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Sample records for algebraic graph theory

  1. K-theory of locally finite graph C∗-algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyudu, Natalia

    2013-09-01

    We calculate the K-theory of the Cuntz-Krieger algebra OE associated with an infinite, locally finite graph, via the Bass-Hashimoto operator. The formulae we get express the Grothendieck group and the Whitehead group in purely graph theoretic terms. We consider the category of finite (black-and-white, bi-directed) subgraphs with certain graph homomorphisms and construct a continuous functor to abelian groups. In this category K0 is an inductive limit of K-groups of finite graphs, which were calculated in Cornelissen et al. (2008) [3]. In the case of an infinite graph with the finite Betti number we obtain the formula for the Grothendieck group K0(OE)=Z, where β(E) is the first Betti number and γ(E) is the valency number of the graph E. We note that in the infinite case the torsion part of K0, which is present in the case of a finite graph, vanishes. The Whitehead group depends only on the first Betti number: K1(OE)=Z. These allow us to provide a counterexample to the fact, which holds for finite graphs, that K1(OE) is the torsion free part of K0(OE).

  2. Algebraic distance on graphs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Safro, I.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the connection strength between a pair of vertices in a graph is one of the most important concerns in many graph applications. Simple measures such as edge weights may not be sufficient for capturing the effects associated with short paths of lengths greater than one. In this paper, we consider an iterative process that smooths an associated value for nearby vertices, and we present a measure of the local connection strength (called the algebraic distance; see [D. Ron, I. Safro, and A. Brandt, Multiscale Model. Simul., 9 (2011), pp. 407-423]) based on this process. The proposed measure is attractive in that the process is simple, linear, and easily parallelized. An analysis of the convergence property of the process reveals that the local neighborhoods play an important role in determining the connectivity between vertices. We demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the proposed measure through several combinatorial optimization problems on graphs and hypergraphs.

  3. On Algebraic Singularities, Finite Graphs and D-Brane Gauge Theories: A String Theoretic Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui

    2002-09-01

    In this writing we shall address certain beautiful inter-relations between the construction of 4-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories and resolution of algebraic singularities, from the perspective of String Theory. We review in some detail the requisite background in both the mathematics, such as orbifolds, symplectic quotients and quiver representations, as well as the physics, such as gauged linear sigma models, geometrical engineering, Hanany-Witten setups and D-brane probes. We investigate aspects of world-volume gauge dynamics using D-brane resolutions of various Calabi-Yau singularities, notably Gorenstein quotients and toric singularities. Attention will be paid to the general methodology of constructing gauge theories for these singular backgrounds, with and without the presence of the NS-NS B-field, as well as the T-duals to brane setups and branes wrapping cycles in the mirror geometry. Applications of such diverse and elegant mathematics as crepant resolution of algebraic singularities, representation of finite groups and finite graphs, modular invariants of affine Lie algebras, etc. will naturally arise. Various viewpoints and generalisations of McKay's Correspondence will also be considered. The present work is a transcription of excerpts from the first three volumes of the author's PhD thesis which was written under the direction of Prof. A. Hanany - to whom he is much indebted - at the Centre for Theoretical Physics of MIT, and which, at the suggestion of friends, he posts to the ArXiv pro hac vice; it is his sincerest wish that the ensuing pages might be of some small use to the beginning student.

  4. Algebraic connectivity and graph robustness.

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Abdallah, Chaouki T.

    2009-07-01

    Recent papers have used Fiedler's definition of algebraic connectivity to show that network robustness, as measured by node-connectivity and edge-connectivity, can be increased by increasing the algebraic connectivity of the network. By the definition of algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian is a lower bound on the node-connectivity. In this paper we show that for circular random lattice graphs and mesh graphs algebraic connectivity is a conservative lower bound, and that increases in algebraic connectivity actually correspond to a decrease in node-connectivity. This means that the networks are actually less robust with respect to node-connectivity as the algebraic connectivity increases. However, an increase in algebraic connectivity seems to correlate well with a decrease in the characteristic path length of these networks - which would result in quicker communication through the network. Applications of these results are then discussed for perimeter security.

