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Sample records for algebra-based physics courses

  1. The Future of Physics in the Undergraduate Education of Biologists: Beyond the Algebra Based Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leone, Charles

    2005-03-01

    The success of quantitative and computational methods of research in the biological sciences has incited calls for change in the undergraduate biological sciences curriculum. This reevaluation of the biology curriculum presents physicists with an opportunity to rethink and rebuild service courses such as the introductory algebra based physics course. Beyond the one-year introductory course, some of the more ambitious curricular reforms include calls for a third semester of physics for students who plan on doing biomedical research. This talk will briefly explore the open question of how we can best serve the evolving needs of our colleagues in biology by considering the calls for change in the biology curriculum such as BIO 2010 and reviewing the current state of the introductory physics course for biologists. In addition, this talk will review the successes and failures of research based courses such as the introductory calculus-based physics course for biologists at Cal State San Marcos.

  2. Using a flipped classroom in an algebra-based physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leigh

    2013-03-01

    The algebra-based physics course is taken by Biology students, Pre-Pharmacy, Pre-Medical, and other health related majors such as medical imaging, physical therapy, and so on. Nearly 500 students take the course each Semester. Student learning is adversely impacted by poor math backgrounds as well as extensive work schedules outside of the classroom. We have been researching the use of an intensive flipped-classroom approach where students spend one to two hours each week preparing for class by reading the book, completing a series of conceptual problems, and viewing videos which describe the material. In class, the new response system Learning Catalytics is used which allows much richer problems to be posed in class and includes sketching figures, numerical or symbolic entries, short answers, highlighting text, etc in addition to the standard multiple choice questions. We make direct comparison of student learning for 1200 sudents who have taken the same tests, 25% of which used the flipped classroom approach, and 75% who took a more standard lecture. There is significant evidence of improvements in student learning for students taking the flipped classroom approach over standard lectures. These benefits appear to impact students at all math backgrounds.

  3. Methods to Improve Performance of Students with Weaker Math Skills in an Algebra-based Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leigh

    2015-03-01

    I will describe methods used at the University of Cincinnati to enhance student success in an algebra-based physics course. The first method is to use ALEKS, an adaptive online mathematics tutorial engine, before the term begins. Approximately three to four weeks before the beginning of the term, the professor in the course emails all of the students in the course informing them of the possibility of improving their math proficiency by using ALEKS. Using only a minimal reward on homework, we have achieved a 70% response rate with students spending an average of 8 hours working on their math skills before classes start. The second method is to use a flipped classroom approach. The class of 135 meets in a tiered classroom twice per week for two hours. Over the previous weekend students spend approximately 2 hours reading the book, taking short multiple choice conceptual quizzes, and viewing videos covering the material. In class, students use Learning Catalytics to work through homework problems in groups, guided by the instructor and one learning assistant. Using these interventions, we have reduced the student DWF rate (the fraction of students receiving a D or lower in the class) from an historical average of 35 to 40% to less than 20%.

  4. Correlates of gender and achievement in introductory algebra based physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rachel Clara

    The field of physics is heavily male dominated in America. Thus, half of the population of our country is underrepresented and underserved. The identification of factors that contribute to gender disparity in physics is necessary for educators to address the individual needs of students, and, in particular, the separate and specific needs of female students. In an effort to determine if any correlations could be established or strengthened between sex, gender identity, social network, algebra skill, scientific reasoning ability, and/or student attitude, a study was performed on a group of 82 students in an introductory algebra based physics course. The subjects each filled out a survey at the beginning of the semester of their first semester of algebra based physics. They filled out another survey at the end of that same semester. These surveys included physics content pretests and posttests, as well as questions about the students' habits, attitudes, and social networks. Correlates of posttest score were identified, in order of significance, as pretest score, emphasis on conceptual learning, preference for male friends, number of siblings (negatively correlated), motivation in physics, algebra score, and parents' combined education level. Number of siblings was also found to negatively correlate with, in order of significance, gender identity, preference for male friends, emphasis on conceptual learning, and motivation in physics. Preference for male friends was found to correlate with, in order of significance, emphasis on conceptual learning, gender identity, and algebra score. Also, gender identity was found to correlate with emphasis on conceptual learning, the strongest predictor of posttest score other than pretest score.

  5. Curriculum design for the algebra-based course: Just change the `d's to deltas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loverude, Michael E.; Kanim, Stephen E.; Gomez, Luanna

    2008-10-01

    The PIs have been involved in an NSF-funded project to develop materials for the introductory mechanics laboratory. The materials are based on the instructional approach taken in Tutorials in Introductory Physics (curriculum developed in the context of the calculus-based course at the University of Washington) [1]. While the materials being developed are intended for the algebra-based course, at many universities the labs are common to the two courses. As a result, we have been looking at differences in performance between these two student populations. In this poster, we describe the differences we have observed, especially as related to graphs, proportional reasoning, and algebra. It turns out that you cannot just change the d's to Deltas—who knew? We will discuss implications for instructors and for curriculum developers.

  6. The IPAD as a Pedagogical Tool in an Algebra-Based Introductory Physics Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garriott, Angela; Bush, Leah; Ramos, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    We report our experience in using the IPAD as a pedagogical tool for enhancing physics learning in an introductory algebra-based physics laboratory course for primarily pre-med students. We used several applications including (1) video analysis for experiments in accelerated motion (2) virtual oscilloscope for studying wave motion and circuit response to low frequency driving voltages; (3) applications for visualization of electric fields and magnetic fields. We compare student responses to this platform versus more traditional experiments. Using student surveys and polls. We also evaluate the IPAD as a new and familiar interface versus traditional interfaces like the standard oscilloscope. We report on the advantages and disadvantages of using this mobile, popular platform in delivering experimental physics content and promoting student engagement.

  7. Transferring a Flipped Class in Algebra-based Physics to New Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leigh; Sousa, Alexandre

    Transferring existing active classroom educational efforts to new faculty is a challenge that must be met to ensure sustainability of changes. We describe a flipped class approach to teaching algebra-based Physics being transferred to a new faculty member. This flipped class includes extensive video and reading-based preparation materials outside of class, and the use of Learning Catalytics for in-class work is developed and tested by one of the authors. These materials are of course idiosyncratic to the style of the developer. Student results using the new materials are compared with students in more standard classes which suggest significant positive benefit over several years. A faculty member decided to use these materials in his own section of the same course. Our experience shows that it takes some time for the new faculty member to use and adapt the materials in a way which matches his own style, which in the end results in equivalently enhanced results. Lessons learned from this transfer process will be discussed. We acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through DUE 1544001 and 1431350.

  8. Linking Science Fiction and Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Krista K.

    2016-05-01

    Generally, cohorts or learning communities enrich higher learning in students. Learning communities consist of conventionally separate groups of students that meet together with common academic purposes and goals. Types of learning communities include paired courses with concurrent student enrollment, living-learning communities, and faculty learning communities. This article discusses a learning community of 21 students that I created with a colleague in the English department. The community encompasses two general education courses: an algebra-based physics course entitled "Intro to Physics" and a literature course entitled "Science Fiction, Science Fact." Students must enroll in both of these courses during the same semester. Additionally, I highlight advantages to linking these courses through surveying the assignments and course materials that we used in our learning community. Figure 1 shows the topics that are covered in both physics and literature courses.

  9. Physics Based University Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeby, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two physics courses which serve as alternatives to general college courses in physics are outlined: physics with astrophysics and physics with electronics. Details are given of the structure of the courses and third year options are specified. (DT)

  10. A uniform algebraically-based approach to computational physics and efficient programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynolds, James; Mullin, Lenore

    2007-03-01

    We present an approach to computational physics in which a common formalism is used both to express the physical problem as well as to describe the underlying details of how computation is realized on arbitrary multiprocessor/memory computer architectures. This formalism is the embodiment of a generalized algebra of multi-dimensional arrays (A Mathematics of Arrays) and an efficient computational implementation is obtained through the composition of of array indices (the psi-calculus) of algorithms defined using matrices, tensors, and arrays in general. The power of this approach arises from the fact that multiple computational steps (e.g. Fourier Transform followed by convolution, etc.) can be algebraically composed and reduced to an simplified expression (i.e. Operational Normal Form), that when directly translated into computer code, can be mathematically proven to be the most efficient implementation with the least number of temporary variables, etc. This approach will be illustrated in the context of a cache-optimized FFT that outperforms or is competitive with established library routines: ESSL, FFTW, IMSL, NAG.

  11. Facilitating case reuse during problem solving in algebra-based physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateycik, Frances Ann

    This research project investigates students' development of problem solving schemata while using strategies that facilitate the process of using solved examples to assist with a new problem (case reuse). Focus group learning interviews were used to explore students' perceptions and understanding of several problem solving strategies. Individual clinical interviews were conducted and quantitative examination data were collected to assess students' conceptual understanding, knowledge organization, and problem solving performance on a variety of problem tasks. The study began with a short one-time treatment of two independent, research-based strategies chosen to facilitate case reuse. Exploration of students' perceptions and use of the strategies lead investigators to select one of the two strategies to be implemented over a full semester of focus group interviews. The strategy chosen was structure mapping. Structure maps are defined as visual representations of quantities and their associations. They were created by experts to model the appropriate mental organization of knowledge elements for a given physical concept. Students were asked to use these maps as they were comfortable while problem solving. Data obtained from this phase of our study (Phase I) offered no evidence of improved problem solving schema. The 11 contact hour study was barely sufficient time for students to become comfortable using the maps. A set of simpler strategies were selected for their more explicit facilitation of analogical reasoning, and were used together during two more semester long focus group treatments (Phase II and Phase III of this study). These strategies included the use of a step-by-step process aimed at reducing cognitive load associated with mathematical procedure, direct reflection of principles involved in a given set of problems, and the direct comparison of problem pairs designed to be void of surface similarities (similar objects or object orientations) and sharing

  12. Physics 3204. Course Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newfoundland and Labrador Dept. of Education.

    A description of the physics 3204 course in Newfoundland and Labrador is provided. The description includes: (1) statement of purpose, including general objectives of science education; (2) a list of six course objectives; (3) course content for units on sound, light, optical instruments, electrostatics, current electricity, Michael Faraday and…

  13. Using Biomedically Relevant Multimedia Content in an Introductory Physics Course for Life Science and Pre-Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mylott, Elliot; Kutschera, Ellynne; Dunlap, Justin C.; Christensen, Warren; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    We will describe a one-quarter pilot algebra-based introductory physics course for pre-health and life science majors. The course features videos with biomedical experts and cogent biomedically inspired physics content. The materials were used in a flipped classroom as well as an all-online environment where students interacted with multimedia…

  14. [Physical assessment course evaluation].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, M; Nozaki, M

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new course it physical assessment which began in April, 1996. The student were requested to complete a questionnaire at the termination of the course. The subjects included the 59 students who enrolled in and completed the course in physical assessment. The response rate to the questionnaire was 64.4%. The findings were as follows: 1. Course Structure and Process: The student responses indicated support for the course structure and process. The course began with content on vital signs and advanced to head to toe physical examination. Students responded most positively to the process of lecture presentation followed by self-learning and then the opportunity for practical experience. 2. Teaching Methods: Team teaching was the method chosen for presentation of the course. Student evaluation indicated both advantages and disadvantages to this method. Students were positive about the experience of practicing the roles of the nurse and patient because it allowed them to gain a better understanding of patient's feelings. Some students noted that there were differences in thinking among the teachers. Other students noted positive aspect of team teaching, i.e. the value of different perspectives from more than one teacher. 3. Student Self-Learning: Approximately 50% of the students responded that they did not have enough time to participate in self-learning activities. The other 50% stated that they did have adequate time. Students noted that they did not consult with the teacher when they were participating in self-learning activities. A few students requested an improvement in the teaching materials that were used. 4. Acquisition of physical examination skills and professional demeanor. Course satisfaction was high-on a scale of 1 to 10, the course average reached 8.1. Students expressed strong satisfaction with the acquisition of skills and professional demeanor.

  15. The laboratory experience in introductory physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Maria C.

    1997-03-01

    The last two decades or so have witnessed intense efforts to improve the teaching and learning of physics. Scholarly studies have provided the grounding for many projects which reform the structure of introductory courses. A number of these innovations, however, are resource intensive, or depend on the ability to introduce changes in areas which are beyond the control of the faculty (e.g., scheduling), thus inhibiting their implementation. An alternative strategy that overcomes these obstacles is to modify the nature of the laboratory experience (a component that practically nobody disputes is an essential part of the introductory course), to provide hands-on learning opportunities that differ from the traditional "follow-this-recipe-to-verify-this-law" approach. I have chosen to implement a variety of activities that support the overall objectives of the course: developing conceptual understanding and transferable skills, and providing practice in the ways scientists actually do science. Given the audience in this two-semester, algebra-based course, mostly biology majors and pre-professionals (health-related careers, such as medicine, physical therapy, and veterinary), these goals were identified as the most important and lasting contribution that a physics course can make to the students intellectual development. I offer here examples of the types of hands on activities that I have implemented, organized for the sake of this presentation in four rather loose categories, depending on which subset of the course objectives the activities mostly address: self-designed lab activities, discussion of demo-type activities, building concepts from simple to complex, and out-of-lab physical phenomena.

  16. Interactive online optics modules for the college physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeling, Barbara M.

    2012-04-01

    A new learning tool for geometrical optics is presented which has been developed for an algebra based introductory college physics course for life science majors. The interactive online learning module contains images, videos of problem solutions, short animated videos, and interactive animations, which allow students to actively explore the physics content beyond the pictures in a textbook. These elements are accompanied by narration and a transcript to guide the students while allowing them to navigate freely between the different parts of the module. The results of student learning, a comparison with a control group, and a survey of student attitudes toward this new instruction method are discussed.

  17. Comparing the Attitudes of Pre-Health Professional and Engineering Students in Introductory Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Meghan

    2015-04-01

    This talk will discuss using the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) to compare student attitudes towards the study of physics of two different groups. Northern Illinois University has two levels of introductory mechanics courses, one geared towards biology majors and pre-health professionals, and one for engineering and physics majors. The course for pre-health professionals is an algebra based course, while the course for engineering and physics majors is a calculus based course. We've adapted the CLASS into a twenty question survey that measures student attitudes towards the practice of and conceptions about physics. The survey is administered as a pre and post assessment to look at student attitudes before and after their first course in physics.

  18. Rounding off the cow: Challenges and successes in an interdisciplinary physics course for life science students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Dawn C.; Bolker, Jessica A.

    2012-10-01

    We describe a 4-yr project designing, teaching, and assessing an interdisciplinary algebra-based physics course for undergraduate biology students. We addressed the needs of this cohort through careful selection of topics and rich biological applications, while also attending to deeper pedagogical concerns (students' conceptual understanding, epistemological stance, and ability to connect meaning and mathematics). The course provided biology/physics connections that students value, and their work indicated an ability to understand and integrate physics in biological contexts. We offer strategies, suggestions, and some cautionary tales for faculty contemplating or already engaged in similar endeavors.

  19. Using multiple-possibility physics problems in introductory physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekoyan, Vazgen

    I have explored the instructional value of using multiple-possibility problems (MPPs) in introductory physics courses. MPPs are different from problems we most often encounter in textbooks. They are different from regular problems since (1) they have missing information, vaguely defined goals or unstated constrains, (2) they possess multiple solutions with multiple criteria for evaluating the solutions, (3) they present uncertainty about which concepts, rules, and principles are necessary for the solution or how they are organized. Real-life problems and professional problems are MPPs. Students rarely encounter such problems in introductory physics courses. Kitchener (1983) proposed a three-level model of cognitive processing to categorize the thinking steps one makes when faced with such problems (cognition, metacognition, epistemic cognition). The critical and distinctive component of MPP solving is epistemic cognition. At that level individuals reflect on the limits of knowing, the certainty of knowing, the underlying assumptions made. It is an important part of thinking in real life. Firstly, I developed and tested a coding scheme for measuring epistemic cognition. Using the coding scheme I compared the epistemic cognition level of experts and novices by conducting think-aloud problem-solving interviews with them. Although experts had higher epistemic cognition level than novices, I documented some instances where a novice showed an expert-like epistemic cognition. I found that prompting question during interviews were 50% effective for students. Secondly, I tested the following two hypotheses by conducting two experimental design and one pre-post treatment design investigations in an algebra-based physics course at Rutgers University: Hypothesis 1: Solving MPPs enhances students' epistemic cognition; Hypothesis 2: Solving MPPs engages students in more meaningful problem solving and thus helps them construct a better conceptual understanding of physics. I found

  20. Self-Paced Physics, Course Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Samples of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this collection for dissemination purposes. Descriptions are included of course objectives, characteristics, structures, and content. As a two-semester course of study for science and engineering sophomores, most topics are on a level comparable to that of classical physics by…

  1. Courses in Physics in Medical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Provides descriptions of courses in physics in medical colleges in England. For each institution, entry requirements, course structure, and main branches of research are included among information provided. (CP)

  2. Medical Physics Undergraduate Degree Courses at University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Roy

    1989-01-01

    Described are the course, teaching/study, entry qualifications, and destination of graduates of four courses in medical physics from Exeter University, King's College London, University College London, and University College of Swansea. (YP)

  3. A photography course for physics students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, P.; Higinbotham, J.

    1990-11-01

    This article is based upon a paper presented at the Asian Pacific Education Network (ASPEN) Conference on the Teaching of Optics. It seeks to encourage Physics Departments to seriously consider the teaching of Photography in Physics Courses.

  4. A Fun General Education Physics Course: Physics of Sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John Eric

    2004-05-01

    During a two-year visiting appointment at Oberlin College in Oberlin, OH, I offered a course called Physics of Sports for the fall 2000 semester and the fall 2001 semester. While preparing the course, I faced a challenge that confronts many physics teachers: How can I make a general education physics course fun for nonscience students? With only an algebra prerequisite for the course, the typical student did not have a particularly strong mathematical background. My goal was to not only teach those students a little physics, but also show them how physicists try to understand and describe the world of sports. I also wanted to make the course sufficiently enjoyable that the students had a positive experience in what may have been the last science course some of them ever took. After discussions with the students, I feel the course succeeded in fulfilling my goals.

  5. A course in Computational Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawitscher, George

    2011-03-01

    This course, taught at UConn, has several objectives: 1) To make the students comfortable in using MATLAB; 2) To reveal the existence of unavoidable inaccuracies due to numerical roundoff errors and algorithm inaccuracies; 3) to introduce modern spectral expansion methods, and compare them with conventional finite difference methods. Some of the projects assigned in the course will be described, such as the motion of a falling parachute, and the vibrations of an inhomogeneous vibrating string.

  6. The effect of the flipped model on achievement in an introductory college physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Joshua Brian

    The flipped or inverted classroom model is one in which the time and place for traditional lecture and homework are reversed. Traditional lecture is replaced by online videos assigned as homework. This frees up time in class to be spent with more student centered activities such as discussion based concept questions and group problem solving. While growing in popularity, research on the effectiveness of this format is sparse. In this quasi-experimental study, two sections of an introductory algebra-based college physics course were examined over a five week period. Each section was taught with either the traditional or flipped model and physics knowledge achieved was compared using independent samples t-tests on both the instructor's unit exam and the Mechanics Baseline Test pre/posttest normalized gain. Results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference between the flipped model and the traditional lecture format. Avenues for further research are discussed.

  7. ITOP: graduate courses for physics teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Andrew; Jariwala, Manher; Garik, Peter

    2011-04-01

    In this talk, we will describe Project ITOP, a set of 10 two-credit graduate courses for in-service physics teachers, offered through the College of Arts and Sciences at Boston University (BU). ITOP (Improving the Teaching of Physics) is based at BU, but we also teach the courses in Chicopee, MA, for teachers in western and central Massachusetts. The physics content in the courses ranges from Newton's laws of motion through to quantum mechanics, special relativity, and computer modeling. In addition, we discuss both the conceptual history of physics, as well as readings from the Physics Education Research literature. Our primary goal is to develop the pedagogical content knowledge of participating teachers, enabling teachers to be more effective in their own classrooms. ITOP web site: http://physics.bu.edu/teachers/

  8. Physical Theory in Biology: An Interdisciplinary Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, Charles J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary course which explores the relationships between physics and biology in terms of their conceptual structures and mathematical frameworks. Highlights the course content, its system of cross-disciplinary literature resources, and several innovative aspects of the method used for evaluating students. (Author/GA)

  9. Exophysics--A New Introductory Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Provides the outline of an introductory college-level physics course which combines astronomy, astrophysics, relativity and communications with a study of civilizations and the conditions necessary for life. Student comments and an informal evaluation of the course are included. (CP)

  10. Web-Based Instruction in Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijekumar, V.

    1998-05-01

    The World Wide Web will be utilized to deliver instructional materials in physics courses in two cases. In one case, a set of physics courses will be entirely taught using WWW for high school science and mathematics teachers in the physics certification program. In the other case, the WWW will be used to enhance the linkage between the laboratory courses in medical physics, human physiology and clinical nursing courses for nursing students. This project links three departments in two colleges to enhance a project known as Integrated Computer System across the Health Science Curriculum. Partial support for this work was provided by the National Science Foundation's Division od Undergraduate Education through grant DUE # 9650793.

  11. The Physical Tourist. A European Study Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd; Westfall, Catherine

    2010-03-01

    We organized and led a European study course for American undergraduate university students to explore the early history of relativity and quantum theory. We were inspired by The Physical Tourist articles published in this journal on Munich, Bern, Berlin, Copenhagen, and Göttingen. We describe this adventure both for others wishing to teach such a course and for anyone wishing to walk in the footsteps of the physicists who revolutionized physics in the early decades of the twentieth century.

  12. Using Biomedically Relevant Multimedia Content in an Introductory Physics Course for Life Science and Pre-health Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylott, Elliot; Kutschera, Ellynne; Dunlap, Justin C.; Christensen, Warren; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    We will describe a one-quarter pilot algebra-based introductory physics course for pre-health and life science majors. The course features videos with biomedical experts and cogent biomedically inspired physics content. The materials were used in a flipped classroom as well as an all-online environment where students interacted with multimedia materials online and prior to engaging in classroom activities. Pre-lecture questions on both the medical content covered in the video media and the physics concepts in the written material were designed to engage students and probe their understanding of physics. The course featured group discussion and peer-lead instruction. Following in-class instruction, students engaged with homework assignments which explore the connections of physics and the medical field in a quantitative manner. Course surveys showed a positive response by the vast majority of students. Students largely indicated that the course helped them to make a connection between physics and the biomedical field. The biomedical focus and different course format were seen as an improvement to previous traditional physics instruction.

  13. Students' Attitudes toward Introductory Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirci, Neset

    2004-01-01

    The problem examined in this study deals with students' attitude toward physics among the freshmen and sophomore students who were taking first introductory physics course. In the study there were 176 students, and they were chosen sample of convenience from Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Florida. 125 subjects were male students, and…

  14. Plasma Physics: An Introductory Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, R. O.

    1995-03-01

    Preface; Introduction R. O. Dendy; 1. Plasma particle dynamics R. J. Hastie; 2. Plasma kinetic theory J. A. Elliott; 3. Waves in plasmas J. P. Doughtery; 4. Magnetohydrodynamics K. I. Hopcraft; 5. Turbulence in fluids and fusion plasmas F. A. Haas; 6. Finite-dimensional dynamics and chaos T. J. Mullin; 7. Computational plasma physics J. W. Eastwood; 8. Tokomak experiments D. C. Robinson and M. R. O'Brien; 9. Magnetospheric plasmas: Part I Basic processes in the solar system D. A. Bryant; Part II Microprocesses R. L. Bingham; 10. Solar plasmas R. A. Hood; 11. Gravitational plasmas J. J. Binney; 12. Laser plasmas A. R. Bell; 13. Industrial plasmas P. C. Johnson; 14. Transport in magnetically confined plasmas T. E. Stringer; 15. Radio-frequency plasma heating R. A. Cairns; 16. Boundary plasmas G. McCracken; 17. How to build a tokomak T. N. Todd; 18. Survey of fusion plasma physics R. S. Pease; Index.

  15. Computing in the Introductory Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabay, Ruth; Sherwood, Bruce

    2004-03-01

    In the Matter & Interactions version of the calculus-based introductory physics course (http://www4.ncsu.edu/ ˜rwchabay/mi) , students write programs in VPython (http://vpython.org) to model physical systems and to calculate and visualize electric and magnetic fields. VPython is unusually easy to learn, produces navigable 3D animations as a side effect of physics computations, and supports full vector calculations. The high speed of current computers makes sophisticated numerical analysis techniques unnecessary. Students can use simple first-order Euler integration, cutting the step size until the behavior of the system no longer changes. In mechanics, iterative application of the momentum principle gives students a sense of the time-evolution character of Newton's second law which is usually missing from the standard course. In E, students calculate electric and magnetic fields numerically and display them in 3D. We are currently studying the impact of introducing computational physics into the introductory course.

  16. A Course Evolves-Physical Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of an online physical anthropology course at Palomar College (California) that evolved from online tutorials. Discusses the ability to update materials on the Web more quickly than in traditional textbooks; creating Web pages that are readable by most Web browsers; test security issues; and clarifying ownership of online…

  17. Physics Courses--Some Suggested Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    To communicate the relevance and excitement of science activity to students, the use of more imaginative, and even openly speculative, case studies in physics courses is suggested. Some useful examples are Magnetic Monopoles, Constants, Black Holes, Antimatter, Zero Mass Particles, Tachyons, and the Bootstrap Hypothesis. (DF)

  18. Dialogue in a Distance Education Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorsky, Paul; Caspi, Avner; Trumper, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the kinds of dialogues utilized by Open University students while studying an intermediate level physics course. Research objectives were twofold: to document what dialogue types, mediated through which resources, were (1) generally utilized by students as they learned; and (2) were specifically utilized by students to…

  19. Environmental Topics for Introductory Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Laurent

    1974-01-01

    Presents selected environmental references with comparatively detailed descriptions for the purpose of helping high school and college physics teachers in selecting materials for their course. The topics include thermal pollution, space heating and cooling, atmospheric temperature distribution, radiation balance of the earth, sound and noises, and…

  20. Exergames for Physical Education Courses: Physical, Social, and Cognitive Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Staiano, Amanda E.; Calvert, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Digital games combining exercise with game play, known as exergames, can improve youths’ health status and provide social and academic benefits. Exergame play increases caloric expenditure, heart rate, and coordination. Psychosocial and cognitive impacts of exergame play may include increased self-esteem, social interaction, motivation, attention, and visual–spatial skills. This article summarizes the literature on exergames, with a special emphasis on physical education courses and the potential of exergames to improve students’ physical health, as well as transfer effects that may benefit related physical, social, and academic outcomes. PMID:22563349

  1. Polarization of physics on global courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alinea, Allan L.; Naylor, Wade

    2015-03-01

    Since October 2010, the Chemistry-Biology Combined Major Program, an international course taught in English at Osaka University, has been teaching small classes (no more than 20 in size). We present data from the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) given to first-year classical mechanics students (N = 47 students over three years) pre and post score, for a class that predominantly uses interactive engagement, such as MasteringPhysics. Our findings show a G-factor improved score of about ˜0.18, which is marginally about the average of a traditional-based course. Furthermore, we analyze in detail a set of six questions from the FCI, involving the identification of forces acting on a body. We find that student answers tend to cluster about ‘polarizing choices’—a pair of choices containing the correct choice and a wrong choice, with the latter corresponding to a superset of forces in the former. Our results are suggestive that students have a good idea of the right set of forces acting on a given system, but the inclusion of extra force(s) brings about confusion; something that may be explained by misleading ontological categorization of forces. In an appendix A we also comment on possible correlations between the pre/post score and the level of English ability on entry to the course.

  2. Prior Preparation in Math and Science and its Effect on Student Performance in an Introductory Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudol, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    I developed a test, hereafter the Baseline Test, to measure the extent to which students meet the expectations of a college level, algebra-based, introductory physics course with regard to prior preparation in math and science. The average Baseline Test score for a sample of N=182 undergraduate students is 0.55 ± 0.18, consistent with past efforts to make similar measurements. Positive correlation is found between Baseline Test scores and average exam scores (r=0.57, p < 0.0001, N=144). Positive correlation is also found between Baseline Test scores and Force Concept Inventory gains (r=0.45, p < 0.0001, N=141). An analysis of the complete record of student responses to each of the Baseline Test questions and the multiple choice questions on exams reveals no apparent, causal relationship between prior preparation in math and science and student performance on exams. The data suggest the presence of a hidden variable.

  3. The Role of Context and Gender in Predicting Success in a Modified Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subero, Keron

    2010-01-01

    We designed and implemented curriculum intended to be used by students in an algebra-based introductory physics laboratory course. Our curricular goal was to foster, through observations in the lab, a coherent framework in students' understanding of general principles presented in the introductory mechanics course, while addressing known student…

  4. PSI for Low-Enrollment Junior-Senior Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Charles P.; Young, Robert D.

    1976-01-01

    The administration of a Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) for junior-senior level courses in mechanics, electricity and magneturn, atomic physics, mathematical physics, physics and computers, astrophysics, and relativity is described. (CP)

  5. Student Perceptions of a Conceptual Physical Education Activity Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jayne M.; Jenkins, Patience; Collums, Ashley; Werhonig, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Conceptual physical education (CPE) courses are typically included in university course work to provide students knowledge and skills to engage in physical activity for life. The purpose of this study was to identify CPE course characteristics that contributed to positive and negative student perceptions. Participants included 157 undergraduates…

  6. A "Medical Physics" Course Based Upon Hospital Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onn, David G.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a noncalculus, medical physics'' course with a basic element of direct hospital field experience. The course is intended primarily for premedical students but may be taken by nonscience majors. (Author/PR)

  7. Rapid Conversion of Traditional Introductory Physics Sequences to an Activity-Based Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Garett; Cook, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Physics at EKU [Eastern Kentucky University] with support from the National Science Foundations Course Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement Program has successfully converted our entire introductory physics sequence, both algebra-based and calculus-based courses, to an activity-based format where laboratory activities,…

  8. Engaging the community through an undergraduate biomedical physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Ness, G. R.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2012-12-01

    We report on the development of an undergraduate biomedical physics course at Portland State University, motivated by both student interest and the desire of the university's Physics Department to provide an interdisciplinary intermediate-level physics course. The course was developed through the community engagement of physicians, clinical researchers, and basic science researchers. Class meetings were a combination of regular and guest lectures, hands-on exercises, web-based activities, class discussions, and a student poster information session for patrons at a local science museum. The course inspired students to engage in research projects in biomedical physics that enhance their understanding of science and education as well as benefit the learning of future students. Furthermore, this course offers an opportunity for traditionally underrepresented groups in physics courses, such as women, to gain additional exposure to physics.

  9. General Physics Course for Pre-medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argos, Patrick

    1973-01-01

    Discusses a two-semester noncalculus general physics course which emphasizes the teaching of physical knowledge in biology, biophysics, and medicine. Included are a table of major biophysical examples, an outline of lectures, and a list of references. (CC)

  10. Introductory Biophysics Course: Presentation of Physics in a Biological Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, B. J.; Henderson, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    An introductory biophysics course for science students who have previously taken two quarters of noncalculus physics is described. Material covered emphasizes the physical principles of sound, light, electricity, energy, and information. (Author/CP)

  11. A Course on the Physics of Urban and Environmental Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marston, Edwin H.

    1970-01-01

    Presents a physics course for social scientists. Physics problems are presented within the context of several urban and environmental case studies. The problems considered include transportation, air pollution, thermal pollution of water, and scarcity of resources. (LS)

  12. Maxwell to Einstein - A Liberal-Arts Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2005-10-01

    The December 1997 issue of The Physics Teacher contained an article describing a liberal-arts physics course entitled Galileo to Newton. This course has been successfully offered for a number of years at the College of Staten Island, and interest in it has been substantial as evidenced by requests for reprints of the TPT article and requests for copies of the course lab manual. A follow-on course was designed called Maxwell to Einstein and Beyond. We offered this course for the first time in the fall 2003 semester.

  13. Powerful Ideas in Physical Science: A Course Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ukens, Leon; Hein, Warren W.; Johnson, Patsy Ann; Layman, John W.

    2004-01-01

    Powerful Ideas in Physical Science (PIPS) is a preservice curriculum that provides modules for physical science courses designed for elementary education majors. Because the courses are built on the learning cycle approach, students develop concepts from activities and then apply this conceptual knowledge. A summative evaluation done by Horizon…

  14. Principles and Applications of Physical Fitness: Course Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, David G.

    A proposal is presented for a Community College of Philadelphia Life Sciences and Allied Health Services course in physical fitness. Following a standard cover form, a statement of purpose explains that the course is designed to provide instruction and experience in the basic areas of nutrition and physical conditioning, including dietary…

  15. A Qualitative Study Comparing the Instruction on Vectors between a Physics Course and a Trigonometry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Wendy Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Science and engineering instructors often observe that students have difficulty using or applying prerequisite mathematics knowledge in their courses. This qualitative project uses a case-study method to investigate the instruction in a trigonometry course and a physics course based on a different methodology and set of assumptions about student…

  16. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 12: Reactor Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  17. Nuclear Technology Series. Course l: Radiation Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  18. Course on the Nature of Physical Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derr, Patrick G.; Andersen, Roy S.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a course which provides nonscience students with an understanding of methods and nature of natural science. The course is a seminar organized around a detailed examination of the Copernican revolution, in part through Copernicus's original writings, and in part through contemporary historical and philosophical analysis. (Author/SK)

  19. Effect of university physical education courses on intention for physical activity adherence in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Soo; Lee, Hwa-Suk

    2010-10-01

    Individuals' intentions of adopting physical activity as part of their lifestyle changed after university physical education courses in Korea. Male students (N = 264) taking physical education courses at a university in Korea were tested on the first and last day of a semester using a physical activity adherence questionnaire. The results showed that the intention to continue physical activity increased after taking the courses. PMID:21162447

  20. A Course in Physics of Human Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halley, J. W.; Eaton, B.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a course in elementary mechanics especially designed for students of athletics and dance. Includes photographs, taken in a gymnasium laboratory, used for analyzing human motion. Student response is described. (Author/CP)

  1. Students' Views About Potentially Offering Physics Courses Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlo, Susan E.

    2016-06-01

    Nationally, many public universities have started to move into the online course and program market that is most often associated with for-profit institutions of higher education. Administrators in public universities make statements regarding benefits to students' desire for flexibility and profit margins related to online courses. But do students attending a large public university want to take courses online especially science courses perceived to be difficult such as freshmen-level physics courses? This study took place at a large, public, Midwestern university and involved students enrolled in the first semester of a face-to-face, flipped physics course for engineering technology majors. Statements were collected from comments about online courses made by the university's administration and students in the course. Twenty students sorted 45 statements. Two student views emerged with one rejecting online courses in general and the other primarily rejecting online math, science, and technology courses, including physics. Students' descriptions of their previous online course experiences were used to inform the analyses and to assist in describing the two views that emerged in conjunction with the distinguishing statements. Consensus among the two views is also discussed. Overall, the results indicate a potential divergence between student views and what university administrators believe students want.

  2. Courses in Physics in Medical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Provides information concerning programs in medical physics, radiation biology, and radiation physics at eight British medical colleges. Each institution is separately listed, and the provided information typically includes program descriptions, graduate programs, and main branches of research. (MLH)

  3. Predicting course performance in freshman and sophomore physics courses: Women are more predictable than men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCammon, Susan; Golden, Jeannie; Wuensch, Karl L.

    This study investigated the extent to which thinking skills and mathematical competency would predict the course performance of freshman and sophomore science majors enrolled in physics courses. Multiple-regression equations revealed that algebra and critical thinking skills were the best overall predictors across several physics courses. Although arithmetic skills, math anxiety, and primary mental abilities scores also correlated with performance, they were redundant with the algebra and critical thinking. The most surprising finding of the study was the differential validity by sex; predictor variables were successful in predicting course performance for women but not for men.

  4. Particle Physics: A New Course for Schools and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinbank, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Considers questions relating to the introduction of particle physics into post-GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education) courses. Describes a project that is producing teacher and student materials to support the teaching of particle physics at this level. Presents a proposed syllabus for a particle physics module. (KR)

  5. Project for the Institution of an Advanced Course in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.; Nobili, G.

    2006-06-01

    A project for an advanced course in physics at the master level, is presented in great detail. The goal of this project is to create a specific and rigorous training for those who want to carry out experimental and theoretical research on "anomalies" in physical science, especially from the point of view of atmospheric physics, plasma physics, photonic physics, biophysics, astronomy and astrophysics. A specific training in powering mental skills is planned as well. The planned teaching program is presented as a two-year course where the following subjects are intended to be taught: cognitive techniques (I and II), radiation physics (I and II), biophysics (I and II), bioastronomy (I and II), history of physics (I and II), didactics of physics, physics of atmospheric plasmas, physics of non-stationary photonic events, physics of non-linear processes, complements of quantum mechanics, quantum informatics, research methodology in physics and astronomy, computer science methods in physics and astronomy, optoelectronics, radioelectronics. Detailed teaching programs, didactics methods, and performance evaluation, are presented for each subject. The technical content of this project is preceded by an ample introduction that shows all the reasons of this kind of physics course, particularly aimed at innovation in physical science.

  6. Linking Science Fiction and Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Krista K.

    2016-01-01

    Generally, cohorts or learning communities enrich higher learning in students. Learning communities consist of conventionally separate groups of students that meet together with common academic purposes and goals. Types of learning communities include paired courses with concurrent student enrollment, living-learning communities, and faculty…

  7. Polarization of Physics on Global Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alinea, Allan L.; Naylor, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Since October 2010, the Chemistry-Biology Combined Major Program, an international course taught in English at Osaka University, has been teaching small classes (no more than 20 in size). We present data from the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) given to first-year classical mechanics students (N = 47 students over three years) pre and post score,…

  8. Teaching the Delightful Laws of Physics in a Survey Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Paul G.

    2015-10-01

    How physics can be made interesting is a question that needs no answer. That's because physics is interesting! It's a field of study jam-packed with fascination and wonder. The general public has an enormous thirst for physics knowledge, as indicated by the great numbers who purchase science magazines and books and watch NOVA and other science specials. A related question, how to make a physics course interesting, is something that we can answer. All we have to do is present physics at a proper pace in the language of the learner. My adage has always been that if the first course in physics is delightful, the rigor of a follow-up course will be welcomed.

  9. The Development and Evaluation of an Interactive Video Lesson for Use in a General College Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, Albert E.

    This report describes the development, use, and evaluation of an interactive video lesson for a community college level algebraic-based general physics class that could be used to demonstrate Newton's laws and the conservation of momentum. The lesson consisted of five mini-lessons including an introduction, a presentation of Newton's laws, a…

  10. Poetry Writing in General Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Poetry writing in the context of physics is a student-centered activity that enables students to view the world through the window of physics and make connections to everyday life scenarios. Poetry assignments provide a creative and atypical challenge to students, creating more student-centered class discussions and a fun, light-hearted approach…

  11. Implementing Physical Best in Higher Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, Suzan F.; Martinez, Ray D.

    2007-01-01

    Since the emphases of physical education teacher education (PETE) programs can be linked to quality K-12 instruction, embedding Physical Best (PB) materials into existing PETE curricula can be a practical means of addressing the obesity crisis in the public schools. The PB program is a comprehensive, health-related fitness education program that…

  12. Physics AB Course of Study. Publication No. SC-953.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Office of Secondary Instruction.

    This course of study is aligned with the California State Science Framework and provides students with the physics content needed to become scientifically and technologically literate and prepared for post-secondary science education. Framework themes incorporated into the course of study include patterns of change, evolution, energy, stability,…

  13. A Course on the Physics and Chemistry of Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Laurent

    1971-01-01

    Describes a course on environmental pollution which stresses physical and chemical principles. Course presents a unified discussion of air and water pollution and solid waste with special treatment of pesticides, thermal pollution, radioactivity, and electric power generation. Uses historical and current statistics extensively to set pollution…

  14. Designing for Enhanced Conceptual Understanding in an Online Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Joanna C.; Furtak, Thomas E.; Tucker, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    The calculus-based, introductory physics course is the port of entry for any student interested in pursuing a college degree in the sciences, mathematics, or engineering. There is increasing demand for online delivery options that make the course more widely available, especially those that use best practices in student engagement. However,…

  15. PHY 300 PRE-TECHNICAL PHYSICS, COURSE OUTLINE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WORTHINGTON, ROGER G.; AND OTHERS

    TEACHERS DEVELOPING LESSON PLANS FOR A COURSE IN BASIC PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS OF PHYSICS CAN USE THIS OUTLINE. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY A COMMITTEE OF TEACHERS AND WAS BASED ON EXPERIENCE AND CLASSROOM USE. THE OBJECTIVE OF THE COURSE IS TO HELP STUDENTS ACQUIRE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE SCIENTIFIC APPROACH AND A WORKING KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC LABORATORY…

  16. Black Holes and Pulsars in the Introductory Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orear, Jay; Salpeter, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the phenomenon of formation of white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes from dying stars for the purpose of providing college teachers with materials usable in the introductory physics course. (CC)

  17. Nerve Conduction in the Pre-Medical Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbie, Russell K.

    1973-01-01

    Reviews properties of nerves, analogous networks in propagation of electrical signals in axons, and regenerative changes in membrane permeability due to propagation of the action potential, which can be explained in the noncalculus physics course. (CC)

  18. Blind Students: Facing Challenges in a College Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazier, Mark; Parry, Michelle; Fischbach, Ephraim

    2000-01-01

    Introduces programs that assist blind students such as Tactile Access to Education for Visually Impaired Students (TAEVIS). Reports on two blind students who successfully completed physics courses and their learning strategies. Discusses the accessibility of visual aids. (YDS)

  19. Gender-based performance differences in an introductory physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Mark Lee

    Cognitive research has indicated that the difference between males and females is negligible. Paradoxically, in traditionally-taught college level introductory physics courses, males have outperformed females. UC Davis' Physics 7A (the first class of a three-quarter Introduction to Physics sequence for Life-Science students), however, counters this trend since females perform similarly to males. The gender-based performance difference within the other two quarters (Physics 7B & 7C) of the radically restructured, active-learning physics sequence still echo the traditionally-taught courses. In one experiment, I modified the laboratory activity instructions of the Physics 7C course to encourage further group interaction. These modifications did not affect the gender-based performance difference. In a later experiment, I compared students' performance on different forms of assessment for certain physics concepts during the Physics 7C course. Over 500 students took weekly quizzes at different times. The students were given different quiz questions on the same topics. Several quiz questions seemed to favor males while others were more gender equitable. I highlighted comparisons between a few pairs of questions that assessed students' understanding of the same physical concept. Males tended to perform better in responding to questions that seemed to require spatial visualization. Questions that required greater understanding of the physical concept or scientific model were more gender neutral.

