators of GFC. Our integral transforms have operational properties analogous to those of the LT - they do algebrize the G-L generalized integrations and differentiations, and thus can serve for solving wide classes of differential equations with variable coefficients of arbitrary, including non-integer order

  5. Probabilistic delay differential equation modeling of event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Ostwald, Dirk; Starke, Ludger

    2016-08-01

    "Dynamic causal models" (DCMs) are a promising approach in the analysis of functional neuroimaging data due to their biophysical interpretability and their consolidation of functional-segregative and functional-integrative propositions. In this theoretical note we are concerned with the DCM framework for electroencephalographically recorded event-related potentials (ERP-DCM). Intuitively, ERP-DCM combines deterministic dynamical neural mass models with dipole-based EEG forward models to describe the event-related scalp potential time-series over the entire electrode space. Since its inception, ERP-DCM has been successfully employed to capture the neural underpinnings of a wide range of neurocognitive phenomena. However, in spite of its empirical popularity, the technical literature on ERP-DCM remains somewhat patchy. A number of previous communications have detailed certain aspects of the approach, but no unified and coherent documentation exists. With this technical note, we aim to close this gap and to increase the technical accessibility of ERP-DCM. Specifically, this note makes the following novel contributions: firstly, we provide a unified and coherent review of the mathematical machinery of the latent and forward models constituting ERP-DCM by formulating the approach as a probabilistic latent delay differential equation model. Secondly, we emphasize the probabilistic nature of the model and its variational Bayesian inversion scheme by explicitly deriving the variational free energy function in terms of both the likelihood expectation and variance parameters. Thirdly, we detail and validate the estimation of the model with a special focus on the explicit form of the variational free energy function and introduce a conventional nonlinear optimization scheme for its maximization. Finally, we identify and discuss a number of computational issues which may be addressed in the future development of the approach. PMID:27114057

  6. The study of nonlinear almost periodic differential equations without recourse to the H-classes of these equations

    SciTech Connect

    Slyusarchuk, V. E. E-mail: V.Ye.Slyusarchuk@NUWM.rv.ua

    2014-06-01

    The well-known theorems of Favard and Amerio on the existence of almost periodic solutions to linear and nonlinear almost periodic differential equations depend to a large extent on the H-classes and the requirement that the bounded solutions of these equations be separated. The present paper provides different conditions for the existence of almost periodic solutions. These conditions, which do not depend on the H-classes of the equations, are formulated in terms of a special functional on the set of bounded solutions of the equations under consideration. This functional is used, in particular, to test whether solutions are separated. Bibliography: 24 titles. (paper)

  7. Oscillation criteria for second order forced ordinary differential equations with mixed nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuan Gong; Wong, James S. W.

    2007-10-01

    We present new oscillation criteria for the second order forced ordinary differential equation with mixed nonlinearities: where , p(t) is positive and differentiable, [alpha]1>...>[alpha]m>1>[alpha]m+1>...>[alpha]n. No restriction is imposed on the forcing term e(t) to be the second derivative of an oscillatory function. When n=1, our results reduce to those of El-Sayed [M.A. El-Sayed, An oscillation criterion for a forced second order linear differential equation, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 118 (1993) 813-817], Wong [J.S.W. Wong, Oscillation criteria for a forced second linear differential equations, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 231 (1999) 235-240], Sun, Ou and Wong [Y.G. Sun, C.H. Ou, J.S.W. Wong, Interval oscillation theorems for a linear second order differential equation, Comput. Math. Appl. 48 (2004) 1693-1699] for the linear equation, Nazr [A.H. Nazr, Sufficient conditions for the oscillation of forced super-linear second order differential equations with oscillatory potential, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 126 (1998) 123-125] for the superlinear equation, and Sun and Wong [Y.G. Sun, J.S.W. Wong, Note on forced oscillation of nth-order sublinear differential equations, JE Math. Anal. Appl. 298 (2004) 114-119] for the sublinear equation.

  8. Operator Factorization and the Solution of Second-Order Linear Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, W.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of second-order linear ordinary differential equations is reviewed from the standpoint of the operator factorization approach to the solution of ordinary differential equations (ODE). Using the operator factorization approach, the general second-order linear ODE is solved, exactly, in quadratures and the resulting…

  9. Modeling Noisy Data with Differential Equations Using Observed and Expected Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deboeck, Pascal R.; Boker, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Complex intraindividual variability observed in psychology may be well described using differential equations. It is difficult, however, to apply differential equation models in psychological contexts, as time series are frequently short, poorly sampled, and have large proportions of measurement and dynamic error. Furthermore, current methods for…

  10. A note on the Dirichlet problem for model complex partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Karaca, Bahriye

    2016-08-01

    Complex model partial differential equations of arbitrary order are considered. The uniqueness of the Dirichlet problem is studied. It is proved that the Dirichlet problem for higher order of complex partial differential equations with one complex variable has infinitely many solutions.

  11. The Local Brewery: A Project for Use in Differential Equations Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starling, James K.; Povich, Timothy J.; Findlay, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe a modeling project designed for an ordinary differential equations (ODEs) course using first-order and systems of first-order differential equations to model the fermentation process in beer. The project aims to expose the students to the modeling process by creating and solving a mathematical model and effectively communicating their…

  12. On group classification of normal systems of linear second-order ordinary differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meleshko, S. V.; Moyo, S.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we study the general group classification of systems of linear second-order ordinary differential equations inspired from earlier works and recent results on the group classification of such systems. Some interesting results and subsequent theorem arising from this particular study are discussed here. This paper considers the study of irreducible systems of second-order ordinary differential equations.

  13. A Predictor-Corrector Approach for the Numerical Solution of Fractional Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diethelm, Kai; Ford, Neville J.; Freed, Alan D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We discuss an Adams-type predictor-corrector method for the numerical solution of fractional differential equations. The method may be used both for linear and for nonlinear problems, and it may be extended to multi-term equations (involving more than one differential operator) too.