  5. Graph Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2005-12-27

    Graph theory is a branch of discrete combinatorial mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. The theory was pioneered by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 18th century, commenced its formal development during the second half of the 19th century, and has witnessed substantial growth during the last seventy years, with applications in areas as diverse as engineering, computer science, physics, sociology, chemistry and biology. Graph theory has also had a strong impact in computational linguistics by providing the foundations for the theory of features structures that has emerged as one of the most widely used frameworks for the representation of grammar formalisms.

  6. Renormalization in Quantum Field Theory and the Riemann-Hilbert Problem I: The Hopf Algebra Structure of Graphs and the Main Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connes, Alain; Kreimer, Dirk

    This paper gives a complete selfcontained proof of our result announced in [6] showing that renormalization in quantum field theory is a special instance of a general mathematical procedure of extraction of finite values based on the Riemann-Hilbert problem. We shall first show that for any quantum field theory, the combinatorics of Feynman graphs gives rise to a Hopf algebra which is commutative as an algebra. It is the dual Hopf algebra of the enveloping algebra of a Lie algebra whose basis is labelled by the one particle irreducible Feynman graphs. The Lie bracket of two such graphs is computed from insertions of one graph in the other and vice versa. The corresponding Lie group G is the group of characters of . We shall then show that, using dimensional regularization, the bare (unrenormalized) theory gives rise to a loop where C is a small circle of complex dimensions around the integer dimension D of space-time. Our main result is that the renormalized theory is just the evaluation at z=D of the holomorphic part γ+ of the Birkhoff decomposition of γ. We begin to analyse the group G and show that it is a semi-direct product of an easily understood abelian group by a highly non-trivial group closely tied up with groups of diffeomorphisms. The analysis of this latter group as well as the interpretation of the renormalization group and of anomalous dimensions are the content of our second paper with the same overall title.

  7. A graph algebra for scalable visual analytics.

    PubMed

    Shaverdian, Anna A; Zhou, Hao; Michailidis, George; Jagadish, Hosagrahar V

    2012-01-01

    Visual analytics (VA), which combines analytical techniques with advanced visualization features, is fast becoming a standard tool for extracting information from graph data. Researchers have developed many tools for this purpose, suggesting a need for formal methods to guide these tools' creation. Increased data demands on computing requires redesigning VA tools to consider performance and reliability in the context of analysis of exascale datasets. Furthermore, visual analysts need a way to document their analyses for reuse and results justification. A VA graph framework encapsulated in a graph algebra helps address these needs. Its atomic operators include selection and aggregation. The framework employs a visual operator and supports dynamic attributes of data to enable scalable visual exploration of data. PMID:24806630

  8. A graph algebra for scalable visual analytics.

    PubMed

    Shaverdian, Anna A; Zhou, Hao; Michailidis, George; Jagadish, Hosagrahar V

    2012-01-01

    Visual analytics (VA), which combines analytical techniques with advanced visualization features, is fast becoming a standard tool for extracting information from graph data. Researchers have developed many tools for this purpose, suggesting a need for formal methods to guide these tools' creation. Increased data demands on computing requires redesigning VA tools to consider performance and reliability in the context of analysis of exascale datasets. Furthermore, visual analysts need a way to document their analyses for reuse and results justification. A VA graph framework encapsulated in a graph algebra helps address these needs. Its atomic operators include selection and aggregation. The framework employs a visual operator and supports dynamic attributes of data to enable scalable visual exploration of data.

  9. Algebraic Mean Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dankova, T. S.; Rosensteel, G.

    1998-10-01

    Mean field theory has an unexpected group theoretic mathematical foundation. Instead of representation theory which applies to most group theoretic quantum models, Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov have been formulated in terms of coadjoint orbits for the groups U(n) and O(2n). The general theory of mean fields is formulated for an arbitrary Lie algebra L of fermion operators. The moment map provides the correspondence between the Hilbert space of microscopic wave functions and the dual space L^* of densities. The coadjoint orbits of the group in the dual space are phase spaces on which time-dependent mean field theory is equivalent to a classical Hamiltonian dynamical system. Indeed it forms a finite-dimensional Lax system. The mean field theories for the Elliott SU(3) and symplectic Sp(3,R) algebras are constructed explicitly in the coadjoint orbit framework.