  20. Poetry Writing in General Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, William L.

    2013-02-01

    Poetry writing in the context of physics is a student-centered activity that enables students to view the world through the window of physics and make connections to everyday life scenarios. Poetry assignments provide a creative and atypical challenge to students, creating more student-centered class discussions and a fun, light-hearted approach to learning what is often perceived as a purely logical subject. In order to write poetry in the context of a physics concept, students actively unify their worldview with an expression of physical concepts, personalizing their connection to the topic. Physics and poetry are two of the great human intellectual endeavors, each producing deep insights on self-created models of the universe. Each attempts to get beneath the surface of events and actions through different domains. Just as poets create a perspective of the world, scientists and researchers use their creativity to come up with new ideas, tests, and explanations. Creative thinking is one of the most important skills scientists have, whether that creativity is used to develop an alternative hypothesis, to devise a new way of testing an idea, or to look at old data in a new light. Scientific analysis often involves alternating among different modes of reasoning and creative brainstorming. Creative thinking is becoming an increasingly valuable skill for students. A 2006 comprehensive study done by job placement professionals concluded that creative thinking has become one of the most important skill sets for recent college graduates.

  1. Strongly and Weakly Directed Approaches to Teaching Multiple Representation Use in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohl, Patrick B.; Rosengrant, David; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2007-01-01

    Good use of multiple representations is considered key to learning physics, and so there is considerable motivation both to learn how students use multiple representations when solving problems and to learn how best to teach problem solving using multiple representations. In this study of two large-lecture algebra-based physics courses at the…

  2. Nationwide Survey of the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Laura J.; Roehrig, Gillian H.

    2015-01-01

    A nationwide survey of the undergraduate physical chemistry course was conducted to investigate the depth and breadth of content that is covered, how content is delivered, how student understanding is assessed, and the experiences and beliefs of instructors. The survey was administered to instructors of physical chemistry (N = 331) at American…

  3. Attitude Changes of Specialist Students of Physical Education towards Physical Activity during Teacher-Training Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrell, G. V.; Holt, D.

    1982-01-01

    A longitudinal investigation of the attitudes towards physical activity of specialist students of physical education was undertaken during a course of training teachers. Significant changes of attitude with time were noted, particularly in the Vertigo and Ascetic dimensions. (Author)

  4. Charting the Course for Elementary Particle Physics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Richter, B.

    2007-02-16

    "It was the best of times; it was the worst of times" is the way Dickens begins the Tale of Two Cities. The line is appropriate to our time in particle physics. It is the best of times because we are in the midst of a revolution in understanding, the third to occur during my career. It is the worst of times because accelerator facilities are shutting down before new ones are opening, restricting the opportunity for experiments, and because of great uncertainty about future funding. My task today is to give you a view of the most important opportunities for our field under a scenario that is constrained by a tight budget. It is a time when we cannot afford the merely good, but must give first priority to the really important. The defining theme of particle physics is to learn what the universe is made of and how it all works. This definition spans the full range of size from the largest things to the smallest things. This particle physics revolution has its origins in experiments that look at both.

  5. Charting the Course for Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Burton

    2007-02-20

    ''It was the best of times; it was the worst of times'' is the way Dickens begins the Tale of Two Cities. The line is appropriate to our time in particle physics. It is the best of times because we are in the midst of a revolution in understanding, the third to occur during my career. It is the worst of times because accelerator facilities are shutting down before new ones are opening, restricting the opportunity for experiments, and because of great uncertainty about future funding. My task today is to give you a view of the most important opportunities for our field under a scenario that is constrained by a tight budget. It is a time when we cannot afford the merely good, but must give first priority to the really important. The defining theme of particle physics is to learn what the universe is made of and how it all works. This definition spans the full range of size from the largest things to the smallest things. This particle physics revolution has its origins in experiments that look at both.

  6. Physics Almost Saved the President! Electromagnetic Induction and the Assassination of James Garfield: A Teaching Opportunity in Introductory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overduin, James; Molloy, Dana; Selway, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction is probably one of the most challenging subjects for students in the introductory physics sequence, especially in algebra-based courses. Yet it is at the heart of many of the devices we rely on today. To help students grasp and retain the concept, we have put together a simple and dramatic classroom demonstration that…

  7. Courses and Resources to Teach Space Physics to Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, P. H.

    2008-12-01

    We have created four courses for teachers, and inquiry-based materials to go with them, that embed space physics concepts while teaching Space Physics to National and State standards. The state of Texas recently adopted a "4x4" standard, which makes the "recommended" graduation requirement for high school students to include four science and four math courses. Space Physics is not specifically listed as a topic, but falls naturally as part of three of the Texas High School courses: "Physics", "Astronomy" and "Earth and Space Science", a new course whose syllabus is being decided now. The national standards which are most relevant at the high school level are "Change, Constancy and Measurement", "Motions and Forces", "Interactions of Energy and Matter" and "Natural and Human-induced hazards" [National Science Ed Standards, 1996]. The "Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills" includes circuits, electricity and magnetism, and waves in their Physics course syllabus, and include "describe the Sun's effects on the Earth" in the Astronomy class. In the new Earth and Space Science class we expect that additional heliospheric concepts will be included. At Rice we have four Astronomy courses (and four Earth Science courses) for teachers, two of which involve a substantial space physics content. By taking those eight courses, plus a research project and another content or education elective, the teachers can earn a "Masters of Science Teaching" degree. In "Teaching Earth and Space Science" (ASTR 402) we dedicate about 4 weeks on the Sun and the Earth and its environment. The "Physics of Ham Radio" course (PHYS 401) has an even more relevant focus. That class introduces electricity and magnetism, with hands-on activities on circuits and electromagnetic waves. The students earn their "Technician" class amateur license by making at least 75 per cent on the first quiz, which allows them VHF and UHF broadcast privileges. The second half of the course covers more space weather topics

  8. Undergraduate Physics Course Innovations and Their Impact on Student Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, Heidi L.; Briggs, Derek C.; Ruiz-Primo, Maria A.; Talbot, Robert M.; Shepard, Lorrie A.

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents results of an NSF project in which the goal is to provide a synthesis of research on instructional innovations that have been implemented in undergraduate courses in physics. The research questions guiding the project are: What constitutes the range of principal course innovations that are being implemented in undergraduate physics courses? What are the effects of these course innovations on student learning? The paper describes: (1) the literature search procedures used to gather over 400 innovation-related journal articles, (2) the procedures followed to analyze the studies within these articles, (3) the characteristics of the studies reported, and (4) the results from synthesizing the quantitative results of those studies that met our criteria for inclusion.

  9. Distance Learning Courses and Master of Arts in Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Richard; Thornton, Stephen

    2006-11-01

    More than twenty distance learning courses in physics have been taken by hundreds of High School Physics Teachers over the past 7 years. The success of these courses helped initiate our 30 credit Master of Arts in Physics Education degree program. We have graduated 28 teachers over the last 6 years and expect 13 more to graduate in 2006. The candidates earn 14 credits in residence at the University of Virginia and 16 credits online. This allows teachers to matriculate, while earning more than half the credits at home. Presently, there are over 50 Master degree candidates. Three of the five online courses utilize CD-ROMS with edited lectures of live Physics courses taught at the University of Virginia by Physics Professors recognized for their teaching. Homework and examinations are submitted using WebAssign. Local high school teachers and administrators proctor the examinations. General communication and pedagogical feedback on homework assignments and exams are submitted through Blackboard as well as email. Screen captured video shots of physics demonstrations are widely used in the audio chat room to facilitate discussion and also used on examinations. We will discuss the changes of our distance-learning model based on what has worked (or not) and new technology.

  10. Physics of Health Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baublitz, Millard; Goldberg, Bennett

    A one-semester algebra-based physics course is being offered to Boston University students whose major fields of study are in allied health sciences: physical therapy, athletic training, and speech, language, and hearing sciences. The classroom instruction incorporates high-engagement learning techniques including worksheets, student response devices, small group discussions, and physics demonstrations instead of traditional lectures. The use of pre-session exercises and quizzes has been implemented. The course also requires weekly laboratory experiments in mechanics or electricity. We are using standard pre- and post-course concept inventories to compare this one-semester introductory physics course to ten years of pre- and post-course data collected on students in the same majors but who completed a two-semester course.

  11. Instructors' Support of Student Autonomy in an Introductory Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Nicholas; Webb, David

    2014-12-01

    The role of autonomy in the student experience in a large-enrollment undergraduate introductory physics course was studied from a self-determination theory perspective. A correlational study investigated whether certain aspects of the student experience correlated with how autonomy supportive (versus controlling) students perceived their instructors to be. An autonomy-supportive instructor acknowledges students' perspectives and feelings and provides students with information and opportunities for choice while minimizing external pressures (e.g., incentives or deadlines). It was found that the degree to which students perceived their instructors as autonomy supportive was positively correlated with student interest and enjoyment in learning physics (β =0.31***) and negatively correlated with student anxiety about taking physics (β =-0.23**). It was also positively correlated with how autonomous (versus controlled) students' reasons for studying physics became over the duration of the course (i.e., studying physics more because they wanted to versus had to; β =0.24***). This change in autonomous reasons for studying physics was in turn positively correlated with student performance in the course (β =0.17*). Additionally, the degree to which students perceived their instructors as autonomy supportive was directly correlated with performance for those students entering the course with relatively autonomous reasons for studying physics (β =0.25**). In summary, students who perceived their instructors as more autonomy supportive tended to have a more favorable motivational, affective, and performance experience in the course. The findings of the present study are consistent with experimental studies in other contexts that argue for autonomy-supportive instructor behaviors as the cause of a more favorable student experience.

  12. Physics of Music:A Course in Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    Colleges with strong music programs generally have a physics course on acoustics for non-science majors. Here I describe a laboratory science course offered at Texas Christian University for about eight years. The course incorporates thirteen laboratory experiences that include an instrument sound level comparison, an individual hearing test, and spectral analysis of each student's instrument. The experiments form the backbone of the course and drive the lectures. I will describe them in some detail, and demonstrate some of the nearly free software that adds enrichment to both the laboratory and lectures. In addition I will explain how guest lecturers from related fields, including audiologists, psychologists and instrument makers, can help provide a more meaningful experience for the students.

  13. Teaching Particle Physics in the Open University's Science Foundation Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmelo, Graham

    1992-01-01

    Discusses four topics presented in the science foundation course of the Open University that exemplify current developments in particle physics, in particular, and that describe important issues about the nature of science, in general. Topics include the omega minus particle, the diversity of quarks, the heavy lepton, and the discovery of the W…

  14. Effect of Cooperative Learning on Academic Achievement of Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keramati, Mohammadreza

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation on the effect of cooperative learning on academic achievement of physics course. Cooperative learning was employed to experimental group and conventional teaching method was used for control group. Sampling of the study consists of 15-16 years old 220 students at high school in Iran. The progress…

  15. Bridging Courses in Chemistry and Physics for Engineering Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Ian J.; de Jong, Eddy J.

    1994-01-01

    A Monash University (Australia) program to enhance the chemistry and physics preparation of secondary school graduates entering engineering in higher education offers one-semester intensive courses. The first four years of the program have produced encouraging results. Coordination of practical work and theory is seen as crucial to learning. (MSE)

  16. A New Course for Physics Teachers in Peru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Carlos; Rushby, Anthony

    1973-01-01

    Describes the conduct of a new course in Peru designed for physics teachers at the university level with emphases upon learning of up-to-date teaching and laboratory techniques. Included is a description of local degree programs and basic philosophy underlying teacher education. (CC)

  17. Teaching and Understanding of Quantum Interpretations in Modern Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baily, Charles; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2010-01-01

    Just as expert physicists vary in their personal stances on interpretation in quantum mechanics, instructors vary on whether and how to teach interpretations of quantum phenomena in introductory modern physics courses. In this paper, we document variations in instructional approaches with respect to interpretation in two similar modern physics…

  18. Evaluation of an Interdisciplinary, Physically Active Lifestyle Course Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fede, Marybeth H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a fit for life program at a university and to use the findings from an extensive literature review, consultations with formative and summative committees, and data collection to develop an interdisciplinary, physically active lifestyle (IPAL) course model. To address the 5 research questions examined in…

  19. Acceptance of physical therapist assistant course work by programs preparing physical therapists.

    PubMed

    Brooks, B A

    1985-01-01

    I developed and sent a questionnaire to the directors of entry-level physical therapy programs to determine if course work taken in an associate degree program could be credited toward requirements leading to a higher degree or certificate in physical therapy. I sent 86 questionnaires; 45 were returned. Results of the survey revealed that basic science courses taken by the physical therapist assistant (PTA) students are more likely to be credited (up to half of the respondents replied positively) toward a higher degree or certificate than are technical courses like therapeutic exercise, fundamentals of physical therapy, or physical modalities. Moreover, as many as 79 percent of the respondents reported that PTAs would not be granted transfer credit for their technical courses. Of those respondents whose programs do give credit for the technical courses, the courses are usually considered as elective hours. Although the concept of upward mobility appears to remain viable in the educational philosophy of the American Physical Therapy Association, students who view the associate degree program as an entry point into a physical therapy program must be aware of the problems of acceptance of PTA credits in an entry-level physical therapy program.

  20. Report of the Polymer Core Course Committee: Polymer Principles in the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Course, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Demonstrates, with a set of definitive examples, how polymer principles can be introduced into the first undergraduate physical chemistry course in a very natural way. The intent is to encourage introduction of polymer-related material into conventional physical chemistry courses without sacrificing any rigor associated with such courses. (JN)

  1. Investigating Students' Reflective Thinking in the Introductory Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreaux, Andrew

    2010-10-01

    Over the past 30 years, physics education research has guided the development of instructional strategies that can significantly enhance students' functional understanding of concepts in introductory physics. Recently, attention has shifted to instructional goals that, while widely shared by teachers of physics, are often more implicit than explicit in our courses. These goals involve the expectations and attitudes that students have about what it means to learn and understand physics, together with the behaviors and actions students think they should engage in to accomplish this learning. Research has shown that these ``hidden'' elements of the curriculum are remarkably resistant to instruction. In fact, traditional physics courses tend to produce movement away from expert-like behaviors. At Western Washington University, we are exploring ways of promoting metacognition, an aspect of the hidden curriculum that involves the conscious monitoring of one's own thinking and learning. We have found that making this reflective thinking an explicit part of the course may not be enough: adequate framing and scaffolding may be necessary for students to meaningfully engage in metacognition. We have thus taken the basic approach of developing metacognition, like conceptual understanding, through guided inquiry. During our teaching experiments, we have collected written and video data, with twin goals of guiding iterative modifications to the instruction as well as contributing to the knowledge base about student metacognition in introductory physics. This talk will provide examples of metacognition activities from course assignments and labs, and will present written data to assess the effectiveness of instruction and to illustrate specific modes of students' reflective thinking.

  2. Applied Physics. Course Materials: Physics 111, 112, 113. Seattle Tech Prep Applied Academics Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    This publication contains materials for three courses in Applied Physics in the Applied Academics program at South Seattle Community College. It begins with the article, "Community College Applied Academics: The State of the Art?" (George B. Neff), which describes the characteristics, model, courses, and coordination activity that make up this…

  3. Integrating Physics and Literacy Learning in a Physics Course for Prospective Elementary and Middle School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zee, Emily H.; Jansen, Henri; Winograd, Kenneth; Crowl, Michele; Devitt, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The ability to listen closely, speak clearly, write coherently, read with comprehension, and to create and critique media offerings in science contexts is essential for effective science teaching. How might instructors develop such abilities in a physics course for prospective elementary and middle school teachers? We describe here such a course,…

  4. Attitudes about Science and Conceptual Physics Learning in University Introductory Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner-Bolotin, Marina; Antimirova, Tetyana; Noack, Andrea; Petrov, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the results of the repeated administration of the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) in a large introductory physics course at a midsize, metropolitan Canadian university. We compare the results to those obtained previously in comparable courses at the University of British Columbia (Canada) and the…

  5. Computational physics in the introductory calculus-based course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabay, Ruth; Sherwood, Bruce

    2008-04-01

    The integration of computation into the introductory calculus-based physics course can potentially provide significant support for the development of conceptual understanding. Computation can support three-dimensional visualizations of abstract quantities, offer opportunities to construct symbolic rather than numeric solutions to problems, and provide experience with the use of vectors as coordinate-free entities. Computation can also allow students to explore models in a way not possible using the analytical tools available to first-year students. We describe how we have incorporated computer programming into an introductory calculus-based course taken by science and engineering students.

  6. Undergraduate physics course innovations and their impact on student learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, Heidi Louise

    Over the last several decades, the efficacy of the traditional lecture-based instructional model for undergraduate physics courses has been challenged. As a result, a large number of reform-oriented instructional innovations have been developed, enacted, and studied in undergraduate physics courses around the globe---all with the intended purpose of improving student learning. This thesis satisfies the need for a comprehensive synthesis of the effectiveness of these course innovations by analyzing: (1) the types of innovations that have been enacted, (2) the impact of these innovations on student learning, and (3) the common features of effective innovations. An exhaustive literature search for studies published after 1990 on undergraduate physics course innovations yielded 432 articles which were then coded with respect to the characteristics of the innovations used as well as the methodological characteristics of the studies. These codes facilitated a descriptive analysis which characterized the features of the pool of studies. These studies were then meta-analyzed in order to evaluate the effect of innovations on student learning. Finally, a case-study analysis was conducted in order to identify the critical characteristics of effective innovations. Results indicate that most innovations focus on introductory mechanics and use some combination of conceptually oriented tasks, collaborative learning, and technology. The overall effect of course innovations has been positive, but with the caveat that a large number of studies suffer from poor methodological designs and potential threats to validity. In addition, over half of the studies had to be eliminated from the meta-analysis because they did not report the data necessary for an effect size to be calculated. Despite these limitations the results of the meta-analysis indicated that there was one innovation which had particularly high effect sizes---Workshop/Studio Physics---an innovation which involves an

  7. Evolution of an Environmentally Themed Introductory Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinuk, Mathew; Kotlicki, Andrzej; Rieger, Georg

    2009-05-01

    In 2007, motivated by research showing many students don't make connections between classroom physics and real-world phenomena, we fundamentally changed the curriculum and pedagogy of Phys 100, a large introductory course for non-physics majors at UBC. Our goal was to enable our students to use scientific knowledge to critically think about real world problems such as transportation and climate change. All topics in the course are now taught with strong connections to applications in the real world. For example conservation of energy is explored using models of home heating and the Earth's energy balance. Real-world connections are reinforced through weekly tutorials where students apply physics to context-rich real world problems, and through explicit discussion of real world analogues to lab experiments. These examples increase students' ability to see physics happening in the real world and encourage them to use their knowledge outside the classroom. This talk will discuss the evolution of the course over the first two years of implementation and results from exams and research on student attitudes.

  8. Deriving the Work Done by an Inverse Square Force in Non-Calculus-Based Introductory Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe a method of evaluating the integral of 1/r[superscript 2] with respect to r that uses only algebra and the concept of area underneath a curve, and which does not formally employ any calculus. This is useful for algebra-based introductory physics classes (where the use of calculus is forbidden) to derive the work done by the force of one…

  9. Analyzing the impact of course structure on electronic textbook use in blended introductory physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, Daniel T.; Kortemeyer, Gerd; Bergner, Yoav; Rayyan, Saif; Pritchard, David E.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate how elements of course structure (i.e., the frequency of assessments as well as the sequencing and weight of course resources) influence the usage patterns of electronic textbooks (e-texts) in introductory physics courses. Specifically, we analyze the access logs of courses at Michigan State University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, each of which deploy e-texts as primary or secondary texts in combination with different formative assessments (e.g., embedded reading questions) and different summative assessment (exam) schedules. As such studies are frequently marred by arguments over what constitutes a "meaningful" interaction with a particular page (usually judged by how long the page remains on the screen), we consider a set of different definitions of "meaningful" interactions. We find that course structure has a strong influence on how much of the e-texts students actually read, and when they do so. In particular, courses that deviate strongly from traditional structures, most notably by more frequent exams, show consistently high usage of the materials with far less "cramming" before exams.

  10. Assessing Students' Attitudes In A College Physics Course In Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Garza, Jorge; Alarcon, Hugo

    2010-10-01

    Considering the benefits of modeling instruction in improving conceptual learning while students work more like scientists, an implementation was made in an introductory Physics course in a Mexican University. Recently Brewe, Kramer and O'Brien have observed positive attitudinal shifts using modeling instruction in a course with a reduced number of students. These results are opposite to previous observations with methodologies that promote active learning. Inspired in those results, the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) was applied as pre and post tests in two Mechanics courses with modeling. In comparison to the different categories of the CLASS, significant positive shifts have been determined in Overall, Sophistication in Problem Solving, and Applied Conceptual Understanding in a sample of 44 students.

  11. A Deliberate Practice Instructional Approach for Upper Division Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David

    2015-05-01

    In upper division physics courses, an overarching educational goal is to have students think about and use the material much as a practicing physicist in the field does. Specifically, this would include knowledge (such as concepts, formalism, and instruments), approaches, and metacognitive skills that physicists use in solving ``typical'' (research context) problems to both understand and predict physical observations and accompanying models. Using an interactive instructional approach known as deliberate practice (described earlier in this session) we will discuss our work on how to provide students with the necessary practice and feedback to achieve these skills in a core DAMOP course of modern optics. We present the results of a direct and explicit comparison between this approach and traditional lecture-based instruction revealing evidence that a significant improvement of the students' mastery of these skills occurs when deliberate practice is employed. Our work was supported by the University of British Columbia through the CWSEI.

  12. Ettore Majorana's Course on Theoretical Physics: A Recent Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drago, Antonino; Esposito, Salvatore

    2007-09-01

    We analyze in some detail the course of Theoretical Physics held by Ettore Majorana at the University of Naples in 1938, just before his mysterious disappearance. In particular we present the recently discovered "Moreno Paper", where all the lecture notes are reported. Six of these lectures are not present in the collection of the original manuscripts conserved at the Domus Galilaeana in Pisa, consisting of only ten lectures.

  13. Physics in ``Polymers, Composites, and Sports Materials" an Interdisciplinary Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Eric; Suskavcevic, Milijana

    2007-10-01

    The undergraduate science course described uses the themes of polymers and composites, as used in sports materials, to teach some key concepts in introductory chemistry and physics. The course is geared towards students who are interested in science, but are still completing prerequisite mathematics courses required for science majors. Each class is built around a laboratory activity. Atoms, molecules and chemical reactions are taught in reference to making polyvinyl acetate (white glue) and polyvinyl alcohol (gel glue). These materials, combined with borax, form balls which are subsequently used in physics activities centered on free-fall and the coefficient of restitution. These activities allow the introduction of kinematics and dynamics. A free fall activity involving ice pellets, with and without embedded tissue paper, illustrates the properties of composites. The final series of activities uses balls, shoes, racquets and bats to further illustrate dynamics concepts (including friction, momentum and energy). The physical properties of these sports objects are discussed in terms of the materials of which they are made. The evaluation plan to determine the effectiveness of these activities and preliminary results are also presented.

  14. Graduate teaching assistants in a reformed introductory physics course: Synthesis of quantitative analyses of instructor action and qualitative analyses of instructor attitudes and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, Austin Michael

    Physics Education Research (PER) has shown us that when students have opportunities to make sense of concepts they tend to remember them better and can apply them more appropriately to new situations. PER has also revealed that an interactive, cooperative, small group environment is more conducive to achieving this than traditional lecture and recitation sections. It is useful to consider the aims of reformed instruction from the point of view of the graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) in physics, who are facilitating the instruction. The data in this dissertation comes from audio-recordings of GTAs teaching in an algebra-based introductory course; I develop a rubric for assessing the teaching practices of the GTAs which separates teaching into five categories according to the reformed practices present. The rubric and technique developed here could be used as a diagnostic for GTAs new to a reformed classroom. I also conducted surveys of the GTA participants, as well as semi-structured interviews to gain more information about the attitudes and perspectives toward reformed physics instruction. Results from this work include: (1) A diagnostic tool for teaching improvement and (2) a detailed understanding of the GTA facilitators' teaching practices in the reformed physics laboratory.

  15. Is conceptual understanding compromised by a problem-solving emphasis in an introductory physics course?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridenour, J.; Feldman, G.; Teodorescu, R.; Medsker, L.; Benmouna, N.

    2013-01-01

    Developing competency in problem solving and enhancing conceptual understanding are primary objectives in introductory physics, and many techniques and tools are available to help instructors achieve them. Pedagogically, we use an easy-to-implement intervention, the ACCESS protocol, to develop and assess problem-solving skills in our SCALE-UP classroom environment for algebra-based physics. Based on our research and teaching experience, an important question has emerged: while primarily targeting improvements in problem-solving and cognitive development, is it necessary that conceptual understanding be compromised? To address this question, we gathered and analyzed information about student abilities, backgrounds, and instructional preferences. We report on our progress and give insights into matching the instructional tools to student profiles in order to achieve optimal learning in group-based active learning. The ultimate goal of our work is to integrate individual student learning needs into a pedagogy that moves students closer to expert-like status in problem solving.

  16. Investigating elementary education and physical therapy majors' perceptions of an inquiry-based physics content course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, John Martin

    This study investigates why physical therapy assistant majors engage and perform better than elementary education majors in an inquiry-based conceptual physics course at Mid-Atlantic Community College. The students from each major are demographically similar, both courses are similar in depth and structure, and each course supports the students' program. However, there is an observed difference in the levels of engagement with the curriculum and performance on writing-based assessments between the two groups. To explore possible explanations for the difference, I examine students' affinity for science, their beliefs about the nature of science and scientific knowledge in the classroom, and their perception of the usefulness of science to their program. During semi-structured interviews, students from both majors displayed nearly identical weak affinities for science, epistemological beliefs, and uncertainty about the usefulness of the class. However, the physical therapy majors' ability to see the relevance of the physics course experience to their program enhanced their interest and motivation. In contrast, the elementary education students do not see connections between the course and their program, and do not see a purpose for their learning of physics content. To improve the program, I propose a two-pronged approach - designing a faded-scaffolded-inquiry approach for both classes, and developing a field-based/seminar class for the elementary education majors. The scaffolded inquiry will help both groups develop better orientations toward lab activities, and the structured observations and reflection will help the elementary group connect the material to their program.

  17. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) for Physics - and for You?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, David E.

    2014-03-01

    We will describe several of the currently available Massive Open Online Courses in Physics-the topics, level, author, and special features of each. Then we will discuss the interesting demographics of the students taking them, presenting evidence showing that students of widely different initial skills and students of all major demographic groups learn at least as much conceptual knowledge as students in a traditional classroom. We will present MOOC research on student habits, use of eTexts and other resources, and indicate what resources impart measured learning. We'll describe a collectivistic MOOC where you can help develop instructional and assessment resources that will be in a library for future use by you and other teachers. Many of these resources are designed for blending with on-campus introductory courses in college or Advanced Placement courses in High School. They will ultimately be displayed in a searchable library with lots of useful information from which you can assemble your own course in the free and open edX.org platform (or simply download them for in-class use). We Acknowledge support from NSF, a Google Faculty Award, and MIT.

  18. Integrating Physics and Literacy Learning in a Physics Course for Prospective Elementary and Middle School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zee, Emily H.; Jansen, Henri; Winograd, Kenneth; Crowl, Michele; Devitt, Adam

    2013-06-01

    The ability to listen closely, speak clearly, write coherently, read with comprehension, and to create and critique media offerings in science contexts is essential for effective science teaching. How might instructors develop such abilities in a physics course for prospective elementary and middle school teachers? We describe here such a course, involving collaboration among physics, science education, and literacy faculty members and two graduate assistants. Meeting twice a week for 10 weeks, the course emphasized questioning, predicting, exploring, observing, discussing, writing, and reading in physical science contexts. We report common themes about aspects that fostered or hindered science and literacy learning, changes in views about science teaching and learning, and positive shifts in interest in science and intended teaching practices.

  19. Small Research Balloons in a Physics Course for Education Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Verner, E.; Long, T.; Montanaro, E.

    2013-12-01

    At The Catholic Univ. of America, we teach an experimental physics course entitled Physics 240: The Sun-Earth Connection, which is designed for the undergraduate education major. The emphasis is on providing hands-on experience and giving the students an exciting experience in physics. As part of this course, in the Spring 2013 semester, we instituted a project to plan, build, launch, and retrieve a small (~1.3 kg) research balloon payload. The payload flown was a small GPS unit that sent its position to an Internet site, a small wide-angle high-resolution video camera, and an analog refrigerator thermometer placed in the field of view of the camera. All data were stored on the camera sim-card. Students faced the problems of flying a small research balloon in the congested, densely populated Northeast Corridor of the US. They used computer simulators available on the Web to predict the balloon path and flight duration given velocities for the Jet Stream and ground winds, as well as payload mass and amount of helium in the balloon. The first flight was extremely successful. The balloon was launched 140 km NW of Washington DC near Hagerstown, MD and touched down 10 miles (16 km) NW of York, PA, within 1.6 km of what was predicted. The balloon reached 73,000 ft (22,000 m) and the thermometer indicated temperatures as low as -70 degrees Fahrenheit (-57 C) during the flight. Further balloon flights are planned in conjunction with this course. Additional exercises and experiments will be developed centered around these flights. Besides learning that science can be exciting, students also learn that science is not always easily predictable, and that these balloon flights give an understanding of many of problems that go into real scientific space missions. This project is supported in part by an educational supplement to NASA grant NNX10AC56G

  20. Making Laboratories Count -- Better Integration of Laboratories in Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Jim

    2011-10-01

    The quality of K-12 education leaves something to be desired and presents higher education faculty with the challenge of instructing under-prepared students. However, by their own admission, students from many institutions inform us that laboratory sections in science classes, including physics, consist mostly of showing up, going through the motions, and getting grades that boost their overall grade. This work presents laboratories that challenge students to take their laboratory work more seriously including specific rubrics enforcing SOLVE and Bloom's Taxonomy, pre-lab preparation work, and quizzes on pre-lab preparation. Early results are encouraging revealing greater student progress with better integration of laboratory with the rest of a complete physics course.

  1. How to teach statistical thermal physics in an introductory physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Koo-Chul

    2001-01-01

    We report on several simulation programs (available through http://phys.snu.ac.kr/howto/ or http://phya.snu.ac.kr/˜kclee/howto/) which can be used to teach the statistical foundations of thermal physics in introductory college physics courses. These programs are simple applications of a technique for generating random configurations of many dice with a fixed total value. By merely simulating dice throwing we can demonstrate all the important principles of classical thermodynamics.

  2. Physics of climate change, taught as a topics a course for undergraduate physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael

    2012-10-01

    While anthropogenic (human-caused) climate change is generally accepted in the scientific community, there is considerable skepticism among the general population. Science students are often asked by their peers, family members, and others, whether they ``believe'' climate change is occurring and what should be done about it (if anything). While the pertinent material is covered in undergraduate physics courses, it helps to review the basics in order to develop an educated perspective on this topic that is very volatile (socially and politically). The basic topics are introductory quantum mechanics (discrete energy levels of atomic systems), molecular spectroscopy, blackbody radiation, and appreciation for the scientific method (particularly peer-reviewed research). These topics are usually covered in undergraduate modern physics and thermodynamics courses, but a separate course on climate change (taught in Spring 2012) helped ``put things together'' for both the students and their professor.

  3. Identifying the Elements of Physics Courses that Impact Student Learning: Curriculum, Instructor, Peers, and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Emily Lincoln Ashbaugh

    2009-01-01

    Prior research across hundreds for introductory physics courses has demonstrated that traditional physics instruction does not generally lead to students learning physics concepts in a meaningful way, but that interactive-engagement physics courses do sometimes promote a great deal more student learning. In this work I analyze a reform effort in a…

  4. Student Understanding of Probability and Introductory Statistical Physics in Upper-division Courses on Thermal Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loverude, Michael E.

    2006-12-01

    This talk describes part of an ongoing investigation of student learning in the context of upper-division courses in thermal physics. In particular, we will examine student understanding of the fundamental concepts of statistical physics, and the underlying mathematics of probability. Our results suggest that students lack a deep understanding of the statistics of binary systems like coin flips, calling into question their ability to apply these results to simple physical systems. We will provide examples of student responses and written explanations and discuss implications for instruction.

  5. Towards Cognitive Coherence In Physics Learning: Image-ability Of Undergraduate Solid State Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2010-07-01

    Based on the famous work of K. Lynch [7] on image-ability of a cityscape, recently a city of physics analogy has been proposed by A.E. Tabor et al.[8] to enhance the cognitive coherence of physics as a subject. The idea of both Lynch and A. abor. et al. is being extended in this paper to image-ability of an undergraduate Solid State Physics course to bring forth cognitive coherence of the subject in a global manner. In this paper an image-ability map of the course is presented both in a pictorial and tabular format with recognition of sections of the syllabus as districts and sub districts. Further in each district and sub district, key concepts as land marks, variables involved as nodes, key physical equations as paths and limits on variables as edges or boundaries are identified through peer discussion among a group of teachers who are teaching this course for the last couple of years. This exercise has helped not only in mental mapping of the subject but focusing on hitherto isolated and advanced topics provided in the syllabus as leading to a very different mental recreational spots in the cityscape of undergraduate Solid State Physics.

  6. Methods of teaching the physics of climate change in undergraduate physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Although anthropogenic climate change is generally accepted in the scientific community, there is considerable skepticism among the general population and, therefore, in undergraduate students of all majors. Students are often asked by their peers, family members, and others, whether they ``believe'' climate change is occurring and what should be done about it (if anything). I will present my experiences and recommendations for teaching the physics of climate change to both physics and non-science majors. For non-science majors, the basic approach is to try to develop an appreciation for the scientific method (particularly peer-reviewed research) in a course on energy and the environment. For physics majors, the pertinent material is normally covered in their undergraduate courses in modern physics and thermodynamics. Nevertheless, it helps to review the basics, e.g. introductory quantum mechanics (discrete energy levels of atomic systems), molecular spectroscopy, and blackbody radiation. I have done this in a separate elective topics course, titled ``Physics of Climate Change,'' to help the students see how their knowledge gives them insight into a topic that is very volatile (socially and politically).

  7. Computer Based Collaborative Problem Solving for Introductory Courses in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Carolina; Lee, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    We discuss collaborative problem solving computer-based recitation style. The course is designed by Lee [1], and the idea was proposed before by Christian, Belloni and Titus [2,3]. The students find the problems on a web-page containing simulations (physlets) and they write the solutions on an accompanying worksheet after discussing it with a classmate. Physlets have the advantage of being much more like real-world problems than textbook problems. We also compare two protocols for web-based instruction using simulations in an introductory physics class [1]. The inquiry protocol allowed students to control input parameters while the worked example protocol did not. We will discuss which of the two methods is more efficient in relation to Scientific Discovery Learning and Cognitive Load Theory. 1. Lee, Kevin M., Nicoll, Gayle and Brooks, Dave W. (2004). ``A Comparison of Inquiry and Worked Example Web-Based Instruction Using Physlets'', Journal of Science Education and Technology 13, No. 1: 81-88. 2. Christian, W., and Belloni, M. (2001). Physlets: Teaching Physics With Interactive Curricular Material, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 3. Christian,W., and Titus,A. (1998). ``Developing web-based curricula using Java Physlets.'' Computers in Physics 12: 227--232.

  8. Physics or Mathematics Preparation - which is the better predictor of performance in a first, calculus-based college physics course?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Norma

    2011-11-01

    Data spanning fifteen semesters and including more than 1200 students showed far less than the anticipated difference in performance between students with quite diverse levels of physics preparation. Students ranged from those with no prior physics course work to those with two or more years of HS physics and prior courses in college physics. Less prior physics training frequently coincided with better performance in the first calculus-based course. Preparation in mathematics, on the other hand, appeared critically important; students at the extremes of the math preparation spectrum were concentrated at the corresponding extremes of the physics grade distribution.

  9. Physics Myth Busting: A Lab-Centered Course for Non-Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Martin John

    2011-01-01

    There is ongoing interest in how and what we teach in physics courses for non-science students, so-called "physics for poets" courses. Art Hobson has effectively argued that teaching science literacy should be a key ingredient in these courses. Hobson uses Jon Millers definition of science literacy, which has two components: first, "a basic…

  10. The Primary Student Teachers' Views about a Blended Learning Application in a Basic Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taskin Ekici, Fatma; Kara, Izzet; Ekici, Erhan

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present an overview of the undergraduate blended Physics course that has been supported by the Moodle platform. The course that has been applied is a basic physics course for primary student teachers. The aim of Moodle is to create an online learning environment which helps students to have a virtual space where they can share…

  11. Strategies for Teaching Physics to Undergraduate Biologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Dawn; Bolker, Jessica; Shubert, Christopher; Vesenka, James; Kraut, Getrud

    2009-10-01

    Most undergraduate students in the life sciences are required to take physics; few understand why, or realize much benefit. We are transforming a traditional one -year algebra-based college physics course populated primarily by such students, by integrating biological examples that both exemplify and motivate the physics. We describe several strategies: emphasizing topics of particular importance to biologists; including examples of physics-rich biological research; developing homework and exam problems built around biological phenomena; and designing concept questions that encourage students to think about biological in a physical frame.

  12. Relationships Among Goal Contents, Exercise Motivations, Physical Activity, and Aerobic Fitness in University Physical Education Courses.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Benjamin A; Bergman, Shawn M

    2016-04-01

    The current research examined the relationships among exercise goal contents, behavioral regulation, physical activity, and aerobic fitness within the context of eight-week university physical education courses. Participants were undergraduate students (M age = 20.2 year, SD = 2.3) enrolled in activity courses (N = 461) during the 2010 Fall semester. At pretest, participants completed a demographic survey, Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire and the Goal Contents in Exercise Questionnaire. At eight-week posttest, participants completed the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adults and the PACER aerobic fitness test. Relative intrinsic goal content was found to predict physical activity indirectly and aerobic fitness via behavioral regulation. Specific goal contents related to health management and skill development were found to predict physical activity and aerobic fitness via a fully mediated path through identified and intrinsic regulation. Results supported the efficacy of goal contents and self-determination theory in describing physical activity behavior and fitness. Examining specific types of goal contents and behavioral regulations revealed relationships that were masked by the utilization of omnibus scoring protocols.

  13. "I No Longer Dread Teaching Physics, I Now Enjoy It!" Participant Reflections from the SASP Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, J.

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to explore some of the experiences of participants on the Science as an Additional Specialism (SASP) physics course. It draws from feedback, assignment work and course evaluations from all of the 22 teachers who were participants on the course at the Science Learning Centre East of England at Bayfordbury, in the 2009-10 academic…

  14. Fostering Scientific Thinking by Prospective Teachers in a Course That Integrates Physics and Literacy Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zee, Emily H.; Jansen, Henri; Winograd, Kenneth; Crowl, Michele; Devitt, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We designed a physics course for prospective elementary and middle school teachers to foster aspects of scientific thinking recommended in reform documents. Because the elementary school curriculum focuses heavily on literacy, we also explicitly integrated physics and literacy learning in this course. By integrating physics and literacy learning,…

  15. Insights from a Subject Knowledge Enhancement Course for Preparing New Chemistry and Physics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Michael; Mallaburn, Andrea; Tynan, Richard; Clays, Ken; Jones, Robert Bryn

    2013-01-01

    A recent Government response to shortages of new physics and chemistry teachers is the extended subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) course. Graduates without a physics or chemistry bachelor degree are prepared by an SKE course to enter a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme to become science teachers with a physics or chemistry…

  16. Instructors' Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior in Teaching Undergraduate Physical Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filho, Paulo Jose Barbosa Gutierres; Monteiro, Maria Dolores Alves Ferreira; da Silva, Rudney; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze adapted physical education instructors' views about the application of the theory of planned behavior (TpB) in teaching physical education undergraduate courses. Participants ("n" = 17) were instructors of adapted physical activity courses from twelve randomly selected institutions of higher…

  17. Evaluation of the Physical Activity and Public Health Course for Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Brown, David R.; Pearce, Emily; Camplain, Ricky; Jernigan, Jan; Epping, Jacqueline; Shepard, Dennis M.; Dorn, Joan M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: From 1996 to 2013, a 6-day Physical Activity and Public Health Course for Practitioners has been offered yearly in the United States. An evaluation was conducted to assess the impact of the course on building public health capacity for physical activity and on shaping the physical activity and public health careers of fellows since taking…

  18. Courses in Physics in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Includes honors degree courses; special entry requirements; course structure; courses regularly available; notes; and how to obtain further information on 42 universities, 28 polytechnics, 12 colleges of technology, and 13 colleges of education in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Some schools have advertisements listing additional…

  19. Physics Myth Busting: A Lab-Centered Course for Non-Science Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Martin John

    2011-10-01

    There is ongoing interest in how and what we teach in physics courses for non-science students, so-called "physics for poets" courses. Art Hobson has effectively argued that teaching science literacy should be a key ingredient in these courses. Hobson uses Jon Millers definition of science literacy, which has two components: first, "a basic knowledge of key scientific concepts," and second, "an understanding of the process of science."2 In preparing to teach our course for non-science students, I found that the majority of textbooks and courses focus on the first component. However, I wanted a lab-centered course that would give students hands-on practice doing science. I describe in this article a course I designed and implemented at Wabash College that focused on teaching students "the process of science." The course was titled "Adventures in Physics: Mythbusters" and was based loosely on the popular Discovery Channel show "MythBusters."3

  20. The role of context and gender in predicting success in a modified laboratory course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subero, Keron

    We designed and implemented curriculum intended to be used by students in an algebra-based introductory physics laboratory course. Our curricular goal was to foster, through observations in the lab, a coherent framework in students' understanding of general principles presented in the introductory mechanics course, while addressing known student difficulties. The research that guided our curriculum development efforts, however, was previously implemented in an intervention setting which was quite different from ours, and was conducted on students enrolled in calculus-based physics courses who were generally academically better prepared than our students. We describe the development of laboratory materials, designed to fit the specific curricular constraints of a lab course at NMSU. We present some results from post-testing of our labs, which were not as favorable as results obtained by researchers at other institutions implementing similar curricula in their courses. We attempted to quantify differences in preparation among our introductory physics student populations who use these laboratory materials. We developed a short proportional reasoning pretest, which we found to be a relatively efficient predictor of student success in our courses. We investigated the effect of context variations on performance by various student populations on this pretest, and found that the effect of context variation was not the same for all of our student populations. Results from our calculus-based population showed a small but significant increase in performance when we modified the context of our pretest, while the performance of our algebra- based population showed very little sensitivity to the variation in pretest context. Finally, when considering students' gender, we found in both algebra-based and calculus-based physics courses that female students were significantly affected by context variation, while male students' performance remained relatively unchanged when we varied

  1. Inquiry-Based Course in Physics and Chemistry for Preservice K-8 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loverude, Michael E.; Gonzalez, Barbara L.; Nanes, Roger

    2011-01-01

    We describe an inquiry-based course in physics and chemistry for preservice K-8 teachers developed at California State University Fullerton. The course is one of three developed primarily to enhance the science content understanding of prospective teachers. The course incorporates a number of innovative instructional strategies and is somewhat…

  2. Childhood physical abuse and midlife physical health: Testing a multi-pathway life course model

    PubMed Central

    Springer, K. W.