  14. A Simple Method to Find out when an Ordinary Differential Equation Is Separable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Jose Angel

    2009-01-01

    We present an alternative method to that of Scott (D. Scott, "When is an ordinary differential equation separable?", "Amer. Math. Monthly" 92 (1985), pp. 422-423) to teach the students how to discover whether a differential equation y[prime] = f(x,y) is separable or not when the nonlinearity f(x, y) is not explicitly factorized. Our approach is…

  15. On the stability of numerical integration routines for ordinary differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, K.; Willems, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical integration methods for the solution of initial value problems for ordinary vector differential equations may be modelled as discrete time feedback systems. The stability criteria discovered in modern control theory are applied to these systems and criteria involving the routine, the step size and the differential equation are derived. Linear multistep, Runge-Kutta, and predictor-corrector methods are all investigated.

  16. A Laboratory Experience for Students of Differential Equations using RLC Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Jeff; Barnes, Julia

    1997-01-01

    Argues that although differential equations are billed as applied mathematics, there is rarely any hands-on experience incorporated into the course. Presents a laboratory project that requires students to obtain data from a physics lab and use that data to compute the coefficients of the second order differential equation, which mathematically…

  17. An Engineering-Oriented Approach to the Introductory Differential Equations Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennell, S.; Avitabile, P.; White, J.

    2009-01-01

    The introductory differential equations course can be made more relevant to engineering students by including more of the engineering viewpoint, in which differential equations are regarded as systems with inputs and outputs. This can be done without sacrificing any of the usual topical coverage. This point of view is conducive to student…

  18. Exact Solutions for Fractional Differential-Difference Equations by an Extended Riccati Sub-ODE Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qing-Hua

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, an extended Riccati sub-ODE method is proposed to establish new exact solutions for fractional differential-difference equations in the sense of modified Riemann—Liouville derivative. By a fractional complex transformation, a given fractional differential-difference equation can be turned into another differential-difference equation of integer order. The validity of the method is illustrated by applying it to solve the fractional Hybrid lattice equation and the fractional relativistic Toda lattice system. As a result, some new exact solutions including hyperbolic function solutions, trigonometric function solutions and rational solutions are established.

  19. Invariance properties of a general bond-pricing equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkala, W.; Leach, P. G. L.; O'Hara, J. G.

    We perform the group classification of a bond-pricing partial differential equation of mathematical finance to discover the combinations of arbitrary parameters that allow the partial differential equation to admit a nontrivial symmetry Lie algebra. As a result of the group classification we propose "natural" values for the arbitrary parameters in the partial differential equation, some of which validate the choices of parameters in such classical models as that of Vasicek and Cox-Ingersoll-Ross. For each set of these natural parameter values we compute the admitted Lie point symmetries, identify the corresponding symmetry Lie algebra and solve the partial differential equation.

  20. High precision series solutions of differential equations: Ordinary and regular singular points of second order ODEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noreen, Amna; Olaussen, Kåre

    2012-10-01

    A subroutine for a very-high-precision numerical solution of a class of ordinary differential equations is provided. For a given evaluation point and equation parameters the memory requirement scales linearly with precision P, and the number of algebraic operations scales roughly linearly with P when P becomes sufficiently large. We discuss results from extensive tests of the code, and how one, for a given evaluation point and equation parameters, may estimate precision loss and computing time in advance. Program summary Program title: seriesSolveOde1 Catalogue identifier: AEMW_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 991 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 488116 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: PC's or higher performance computers. Operating system: Linux and MacOS RAM: Few to many megabytes (problem dependent). Classification: 2.7, 4.3 External routines: CLN — Class Library for Numbers [1] built with the GNU MP library [2], and GSL — GNU Scientific Library [3] (only for time measurements). Nature of problem: The differential equation -s2({d2}/{dz2}+{1-ν+-ν-}/{z}{d}/{dz}+{ν+ν-}/{z2})ψ(z)+{1}/{z} ∑n=0N vnznψ(z)=0, is solved numerically to very high precision. The evaluation point z and some or all of the equation parameters may be complex numbers; some or all of them may be represented exactly in terms of rational numbers. Solution method: The solution ψ(z), and optionally ψ'(z), is evaluated at the point z by executing the recursion A(z)={s-2}/{(m+1+ν-ν+)(m+1+ν-ν-)} ∑n=0N Vn(z)A(z), ψ(z)=ψ(z)+A(z), to sufficiently large m. Here ν is either ν+ or ν-, and Vn(z)=vnz. The recursion is initialized by A(z)=δzν,for n

  1. Stochastic differential equation model for linear growth birth and death processes with immigration and emigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granita, Bahar, A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper discusses on linear birth and death with immigration and emigration (BIDE) process to stochastic differential equation (SDE) model. Forward Kolmogorov equation in continuous time Markov chain (CTMC) with a central-difference approximation was used to find Fokker-Planckequation corresponding to a diffusion process having the stochastic differential equation of BIDE process. The exact solution, mean and variance function of BIDE process was found.

  2. Interval oscillation criteria for second-order forced impulsive delay differential equations with damping term.

    PubMed

    Thandapani, Ethiraju; Kannan, Manju; Pinelas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present some sufficient conditions for the oscillation of all solutions of a second order forced impulsive delay differential equation with damping term. Three factors-impulse, delay and damping that affect the interval qualitative properties of solutions of equations are taken into account together. The results obtained in this paper extend and generalize some of the the known results for forced impulsive differential equations. An example is provided to illustrate the main result. PMID:27218008

  3. Stochastic differential equation model for linear growth birth and death processes with immigration and emigration

    SciTech Connect

    Granita; Bahar, A.

    2015-03-09

    This paper discusses on linear birth and death with immigration and emigration (BIDE) process to stochastic differential equation (SDE) model. Forward Kolmogorov equation in continuous time Markov chain (CTMC) with a central-difference approximation was used to find Fokker-Planckequation corresponding to a diffusion process having the stochastic differential equation of BIDE process. The exact solution, mean and variance function of BIDE process was found.