  10. Slower Algebra Students Meet Faster Tools: Solving Algebra Word Problems with Graphing Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerushalmy, Michal

    2006-01-01

    The article discusses the ways that less successful mathematics students used graphing software with capabilities similar to a basic graphing calculator to solve algebra problems in context. The study is based on interviewing students who learned algebra for 3 years in an environment where software tools were always present. We found differences…

  11. Deformations of Fell bundles and twisted graph algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeburn, Iain

    2016-11-01

    We consider Fell bundles over discrete groups, and the C*-algebra which is universal for representations of the bundle. We define deformations of Fell bundles, which are new Fell bundles with the same underlying Banach bundle but with the multiplication deformed by a two-cocycle on the group. Every graph algebra can be viewed as the C*-algebra of a Fell bundle, and there are are many cocycles of interest with which to deform them. We thus obtain many of the twisted graph algebras of Kumjian, Pask and Sims. We demonstate the utility of our approach to these twisted graph algebras by proving that the deformations associated to different cocycles can be assembled as the fibres of a C*-bundle.

  12. Second-Order Algebraic Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Marcelo; Mahmoud, Ola

    Fiore and Hur [10] recently introduced a conservative extension of universal algebra and equational logic from first to second order. Second-order universal algebra and second-order equational logic respectively provide a model theory and a formal deductive system for languages with variable binding and parameterised metavariables. This work completes the foundations of the subject from the viewpoint of categorical algebra. Specifically, the paper introduces the notion of second-order algebraic theory and develops its basic theory. Two categorical equivalences are established: at the syntactic level, that of second-order equational presentations and second-order algebraic theories; at the semantic level, that of second-order algebras and second-order functorial models. Our development includes a mathematical definition of syntactic translation between second-order equational presentations. This gives the first formalisation of notions such as encodings and transforms in the context of languages with variable binding.

  13. Algebraic theory of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iachello, Franco

    1995-01-01

    An algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics is presented. In this formulation, operators of interest are expanded onto elements of an algebra, G. For bound state problems in nu dimensions the algebra G is taken to be U(nu + 1). Applications to the structure of molecules are presented.

  14. A PVS Graph Theory Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Sjogren, Jon A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper documents the NASA Langley PVS graph theory library. The library provides fundamental definitions for graphs, subgraphs, walks, paths, subgraphs generated by walks, trees, cycles, degree, separating sets, and four notions of connectedness. Theorems provided include Ramsey's and Menger's and the equivalence of all four notions of connectedness.

  15. Using graph theory for automated electric circuit solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscano, L.; Stella, S.; Milotti, E.

    2015-05-01

    Graph theory plays many important roles in modern physics and in many different contexts, spanning diverse topics such as the description of scale-free networks and the structure of the universe as a complex directed graph in causal set theory. Graph theory is also ideally suited to describe many concepts in computer science. Therefore it is increasingly important for physics students to master the basic concepts of graph theory. Here we describe a student project where we develop a computational approach to electric circuit solving which is based on graph theoretic concepts. This highly multidisciplinary approach combines abstract mathematics, linear algebra, the physics of circuits, and computer programming to reach the ambitious goal of implementing automated circuit solving.