    2009-01-01

    Although prior research has established that childhood abuse adversely affects midlife physical health outcomes, it is unclear how abuse continues to harm health decades after the abuse has ended. In this project, I assess four life course pathways (behavioral, emotional, cognitive, and social relations) that plausibly link childhood physical abuse to three midlife physical health outcomes (bronchitis diagnosis, ulcer diagnosis, and general physical health). These three outcomes are etiologically distinct, leading to unique testable hypotheses. Multivariate models controlling for childhood background and early adversity were estimated using data from over 3,000 respondents in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, USA. The results indicate that midlife social relations and cognition do not function as pathways for any outcome. However, smoking is a crucial pathway connecting childhood abuse with bronchitis; mental health is important for ulcers; and BMI, smoking, and mental health are paramount for general physical health. These findings suggest that abuse survivors’ coping mechanisms can lead to an array of midlife health problems. Furthermore, the results validate the use of etiologically distinct outcomes for understanding plausible causal pathways when using cross-sectional data. PMID:19446943

  3. Childhood physical abuse and midlife physical health: testing a multi-pathway life course model.

    PubMed

    Springer, Kristen W

    2009-07-01

    Although prior research has established that childhood abuse adversely affects midlife physical health, it is unclear how abuse continues to harm health decades after the abuse has ended. In this project, I assess four life course pathways (health behaviors, cognition, mental health, and social relation) that plausibly link childhood physical abuse to three midlife physical health outcomes (bronchitis diagnosis, ulcer diagnosis, and general physical health). These three outcomes are etiologically distinct, leading to unique testable hypotheses. Multivariate models controlling for childhood background and early adversity were estimated using data from over 3000 respondents in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, USA. The results indicate that midlife social relations and cognition do not function as pathways for any outcome. However, smoking is a crucial pathway connecting childhood abuse with bronchitis; mental health is important for ulcers; and BMI, smoking, and mental health are paramount for general physical health. These findings suggest that abuse survivors' coping mechanisms can lead to an array of midlife health problems. Furthermore, the results validate the use of etiologically distinct outcomes for understanding plausible causal pathways when using cross-sectional data.

  4. Student Teachers' Understanding and Application of Assessment for Learning during a Physical Education Teacher Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorente-Catalán, Eloisa; Kirk, David

    2016-01-01

    There is widespread consensus on the need for assessment for learning (AfL) in both university courses and school programmes. Given the prevalence of traditional practices in school physical education where assessment is basic or non-existent, we might ask whether AfL is present in physical education teacher education (PETE) courses. Where it is,…

  5. A Course in Biophysics: An Integration of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giancoli, Douglas C.

    1971-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary course for advanced undergraduates in the physical and biological sciences. The goal is to understand a living cell from the most basic standpoint possible. The ideas of physics, chemistry, and molecular biology are all essential to the course, which leads to a unified view of the sciences. (PR)

  6. Piagetian-Styled and Process-Based Physics Lecture Course for Liberal Arts Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigo, Robert B.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an introductory physics course for liberal arts majors presented in a manner consistent with Piagetian developmental psychology. The course is organized and offered through lecture demonstrations and homework problems with emphasis on the historical processes of concept formation and the humanistic side of physics. (GA)

  7. Flipped Classroom Adapted to the ARCS Model of Motivation and Applied to a Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiksoy, Gülsüm; Özdamli, Fezile

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect on the achievement, motivation and self-sufficiency of students of the flipped classroom approach adapted to Keller's ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence and Satisfaction) motivation model and applied to a physics course. The study involved 66 students divided into two classes of a physics course. The…

  8. The Impact of Postsecondary Fitness and Wellness Courses on Physical Activity Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Joshua Charles

    2013-01-01

    Regular physical activity contributes to decreasing health risk factors. With the intent of establishing long-term behavioral changes that attribute to overall physical wellbeing, many U.S. universities offer fitness and wellness courses. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a postsecondary fitness and wellness course on physical…

  9. Interaction and learning: An analysis of two freshman physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Dexter

    2005-08-01

    The influence of digital technology has gradually increased through the years to the point where it impacts almost every part of our experience in some way. Educators are expected increasingly to supplement or even replace lecture and chalkboard practices with alternative strategies. Beyond integrating new technologies into the learning environments are the new forms of learning that some believe are implied by the nature of digitally mediated instruction itself. The use of multimedia technologies for learning in many cases is thought to facilitate a move away from teacher-centered practices of instruction toward learner-centered strategies of both delivery and assessment. This study was an investigation of effects that may be encountered when alternative forms of classroom delivery are introduced. It was a mixed-mode investigation of classroom culture and student performance in two sections of a physics course for undergraduate engineering students. The content for these two classes was identical as were the learning resources available to students. Both classes employed multiple methods of presentation combining face-to-face methods with classroom and online digital learning tools. The most distinctive differences between them were found in the classroom practice itself. One class received what may be called a traditional teacher-centered presentation focusing on solving math problems in physics. The other employed dense student to instructor and student-to-student interaction in the classroom with a learning approach characterized by inquiry methods of content delivery. The investigation asked three questions. First it sought to identify what expectations students brought to the classroom about what they would experience and how they would be taught. Second it examined how the tools and practices used to facilitate learning actually affected the classroom culture. Finally the study explored what affect if any the pedagogical practices students experienced had on

  10. The Relationship between Attitude and Knowledge in an Introductory Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihari, James; White, Arthur

    1998-04-01

    Pre and posttests were given over a three year period to students in an introductory university physics course, a two-quarter, hands-on, laboratory-based, science literacy course with a focus on energy. Attitude items on the tests related to student anxiety and efficacy, discovery, relevance, enjoyment, and interest. Knowledge items on the tests related to course subject matter. Quantitative analysis was used to study relationships between attitude variables, age, gender, subject matter knowledge, and performance in the course.

  11. Evaluation of a course designed to teach physics to students of physiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Ian A.; Singer, Kevin P.; Treagust, David; Zadnik, Marjan G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a course in physiotherapy whereby the physics fundamental to the modalities of cold, heat and ultrasound therapies was integrated in lectures and actual physiotherapy activities. The design of the course is described together with the perceptions of physiotherapy students regarding the organisation of the course, safety aspects and how well the integration contributed to their understanding of the physics involved in electrotherapy.

  12. "The Physics of Life," an Undergraduate General Education Biophysics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2015-01-01

    Improving the scientific literacy of non-scientists is an important aim, both because of the ever-increasing impact of science on our lives and because understanding science enriches our experience of the natural world. One route to improving scientific literacy is via general education undergraduate courses--i.e. courses for students not majoring…

  13. Designing and using multiple-possibility physics problems in physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekoyan, Vazgen

    2012-02-01

    One important aspect of physics instruction is helping students develop better problem solving expertise. Besides enhancing the content knowledge, problems help students develop different cognitive abilities and skills. This presentation focuses on multiple-possibility problems (alternatively called ill-structured problems). These problems are different from traditional ``end of chapter'' single-possibility problems. They do not have one right answer and thus the student has to examine different possibilities, assumptions and evaluate the outcomes. To solve such problems one has to engage in a cognitive monitoring called epistemic cognition. It is an important part of thinking in real life. Physicists routinely use epistemic cognition when they solve problems. I have explored the instructional value of using such problems in introductory physics courses.

  14. "Shut up and calculate": the available discursive positions in quantum physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Anders; Andersson, Staffan; Salminen-Karlsson, Minna; Elmgren, Maja

    2016-08-01

    Educating new generations of physicists is often seen as a matter of attracting good students, teaching them physics and making sure that they stay at the university. Sometimes, questions are also raised about what could be done to increase diversity in recruitment. Using a discursive perspective, in this study of three introductory quantum physics courses at two Swedish universities, we instead ask what it means to become a physicist, and whether certain ways of becoming a physicist and doing physics is privileged in this process. Asking the question of what discursive positions are made accessible to students, we use observations of lectures and problem solving sessions together with interviews with students to characterize the discourse in the courses. Many students seem to have high expectations for the quantum physics course and generally express that they appreciate the course more than other courses. Nevertheless, our analysis shows that the ways of being a "good quantum physics student" are limited by the dominating focus on calculating quantum physics in the courses. We argue that this could have negative consequences both for the education of future physicists and the discipline of physics itself, in that it may reproduce an instrumental "shut up and calculate"-culture of physics, as well as an elitist physics education. Additionally, many students who take the courses are not future physicists, and the limitation of discursive positions may also affect these students significantly.

  15. Developing the Learning Physical Science Curriculum: Adapting a Small Enrollment, Laboratory and Discussion Based Physical Science Course for Large Enrollments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Fred; Price, Edward; Robinson, Stephen; Boyd-Harlow, Danielle; McKean, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We report on the adaptation of the small enrollment, lab and discussion based physical science course, "Physical Science and Everyday Thinking" (PSET), for a large-enrollment, lecture-style setting. Like PSET, the new "Learning Physical Science" (LEPS) curriculum was designed around specific principles based on research on learning to meet the…

  16. A Profile of the Introduction to Adapted Physical Education Course within Undergraduate Physical Education Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piletic, Cindy K.; Davis, Ron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the profile, content, delivery mechanism, and application of teaching standards, National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) and Adapted Physical Education National Standards (APENS), within the Introduction to Adapted Physical Education (APE) course for college/university PETE preparation…

  17. Experimental College Physics Course Based on Ausubel's Learning Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Marco Antonio

    1978-01-01

    Compares the Ausubelian approach and the traditional one to the content organization of an introductory course in electromagnetism. States the differences between these approaches in terms of the student's ability to apply, relate, and differentiate electromagnetic concepts. (GA)

  18. Interactive fundamental physics. [THE REAL STUFF: The New Expanded Media Physics Course for secondary school students

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.L.

    1992-11-24

    THE REAL STUFF is an Expanded Media Physics Course aimed at students still in the formative early years of secondary school. Its consists of a working script for an interactive multimedia study unit in basic concepts of physics. The unit begins with a prologue on the Big Bang that sets the stage, and concludes with a lesson on Newton's first law of motion. The format is interactive, placing the individual student in control of a layered hypermedia'' structure that enables him or her to find a level of detail and difficulty that is comfortable and meaningful. The intent is to make physics relevant, intellectually accessible and fun. On-screen presenters and demonstrators will be females and males of various ages, ethnicities and backgrounds, and will include celebrities and physicists of note. A lean, layered design encourages repeated, cumulative study and makes the material useful for self-directed Teaming even by college students. THE REAL STUFF introduces a new science teaching paradigm, a way to teach science that will engage even students who have declined'' to be interested in science in the past. Increased participation in science by women, African-Americans and Spanish-speaking students is a particular goal.

  19. Teaching the Delightful Laws of Physics in a Survey Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    How physics can be made interesting is a question that needs no answer. That's because physics is interesting! It's a field of study jam-packed with fascination and wonder. The general public has an enormous thirst for physics knowledge, as indicated by the great numbers who purchase science magazines and books and watch "NOVA" and other…

  20. Physics Almost Saved the President! Electromagnetic Induction and the Assassination of James Garfield: A Teaching Opportunity in Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overduin, James; Molloy, Dana; Selway, Jim

    2014-03-01

    Electromagnetic induction is probably one of the most challenging subjects for students in the introductory physics sequence, especially in algebra-based courses. Yet it is at the heart of many of the devices we rely on today. To help students grasp and retain the concept, we have put together a simple and dramatic classroom demonstration that combines sight and sound with a compelling personal story from U.S. history. Other classroom activities dealing with induction have been discussed in this journal, but we believe that this one will be especially likely to attract and retain student interest, particularly in courses geared toward medical, biological, and other non-physics majors.

  1. An Introduction to the WeBWork Online Homework System for Introductory Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Douglas

    2012-03-01

    The use of online homework systems, such as WebAssign or the University of Texas' Quest Learning, as part of an introductory physics course has become popular among physics teachers. In some situations, such as teaching physics in high school, access to these services is not possible. WeBWork is an open-source online homework system maintained by the Mathematical Association of America and funded by the National Science Foundation. WeBWork has a small library of physics problems. In this paper, I will provide an introduction to how WeBWork could be used as part of an introductory physics course.

  2. Evaluation of the Physical Activity and Public Health Course for Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Dorn, Joan M.; Camplain, Ricky; Pate, Russell R.; Brown, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Since 1995, an 8-day Physical Activity and Public Health Course for Researchers has been offered yearly in the United States. Methods In 2013, an evaluation quantified time that fellows spent in different course offerings, surveyed fellows on course impact, documented grant funding, and identified fellow participation on leading physical activity-related journals. Results The number of fellows that attended the course ranged from 20–35/year. Fellows who participated in the web survey (n=322) agreed that the course: met their expectations (99%), had a positive impact on the physical activity research or practice work they did (98%), and helped increase their professional networking in the field (93%). Following the course, 73% of fellows had further contact with course faculty and 71% had further contact with other fellows. From the National Institutes of Health, 117 grants were awarded to 82 fellows (21% of eligible fellows). Out of 14 journals reviewed, 11 had at least one fellow on their staff as editor, associate editor, or editorial board member. Conclusion The Physical Activity and Public Health Course for Researchers helps address a training need by providing instruction and building capacity in the US and abroad for conducting research on physical activity and public health. PMID:25271475

  3. An Investigation of Tertiary-Level Learning in Some Practical Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Weili; Coll, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental physics is seen as an essential part of tertiary physics education. Students are supposed to develop practical skills and advance from closed "cookbook" experiments to open experiment and design experiment procedures independently. As a consequence tertiary practical physics courses increase in the level of challenge throughout an…

  4. Putting Physics First: Three Case Studies of High School Science Department and Course Sequence Reorganization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the process of shifting to a "Physics First" sequence in science course offerings in three school districts in the United States. This curricular sequence reverses the more common U.S. high school sequence of biology/chemistry/physics, and has gained substantial support in the physics education community over the…

  5. A New Labwork Course for Physics Students: Devices, Methods and Research Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Knut; Welzel, Manuela

    2007-01-01

    Physics labwork has for a long time now been an important part of academic physics education. But demands on physics education have changed. However, while seminars and lectures have easily been updated with the latest content, it is much more difficult to modernize labwork courses: mere changes of content require expensive new equipment, tight…

  6. Special Relativity and Magnetism in an Introductory Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccioni, R. G.

    2007-01-01

    Too often, students in introductory courses are left with the impression that Einstein's special theory of relativity comes into play only when the relative speed of two objects is an appreciable fraction of the speed of light ("c"). In fact, relativistic length contraction, along with Coulomb's law, accounts quantitatively for the force on a…

  7. Physical Education Students' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Their Distance Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frimming, Renee E.; Bordelon, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Because of the increasing demand from students to have available to them distance education courses, it is vital to offer students health and physical education distance education courses that meet their need for a challenging and rewarding educational experience. In this pilot study, we explored the learning experiences of students…

  8. Accelerated Integrated Science Sequence (AISS): An Introductory Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis-Roberts, Kathleen L.; Edwalds-Gilbert, Gretchen; Landsberg, Adam S.; Copp, Newton; Ulsh, Lisa; Drew, David E.

    2009-01-01

    A new interdisciplinary, introductory science course was offered for the first time during the 2007-2008 school year. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the idea of working at the intersections of biology, chemistry, and physics and to recognize interconnections between the disciplines. Interdisciplinary laboratories are a key…

  9. Introductory Physical and Earth Science 8AB. An Instructional Course Outline. Publication No. SC-864.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Office of Secondary Instruction.

    Introductory Physical and Earth Science 8AB, a required course in the Los Angeles Unified School District, covers skills and concepts related to matter, energy, space science, weather, and oceanography with particular emphasis on the investigative approach. This instructional outline contains teacher guidelines and course content information.…

  10. Student Perceptions of University Physical Activity Instruction Courses Taught Utilizing Sport Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Derek J.; Sibley, Benjamin A.; Townsend, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Limited research exists on effective teaching methods in university physical activity instruction (PAI) program courses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate PAI courses taught utilizing a sport education curriculum and instructional model. The Individual Development and Educational Assessment (IDEA) teaching evaluation was administered to…

  11. Teaching a Chemistry MOOC with a Virtual Laboratory: Lessons Learned from an Introductory Physical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Patrick J.; Agger, Jonathan R.; Anderson, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the experience and lessons learned of running a MOOC in introductory physical chemistry. The course was unique in allowing students to conduct experimental measurements using a virtual laboratory constructed using video and simulations. A breakdown of the student background and motivation for taking the course is…

  12. An Investigation into the Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning in a Physical Chemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurses, Ahmet; Acikyildiz, Metin; Dogar, Cetin; Sozbilir, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) approach in a physical chemistry laboratory course. The parameters investigated were students' attitudes towards a chemistry laboratory course, scientific process skills of students and their academic achievement. The design of the study was one group…

  13. The Evaluation of the Studies Related to the New Curriculum of Physics Course: The Case of Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ergin, Ismet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to state the points when choosing a method in studies concerning physics course new curriculum by evaluating researches whose topics are secondary physics course curriculum (in Turkey) in terms of subject, objective, method and consequences. 24 researches conducted within the lines of secondary physics course curriculum…

  14. International Training Course on Physical Protection (ITC-25) Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Overholt, Michelle Jungst

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this evaluation repor t is to provide the informa tion necessary to improve the effectiveness of the ITC provided to the In ternational Atomic Energy Agency Member States. This report examines ITC-25 training content, delivery me thods, scheduling, and logistics. Ultimately, this report evaluates whether the course pr ovides the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the students' needs in the protection of nuclear materials and facilities.

  15. Science Awareness and Science Literacy through the Basic Physics Course: Physics with a bit of Metaphysics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusli, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Until the 1980s, it is well known and practiced in Indonesian Basic Physics courses, to present physics by its effective technicalities: The ideally elastic spring, the pulley and moving blocks, the thermodynamics of ideal engine models, theoretical electrostatics and electrodynamics with model capacitors and inductors, wave behavior and its various superpositions, and hopefully closed with a modern physics description. A different approach was then also experimented with, using the Hobson and Moore texts, stressing the alternative aim of fostering awareness, not just mastery, of science and the scientific method. This is hypothesized to be more in line with the changed attitude of the so-called Millenials cohort who are less attentive if not interested, and are more used to multi-tasking which suits their shorter span of attention. The upside is increased awareness of science and the scientific method. The downside is that they are getting less experience of the scientific method which intensely bases itself on critical observation, analytic thinking to set up conclusions or hypotheses, and checking consistency of the hypotheses with measured data. Another aspect is recognition that the human person encompasses both the reasoning capacity and the mental- spiritual-cultural capacity. This is considered essential, as the world grows even smaller due to increased communication capacity, causing strong interactions, nonlinear effects, and showing that value systems become more challenging and challenged due to physics / science and its cosmology, which is successfully based on the scientific method. So students should be made aware of the common basis of these two capacities: the assumptions, the reasoning capacity and the consistency assumption. This shows that the limits of science are their set of basic quantifiable assumptions, and the limits of the mental-spiritual-cultural aspects of life are their set of basic metaphysical (non-quantifiable) assumptions. The

  16. An evidence based approach to undergraduate physical assessment practicum course development.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brenda; Nix, Elizabeth; Norman, Bilinda; McPike, H Dawn

    2014-05-01

    Physical assessment is an important component of professional nursing practice. New nurse graduates experience difficulty transitioning the traditional head to toe physical assessment into real world nursing practice. This study was conducted to provide current data concerning physical assessment competencies utilized consistently by registered nurses. This quantitative study used a 126 item survey mailed to 900 Registered Nurses. Participants used a Likert-type scale to report frequency of use for physical assessment competencies. Thirty seven competencies were determined to be essential components of the physical assessment, 18 were determined supplemental, and 71 were determined to be non-essential. Transition of the new graduate nurse into professional practice can be enhanced by focusing content in physical assessment practicum courses on the essential competencies of physical assessment. Faculty for the university has analyzed data from this study to support evidence based changes to the undergraduate nursing program physical assessment practicum course.

  17. From F = ma to flying squirrels: curricular change in an introductory physics course.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Brian; Terry, Laura; Benenson, Walter

    2013-06-01

    We present outcomes from curricular changes made to an introductory calculus-based physics course whose audience is primarily life sciences majors, the majority of whom plan to pursue postbaccalaureate studies in medical and scientific fields. During the 2011-2012 academic year, we implemented a Physics of the Life Sciences curriculum centered on a draft textbook that takes a novel approach to teaching physics to life sciences majors. In addition, substantial revisions were made to the homework and hands-on components of the course to emphasize the relationship between physics and the life sciences and to help the students learn to apply physical intuition to life sciences-oriented problems. Student learning and attitudinal outcomes were assessed both quantitatively, using standard physics education research instruments, and qualitatively, using student surveys and a series of postsemester interviews. Students experienced high conceptual learning gains, comparable to other active learning-based physics courses. Qualitatively, a substantial fraction of interviewed students reported an increased interest in physics relative to the beginning of the semester. Furthermore, more than half of students self-reported that they could now relate physics topics to their majors and future careers, with interviewed subjects demonstrating a high level of ability to come up with examples of how physics affects living organisms and how it helped them to better understand content presented in courses in their major. PMID:23737630

  18. From F = ma to flying squirrels: curricular change in an introductory physics course.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Brian; Terry, Laura; Benenson, Walter

    2013-06-01

    We present outcomes from curricular changes made to an introductory calculus-based physics course whose audience is primarily life sciences majors, the majority of whom plan to pursue postbaccalaureate studies in medical and scientific fields. During the 2011-2012 academic year, we implemented a Physics of the Life Sciences curriculum centered on a draft textbook that takes a novel approach to teaching physics to life sciences majors. In addition, substantial revisions were made to the homework and hands-on components of the course to emphasize the relationship between physics and the life sciences and to help the students learn to apply physical intuition to life sciences-oriented problems. Student learning and attitudinal outcomes were assessed both quantitatively, using standard physics education research instruments, and qualitatively, using student surveys and a series of postsemester interviews. Students experienced high conceptual learning gains, comparable to other active learning-based physics courses. Qualitatively, a substantial fraction of interviewed students reported an increased interest in physics relative to the beginning of the semester. Furthermore, more than half of students self-reported that they could now relate physics topics to their majors and future careers, with interviewed subjects demonstrating a high level of ability to come up with examples of how physics affects living organisms and how it helped them to better understand content presented in courses in their major.

  19. From F = ma to Flying Squirrels: Curricular Change in an Introductory Physics Course

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Brian; Terry, Laura; Benenson, Walter

    2013-01-01

    We present outcomes from curricular changes made to an introductory calculus-based physics course whose audience is primarily life sciences majors, the majority of whom plan to pursue postbaccalaureate studies in medical and scientific fields. During the 2011–2012 academic year, we implemented a Physics of the Life Sciences curriculum centered on a draft textbook that takes a novel approach to teaching physics to life sciences majors. In addition, substantial revisions were made to the homework and hands-on components of the course to emphasize the relationship between physics and the life sciences and to help the students learn to apply physical intuition to life sciences–oriented problems. Student learning and attitudinal outcomes were assessed both quantitatively, using standard physics education research instruments, and qualitatively, using student surveys and a series of postsemester interviews. Students experienced high conceptual learning gains, comparable to other active learning–based physics courses. Qualitatively, a substantial fraction of interviewed students reported an increased interest in physics relative to the beginning of the semester. Furthermore, more than half of students self-reported that they could now relate physics topics to their majors and future careers, with interviewed subjects demonstrating a high level of ability to come up with examples of how physics affects living organisms and how it helped them to better understand content presented in courses in their major. PMID:23737630

  20. Courses in Physics in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents a description of the curricula in physics at 124 universities, colleges, and polytechnical institutes in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. General information is provided on examination requirements for admission and procedures for making application to the schools. (SA)

  1. Compressed-format compared to regular-format in a first-year university physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Jason J. B.; Harrison, David M.; Honig, Eli

    2015-03-01

    We compare student performance in two sessions of a large first-year university physics course, one with a normal 12-week term and the other with a compressed 6-week term. Student performance is measured by the normalized gain on the Force Concept Inventory. We find that the gains for the regular-format course are better than the gains for the compressed-format course, and while the differences in gains are small they are statistically significant. Not accounted for are the differences in effectiveness of the different instructors in the two versions of the course.

  2. A New Introductory Physics Course for Pre-Service Elementary School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohne, Mary Vickie

    1998-04-01

    Much of the science taught in elementary schools is physics, even though it is called "physical science" at that level. To encourage pre-service teachers to learn more about physics, we are offering a new and special introductory physics course that is restristed to education majors. Our aim is to teach them basic physics in such a way that they will be readily able to apply their knowledge in a preschool or K-8 classroom. The approach of the course is very conceptual. Special features of the course include group learning, "check questions" at the beginning of each lecture, multiple short lab activities, hands-on lecture demonstrations, and extensive use of everyday materials in labs and lecture demonstrations.

  3. Does Taking Physics Pay Off Later in Chemistry and Biology Courses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Philip M.; Tai, R. H.

    2006-12-01

    The relationship between performance of 8474 students enrolled in introductory college biology, chemistry, or physics courses and their prior high school course-taking in physics is investigated in 122 randomly-selected undergraduate classrooms. Employing multiple linear regression, models are constructed that control for variation in student background, socio-economic status, and students' prior achievement in mathematics and English. A small effect size (ES = 0.13 SD, p = 0.01) is found for each year of school coursework in the same subject as a college course in biology, chemistry, or physics. No statistically significant relationship is found (p = 0.05) for any cross-disciplinary preparation, including that of differing amounts of high school physics preparation on college chemistry or biology performance. Our findings do not provide support for the view that students will be better prepared for taking high school chemistry and biology by taking physics in ninth grade.

  4. Modifying your Physics and Astronomy Courses to Incorporate Heliophysics - Some Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebulka, Rebecca; Cox, Amanda; Rodriguez Garrigues, Alvar; Hoshino, Laura; Fitzgerald, Cullen; Montgomery, M.; Al-Rawi, Ahlam N.; Velissaris, Christos; Flitsiyan, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Although physics and astronomy courses include heliophysics topics, students still leave the courses without knowing what heliophysics is and how heliophysics relates to their daily lives. To meet goals of NASA's Living With a Star Program, UCF Physics has modified courses such as SCALE-UP: Electricity and Magnetism for Engineers and Scientists, Astronomy (for non-science majors), and Astrophysics to include heliophysics topics. In this poster, we present the previous labs, the student-modified labs to incorporate heliophysics, and we present student learning statistics.

  5. SCALE-UP Your Astronomy and Physics Undergraduate Courses to Incorporate Heliophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rawi, Ahlam N.; Cox, Amanda; Hoshino, Laura; Fitzgerald, Cullen; Cebulka, Rebecca; Rodriguez Garrigues, Alvar; Montgomery, Michele; Velissaris, Chris; Flitsiyan, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Although physics and astronomy courses include heliophysics topics, students still leave these courses without knowing what heliophysics is and how heliophysics relates to their daily lives. To meet goals of NASA's Living With a Star Program of incorporating heliophysics into undergraduate curriculum, UCF Physics has modified courses such as Astronomy (for non-science majors), Astrophysics, and SCALE-UP: Electricity and Magnetism for Engineers and Scientists to incorporate heliophysics topics. In this presentation, we discuss these incorporations and give examples that have been published in NASA Wavelength. In an associated poster, we present data on student learnin

  6. Pedagogical changes in an astronomy course for non-physics majors: Student and professor perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Katarin; Razul, Mohamed Shajahan Gulam; Powell, Jamie

    2015-12-01

    Pedagogical changes were made in the delivery of a three-credit, first-year astronomy course offered to non-physics majors by a department of physics at a small undergraduate university in Canada. The professor of the course initiated this change to better meet the needs of the students enrolled. A brief description of some of the activities and teaching strategies is given, along with student and professor perceptions. Results indicate that it is possible to develop and deliver a rigorous, conceptually based astronomy course and that the effort is worth the result.

  7. Lessons from two decades of hybrid and online physics courses at Michigan State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd

    In Fall 1992, at Michigan State University we first offered online homework to one section of an introductory physics course; students received randomized assignments as printouts and entered answers through Telnet sessions, frequently using text terminals. Now, over two decades later, all of our introductory physics courses have significant online components, and students can chose between different formats, including hybrid courses with free online textbook materials, as well as courses that are completely online. What have we learned over the years about which formats are most effective for which students? What are the respective learning outcomes? Which logistical models work best for homework, exams, videos, and textbook materials? What about academic integrity? In our talk we will reflect on how our courses have been developing over the years, report educational research results, relate anecdotes and experiences, and point out pitfalls that we have encountered.

  8. Student Use of Energy Concepts from Physics in Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Megan L.; Lindsey, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an interdisciplinary investigation of students' usage of ideas about energy from physics in the context of introductory chemistry. We focus on student understanding of the idea that potential energy is a function of distance between interacting objects, a concept relevant to understanding potential energy in both physical…

  9. Action Research: Tiered Instruction in a High School Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courville, Keith

    2010-01-01

    (Purpose) This article describes the use of tiered instruction, a specific form of differentiation, within the author's high school Physics classroom. A background and discussion on the nature of tiered instruction is also included. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the necessity of differentiation within the classroom; (2)…

  10. Polymer Principles in the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Course. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Part l (SE 538 305) covered application of classical thermodynamics, polymer crystallinity, and phase diagrams to teaching physical chemistry. This part covers statistical thermodynamics, conformation, molecular weights, rubber elasticity and viscoelasticity, and kinetics of polymerization. Eight polymer-oriented, multiple-choice test questions…

  11. "Energy Is...life": Meaning Making through Dialogue in a Tribal College Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonellis, Jessica Christel

    2013-01-01

    This research is an exploration of students' meaning making around physical concepts through connections to students' funds of knowledge. This qualitative case study, influenced by Indigenous methodologies, focused on two Native students in a tribal college introductory physics course, exploring the personal, cultural, and philosophical…

  12. Research and Teaching: Implementation of Interactive Engagement Teaching Methods in a Physical Oceanography Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiner, Louis E.; Gilman, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This study measures the effects of increased faculty-student engagement on student learning, success rates, and perceptions in a Physical Oceanography course. The study separately implemented two teaching methods that had been shown to be successful in a different discipline, introductory physics. These methods were the use of interactive…

  13. Development of Polytechnic Knowledge and Abilities in the Course of Studying Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imashev, Gizatulla; Abykanova, Bakytgul T.; Rakhmetova, Mairagul T.; Tumysheva, Anar A.; Moldasheva, Raushan N.; Ilyasova, Sandugash S.; Shahimova, Aliya A.

    2016-01-01

    In this article one of aspects of physics course studying improvement at high schools--the problem of the development of polytechnic knowledge and abilities in modern conditions--is revealed. In this research, the role and place of polytechnic education in the improvement of teaching physics at high schools are revealed, the main pedagogical…

  14. Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) Courses for Creating New Chemistry and Physics Teachers: Do They Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynan, Richard; Mallaburn, Andrea; Jones, Robert Bryn; Clays, Ken

    2014-01-01

    During extended subject knowledge enhancement (SKE) courses, graduates without chemistry or physics bachelor degrees prepared to enter a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) programme to become chemistry or physics teachers. Data were gathered from the exit survey returned by Liverpool John Moores University SKE students about to start…

  15. An Examination of Pedagogy Effectiveness on Undergraduate Development in a Police Physical Qualification Preparation Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotay, Alberto A.

    2009-01-01

    The first purpose of the quantitative study was to determine the relationship, if any, between the pre- and post-training physical assessment scores of college students enrolled in a course designed to assist in passing police qualification physical tests. Having determined the pre-test and post-test relationship, the second purpose was to develop…

  16. A Field-Based Introductory Physical and Historical Geology Course Taught in the Rocky Mountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, George Christopher; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a six-week, six-credit, field-based physical and historical geology course offered by Lehigh University (Pennsylvania) in conjunction with its standard summer field studies program. Stresses the advantages of integrating physical and historical geology concepts in a field setting. (TW)

  17. Electromagnetism Unit of an Introductory University Physics Course: The Influence of a Reform-Based Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sarah Elizabeth; Hazari, Zahra; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Harrison, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Many students enrolled in university physics have little interest in the subject matter, a trend more pronounced in females. This study assesses students' conceptual understanding and interest during the electrochemistry unit of a physics course for nonphysics majors that was revised in light of consistently low ratings from its students. The…

  18. A Critical Examination of Movement Content Knowledge Courses in Physical Education Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Insook; Lee, Yun Soo; Ward, Phillip; Li, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing policy emphasis on improving teacher quality, little is known about how teachers acquire their movement content knowledge in physical education teacher education (PETE). To address this question we examined: (a) movement content courses designed to teach K-12 physical education content in the PETE curriculum, (b) the purpose of…

  19. From "F = ma" to Flying Squirrels: Curricular Change in an Introductory Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, Brian; Terry, Laura; Benenson, Walter

    2013-01-01

    We present outcomes from curricular changes made to an introductory calculus-based physics course whose audience is primarily life sciences majors, the majority of whom plan to pursue postbaccalaureate studies in medical and scientific fields. During the 2011-2012 academic year, we implemented a Physics of the Life Sciences curriculum centered on…

  20. SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPLEMENTS FOR A TELEVISED PHYSICS COURSE, STUDY PLAN AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; LUMSDAINE, ARTHUR A.

    THE INITIAL PHASES OF A STUDY OF SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL AIDS FOR A TELEVISED PHYSICS COURSE WERE DESCRIBED. THE APPROACH, EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN, PROCEDURE, AND TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF THE STUDY PLAN WERE INCLUDED. THE MATERIALS WERE PREPARED TO SUPPLEMENT THE SECOND SEMESTER OF HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICS. THE MATERIAL COVERED STATIC AND CURRENT ELECTRICITY,…

  1. Transversality of Electromagnetic Waves in the Calculus-Based Introductory Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burko, Lior M.

    2008-01-01

    Introductory calculus-based physics textbooks state that electromagnetic waves are transverse and list many of their properties, but most such textbooks do not bring forth arguments why this is so. Both physical and theoretical arguments are at a level appropriate for students of courses based on such books, and could be readily used by…

  2. Engaging Students in a Physics Course through Use of Digital Video Capture and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lojewska, Zenobia

    2007-10-01

    Use of digital video motion analysis as a teaching tool in an introductory physics course is presented. The focus of the presentation is the application of digital video technology in a Physics for Movement Science course geared towards Physical Education, Athletic Training and Exercise Science majors. The Dickinson movie set was found to be the most applicable for in-class activities, homework assignments, and projects. Some of the movie clips chosen for analysis are focused on human motion and sports. Additionally, students are starting to capture and analyze their own movie clips.

  3. Gender Differences in Learning Constructs, Shifts in Learning Constructs, and Their Relationship to Course Achievement in a Structured Inquiry, Yearlong College Physics Course for Life Science Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavallo, Ann M. L.; Rozman, Michelle; Potter, Wendell H.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated differences and shifts in learning and motivation constructs among male and female students in a nonmajors, yearlong structured inquiry college physics course and examined how these variables were related to physics understanding and course achievement. Tests and questionnaires measured students' learning approaches,…

  4. A project-based course about outreach in a physics curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobroff, Julien; Bouquet, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    We describe an undergraduate course where physics students are asked to conceive an outreach project of their own. This project-based-learning course alternates between the project conception and teaching activities about outreach. It ends in a public show. Students decide the topic and format on their own. An analysis of the students’ productions over three years shows that all physics fields were equally covered, and various formats were used (experimental devices, animation or fiction movies, games, live events, photography). Some typical examples are described. We also analyse the benefits of this approach from the students’ perspective, through a survey done over three classes. Students showed an overall very good assessment of the course (average of 4.5(0.6) on an appreciation scale from 1 to 5) and recognised having developed outreach skills but also project-management and group-work know-how. They acknowledged this course to be a unique opportunity to share with an audience their interest in physics compared to other courses. They further mentioned that it served as an intermission in a classical academic curriculum. They also point out some challenges, especially the time-consuming issue. This survey together with the practical description of the course implementation should help other universities develop similar courses.

  5. Effects of California community college students' gender, self-efficacy, and attitudes and beliefs toward physics on conceptual understanding of Newtonian mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Asma

    Despite the advances made in various fields, women are still considered as minorities in the fields of science and mathematics. There is a gender gap regarding women's participation and achievement in physics. Self-efficacy and attitudes and beliefs toward physics have been identified as predictors of students' performance on conceptual surveys in physics courses. The present study, which used two-way analysis of variance and multiple linear regression analyses at a community college in California, revealed there is no gender gap in achievement between male and female students in physics courses. Furthermore, there is an achievement gap between students who are enrolled in algebra-based and calculus-based physics courses. The findings indicate that attitudes and beliefs scores can be used as predictors of students' performance on conceptual surveys in physics courses. However, scores of self-efficacy cannot be used as predictors of students' performance on conceptual surveys in physics courses.

  6. Exploring Algebra Based Problem Solving Methods and Strategies of Spanish-Speaking High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes differences found in Spanish-speaking middle school and high school students in algebra-based problem solving. It identifies the accuracy differences between word problems presented in English, Spanish and numerically based problems. The study also explores accuracy differences between each subgroup of Spanish-speaking…

  7. Design Of Instructional Objectives Of Undergraduate Solid State Physics Course: A First Step To Physics Education Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Sastri, O.; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that most of the undergraduate study in India is conducted through the affiliate system in which affiliated colleges run the courses prescribed by a Board of Studies of the affiliating University in the form of a syllabus, which happens to be the only academic link between the students, teachers and the examiners. This document is limited only to defining the contents of the course without any hint about the instructional/learning objectives. Given these limitations of the existing course structure an attempt has been made to define the instructional/learning objectives for an undergraduate course of study in Solid State Physics prescribed in B. Sc. (Honours and Pass Course) in Physics of Himachal Pradesh University, India. It is not only the first step to enhance learning but to make teaching research based as well, as has been practiced in US and West as a foundation of Physics Education Research. The instructional objectives/learning objectives are written using Mager's approach and classified using Bloom's taxonomy. An effort has also been made to make it ready for adoption in the classroom.

  8. Correlating Student Interest and High School Preparation with Learning and Performance in an Introductory University Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Jason J.?B.; Harrison, David M.; Meyertholen, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the correlation of student performance in a large first year university physics course with their reasons for taking the course and whether or not the student took a senior-level high school physics course. Performance was measured both by the Force Concept Inventory and by the grade on the final examination. Students who took the…

  9. The Learning-Focused Transformation of Biology and Physics Core Courses at the U.S. Air Force Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagendorf, Kenneth; Noyd, Robert K.; Morris, D. Brent

    2009-01-01

    An institution-wide focus on deep learning has made significant changes in the biology and physics core course curriculum at the U.S. Air Force Academy. The biology course director has reworked course objectives to reflect the learning-focused approach to teaching, while the physics curriculum has adopted new learning outcomes and ways to…

  10. Sex differences in physics learning and evaluations in an introductory course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, Jennifer Marie

    On a national level, boys and men score higher than girls and women on science and math tests. There have been several investigations into the reasons for these differences, with some believing that they are caused by innate biological sex differences and some that they are caused by social and cultural gender differences. In addition, women who plan to major in science and engineering drop out of those majors at higher rates than men do. This study was designed to contribute to the ongoing discussion about why these differences between women and men exist. This study compared post-test physics scores of a matched sample of men and women to see whether there were differences in how much physics had been learned at the end of a course when there were few differences at the beginning of the course. The study also looked at the ratings that men and women gave to the problem solving method and the sections of the course that used cooperative grouping. It was found that, although the population of students taking Physics 1251 showed differences in performance on physics tests both at the beginning and at the end of the course, when students were matched according to their high school background and their physics pretest scores there was no difference in their post-test scores. It was also found that women liked the relevant aspects of the course more than men did. Implications of these results are discussed.