  4. On spectral methods for Volterra-type integro-differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying-Jun

    2009-08-01

    This paper considers the spectral methods for a Volterra-type integro-differential equation. Firstly, the Volterra-type integro-differential equation is equivalently restated as two integral equations of the second kind. Secondly, a Legendre-collocation method is used to solve them. Then the error analysis is conducted based on the L[infinity]-norm. In addition, numerical results are presented to confirm our analysis.

  5. Variation of Parameters in Differential Equations (A Variation in Making Sense of Variation of Parameters)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Terry; Rai, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The method of variation of parameters can be found in most undergraduate textbooks on differential equations. The method leads to solutions of the non-homogeneous equation of the form y = u[subscript 1]y[subscript 1] + u[subscript 2]y[subscript 2], a sum of function products using solutions to the homogeneous equation y[subscript 1] and…

  6. Incorporating Writing in an Integrated Calculus, Linear Algebra, and Differential Equations Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Susan E.; LeDocq, Rebecca Lewin

    2001-01-01

    Describes the specific courses in a sequence along with how the writing has been implemented in each course. Provides ideas for how to efficiently handle the additional paper load so students receive the necessary feedback while keeping the grading time reasonable. (Author/ASK)

  7. The algebraic criteria for the stability of control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cremer, H.; Effertz, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper critically examines the standard algebraic criteria for the stability of linear control systems and their proofs, reveals important previously unnoticed connections, and presents new representations. Algebraic stability criteria have also acquired significance for stability studies of non-linear differential equation systems by the Krylov-Bogoljubov-Magnus Method, and allow realization conditions to be determined for classes of broken rational functions as frequency characteristics of electrical network.

  8. Integrable systems of partial differential equations determined by structure equations and Lax pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Paul

    2010-01-01

    It is shown how a system of evolution equations can be developed both from the structure equations of a submanifold embedded in three-space as well as from a matrix SO(6) Lax pair. The two systems obtained this way correspond exactly when a constraint equation is selected and imposed on the system of equations. This allows for the possibility of selecting the coefficients in the second fundamental form in a general way.

  9. Iterative methods for elliptic finite element equations on general meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolaides, R. A.; Choudhury, Shenaz

    1986-01-01

    Iterative methods for arbitrary mesh discretizations of elliptic partial differential equations are surveyed. The methods discussed are preconditioned conjugate gradients, algebraic multigrid, deflated conjugate gradients, an element-by-element techniques, and domain decomposition. Computational results are included.

  10. Numerical solution of control problems governed by nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Heinkenschloss, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this presentation the author investigates an iterative method for the solution of optimal control problems. These problems are formulated as constrained optimization problems with constraints arising from the state equation and in the form of bound constraints on the control. The method for the solution of these problems uses the special structure of the problem arising from the bound constraint and the state equation. It is derived from SQP methods and projected Newton methods and combines the advantages of both methods. The bound constraint is satisfied by all iterates using a projection, the nonlinear state equation is satisfied in the limit. Only a linearized state equation has to be solved in every iteration. The solution of the linearized problems are done using multilevel methods and GMRES.

  11. DG Poisson algebra and its universal enveloping algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, JiaFeng; Wang, XingTing; Zhuang, GuangBin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notions of differential graded (DG) Poisson algebra and DG Poisson module. Let $A$ be any DG Poisson algebra. We construct the universal enveloping algebra of $A$ explicitly, which is denoted by $A^{ue}$. We show that $A^{ue}$ has a natural DG algebra structure and it satisfies certain universal property. As a consequence of the universal property, it is proved that the category of DG Poisson modules over $A$ is isomorphic to the category of DG modules over $A^{ue}$. Furthermore, we prove that the notion of universal enveloping algebra $A^{ue}$ is well-behaved under opposite algebra and tensor product of DG Poisson algebras. Practical examples of DG Poisson algebras are given throughout the paper including those arising from differential geometry and homological algebra.

  12. New variational principles for locating periodic orbits of differential equations.

    PubMed

    Boghosian, Bruce M; Fazendeiro, Luis M; Lätt, Jonas; Tang, Hui; Coveney, Peter V

    2011-06-13

    We present new methods for the determination of periodic orbits of general dynamical systems. Iterative algorithms for finding solutions by these methods, for both the exact continuum case, and for approximate discrete representations suitable for numerical implementation, are discussed. Finally, we describe our approach to the computation of unstable periodic orbits of the driven Navier-Stokes equations, simulated using the lattice Boltzmann equation. PMID:21536567

  13. Traveling Wave Solutions for Nonlinear Differential-Difference Equations of Rational Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İsmail, Aslan

    2016-01-01

    Differential-difference equations are considered to be hybrid systems because the spatial variable n is discrete while the time t is usually kept continuous. Although a considerable amount of research has been carried out in the field of nonlinear differential-difference equations, the majority of the results deal with polynomial types. Limited research has been reported regarding such equations of rational type. In this paper we present an adaptation of the (G‧/G)-expansion method to solve nonlinear rational differential-difference equations. The procedure is demonstrated using two distinct equations. Our approach allows one to construct three types of exact traveling wave solutions (hyperbolic, trigonometric, and rational) by means of the simplified form of the auxiliary equation method with reduced parameters. Our analysis leads to analytic solutions in terms of topological solitons and singular periodic functions as well.