  16. Graphs and Matroids Weighted in a Bounded Incline Algebra

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ling-Xia; Zhang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Firstly, for a graph weighted in a bounded incline algebra (or called a dioid), a longest path problem (LPP, for short) is presented, which can be considered the uniform approach to the famous shortest path problem, the widest path problem, and the most reliable path problem. The solutions for LPP and related algorithms are given. Secondly, for a matroid weighted in a linear matroid, the maximum independent set problem is studied. PMID:25126607

  17. Graphs and matroids weighted in a bounded incline algebra.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling-Xia; Zhang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Firstly, for a graph weighted in a bounded incline algebra (or called a dioid), a longest path problem (LPP, for short) is presented, which can be considered the uniform approach to the famous shortest path problem, the widest path problem, and the most reliable path problem. The solutions for LPP and related algorithms are given. Secondly, for a matroid weighted in a linear matroid, the maximum independent set problem is studied. PMID:25126607

  18. Graphs and matroids weighted in a bounded incline algebra.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling-Xia; Zhang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Firstly, for a graph weighted in a bounded incline algebra (or called a dioid), a longest path problem (LPP, for short) is presented, which can be considered the uniform approach to the famous shortest path problem, the widest path problem, and the most reliable path problem. The solutions for LPP and related algorithms are given. Secondly, for a matroid weighted in a linear matroid, the maximum independent set problem is studied.

  19. The Relationship between Graphing Calculator Use and Teachers' Beliefs about Learning Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Arnita J.

    The purpose of this study was to determine teachers' views of learning algebra and to investigate if any relationship exists between their views of learning algebra and the ways that they use graphing calculators in their algebra classes. The 48 algebra teachers who participated in the study were from Allen, Putnam, and Van Wert counties in…

  20. Chemical Applications of Graph Theory: Part II. Isomer Enumeration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Peter J.; Jurs, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of graph theory to aid in the depiction of organic molecular structures. Gives a historical perspective of graph theory and explains graph theory terminology with organic examples. Lists applications of graph theory to current research projects. (ML)

  1. The algebra of bipartite graphs and Hurwitz numbers of seamed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseevskii, A. V.; Natanzon, S. M.

    2008-08-01

    We extend the definition of Hurwitz numbers to the case of seamed surfaces, which arise in new models of mathematical physics, and prove that they form a system of correlators for a Klein topological field theory in the sense defined in [1]. We find the corresponding Cardy-Frobenius algebras, which yield a method for calculating the Hurwitz numbers. As a by-product, we prove that the vector space generated by the bipartite graphs with n edges possesses a natural binary operation that makes this space into a non-commutative Frobenius algebra isomorphic to the algebra of intertwining operators for a representation of the symmetric group S_n on the space generated by the set of all partitions of a set of n elements.

  2. Computational Genomics Using Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Tamar

    2005-03-01

    With exciting new discoveries concerning RNA's regulatory cellular roles in gene expression, structural and functional problems associated with DNA's venerable cousin have come to the forefront. RNA folding, for example, is analogous to the well-known protein folding problem, and seeks to link RNA's primary sequence with secondary and tertiary structures. As a single-stranded polynucleotide, RNA's secondary structures are defined by a network of hydrogen bonds, which lead to a variety of stems, loops, junctions, bulges, and other motifs. Supersecondary pseudoknot structures can also occur and, together, lead to RNA's complex tertiary interactions stabilized by salt and solvent ions in the natural cellular milieu. Besides folding, challenges in RNA research include identifying locations and functions of RNA genes, discovering RNA's structural repertoire (folding motifs), designing novel RNAs, and developing new antiviral and antibiotic compounds composed of, or targeting, RNAs. In this talk, I will describe some of these new biological findings concerning RNA and present an approach using graph theory (network theory) to represent RNA secondary structures. Because the RNA motif space using graphs is vastly smaller than RNA's sequence space, many problems related to analyzing and discovering new RNAs can be simplified and studied systematically. Some preliminary applications to designing novel RNAs will also be described.Related ReadingH. H. Gan, S. Pasquali, and T. Schlick, ``A Survey of Existing RNAs using Graph Theory with Implications to RNA Analysis and Design,'' Nuc. Acids Res. 31: 2926--2943 (2003). J. Zorn, H. H. Gan, N. Shiffeldrim, and T. Schlick, ``Structural Motifs in Ribosomal RNAs: Implications for RNA Design and Genomics,'' Biopolymers 73: 340--347 (2004). H. H. Gan, D. Fera, J. Zorn, M. Tang, N. Shiffeldrim, U. Laserson, N. Kim, and T. Schlick,``RAG: RNA-As-Graphs Database -- Concepts, Analysis, and Features,'' Bioinformatics 20: 1285--1291 (2004). U