  11. How teaching practices are connected to student intention to enrol in upper secondary school physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari

    2016-05-01

    Background: In developed countries, it is challenging for teachers to select pedagogical practices that encourage students to enrol in science and technology courses in upper secondary school. Purpose: Aiming to understand the enrolment dynamics, this study analyses sample-based data from Finland's National Assessment in Science to determine whether pedagogical approaches influence student intention to enrol in upper secondary school physics courses. Sample: This study examined a clustered sample of 2949 Finnish students in the final year of comprehensive school (15-16 years old). Methods: Through explorative factor analysis, we extracted several variables that were expected to influence student intention to enrol in physics courses. We applied partial correlation to determine the underlying interdependencies of the variables. Results: The analysis revealed that the main predictor of enrolment in upper secondary school physics courses is whether students feel that physics is important. Although statistically significant, partial correlations between variables were rather small. However, the analysis of partial correlations revealed that pedagogical practices influence inquiry and attitudinal factors. Pedagogical practices that emphasise science experimentation and the social construction of knowledge had the strongest influence. Conclusions: The research implies that to increase student enrolment in physics courses, the way students interpret the subject's importance needs to be addressed, which can be done by the pedagogical practices of discussion, teacher demonstrations, and practical work.

  12. Spiral-syllabus course in wave phenomena to introduce majors and nonmajors to physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touger, Jerold S.

    1981-09-01

    A single course to introduce physics to both nonscience and physics majors has been developed, dealing with light, sound, and signal, transmission and reception, and emphasizing wave aspects of these phenomena. Themes such as the observational basis of physics, the progression from qualitative observation to measurement, physical models, mathematical modeling, and the utility of models in developing technology are stressed. Modes of presentation, consistent with the notion of a spiral syllabus, are explained with reference to the cognitive and educational theories of Bruner and Piaget. Reasons are discussed for choosing this subject matter in preference to Newtonian mechanics as a starting point for physics majors.

  13. Effects of Requiring Physical Fitness in a Lecture-Based College Course: Students' Attitudes toward Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esslinger, Keri A.; Grimes, Amanda R.; Pyle, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated students' attitudes toward physical activity (PA) when including a required PA component in a university-required personal wellness class. The study included (a) an experimental group of students enrolled in a personal wellness course in which there was a required PA requirement and (b) a control group of students…

  14. A statistical development of entropy for the introductory physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepf, David C.

    2002-02-01

    Many introductory physics texts introduce the statistical basis for the definition of entropy in addition to the Clausius definition, ΔS=q/T. We use a model based on equally spaced energy levels to present a way that the statistical definition of entropy can be developed at the introductory level. In addition to motivating the statistical definition of entropy, we also develop statistical arguments to answer the following questions: (i) Why does a system approach a state of maximum number of microstates? (ii) What is the equilibrium distribution of particles? (iii) What is the statistical basis of temperature? (iv) What is the statistical basis for the direction of spontaneous energy transfer? Finally, a correspondence between the statistical and the classical Clausius definitions of entropy is made.

  15. a University Course on the Physical Principles of Ultrasound Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genis, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    The ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials course was offered to Applied Engineering Technology (AET) students at Drexel University for last two years. The main objective of this three-credit (thirty-hour) course is to introduce students to physical principles of ultrasound measurements and to demonstrate the basic principles of ultrasound nondestructive evaluation of materials by combining hands-on laboratory experience with lectures. The work in the laboratory enhances the fundamentals taught in the classroom sessions.

  16. Developing physical capability standards that are predictive of success on Special Forces selection courses.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Andrew P; Orr, Robin M; Billing, Daniel C

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to develop minimum standards for physical capability assessments (vertical jump, sit and reach, push-ups, seven-stage sit-ups, heaves, agility, 20-m shuttle run, loaded 5-km pack march, and 400-m swim) that candidates must pass before they can commence Australian Army Special Forces (SF) selection courses. Soldiers (Part A: n = 104; Part B: n = 92) completed the physical capability assessments before commencing a SF selection course. At the beginning of these selection courses, participants attempted two barrier assessments (3.2-km battle run and 20-km march). Statistical analysis revealed several physical capability assessments were associated with performance on the barrier assessments and selection course outcome (Part A); however, these statistical models were unable to correctly classify all candidates as likely to pass or fail the selection course. Alternatively, manual analysis identified a combination of physical capability standards that correctly classified 14% to 18% of candidates likely to fail, without excluding any candidates able to pass (Part A). The standards were applied and refined through Part B and included completing the 5-km pack march in ≤45:45 minutes : seconds, achieving ≥level five on the sit-up test, or completing ≥66 push-ups. Implementation of these standards may reduce attrition rates and enhance the efficiency of the SF recruitment process.

  17. Millikan Lecture 1996: Promoting active learning based on physics education research in introductory physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, P. W.

    1997-01-01

    Early in his career Robert Millikan experimented with a laboratory-based method of teaching introductory physics that bears close resemblance to Workshop Physics.® In this talk, key elements of Workshop Physics are summarized. Some Workshop Physics activities are described which involve apparati that are used for rapid observations of conceptual aspects of physical phenomena as well as for equation verification experiments. Challenges are discussed that must be faced if recently developed activity-based approaches to teaching based on the outcomes of physics education research are to provide a foundation for a major paradigm shift in physics teaching.

  18. A Calculus-Level Introductory Physics Course with an Astronomy Theme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Joseph

    2011-05-01

    Physics from Planet Earth (PPE) is a one-semester, calculus-based introductory course in classical mechanics intended for first year students of physics, chemistry, astronomy and engineering. Most of the core topics in mechanics are included, but many of the examples and applications are drawn from astronomy, space science, and astrophysics. The laws of physics are assigned the task of exploring the heavens - the same task addressed by Newton over 300 years ago at the birth of classical mechanics. How do we know the distance to the Moon, Sun, or other galaxies? How do we know the masses of the Earth, Sun, and other planets and stars, and why do we believe in "missing” mass? As a physics course, PPE concentrates on how we know rather than what we know. Examples and applications include those of historical importance (the Earth-Moon distance, the Earth-Sun distance, Ptolemaic vs. Copernican models, weighing the Earth) as well as those of contemporary interest (Hubble's Law, rocket propulsion, spacecraft gravity boosts, the Roche limit, search for extrasolar planets, orbital mechanics, pulsars, galactic rotation curves). The course has been taught successfully at Colgate for over a decade, using materials that have been developed and refined during the past 15 years. Developers of PPE are eager to enrich the course by identifying other topics in contemporary astronomy that can be adapted for the first year physics audience.

  19. Conception and development of the Second Life® Embryo Physics Course.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The study of embryos with the tools and mindset of physics, started by Wilhelm His in the 1880s, has resumed after a hiatus of a century. The Embryo Physics Course convenes online allowing interested researchers and students, who are scattered around the world, to gather weekly in one place, the virtual world of Second Life®. It attracts people from a wide variety of disciplines and walks of life: applied mathematics, artificial life, bioengineering, biophysics, cancer biology, cellular automata, civil engineering, computer science, embryology, electrical engineering, evolution, finite element methods, history of biology, human genetics, mathematics, molecular developmental biology, molecular biology, nanotechnology, philosophy of biology, phycology, physics, self-reproducing systems, stem cells, tensegrity structures, theoretical biology, and tissue engineering. Now in its fifth year, the Embryo Physics Course provides a focus for research on the central question of how an embryo builds itself.

  20. Conception and development of the Second Life® Embryo Physics Course.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The study of embryos with the tools and mindset of physics, started by Wilhelm His in the 1880s, has resumed after a hiatus of a century. The Embryo Physics Course convenes online allowing interested researchers and students, who are scattered around the world, to gather weekly in one place, the virtual world of Second Life®. It attracts people from a wide variety of disciplines and walks of life: applied mathematics, artificial life, bioengineering, biophysics, cancer biology, cellular automata, civil engineering, computer science, embryology, electrical engineering, evolution, finite element methods, history of biology, human genetics, mathematics, molecular developmental biology, molecular biology, nanotechnology, philosophy of biology, phycology, physics, self-reproducing systems, stem cells, tensegrity structures, theoretical biology, and tissue engineering. Now in its fifth year, the Embryo Physics Course provides a focus for research on the central question of how an embryo builds itself. PMID:23586840

  1. Prospective Elementary Teachers' Analysis of Children's Science Talk in an Undergraduate Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Danielle B.; Swanson, Lauren H.; Otero, Valerie K.

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how prospective teachers used physics content knowledge when analyzing the talk of elementary children during special activities in an undergraduate physics content course designed for prospective teachers. We found that prospective teachers used content knowledge to reflect on their own learning and to identify students' science ideas and restate these ideas in scientific terms. Based on this research, we inferred that analyzing children's ideas through videos provides a meaningful context for applying conceptual physics knowledge in physics courses. Activities that are embedded within a disciplinary curriculum, such as those studied here, may help prospective teachers learn to use disciplinary knowledge in exactly the type of activity in which their content knowledge will be most useful: listening to and interpreting children's science ideas.

  2. Prospective Elementary Teachers' Analysis of Children's Science Talk in an Undergraduate Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Danielle B.; Swanson, Lauren H.; Otero, Valerie K.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated how prospective teachers used physics content knowledge when analyzing the talk of elementary children during special activities in an undergraduate physics content course designed for prospective teachers. We found that prospective teachers used content knowledge to reflect on their own learning and to identify students' science ideas and restate these ideas in scientific terms. Based on this research, we inferred that analyzing children's ideas through videos provides a meaningful context for applying conceptual physics knowledge in physics courses. Activities that are embedded within a disciplinary curriculum, such as those studied here, may help prospective teachers learn to use disciplinary knowledge in exactly the type of activity in which their content knowledge will be most useful: listening to and interpreting children's science ideas.

  3. Designing Water Rockets as a Multi-disciplinary Project for Physics, Calculus, and Engineering Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Paul; Craig, David; Hunt, Emily; Lockwood, Pamela

    2007-10-01

    We report the development of a cross-disciplinary activity for strengthening and relating student understanding of concepts from introductory physics, calculus, and engineering courses. Students, most simultaneously enrolled in all three classes, used material from physics and calculus to design rockets built from soda water bottles. They then constructed these rockets and a launcher in their engineering class and concluded the project with a public launch. Topics addressed include kinematics, dynamics, and fluid dynamics.

  4. Evaluation of connectedness between the University courses of Physics and Chemistry basing on the graph model of intersubject links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnitetskaya, Tatyana; Ivanova, Elena

    2016-08-01

    An application of the graph model of inter-subject links to University courses of Physics and Chemistry is presented in this article. A part of inter-subject space with directions of inter-subject links from Physics to Chemistry in the group of physical concepts has been shown. The graph model of inter-subject links includes quantitative indicators. Its numerical values are given in the article. The degree of connectedness between the data of Physics and Chemistry courses is discussed for the courses considered. The effect of the courses placement within a curriculum on the value of their connectedness is shown. The placement of courses within a curriculum can provide the study of the courses at the same time or consecutive study, when one course precedes another.

  5. Observations Of General Learning Patterns In An Upper-Level Thermal Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, David E.

    2009-11-01

    I discuss some observations from using interactive-engagement instructional methods in an upper-level thermal physics course over a two-year period. From the standpoint of the subject matter knowledge of the upper-level students, there was a striking persistence of common learning difficulties previously observed in students enrolled in the introductory course, accompanied, however, by some notable contrasts between the groups. More broadly, I comment on comparisons and contrasts regarding general pedagogical issues among different student sub-populations, for example: differences in the receptivity of lower- and upper-level students to diagrammatic representations; varying receptivity to tutorial-style instructional approach within the upper-level population; and contrasting approaches to learning among physics and engineering sub-populations in the upper-level course with regard to use of symbolic notation, mathematical equations, and readiness to employ verbal explanations.

  6. An undergraduate course, and new textbook, on ``Physical Models of Living Systems''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Philip

    2015-03-01

    I'll describe an intermediate-level course on ``Physical Models of Living Systems.'' The only prerequisite is first-year university physics and calculus. The course is a response to rapidly growing interest among undergraduates in several science and engineering departments. Students acquire several research skills that are often not addressed in traditional courses, including: basic modeling skills, probabilistic modeling skills, data analysis methods, computer programming using a general-purpose platform like MATLAB or Python, dynamical systems, particularly feedback control. These basic skills, which are relevant to nearly any field of science or engineering, are presented in the context of case studies from living systems, including: virus dynamics; bacterial genetics and evolution of drug resistance; statistical inference; superresolution microscopy; synthetic biology; naturally evolved cellular circuits. Publication of a new textbook by WH Freeman and Co. is scheduled for December 2014. Supported in part by EF-0928048 and DMR-0832802.

  7. Adding Vectors across the North: Development of Laboratory Component of Distance Education Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, V. K.; Solie, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Bush Physics for the 21st Century (BP21) is a distance education physics course offered through the Interior Aleutians Campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It provides an opportunity for rural Alaskan high school and community college students, many of whom have no other access to advanced science courses, to earn university science credit. The curriculum is mathematically rigorous and includes a laboratory component to prepare students who wish to pursue science and technology careers. The laboratory component has been developed during the past 3 years. Students learn lab safety, basic laboratory technique, experiment components and group collaboration. Experiments have place-based themes and involve skills that translate to rural Alaska when possible. Preliminary data on the general effectiveness of the labs have been analyzed and used to improve the course.

  8. Incorporating Sustainability and 21st-Century Problem Solving into Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Michael; Pfaff, Tom; Hamilton, Jason; Erkan, Ali

    2013-09-01

    As educators we are facing an unprecedented challenge to prepare our students not only for traditional careers but also for future careers that don't exist today. Many of these careers will require a firm grounding in disciplines such as physics, along with multidisciplinary, Global, and systems thinking skill sets. Our Multidisciplinary Sustainability Education (MSE) project is addressing this challenge by creating sustainability-themed modules where a variety of courses in a range of disciplines tackle relevant, real-world problems from each discipline's perspective. Each course involved in a module, which addresses an overarching question, has students write technical reports, using their discipline knowledge to address the question, and they are expected to read and synthesize reports from other discipline-based courses. This paper discusses one of our modules, "What Are the Current and Future Impacts of Global Climate Change on Polar Bears?" and how students studying thermal physics can help answer this question.

  9. Effective Student Teams for Collaborative Learning in an Introductory University Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Jason J. B.; Harrison, David M.; Meyertholen, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the types of student teams that are most effective for collaborative learning in a large freshman university physics course. We compared teams in which the students were all of roughly equal ability to teams with a mix of student abilities, we compared teams with three members to teams with four members, and we examined teams with…

  10. From Gene to Protein: A 3-Week Intensive Course in Molecular Biology for Physical Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadeau, Jay L.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a 3-week intensive molecular biology methods course based upon fluorescent proteins, which is successfully taught at the McGill University to advanced undergraduates and graduates in physics, chemical engineering, biomedical engineering, and medicine. No previous knowledge of biological terminology or methods is expected, so…

  11. Instructors' Support of Student Autonomy in an Introductory Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Nicholas; Webb, David

    2014-01-01

    The role of autonomy in the student experience in a large-enrollment undergraduate introductory physics course was studied from a self-determination theory perspective. A correlational study investigated whether certain aspects of the student experience correlated with how autonomy supportive (versus controlling) students perceived their…

  12. College Students' Opinions of Engaging Approaches in a Physical Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson

    2009-01-01

    Physical science courses have historically been taught from a variety of perspectives or emphases. In many cases, the instructor decides on the perspective and textbook for nonscience majors, so students rarely have a voice in the decision. This top-down approach and a potential gap between what instructors and students expect from a general…

  13. A Teaching Intervention to Increase Achievement of Hispanic Nonscience Majors Taking Physical Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poelzer, G. Herold; Zeng, Liang

    2008-01-01

    This quasi-experimental pilot study of nonscience majors taking a physical science course at a university in South Texas was conducted on Hispanic undergraduate students, and is theory based--an application of attribution theory. That the treatment group outperformed the comparison group provides evidence of the positive effect of having students…

  14. Use of Instructional Dialogue by University Students in a Difficult Distance Education Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorsky, Paul; Caspi, Avner; Smidt, Samantha

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the kinds of dialogic behavior engaged in by students while studying a difficult physics course at the Open University, UK. Research objectives were twofold: (1) to document what dialogue types, mediated through which resources, were utilized by students to overcome conceptual difficulties that emerged while reading the…

  15. Integrating a Single Tablet PC in Chemistry, Engineering, and Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, James W.; Cox, James R.

    2008-01-01

    A tablet PC is a versatile computer that combines the computing power of a notebook with the pen functionality of a PDA (Cox and Rogers 2005b). The authors adopted tablet PC technology in order to improve the process and product of the lecture format in their chemistry, engineering, and physics courses. In this high-tech model, a single tablet PC…

  16. Investigation of the Reasons of Negative Perceptions of Undergraduate Students Regarding the Modern Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksakalli, Ayhan; Salar, Riza; Turgut, Umit

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the negative perceptions of undergraduate students regarding modern physics course and the causes of their negative perceptions have been investigated. For this investigation, a qualitative and quantitative method (mix method) was chosen for data collection and analysis. The study group of the research consists of a total of 169…

  17. Faculty Beliefs about the Purposes for Teaching Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Michael R.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a phenomenographic analysis of faculty beliefs about the purposes for teaching upper-division physical chemistry courses in the undergraduate curriculum. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to recruit a diverse group of faculty for interviews. Collectively, the participating faculty regularly teach or have taught…

  18. Persuading Girls to Take Elective Physical Science Courses in High School: Who Are the Credible Communicators?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Identifies communicators whom eighth-grade girls perceive as credible regarding reasons for taking elective physical science courses in high school. Finds that father, woman science teacher, mother, and boy high school student are ranked highly. Attributes associated with the communicators were classified as prestige, trustworthiness, similarity,…

  19. Problem-Based Labs and Group Projects in an Introductory University Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohnle, Antje; Brown, C. Tom A.; Rae, Cameron F.; Sinclair, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes problem-based labs and analytical and computational project work we have been running at the University of St Andrews in an introductory physics course since 2008/2009. We have found the choice of topics, scaffolding of the process, timing in the year and facilitator guidance decisive for the success of these activities.…

  20. The Effect of Information Literacy on Physical Education Students' Perception of a Course Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernadakis, Nikolaos; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Giannousi, Maria; Zetou, Eleni; Kioumourtzoglou, Efthimis

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of information literacy on students' perception toward the educational services offered by an asynchronous course management system (e-Class) for the support of the traditional instruction method in tertiary physical education (PE) institutions. Participants were 211 PE students between the…

  1. Scientific Reasoning Abilities of Nonscience Majors in Physics-Based Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J. Christopher; Rubbo, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    We have found that non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors taking either a conceptual physics or astronomy course at two regional comprehensive institutions score significantly lower preinstruction on the Lawson's Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR) in comparison to national average STEM majors. Based on…

  2. A Game-Based Approach to an Entire Physical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daubenfeld, Thorsten; Zenker, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    We designed, implemented, and evaluated a game-based learning approach to increase student motivation and achievement for an undergraduate physical chemistry course. By focusing only on the most important game aspects, the implementation was realized with a production ratio of 1:8 (study load in hours divided by production effort in hours).…

  3. Toolbox of Activities to Support Students in a Physics Gateway Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Calvin S.; Rohar, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a set of activities, which scaffolds students to succeed in the standard Physics gateway course. The set of instructional activities that were designed included four distinct components: reflective writing, collaborative groups, critiques, and an essay question on the examination. Each activity was designed to lead into and…

  4. Physical Features of Soil: Advanced Crop and Soil Science. A Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Larry E.

    The course of study represents the second of six modules in advanced crop and soil science and introduces the agriculture student to the subject of physical features of the soil. Upon completing the two day lesson, the student will be able to determine the texture and structural types of soil, list the structural classes of the soil and where they…

  5. A Writing and Ethics Component for a Quantum Mechanics, Physical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, John T.; Strickland, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A writing-across-the-curriculum and ethics component is presented for a second-semester, physical chemistry course. The activity involves introducing ethical issues pertinent to scientists. Students are asked to read additional material, participate in discussions, and write essays and a paper on an ethical issue. The writing and discussion…

  6. "A Thing of Beauty Is a Joy Forever"? Returns to Physical Attractiveness over the Life Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Mads Meier

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the effect of three aspects of physical attractiveness (facial attractiveness, Body Mass Index and height) on socio-economic and marital success over the life course. In a sample of high school graduates from Wisconsin followed from their late teens and until their mid-60s, I find that (1. taller men have higher earnings than…

  7. Guidelines for an Introductory Undergraduate Course in Physical Education Teacher Education. Guidance Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castelli, Darla M.; Woods, Amelia M.; Lambdin, Dolly; Hall, Tina; Webster, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The intent of teacher education is to develop a person's skill, knowledge and ability to foster learning in pre-K-12 education settings. Preparation in this field of education carries added complexities, in that physical educators must address psychomotor, cognitive and affective goals. An introductory course for undergraduates should overview the…

  8. Challenges in a Physics Course: Introducing Student-Centred Activities for Increased Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Carola; Ravn, Ole; Forero-Shelton, Manu

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies and analyses some of the challenges that arose in a development process of changing from a content-based teaching environment to a student-centred environment in an undergraduate physics course for medicine and biology students at Universidad de los Andes. Through the use of the Critical Research model proposed by Skovsmose…

  9. Teachers' and students' reactions to the Revised Nuffield A-Level Physics Course (RNAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, David

    1990-07-01

    A battery of questionnaires and interviews with teachers and students experienced in RNAP, produced statistical data on many aspects of the course that leads to some guidelines and suggestions for better use of the course design and materials. The patterns described in this article relate to the responses of almost 200 teachers and about 100 students who were teaching and studying RNAP course during school year 1987/8. Though many of them criticised some aspects of the course, generally they were very enthusiastic about it and most of the information they gave us was accurate and reliable. The A-level physics teachers can choose either a `traditional' course or RNAP. We found that most of them don't like to change from one course to another. In the few cases it was done, the reasons generally were like `changing of school', `decreasing number of A-level physics students' or similar reasons. Most of RNAP teachers were keen about the course, its objectives and the way it prepares the students toward higher education as physicists or in other areas. Though pointing out its weaknesses, when comparing it with a `traditional' course, they stress much upon its advantages. We found a tendency to favour the course for the able student than for the weak or the average one. There was more than a feeling among teachers that the less motivated student can better succeed in a `traditional' course. This feeling became even stronger along the interviews where some teachers pointed out the high proportion of the selective schools doing RNAP, which made it more difficult (according to their feeling) for the average student to get an A or B grade. In some of the teachers' opinions RNAP is less suitable for girls who prefer a more `straightforward' course. It is interesting to point out that more than 50% of the students found the course more difficult than they expected it to be. Only 5% found it to be easier than they had suggested. Another point to think about is that almost one

  10. A model-based view of physics for computational activities in the introductory physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffler, Andy; Pillay, Seshini; Lubben, Fred; Fearick, Roger

    2008-04-01

    A model-based view of physics provides a framework within which computational activities may be structured so as to present to students an authentic representation of physics as a discipline. The use of the framework in teaching computation at the introductory physics level is illustrated by a case study based on the simultaneous translation and rotation of a disk-shaped spaceship. Student responses to an interactive worksheet are used to support guidelines for the design of computational tasks to enhance the understanding of physical systems through numerical problem solving.

  11. Gains in Content Knowledge, Confidence and Comfort Levels from a Physical Science Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wormer, Laura; Sorrick, Roxanne

    2009-10-01

    Physical Science for Everyday Thinking (PSET) is a guided inquiry approach to teaching physical science. Pre and post survey data were collected during four years of using PSET. The course was taught in an intensive format at a small, private liberal arts college; at least half the students were education majors. The surveys assessed content knowledge and confidence in the answers, attitudes toward science and understanding of the process of learning science. Analysis indicated significant increases in content knowledge, confidence in content knowledge and comfort levels with physical science; also significant changes in identification as a science person, what is a fact, objectivity of scientists and science as a solitary pursuit.

  12. Correlation Study of Physics Achievement, Learning Strategy, Attitude and Gender in an Introductory Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezgin Selcuk, Gamze

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between multiple predictors of physics achievement including reported use of four learning strategy clusters (elaboration, organization, comprehension monitoring and rehearsal), attitudes towards physics (sense of care and sense of interest) and a demographic variable (gender) in order to determine the…

  13. The Effects of Learning Strategy Instruction on Achievement, Attitude, and Achievement Motivation in a Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezgin Selçuk, Gamze; Sahin, Mehmet; Açıkgöz, Kamile Ün

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the influence of learning strategy instruction on student teachers' physics achievement, attitude towards physics, and achievement motivation. A pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental design with matching control group was used in the study. Two groups of student teachers ( n = 75) who were enrolled in an introductory physics course participated in the study. In the experimental group, questioning, summarizing, and graphic organizers were taught. The control group did not receive any presentation on strategy learning. Data were collected via the pre- and post-administration of the Physics Course Achievement Test, the Scale of Attitudes towards Physics, and the Achievement Motivation Scale. Univariate and multivariate analyses of variance on the data revealed no significant differences in the attitude and achievement motivation between the strategy and control groups. However, the strategy group students were observed to have a tendency of more positive attitude and motivation than the control group students. Results also showed that explicit learning strategy instruction was more effective than traditional instruction in improving physics achievement of the participating students. The implications of these results for physics education are discussed.

  14. Ready to Be Physically Active? The Effects of a Course Preparing Low-Income Multiethnic Women to Be More Physically Active

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Rakale; Lee, Rebecca E.; Albright, Cheryl L.; King, Abby C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of a preintervention physical activity preparatory course on physical activity, and social, cognitive, and transtheoretical constructs. The sample included 82 low-income, multiethnic women (75% Latina) who completed an 8-week course designed to prepare them to become more active prior to…

  15. The use of audio-visual methods in radiology and physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Peter

    1987-03-01

    Today's medicine utilizes sophisticated equipment for radiological, biochemical and microbiological investigation procedures and analyses. Hence it is necessary that physicians have adequate scientific and technical knowledge of the apparatus they are using so that the equipment can be used in the most effective way. Partly this knowledge is obtained from science-orientated courses in the preclinical stage of the study program for medical students. To increase the motivation to study science-courses (medical physics) audio-visual methods are used to describe diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the clinical routines.

  16. The Learning Reconstruction of Particle System and Linear Momentum Conservation in Introductory Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, S.; Saepuzaman, D.; Sriyansyah, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    This study is initiated by low achievement of prospective teachers in understanding concepts in introductory physics course. In this case, a problem has been identified that students cannot develop their thinking skills required for building physics concepts. Therefore, this study will reconstruct a learning process, emphasizing a physics concept building. The outcome will design physics lesson plans for the concepts of particle system as well as linear momentum conservation. A descriptive analysis method will be used in order to investigate the process of learning reconstruction carried out by students. In this process, the students’ conceptual understanding will be evaluated using essay tests for concepts of particle system and linear momentum conservation. The result shows that the learning reconstruction has successfully supported the students’ understanding of physics concept.

  17. Innovative Training of In-Service Teachers for Active Learning: A Short Teacher Development Course Based on Physics Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavala, Genaro; Alarcon, Hugo; Benegas, Julio

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution we describe a short development course for in-service physics teachers. The course structure and materials are based on the results of educational research, and its main objective is to provide in-service teachers with a first contact with the active learning strategy "Tutorials in Introductory Physics," developed by the…

  18. Conceptual Understanding of Students in an Upper Division Space Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.; Oppenheim, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Astronomy Department of Boston University offers both an upper division undergraduate and a graduate level introductory course in space physics. These are taught by faculty affiliated with both the Center for Space Physics and the Astronomy Department. These courses typically cover phenomena in that occur in the solar corona, solar wind, and the magnetospheres and atmospheres of planets and comets. Topics also include, Solar System plasma physics, magnetic storms, measurement techniques, and space weather affects. In the spring of 2006, a preliminary analysis was conducted of the students' understanding of selected concepts in space physics. This work consisted of multiple-choice pre/post tests and a series of interviews with student volunteers. As part of the tests students were asked to gauge their relative confidence in their answers on a 0-4 Likert Scale. This analysis gives some insight into students' prior knowledge regarding space physics concepts. Results from pretest and interviews showed that students had a particular weakness in their understanding of particle motions in simple field configurations. This is surprising since these students should have typically both an introductory and upper division E&M course. In addition, the results showed misconceptions regarding the structure of the interplanetary magnetic field, the source region of auroral particles, and the relationship between magnetospheric currents and magnetic fields. Post test showed improvement in areas that were of focus in the course, particularly with respect to motion of charged particles in fields. The results of this work are intended to direct future studies and curricular development.

  19. Identifying the elements of physics courses that impact student learning: Curriculum, instructor, peers, and assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Emily Lincoln Ashbaugh

    Prior research across hundreds for introductory physics courses has demonstrated that traditional physics instruction does not generally lead to students learning physics concepts in a meaningful way, but that interactive-engagement physics courses do sometimes promote a great deal more student learning. In this work I analyze a reform effort in a large-enrollment, introductory, physics course. I find that evaluating a curriculum in isolation from other influences, such as the instructor implementation and the student population, is problematical. Instead, I propose a model of classroom culture identifying the curriculum, instructor, and student peer group as key components to creating a learning environment. Assessment, a key influence of classroom culture, is considered a product of the instructor/curriculum interaction. All three aspects of the classroom culture have the potential to influence student learning outcomes. I analyze the implementation of two different reformed physics series in terms of classroom culture. In a calculus-based course, I evaluate a new reform-based curriculum for the first and third quarters of instruction. In the first quarter, mechanics, I find that having an instructor teach in alignment with the philosophy of the reformed curriculum is essential, with students of only certain section instructors having improved outcomes over traditional instruction on measures of conceptual understanding. In the electromagnetism quarter of instruction, student outcomes for all reformed sections are higher than those from traditional sections in spite of variations in instructor implementation. The vast range of instructor-student interactions within such a reformed course are analyzed in an observational study, finding that some types of interactions are characteristic of particular instructors, regardless of the content studied that day. An analysis of assessment proposes an alternative grading method that is superior to the traditional grading

  20. Longitudinal course of physical and psychological symptoms after a natural disaster

    PubMed Central

    Wahlström, Lars; Michélsen, Hans; Schulman, Abbe; Backheden, Hans; Keskinen-Rosenqvist, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    Background After disaster, physical symptoms are common although seldom recognized due to lack of knowledge of the course of symptoms and relation to more studied psychological symptoms. Objective This study aimed to investigate the change in the reporting of different physical symptoms after a disaster, including possible factors for change, and whether psychological symptoms predict physical symptoms reporting at a later point in time. Method A longitudinal study of citizens of Stockholm who survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. A total of 1,101 participants completed questionnaires on somatic symptoms, general distress, posttraumatic stress, exposure, and demographic details 14 months and 3 years after the disaster. Physical symptoms occurring daily or weekly during the last year were investigated in four symptom indices: neurological, cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, and musculoskeletal. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis to determine odds ratios for a change in symptoms, and pathway analysis to predict the influence of psychological symptoms on physical symptoms. Results There was a general decrease of reporting in all physical symptom indices except the musculoskeletal symptom index. The change in the neurological symptom index showed the strongest association with exposure, and for women. General distress and posttraumatic stress at 14 months postdisaster predicted physical symptoms at 3 years. Conclusion Physical symptoms were predicted by psychological symptoms at an earlier time point, but in a considerable proportion of respondents, physical symptoms existed independently from psychological symptoms. Physicians should be observant on the possible connection of particular pseudoneurological symptoms with prior adversities. PMID:24379941

  1. Using Tutorials in Introductory Physics on circuits in a German university course: observations and experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, Peter; Simon, Andreas; Prochaska, Marcus; Kautz, Christian; Bierwirth, Rebekka; Hagendorf, Susan; Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2016-11-01

    We describe the implementation of Tutorials in Introductory Physics in a German university course. In particular, we investigate if the conceptual challenges that gave rise to the development of Tutorials are also found among German students, which hurdles to the implementation of Tutorials are encountered in a German context, and how Tutorials are perceived in this different context. To that end, video recordings from workgroup sessions and guided group discussions with students and teaching assistants, as well as interviews with faculty are analysed. It was found that German students enter introductory physics courses with a different set of prior knowledge than their US-American counterparts, which together with implementation hurdles and negative perceptions by students, teaching assistants, and faculty led to the discontinuation of Tutorials after only one semester.

  2. Investigating Student Ownership of Projects in Upper-Division Physics Laboratory Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Jacob

    In undergraduate research experiences, student development of an identity as a scientist is coupled to their sense of ownership of their research projects. As a first step towards studying similar connections in physics laboratory courses, we investigate student ownership of projects in a lasers-based upper-division course. Students spent the final seven weeks of the semester working in groups on final projects of their choosing. Using data from the Project Ownership Survey and weekly student reflections, we investigate student ownership as it relates to students' personal agency, self-efficacy, peer interactions, and complex affective responses to challenges and successes. We present evidence of students' project ownership in an upper-division physics lab. Additionally, we propose a model for student development of ownership through cycles of frustration and excitement as students progress on their projects. This work was supported by NSF Grant Nos. DUE-1323101 and DUE-1334170.

  3. Social network analysis of a project-based introductory physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Research suggests that students benefit from peer interaction and active engagement in the classroom. The quality, nature, effect of these interactions is currently being explored by Physics Education Researchers. Spelman College offers an introductory physics sequence that addresses content and research skills by engaging students in open-ended research projects, a form of Project-Based Learning. Students have been surveyed at regular intervals during the second semester of trigonometry-based course to determine the frequency of interactions in and out of class. These interactions can be with current or past students, tutors, and instructors. This line of inquiry focuses on metrics of Social Network analysis, such as centrality of participants as well as segmentation of groups. Further research will refine and highlight deeper questions regarding student performance in this pedagogy and course sequence.

  4. Student understanding of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics in an introductory physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Warren M.

    2005-03-01

    We are investigating students' thinking regarding entropy and the second law of thermodynamics in a calculus-based general physics course. Most students enrolled in the class have had previous exposure to thermodynamics in chemistry courses or in high-school physics, and so many of them have specific ideas about these concepts even before instruction begins. To explore these ideas we administered a series of free-response pretest questions during the first week of class, before any instruction on thermodynamics had taken place. The questions probed student conceptions about entropy and its relationship with other thermodynamic properties. We will present an analysis of these data, as well as follow-up interview data that shed additional light on students' thinking.

  5. A Proposal for a Research-based Constructivist Physics-and-Pedagogy Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirbel, Esther

    2006-12-01

    This poster proposes a research-based science-and-pedagogy course that will combine the learning of fundamental physics concepts with methods of how to teach these concepts. Entitled “Understanding the Cosmos: From Antiquity to the Modern Day,” the course will explore how people learn science concepts through the ages, and from childhood through adulthood. This course will use the historical-constructivist approach to illustrate how our understanding of scientific phenomena advanced as we progressed from simple 2-dimensional thinking (starting with the flat Earth concept) to 3-D thinking (learning about the structure of the solar system) to 4-D thinking (understanding space-time and theories about the Big Bang). While transitioning from Impetus to Aristotelian to Newtonian to Einsteinian thinking, students will learn the essence of scientific thinking and inquiry. The overall goal of this course is to excite students in the process of scientific discovery, help them develop scientific reasoning skills, and provide them with fulfilling experiences of truly understanding science concepts. This will be done by employing active engagement techniques (e.g., peer tutoring, Socratic dialogue, and think/pair/share methods) and by challenging students to articulate their thoughts clearly and persuasively. This course could be of value for anybody wanting to enter the teaching profession or simply for anybody who would like to deepen their science understanding.

  6. The Effects of Basic Gymnastics Training Integrated with Physical Education Courses on Selected Motor Performance Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpkaya, Ufuk

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the influence of gymnastics training integrated with physical education courses on selected motor performance variables in seven year old girls. Subjects were divided into two groups: (1) control group (N=15, X=7.56 plus or minus 0.46 year old); (2) gymnastics group (N=16, X=7.60 plus or minus 0.50 year…

  7. The Effects of a Lifetime Physical Fitness (LPF) Course on College Students’ Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    QUARTIROLI, ALESSANDRO; MAEDA, HOTAKA

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine motivational constructs and the effect of physical activity engagement on health behaviors in college students who were required to take a 15-week lifetime physical fitness (LPF) course for graduation. A total of fifty-eight first and second year college students aged between 17 and 23 years (M=18.72; SD=1.09). Paper and pencil questionnaires were anonymously administered at the beginning and at the end of the 15-week long spring 2012 semester. Analysis of the differences between the beginning and the end of the semester was completed. Physical activity behaviors and Behavioral Regulations variables did not change across time (p > .05). Appearance (d = −0.34, p = .013) and fitness (d = −0.37, p = .006) reasons for participating in physical activity and all Theory of Planned Behavior variables decreased over time (d = −0.32 to − 0.41, p < .05). Changes in attitude toward physical activity negatively predicted changes in alcohol consumption (r = −.261 to −.357). This study sustains the already existing literature that supports the positive impact of LPF courses offered to college students. PMID:27293510

  8. Development of a Hands-On Survey Course in the Physics of Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Megan; Goldman, Daniel I.

    Due to the widespread availability and technological capabilities of modern smartphones, many biophysical systems can be investigated using easily accessible, low-cost, and/or ``homemade'' equipment. Our survey course is structured to provide students with an overview of research in the physics of living systems, emphasizing the interplay between measurement, mechanism, and modeling required to understand principles at the intersection of physics and biology. The course proceeds through seven modules each consisting of one week of lectures and one week of hands-on experiments, called ``microlabs''. Using smartphones, Arduinos, and 3D printed materials students create their own laboratory equipment, including a 150X van Leeuwenhoek microscope, a shaking incubator, and an oscilloscope, and then use them to study biological systems ranging in length scales from nanometers to meters. These systems include population dynamics of rotifer/algae cultures, experimental evolution of multicellularity in budding yeast, and the bio- & neuromechanics involved in animal locomotion, among others. In each module, students are introduced to fundamental biological and physical concepts as well as theoretical and computational tools (nonlinear dynamics, molecular dynamics simulation, and statistical mechanics). At the end of the course, students apply these concepts and tools to the creation of their own microlab that integrates hands-on experimentation and modeling in the study of their chosen biophysical system.

  9. Teaching Physics to Environmental Science Majors Using a Flipped Course Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, N. B.; Riha, S. J.; Wysocki, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Coursework in physics provides a framework for quantitative reasoning and problem solving skill development in budding geoscientists. To make physical concepts more accessible and relevant to students majoring in environmental science, an environmental physics course was developed at Cornell University and offered for the first time during spring 2014. Principles of radiation, thermodynamics, and mechanics were introduced and applied to the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere to describe energy and mass transfers in natural and built environments. Environmental physics was designed as a flipped course where students viewed online material outside of class and worked in groups in class to solve sustainability problems. Experiential learning, just-in-time teaching, and peer collaboration strategies were also utilized. In-class problems were drawn from both local and global environmental sustainability concerns. Problems included an investigation of Cornell's lake source cooling system, calculations on the energy consumed in irrigation with groundwater in the southwestern United States, and power generated by wind turbines at various locations around the world. Class attendance was high, with at least 84% of students present at each meeting. Survey results suggest that students enjoyed working in groups and found the in-class problems helpful for assimilating the assigned material. However, some students reported that the workload was too heavy and they preferred traditional lectures to the flipped classroom. The instructors were able to actively engage with students and quickly identify knowledge and skill gaps that needed to be addressed. Overall, the integration of current environmental problems and group work into an introductory physics course could help to inspire and motivate students as they advance their ability to analyze problems quantitatively.

  10. Preparing students for research: faculty/librarian collaboration in a pre-doctoral physical therapy research course.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Salome V; Bigelow, Susan

    2015-12-01

    In this article, guest writers Susan Bigelow and Dr Salome Brooks from Springfield College, Massachusetts, present an overview of their evaluative research study in which a faculty professor and the liaison librarian collaborated to develop an information literacy course entitled Physical Therapy (PT) and Health care Research Skills, in order to teach necessary information literacy skills to upper-level undergraduate PT students. Triangulation of the Physical Therapy and Information Literacy standards in alignment with the course objectives strengthened the collaboration, course development and expectations of student performance. Student performance was assessed through formal and expected evaluative means, and the preliminary evidence suggests some key successes in the course outcomes. PMID:26768908

  11. A New Undergraduate Course on the Physics of Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, T.; Dearborn, M.; Chun, F.; McHarg, G.

    As documented in the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2010, space situational awareness (SSA) is a high priority for the DoD and intelligence community. A fundamental understanding of the technical issues involved with SSA requires knowledge in many different scientific areas. The mission of the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) is to educate, train, and inspire men and women to become officers of character motivated to lead the United States Air Force in service to our Nation. The physics department is implementing the USAFA mission and the need for technically competent officers in SSA through a comprehensive SSA Initiative. As part of the Initiative, we are developing a course to provide junior or senior cadets with the scientific background necessary to understand the challenges associated with SSA missions and systems. This presentation introduces the planned course objectives and includes a discussion of topics to be covered. Examples of topics include, optically resolved imaging, radiometry and photometry, radar detection and tracking, orbital prediction, debris and collision avoidance, detection of proximity operations and modeling and simulation tools. Cadets will have hands-on opportunities to collect metrics of a designated object using Academy assets such as the 41 cm telescope. Cadets will convert telescope gimbal angles into an orbital data. Cadets will synthesize what they learned in the course by completing the semester with a final project where the collected data is merged with a notional scenario to present a mock decision briefing. This class will be open to cadets of any academic major, since the intent is to prepare officers with basic technical competence in SSA applications. This is critical since graduates of the Academy become commissioned officers in the military and serve in a large variety of leadership positions -- from the researcher to the warfighter. Since we are currently developing the course, the SSA

  12. SU-E-E-01: ABR Diagnostic Radiology Core Exam: Was Our Redesigned Physics Course Successful in Teaching Physics to Radiology Residents?