  14. Unsplit complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer for second-order wave equation using auxiliary differential equations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingjie; Zhang, Jinhai; Yao, Zhenxing

    2015-12-01

    The complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer (CFS-PML) can improve the absorbing performance of PML for nearly grazing incident waves. However, traditional PML and CFS-PML are based on first-order wave equations; thus, they are not suitable for second-order wave equation. In this paper, an implementation of CFS-PML for second-order wave equation is presented using auxiliary differential equations. This method is free of both convolution calculations and third-order temporal derivatives. As an unsplit CFS-PML, it can reduce the nearly grazing incidence. Numerical experiments show that it has better absorption than typical PML implementations based on second-order wave equation. PMID:26723366

  15. A Solution Space for a System of Null-State Partial Differential Equations: Part 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Steven M.; Kleban, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article is the last of four that completely and rigorously characterize a solution space for a homogeneous system of 2 N + 3 linear partial differential equations in 2 N variables that arises in conformal field theory (CFT) and multiple Schramm-Löwner evolution (SLE). The system comprises 2 N null-state equations and three conformal Ward identities that govern CFT correlation functions of 2 N one-leg boundary operators. In the first two articles (Flores and Kleban in Commun Math Phys, 2012; Flores and Kleban, in Commun Math Phys, 2014), we use methods of analysis and linear algebra to prove that dim , with C N the Nth Catalan number. Using these results in the third article (Flores and Kleban, in Commun Math Phys, 2013), we prove that dim and is spanned by (real-valued) solutions constructed with the Coulomb gas (contour integral) formalism of CFT. In this article, we use these results to prove some facts concerning the solution space . First, we show that each of its elements equals a sum of at most two distinct Frobenius series in powers of the difference between two adjacent points (unless is odd, in which case a logarithmic term may appear). This establishes an important element in the operator product expansion for one-leg boundary operators, assumed in CFT. We also identify particular elements of , which we call connectivity weights, and exploit their special properties to conjecture a formula for the probability that the curves of a multiple-SLE process join in a particular connectivity. This leads to new formulas for crossing probabilities of critical lattice models inside polygons with a free/fixed side-alternating boundary condition, which we derive in Flores et al. (Partition functions and crossing probabilities for critical systems inside polygons, in preparation). Finally, we propose a reason for why the exceptional speeds [certain values that appeared in the analysis of the Coulomb gas solutions in Flores and Kleban (Commun Math Phys, 2013)] and

  16. An analytical theory of a scattering of radio-waves on meteoric ionization. II. Solution of the integro-differential equation in case of backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecina, P.

    2016-08-01

    The integro-differential equation for the polarization vector P inside the meteor trail, representing the analytical solution of the set of Maxwell equations, is solved for the case of backscattering of radio waves on meteoric ionization. The transversal and longitudinal dimensions of a typical meteor trail are small in comparison to the distances to both transmitter and receiver and so the phase factor appearing in the kernel of the integral equation is large and rapidly changing. This allows us to use the method of stationary phase to obtain an approximate solution of the integral equation for the scattered field and for the corresponding generalized radar equation. The final solution is obtained by expanding it into the complete set of Bessel functions, which results in solving a system of linear algebraic equations for the coefficients of the expansion. The time behaviour of the meteor echoes is then obtained using the generalized radar equation. Examples are given for values of the electron density spanning a range from underdense meteor echoes to overdense meteor echoes. We show that the time behaviour of overdense meteor echoes using this method is very different from the one obtained using purely numerical solutions of the Maxwell equations. Our results are in much better agreement with the observations performed e. g. by the Ondřejov radar.

  17. Exponential rational function method for space-time fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Esin; Kaplan, Melike; Bekir, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, exponential rational function method is applied to obtain analytical solutions of the space-time fractional Fokas equation, the space-time fractional Zakharov Kuznetsov Benjamin Bona Mahony, and the space-time fractional coupled Burgers' equations. As a result, some exact solutions for them are successfully established. These solutions are constructed in fractional complex transform to convert fractional differential equations into ordinary differential equations. The fractional derivatives are described in Jumarie's modified Riemann-Liouville sense. The exact solutions obtained by the proposed method indicate that the approach is easy to implement and effective.

  18. Surfaces specified by integrable systems of partial differential equations determined by structure equations and Lax pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Paul

    2010-04-01

    A system of evolution equations can be developed from the structure equations for a submanifold embedded in a three-dimensional space. It is seen how these same equations can be obtained from a generalized matrix Lax pair provided a single constraint equation is imposed. This can be done in Euclidean space as well as in Minkowski space. The integrable systems which result from this process can be thought of as generalizing the SO(3) and SO(2,1) Lax pairs which have been studied previously.

  19. Symmetric linear systems - An application of algebraic systems theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazewinkel, M.; Martin, C.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamical systems which contain several identical subsystems occur in a variety of applications ranging from command and control systems and discretization of partial differential equations, to the stability augmentation of pairs of helicopters lifting a large mass. Linear models for such systems display certain obvious symmetries. In this paper, we discuss how these symmetries can be incorporated into a mathematical model that utilizes the modern theory of algebraic systems. Such systems are inherently related to the representation theory of algebras over fields. We will show that any control scheme which respects the dynamical structure either implicitly or explicitly uses the underlying algebra.

  20. New symbolic tools for differential geometry, gravitation, and field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, I. M.; Torre, C. G.

    2012-01-01

    DifferentialGeometry is a Maple software package which symbolically performs fundamental operations of calculus on manifolds, differential geometry, tensor calculus, spinor calculus, Lie algebras, Lie groups, transformation groups, jet spaces, and the variational calculus. These capabilities, combined with dramatic recent improvements in symbolic approaches to solving algebraic and differential equations, have allowed for development of powerful new tools for solving research problems in gravitation and field theory. The purpose of this paper is to describe some of these new tools and present some advanced applications involving: Killing vector fields and isometry groups, Killing tensors, algebraic classification of solutions of the Einstein equations, and symmetry reduction of field equations.

  1. Constructing conservation laws for fractional-order integro-differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukashchuk, S. Yu.

    2015-08-01

    In a class of functions depending on linear integro-differential fractional-order variables, we prove an analogue of the fundamental operator identity relating the infinitesimal operator of a point transformation group, the Euler-Lagrange differential operator, and Noether operators. Using this identity, we prove fractional-differential analogues of the Noether theorem and its generalizations applicable to equations with fractional-order integrals and derivatives of various types that are Euler-Lagrange equations. In explicit form, we give fractional-differential generalizations of Noether operators that gives an efficient way to construct conservation laws, which we illustrate with three examples.