  3. Computer algebra and transport theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Warsa, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    Modern symbolic algebra computer software augments and complements more traditional approaches to transport theory applications in several ways. The first area is in the development and enhancement of numerical solution methods for solving the Boltzmann transport equation. Typically, special purpose computer codes are designed and written to solve specific transport problems in particular ways. Different aspects of the code are often written from scratch and the pitfalls of developing complex computer codes are numerous and well known. Software such as MAPLE and MATLAB can be used to prototype, analyze, verify and determine the suitability of numerical solution methods before a full-scale transport application is written. Once it is written, the relevant pieces of the full-scale code can be verified using the same tools I that were developed for prototyping. Another area is in the analysis of numerical solution methods or the calculation of theoretical results that might otherwise be difficult or intractable. Algebraic manipulations are done easily and without error and the software also provides a framework for any additional numerical calculations that might be needed to complete the analysis. We will discuss several applications in which we have extensively used MAPLE and MATLAB in our work. All of them involve numerical solutions of the S{sub N} transport equation. These applications encompass both of the two main areas in which we have found computer algebra software essential.

  4. Formal scattering theory by an algebraic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Levine, R. D.

    1985-02-01

    Formal scattering theory is recast in a Lie-algebraic form. The central result is an algebraic Lippmann-Schwinger equation for the wave operator from which an algebraic form of the Born series (containing only linked terms) is obtained. When a finite Lie algebra is sufficient, The Mo/ller wave operator, on the energy shell, can be solved for explicitly as an element of the corresponding group. The method is illustrated for the separable potential whose relevant algebra is found to be U(1,1).

  5. Image clustering using fuzzy graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarkhani, Hamid; Tarokh, Vahid

    1999-12-01

    We propose an image clustering algorithm which uses fuzzy graph theory. First, we define a fuzzy graph and the concept of connectivity for a fuzzy graph. Then, based on our definition of connectivity we propose an algorithm which finds connected subgraphs of the original fuzzy graph. Each connected subgraph can be considered as a cluster. As an application of our algorithm, we consider a database of images. We calculate a similarity measure between any paris of images in the database and generate the corresponding fuzzy graph. The, we find the subgraphs of the resulting fuzzy graph using our algorithm. Each subgraph corresponds to a cluster. We apply our image clustering algorithm to the key frames of news programs to find the anchorperson clusters. Simulation results show that our algorithm is successful to find most of anchorperson frames from the database.

  6. Application of Computer Graphics to Graphing in Algebra and Trigonometry. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, J. Richard

    This project was designed to improve the graphing competency of students in elementary algebra, intermediate algebra, and trigonometry courses at Virginia Commonwealth University. Computer graphics programs were designed using an Apple II Plus computer and implemented using Pascal. The software package is interactive and gives students control…

  7. Quantum graphs and random-matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhař, Z.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2015-07-01

    For simple connected graphs with incommensurate bond lengths and with unitary symmetry we prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit (BGS) conjecture in its most general form. Using supersymmetry and taking the limit of infinite graph size, we show that the generating function for every (P,Q) correlation function for both closed and open graphs coincides with the corresponding expression of random-matrix theory. We show that the classical Perron-Frobenius operator is bistochastic and possesses a single eigenvalue +1. In the quantum case that implies the existence of a zero (or massless) mode of the effective action. That mode causes universal fluctuation properties. Avoiding the saddle-point approximation we show that for graphs that are classically mixing (i.e. for which the spectrum of the classical Perron-Frobenius operator possesses a finite gap) and that do not carry a special class of bound states, the zero mode dominates in the limit of infinite graph size.