    SciTech Connect

    Kanal, K; Hoff, M; Dickinson, R; Zamora, D; Stewart, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Our purpose is to evaluate the effectiveness of our two year physics course in preparing radiology residents for the American Board of Radiology (ABR) diagnostic radiology exam. Methods: We designed a new two-year physics course that integrates radiology clinical content and practice and is primarily based on the AAPM curriculum and RSNA/AAPM physics modules. Biweekly classes focus on relevant concepts from assigned reading and use audience response systems to encourage participation. Teaching efficiency is optimized through lecturer rotations of physicists, radiologists, and guest speakers. An emphasis is placed on clinical relevance by requiring lab work and providing equipment demonstrations. Periodic quiz were given during the course. The course website was also redesigned for usability, and physics review lectures were conducted two weeks before the board exam to refresh key concepts. At the completion of our first two-year course, we conducted a confidential evaluation of the faculty and course. The evaluation assessed metrics such as overall organization, clinical relevance of content, and level of difficulty, with a rating scale from poor to excellent. Results: Our evaluation indicated that the redesigned course provided effective board exam preparation, with most responses between good and excellent. There was some criticism on the course length and on chronological discontinuity, but the review lectures were appreciated by the residents. All of our residents passed the physics component of the ABR exam with scores exceeding the minimum passing score by a significant margin. Conclusion: The course evaluation and board exam results indicate that our new two-year course format provides valuable board exam preparation. This is possible thanks to the time and effort taken by the physics faculty on ensuring the residents get quality physics education.

  13. A comparative evaluation of teaching methods in an introductory neuroscience course for physical therapy students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Gilbert M.

    Background and purpose. Use of computer based instruction (CBI) in physical therapy (P.T.) education is growing. P.T. educators have reported few studies regarding the effectiveness of CBI compared to lecture based instruction, and none have specifically addressed the area of neuroscience. The purpose of this study was to determine whether CBI would be a better alternative than lecture for teaching introductory neuroscience information to first year P.T. students. Subjects. This study was conducted over two years, with 28 participants in 2003 and 34 in 2004. Methods. A randomized, cross-over design was employed for this investigation. The course in which the study took place was divided into two sections with an exam after each. Both sections included 5 one hour lectures (or 5 equivalent CBI modules) and a two hour laboratory experience. Exams consisted of 30 multiple choice questions. Students in one group participated in CBI during the first half of the course and lecture during the second half. The order of participation was reversed for students in the other group. A review exam (60 multiple choice questions) was also taken by participants six months post-participation in the course. Exam scores, study time, course development costs, and student opinions regarding teaching methods were collected after each section of the course and analyzed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results. There were no statistically significant differences in "within course" or review exam scores between participant groups based on instructional method, however, CBI taught students spent less time studying. Student opinions did not distinguish a major preference for either instruction method. Many students preferred that CBI be used as a complimentary rather than mutually exclusive instructional method. Lecture based instruction was clearly more cost effective than CBI. Conclusion. In this study, lecture based instruction was clearly the better choice of teaching method in

  14. Correlating student interest and high school preparation with learning and performance in an introductory university physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Jason J. B.; Harrison, David M.; Meyertholen, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    We have studied the correlation of student performance in a large first year university physics course with their reasons for taking the course and whether or not the student took a senior-level high school physics course. Performance was measured both by the Force Concept Inventory and by the grade on the final examination. Students who took the course primarily for their own interest outperformed students who took the course primarily because it was required, both on the Force Concept Inventory and on the final examination; students who took a senior-level high school physics course outperformed students who did not, also both on the Force Concept Inventory and on the final exam. Students who took the course for their own interest and took high school physics outperformed students who took the course because it was required and did not take high school physics by a wide margin. However, the normalized gain on the Force Concept Inventory was the same within uncertainties for all groups and subgroups of students.

  15. The Physics of Life: A Biophysics Course for Non-science Major Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    Enhancing the scientific literacy of non-scientists is an important goal, both because of the ever-increasing impact of science and technology on people's lives, and because understanding contemporary science enables enriching insights into the workings of nature. One route to improving scientific literacy is via general education undergraduate courses - i.e. courses intended for students not majoring in the sciences or engineering - which in many cases provide these students' last formal exposure to science. I describe here a course on biophysics for non-science-major undergraduates recently developed at the University of Oregon. Biophysics, I claim, is a particularly useful vehicle for addressing scientific literacy. It involves important and general scientific concepts, demonstrates connections between basic science and tangible, familiar phenomena related to health and disease, and illustrates how scientific insights proceed not in predictable paths, but rather by applying tools and perspectives from disparate fields in creative ways. In addition, it highlights the far-reaching impact of physics research. I describe the general design of this course and the specific content of a few of its modules, as well as noting aspects of enrollment and evaluation. This work is affiliated with the University of Oregon's Science Literacy Program, supported by a grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

  16. A new course and textbook on Physical Models of Living Systems, for science and engineering undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Philip

    2015-03-01

    I'll describe an intermediate-level course on ``Physical Models of Living Systems.'' The only prerequisite is first-year university physics and calculus. The course is a response to rapidly growing interest among undergraduates in a broad range of science and engineering majors. Students acquire several research skills that are often not addressed in traditional courses: Basic modeling skills Probabilistic modeling skills Data analysis methods Computer programming using a general-purpose platform like MATLAB or Python Dynamical systems, particularly feedback control. These basic skills, which are relevant to nearly any field of science or engineering, are presented in the context of case studies from living systems, including: Virus dynamics Bacterial genetics and evolution of drug resistance Statistical inference Superresolution microscopy Synthetic biology Naturally evolved cellular circuits. Work supported by NSF Grants EF-0928048 and DMR-0832802.

  17. ``Physical Concepts in Cell Biology,'' an upper level interdisciplinary course in cell biophysics/mathematical biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2009-03-01

    I will describe my experience in developing an interdisciplinary biophysics course addressed to students at the upper undergraduate and graduate level, in collaboration with colleagues in physics and biology. The students had a background in physics, biology and engineering, and for many the course was their first exposure to interdisciplinary topics. The course did not depend on a formal knowledge of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Instead, the approach was based on dynamics. I used diffusion as a universal ``long time'' law to illustrate scaling concepts. The importance of statistics and proper counting of states/paths was introduced by calculating the maximum accuracy with which bacteria can measure the concentration of diffuse chemicals. The use of quantitative concepts and methods was introduced through specific biological examples, focusing on model organisms and extremes at the cell level. Examples included microtubule dynamic instability, the search and capture model, molecular motor cooperativity in muscle cells, mitotic spindle oscillations in C. elegans, polymerization forces and propulsion of pathogenic bacteria, Brownian ratchets, bacterial cell division and MinD oscillations.

  18. Life Course and Intergenerational Continuity of Intimate Partner Aggression and Physical Injury: A 20-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Knight, Kelly E; Menard, Scott; Simmons, Sara B; Bouffard, Leana A; Orsi, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine continuity of intimate partner aggression (IPA), which is defined as repeated annual involvement in IPA, across respondents' life course and into the next generation, where it may emerge among adult children. A national, longitudinal, and multigenerational sample of 1,401 individuals and their adult children is analyzed. Annual data on IPA severity and physical injury were collected by the National Youth Survey Family Study across a 20-year period from 1984 to 2004. Three hypotheses and biological sex differences are tested and effect sizes are estimated. First, findings reveal evidence for life course continuity (IPA is a strong predictor of subsequent IPA), but the overall trend decreases over time. Second, intergenerational continuity is documented (parents' IPA predicts adult children's IPA), but the effect is stronger for female than for male adult children. Third, results from combined and separate, more restrictive, measures of victimization and perpetration are nearly identical except in the intergenerational analyses. Fourth, evidence for continuity is not found when assessing physical injury alone. Together, these findings imply that some but not all forms of IPA are common, continuous, and intergenerational. Life course continuity appears stronger than intergenerational continuity. PMID:27076093

  19. [Physical exertion at work and the course and outcome of pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Makowiec-Dabrowska, T; Siedlecka, J

    1996-01-01

    The authors present the latest data on the effect of physical load on pregnancy course and outcome, and they indicate that such as load may become a risk factor for preterm birth and low birth weight. The probability of pregnancy complications induced by great physical load is related to physiological changes occurring in the female body during pregnancy. Observations made in regard to physical load related with sport or recreation activities confirm such a likelihood. In the literature on the effect of occupation-related physical load on pregnancy course and outcome, the following factors are emphasised: intensity of physical activity (work), work pace, handling heavy objects, body position during work performance, time spent in standing position, and daily or weekly distribution of working time. The study results indicate evidently negative effect of occupation-related physical load only in the case low living standards experienced by pregnant women. The results of the studies carried out in Poland showed that high occupation burden is an independent risk factor or preterm birth and hypotrophia. Therefore, according to current regulations concerning job restrictions for pregnant women only light work and standing position limited to three hours during shift are permissible, whereas forced body position and forced work pace (e.g. at production belt) are forbidden. In the discussion, the authors compare the legal regulations binding in our country with the European Union's legislation on the protection of pregnant women against harmful factors occurring in the work environment. Attention is also turned to the need for bringing our legal regulations closer to solutions adopted by the European Union, especially in the case of lack of jobs in a given enterprise which could be performed by pregnant women.

  20. Facilitating Case Reuse during Problem Solving in Algebra-Based Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mateycik, Frances Ann

    2010-01-01

    This research project investigates students' development of problem solving schemata while using strategies that facilitate the process of using solved examples to assist with a new problem (case reuse). Focus group learning interviews were used to explore students' perceptions and understanding of several problem solving strategies. Individual…

  1. An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Space Physics Course: Understanding the Process of Science Through One Field's Colorful History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.

    1996-01-01

    Science education in this country is in its greatest period of ferment since the post-Sputnik frenzy a generation ago. In that earlier time, however, educators' emphasis was on producing more scientists and engineers. Today we recognize that all Americans need a good science background. The ability to observe, measure, think quantitatively, and reach logical conclusions based on available evidence is a set of skills that everyone entering the workforce needs to acquire if our country is to be competitive in a global economy. Moreover, as public policy increasingly crystallizes around scientific issues, it is critical that citizens be educated in science so that they may provide informed debate and on these issues. In order to develop this idea more fully, I proposed to teach a historically based course about space physics as an honors course at the University of Maryland-College Park (UMCP). The honors program at UMCP was established to foster broad-based undergraduate courses that utilize innovative teaching techniques to provide exemplary education to a select group of students. I designed an introductory course that would have four basic goals: to acquaint students with geomagnetic and auroral phenomena and their relationship to the space environment; to examine issues related to the history of science using the evolution of the field as an example; to develop familiarity with basic skills such as describing and interpreting observations, analyzing scientific papers, and communicating the results of their own research; and to provide some understanding of basic physics, especially those aspect that play a role in the near-earth space environment.

  2. A Study of Faculty Approaches to Teaching Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Michael Ryan

    Chemistry education researchers have not adequately studied teaching and learning experiences at all levels in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum leaving gaps in discipline-based STEM education communities understanding about how the upper- division curricula works (National Research Council, 2012b; Towns, 2013). This study explored faculty approaches to teaching in upper-division physical chemistry course settings using an interview-based methodology. Two conceptualizations of approaches to teaching emerged from a phenomenographic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) faculty beliefs about the purposes for teaching physical chemistry and (2) their conceptions of their role as an instructor in these course settings. Faculty who reported beliefs predominantly centered on helping students develop conceptual knowledge and problem-solving skills in physical chemistry often worked with didactic models of teaching, which emphasized the transfer of expert knowledge to students. When faculty expressed beliefs that were more inclusive of conceptual, epistemic, and social learning goals in science education they often described more student-centered models of teaching and learning, which put more responsibilities on them to facilitate students' interactive engagement with the material and peers during regularly scheduled class time. Knowledge of faculty thinking, as evinced in a rich description of their accounts of their experience, provides researchers and professional developers with useful information about the potential opportunities or barriers that exist for helping faculty align their beliefs and goals for teaching with research-based instructional strategies.

  3. Approaches and Methodologies for a Course on History and Epistemology of Physics: Analyzing the Experience of a Brazilian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosa, Katemari; Martins, Maria Cristina

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an analysis of inserting history and philosophy of science (HPS) in a physics undergraduate program at a Brazilian university. It is an examination of the approaches and methodologies adopted by professors of a History and Epistemology course. The course aims to have an explicit approach to HPS. The results suggest a concern of the…

  4. An Investigation of How a Physics Professional Development Course Influenced the Teaching Practices of Five Elementary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Danielle B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation of how a professional development content course based on the Physics and Everyday Thinking (PET) curriculum affected the teaching practices of five case study elementary school teachers. The findings of this study highlight different ways that teachers use what they learn in content courses to…

  5. Revisions of Physical Geology Laboratory Courses to Increase the Level of Inquiry: Implications for Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grissom, April N.; Czajka, C. Douglas; McConnell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The introductory physical geology laboratory courses taught at North Carolina State University aims to promote scientific thinking and learning through the use of scientific inquiry-based activities. A rubric describing five possible levels of inquiry was applied to characterize the laboratory activities in the course. Two rock and mineral…

  6. The Use of a PDP-11/20 Computer in a Non-Calculus General Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, David U. L.

    Computer-assisted instruction supplements traditional methods in a non-calculus physics course offered at Seattle Pacific College. Thirty-five science majors enrolled in the first quarter and 32 continued in the second term. The hardware for the course consists of a PDP-11/20 computer and eight teletype terminals; additional peripheral equipment…

  7. "Energy is...life": Meaning making through dialogue in a tribal college physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellis, Jessica Christel

    This research is an exploration of students' meaning making around physical concepts through connections to students' funds of knowledge. This qualitative case study, influenced by Indigenous methodologies, focused on two Native students in a tribal college introductory physics course, exploring the personal, cultural, and philosophical connections that were voiced in dialogic interactions among the students and instructor. The data were collected through audio recordings of class sessions and reflective journaling by the instructor/researcher. Analysis identified dialogues in which meaning making took place, and the funds of knowledge that students brought to bear on these dialogues. The results of the analysis of these meaning-making occasions are presented by physical concept. For both students, the cultural connections they brought in were ways for them to incorporate their out-of-class identities and to consider their cultures from a scientific perspective. The influence of the students' personal connections was just as important as that of the cultural connections; the shared classroom context was also a valuable resource in the for collaborative meaning making. Both students both enjoyed examining the philosophical and spiritual implications of physical ideas; these dialogues provided windows into students' thinking that would not have been accessible in other ways. The students also made meanings about the nature of science that meshed with their identities and created a space for them to identify as scientists, and both came to view science as part of their cultural heritage. Allowing students free reign to make connections and empowering them to make decisions about their own learning were means of encouraging students to develop meaningful conceptual understanding. By investigating the meanings students made around physical content, we can learn about what motivates them, what is important to them, and potentially how to structure curricula that will

  8. Developing the learning physical science curriculum: Adapting a small enrollment, laboratory and discussion based physical science course for large enrollments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Fred; Price, Edward; Robinson, Stephen; Boyd-Harlow, Danielle; McKean, Michael

    2012-06-01

    We report on the adaptation of the small enrollment, lab and discussion based physical science course, Physical Science and Everyday Thinking (PSET), for a large-enrollment, lecture-style setting. Like PSET, the new Learning Physical Science (LEPS) curriculum was designed around specific principles based on research on learning to meet the needs of nonscience students, especially prospective and practicing elementary and middle school teachers. We describe the structure of the two curricula and the adaptation process, including a detailed comparison of similar activities from the two curricula and a case study of a LEPS classroom implementation. In LEPS, short instructor-guided lessons replace lengthier small group activities, and movies, rather than hands-on investigations, provide the evidence used to support and test ideas. LEPS promotes student peer interaction as an important part of sense making via “clicker” questions, rather than small group and whole class discussions typical of PSET. Examples of student dialog indicate that this format is capable of generating substantive student discussion and successfully enacting the design principles. Field-test data show similar student content learning gains with the two curricula. Nevertheless, because of classroom constraints, some important practices of science that were an integral part of PSET were not included in LEPS.

  9. New and effective techniques in physics courses for non-science majors and the training of pre-college teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Brian B.

    1997-03-01

    Based on experience and research, two major educational programs are described, a physics course content and philosophy for non-science majors and a physics course for urban teachers and students based on the theme of sports and movement. Examples for each of these programs are given including a useful table for solving quantitative physics problems using the barest mathematics of subtraction and division by two. The thematic based program is entitled ACTION PHYSICS and was aimed at junior high school teachers and had the support of the National Science Foundation

  10. The use of physical and virtual manipulatives in an undergraduate mechanical engineering (Dynamics) course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Edward A.

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education is a national focus. Engineering education, as part of STEM education, needs to adapt to meet the needs of the nation in a rapidly changing world. Using computer-based visualization tools and corresponding 3D printed physical objects may help nontraditional students succeed in engineering classes. This dissertation investigated how adding physical or virtual learning objects (called manipulatives) to courses that require mental visualization of mechanical systems can aid student performance. Dynamics is one such course, and tends to be taught using lecture and textbooks with static diagrams of moving systems. Students often fail to solve the problems correctly and an inability to mentally visualize the system can contribute to student difficulties. This study found no differences between treatment groups on quantitative measures of spatial ability and conceptual knowledge. There were differences between treatments on measures of mechanical reasoning ability, in favor of the use of physical and virtual manipulatives over static diagrams alone. There were no major differences in student performance between the use of physical and virtual manipulatives. Students used the physical and virtual manipulatives to test their theories about how the machines worked, however their actual time handling the manipulatives was extremely limited relative to the amount of time they spent working on the problems. Students used the physical and virtual manipulatives as visual aids when communicating about the problem with their partners, and this behavior was also seen with Traditional group students who had to use the static diagrams and gesture instead. The explanations students gave for how the machines worked provided evidence of mental simulation; however, their causal chain analyses were often flawed, probably due to attempts to decrease cognitive load. Student opinions about the static diagrams and dynamic

  11. One model for an integrated math/physics course focusing on electricity and magnetism and related calculus topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jason W.; Barbanel, Julius

    2000-08-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an increasing, widespread pedagogical interest in developing various types of integrated curricula for science and engineering programs. Over the last three years, a year-long Integrated Math/Physics course has been developed at Union College. This paper will focus on a model for a one-quarter integrated course organized around a traditional set of electricity and magnetism (E&M) physics topics, integrated with appropriate mathematical topics. Traditional, nonintegrated E&M physics students often struggle with challenging vector calculus ideas which may have been forgotten, not yet encountered, or introduced with different notation in different contexts. Likewise, traditional vector calculus mathematics students are often unable to gain intuitive insight, or fail to grasp the physical significance of many of the vector calculus ideas they are learning. Many of these frustrations are due to the fact that at many schools, the physics and calculus teachers teaching separate courses probably have little or no idea what their fellow educators are actually doing in these courses. Substantial differences in context, notation, and philosophy can cause breakdowns in the transfer of knowledge between mathematics and physics courses. We will discuss the methods, philosophy, and implementation of our course, and then go on to present what we feel were the substantial strengths and insights gained from a thoughtful integration of the two subjects. In addition, some problem areas and recommendations for probable student difficulties will be addressed.

  12. Exercises are problems too: implications for teaching problem-solving in introductory physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuza, Kristina; Garmendia, Mikel; Barragués, José-Ignacio; Guisasola, Jenaro

    2016-09-01

    Frequently, in university-level general physics courses, after explaining the theory, exercises are set based on examples that illustrate the application of concepts and laws. Traditionally formulated numerical exercises are usually solved by the teacher and students through direct replacement of data in formulae. It is our contention that such strategies can lead to the superficial and erroneous resolution of such exercises. In this paper, we provide an example that illustrates that students tend to solve problems in a superficial manner, without applying fundamental problem-solving strategies such as qualitative analysis, hypothesis-forming and analysis of results, which prevents them from arriving at a correct solution. We provide evidence of the complexity of an a priori simple exercise in physics, although the theory involved may seem elementary at first sight. Our aim is to stimulate reflection among instructors to follow these results when using examples and solving exercises with students.

  13. Student performance in computer modeling and problem solving in a modern introductory physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlmyer, Matthew Adam

    Matter & Interactions, an innovative introductory physics curriculum developed by Ruth Chabay and Bruce Sherwood, emphasizes computer modeling and fundamental physical principles. Two think-aloud protocol studies were conducted to investigate the performance of students from this curriculum in solving physics problems that require computer modeling. Experiment 1 examined whether Matter & Interactions students would, given the choice, use computer modeling to solve difficult problems that required predicting motion, and how their solution approaches differed from those of students from a traditional introductory physics course. Though they did not overwhelmingly choose computer modeling, some M&I students did write computer models successfully or apply the iterative algorithm by hand. The solution approaches of M&I students and traditional course students differed qualitatively in their use of the momentum principle and pre-derived special case formulas. In experiment 2, Matter & Interactions students were observed while they wrote programs in the VPython language in order to examine their difficulties with computer modeling. Areas of difficulty included determining initial conditions, distinguishing between simulated time and the time step, and updating momentum and position. Especially troublesome for students was the multistep procedure for calculating a force that changes with time. Students' understanding of the structure of a computer model improved by the end of the semester as shown by their performance on a line sorting task. Students with fewer difficulties proceeded through the computer model in a more linear, straightforward fashion. Instruction was revised based on initial findings from the first phase of the experiment. Students in the second phase of the experiment, who had used the revised instruction, had fewer difficulties on the same tasks, though other factors may have been involved in the improvement.

  14. Interdisciplinary reasoning about energy in an introductory physics course for the life sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin William

    Energy is a unifying concept that cuts across physics, chemistry, and biology. However, students who study all three disciplines can end up with a fragmented understanding of energy. This dissertation sits at the intersection of two active areas of current research: the teaching and learning of energy, and interdisciplinary science education (particularly the intersection of physics and biology). The context for this research is an introductory physics course for undergraduate life sciences majors that is reformed to build stronger interdisciplinary connections between physics, biology, and chemistry. An approach to energy that incorporates chemical bonds and chemical reactions is better equipped to meet the needs of life sciences students than a traditional introductory physics approach that focuses primarily on mechanical energy, and so we present a curricular thread for chemical energy in the physics course. Our first set of case studies examines student reasoning about ATP hydrolysis, a biochemically significant reaction that powers various processes in the cell. We observe students expressing both that an energy input is required to break a chemical bond (which they associate with physics) and that energy is released when the phosphate bond is broken in ATP (which they associate with biology). We use these case studies to articulate a model of interdisciplinary reconciliation: building coherent connections between concepts from different disciplines while understanding each concept in its own disciplinary context and justifying the modeling choices in deciding when to use each disciplinary model. Our second study looks at ontological metaphors for energy: metaphors about what kind of thing energy is. Two ontological metaphors for energy that have previously been documented include energy as a substance and energy as a location. We argue for the use of negative energy in modeling chemical energy in an interdisciplinary context, and for the use of a blended

  15. Student Estimates of Probability and Uncertainty in Advanced Laboratory and Statistical Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountcastle, Donald B.; Bucy, Brandon R.; Thompson, John R.

    2007-11-01

    Equilibrium properties of macroscopic systems are highly predictable as n, the number of particles approaches and exceeds Avogadro's number; theories of statistical physics depend on these results. Typical pedagogical devices used in statistical physics textbooks to introduce entropy (S) and multiplicity (ω) (where S = k ln(ω)) include flipping coins and/or other equivalent binary events, repeated n times. Prior to instruction, our statistical mechanics students usually gave reasonable answers about the probabilities, but not the relative uncertainties, of the predicted outcomes of such events. However, they reliably predicted that the uncertainty in a measured continuous quantity (e.g., the amount of rainfall) does decrease as the number of measurements increases. Typical textbook presentations assume that students understand that the relative uncertainty of binary outcomes will similarly decrease as the number of events increases. This is at odds with our findings, even though most of our students had previously completed mathematics courses in statistics, as well as an advanced electronics laboratory course that included statistical analysis of distributions of dart scores as n increased.

  16. An investigation into the effectiveness of problem-based learning in a physical chemistry laboratory course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürses, Ahmet; Açıkyıldız, Metin; Doğar, Çetin; Sözbilir, Mustafa

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) approach in a physical chemistry laboratory course. The parameters investigated were students’ attitudes towards a chemistry laboratory course, scientific process skills of students and their academic achievement. The design of the study was one group pre-test post-test. Four experiments, covering the topics adsorption, viscosity, surface tension and conductivity were performed using a PBL approach in the fall semester of the 2003/04 academic year at Kazim Karabekir Education Faculty of Atatürk University. Each experiment was done over a three week period. A total of 40 students, 18 male and 22 female, participated in the study. Students took the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Concept Test (PCLCT), Attitudes towards Chemistry Laboratory (ATCL) questionnaire and Science Process Skills Test (SPST) as pre and post-tests. In addition, the effectiveness of the PBL approach was also determined through four different scales; Scales Specific to Students’ Views of PBL. A statistically significant difference between the students’ academic achievement and scientific process skills at p

  17. Persuading girls to take elective physical science courses in high school: Who are the credible communicators?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.

    Eighth-grade girls (N=257) randomly selected from nine different public junior high schools in central Texas were questioned in order to identify the communicators whom they perceive as highly credible regarding reasons for taking elective physical science courses in high school and the attributes associated with these communicators. Four persons were each identified by better than 10 percent of the sample as the best person to try to convince junior high school girls to take elective physical science courses in high school. In order of perceived credibility, these persons are father, woman science teacher, mother, and boy high school student. Slight variations in the order of perceived credibility were found when the responses from girls of the different ethnic groups represented in the sample (Caucasian, Hispanic, Black, and Asian) were examined separately. Attributes listed by the respondents for father, woman science teacher, mother, and boy high school student were examined and classified into the categories of prestige, trustworthiness, similarity, attractiveness, and power. Prestige and trustworthiness are the attributes associates most frequently with communicators identified as highly credible. Implications of the present study and suggestions for further research are discussed.

  18. Entropy and spontaneity in an introductory physics course for life science students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Benjamin D.; Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Gouvea, Julia; Sawtelle, Vashti; Turpen, Chandra; Redish, Edward F.

    2014-05-01

    Life science students develop a variety of resources for thinking about entropy and spontaneity in their biology, chemistry, and introductory physics courses. Helping students to develop a deeper and more coherent conceptual framework for organizing these varied ideas means attending carefully to the ways in which students interact with different disciplinary descriptions and to the ways in which these descriptions may be in tension. Canonical introductory physics treatments of the second law of thermodynamics, while useful in some contexts, may not be the most productive ones in authentic biological or chemical contexts. We draw on case-study interviews with introductory physics for life science students to argue that an approach to the second law of thermodynamics that emphasizes the interplay of energy and entropy in determining spontaneity (one that involves a central role for free energy) is one that draws on students' resources from biology and chemistry in particularly effective ways. We see the positioning of entropic arguments alongside energetic arguments in the determination of spontaneity as an important step toward making our life science students' biology, chemistry, and physics experiences more coherent.

  19. Results of Using the Take-Away Technique on Students' Achievements and Attitudes in High School Physics and Physical Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carifio, James; Doherty, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Take-away Technique was used in High School Physics and Physical Science courses for the unit on Newtonian mechanics in a teacher (6) by grade level (4) partially crossed design (N = 272). All classes received the same IE instructional treatment. The experimental group (classrooms) did a short Take-away after each class summarizing the key…

  20. Preparing Future Teachers to Anticipate Student Difficulties in Physics in a Graduate-Level Course in Physics, Pedagogy, and Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, John R.; Christensen, Warren M.; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe courses designed to help future teachers reflect on and discuss both physics content and student knowledge thereof. We use three kinds of activities: reading and discussing the literature, experiencing research-based curricular materials, and learning to use the basic research methods of physics education research. We present a general…

  1. Just-in-Time Teaching in undergraduate physics courses: Implementation, learning, and perceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Jessica Hewitt

    Regardless of discipline, a decades-long battle has ensued within nearly every classroom in higher education: instructors getting students to come to class prepared to learn. In response to this clash between teacher expectations and frequent student neglect, a group of four physics education researchers developed a reformed instructional strategy called Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT). This dissertation investigates the following three areas: 1) the fidelity with which undergraduate physics instructors implement JiTT, 2) whether student performance predicts student perception of their instructor's fidelity of JiTT implementation, and 3) whether student perception of their instructor's fidelity of JiTT implementation correlates with student views of their physics course. A blend of quantitative data (e.g., students grades, inventory scores, and questionnaire responses) are integrated with qualitative data (e.g., individual faculty interviews, student focus group discussions, and classroom observations). This study revealed no statistically significant relationship between instructors who spent time on a predefined JiTT critical component and their designation as a JiTT user or non-user. While JiTT users implemented the pedagogy in accordance with the creators' intended ideal vision, many also had trouble reconciling personal concerns about their role as a JiTT adopter and the anticipated demand of the innovation. I recommend that this population of faculty members can serve as a JiTT model for other courses, disciplines, and/or institutions. Student performance was not a predictor of student perception instructor fidelity of JiTT implementation. Additionally, the majority of students in this study reported they read their textbook prior to class and that JiTT assignments helped them prepare for in-class learning. I found evidence that exposure to the JiTT strategy may correlate with a more favorable student view of their physics course. Finally, according to students

  2. Online Data Collection and Analysis in Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Christopher M.; Murphy, Sytil K.; Juma, Nasser M.; Rebello, N. Sanjay; Zollman, Dean

    2009-11-01

    Online implementation of physics learning materials may present a powerful method of data collection for physics education research, in addition to being useful for supplemental instruction. This may have implications for composite instruction and research designs. We have developed three lessons on Newton's laws and implemented them on the Internet. The lessons ask students to make observations and measurements using video clips, perform calculations and answer open-ended questions. Responses are collected via an online response system. One hundred ten university students enrolled in an algebra-based physics course and 30 high school physics students worked through some or all of our lessons, and their responses were collected. We present a qualitative and quantitative analysis of their responses and assess the implications for optimal design of online lesson materials for collecting meaningful data about students' understanding of basic physics concepts.

  3. Cross Coursing in Mathematics: Physical Modelling in Differential Equations Crossing to Discrete Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We give an example of cross coursing in which a subject or approach in one course in undergraduate mathematics is used in a completely different course. This situation crosses falling body modelling in an upper level differential equations course into a modest discrete dynamical systems unit of a first-year mathematics course. (Contains 1 figure.)

  4. Cross coursing in mathematics: physical modelling in differential equations crossing to discrete dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-03-01

    We give an example of cross coursing in which a subject or approach in one course in undergraduate mathematics is used in a completely different course. This situation crosses falling body modelling in an upper level differential equations course into a modest discrete dynamical systems unit of a first-year mathematics course.

  5. Prospective Elementary Teachers' Analysis of Children's Science Talk in an Undergraduate Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Danielle B.; Swanson, Lauren H.; Otero, Valerie K.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how prospective teachers used physics content knowledge when analyzing the talk of elementary children during special activities in an undergraduate physics content course designed for prospective teachers. We found that prospective teachers used content knowledge to reflect on their own learning and to identify students'…

  6. Correlations of Students' Grades, Expectations, Epistemological Beliefs and Demographics in a Problem-Based Introductory Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the predictors of student grades in introductory physics courses utilizing problem-based learning (PBL) approach and traditional lecturing. The study employed correlational/predictive methods to investigate and describe/explain relationships of students' physics grades with their expectations, attitudes,…

  7. Overcoming Students' Misconceptions Concerning Thermal Physics with the Aid of Hints and Peer Interaction during a Lecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinonen, Risto; Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2013-01-01

    As has been shown by previous research, students may possess various misconceptions in the area of thermal physics. In order to help them overcome misconceptions observed prior to instruction, we implemented a one-hour lecture-based intervention in their introductory thermal physics course. The intervention was held after the conventional lectures…

  8. Peer 2 Peer: Efficacy of a Course-Based Peer Education Intervention to Increase Physical Activity among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Jennifer; Mattern, Craig O.; Lassiter, Jill W.; Ritzler, Julia A.

    2011-01-01

    There are few physical activity (PA) interventions in higher education, and they have been only minimally effective. Objective: To determine if a course-based, peer education intervention was associated with increases in PA and physical fitness. Participants: Participants were 178 students enrolled in a personal health class during the 2007-2008…

  9. PhET + Hypercam2 = Simulation Videos for Distance Learning Physics Courses for Elementary Classroom Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaway, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    The Physics Education Technology (PhET) simulations offer a fantastic set of tools to present simulations of science phenomena in the classroom. The problem with asynchronous distance learning instruction is that you do not have an opportunity to provide live instruction on the controls for each simulation. For those familiar with physics phenomena, the nature of the controls are usually obvious, but for pre-service elementary school teachers this is not the case. The on-line course that we offer presents physics lectures on DVD. By recording the computer screen and audio from the computer microphone (I use free Hypercam2), it is possible to create avi files that can be incorporated into lecture content that show how to conduct PhET simulations. The avi files can be offered as stand alone presentations, but I incorporate these into lectures using Adobe Premier video editing software. This presentation gives a description of some options on the use of video produced using PhET simulations and screen recording.

  10. Energy balance and physical demands during an 8-week arduous military training course.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Victoria L; Horner, Fleur E; Wilkinson, David M; Rayson, Mark P; Wright, Antony; Izard, Rachel

    2014-04-01

    This study assessed soldier's physical demands and energy balance during the Section Commanders' Battles Course (SCBC). Forty male soldiers were monitored during the 8-week tactics phase of the SCBC. Energy expenditure was measured using the doubly labeled water method. Cardiovascular strain (heart rate) and physical activity (using triaxial accelerometer) were also monitored. Average sized portions of meals were weighed, with all recipes and meals entered into a dietary analysis program to calculate the calorie content. Energy expenditure averaged 19.6 ± 1.8 MJ · d(-1) in weeks 2 to 3 and 21.3 ± 2.0 MJ · d(-1) in weeks 6 to 7. Soldiers lost 5.1 ± 2.6 kg body mass and body fat percent decreased from 23 ± 4% to 19 ± 5%. This average weight loss equates to an estimated energy deficit of 2.69 MJ · d(-1). The Army provided an estimated 14.0 ± 2.2 MJ · d(-1) in weeks 2 to 3 and 15.7 ± 2.2 MJ · d(-1) in weeks 6 to 7. Although this provision adheres to the minimum requirement of 13.8 MJ · d(-1) set by Army regulations, soldiers were in a theoretical 5.6 MJ · d(-1) energy deficit. The physical demands of SCBC were high, and soldiers were in energy deficit resulting in loss in body mass; primarily attributed to a loss in fat mass. PMID:24690967

  11. Setting Sail or Missing the Boat: Comparing the Beliefs of Preservice Elementary Teachers With and Without an Inquiry-Based Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Paula; Abell, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    We examined the beliefs about science teaching and learning held by elementary preservice teachers in a science methods course, comparing students who had experienced an inquiry-based physics course with those who had not. Students who had taken the physics course prior to the methods semester were better equipped to recognize and learn from…

  12. Negotiated meanings of disability simulations in an adapted physical activity course: learning from student reflections.

    PubMed

    Leo, Jennifer; Goodwin, Donna

    2014-04-01

    Disability simulations have been used as a pedagogical tool to simulate the functional and cultural experiences of disability. Despite their widespread application, disagreement about their ethical use, value, and efficacy persists. The purpose of this study was to understand how postsecondary kinesiology students experienced participation in disability simulations. An interpretative phenomenological approach guided the study's collection of journal entries and clarifying one-on-one interviews with four female undergraduate students enrolled in a required adapted physical activity course. The data were analyzed thematically and interpreted using the conceptual framework of situated learning. Three themes transpired: unnerving visibility, negotiating environments differently, and tomorrow I'll be fine. The students described emotional responses to the use of wheelchairs as disability artifacts, developed awareness of environmental barriers to culturally and socially normative activities, and moderated their discomfort with the knowledge they could end the simulation at any time.

  13. Development of multi-representation learning tools for the course of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, C.; Siswanto, J.; Kurniawan, A. F.; Nuroso, H.

    2016-08-01

    This research is aimed at designing a learning tool based on multi-representation that can improve problem solving skills. It used the research and development approach. It was applied for the course of Fundamental Physics at Universitas PGRI Semarang for the 2014/2015 academic year. Results show gain analysis value of 0.68, which means some medium improvements. The result of t-test is shows a calculated value of 27.35 and a table t of 2.020 for df = 25 and α = 0.05. Results of pre-tests and post-tests increase from 23.45 to 76.15. Application of multi-representation learning tools significantly improves students’ grades.

  14. Effective student teams for collaborative learning in an introductory university physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Jason J. B.; Harrison, David M.; Meyertholen, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    We have studied the types of student teams that are most effective for collaborative learning in a large freshman university physics course. We compared teams in which the students were all of roughly equal ability to teams with a mix of student abilities, we compared teams with three members to teams with four members, and we examined teams with only one female student and the rest of the students male. We measured team effectiveness by the gains on the Force Concept Inventory and by performance on the final examination. None of the factors that we examined had significant impact on student learning. We also investigated student satisfaction as measured by responses to an anonymous evaluation at the end of the term, and found small but statistically significant differences depending on how the nine teams in the group were constructed.

  15. Value Added: History of Physics in a ``Science, Technology, and Society'' General Education Undergraduate Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, Dwight

    2016-03-01

    In thirty years of teaching a capstone ``Science, Technology, and Society'' course to undergraduate students of all majors, I have found that, upon entering STS, to most of them the Manhattan Project seems about as remote as the Civil War; few can describe the difference between nuclear and large non-nuclear weapons. With similar lack of awareness, many students seem to think the Big Bang was dreamed up by science sorcerers. One might suppose that a basic mental picture of weapons that held entire populations hostage should be part of informed citizenship. One might also suppose that questions about origins, as they are put to nature through evidence-based reasoning, should be integral to a culture's identity. Over the years I have found the history of physics to be an effective tool for bringing such subjects to life for STS students. Upon hearing some of the history behind (for example) nuclear weapons and big bang cosmology, these students can better imagine themselves called upon to help in a Manhattan Project, or see themselves sleuthing about in a forensic science like cosmology. In this talk I share sample student responses to our class discussions on nuclear weapons, and on cosmology. The history of physics is too engaging to be appreciated only by physicists.

  16. Scientific reasoning abilities of nonscience majors in physics-based courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. Christopher; Rubbo, Louis J.

    2012-06-01

    We have found that non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors taking either a conceptual physics or astronomy course at two regional comprehensive institutions score significantly lower preinstruction on the Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR) in comparison to national average STEM majors. Based on LCTSR score, the majority of non-STEM students can be classified as either concrete operational or transitional reasoners in Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, whereas in the STEM population formal operational reasoners are far more prevalent. In particular, non-STEM students demonstrate significant difficulty with proportional and hypothetico-deductive reasoning. Prescores on the LCTSR are correlated with normalized learning gains on various concept inventories. The correlation is strongest for content that can be categorized as mostly theoretical, meaning a lack of directly observable exemplars, and weakest for content categorized as mostly descriptive, where directly observable exemplars are abundant. Although the implementation of research-verified, interactive engagement pedagogy can lead to gains in content knowledge, significant gains in theoretical content (such as force and energy) are more difficult with non-STEM students. We also observe no significant gains on the LCTSR without explicit instruction in scientific reasoning patterns. These results further demonstrate that differences in student populations are important when comparing normalized gains on concept inventories, and the achievement of significant gains in scientific reasoning requires a reevaluation of the traditional approach to physics for non-STEM students.

  17. Students' experiences with interactivity and learning in a high school physics multimedia distance learning course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal-Stewart, Irene

    The purpose guiding this research has been to learn about and describe the phenomena of interactivity from the learners' perspectives and to learn which of the interactivity affordances and practices were actually used by students and why in the process of learning physics using an interactive multimedia distance learning course system. The bigger purpose behind learning about and describing interactivity has been to gain knowledge and perspective for its instructional design to benefit the learner, the school as curriculum implementer, and instructional media designers to create better products. Qualitative methodology in the interpretivist tradition was used, that is, in-depth interviews and on-site observations, to gain understanding of interactivity from the learners' perspective and to gain understanding of the student learning context impacting and shaping the students' interactivity experiences. NVivo was used to sort, organize and index data. All data were read on three levels: literally, interpretively, and reflexively; and were read comparatively to other perspectives to get descriptions and interpretations that were holistic to the implementation and had potential insight to improve practice for instructional designers, teachers, administrators, specifically to improve the learning experience for students. Site-Specific Findings: Students watched videos, resisted using phone and e-mail, and worked math problems to demonstrate learning, which resulted in very little interactivity, virtually no dialogue about physics, no physical activity, one-way communication, multifaceted dissatisfaction, student need for teacher involvement in the learning enterprise, student appreciation for interactivity, and expressed desire for a real, live teacher. I also found that some students did experience the system as interactive, did experience learner control and self-directed learning, and despite dissatisfaction, liked and appreciated the course. Wider Applications

  18. Preparing future teachers to anticipate student difficulties in physics in a graduate-level course in physics, pedagogy, and education research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, John R.; Christensen, Warren M.; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2011-06-01

    We describe courses designed to help future teachers reflect on and discuss both physics content and student knowledge thereof. We use three kinds of activities: reading and discussing the literature, experiencing research-based curricular materials, and learning to use the basic research methods of physics education research. We present a general overview of the two courses we have designed as well as a framework for assessing student performance on physics content knowledge and one aspect of pedagogical content knowledge—knowledge of student ideas—about one particular content area: electric circuits. We find that the quality of future teachers’ responses, especially on questions dealing with knowledge of student ideas, can be successfully categorized and may be higher for those with a nonphysics background than those with a physics background.