  2. A note on the generation of phase plane plots on a digital computer. [for solution of nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is presented for generating phase plane plots on a digital computer which circumvents the difficulties associated with more traditional methods of numerical solving nonlinear differential equations. In particular, the nonlinear differential equation of operation is formulated.

  3. Recursion operators, conservation laws, and integrability conditions for difference equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. V.; Wang, Jing Ping; Xenitidis, P.

    2011-04-01

    We attempt to propose an algebraic approach to the theory of integrable difference equations. We define the concept of a recursion operator for difference equations and show that it generates an infinite sequence of symmetries and canonical conservation laws for a difference equation. As in the case of partial differential equations, these canonical densities can serve as integrability conditions for difference equations. We obtain the recursion operators for the Viallet equation and all the Adler-Bobenko-Suris equations.

  4. Localization of the eigenvalues of linear integral equations with applications to linear ordinary differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloss, J. M.; Kranzler, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    The equivalence of a considered integral equation form with an infinite system of linear equations is proved, and the localization of the eigenvalues of the infinite system is expressed. Error estimates are derived, and the problems of finding upper bounds and lower bounds for the eigenvalues are solved simultaneously.

  5. Teaching Algebra without Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Algebra is, among other things, a shorthand way to express quantitative reasoning. This article illustrates ways for the classroom teacher to convert algebraic solutions to verbal problems into conversational solutions that can be understood by students in the lower grades. Three reasonably typical verbal problems that either appeared as or…

  6. Stability Criteria for Differential Equations with Variable Time Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schley, D.; Shail, R.; Gourley, S. A.

    2002-01-01

    Time delays are an important aspect of mathematical modelling, but often result in highly complicated equations which are difficult to treat analytically. In this paper it is shown how careful application of certain undergraduate tools such as the Method of Steps and the Principle of the Argument can yield significant results. Certain delay…

  7. Existence and global attractivity of periodic solution for an impulsive delay differential equation with Allee effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jurang; Zhao, Aimin; Yan, Weiping

    2005-09-01

    Sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence and global attractivity of positive periodic solution of an impulsive delay differential equation with Allee effect. The results of this paper improve and generalize noticeably the known theorems in the literature.

  8. Some results on the integral transforms and applications to differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Eltayeb, Hassan; Kilicman, Adem

    2010-11-11

    In this paper we give some remark about the relationship between Sumudu and Laplace transforms, further; for the comparison purpose, we apply both transforms to solve partial differential equations to see the differences and similarities.

  9. On the reduction principle for differential equations with piecewise constant argument of generalized type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmet, M. U.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we introduce a new type of differential equations with piecewise constant argument (EPCAG), more general than EPCA [K.L. Cooke, J. Wiener, Retarded differential equations with piecewise constant delays, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 99 (1984) 265-297; J. Wiener, Generalized Solutions of Functional Differential Equations, World Scientific, Singapore, 1993]. The Reduction Principle [V.A. Pliss, The reduction principle in the theory of the stability of motion, Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR Ser. Mat. 27 (1964) 1297-1324 (in Russian); V.A. Pliss, Integral Sets of Periodic Systems of Differential Equations, Nauka, Moskow, 1977 (in Russian)] is proved for EPCAG. The structure of the set of solutions is specified. We establish also the existence of global integral manifolds of quasilinear EPCAG in the so-called critical case and investigate the stability of the zero solution.

  10. Multilayer neural networks for solving a class of partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    He, S; Reif, K; Unbehauen, R

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, training the derivative of a feedforward neural network with the extended backpropagation algorithm is presented. The method is used to solve a class of first-order partial differential equations for input-to-state linearizable or approximate linearizable systems. The solution of the differential equation, together with the Lie derivatives, yields a change of coordinates. A feedback control law is then designed to keep the system in a desired behavior. The examination of the proposed method, through simulations, exhibits the advantages of it. They include easily and quickly finding approximate solutions for complicated first-order partial differential equations. Therefore, the work presented here can benefit the design of the class of nonlinear control systems, where the nontrivial solutions of the partial differential equations are difficult to find. PMID:10937971

  11. Periodic boundary value problem for a system of ordinary differential equations with impulse effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tleulesova, Agila

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we investigated a nonlinear periodic boundary value problem with impulse effects. We have found some sufficient conditions for existence of isolated solution to periodic boundary value problem for system of nonlinear differential equations with impulse effects.

  12. On testing a subroutine for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses how to numerically test a subroutine for the solution of ordinary differential equations. Results obtained with a variable order Adams method are given for eleven simple test cases.-

  13. Time Parallel Solution of Linear Partial Differential Equations on the Intel Touchstone Delta Supercomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, N.; Fijany, A.; Barhen, J.

    1993-01-01

    Evolutionary partial differential equations are usually solved by decretization in time and space, and by applying a marching in time procedure to data and algorithms potentially parallelized in the spatial domain.

  14. A differential equation for the transition probability B(E2)↑ and the resulting recursion relations connecting even-even nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattnaik, S.; Nayak, R. C.

    2014-04-01

    We obtain here a new relation for the reduced electric quadrupole transition probability B(E2)↑ of a given nucleus in terms of its derivatives with respect to neutron and proton numbers based on a similar local energy relation in the Infinite Nuclear Matter (INM) model of atomic nuclei, which is essentially built on the foundation of the Hugenholtz-Van Hove (HVH) theorem of many-body theory. Obviously, such a relation in the form of a differential equation is expected to be more powerful than the usual algebraic difference equations. Although the relation for B(E2)↑ has been perceived simply on the basis of a corresponding differential equation for the local energy in the INM model, its theoretical foundation otherwise has been clearly demonstrated. We further exploit the differential equation in using the very definitions of the derivatives to obtain two different recursion relations for B(E2)↑, connecting in each case three neighboring even-even nuclei from lower to higher mass numbers and vice versa. We demonstrate their numerical validity using available data throughout the nuclear chart and also explore their possible utility in predicting B(E2)↑ values.