  19. Bush Physics for the 21st Century, A Distance Delivery Physics Course Targeting Students in Rural Alaska and Across the North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solie, D. J.; Spencer, V. K.

    2010-12-01

    Bush Physics for the 21st Century brings physics that is engaging to modern youth, and mathematically rigorous, to high school and college students in the remote and often road-less villages of Alaska where the opportunity to take a physics course has been nearly nonexistent. The primary goal of the course is to prepare rural (predominantly Alaska Native) students for success in university science and engineering degree programs and ultimately STEM careers. The course is delivered via video conference and web based electronic blackboard tailored to the needs of remote students. Kinetic, practical and culturally relevant place-based examples from traditional and modern northern life are used to engage students, and a rigorous and mathematical focus is stressed to strengthen problem solving skills. Simple hands-on-lab experiment kits are shipped to the students. In addition students conduct a Collaborative Research Experiment where they coordinate times of sun angle measurements with teams in other villages to determine their latitude and longitude as well as an estimate of the circumference of the earth. Connecting abstract mathematical symbols and equations to real physical objects and problems is one of the most difficult things to master in physics. We introduce Inuktitut symbols to complement the traditional Greek symbols in equations to strengthen the visual/conceptual connection with symbol and encourage an indigenous connection to the physical concepts. Results and observations from the first three pilot semesters (spring 2008, 2009 and 2010) will be presented.

  20. MO-E-18C-03: Incorporating Active Learning Into A Traditional Graduate Medical Physics Course

    SciTech Connect

    Burmeister, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the ability of graduate students to learn medical physics concepts through the incorporation of active learning techniques. Methods: A traditional lecture-based radiological physics course was modified such that: (1) traditional (two-hour) lectures were provided online for students to watch prior to class, (2) a student was chosen randomly at the start of each class to give a two minute synopsis of the material and its relevance (two-minute drill), (3) lectures were significantly abbreviated and remaining classroom time used for group problem solving, and (4) videos of the abbreviated lectures were made available online for review. In the transition year, students were surveyed about the perceived effects of these changes on learning. Student performance was evaluated for 3 years prior to and 4 years after modification. Results: The survey tool used a five point scale from 1=Not True to 5=Very True. While nearly all students reviewed written materials prior to class (4.3±0.9), a minority watched the lectures (2.1±1.5). A larger number watched the abbreviated lectures for further clarification (3.6±1.6) and found it helpful in learning the content (4.2±1.0). Most felt that the two-minute drill helped them get more out of the lecture (3.9±0.8) and the problem solving contributed to their understanding of the content (4.1±0.8). However, no significant improvement in exam scores resulted from the modifications (mean scores well within 1 SD during study period). Conclusion: Students felt that active learning techniques improved their ability to learn the material in what is considered the most difficult course in the program. They valued the ability to review the abbreviated class lecture more than the opportunity to watch traditional lectures prior to class. While no significant changes in student performance were observed, aptitude variations across the student cohorts make it difficult to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of active

  1. "The Sweetness of Struggle": Innovation in Physical Education Teacher Education through "Student-Centered Inquiry as Curriculum" in a Physical Education Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Kimberly L.; Oesterreich, Heather A.; Aranda, Raquel; Archeleta, Jarrod; Blazer, Casey; de la Cruz, Kandy; Martinez, Daniel; McConnell, Jenn; Osta, Maggee; Parks, Lacie; Robinson, Rinalldo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the challenges and benefits that emerged while using an innovative field-based student-centered inquiry as curriculum model in a secondary physical education methods course. Participants and setting: This study took place in the Southwest USA. Participants included 11 pre-service teachers who were…

  2. Combination of the Research-Based Learning Method with the Modern Physics Experiment Course Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaolai; Li, Qinghuai

    2011-01-01

    It has been the hotspot to reconstruct the education course based on the research-based learning in the course reform in many countries in recent years. The new course standard of China insists that the teaching is the interactive process that teachers and students communicate and develop together. In the teaching, the relationship between…

  3. Effectiveness of a GUM-Compliant Course for Teaching Measurement in the Introductory Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Seshini; Buffler, Andy; Lubben, Fred; Allie, Saalih

    2008-01-01

    An evaluation of a course aimed at developing university students' understanding of the nature of scientific measurement and uncertainty is described. The course materials follow the framework for metrology as recommended in the "Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement" (GUM). The evaluation of the course is based on responses to…

  4. Multi-Level Discourse Analysis in a Physics Teaching Methods Course from the Psychological Perspective of Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieira, Rodrigo Drumond; Kelly, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present and apply a multi-level method for discourse analysis in science classrooms. This method is based on the structure of human activity (activity, actions, and operations) and it was applied to study a pre-service physics teacher methods course. We argue that such an approach, based on a cultural psychological perspective,…

  5. Changes in Understanding of the Nature of Science and in Critical Thinking Resulting From Two Different Physical Science Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitten, Maurice Mason

    Reported is an investigation to determine if changes in college students' understanding of the nature of science and in critical thinking result from modifying a "traditional," general education, laboratory, physical science course. The criterion instruments were the Test on Understanding Science (TOUS), Form W; the Wisconsin Inventory of Science…

  6. An Analysis on High School Students' Perceptions of Physics Courses in Terms of Gender (A Sample from Turkey)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Medine

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine high school students' perceptions of the courses of Physics and the factors influential on their perceptions with respect to gender. The research sample included 154 high school students (F:78; M:76). In the study, as the data collection tool, a structured interview form was used. The data collected in the…

  7. Design of an Experimental Contemporary Physics Course which Develops the Full Experience of Scientific Research and Highlights Current Faculty Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarrison-Rice, Jan M.; Jaeger, Herbert; Eid, Khalid F.

    2013-03-01

    From background literature searches and reading, to conducting experiments, to presenting results and writing a journal manuscript, Miami University has revised its second-year Experimental Contemporary Physics Course, Phy293, to follow a basic research model. We examined research that faculty were conducting and chose experiments which were strongly related to understanding the ongoing research in the Department, while being based in fundamental quantum mechanics and recent 21st century physics. Experiments often had common instrumentation and data analysis techniques which allowed for grouping them into 3 basic categories: 1) Spectroscopy of gases and solids, 2) Characterization of contemporary samples, and 3) Quantized systems in electronic, magnetic and nuclear physics. These experiments also supported our secondary goal of preparing students to enter our research laboratories. At Miami, we generally have between 25-35 second year students, so the laboratory course must be managed to maintain groups of 2-3 for the best student learning outcomes. We will report on course logistics, the grouping of experiments, and methods for assessing students' learning. Having run the revised, full experimental format of Phy293 a 3rd time, we feel confident stating that this course demonstrates to students ``how physics research in the 21st century is actually conducted!''

  8. Interactive-Engagement vs. Traditional Methods: A Six-Thousand-Student Survey of Mechanics Test Data for Introductory Physics Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hake, Richard R.

    A survey of pre/post test data using the Halloun-Hestenes Mechanics Diagnostic test or more recent Force Concept Inventory is reported for 62 introductory physics courses enrolling a total number of students N=6542. A consistent analysis over diverse student populations in high schools, colleges, and universities is obtained if a rough measure of…

  9. Coherent Teaching and Need-Based Learning in Science: An Approach to Teach Engineering Students in Basic Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurki-Suonio, T.; Hakola, A.

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, we propose an alternative, based on constructivism, to the conventional way of teaching basic physics courses at the university level. We call this approach "coherent teaching" and the underlying philosophy of teaching science and engineering "need-based learning". We have been applying this philosophy in practice in a basic…

  10. A Comparison of Student Knowledge between Traditional and Blended Instruction in a Physical Education in Early Childhood Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannousi, Maria; Vernadakis, Nikolaos; Derri, Vassiliki; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Kioumourtzoglou, Efthimis

    2014-01-01

    Blended learning model combines different advantages of face to face education and e-learning to ensure an effective learning environment for students. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of traditional and blended instruction, in students' knowledge in a Physical Education in Early Childhood course. For the purpose of…

  11. Physical and Earth Science AB: Grades 9-12. A Course Outline for Senior High Schools. Publication No. SC-874.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Office of Secondary Instruction.

    Physical and Earth Science AB, a required senior high school course in the Los Angeles Unified School District, uses an investigative approach for developing scientific understanding and attitudes for students. Contents include: (1) summary of representative objectives; (2) teacher responsibilities; (3) the agenda; (4) guidelines for assignment of…

  12. Innovative Training of In-service Teachers for Active Learning: A Short Teacher Development Course Based on Physics Education Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, Genaro; Alarcón, Hugo; Benegas, Julio

    2007-08-01

    In this contribution we describe a short development course for in-service physics teachers. The course structure and materials are based on the results of educational research, and its main objective is to provide in-service teachers with a first contact with the active learning strategy “Tutorials in Introductory Physics,” developed by the Physics Education Research Group at the University of Washington. The course was organized in a constructivist, active learning environment, so that teachers have first to experience, as regular students, the whole Tutorial sequence of activities: Tutorial pre-test, Tutorial, and Tutorial Homework. After each Tutorial, teachers reflect on, and recognize their own students’ learning difficulties, discussing their teaching experiences with their colleagues in small collaborative groups first and the whole class later. Finally they read and discuss specific Physics Education Research literature, where these learning difficulties have been extensively studied by researchers. At the beginning and at the end of the course the participants were given the conceptual multiple-choice test Force Concept Inventory (FCI). The pre-/post-instruction FCI data were presented as a practical example of the use of a research-based test widely used in educational research and in formative assessment processes designed to improve instruction.

  13. Formative Evaluation in an Audio-Tutorial Physics Course with Emphasis on Intuitive and Analytic Problem Solving Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsland, Martin Nils

    The purposes of this study were: (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of audio-tutorial (A-T) instruction and (2) to identify, classify and study differences in problem solving approach using a theoretical framework derived from the ideas of D. P. Ausubel. Seventy of 420 students taking a college introductory non-calculus physics course used A-T…

  14. Work Habits of Students in Traditional and Online Sections of an Introductory Physics Course: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The study compares the work habits of two student groups in an introductory physics course, one in traditional and one in online sections. Both groups shared the same online materials and online homework, as well as the same discussion boards and examinations, but one group in addition had traditional lectures. The groups were compared with…

  15. A Need to Reassess Physical-Organic Curricula: A Course Enhancement Using Readily Available Quantum Chemistry Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipkowitz, Kenny B.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a graduate-level course in physical-organic chemistry in which students learn to solve problems using computer programs available through the Quantum Chemistry Program Exchange. Includes condensed syllabus and time line showing where various computational programs are introduced. (Author/JN)

  16. Primary Teachers' Particle Ideas and Explanations of Physical Phenomena: Effect of an In-Service Training Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgiou, George; Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Johnson, Phil Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a study concerning Greek primary school teachers' (n = 162) ideas about the particulate nature of matter and their explanations of physical phenomena. The study took place during an in-service training course where the effectiveness of a specially designed intervention was tested. A key feature was an approach based on the…

  17. Conceptual Mobility and Entrenchment in Introductory Geoscience Courses: New Questions Regarding Physics' and Chemistry's Role in Learning Earth Science Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Steven W.; Libarkin, Julie C.

    2016-01-01

    Nationwide pre- and posttesting of introductory courses with the Geoscience Concept Inventory (GCI) shows little gain for many of its questions. Analysis of more than 3,500 tests shows that 22 of the 73 GCI questions had gains of <0.03, and nearly half of these focused on basic physics and chemistry. We also discovered through an assessment of…

  18. Design of Online Report Writing Based on Constructive and Cooperative Learning for a Course on Traditional General Physics Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Hao-Chang

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an online report writing activity that was a constructive and cooperative learning process for a course on traditional general physics experiments. Wiki, a CMC authoring tool, was used to construct the writing platform. Fifty-eight undergraduate students (33 men and 25 women), working in randomly assigned…

  19. College Science Courses, ACT Science, C-Base Science, and GALT: Predictors of Science Process Skills and Physical Science Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitner, Betty L.

    In this predictive study, the variables of College Basic Academic Subjects Examination (C-BASE) Science score, American College Test (ACT) Science score, Group Assessment of Logical Thinking (GALT) score, and total number of college science courses completed were investigated as predictors of science process skills and physical science…

  20. Using a Disciplinary Discourse Lens to Explore How Representations Afford Meaning Making in a Typical Wave Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enghag, Margareta; Forsman, Jonas; Linder, Cedric; MacKinnon, Allan; Moons, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    We carried out a case study in a wave physics course at a Swedish university in order to investigate the relations between the representations used in the lessons and the experience of meaning making in interview-discussions. The grounding of these interview-discussions also included obtaining a rich description of the lesson environment in terms…

  1. Bio- chemical and physical characterizations of mesenchymal stromal cells along the time course of directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Quan; Liu, Yi-Shiuan; Liu, Yu-An; Wu, Yi-Chang; Del Álamo, Juan C; Chiou, Arthur; Lee, Oscar K

    2016-01-01

    Cellular biophysical properties are novel biomarkers of cell phenotypes which may reflect the status of differentiating stem cells. Accurate characterizations of cellular biophysical properties, in conjunction with the corresponding biochemical properties could help to distinguish stem cells from primary cells, cancer cells, and differentiated cells. However, the correlated evolution of these properties in the course of directed stem cells differentiation has not been well characterized. In this study, we applied video particle tracking microrheology (VPTM) to measure intracellular viscoelasticity of differentiating human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs). Our results showed that osteogenesis not only increased both elastic and viscous moduli, but also converted the intracellular viscoelasticity of differentiating hMSCs from viscous-like to elastic-like. In contrast, adipogenesis decreased both elastic and viscous moduli while hMSCs remained viscous-like during the differentiation. In conjunction with bio- chemical and physical parameters, such as gene expression profiles, cell morphology, and cytoskeleton arrangement, we demonstrated that VPTM is a unique approach to quantify, with high data throughput, the maturation level of differentiating hMSCs and to anticipate their fate decisions. This approach is well suited for time-lapsed study of the mechanobiology of differentiating stem cells especially in three dimensional physico-chemical biomimetic environments including porous scaffolds.

  2. Bio- chemical and physical characterizations of mesenchymal stromal cells along the time course of directed differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin-Quan; Liu, Yi-Shiuan; Liu, Yu-An; Wu, Yi-Chang; del Álamo, Juan C.; Chiou, Arthur; Lee, Oscar K.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular biophysical properties are novel biomarkers of cell phenotypes which may reflect the status of differentiating stem cells. Accurate characterizations of cellular biophysical properties, in conjunction with the corresponding biochemical properties could help to distinguish stem cells from primary cells, cancer cells, and differentiated cells. However, the correlated evolution of these properties in the course of directed stem cells differentiation has not been well characterized. In this study, we applied video particle tracking microrheology (VPTM) to measure intracellular viscoelasticity of differentiating human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs). Our results showed that osteogenesis not only increased both elastic and viscous moduli, but also converted the intracellular viscoelasticity of differentiating hMSCs from viscous-like to elastic-like. In contrast, adipogenesis decreased both elastic and viscous moduli while hMSCs remained viscous-like during the differentiation. In conjunction with bio- chemical and physical parameters, such as gene expression profiles, cell morphology, and cytoskeleton arrangement, we demonstrated that VPTM is a unique approach to quantify, with high data throughput, the maturation level of differentiating hMSCs and to anticipate their fate decisions. This approach is well suited for time-lapsed study of the mechanobiology of differentiating stem cells especially in three dimensional physico-chemical biomimetic environments including porous scaffolds. PMID:27526936

  3. Case study of a problem-based learning course of physics in a telecommunications engineering degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho-Stadler, Erica; Jesús Elejalde-García, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Active learning methods can be appropriate in engineering, as their methodology promotes meta-cognition, independent learning and problem-solving skills. Problem-based learning is the educational process by which problem-solving activities and instructor's guidance facilitate learning. Its key characteristic involves posing a 'concrete problem' to initiate the learning process, generally implemented by small groups of students. Many universities have developed and used active methodologies successfully in the teaching-learning process. During the past few years, the University of the Basque Country has promoted the use of active methodologies through several teacher training programmes. In this paper, we describe and analyse the results of the educational experience using the problem-based learning (PBL) method in a physics course for undergraduates enrolled in the technical telecommunications engineering degree programme. From an instructors' perspective, PBL strengths include better student attitude in class and increased instructor-student and student-student interactions. The students emphasised developing teamwork and communication skills in a good learning atmosphere as positive aspects.

  4. An investigation of the impact of science course sequencing on student performance in high school science and math

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mary, Michael Todd

    High school students in the United States for the past century have typically taken science courses in a sequence of biology followed by chemistry and concluding with physics. An alternative sequence, typically referred to as "physics first" inverts the traditional sequence by having students begin with physics and end with biology. Proponents of physics first cite advances in biological sciences that have dramatically changed the nature of high school biology and the potential benefit to student learning in math that would accompany taking an algebra-based physics course in the early years of high school to support changing the sequence. Using a quasi-experimental, quantitative research design, the purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of science course sequencing on student achievement in math and science at a school district that offered both course sequences. The Texas state end-of-course exams in biology, chemistry, physics, algebra I and geometry were used as the instruments measuring student achievement in math and science at the end of each academic year. Various statistical models were used to analyze these achievement data. The conclusion was, for students in this study, the sequence in which students took biology, chemistry, and physics had little or no impact on performance on the end-of-course assessments in each of these courses. Additionally there was only a minimal effect found with respect to math performance, leading to the conclusion that neither the traditional or "physics first" science course sequence presented an advantage for student achievement in math or science.

  5. Success in introductory college physics: The role of gender, high school preparation, and student learning perceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jean Chi-Jen

    Physics is fundamental for science, engineering, medicine, and for understanding many phenomena encountered in people's daily lives. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between student success in college-level introductory physics courses and various educational and background characteristics. The primary variables of this study were gender, high school mathematics and science preparation, preference and perceptions of learning physics, and performance in introductory physics courses. Demographic characteristics considered were age, student grade level, parents' occupation and level of education, high school senior grade point average, and educational goals. A Survey of Learning Preference and Perceptions was developed to collect the information for this study. A total of 267 subjects enrolled in six introductory physics courses, four algebra-based and two calculus-based, participated in the study conducted during Spring Semester 2002. The findings from the algebra-based physics courses indicated that participant's educational goal, high school senior GPA, father's educational level, mother's educational level, and mother's occupation in the area of science, engineering, or computer technology were positively related to performance while participant age was negatively related. Biology preparation, mathematics preparation, and additional mathematics and science preparation in high school were also positively related to performance. The relationships between the primary variables and performance in calculus-based physics courses were limited to high school senior year GPA and high school physics preparation. Findings from all six courses indicated that participant's educational goal, high school senior GPA, father's educational level, and mother's occupation in the area of science, engineering, or computer technology, high school preparation in mathematics, biology, and the completion of additional mathematics and science courses were

  6. Implementing 'The Math You Need' in an Introductory Physical Geology Course at California State University East Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    The wide range of abilities in the student population at California State University East Bay, with a significant fraction of students under-prepared and requiring mathematics remediation, is a challenge to including mathematical concepts and exercises in our introductory geoscience courses. Student expectations that a geoscience course will not include quantitative work may result in math-phobics choosing the course and resisting quantitative work when presented with it. Introductory courses that are required for Geology and Environmental Science majors are also designated as General Education, which gives rise to a student group with a wide range of abilities and expectations. This presentation will focus on implementation of a series of online math tutorials for students in introductory geoscience courses called 'The Math You Need' (TMYN; http://serc.carleton.edu/mathyouneed/index.html). The program is implemented in a Physical Geology course, in which 2/3 of the students are typically non-majors. The Physical Geology course has a three hour lab each week and the lab exercises and lab manual offer several opportunities for application of TMYN. Many of the lab exercises include graphing, profiling, working with map scales, converting units, or using equations to calculate some parameter or solve for an unknown. Six TMYN modules covering topics using density calculations as applied to mineral properties and isostasy, graphing as applied to rock properties, earthquake location, and radiometric dating, and calculation of rates as applied to plate movement, stream discharge, and groundwater flow, are assigned as pre-labs to be completed before lab classes. TMYN skills are reinforced during lectures and lab exercises, as close in time as possible to students' exposure via TMYN. Pre- and post-tests give a measure of the effectiveness of TMYN in improving students' quantitative literacy.

  7. Bush Physics for the 21st Century, A Distance Delivery Physics Course to Bridge the Gap in Rural Alaska and Across the North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solie, D. J.; Spencer, V.

    2009-12-01

    Bush Physics for the 21st Century brings physics that is culturally connected, engaging to modern youth, and mathematically rigorous, to high school and college students in the remote and often road-less villages of Alaska. The primary goal of the course is to prepare rural (predominantly Alaska Native) students for success in university science and engineering degree programs and ultimately STEM careers. The course is currently delivered via video conference and web based electronic blackboard tailored to the needs of remote students. Practical, culturally relevant kinetic examples from traditional and modern northern life are used to engage students, and a rigorous and mathematical focus is stressed to strengthen problem solving skills. Simple hands-on-lab experiments are delivered to the students with the exercises completed on-line. In addition, students are teamed and required to perform a much more involved experimental study with the results presented by teams at the conclusion of the course. Connecting abstract mathematical symbols and equations to real physical objects and problems is one of the most difficult things to master in physics. Greek symbols are traditionally used in equations, however, to strengthen the visual/conceptual connection with symbol and encourage an indigenous connection to the concepts we have introduced Inuktitut symbols to complement the traditional Greek symbols. Results and observations from the first two pilot semesters (spring 2008 and 2009) will be presented.

  8. The Impact of a Required Undergraduate Health and Wellness Course on Students' Awareness and Knowledge of Physical Activity and Chronic Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuruganti, Usha

    2014-01-01

    As part of the undergraduate curriculum, the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) requires all students to take an undergraduate course in physical activity, health and wellness in their third year of study. This capstone course allows students to integrate concepts from their program regarding physical activity,…

  9. The Perceptions of Pre-Service Science Teachers' about Using Vee Diagrams and Electronic Portfolios in Physics Laboratuary Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çaliskan, Ilke

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of pre-service science teachers about using vee diagrams and preparing electronic portfolios in physics laboratuary course. 103 first grade pre-service science teachers who took general physics laboratuary course were the participants of the study. Pre-service teachers constructed vee…

  10. Outdoor Pursuits: Self to Nature Activities -- A Supplement to the Physical Education Course of Study. The Protestant School Board of Greater Montreal, March 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter; And Others

    In keeping with the Department of Education's course content in physical education, this supplement to the Physical Education Course of Study was prepared. Suggestions for teaching and organizing classes in 16 "Self to Nature" activities are outlined. Activities are: backpacking, bicycling, boating, camping, canoeing, fishing, hebertisme (an…

  11. The Impact of a Critically Oriented Physical Education Teacher Education Course on Preservice Classroom Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtner-Smith, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    Studies of the influence of conventional methods courses on preservice classroom teachers (PCTs) have provided mixed results. The purpose of the study described in this paper was to break new ground and examine the effects of a critically oriented 6-week methods course and a 9-week early field experience on one class of 24 PCTs. Data were…

  12. Reaching Out: The Bachelor of Arts Degree In Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Art

    1996-05-01

    Physics degrees are not only for physicists. Our department believes that it would be healthy if attorneys, physicians, journalists, politicians, businesspeople, and others had undergraduate degrees in physics. Thus, we have begun offering a Bachelor of Arts degree in physics, for students who want to study physics as a background for other fields such as law (patents, environmental law), medical school, business (high-tech firms), journalism (science reporting, environmental reporting), music (accoustics, electronic music), and essentially any other profession. The program reaches outward, outside of physics, rather than pointing toward further work in physics. It begins with the algebra-based introductory course rather than the calculus-based course for future physicists and engineers. Two new courses are being created to provide these pre-professional students with broad science literacy and knowledge of physics-related technologies. The program is more flexible and less technical than the traditional Bachelor of Science program, allowing students time for outside electives and professional requirements in other fields.

  13. Work Habits of Students in Traditional and Online Sections of an Introductory Physics Course: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2016-05-01

    The study compares the work habits of two student groups in an introductory physics course, one in traditional and one in online sections. Both groups shared the same online materials and online homework, as well as the same discussion boards and examinations, but one group in addition had traditional lectures. The groups were compared with respect to amount and frequency of access to different online course resources. It was found that with few exceptions, both groups exhibited very similar work habits. Students in the online sections more frequently accessed content pages and more frequently contributed to course discussions. It was also found that regular access of the materials throughout the week, rather than only on homework deadline nights, is a predictor of success on examinations, and that this indicator is more reliable for students in the online sections. Overall, though, the effect of traditional lectures is minimal.

  14. Work Habits of Students in Traditional and Online Sections of an Introductory Physics Course: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2016-10-01

    The study compares the work habits of two student groups in an introductory physics course, one in traditional and one in online sections. Both groups shared the same online materials and online homework, as well as the same discussion boards and examinations, but one group in addition had traditional lectures. The groups were compared with respect to amount and frequency of access to different online course resources. It was found that with few exceptions, both groups exhibited very similar work habits. Students in the online sections more frequently accessed content pages and more frequently contributed to course discussions. It was also found that regular access of the materials throughout the week, rather than only on homework deadline nights, is a predictor of success on examinations, and that this indicator is more reliable for students in the online sections. Overall, though, the effect of traditional lectures is minimal.

  15. Integrating nature of science instruction into a physical science content course for preservice elementary teachers: NOS views of teaching assistants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuscin, Deborah L.; Akerson, Valarie L.; Phillipson-Mower, Teddie

    2006-09-01

    Teacher education programs have met with limited success in improving teachers' understanding of the nature of science (NOS). Research suggests that such efforts could be enhanced by addressing NOS in preservice teachers' science courses. We planned NOS instruction in a physical science content course for preservice elementary teachers. Our first concern was the NOS views of the instructors for the course, which included undergraduate teaching assistants (UTAs). We examined the NOS views of nine UTAs, and the impact of job-embedded professional development on their views. Although initially UTAs held a number of views inconsistent with science education reforms, four modes of explicit-and-reflective interventions, including analysis of NOS views of preservice teachers, resulted in favorable changes in UTAs' views.

  16. A case study of successful e-learning: a web-based distance course in medical physics held for school teachers of the upper secondary level.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Bo-Anders

    2005-09-01

    Learning activities and course design in the new context of e-learning, such as in web-based courses involves a change both for teachers and students. The paper discusses factors important for e-learning to be successful. The development of an online course in medical physics and technology for high school teachers of physics, details of the course, and experience gained in connection with it are described. The course syllabus includes basics of radiation physics, imaging techniques using ionizing or non-ionizing radiation, and external and internal radiation therapy. The course has a highly didactic approach. The final task is for participants to design a course of their own centered on some topic of medical physics on the basis of the knowledge they have acquired. The aim of the course is to help the teachers integrate medical physics into their own teaching. This is seen as enhancing the interest of high school students in later studying physics, medical physics or some other branch of science at the university level, and as increasing the knowledge that they and people generally have of science. It is suggested that the basic approach taken can also have applicability to the training of medical, nursing or engineering students, and be used for continuing professional development in various areas.

  17. Student Success in First-Year University Physics and Mathematics Courses: Does the high-school attended make a difference?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuti-Trache, Maria; Bluman, George; Tiedje, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    This paper considers school factors that contribute to a successful transition from high school to first-year university Physics courses at the University of British Columbia by employing a two-level hierarchical model. It is assumed that there is a relationship between student performance and the high school they graduated from. It is shown that school location and type affect student performance: students from public schools in the Metro Vancouver area perform better in first year compared to students from independent schools and schools in distant communities. The study also considers rankings of schools based on student performance in first-year university Physics and Calculus courses. These university-based rankings differ significantly (essentially in reverse order) from the well-known Fraser Institute rankings based on measures internal to high schools.

  18. A 18^th century thermometer recipe: The begin of experimental physics courses in Guadalajara, M'exico?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Alba Martinez, Durruty Jesus

    2007-03-01

    As a part of the Special Funds Collection of the Jalisco's State Public Library ``Juan Jos'e Arreola'' is a physics course manuscript attributed to Francisco Javier Clavigero s.j. (1731-1787), teacher at the Jesuit Colegio de Santo Tom'as (a college-level institution in Guadalajara before the university opening), inside of the vellum bounded volume is a unbounded folio containing instructions on how to build a thermometer. In this work are discussed some evidences of the belonging of such folio to the manuscript in spite of their differences (it is written in Spanish not in Latin as the whole), we also describe the process to construct the thermometer and how could be the experimental part of the physics course. Also is briefly exposed the importance of the educational role of Clavigero as a builder of the concept of mexicanity.

  19. A field study of data analysis exercises in a bachelor physics course using the internet platform VISPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Glaser, Christian; Klingebiel, Dennis; Krause, Raphael; Kuempel, Daniel; Müller, Gero; Rieger, Marcel; Steggemann, Jan; Urban, Martin; Walz, David; Weidenhaupt, Klaus; Winchen, Tobias; Weltermann, Birgitta

    2014-05-01

    Bachelor of physics lectures on ‘Particle Physics and Astrophysics’ were complemented by exercises related to data analysis and data interpretation at the RWTH Aachen University recently. The students performed these exercises using the internet platform VISPA, which provides a development environment for physics data analyses. We describe the platform and its application within the physics course, and present the results of a student survey. The students’ acceptance of the learning project was positive. The level of acceptance was related to their individual preference for learning with a computer. Furthermore, students with good programming skills favour working individually, while students who attribute themselves as having low programming abilities favour working in teams. The students appreciated approaching actual research through the data analysis tasks.

  20. Application of Physics and Chemistry to Archeology: A New Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meschel, Susan V.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a course that covers such topics as the archeological dating processes and methods that enable the identification and authentication of artifacts, including X-ray diffraction, optical emission spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and neutron activation analysis. (MLH)

  1. An Unusual Apporach to the Elementary Qualitative Physics Course: Introduction to Space Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, E. Neal

    1975-01-01

    Describes a course, without laboratory, using rudimentary algebra and covering such topics as gravitation, orbital mechanics, atomic structure, geomagnetism, electromagnetic spectrum, theory of relativity, extraterrestrial life, and interstellar travel. (GH)

  2. Learning physical biology via modeling and simulation: A new course and textbook for science and engineering undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Philip

    To a large extent, undergraduate physical-science curricula remain firmly rooted in pencil-and-paper calculation, despite the fact that most research is done with computers. To a large extent, undergraduate life-science curricula remain firmly rooted in descriptive approaches, despite the fact that much current research involves quantitative modeling. Not only does our pedagogy not reflect current reality; it also creates a spurious barrier between the fields, reinforcing the narrow silos that prevent students from connecting them. I'll describe an intermediate-level course on ``Physical Models of Living Systems.'' The prerequisite is first-year university physics and calculus. The course is a response to rapidly growing interest among undergraduates in a broad range of science and engineering majors. Students acquire several research skills that are often not addressed in traditional undergraduate courses: •Basic modeling skills; •Probabilistic modeling skills; •Data analysis methods; •Computer programming using a general-purpose platform like MATLAB or Python; •Pulling datasets from the Web for analysis; •Data visualization; •Dynamical systems, particularly feedback control. Partially supported by the NSF under Grants EF-0928048 and DMR-0832802.

  3. Students' confidence in the ability to transfer basic math skills in introductory physics and chemistry courses at a community college

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Reginald

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the confidence levels that community college students have in transferring basic math skills to science classes, as well as any factors that influence their confidence levels. This study was conducted with 196 students at a community college in central Mississippi. The study was conducted during the month of November after all of the students had taken their midterm exams and received midterm grades. The instrument used in this survey was developed and validated by the researcher. The instrument asks the students to rate how confident they were in working out specific math problems and how confident they were in working problems using those specific math skills in physics and chemistry. The instrument also provided an example problem for every confidence item. Results revealed that students' demographics were significant predictors in confidence scores. Students in the 18-22 year old range were less confident in solving math problems than others. Students who had retaken a math course were less confident than those who had not. Chemistry students were less confident in solving math problems than those in physics courses. Chemistry II students were less confident than those in Chemistry I and Principals of Chemistry. Students were least confident in solving problems involving logarithms and the most confident in solving algebra problems. In general, students felt that their math courses did not prepare them for the math problems encountered in science courses. There was no significant difference in confidence between students who had completed their math homework online and those who had completed their homework on paper. The researcher recommends that chemistry educators find ways of incorporating more mathematics in their courses especially logarithms and slope. Furthermore, math educators should incorporate more chemistry related applications to math class. Results of hypotheses testing, conclusions, discussions, and

  4. High School Physics Courses & Enrollments: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2014-01-01

    This report examines enrollments in high school physics during the 2012-13 school year. Based on data from the most recent survey (which includes both public and private high schools in the U.S.), it is estimated that 39% of the class of 2013 took high school physics before graduating. During the 2012-13 school year, 1.38 million students were…

  5. A Framework for Understanding Physics Instruction in Secondary and College Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blickenstaff, Jacob Clark

    2010-01-01

    The continued downward spiral of enrollment in physical sciences in the USA and Europe has science educators concerned on both sides of the Atlantic. Physics has been particularly hard-hit, with the percentage of students choosing to major in the subject at the lowest level in decades. University physics has a reputation as a difficult, abstract…

  6. An Inquiry-Based Course Using "Physics?" in Cartoons and Movies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Books, cartoons, movies, and video games provide engaging opportunities to get both science and nonscience students excited about physics. An easy way to use these media in one's classroom is to have students view clips and identify unusual events, odd physics, or list things that violate our understanding of the physics that governs our universe.…

  7. Enhancing Cognitive Development through Physics Problem Solving: A Taxonomy of Introductory Physics Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Raluca; Bennhold, Cornelius; Feldman, Gerald

    2008-10-01

    As part of an ongoing project to reform the introductory algebra-based physics courses at George Washington University, we are developing a taxonomy of introductory physics problems (TIPP) that establishes a connection between the physics problems, the type of physics knowledge they involve and the cognitive processes they develop in students. This taxonomy will provide, besides an algorithm for classifying physics problems, an organized and relatively easy-to-use database of physics problems that contains the majority of already created text-based and research-based types of problems. In addition, this taxonomy will reveal the kinds of physics problems that are still lacking and that are found to be necessary to enhance students' cognitive development. For this reason, we expect it to be a valuable teaching resource for physics instructors which will enable them to select the problems used in their curricular materials based on the specifics of their students' cognition and the learning objectives they want to achieve in their class. This organization scheme will also provide a framework for creating physics-related assessments with a cognitive component.

  8. Attending to experimental physics practices and lifelong learning skills in an introductory laboratory course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Punit R.; Livezey, Jesse A.; Zaniewski, Anna M.; Reinholz, Daniel L.; Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.

    2016-09-01

    We have designed an introductory laboratory course that engaged first-year undergraduate students in two complementary types of iteration: (1) iterative improvement of experiments through cycles of modeling systems, designing experiments, analyzing data, and refining models and designs; and (2) iterative improvement of self through cycles of reflecting on progress, soliciting feedback, and implementing changes to study habits and habits of mind. The course consisted of three major activities: a thermal expansion activity, which spanned the first half of the semester; final research projects, which spanned the second half of the semester; and guided student reflections, which took place throughout the duration of the course. We describe our curricular designs and report examples of student work that demonstrate students' iterative improvements in multiple contexts.

  9. Investigation of the Interactions Between Instructors and Students in an Introductory Interactive-Engagement College Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Cassandra Ann

    The physics instruction at UC Davis for life science majors takes place in a long-standing reformed large-enrollment physics course in which the discussion/lab instructors (primarily graduate student teaching assistants) implement the interactive-engagement (IE) elements of the course. Because so many different instructors participate in disseminating the IE course elements, we find it essential to the instructors' professional development to observe and document the student-instructor interactions within the classroom. Out of this effort, we have developed a computerized Real-time Instructor Observation Tool (RIOT) to take data of student-instructor interactions. We use the RIOT to observe 29 different instructors some over multiple quarters, and discover 1) the range of instructor behaviors is more extreme than previously assumed, 2) the students, the curriculum, and the individual instructor's style contribute to this variation 3) there are some instructor-student interactions (specifically actively observing students, and explaining to students in small groups) that are correlated with student achievement as measured by their final exam score. In this dissertation, I introduce the RIOT, and describe how I came to each of these conclusions.

  10. Physical Education and General Health Courses and Minority Community College Student Risk Levels for Poor Health and Leisure-Time Exercise Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Sally L.; Keating, Xiaofen Deng; Chen, Li; Guan, Jianmin; Delzeit-McIntyre, Linda; Bridges, Dwan

    2008-01-01

    College education is the last opportunity to educate a large segment of young adults to be physically active and develop a healthy lifestyle. This study examined minority community college student risks for cardiovascular disease, physical activity (PA) patterns, and effects of physical education and general health courses on promoting PA.…

  11. A Novel Interdisciplinary Science Experience for Undergraduates across Introductory Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Joelle L.; Atkinson, Elizabeth J. O.; Gilbert, Brian D.; Kruchten, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Successfully creating and implementing interdisciplinary curricula in introductory science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses is challenging, but doing so is increasingly more important as current problems in science become more interdisciplinary. Opening up the silos between science disciplines and overcoming common…

  12. How Teaching Practices Are Connected to Student Intention to Enrol in Upper Secondary School Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari

    2016-01-01

    Background: In developed countries, it is challenging for teachers to select pedagogical practices that encourage students to enrol in science and technology courses in upper secondary school. Purpose: Aiming to understand the enrolment dynamics, this study analyses sample-based data from Finland's National Assessment in Science to determine…

  13. Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR): A Tool for Introductory Physical Geography Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richason, Benjamin F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Suggests how to use remote sensing techniques and data in geography courses in high school and college as well as in geography research. Tips are presented on using techniques such as topographic maps, vertical aerial photographs in stereo pairs, satellite images, and SLAR images (which are particularly useful in teaching landforms and…

  14. Incorporating an Introductory Service-Learning Experience in a Physical Geography Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurmu, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Even as service-learning has become more prevalent in higher education as a high-impact teaching methodology, barriers still exist to its implementation by some instructors. One concern is the perception of these types of activities infringing upon course content. This article outlines an example of an introductory service-learning project for an…

  15. ‘The physics of life,’ an undergraduate general education biophysics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2015-05-01

    Improving the scientific literacy of non-scientists is an important aim, both because of the ever-increasing impact of science on our lives and because understanding science enriches our experience of the natural world. One route to improving scientific literacy is via general education undergraduate courses—i.e. courses for students not majoring in the sciences or engineering. Because it encompasses a variety of important scientific concepts, demonstrates connections between basic science and real-world applications and illustrates the creative ways in which scientific insights develop, biophysics is a useful subject with which to promote scientific literacy. I describe here a course on biophysics for non-science-major undergraduates recently developed at the University of Oregon (Eugene, OR, USA), noting its design, which spans both macroscopic and microscopic topics, and the specific content of a few of its modules. I also describe evidence-based pedagogical approaches adopted in teaching the course and aspects of course enrollment and evaluation.

  16. An Investigation of How a Physics Professional Development Course Influenced the Teaching Practices of Five Elementary School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Danielle B.

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation of how a professional development content course based on the Physics and Everyday Thinking (PET) curriculum affected the teaching practices of five case study elementary school teachers. The findings of this study highlight different ways that teachers use what they learn in content courses to teach science to elementary children. While some teachers transferred pedagogical practices along with the content, others transformed the content to be useful in already existing pedagogical frameworks, and still others show little or no evidence of transfer. The range of transfer is explained by considering how each teacher interacted with the learning context (the PET curriculum) and their initial ideas about teaching science.

  17. Effect of scaffolding on helping introductory physics students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that introductory physics students often have alternative conceptions that are inconsistent with established physical principles and concepts. Invoking alternative conceptions in the quantitative problem-solving process can derail the entire process. In order to help students solve quantitative problems involving strong alternative conceptions correctly, appropriate scaffolding support can be helpful. The goal of this study is to examine how different scaffolding supports involving analogical problem-solving influence introductory physics students' performance on a target quantitative problem in a situation where many students' solution process is derailed due to alternative conceptions. Three different scaffolding supports were designed and implemented in calculus-based and algebra-based introductory physics courses involving 410 students to evaluate the level of scaffolding needed to help students learn from an analogical problem that is similar in the underlying principles involved but for which the problem-solving process is not derailed by alternative conceptions. We found that for the quantitative problem involving strong alternative conceptions, simply guiding students to work through the solution of the analogical problem first was not enough to help most students discern the similarity between the two problems. However, if additional scaffolding supports that directly helped students examine and repair their knowledge elements involving alternative conceptions were provided, e.g., by guiding students to contemplate related issues and asking them to solve the targeted problem on their own first before learning from the analogical problem provided, students were more likely to discern the underlying similarities between the problems and avoid getting derailed by alternative conceptions when solving the targeted problem. We also found that some scaffolding supports were more effective in the calculus-based course than in the algebra-based

  18. Application of the K-W-L Teaching and Learning Method to an Introductory Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrinkle, Cheryl Schaefer; Manivannan, Mani K.

    2009-01-01

    The K-W-L method of teaching is a simple method that actively engages students in their own learning. It has been used with kindergarten and elementary grades to teach other subjects. The authors have successfully used it to teach physics at the college level. In their introductory physics labs, the K-W-L method helped students think about what…

  19. Physical Models Enhance Molecular Three-Dimensional Literacy in an Introductory Biochemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jacqueline R.; Hagedorn, Eric; Dillenburg, Paul; Patrick, Michael; Herman, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    This article reports the results of a recent study to evaluate the usefulness of physical models of molecular structures as a new tool with which to teach concepts of molecular structure and function. Of seven different learning tools used by students in this introductory biochemistry class, the use of the physical models in a laboratory was rated…

  20. Teaching Quantum Interpretations: Revisiting the Goals and Practices of Introductory Quantum Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baily, Charles; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2015-01-01

    Most introductory quantum physics instructors would agree that transitioning students from classical to quantum thinking is an important learning goal, but may disagree on whether or how this can be accomplished. Although (and perhaps because) physicists have long debated the physical interpretation of quantum theory, many instructors choose to…

  1. A Model for Implementing the Project Physics Course for Independent Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolin, Calvin

    Included are results of a study conducted to assess the possibilities and effectiveness of learning physics at high school level via independent study. The sample was drawn from a regular high school physics class. During the experiment, no instruction was carried out by any teacher. An auto-instructional system was developed and provided for use…

  2. Advantages and Challenges of Using Physics Curricula as a Model for Reforming an Undergraduate Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, D. A.; Atkins, L. J.; Salter, I. Y.; Gallagher, D. J.; Kratz, R. F.; Rousseau, J. V.; Nelson, G. D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the development of a life sciences curriculum, targeted to undergraduate students, which was modeled after a commercially available physics curriculum and based on aspects of how people learn. Our paper describes the collaborative development process and necessary modifications required to apply a physics pedagogical model in a life…

  3. Developing Web-Oriented Homework System to Assess Students' Introductory Physics Course Performance and Compare to Paper-Based Peer Homework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirci, Neset

    2006-01-01

    The World Wide Web influences education and our lives in many ways. Nowadays, Web-based homework has been becoming widespread practice in physics courses and some other courses as well. Although are some disputes whether this is an encouraging or risky development for student learning, there is limited research assessing the pedagogical effect of…

  4. Is classical mechanics a prerequisite for learning physics of the 20th century?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walwema, Godfrey B.; French, Debbie A.; Verley, Jim D.; Burrows, Andrea C.

    2016-11-01

    Physics of the 20th century has contributed significantly to modern technology, and yet many physics students are never availed the opportunity to study it as part of the curriculum. One of the possible reasons why it is not taught in high school and introductory physics courses could be because curriculum designers believe that students need a solid background in classical mechanics and calculus in order to study physics of the 20th century such as the photoelectric effect, special and general relativity, the uncertainty principle, etc. This presumption may not be justifiable or valid. The authors of this paper contend that teaching physics of the 20th century aids students in relating physics to modern technology and the real world, making studying physics exciting. In this study, the authors correlated scores for matched questions in the Mechanics Baseline Test and a physics of the 20th century test in order to examine the trend of the scores. The participants included undergraduate students attending an introductory algebra-based physics course with no intention of taking physics at a higher level. The analysis of the scores showed no significant correlation for any of the matched pairs of questions. The purpose of this article is to recommend that even without a solid background in classical mechanics, teachers can introduce physics of the 20th century to their students for increased interest.

  5. Looking Inward: Introspectiveness, Physical Disability, and Depression across the Life Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Gundy, Karen; Schieman, Scott

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates interrelationships among age, physical disability, introspectiveness, and depression. Results show that older people report less introspectiveness than do younger people. Disabled respondents experience a more positive relationship between introspectiveness and depression; however, disabled respondents' poorer global health…

  6. Advantages and challenges of using physics curricula as a model for reforming an undergraduate biology course.

    PubMed

    Donovan, D A; Atkins, L J; Salter, I Y; Gallagher, D J; Kratz, R F; Rousseau, J V; Nelson, G D

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of a life sciences curriculum, targeted to undergraduate students, which was modeled after a commercially available physics curriculum and based on aspects of how people learn. Our paper describes the collaborative development process and necessary modifications required to apply a physics pedagogical model in a life sciences context. While some approaches were easily adapted, others provided significant challenges. Among these challenges were: representations of energy, introducing definitions, the placement of Scientists' Ideas, and the replicability of data. In modifying the curriculum to address these challenges, we have come to see them as speaking to deeper differences between the disciplines, namely that introductory physics--for example, Newton's laws, magnetism, light--is a science of pairwise interaction, while introductory biology--for example, photosynthesis, evolution, cycling of matter in ecosystems--is a science of linked processes, and we suggest that this is how the two disciplines are presented in introductory classes. We illustrate this tension through an analysis of our adaptations of the physics curriculum for instruction on the cycling of matter and energy; we show that modifications of the physics curriculum to address the biological framework promotes strong gains in student understanding of these topics, as evidenced by analysis of student work.

  7. Area deprivation across the life course and physical capability in midlife: findings from the 1946 British Birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Murray, Emily T; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Tilling, Kate; Southall, Humphrey; Aucott, Paula; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca

    2013-08-01

    Physical capability in later life is influenced by factors occurring across the life course, yet exposures to area conditions have only been examined cross-sectionally. Data from the National Survey of Health and Development, a longitudinal study of a 1946 British birth cohort, were used to estimate associations of area deprivation (defined as percentage of employed people working in partly skilled or unskilled occupations) at ages 4, 26, and 53 years (residential addresses linked to census data in 1950, 1972, and 1999) with 3 measures of physical capability at age 53 years: grip strength, standing balance, and chair-rise time. Cross-classified multilevel models with individuals nested within areas at the 3 ages showed that models assessing a single time point underestimate total area contributions to physical capability. For balance and chair-rise performance, associations with area deprivation in midlife were robust to adjustment for individual socioeconomic position and prior area deprivation (mean change for a 1-standard-deviation increase: balance, -7.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): -12.8, -2.8); chair rise, 2.1% (95% CI: -0.1, 4.3)). In addition, area deprivation in childhood was related to balance after adjustment for childhood socioeconomic position (-5.1%, 95% CI: -8.7, -1.6). Interventions aimed at reducing midlife disparities in physical capability should target the socioeconomic environment of individuals-for standing balance, as early as childhood.

  8. News Demonstrations: Lecture showcases the best of physics Astronomy: April 2011 celebrates astronomy Award: Physics project wins Guardian innovation award Teaching: Liverpool conference inspires teachers Media: Physics Education finds fame at last Conference: Network stimulates physics at ASE Lectures: University of Oxford hosts a crowd for an update on physics Materials: Goldsmiths course lets teachers get to grips with materials Workshop: Stimulating Physics workshop offers places for teachers and technicians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    Demonstrations: Lecture showcases the best of physics Astronomy: April 2011 celebrates astronomy Award: Physics project wins Guardian innovation award Teaching: Liverpool conference inspires teachers Media: Physics Education finds fame at last Conference: Network stimulates physics at ASE Lectures: University of Oxford hosts a crowd for an update on physics Materials: Goldsmiths course lets teachers get to grips with materials Workshop: Stimulating Physics workshop offers places for teachers and technicians

  9. Disciplinary Authenticity: Enriching the Reforms of Introductory Physics Courses for Life-Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Jessica; Coffey, Janet E.; Redish, Edward F.; Cooke, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    Educators and policy makers have advocated for reform of undergraduate biology education, calling for greater integration of mathematics and physics in the biology curriculum. While these calls reflect the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of biology research, crossing disciplinary boundaries in the classroom carries epistemological challenges…

  10. Team-Based Learning in a Physical Therapy Gross Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killins, Anita M.

    2015-01-01

    As medical knowledge grows exponentially and healthcare systems continue to utilize interdisciplinary care, it is essential that physical therapy (PT) graduates be prepared to practice efficiently and effectively on healthcare teams. Team-based learning (TBL) is a teaching pedagogy used in medicine to improve academic performance and teamwork…

  11. Examining Service-Learning in a Graduate Physical Education Teacher Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meaney, Karen S.; Housman, Jeff; Cavazos, Arnoldo; Wilcox, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the impact of service-learning on graduate physical education teacher education students. Social-Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1986; 1999) served as the framework to examine graduate student's experiences in a service-learning program. Participants were graduate students (N =16) enrolled in a curriculum and…

  12. Evaluation of Games in Games and Physical Activity Course Curriculum in Terms of Common Basic Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inan, Mehmet; Ozden, Bülent; Dervent, Fatih; Küçüktepe, Coskun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the games in the "I am Playing Games" (IPG) compilation booklet that was used in the Games and Physical Activity (GPA) curriculum. 257 games in IPG compilation booklet were coded whether they had elements that would enable development of common basic skills or not. Common basic…

  13. The Use of Web-Based Portfolios in College Physical Education Activity Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastie, Peter A.; Sinelnikov, Oleg A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction of web-based portfolios as a means of authentic assessment in collegiate physical education classes. Students in three volleyball classes were required to contribute to web-based team portfolios, and at the end of the semester, were able to make comment upon this process. A six-item on-line survey used to…

  14. Advantages and Challenges of Using Physics Curricula as a Model for Reforming an Undergraduate Biology Course

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, D. A.; Atkins, L. J.; Salter, I. Y.; Gallagher, D. J.; Kratz, R. F.; Rousseau, J. V.; Nelson, G. D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the development of a life sciences curriculum, targeted to undergraduate students, which was modeled after a commercially available physics curriculum and based on aspects of how people learn. Our paper describes the collaborative development process and necessary modifications required to apply a physics pedagogical model in a life sciences context. While some approaches were easily adapted, others provided significant challenges. Among these challenges were: representations of energy, introducing definitions, the placement of Scientists’ Ideas, and the replicability of data. In modifying the curriculum to address these challenges, we have come to see them as speaking to deeper differences between the disciplines, namely that introductory physics—for example, Newton's laws, magnetism, light—is a science of pairwise interaction, while introductory biology—for example, photosynthesis, evolution, cycling of matter in ecosystems—is a science of linked processes, and we suggest that this is how the two disciplines are presented in introductory classes. We illustrate this tension through an analysis of our adaptations of the physics curriculum for instruction on the cycling of matter and energy; we show that modifications of the physics curriculum to address the biological framework promotes strong gains in student understanding of these topics, as evidenced by analysis of student work. PMID:23737629

  15. Reviewing the curriculum for physics and technology in postgraduate sonography courses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Physics and technology is seen as a difficult subject by those training in medical ultrasound. The reasons for this are discussed. Who should teach the subject and what should be included are considered. Ways to approach the subject so as to make it more relevant and easier to learn are proposed and a basic syllabus is suggested in an appendix. PMID:27433234

  16. Factors Concomitant with Approach and Avoidance Behavior with Respect to Enrollment in High School Physics Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurence, J. Parker

    Reported is a study designed to examine potential explanations for the decline in the percentage of students who enroll in high school physics. Two kinds of factors were assessed: students' stated perceptions of science teaching and teachers and the difficulty components of the science curriculum (particularly the reading level of textbooks and…

  17. Enhancing Student Motivation in College and University Physical Activity Courses Using Instructional Alignment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, MooSong; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Yun, Joonkoo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation is a key factor in promoting students' active engagement in regular physical activity. According to self-determination theory -- one of the prominent motivational theories -- for this to occur, students' basic psychological needs must be met (i.e., their need for autonomy, competence and relatedness). Students' self-determined…

  18. Teaching the Nature of Science in Physics Courses: The Contribution of Classroom Historical Inquiries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence; Beaufils, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Physics and chemistry programs at the secondary school level in France recommend introducing components of the history of science (HS). Emphasis is placed on a "cultural" dimension, which is poorly defined but essentially refers to elements of epistemological nature. Moreover, the few examples of activities based on HS suggested by the programs…

  19. Incorporating Sustainability and 21st-Century Problem Solving into Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Michael; Pfaff, Tom; Hamilton, Jason; Erkan, Ali

    2013-01-01

    As educators we are facing an unprecedented challenge to prepare our students not only for traditional careers but also for future careers that don't exist today. Many of these careers will require a firm grounding in disciplines such as physics, along with multidisciplinary, Global, and systems thinking skill sets. Our Multidisciplinary…

  20. The Use of Physical and Virtual Manipulatives in an Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering (Dynamics) Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education is a national focus. Engineering education, as part of STEM education, needs to adapt to meet the needs of the nation in a rapidly changing world. Using computer-based visualization tools and corresponding 3D printed physical objects may help nontraditional students succeed in…

  1. Evaluating a Contextual-Based Course on Data Analysis for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukliansky, Ida; Eshach, Haim

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of data and construction and understanding of graphs are central practices in science; therefore, an important skill needed in the undergraduate physics laboratory is the ability to analyze data obtained from experiments. Often students are not able to reach logical deductions based on data, acquired from the experiments that…

  2. The Role of Online Homework in Low-Enrollment College Introductory Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarova, Krassi

    2015-01-01

    Studying physics for nonphysics majors at college level is usually a process of learning new problem-solving skills and sometimes seems a frustrating experience. In an attempt to provide students with more learning resources, online homework was required to supplement the instruction. This study reveals the role of the online homework assignments…

  3. A Web-based Quantum Mechanics Course for first Year Graduate Students in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinig, M.

    1996-11-01

    All class materials for the 1996 graduate Quantum Mechanics course at the University of Tennessee are distributed over the Internet (http://electron4.phys.utk.edu). Complete class notes are available in PDF format. Homework problems and solutions are distributed in PDF format or as scanned notes. Students need Web access using a graphical browser with a PDF reader plug-in (Adobe Acrobat) installed. The news and mail clients must be able to display attachments, such as graphics files, inline. A class news group has been set up. Students use this news group to discus class material, homework problems, and anything else of interest among themselves. Numerical solutions are presented in the form of Java programs.

  4. The Impact of the Pre-Instructional Cognitive Profile on Learning Gain and Final Exam of Physics Courses: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capizzo, Maria Concetta; Nuzzo, Silvana; Zarcone, Michelangelo

    2006-01-01

    The case study described in this paper investigates the relationship among some pre-instructional knowledge, the learning gain and the final physics performance of computing engineering students in the introductory physics course. The results of the entrance engineering test (EET) have been used as a measurement of reading comprehension, logic and…

  5. The Progression of Podcasting/Vodcasting in a Technical Physics Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glanville, Y. J.

    2010-11-01

    Technology such as Microsoft PowerPoint presentations, clickers, podcasting, and learning management suites is becoming prevalent in classrooms. Instructors are using these media in both large lecture hall settings and small classrooms with just a handful of students. Traditionally, each of these media is instructor driven. For instance, podcasting (audio recordings) provided my technical physics course with supplemental notes to accompany a traditional algebra-based physics lecture. Podcasting is an ideal tool for this mode of instruction, but podcasting/vodcasting is also an ideal technique for student projects and student-driven learning. I present here the various podcasting/vodcasting projects my students and I have undertaken over the last few years.

  6. Physical activity in the elderly who underwent joint replacement surgery in the course of rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Przepióra, Wiktor; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    According to the forecasts of the Central Statistical Office of Poland, in 2030 people at the age of 65 and older will account for 23.8%, i.e. their number will amount to approx. 8.5 m people. Geriatric rheumatic patients more often decide to undergo surgical joint replacement. According to the National Health Fund, the number of joint replacement services provided in 2014 increased by 93%, as compared to 2005. Improving the physical performance of this constantly expanding group of patients requires taking into account many factors to raise their functional status, reduce the risk of falling, teach rules of proper functioning with an artificial joint and encourage unassisted physical activity. Restoring fitness and independence is a difficult but necessary task due to an increasing number of seniors with replaced joint. PMID:27504021

  7. Physical activity in the elderly who underwent joint replacement surgery in the course of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Przepióra, Wiktor; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    According to the forecasts of the Central Statistical Office of Poland, in 2030 people at the age of 65 and older will account for 23.8%, i.e. their number will amount to approx. 8.5 m people. Geriatric rheumatic patients more often decide to undergo surgical joint replacement. According to the National Health Fund, the number of joint replacement services provided in 2014 increased by 93%, as compared to 2005. Improving the physical performance of this constantly expanding group of patients requires taking into account many factors to raise their functional status, reduce the risk of falling, teach rules of proper functioning with an artificial joint and encourage unassisted physical activity. Restoring fitness and independence is a difficult but necessary task due to an increasing number of seniors with replaced joint. PMID:27504021

  8. Physical activity in the elderly who underwent joint replacement surgery in the course of rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Komorowski, Arkadiusz; Przepióra, Wiktor; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    According to the forecasts of the Central Statistical Office of Poland, in 2030 people at the age of 65 and older will account for 23.8%, i.e. their number will amount to approx. 8.5 m people. Geriatric rheumatic patients more often decide to undergo surgical joint replacement. According to the National Health Fund, the number of joint replacement services provided in 2014 increased by 93%, as compared to 2005. Improving the physical performance of this constantly expanding group of patients requires taking into account many factors to raise their functional status, reduce the risk of falling, teach rules of proper functioning with an artificial joint and encourage unassisted physical activity. Restoring fitness and independence is a difficult but necessary task due to an increasing number of seniors with replaced joint.

  9. Knowing thermodynamics: A study of students' collective argumentation in an undergraduate physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Nicole Marie

    Educational research methods that rely on characterizing the beginning and end states of the individual learners around some curriculum intervention can determine that some effect has occurred, and may be able to support plausible inferences as to why. However, such methods are inadequate for capturing and understanding the complexity of reasoning processes that take place in talk among students engaged in classroom work. This qualitative study will examine in close detail the classroom talk that occurs among groups of undergraduate physics students working collaboratively on worksheet questions and laboratory exercises with relatively little intervention from their instructor. The topic of the curriculum that the students are working on is thermodynamics, an area of physics that draws on multiple ways of representing phenomena, including mathematical laws, particulate models of matter and fluid models of heat. It is also a topic in which everyday experiences and understandings of phenomena such as heating and cooling bear on and interact with the canonical physics concepts. Hence, the students' talk as they attempt to collectively answer questions in these classes involves a complex mix of resources, both canonical and everyday, and provides a rich basis for examining how a group of beginning physics students reason with these resources, and how (or if) that reasoning transforms over several weeks of instruction. The focus of my analysis is on how socially shared knowledge is formed and transformed in the cycles of argumentation and consensus that occur as the students negotiate acceptable (to them) answers to the worksheet and laboratory questions. Argumentation analysis provides a way of examining how students use various resources such as equations, models, authoritative texts and everyday experiences and elucidates what counts as meaningful and convincing to the students.

  10. Examining gender differences on FCI performance in algebra and calculus based physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzer, Kimberley; Boudreaux, Andrew

    2009-05-01

    The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) has been widely used to asses student understanding of Newtonian principles. Studies have shown a marked difference in the performance of men and women on both pre- and post-tests [1,2] and also indicate that experiential based instruction may lead to a reduction in this gender gap [1,3]. This poster presents FCI data collected at Western Washington University. Initial analysis of gender differences are consistent with those reported nationally. We also discuss factors that may contribute to the differences in performance and propose instructional strategies that are designed to address the gender gap. [4pt] [1] M. Lorenzo, et. al., ``Reducing the gender gap in the physics classroom,'' AJP 74(2), 118-122 (2006) [0pt] [2] J. Docktor and K. Heller, ``Gender Differences in Both Force Concept Inventory and Introductory Physics Performance,'' Proceedings at the 2008 PERC [0pt] [3] S. Pollack, et. al., ``Reducing the gender gap in the physics classroom: How sufficient is interactive engagement?'' PRST-PER 3 (2007)

  11. Engaging Students: An Examination of the Effects of Teaching Strategies on Self-Efficacy and Course Climate in a Nonmajors Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fencl, Heidi; Scheel, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Given the success of self-efficacy theory for predicting student success in scientific study, and the demonstrated effect that teaching approaches have on student self-efficacy in majors courses, the purpose of this study is to ask if similar relationships between pedagogy and self-efficacy exist in introductory science courses for non-physical…

  12. Evaluating a Contextual-Based Course on Data Analysis for the Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukliansky, Ida; Eshach, Haim

    2013-06-01

    The interpretation of data and construction and understanding of graphs are central practices in science; therefore, an important skill needed in the undergraduate physics laboratory is the ability to analyze data obtained from experiments. Often students are not able to reach logical deductions based on data, acquired from the experiments that they conducted, because they lack appropriate analysis skills. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a short teaching unit developed for this purpose, among undergraduate students. Learning in context approach was implemented in building the unit. Also, both procedural and conceptual knowledge were given emphasis. The "data analysis" questionnaire was used to compare the results between the experimental group and control group. The findings indicate that students who participated in the teaching unit arrived at significantly better results in the data analysis questionnaire as compared to students in the control group. This study may contribute to those who wish to design a contextual-based learning environment for physics laboratory data analysis.

  13. Multi-level Discourse Analysis in a Physics Teaching Methods Course from the Psychological Perspective of Activity Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumond Vieira, Rodrigo; Kelly, Gregory J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present and apply a multi-level method for discourse analysis in science classrooms. This method is based on the structure of human activity (activity, actions, and operations) and it was applied to study a pre-service physics teacher methods course. We argue that such an approach, based on a cultural psychological perspective, affords opportunities for analysts to perform a theoretically based detailed analysis of discourse events. Along with the presentation of analysis, we show and discuss how the articulation of different levels offers interpretative criteria for analyzing instructional conversations. We synthesize the results into a model for a teacher's practice and discuss the implications and possibilities of this approach for the field of discourse analysis in science classrooms. Finally, we reflect on how the development of teachers' understanding of their activity structures can contribute to forms of progressive discourse of science education.

  14. Mothers' marital history and the physical and mental health of young adults: an investigation over the early life course.

    PubMed

    Wickrama, Kandauda K A S; Lee, Tae Kyoung; O'Neal, Catherine Walker

    2013-12-01

    Using survey data from 12,424 adolescents and their mothers over 13 years in the nationally representative National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the purpose of this study was to examine a life course model exploring the pathways linking mothers' marital history (identified as latent classes) and young adult health outcomes. During young adulthood (Wave 4), respondents ranged in age from 19 to 32. The results demonstrated unique long-term influences of stressful marital history typologies of mothers (prior to 1995) on the physical and mental health of young adults (2008) with reference to consistently married mothers after controlling for health status in 2001. These influences operated through family processes (economic pressure and parental rejection) and adolescent psychosocial adjustment (self-esteem, academic performance, and delinquent behavior). Our findings show that vulnerable groups of youth, in terms of mothers' marital history, can be identified early for appropriate intervention efforts. PMID:24215951

  15. Mothers' marital history and the physical and mental health of young adults: an investigation over the early life course.

    PubMed

    Wickrama, Kandauda K A S; Lee, Tae Kyoung; O'Neal, Catherine Walker

    2013-12-01

    Using survey data from 12,424 adolescents and their mothers over 13 years in the nationally representative National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the purpose of this study was to examine a life course model exploring the pathways linking mothers' marital history (identified as latent classes) and young adult health outcomes. During young adulthood (Wave 4), respondents ranged in age from 19 to 32. The results demonstrated unique long-term influences of stressful marital history typologies of mothers (prior to 1995) on the physical and mental health of young adults (2008) with reference to consistently married mothers after controlling for health status in 2001. These influences operated through family processes (economic pressure and parental rejection) and adolescent psychosocial adjustment (self-esteem, academic performance, and delinquent behavior). Our findings show that vulnerable groups of youth, in terms of mothers' marital history, can be identified early for appropriate intervention efforts.

  16. [Abdominal ultrasound course an introduction to the ultrasound technique. Physical basis. Ultrasound language].

    PubMed

    Segura-Grau, A; Sáez-Fernández, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Díaz-Rodríguez, N

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is a non-invasive, accessible, and versatile diagnostic technique that uses high frequency ultrasound waves to define outline the organs of the human body, with no ionising radiation, in real time and with the capacity to visual several planes. The high diagnostic yield of the technique, together with its ease of uses plus the previously mentioned characteristics, has currently made it a routine method in daily medical practice. It is for this reason that the multidisciplinary character of this technique is being strengthened every day. To be able to perform the technique correctly requires knowledge of the physical basis of ultrasound, the method and the equipment, as well as of the human anatomy, in order to have the maximum information possible to avoid diagnostic errors due to poor interpretation or lack of information.

  17. Investigating Students' Ideas About X-rays While Developing Teaching Materials for a Medical Physics Course

    SciTech Connect

    Kalita, Spartak; Zollman, Dean

    2007-01-30

    The goal of the Modern Miracle Medical Machines project is to promote pre-med students' interest in physics by using the context of contemporary medical imaging. The X-ray medical imaging learning module will be a central part of this effort. To investigate students' transfer of learning in this context we have conducted a series of clinical and teaching interviews. In the latter interview, some of the proposed learning materials were used. The students brought to our discussion pieces of knowledge transferred from very different sources such as their own X-ray experiences, previous learning and the mass media. This transfer seems to result in more or less firm mental models which often are not always internally consistent or coherent.

  18. Assessing gender differences in response system questions for an introductory physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.; O'Shea, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we investigate whether gender differences are present in the iClicker student response system during introductory physics lectures in an engaged environment. We find that men and women are equally likely to respond to questions correctly and in the same amount of time. We also find that both genders make use of multiple responses in the same timescale, however, the average number of responses for a given question is significantly higher for men than women. Upon analyzing these responses, we also find men are slightly more likely than women to change their response, while the response base station is open. Both genders benefit from peer instruction by answering more quickly and correctly. The connection between previously documented timescale differences, differences in ungraded responses, and their implications for the classroom environment are discussed.

  19. Multifaceted graphics for learning: A case study on explaining projectile motion in a university physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tingyi S.

    Multifaceted graphics is defined as a visual representation that explains subjects, procedures, and events through multi-sided or compound layers and that explains concepts, the relationships among them, and their function as a unified whole. I generated the data of this study from my examination of users' responses to (1) material from a currently used physics textbook, (2) my revision of the currently used material, and (3) my revision of the revision. The topic of each of the three materials was projectile motion, and I approached the redesigned materials from an information-design perspective. In this study, I employed participatory research and user-experience research to analyze the data collected from college students, professionals in physics, and practice designers, and to determine how traditional design and contemporary multifaceted graphics affected users' perspectives, reading patterns, and perceived understanding. This study shows that multifaceted graphics affect how users interact with visual materials, thereby shaping human cognition. Three user groups shares similar response patterns and there are differences among the groups. Users believe that the fusion of graphics elements and textual elements-multifaceted graphics-resulted in material that (1) was interesting to read; (2) explained complex concepts; (3) was different from that in a standard textbook format; (4) reinforced real-life connections; and (5) was sufficiently flexible to allow for various reading patterns. The application of multifaceted graphics to instructional material focuses on human-centered information design that enables both users to understand complex concepts and anyone who is interested in designing instructional materials to do so with rigor. The application is a significant move toward the interweaving of technology, science, aesthetics, and the humanities in the design and the production of learning materials.

  20. How are learning physics and student beliefs about learning physics connected? Measuring epistemological self-reflection in an introductory course and investigating its relationship to conceptual learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, David B.

    2002-11-01

    To explore students' epistemological beliefs in a variety of conceptual domains in physics, and in a specific and novel context of measurement, this Dissertation makes use of Weekly Reports, a class assignment in which students reflect in writing on what they learn each week and how they learn it. Reports were assigned to students in the introductory physics course for honors engineering majors at The Ohio State University in two successive years. The Weekly Reports of several students from the first year were analyzed for the kinds of epistemological beliefs exhibited therein, called epistemological self-reflection, and a coding scheme was developed for categorizing and quantifying this reflection. The connection between epistemological self-reflection and conceptual learning in physics seen in a pilot study was replicated in a larger study, in which the coded reflections from the Weekly Reports of thirty students were correlated with their conceptual learning gains. Although the total amount of epistemological self-reflection was not found to be related to conceptual gain, different kinds of epistemological self-reflection were. Describing learning physics concepts in terms of logical reasoning and making personal connections were positively correlated with gains; describing learning from authority figures or by observing phenomena without making inferences were negatively correlated. Linear regression equations were determined in order to quantify the effects on conceptual gain of specific ways of describing learning. In an experimental test of this model, the regression equations and the Weekly Report coding scheme developed from the first year's data were used to predict the conceptual gains of thirty students from the second year. The prediction was unsuccessful, possibly because these students were not given as much feedback on their reflections as were the first-year students. These results show that epistemological beliefs are important factors affecting

  1. Information Resources in High-Energy Physics: Surveying the Present Landscape and Charting the Future Course

    SciTech Connect

    Gentil-Beccot, Anne; Mele, Salvatore; Holtkamp, Annette; O'Connell, Heath B.; Brooks, Travis C.

    2008-04-22

    Access to previous results is of paramount importance in the scientific process. Recent progress in information management focuses on building e-infrastructures for the optimization of the research workflow, through both policy-driven and user-pulled dynamics. For decades, High-Energy Physics (HEP) has pioneered innovative solutions in the field of information management and dissemination. In light of a transforming information environment, it is important to assess the current usage of information resources by researchers and HEP provides a unique test-bed for this assessment. A survey of about 10% of practitioners in the field reveals usage trends and information needs. Community-based services, such as the pioneering arXiv and SPIRES systems, largely answer the need of the scientists, with a limited but increasing fraction of younger users relying on Google. Commercial services offered by publishers or database vendors are essentially unused in the field. The survey offers an insight into the most important features that users require to optimize their research workflow. These results inform the future evolution of information management in HEP and, as these researchers are traditionally 'early adopters' of innovation in scholarly communication, can inspire developments of disciplinary repositories serving other communities.

  2. [Impact of chemical and physical environmental factors on the course and outcome of pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Slama, R; Cordier, S

    2013-09-01

    We review the epidemiological literature on the possible impact of chemical and physical factors on pregnancy outcome. Effects of in-utero exposures on child health are not considered here. The highest levels of evidence concern the effects of passive smoking (on fetal growth), of lead (pregnancy-induced hypertension, fetal growth), of some Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB; on fetal growth) and, to a lesser extent, of atmospheric pollutants (on fetal growth and preterm delivery). For the other compounds, in particular non-persistent chemicals, the literature, which is generally based on poor exposure assessment, is less informative. In conclusion, the last decades have witnessed the development of mother-child cohorts in which exposure biomarkers have been assayed, allowing a large number of publications. For some persistent compounds, for which efficient exposure assessment approaches have been used, the literature indicates a likely impact on pregnancy outcomes. With the exception of air pollutants, the literature on non-persistent compounds is little conclusive; the assay of exposure biomarkers in repeated biological samples collected at relevant time points could help further increase knowledge regarding any health impact.

  3. Measurement of the magnetic field of small magnets with a smartphone: a very economical laboratory practice for introductory physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, Enrique; Escobar, Isabel; Suarez, Carmen P.; Najera, Alberto; Beléndez, Augusto

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we propose an inexpensive laboratory practice for an introductory physics course laboratory for any grade of science and engineering study. This practice was very well received by our students, where a smartphone (iOS, Android, or Windows) is used together with mini magnets (similar to those used on refrigerator doors), a 20 cm long school rule, a paper, and a free application (app) that needs to be downloaded and installed that measures magnetic fields using the smartphone’s magnetic field sensor or magnetometer. The apps we have used are: Magnetometer (iOS), Magnetometer Metal Detector, and Physics Toolbox Magnetometer (Android). Nothing else is needed. Cost of this practice: free. The main purpose of the practice is that students determine the dependence of the component x of the magnetic field produced by different magnets (including ring magnets and sphere magnets). We obtained that the dependency of the magnetic field with the distance is of the form x-3, in total agreement with the theoretical analysis. The secondary objective is to apply the technique of least squares fit to obtain this exponent and the magnetic moment of the magnets, with the corresponding absolute error.

  4. The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S. M.; Watson, L. E.; Hooper, E.; Huesmann, A.; Schenker, B.; Timbie, P.; Rzchowski, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides academic support and small-group supplemental instruction to students studying introductory algebra-based and calculus-based physics. These classes are gateway courses for majors in the biological and physical sciences, pre-health fields, engineering, and secondary science education. The Physics Learning Center offers supplemental instruction groups twice weekly where students can discuss concepts and practice with problem-solving techniques. The Center also provides students with access on-line resources that stress conceptual understanding, and to exam review sessions. Participants in our program include returning adults, people from historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, students from families in lower-income circumstances, students in the first generation of their family to attend college, transfer students, veterans, and people with disabilities, all of whom might feel isolated in their large introductory course and thus have a more difficult time finding study partners. We also work with students potentially at-risk for having academic difficulty (due to factors academic probation, weak math background, low first exam score, or no high school physics). A second mission of the Physics Learning Center is to provide teacher training and leadership experience for undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors. These Peer Tutors lead the majority of the weekly group sessions in close supervision by PLC staff members. We will describe our work to support students in the Physics Learning Center, including our teacher-training program for our undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors

  5. Overcoming students' misconceptions concerning thermal physics with the aid of hints and peer interaction during a lecture course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, Risto; Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2013-12-01

    As has been shown by previous research, students may possess various misconceptions in the area of thermal physics. In order to help them overcome misconceptions observed prior to instruction, we implemented a one-hour lecture-based intervention in their introductory thermal physics course. The intervention was held after the conventional lectures and homework sessions, and it consisted of three phases: individual working, hinting, and peer discussion. To probe students’ conceptual understanding before, during, and after the intervention, use was made of a diagnostic test related to the multiphased process of an ideal gas [D. E. Meltzer, Am. J. Phys. 72, 1432 (2004)AJPIAS0002-950510.1119/1.1789161]. The students’ conceptions were monitored by analyzing the explanations they provided and by recording the peer discussions of five voluntary pairs. The intervention helped students to realize the flaws in their explanations and increased the proportion of their scientific explanations, the increase being statistically significant in five tasks out of seven. When the same themes were addressed in a post-test, it was shown that the level of accurate explanations remained almost constant after the intervention, and hence it could be deduced that the impact had not been short-lived. In comparison with earlier studies conducted with the same material, our intervention produced a better learning outcome, the difference being 15-20 percentage points. In addition, the number of misconceptions on the part of the students was smaller in our study, although with individual exceptions. Hence, we conclude that the intervention was successful and that similar interventions could also be designed and implemented in other areas of physics.

  6. Implementation of Inquiry-Based Tutorials in AN Introductory Physics Course: the Role of the Graduate Teaching Assistant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoresen, Carol Wiggins

    1994-01-01

    This study determined if the training provided physics teaching assistants was sufficient to accomplish the objectives of inquiry-based tutorials for an introductory physics course. Qualitative research methods were used: (1) to determine if the Physics by Inquiry method was modeled; (2) to describe the process from the teaching assistant perspective; (3) to determine TA opinions on training methods; (4) to develop a frame of reference to better understand the role of TA's as instructional support staff. The study determined that the teaching assistants verbalized appropriate instructional actions, but were observed to use a predominantly didactic teaching style. TA's held a variety of perceptions and beliefs about inquiry -based learning and how science is learned. They felt comfortable in the role of tutorial instructor. They were satisfied with the training methods provided and had few suggestions to change or improve training for future tutorial instructors. A concurrent theme of teacher action dependent on teacher beliefs was sustained throughout the study. The TA's actions, as tutorial instructors, reflected their educational beliefs, student background and learning experiences. TA's performance as tutorial instructors depended on what they think and believe about learning science. Practical implications exist for training teaching assistants to be tutorial instructors. Some recommendations may be appropriate for TA's required to use instructional methods that they have not experienced as students. Interview prospective teaching assistants to determine educational experience and beliefs. Employ inexperienced teaching assistants whose perspectives match the proposed instructional role and who might be more receptive to modeling. Incorporate training into staff meetings. Provide time for TA's to experience the instructional model with simulation or role play as students and as instructors, accompanied by conference discussion. Use strategies known to enhance

  7. Performance of Physical Examination Skills in Medical Students during Diagnostic Medicine Course in a University Hospital of Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Na; Han, Qunying; He, Shuixiang; Bae, Ricard S.; Liu, Zhengwen; Lv, Yi; Shi, Bingyin

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of physical examination (PE) skills during our diagnostic medicine course and analyze the characteristics of the data collected to provide information for practical guidance to improve the quality of teaching. Seventy-two fourth-year medical students were enrolled in the study. All received an assessment of PE skills after receiving a 17-week formal training course and systematic teaching. Their performance was evaluated and recorded in detail using a checklist, which included 5 aspects of PE skills: examination techniques, communication and care skills, content items, appropriateness of examination sequence, and time taken. Error frequency and type were designated as the assessment parameters in the survey. The results showed that the distribution and the percentage in examination errors between male and female students and among the different body parts examined were significantly different (p<0.001). The average error frequency per student in females (0.875) was lower than in males (1.375) although the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.167). The average error frequency per student in cardiac (1.267) and pulmonary (1.389) examinations was higher than in abdominal (0.867) and head, neck and nervous system examinations (0.917). Female students had a lower average error frequency than males in cardiac examinations (p = 0.041). Additionally, error in examination techniques was the highest type of error among the 5 aspects of PE skills irrespective of participant gender and assessment content (p<0.001). These data suggest that PE skills in cardiac and pulmonary examinations and examination techniques may be included in the main focus of improving the teaching of diagnostics in these medical students. PMID:25329685

  8. Performance of physical examination skills in medical students during diagnostic medicine course in a University Hospital of Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Na; Han, Qunying; He, Shuixiang; Bae, Ricard S; Liu, Zhengwen; Lv, Yi; Shi, Bingyin

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of physical examination (PE) skills during our diagnostic medicine course and analyze the characteristics of the data collected to provide information for practical guidance to improve the quality of teaching. Seventy-two fourth-year medical students were enrolled in the study. All received an assessment of PE skills after receiving a 17-week formal training course and systematic teaching. Their performance was evaluated and recorded in detail using a checklist, which included 5 aspects of PE skills: examination techniques, communication and care skills, content items, appropriateness of examination sequence, and time taken. Error frequency and type were designated as the assessment parameters in the survey. The results showed that the distribution and the percentage in examination errors between male and female students and among the different body parts examined were significantly different (p<0.001). The average error frequency per student in females (0.875) was lower than in males (1.375) although the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.167). The average error frequency per student in cardiac (1.267) and pulmonary (1.389) examinations was higher than in abdominal (0.867) and head, neck and nervous system examinations (0.917). Female students had a lower average error frequency than males in cardiac examinations (p = 0.041). Additionally, error in examination techniques was the highest type of error among the 5 aspects of PE skills irrespective of participant gender and assessment content (p<0.001). These data suggest that PE skills in cardiac and pulmonary examinations and examination techniques may be included in the main focus of improving the teaching of diagnostics in these medical students.

  9. Conceptual physics differences by pedagogy and gender: Questioning the deficit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majors, Twanelle Deann Walker

    The differences in physics performance between males and females have been studied extensively (Blue & Heller, 2003; Coletta, 2015; Madsen, McKagan, & Sayre 2013; McCullough, 2002, 2004, 2011; Pollock, Finkelstein, & Kost, 2007; Zohar & Sela, 2003). The purpose of this study was to look at the ways teaching methods and assessment choices have fabricated a gender gap. Deficit ways of thinking have further marginalized women by renegotiating prior acts of power that initiated and perpetuated marginalization. Outside of the deficit model, the blame for the underperformance of females has been attributed to discourses of power as well as less-than-critical ways of evaluating learning and schooling. Students in introductory algebra-based physics courses from 2008-2014 at Tennessee Technological University were self-enrolled in PHYS2010 sections that were taught using either a traditional or constructivist, interactive-engagement Learner-centered Environment for Algebra-based Physics (LEAP) pedagogy. Propensity scoring on all feasible and relevant independent variables was used to adjust for the probability of students choosing either LEAP or traditional sections. The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) and Gender Force Concept Inventory (GFCI) were used as the measures to gauge students' performance on physics concepts. The results showed that there were no differences in the FCI or GFCI performance of males and females. Results also showed that when accounting for pretest performance and the likelihood of choosing a LEAP section, LEAP pedagogy accounted for roughly 30% of performance differences. Not only was this true on the average, it was true for both genders. This meant that the main effect of LEAP pedagogy was even stronger and more generalizable. Gender did not moderate pedagogy, indicating that a pedagogy gap focus was more appropriate for evaluating physics learners.

  10. Web-Based vs. Paper-Based Homework to Evaluate Students' Performance in Introductory Physics Courses and Students' Perceptions: Two Years Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirci, Neset

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to assess and compare undergraduate students' homework performance using a web-based testing system with paper-based, hand-graded one in introductory physics courses. Students' perceptions about each method were then investigated. Every semester during the two-year period, one of the two identical sections of…

  11. The Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning in the Web-Based Environment for the Delivery of an Undergraduate Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atan, Hanafi; Sulaiman, Fauziah; Idrus, Rozhan M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the investigation of the effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) within a web-based environment in the delivery of an undergraduate Physics course. The effectiveness was evaluated by comparing the performances and the perceptions of the sample students (n=67) using the web-based PBL and comparing the outcomes with those of…

  12. Production of Closed-Circuit Television Programs for Improving Instruction in Professional Health and Physical Education Courses at the Undergraduate Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Joe M.; Griffey, Bert

    To study the adaptability of semi-portable closed-circuit television equipment on remote location, six videotape programs were produced at Midwestern University for use in physical education courses. The programs dealt with "Knee Injuries,""Rehabilitation of Knee Injuries,""Teaching Tumbling by Progression,""The Mini-Tramp,""Introduction to…

  13. Exercise Motivation of College Students in Online, Face-to-Face, and Blended Basic Studies Physical Activity and Wellness Course Delivery Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidman, Cara Lynn; Fiala, Kelly Ann; D'Abundo, Michelle Lee

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess exercise motivation among college students self-selected into 4 online (OL) and face-to-face (F2F) basic studies' physical activity and wellness course delivery formats. Participants/Methods: Out of 1,037 enrolled students during the Spring 2009 semester, 602 responded online to demographic…

  14. Potential Teachers' Appropriate and Inappropriate Application of Pedagogical Resources in a Model-Based Physics Course: A "Knowledge in Pieces" Perspective on Teacher Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Danielle B.; Bianchini, Julie A.; Swanson, Lauren H.; Dwyer, Hilary A.