  15. Formulation and Application of Optimal Homotopty Asymptotic Method to Coupled Differential - Difference Equations

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Hakeem; Islam, Saeed; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan; Fiza, Mehreen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we applied a new analytic approximate technique Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM) for treatment of coupled differential- difference equations (DDEs). To see the efficiency and reliability of the method, we consider Relativistic Toda coupled nonlinear differential-difference equation. It provides us a convenient way to control the convergence of approximate solutions when it is compared with other methods of solution found in the literature. The obtained solutions show that OHAM is effective, simpler, easier and explicit. PMID:25874457

  16. On the accuracy and convergence of implicit numerical integration of finite element generated ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Soliman, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    A study of accuracy and convergence of linear functional finite element solution to linear parabolic and hyperbolic partial differential equations is presented. A variable-implicit integration procedure is employed for the resultant system of ordinary differential equations. Accuracy and convergence is compared for the consistent and two lumped assembly procedures for the identified initial-value matrix structure. Truncation error estimation is accomplished using Richardson extrapolation.

  17. Numerical solution of nonlinear partial differential equations of mixed type. [finite difference approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A.

    1976-01-01

    A review is presented of some recently developed numerical methods for the solution of nonlinear equations of mixed type. The methods considered use finite difference approximations to the differential equation. Central difference formulas are employed in the subsonic zone and upwind difference formulas are used in the supersonic zone. The relaxation method for the small disturbance equation is discussed and a description is given of difference schemes for the potential flow equation in quasi-linear form. Attention is also given to difference schemes for the potential flow equation in conservation form, the analysis of relaxation schemes by the time dependent analogy, the accelerated iterative method, and three-dimensional calculations.

  18. An Artificial Neural Networks Method for Solving Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Abir

    2010-09-01

    While there already exists many analytical and numerical techniques for solving PDEs, this paper introduces an approach using artificial neural networks. The approach consists of a technique developed by combining the standard numerical method, finite-difference, with the Hopfield neural network. The method is denoted Hopfield-finite-difference (HFD). The architecture of the nets, energy function, updating equations, and algorithms are developed for the method. The HFD method has been used successfully to approximate the solution of classical PDEs, such as the Wave, Heat, Poisson and the Diffusion equations, and on a system of PDEs. The software Matlab is used to obtain the results in both tabular and graphical form. The results are similar in terms of accuracy to those obtained by standard numerical methods. In terms of speed, the parallel nature of the Hopfield nets methods makes them easier to implement on fast parallel computers while some numerical methods need extra effort for parallelization.

  19. Fitting a stochastic partial differential equation to aquifer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. H.

    1989-06-01

    The steady state two dimensional groundwater flow equation with constant transmissivities was studied by Whittle in 1954 as a stochastic Laplace equation. He showed that the correlation function consisted of a modified Bessel function of the second kind, order 1, multiplied by its argument. This paper uses this pioneering work of Whittle to fit an aquifer head field to unequally spaced observations by maximum likelihood. Observational error is also included in the model. Both the isotropic and anisotropic cases are considered. The fitted field is then calculated on a two dimensional grid together with its standard deviation. The method is closely related to the use of two-dimensional splines for fitting surfaces to irregularly spaced observations.

  20. The numerical dynamic for highly nonlinear partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafon, A.; Yee, H. C.

    1992-01-01

    Problems associated with the numerical computation of highly nonlinear equations in computational fluid dynamics are set forth and analyzed in terms of the potential ranges of spurious behaviors. A reaction-convection equation with a nonlinear source term is employed to evaluate the effects related to spatial and temporal discretizations. The discretization of the source term is described according to several methods, and the various techniques are shown to have a significant effect on the stability of the spurious solutions. Traditional linearized stability analyses cannot provide the level of confidence required for accurate fluid dynamics computations, and the incorporation of nonlinear analysis is proposed. Nonlinear analysis based on nonlinear dynamical systems complements the conventional linear approach and is valuable in the analysis of hypersonic aerodynamics and combustion phenomena.

  1. SDP-based approximation of stabilising solutions for periodic matrix Riccati differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Sergei V.; Shiriaev, Anton S.; Freidovich, Leonid B.

    2016-07-01

    Numerically finding stabilising feedback control laws for linear systems of periodic differential equations is a nontrivial task with no known reliable solutions. The most successful method requires solving matrix differential Riccati equations with periodic coefficients. All previously proposed techniques for solving such equations involve numerical integration of unstable differential equations and consequently fail whenever the period is too large or the coefficients vary too much. Here, a new method for numerical computation of stabilising solutions for matrix differential Riccati equations with periodic coefficients is proposed. Our approach does not involve numerical solution of any differential equations. The approximation for a stabilising solution is found in the form of a trigonometric polynomial, matrix coefficients of which are found solving a specially constructed finite-dimensional semidefinite programming (SDP) problem. This problem is obtained using maximality property of the stabilising solution of the Riccati equation for the associated Riccati inequality and sampling technique. Our previously published numerical comparisons with other methods shows that for a class of problems only this technique provides a working solution. Asymptotic convergence of the computed approximations to the stabilising solution is proved below under the assumption that certain combinations of the key parameters are sufficiently large. Although the rate of convergence is not analysed, it appeared to be exponential in our numerical studies.

  2. Determining mixed linear-nonlinear coupled differential equations from multivariate discrete time series sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, A. D.; Dewson, T.