    2013-01-01

    We used a "knowledge in pieces" perspective on teacher learning to document undergraduates' pedagogical resources in a model-based physics course for potential teachers. We defined pedagogical resources as small, discrete ideas about teaching science that are applied appropriately or inappropriately in specific contexts. Neither…

  15. The Determinants of Female Junior High School Students' Intentions to Enroll in Elective Physical Science Courses in High School: Testing the Applicability of the Theory of Reasoned Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Identifies the determinants of female junior high school students' intentions to enroll in elective physical science courses in high school using the theory of the Reasoned Action model. Finds that the intentions were a function of both attitude toward performing the behavior and subjective norms. (Author/YP)

  16. Free Radical Addition Polymerization Kinetics without Steady-State Approximations: A Numerical Analysis for the Polymer, Physical, or Advanced Organic Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Brown, Amber; Landis, Amanda; Schimke, Greg; Peters, George

    2014-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the free radical addition polymerization system is described that provides those teaching polymer, physical, or advanced organic chemistry courses the opportunity to introduce students to numerical methods in the context of a simple but mathematically stiff chemical kinetic system. Numerical analysis can lead students to an…

  17. Naïve Students' Conceptual Development and Beliefs: The Need for Multiple Analyses to Determine what Contributes to Student Success in a University Introductory Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hye-Eun; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    This research involved naïve physics learners who were interested in majoring in science or engineering. In a semester-long quasi-experimental study, open-ended pretests and weekly interviews were used to analyse the progressive development of students’ conceptions relating to sound and wave motion. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted to elucidate: (1) how their conceptions developed from everyday conceptions to unclear scientific conceptions to scientific conceptions, and (2) their beliefs of physics knowledge. Despite efforts to enable these students to learn physics, the findings showed that only two out of ten students developed acceptable physics conceptions during the course that would enable them to pursue the subject to a higher level. Also, students’ conceptual development was found to be related to their cognitive understanding and to epistemological beliefs of physics. Therefore, to facilitate naïve physics learners’ success in a general physics course, in addition to the acquisition of content knowledge, explicit emphasis needs to be placed on the nature of physics knowledge.

  18. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics.more » In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.« less

  19. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics. In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.

  20. 38 CFR 21.7622 - Courses precluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... are: (i) Any photography course or entertainment course; or (ii) Any music course, instrumental or... courses, except courses of applied music, physical education, or public speaking which are offered...

  1. 38 CFR 21.7622 - Courses precluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... are: (i) Any photography course or entertainment course; or (ii) Any music course, instrumental or... courses, except courses of applied music, physical education, or public speaking which are offered...

  2. 38 CFR 21.7622 - Courses precluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... are: (i) Any photography course or entertainment course; or (ii) Any music course, instrumental or... courses, except courses of applied music, physical education, or public speaking which are offered...

  3. Influences of Learning Environment Characteristics on Student Learning During Authentic Science Inquiry in an Introductory Physical Geology Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, H. R.; Sell, K. S.; Herbert, B. E.

    2004-12-01

    Shifts in learning goals in introductory earth science courses to greater emphasis on critical thinking and the nature of science has led to the adoption of new pedagogical techniques, including inquiry-based learning (IBL). IBL is thought to support understanding of the nature of science and foster development of scientific reasoning and critical thinking skills by modeling authentic science inquiry. Implementation of new pedagogical techniques do not occur without influence, instruction and learning occurs in a complex learning environment, referring to the social, physical, mental, and pedagogical contexts. This study characterized the impact of an IBL module verses a traditionally structured laboratory exercise in an introductory physical geology class at Texas A&M University. Student activities in this study included manipulation of large-scale data sets, use of multiple representations, and exposure to ill-constrained problems common to the Texas Gulf Coast system. Formative assessment data collected included an initial survey of self efficacy, student demographics, content knowledge and a pre-mental model expression. Summative data collected included a post-test, post-mental model expression, final laboratory report, and a post-survey on student attitudes toward the module. Mental model expressions and final reports were scored according to a validated rubric instrument (Cronbrach alpha: 0.84-0.98). Nine lab sections were randomized into experimental and control groups. Experimental groups were taught using IBL pedagogical techniques, while the control groups were taught using traditional laboratory "workbook" techniques. Preliminary assessment based on rubric scores for pre-tests using Student's t-test (N ˜ 140) indicated that the experimental and control groups were not significantly different (ρ > 0.05), therefore, the learning environment likely impacted student's ability to succeed. A non-supportive learning environment, including student attitudes

  4. Examination of a Physical Education Personal Health Science Course: Face-to-Face Classroom Compared to Online Hybrid Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frimming, Renee Elizabeth; Bower, Glenna G.; Choi, Chulhwan

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have compared traditional face-to-face courses to online or distance education courses. The purpose of this study was to examine academic performance, perceptions, and experiences of participants enrolled in different academic learning environments. Pre and Post Content Knowledge Tests and a student evaluation were used to measure…

  5. The effect of mass screening by physical examination combined with regular breast self-examination on clinical stage and course of Japanese women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Koibuchi, Y; Iino, Y; Takei, H; Maemura, M; Horiguchi, J; Yokoe, T; Morishita, Y

    1998-01-01

    A mass screening program for breast cancer in Japan consists of physical examination (PE) and education on regular breast self-examination (BSE). The effect of PE with BSE on clinical stages and courses of breast cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical stages and courses were compared between; i) patients who were examined in outpatient clinics (OPC, n=587), ii) patients who were detected by mass screening with regular BSE [BSE(+), n=68], and iii) without BSE [BSE(-), n=178]. Clinical stage in BSE(+) was significantly earlier than that in BSE(-) or OPC. As early stage cancer was most common in BSE(+), conservative surgery was mostly selected. Survival curve in BSE(+) was significantly better than those in BSE(-) or OPC. BSE complements the role of mass screening by PE for early detection and a more favorable clinical course.

  6. Nearly 1.4 Million High School Physics Students--Enrollments in AP and Second-Year Courses up 26% Even though Number of Graduates down in 2012-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2014-01-01

    Since 1987, the Statistical Research Center at the American Institute of Physics has regularly conducted a nationwide survey of high school physics teachers to take a closer look at physics in U.S. high schools. We contact all of the teachers who teach at least one physics course at a nationally representative sample of all U.S. high schools-both…

  7. A New Approach to Analyzing the Cognitive Load in Physics Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Raluca

    2010-02-01

    I will present a Taxonomy of Introductory Physics Problems (TIPP), which relates physics problems to the cognitive processes and the knowledge required to solve them. TIPP was created for designing and clarifying educational objectives, for developing assessments to evaluate components of the problem-solving process, and for guiding curriculum design in introductory physics courses. To construct TIPP, I considered processes that have been identified either by cognitive science and expert-novice research or by direct observation of students' behavior while solving physics problems. Based on Marzano and Kendall's taxonomy [1], I developed a procedure to classify physics problems according to the cognitive processes that they involve and the knowledge to which they refer. The procedure is applicable to any physics problem and its validity and reliability have been confirmed. This algorithm was then used to build TIPP, which is a database that contains text-based and research-based physics problems and explains their relationship to cognitive processes and knowledge. TIPP has been used in the years 2006--2009 to reform the first semester of the introductory algebra-based physics course at The George Washington University. The reform targeted students' cognitive development and attitudes improvement. The methodology employed in the course involves exposing students to certain types of problems in a variety of contexts with increasing complexity. To assess the effectiveness of our approach, rubrics were created to evaluate students' problem-solving abilities and the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) was administered pre- and post-instruction to determine students' shift in dispositions towards learning physics. Our results show definitive gains in the areas targeted by our curricular reform.[4pt] [1] R.J. Marzano and J.S. Kendall, The New Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, 2^nd Ed., (Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, 2007). )

  8. The Development of a Personalized-System-of-Instruction Introductory Physics Course for Life-Science Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, E. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the development and operation of a college biophysics course as well as the educational materials used, the structure of the modules and the performance of the students. Also discusses the economics of such a flexible system of instruction. (GA)

  9. ACTN3 Genotype, Athletic Status, and Life Course Physical Capability: Meta-Analysis of the Published Literature and Findings from Nine Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alfred, Tamuno; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Cooper, Rachel; Hardy, Rebecca; Cooper, Cyrus; Deary, Ian J; Gunnell, David; Harris, Sarah E; Kumari, Meena; Martin, Richard M; Moran, Colin N; Pitsiladis, Yannis P; Ring, Susan M; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Smith, George Davey; Starr, John M; Kuh, Diana; Day, Ian NM

    2011-01-01

    The ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) genotype has been associated with athletic status and muscle phenotypes, although not consistently. Our objective was to conduct a meta-analysis of the published literature on athletic status and investigate its associations with physical capability in several new population-based studies. Relevant data were extracted from studies in the literature, comparing genotype frequencies between controls and sprint/power and endurance athletes. For life course physical capability, data were used from two studies of adolescents and seven studies in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research program, involving individuals aged between 53 and 90+ years. We found evidence from the published literature to support the hypothesis that in Europeans the RR genotype is more common among sprint/power athletes compared with their controls. There is currently no evidence that the X allele is advantageous to endurance athleticism. We found no association between R577X and grip strength (P = 0.09, n = 7,672 in males; P = 0.90, n = 7,839 in females), standing balance, timed get up and go, or chair rises in our studies of physical capability. The ACTN3 R577X genotype is associated with sprint/power athletic status in Europeans, but does not appear to be associated with objective measures of physical capability in the general population. Hum Mutat 32:1–11, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21542061

  10. Nearly 1.4 Million High School Physics Students - Enrollments in AP and second-year courses up 26% even though number of graduates down in 2012-13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2014-05-01

    Since 1987, the Statistical Research Center at the American Institute of Physics has regularly conducted a nationwide survey of high school physics teachers to take a closer look at physics in U.S. high schools. We contact all of the teachers who teach at least one physics course at a nationally representative sample of all U.S. high schools—both public and private schools. Our most recent survey was conducted during the 2012-13 school year. While our questionnaire covers a number of areas of interest, in this article we examine the number of students enrolled in high school physics courses and the types of courses offered. We also take a closer look at the prior physics experience of students enrolled in Advanced Placement (AP) Physics classes.

  11. Cognitive development in introductory physics: A research-based approach to curriculum reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Raluca Elena

    This project describes the research on a classification of physics problems in the context of introductory physics courses. This classification, called the Taxonomy of Introductory Physics Problems (TIPP), relates physics problems to the cognitive processes required to solve them. TIPP was created for designing and clarifying educational objectives, for developing assessments that can evaluate individual component processes of the problem-solving process, and for guiding curriculum design in introductory physics courses, specifically within the context of a "thinking-skills" curriculum. TIPP relies on the following resources: (1) cognitive research findings adopted by physics education research, (2) expert-novice research discoveries acknowledged by physics education research, (3) an educational psychology taxonomy for educational objectives, and (4) various collections of physics problems created by physics education researchers or developed by textbook authors. TIPP was used in the years 2006--2008 to reform the first semester of the introductory algebra-based physics course (called Phys 11) at The George Washington University. The reform sought to transform our curriculum into a "thinking-skills" curriculum that trades "breadth for depth" by focusing on fewer topics while targeting the students' cognitive development. We employed existing research on the physics problem-solving expert-novice behavior, cognitive science and behavioral science findings, and educational psychology recommendations. Our pedagogy relies on didactic constructs such as the GW-ACCESS problem-solving protocol, learning progressions and concept maps that we have developed and implemented in our introductory physics course. These tools were designed based on TIPP. Their purpose is: (1) to help students build local and global coherent knowledge structures, (2) to develop more context-independent problem-solving abilities, (3) to gain confidence in problem solving, and (4) to establish

  12. Open-Ended Laboratory Investigations in a High School Physics Course: The Difficulties and Rewards of Implementing Inquiry-Based Learning in a Physics Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szott, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Traditional physics labs at the high school level are often closed-ended. The outcomes are known in advance and students replicate procedures recommended by the teacher. Over the years, I have come to appreciate the great opportunities created by allowing students investigative freedom in physics laboratories. I have realized that a laboratory…

  13. The Use of a Web-Based Classroom Interaction System in Introductory Physics Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corpuz, Edgar D.; Corpuz, Ma. Aileen A.; Rosalez, Rolando

    2010-10-01

    A web-based interaction system was used in algebra-based and calculus-based physics classes to enhance students' classroom interaction. The interactive teaching approach primarily incorporated elements of Mazur's Peer Instruction and Interactive Lecture Demonstration. In our implementation, students used personal digital assistants (PDAs) to interact with their instructor during lecture and classroom demonstration. In this paper, we document the perceptions and attitudes of algebra-based and calculus-based physics students towards the interactive teaching approach and likewise present data on how this approach affected students' performance on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI).

  14. A Study on the Necessity of Introducing Teaching-Plan-Telling into Physical Education Undergraduates' Courses in Normal Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Guodong

    2011-01-01

    The cultivation target of physical education major in normal universities is mainly physical teachers' qualification in basic education. Training of teaching-plan-telling on students of sports teaching major in normal universities has significant meaning to enhance the quality of students in a comprehensive way, realize the target of professional…

  15. Use of Individual Feedback during Human Gross Anatomy Course for Enhancing Professional Behaviors in Doctor of Physical Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youdas, James W.; Krause, David A.; Hellyer, Nathan J.; Rindflesch, Aaron B.; Hollman, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Medical professionals and public consumers expect that new physical therapy graduates possess cognitive, technical, and behavioral skills required to provide safe and high-quality care to patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if a repertoire of ten professional behaviors assessed at the beginning of doctorate of physical therapy…

  16. ``The Boundaries of Nature: Special and general relativity and quantum mechanics, a second course in physics:'' Edwin F. Taylor's acceptance speech for the 1998 Oersted Medal presented by the American Association of Physics Teachers, 6 January 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edwin F.

    1998-05-01

    Public hunger for relativity and quantum mechanics is insatiable, and we should use it selectively but shamelessly to attract students, most of whom will not become physics majors, but all of whom can experience "deep physics." Science, engineering, and mathematics students, indeed anyone comfortable with calculus, can now delve deeply into special and general relativity and quantum mechanics. Big chunks of general relativity require only calculus if one starts with the metric describing spacetime around Earth or black hole. Expressions for energy and angular momentum follow, along with orbit predictions for particles and light. Feynman's Sum Over Paths quantum theory simply commands the electron: Explore all paths. Students can model this command with the computer, pointing and clicking to tell the electron which paths to explore; wave functions and bound states arise naturally. A second full-year course in physics covering special relativity, general relativity, and quantum mechanics would have wide appeal—and might also lead to significant advancements in upper-level courses for the physics major.

  17. 20th International Training Course (ITC-20) on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials evaluation report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, Amanda Ann

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this evaluation report is to provide the information necessary to improve the effectiveness of the ITC provided to the International Atomic Energy Agency Member States. This report examines ITC-20 training content, delivery methods, scheduling, and logistics. Ultimately, this report evaluates whether the course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the participants needs in the protection of nuclear materials and facilities.

  18. Assessing and enhancing the introductory science course in physics and biology: Peer instruction, classroom demonstrations, and genetics vocabulary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagen, Adam Paul

    Most introductory college science courses in the United States are taught in large lectures with students rarely having the opportunity to think critically about the material being presented nor to participate actively. Further, many classes focus on teaching rather than learning, that is, the transfer of information as opposed to actual student understanding. This thesis focuses on three studies about the assessment and enhancement of learning in undergraduate science courses. We describe the results of an international survey on the implementation of Peer Instruction (PI), a collaborative learning pedagogy in which lectures are interspersed with short conceptual questions designed to challenge students to think about the material as it is being presented. We present a portrait of the many instructors teaching with PI and the settings in which it is being used as well as data on the effectiveness of PI in enhancing student learning in diverse settings. The wide variety of implementations suggests that PI is a highly adaptable strategy that can work successfully in almost any environment. We also provide recommendations for those considering adopting PI in their classes. Classroom demonstrations are an important aspect of many introductory science courses, but there is little evidence supporting their educational effectiveness. We explore the effect of different modes of presentation on enhancing student learning from demonstrations. Our results show that students who actively engage with a demonstration by predicting the outcome before it is conducted are better able to recall and explain the scenario posed by that demonstration. As preliminary work for the creation of an inventory of conceptual understanding in introductory biology, we discuss results from a survey of vocabulary familiarity and understanding in an undergraduate genetics course. Students begin introductory classes with significant gaps in their understanding, some of which are retained beyond

  19. A collaborative learning approach for service-oriented introductory physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael R.

    1997-03-01

    I have taught algebra-based introductory physics for six years to liberal arts students. It was primarily a service course for students majoring in Athletic Training, Physical Therapy, Geology, Biology, and Pre-Med. The typical student was characterized by having a minimal math and problem-solving proficiency. There also was a pattern of students being predisposed to memorizing facts and formulas, and attempting to solve problems by finding the correct formula and "plugging in" numbers to get an answer. The students seemed to have a minimal ability in deductive reasoning and problem solving, starting from basic principles. It is no wonder that they entered the introductory physics service course with extreme trepidation, based upon a strongly perceived physics phobia. A standard lecture format was used for the class size of approximately 25-30 students; and an attempt was always made to engage the students through the Socratic approach, by asking leading questions during the course of the lecture. The students were relatively unprepared and couldn't participate in the class, and often responded antagonistically. They indicated they didn't want to be asked to think about an issue, but would rather just be told the facts so they could take specific notes for subsequent memorization. It was clear from the results of the open book exams given during the semester that the majority of students could not approach problem solving using deductive reasoning based on basic principles, but relied on attempting to force-fit the problem into a worked example in the text (often out of context, with illogical results). The absentee rate in the classroom was usually around 30-40%. The academic administration of my liberal arts university has the policy of formal course evaluations by the students at the end of each semester. The evaluation questionnaire appears to be primarily a measurement of the stress level of the student during the course, and the evaluation score I received

  20. Reinventing college physics for biologists: Explicating an epistemological curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redish, Edward F.; Hammer, David

    2009-07-01

    The University of Maryland Physics Education Research Group has done a five-year project to rethink, observe, and reform introductory algebra-based (college) physics, which primarily serves life-science majors. We refocused the class on helping the students learn to think scientifically—to build coherence, think in terms of mechanisms, and to follow the implications of assumptions. We designed the course to tap into students' productive conceptual and epistemological resources, based on a theoretical framework from research on learning. The reformed class retains its traditional structure in terms of time and instructional personnel, but we modified existing best-practices curricular materials. We provided class-controlled spaces for student collaboration, which allowed us to observe and record students learning directly. We also scanned all written homework and examinations and administered pre-post conceptual and epistemological surveys. The reformed class enhanced the strong gains on pre-post conceptual tests produced by the best-practices materials while obtaining unprecedented pre-post gains on epistemological surveys instead of the traditional losses.

  1. Surveying Turkish high school and university students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, Nuri; Mason, Andrew J.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-06-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving can impact how well they learn physics and how successful they are in solving physics problems. Prior research in the U.S. using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and astronomy courses and physics experts in terms of their attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving. Here we discuss the validation, administration, and analysis of data for the Turkish version of the AAPS survey for high school and university students in Turkey. After the validation and administration of the Turkish version of the survey, the analysis of the data was conducted by grouping the data by grade level, school type, and gender. While there are no statistically significant differences between the averages of various groups on the survey, overall, the university students in Turkey were more expertlike than vocational high school students. On an item by item basis, there are statistically differences between the averages of the groups on many items. For example, on average, the university students demonstrated less expertlike attitudes about the role of equations and formulas in problem solving, in solving difficult problems, and in knowing when the solution is not correct, whereas they displayed more expertlike attitudes and approaches on items related to metacognition in physics problem solving. A principal component analysis on the data yields item clusters into which the student responses on various survey items can be grouped. A comparison of the responses of the Turkish and American university students enrolled in algebra-based introductory physics courses shows that on more than half of the items, the responses of these two groups were statistically significantly different, with the U.S. students on average responding to the items in a more expertlike manner.

  2. THE PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF URBANIZATION, PHYSICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN COMMUNITY ACTION. KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY SHORT COURSE SERIES IN PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCGRAW, EUGENE T.

    PART OF A KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY SERIES ON COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, THIS MONOGRAPH DESCRIBES AND DEFINES THE NATURE OF URBAN CENTERS AS PHYSICAL ENTITIES. BASIC LAND USE CATEGORIES AND SUBDIVISIONS, FUNCTIONAL CLASSIFICATIONS OF COMMUNITIES IN THE UNITED STATES (MANUFACTURING, RETAIL, WHOLESALE, DIVERSIFIED, TRANSPORTATION, MINING,…

  3. A Study of Motivation and Other Factors as Relating to Course Achievement in Introductory College Biology, Chemistry, and Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pridmore, Brooke M.; Halyard, Rebecca A.

    Results of a preliminary study that examined various factors relating to achievement in introductory level biology, chemistry, and physics classes at a public junior college are presented. Background variables, including age, sex, college major, grade point average, SAT-Verbal and SAT-Quantitative, and the sixteen-part scores of Academic…

  4. Value Orientations of Student Physical Education Teachers Learning to Teach on School-Based Initial Teacher Education Courses in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the socialisation of (student) physical education (PE) teachers, the beliefs and values developed as a result of this socialisation and the impact of these on teachers' learning, behaviours and practices and the curriculum. Many studies looking at the beliefs and values of PE teachers have used the values…

  5. Applicability of the Newtonian gravity concept inventory to introductory college physics classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Kathryn; Prather, Edward E.; Willoughby, Shannon

    2016-06-01

    The study described here extends the applicability of the Newtonian Gravity Concept Inventory (NGCI) to college algebra-based physics classes, beyond the general education astronomy courses for which it was originally developed. The four conceptual domains probed by the NGCI (Directionality, Force Law, Independence of Other Forces, and Threshold) are well suited for investigating students' reasoning about gravity in both populations, making the NGCI a highly versatile instrument. Classical test theory statistical analysis with physics student responses pre-instruction (N = 1,392) and post-instruction (N = 929) from eight colleges and universities across the United States indicate that the NGCI is composed of items with appropriate difficulty and discrimination and is reliable for this population. Also, expert review and student interviews support the NGCI's validity for the physics population. Emergent similarities and differences in how physics students reason about gravity compared to astronomy students are discussed, as well as future directions for analyzing the instrument's item parameters across both populations.

  6. Tracing the time course of emotion perception: the impact of stimulus physics and semantics on gesture processing.

    PubMed

    Flaisch, Tobias; Schupp, Harald T

    2013-10-01

    Numerous event-related brain potential (ERP) studies reveal the differential processing of emotional and neutral stimuli. Yet, it is an ongoing debate to what extent the ERP components found in previous research are sensitive to physical stimulus characteristics or emotional meaning. This study manipulated emotional meaning and stimulus orientation to disentangle the impact of stimulus physics and semantics on emotional stimulus processing. Negative communicative hand gestures of Insult were contrasted with neutral control gestures of Allusion to manipulate emotional meaning. An elementary physical manipulation of visual processing was implemented by presenting these stimuli vertically and horizontally. The results showed dissociable effects of stimulus meaning and orientation on the sequence of ERP components. Effects of orientation were pronounced in the P1 and N170 time frames and attenuated during later stages. Emotional meaning affected the P1, evincing a distinct topography to orientation effects. Although the N170 was not modulated by emotional meaning, the early posterior negativity and late positive potential components replicated previous findings with larger potentials elicited by the Insult gestures. These data suggest that the brain processes different attributes of an emotional picture in parallel and that a coarse semantic appreciation may already occur during relatively early stages of emotion perception.

  7. A conceptual framework for international service-learning course planning: promoting a foundation for ethical practice in the physical therapy and occupational therapy professions.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Jill Black; Pechak, Celia

    2011-01-01

    As physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) educational programs endeavor to foster core values of social responsibility, justice, and altruism in an increasingly global community, the incorporation of local and international service-learning (ISL) into the curriculum is growing. Much of the research has focused on the measurement of student learning, with little written about the impact on the host community. Proponents of global health initiatives are calling for consideration of all stakeholders to ensure ethical practice. This paper explores the current literature related to PT and OT ISL and builds a conceptual framework for ISL course planning. The essential phases in the framework include: 1) pre-experience planning/preparation stage, 2) field immersion experience stage, and 3) postexperience stage. The essential elements are: 1) cultural competency training, 2) communication and coordination with community, 3) comprehensive assessment, and 4) strategic planning. The authors suggest this framework as a practical tool to structure ISL courses with an explicit emphasis on ethical concerns. Additionally, they seek to foster more dialogue and action related to the promotion of ethical practices in ISL in PT and OT education programs. PMID:21695371

  8. The Effect of Assessment Style on Student Epistemologies in Introductory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Mark Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Epistemologies were measured across two separate lecture sections of introductory algebra-based physics at UC Davis. Remarkable differences in epistemologies, as measured by the MPEX II survey were noted with one section's students (section A) showing significantly better gains in almost all epistemological categories than the other (section…

  9. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  10. Astrophysics: An Integrative Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutsche, Graham D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a one semester course in introductory stellar astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level. The course aims to integrate all previously learned physics by applying it to the study of stars. After a brief introductory section on basic astronomical measurements, the main topics covered are stellar atmospheres, stellar structure, and…

  11. Race and Unhealthy Behaviors: Chronic Stress, the HPA Axis, and Physical and Mental Health Disparities Over the Life Course

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Katherine M.; Rafferty, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to determine whether unhealthy behaviors play a stress-buffering role in observed racial disparities in physical and mental health. Methods. We conducted logistic regressions by race on data from the first 2 waves of the Americans' Changing Lives Survey to determine whether unhealthy behaviors had buffering effects on the relationship between major stressors and chronic health conditions, and on the relationship between major stressors and meeting the criteria for major depression. Results. Among Whites, unhealthy behaviors strengthened the relationship between stressors and meeting major-depression criteria. Among Blacks, however, the relationship between stressors and meeting major-depression criteria was stronger among those who had not engaged in unhealthy behaviors than among those who had. Among both race groups there was a positive association between stressors and chronic health conditions. Among Blacks there was an additional positive association between number of unhealthy behaviors and number of chronic conditions. Conclusions. Those who live in chronically stressful environments often cope with stressors by engaging in unhealthy behaviors that may have protective mental-health effects. However, such unhealthy behaviors can combine with negative environmental conditions to eventually contribute to morbidity and mortality disparities among social groups. PMID:19846689

  12. Physics Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are 13 physics experiments/demonstrations applicable to introductory physics courses. Activities include: improved current balance, division circuits, liquid pressure, convection, siphons, oscillators and modulation, electrical resistance, soap films, Helmholtz coils, radioactive decay, and springs. (SL)

  13. Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Norman Robert

    2013-03-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. The Propositions of Science: 1. The subject matter of science; 2. The nature of laws; 3. The nature of laws (contd); 4. The discovery and proof of laws; 5. The explanation of laws; 6. Theories; 7. Chance and probability; 8. The meaning of science; 9. Science and philosophy; Part II. Measurement: 10. Fundamental measurement; 11. Physical number; 12. Fractional and negative magnitudes; 13. Numerical laws and derived magnitudes; 14. Units and dimensions; 15. The uses of dimensions; 16. Errors of measurement; methodical errors; 17. Errors of measurement; errors of consistency and the adjustment of observations; 18. Mathematical physics; Appendix; Index.

  14. The Development, Field Testing and Evaluation of Three Hierarchies of Behaviorally Stated Objectives for the Chemistry Content of a Course of Instruction in Physical Science for Pre-Service Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Robert Alden

    The purpose of this research was to develop hierarchies of behavioral objectives for the chemistry content of a one-semester course in physical science for preservice associate degree nursing students. Each of three content objectives was expressed by a series of behaviorally stated objectives which included a terminal objective for a unit of…

  15. Challenges in examining area effects across the life course on physical capability in mid-life: findings from the 1946 British Birth Cohort.

    PubMed

    Murray, Emily T; Southall, Humphrey; Aucott, Paula; Tilling, Kate; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2012-03-01

    A major limitation of past work linking area socioeconomic conditions to health in mid-life has been the reliance on single point in time measurement of area. Using the MRC National Survey of Health and Development, this study for the first time linked place of residence at three major life periods of childhood (1950), young adulthood (1972), and mid-life (1999) to area-socioeconomic data from the nearest census years. Using objective measures of physical capability as the outcome, the purpose of this study was to highlight four methodological challenges of attrition bias, secular changes in socio-economic measures, historical data availability, and changing reporting units over time. In general, standing balance and chair rise time showed clear cross-sectional associations with residing in areas with high deprivation. However, it was the process of overcoming the methodological challenges, which led to the conclusion that in this example percent low social class occupations was the most appropriate measure to use when extending cross-sectional analysis of standing balance and chair rise to life course investigation.

  16. Nuclear physics: a short course

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Jorge G.

    2010-09-10

    Basic properties of atomic nuclei are reviewed. Starting with the energy and length scales for microscopic processes, we go through the charge density inside the nucleus, nuclear masses and abundances, and nuclear decays. The Liquid Drop Model is presented along with some extensions. Microscopic models are introduced, with emphasis in the shell model. Alpha, beta and gamma decays are commented with some detail, including the symmetry laws which govern these decays.

  17. Physics.

    PubMed

    Bromley, D A

    1980-07-01

    From massive quarks deep in the hearts of atomic nuclei to the catastrophic collapse of giant stars in the farthest reaches of the universe, from the partial realization of Einstein's dream of a unified theory of the forces of nature to the most practical applications in technology, medicine, and throughout contemporary society, physics continues to have a profound impact on man's view of the universe and on the quality of life. The author argues that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, new insight-and the new questions-have been among the most productive in the history of the field and puts into context his selection of some of the most important new developments in this fundamental science.

  18. Reflection on problem solving in introductory and advanced physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Andrew J.

    Reflection is essential in order to learn from problem solving. This thesis explores issues related to how reflective students are and how we can improve their capacity for reflection on problem solving. We investigate how students naturally reflect in their physics courses about problem solving and evaluate strategies that may teach them reflection as an integral component of problem-solving. Problem categorization based upon similarity of solution is a strategy to help them reflect about the deep features of the problems related to the physics principles involved. We find that there is a large overlap between the introductory and graduate students in their ability to categorize. Moreover, introductory students in the calculus-based courses performed better categorization than those in the algebra-based courses even though the categorization task is conceptual. Other investigations involved exploring if reflection could be taught as a skill on individual and group levels. Explicit self-diagnosis in recitation investigated how effectively students could diagnose their own errors on difficult problems, how much scaffolding was necessary for this purpose, and how effective transfer was to other problems employing similar principles. Difficulty in applying physical principles and difference between the self-diagnosed and transfer problems affected performance. We concluded that a sustained intervention is required to learn effective problem-solving strategies. Another study involving reflection on problem solving with peers suggests that those who reflected with peers drew more diagrams and had a larger gain from the midterm to final exam. Another study in quantum mechanics involved giving common problems in midterm and final exams and suggested that advanced students do not automatically reflect on their mistakes. Interviews revealed that even advanced students often focus mostly on exams rather than learning and building a robust knowledge structure. A survey was

  19. 38 CFR 21.7120 - Courses included in programs of education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (ii) Any music course, instrumental or vocal, public speaking course or courses in dancing, sports or... officiating, or other sport or athletic courses, except courses of applied music, physical education,...

  20. 38 CFR 21.7120 - Courses included in programs of education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (ii) Any music course, instrumental or vocal, public speaking course or courses in dancing, sports or... officiating, or other sport or athletic courses, except courses of applied music, physical education,...

  1. 38 CFR 21.7120 - Courses included in programs of education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (ii) Any music course, instrumental or vocal, public speaking course or courses in dancing, sports or... officiating, or other sport or athletic courses, except courses of applied music, physical education,...

  2. 38 CFR 21.7120 - Courses included in programs of education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (ii) Any music course, instrumental or vocal, public speaking course or courses in dancing, sports or... officiating, or other sport or athletic courses, except courses of applied music, physical education,...

  3. 38 CFR 21.7622 - Courses precluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... courses, except courses of applied music, physical education, or public speaking which are offered by...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Educational Assistance for Members of the Selected Reserve Courses...) Courses not part of a program of education. VA will not pay educational assistance for an enrollment...

  4. Moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity across the life course and risk of pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Lindsay C; Janssen, Ian; Richardson, Harriet; Lai, Agnes S; Spinelli, John J; Aronson, Kristan J

    2013-06-01

    Moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) reduces breast cancer risk, although the effects of MVPA in different settings across the life course and how they may differ by menopausal status are unclear. This gap was addressed using data from a case-control study of 1,110 incident breast cancer cases and 1,172 cancer-free controls, frequency matched by age, from Vancouver and Kingston, Canada. In Vancouver, cases were recruited from the British Columbia Cancer Registry and controls from the Screening Mammography Program of British Columbia and in Kingston cases and controls were recruited from a breast assessment center. Lifetime leisure-time, household, and occupational MVPA energy expenditures were assessed in an open-ended questionnaire and mean weekly metabolic equivalent hours (MET-h/week) were calculated for the age periods 12-17, 18-34, 35-49, and ≥50 years and for the total lifetime. Odds ratios were estimated separately for pre- and for post-menopausal women using unconditional logistic regression. Among post-menopausal women, each of >22.9 MET-h/week of mean lifetime leisure-time MVPA (equivalent to running for 3 h) and >61.1 MET-h/week of mean lifetime household MVPA (equivalent to 24 h of moderate household work) reduced breast cancer risk by 40 %, compared to 0 MET-h/week of each. The respective ORs were 0.63 (95 % CI 0.42-0.94) and 0.58 (95 % CI 0.43-0.79). Among post-menopausal women, leisure-time MVPA after age 35 was more strongly associated with reduced breast cancer risk than MVPA in early life, while household MVPA was associated with reduced risk at all adulthood age periods. The weekly volume of leisure-time MVPA required to reduce post-menopausal breast cancer risk was consistent with amount recommended in the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines for cancer prevention.

  5. Computational Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borcherds, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an optional course in "computational physics" offered at the University of Birmingham. Includes an introduction to numerical methods and presents exercises involving fast-Fourier transforms, non-linear least-squares, Monte Carlo methods, and the three-body problem. Recommends adding laboratory work into the course in the future. (TW)

  6. First Aid Instruction Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Mines (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the Department of the Interior, this teaching guide is for the instructors' use in teaching a first aid course. Six fundamental areas include: (1) Artificial Respiration, (2) Control of Bleeding, (3) Physical Shock, (4) Open Wounds, Closed Wounds, and Burns, (5) Fractures and Dislocations, and (6) Transportation. A complete…

  7. Preparing Teachers To Teach Physics and Physical Science by Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Lillian C.; Shaffer, Peter S.; Constantinou, C. P.

    2000-01-01

    In physics, neither courses for majors nor for non-majors provide the kind of preparation required for teaching physics or physical science by inquiry. Indicates that science methods courses cannot help teachers develop the depth of understanding needed for this type of teaching. Offers a practical alternative for special physics courses for…

  8. A Course in Fluid Mechanics of Suspensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a course focusing on fluid mechanics and physical chemistry of suspensions. Describes the main themes of the lectures and includes a list of course outlines. Possible textbooks and many journal articles are listed. (YP)

  9. Crash Course in Course Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Many teachers find developing a new lesson or course quite difficult. It would be nice to have all necessary information, lesson plans and assessment materials ready at hand. But most often, they find themselves on their own when it comes to lesson and course development. The author faced this situation when he was asked to develop a lesson on…

  10. NUCLEAR SCIENCE, AN INTRODUCTORY COURSE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SULCOSKI, JOHN W.

    THIS CURRICULUM GUIDE DESCRIBES A TWELFTH-GRADE INTERDISCIPLINARY, INTRODUCTORY NUCLEAR SCIENCE COURSE. IT IS BELIEVED TO FILL THE NEED FOR AN ADVANCED COURSE THAT IS TIMELY, CHALLENGING, AND APPROPRIATE AS A SEQUENTIAL ADDITION TO THE BIOLOGY-CHEMISTRY-PHYSICS SEQUENCE. PRELIMINARY INFORMATION COVERS SUCH MATTERS AS (1) RADIOISOTOPE WORK AREAS,…

  11. Physics: Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    The physics objectives are geared to use in college preparatory, high school physics courses and are based on the three most common physics curricula: (1) Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC); (2) The Project Physics Course; and (3) Modern Physics by Dull, Metcalf, and Williams. Since many of the sample items can be answered in various ways,…

  12. Climate Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Space, William

    2007-01-01

    Numerous connections exist between climate science and topics normally covered in physics and physical science courses. For instance, lessons on heat and light can be used to introduce basic climate science, and the study of electric circuits provides a context for studying the relationship between electricity consumption and carbon pollution. To…

  13. The preparation, use, and evaluation of recorded material for teaching ultrasonics in a university Master of Science course in medical physics.

    PubMed

    Chivers, R C; Hills, P J

    1976-04-01

    The potential value of using recorded instructional material in a university Master's course module in medical ultrasonics is discussed. The procedure for preparation and evaluation of a program of slides with synchronized audio tape is reported. The evaluation indicates that the flexibility of this form of recorded material can make several unique contributions to the teaching program, in acquainting students with clinical problems, in simulating expensive equipment, and encouraging students to use the literature.

  14. Physics Phridays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falbo, Maria

    2007-12-01

    Teaching high school physics involves cheerleading, coaching, and acting (in addition to course preparation, equipment maintenance/construction, and grading). One is like a performer that has to be "on" all the time to keep the attention and interest of students in order to engage them in the content. But what happens once the course is over? We hope that we have sparked some interest in physics that will continue and that our students take what they've learned with them, but the reality is often disappointing. Can we do better than hope? "Physics Phridays" might be a starting point.

  15. Core graduate courses: A missed learning opportunity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chandralekha; Maries, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    An important goal of graduate physics core courses is to help students develop expertise in problem solving and improve their reasoning and meta-cognitive skills. We explore the conceptual difficulties of physics graduate students by administering conceptual problems on topics covered in undergraduate physics courses before and after instruction in related first year core graduate courses. Here, we focus on physics graduate students' difficulties manifested by their performance on two qualitative problems involving diagrammatic representation of vector fields. Some graduate students had great difficulty in recognizing whether the diagrams of the vector fields had divergence and/or curl but they had no difficulty computing the divergence and curl of the vector fields mathematically. We also conducted individual discussions with various faculty members who regularly teach first year graduate physics core courses about the goals of these courses and the performance of graduate students on the conceptual problems after related instruction in core courses.

  16. Electrocardiograph course.

    PubMed

    Kingston, M E

    1979-02-01

    Instruction in electrocardiogram interpretation was provided for students by distributing complete electrocardiograms to them at the beginning of the week, for nine weeks, followed by analysis by an instructor at the end of the week. This problem-solving method required minimal instruction in theory and lecture time. Skills in interpretation were promoted by teaching recognition of specific electrocardiographic patterns and their differential diagnosis rather than electrocardiogram aberrations produced by particular diseases. Reinforcement was provided by the frequent repetition of similar electrocardiograms during the course. This course was evaluated by examining students before and after the course and comparing their results with those of general internists who took the same examination. The students significantly improved their mean score and scored significantly higher than the general internists.

  17. Physics with Fizz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hise, Yvette A.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the revamping of a high school physics course in which students are challenged by open-ended questions, assignments outside the classroom, guest speakers, a physics bowl and physics olympics. Reports on the increased enrollment in the course and the results of the students' test performance. (TW)

  18. Transfer of learning with an application to the physics of positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Bijaya

    2007-12-01

    A series of teaching activities using physical models was developed to present some portions of physics of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and investigate students' understanding and transfer of learning in physics to a medical technology. A teaching interview protocol consistent with a qualitative research methodology was developed and administered to the students enrolled in an algebra-based introductory level physics course. 16 students participated in individual interviews and another 21 students participated in the group sessions. The major objectives of the teaching interviews were to investigate students' transfer of physics learning from their prior experiences to the provided physical models, from one model to the other and from the models to the PET problems. The study adapted phenomenological research methodology in analyzing students' use of cognitive resources and cognitive strategies during knowledge construction and reconstruction. A resource based transfer model framed under the cognitive theory of learning and consistent with contemporary views of transfer was used to describe the transfer of physics learning. Results of the study indicated both appropriate and inappropriate use of the students' prior conceptual resources in novel contexts. Scaffolding and questioning were found to be effective in activating appropriate and suppressing the inappropriate resources. The physical models used as analogies were found useful in transferring physics learning to understand image construction in PET. Positive transfer was possible when the models were introduced in an appropriate sequence. The results of the study indicate the occurrence of three types of non-scaffolded transfer---spontaneous, semi spontaneous and non-spontaneous. The research found connections between sequencing of hints and phrasing of information in activating students' different conceptual resources. A qualitative investigation based on Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD

  19. Cosmology. A first course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachieze-Rey, Marc

    This book delivers a quantitative account of the science of cosmology, designed for a non-specialist audience. The basic principles are outlined using simple maths and physics, while still providing rigorous models of the Universe. It offers an ideal introduction to the key ideas in cosmology, without going into technical details. The approach used is based on the fundamental ideas of general relativity such as the spacetime interval, comoving coordinates, and spacetime curvature. It provides an up-to-date and thoughtful discussion of the big bang, and the crucial questions of structure and galaxy formation. Questions of method and philosophical approaches in cosmology are also briefly discussed. Advanced undergraduates in either physics or mathematics would benefit greatly from use either as a course text or as a supplementary guide to cosmology courses.

  20. Teaching Computer Science Courses in Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huan, Xiaoli; Shehane, Ronald; Ali, Adel

    2011-01-01

    As the success of distance learning (DL) has driven universities to increase the courses offered online, certain challenges arise when teaching computer science (CS) courses to students who are not physically co-located and have individual learning schedules. Teaching CS courses involves high level demonstrations and interactivity between the…