    1997-02-01

    A new method is described for extracting mixed linear-nonlinear coupled differential equations from multivariate discrete time series data. It is assumed in the present work that the solution of the coupled ordinary differential equations can be represented as a multivariate Volterra functional expansion. A tractable hierarchy of moment equations is generated by operating on a suitably truncated Volterra functional expansion. The hierarchy facilitates the calculation of the coefficients of the coupled differential equations. In order to demonstrate the method's ability to accurately estimate the coefficients of the governing differential equations, it is applied to data derived from the numerical solution of the Lorenz equations with additive noise. The method is then used to construct a dynamic global mid- and high-magnetic latitude ionospheric model where nonlinear phenomena such as period doubling and quenching occur. It is shown that the estimated inhomogeneous coupled second-order differential equation model for the ionospheric foF2 peak plasma density can accurately forecast the future behaviour of a set of ionosonde stations which encompass the earth. Finally, the method is used to forecast the future behaviour of a portfolio of Japanese common stock prices. The hierarchy method can be used to characterise the observed behaviour of a wide class of coupled linear and mixed linear-nonlinear phenomena.

  3. Differential invariants and exact solutions of the Einstein equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychagin, Valentin; Yumaguzhin, Valeriy

    2016-03-01

    In this paper (cf. Lychagin and Yumaguzhin, in Anal Math Phys, 2016) a class of totally geodesics solutions for the vacuum Einstein equations is introduced. It consists of Einstein metrics of signature (1,3) such that 2-dimensional distributions, defined by the Weyl tensor, are completely integrable and totally geodesic. The complete and explicit description of metrics from these class is given. It is shown that these metrics depend on two functions in one variable and one harmonic function.

  4. Automatic multirate methods for ordinary differential equations. [Adaptive time steps

    SciTech Connect

    Gear, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A study is made of the application of integration methods in which different step sizes are used for different members of a system of equations. Such methods can result in savings if the cost of derivative evaluation is high or if a system is sparse; however, the estimation and control of errors is very difficult and can lead to high overheads. Three approaches are discussed, and it is shown that the least intuitive is the most promising. 2 figures.

  5. Choas and instabilities in finite difference approximations to nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L. D., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    The numerical solution of time-dependent ordinary and partial differential equations by finite difference techniques is a common task in computational physics and engineering The rate equations for chemical kinetics in combustion modeling are an important example. They not only are nonlinear, but they tend to be stiff, which makes their solution a challenge for transient problems. We show that one must be very careful how such equations are solved In addition to the danger of large time-marching errors, there can be unphysical chaotic solutions that remain numerically stable for a range of time steps that depends on the particular finite difference method used We point out that the solutions of the finite difference equations converge to those of the differential equations only in the limit as the time step approaches zero for stable and consistent finite difference approximations The chaotic behavior observed for finite time steps in some nonlinear difference equations is unrelated to solutions of the differential equations, but is connected with the onset of numerical instabilities of the finite difference equations This behavior suggests that the use of the theory of chaos in nonlinear iterated maps may be useful in stability anlaysis of finite difference approximations to nonlinear differential equations, providing more stringent time step limits than the formal linear stability analysis that tests only for unbounded solutions This observation implies that apparently stable numerical solutions of nonlinear differential equations by finite difference techniques may in fact be contaminated (if not dominated) by nonphysical chaotic parasitic solutions that degrade the accuracy of the numerical solution We demonstrate this phenomenon with some solutions of the logistic equation and a simple two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics example

  6. Multilinear Littlewood-Paley estimates with applications to partial differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Fabes, Eugene B.; Jerison, David S.; Kenig, Carlos E.

    1982-01-01

    We obtain a collection of multilinear Littlewood-Paley estimates, which we then apply to two problems in partial differential equations. The first problem is the estimation of the square root of an elliptic operator in divergence form, and the second is the estimation of solutions to the Cauchy problem for nondivergence-form parabolic equations. PMID:16593230

  7. Boundedness of solutions for non-linear quasi-periodic differential equations with Liouvillean frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; You, Jiangong

    2016-07-01

    We study the boundedness of solutions for non-linear quasi-periodic differential equations with Liouvillean frequencies. We proved that if the forcing is quasi-periodic in time with two frequencies which is not super-Liouvillean, then all solutions of the equation are bounded. The proof is based on action-angle variables and modified KAM theory.

  8. A Multilevel Algorithm for the Solution of Second Order Elliptic Differential Equations on Sparse Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pflaum, Christoph

    1996-01-01

    A multilevel algorithm is presented that solves general second order elliptic partial differential equations on adaptive sparse grids. The multilevel algorithm consists of several V-cycles. Suitable discretizations provide that the discrete equation system can be solved in an efficient way. Numerical experiments show a convergence rate of order Omicron(1) for the multilevel algorithm.

  9. A note on a corrector formula for the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Y.-C.; Agrawal, K. M.

    1979-01-01

    A new corrector formula for predictor-corrector methods for numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations is presented. Two considerations for choosing corrector formulas are given: (1) the coefficient in the error term and (2) its stability properties. The graph of the roots of an equation plotted against its stability region, of different values, is presented along with the tables that correspond to various corrector equations, including Hamming's and Milne and Reynolds'.

  10. Study of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations for finding exact analytical solutions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kamruzzaman; Akbar, M. Ali; Koppelaar, H.

    2015-01-01

    Exact solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations (NPDEs) are obtained via the enhanced (G′/G)-expansion method. The method is subsequently applied to find exact solutions of the Drinfel'd–Sokolov–Wilson (DSW) equation and the (2+1)-dimensional Painlevé integrable Burgers (PIB) equation. The efficiency of this method for finding these exact solutions is demonstrated. The method is effective and applicable for many other NPDEs in mathematical physics. PMID:26587256

  11. IDSOLVER: A general purpose solver for nth-order integro-differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmi, Claudio A.; Jorquera, Héctor

    2014-01-01

    Many mathematical models of complex processes may be posed as integro-differential equations (IDE). Many numerical methods have been proposed for solving those equations, but most of them are ad hoc thus new equations have to be solved from scratch for translating the IDE into the framework of the specific method chosen. Furthermore, there is a paucity of general-purpose numerical solvers that free the user from additional tasks.

  12. Some properties of solutions of a functional-differential equation of second order with delay.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Veronica Ana; Otrocol, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Existence, uniqueness, data dependence (monotony, continuity, and differentiability with respect to parameter), and Ulam-Hyers stability results for the solutions of a system of functional-differential equations with delays are proved. The techniques used are Perov's fixed point theorem and weakly Picard operator theory. PMID:24683363

  13. Stochastic Calculus and Differential Equations for Physics and Finance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Joseph L.

    2013-02-01

    1. Random variables and probability distributions; 2. Martingales, Markov, and nonstationarity; 3. Stochastic calculus; 4. Ito processes and Fokker-Planck equations; 5. Selfsimilar Ito processes; 6. Fractional Brownian motion; 7. Kolmogorov's PDEs and Chapman-Kolmogorov; 8. Non Markov Ito processes; 9. Black-Scholes, martingales, and Feynman-Katz; 10. Stochastic calculus with martingales; 11. Statistical physics and finance, a brief history of both; 12. Introduction to new financial economics; 13. Statistical ensembles and time series analysis; 14. Econometrics; 15. Semimartingales; References; Index.

  14. Dynamics of gelling liquids: algebraic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sunita; Kumar, C N; Tankeshwar, K

    2009-08-19

    The sol-gel system which is known, experimentally, to exhibit a power law decay of stress autocorrelation function has been studied theoretically. A second-order nonlinear differential equation obtained from Mori's integro-differential equation is derived which provides the algebraic decay of a time correlation function. Involved parameters in the expression obtained are related to exact properties of the corresponding correlation function. The algebraic model has been applied to Lennard-Jones and sol-gel systems. The model shows the behaviour of viscosity as has been observed in computer simulation and theoretical studies. The expression obtained for the viscosity predicts a logarithmic divergence at a critical value of the parameter in agreement with the prediction of other theories. PMID:21828600

  15. Cantor-type cylindrical-coordinate method for differential equations with local fractional derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Srivastava, H. M.; He, Ji-Huan; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2013-10-01

    In this Letter, we propose to use the Cantor-type cylindrical-coordinate method in order to investigate a family of local fractional differential operators on Cantor sets. Some testing examples are given to illustrate the capability of the proposed method for the heat-conduction equation on a Cantor set and the damped wave equation in fractal strings. It is seen to be a powerful tool to convert differential equations on Cantor sets from Cantorian-coordinate systems to Cantor-type cylindrical-coordinate systems.

  16. Derivation of a Differential Equation Exhibiting Replicative Time-Evolution Patterns by Inverse Ultra-Discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Asumi; Nishiyama, Akinobu; Tokihiro, Tetsuji

    2009-03-01

    A differential equation exhibiting replicative time-evolution patterns is derived by inverse ultradiscretizatrion of Fredkin’s game, which is one of the simplest replicative cellular automaton (CA) in two dimensions. This is achieved by employing a certain filter and a clock function in the equation. These techniques are applicable to the inverse ultra-discretization (IUD) of other CA and stabilize the time-evolution of the obtained differential equation. Application to the game of life, another CA in two dimensions, is also presented.

  17. Solving Fractional Partial Differential Equations with Variable Coefficients by the Reconstruction of Variational Iteration Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesameddini, Esmail; Rahimi, Azam

    2015-05-01

    In this article, we propose a new approach for solving fractional partial differential equations with variable coefficients, which is very effective and can also be applied to other types of differential equations. The main advantage of the method lies in its flexibility for obtaining the approximate solutions of time fractional and space fractional equations. The fractional derivatives are described based on the Caputo sense. Our method contains an iterative formula that can provide rapidly convergent successive approximations of the exact solution if such a closed form solution exists. Several examples are given, and the numerical results are shown to demonstrate the efficiency of the newly proposed method.

  18. Numerical solution of stiff systems of ordinary differential equations with applications to electronic circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    Systems of ordinary differential equations in which the magnitudes of the eigenvalues (or time constants) vary greatly are commonly called stiff. Such systems of equations arise in nuclear reactor kinetics, the flow of chemically reacting gas, dynamics, control theory, circuit analysis and other fields. The research reported develops an A-stable numerical integration technique for solving stiff systems of ordinary differential equations. The method, which is called the generalized trapezoidal rule, is a modification of the trapezoidal rule. However, the method is computationally more efficient than the trapezoidal rule when the solution of the almost-discontinuous segments is being calculated.

  19. Solving the quantum brachistochrone equation through differential geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Chenglong; Wilde, Mark; Dowling, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaoting

    2016-05-01

    The ability of generating a particular quantum state, or model a physical quantum device by exploring quantum state transfer, is important in many applications such as quantum chemistry, quantum information processing, quantum metrology and cooling. Due to the environmental noise, a quantum device suffers from decoherence causing information loss. Hence, completing the state-generation task in a time-optimal way can be considered as a straightforward method to reduce decoherence. For a quantum system whose Hamiltonian has a fixed type and a finite energy bandwidth, it has been found that the time-optimal quantum evolution can be characterized by the quantum brachistochrone equation. In addition, the brachistochrone curve is found to have a geometric interpretation: it is the limit of a one-parameter family of geodesics on a sub-Riemannian model. Such geodesic-brachistochrone connection provides an efficient numerical method to solve the quantum brachistochrone equation. In this work, we will demonstrate this numerical method by studying the time-optimal state-generating problem on a given quantum spin system. We also find that the Pareto weighted-sum optimization turns out to be a simple but efficient method in solving the quantum time-optimal problems. We would like to acknowledge support from NSF under Award No. CCF-1350397.

  20. Approximate controllability of impulsive differential equations with state-dependent delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Anandhi, E. R.

    2010-02-01

    In order to describe various real-world problems in physical and engineering sciences subject to abrupt changes at certain instants during the evolution process, impulsive differential equations have been used to describe the system model. In this article, the problem of approximate controllability for nonlinear impulsive differential equations with state-dependent delay is investigated. We study the approximate controllability for nonlinear impulsive differential system under the assumption that the corresponding linear control system is approximately controllable. Using methods of functional analysis and semigroup theory, sufficient conditions are formulated and proved. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate the proposed theory.