  8. Many-core graph analytics using accelerated sparse linear algebra routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozacik, Stephen; Paolini, Aaron L.; Fox, Paul; Kelmelis, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Graph analytics is a key component in identifying emerging trends and threats in many real-world applications. Largescale graph analytics frameworks provide a convenient and highly-scalable platform for developing algorithms to analyze large datasets. Although conceptually scalable, these techniques exhibit poor performance on modern computational hardware. Another model of graph computation has emerged that promises improved performance and scalability by using abstract linear algebra operations as the basis for graph analysis as laid out by the GraphBLAS standard. By using sparse linear algebra as the basis, existing highly efficient algorithms can be adapted to perform computations on the graph. This approach, however, is often less intuitive to graph analytics experts, who are accustomed to vertex-centric APIs such as Giraph, GraphX, and Tinkerpop. We are developing an implementation of the high-level operations supported by these APIs in terms of linear algebra operations. This implementation is be backed by many-core implementations of the fundamental GraphBLAS operations required, and offers the advantages of both the intuitive programming model of a vertex-centric API and the performance of a sparse linear algebra implementation. This technology can reduce the number of nodes required, as well as the run-time for a graph analysis problem, enabling customers to perform more complex analysis with less hardware at lower cost. All of this can be accomplished without the requirement for the customer to make any changes to their analytics code, thanks to the compatibility with existing graph APIs.

  9. Imperfect Cloning Operations in Algebraic Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    No-cloning theorem says that there is no unitary operation that makes perfect clones of non-orthogonal quantum states. The objective of the present paper is to examine whether an imperfect cloning operation exists or not in a C*-algebraic framework. We define a universal -imperfect cloning operation which tolerates a finite loss of fidelity in the cloned state, and show that an individual system's algebra of observables is abelian if and only if there is a universal -imperfect cloning operation in the case where the loss of fidelity is less than . Therefore in this case no universal -imperfect cloning operation is possible in algebraic quantum theory.

  10. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology: (I) algebra, functions and graphs.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-02-01

    This is the first in a series of four articles developed for the readers of. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas. This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease, abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to cardiovascular medicine and

  11. Algebraic methods in system theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, R. W.; Willems, J. C.; Willsky, A. S.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations on problems of the type which arise in the control of switched electrical networks are reported. The main results concern the algebraic structure and stochastic aspects of these systems. Future reports will contain more detailed applications of these results to engineering studies.

  12. Implementation of Graphing Calculator in Intermediate Algebra with Function Approach in Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reznichenko, Nataliya

    2006-01-01

    A major goal of this paper is to document changes that occurred in developmental mathematics classrooms in the community college setting when the graphing calculator (GC) Texas Instruments (TI)-83 was introduced to students. The six-week intervention was conducted during the section of Intermediate Algebra in the Community College Baltimore County…

  13. Discrete Minimal Surface Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnlind, Joakim; Hoppe, Jens

    2010-05-01

    We consider discrete minimal surface algebras (DMSA) as generalized noncommutative analogues of minimal surfaces in higher dimensional spheres. These algebras appear naturally in membrane theory, where sequences of their representations are used as a regularization. After showing that the defining relations of the algebra are consistent, and that one can compute a basis of the enveloping algebra, we give several explicit examples of DMSAs in terms of subsets of sln (any semi-simple Lie algebra providing a trivial example by itself). A special class of DMSAs are Yang-Mills algebras. The representation graph is introduced to study representations of DMSAs of dimension d ≤ 4, and properties of representations are related to properties of graphs. The representation graph of a tensor product is (generically) the Cartesian product of the corresponding graphs. We provide explicit examples of irreducible representations and, for coinciding eigenvalues, classify all the unitary representations of the corresponding algebras.

  14. Complex Networks: from Graph Theory to Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesne, Annick

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this text is to show the central role played by networks in complex system science. A remarkable feature of network studies is to lie at the crossroads of different disciplines, from mathematics (graph theory, combinatorics, probability theory) to physics (statistical physics of networks) to computer science (network generating algorithms, combinatorial optimization) to biological issues (regulatory networks). New paradigms recently appeared, like that of ‘scale-free networks’ providing an alternative to the random graph model introduced long ago by Erdös and Renyi. With the notion of statistical ensemble and methods originally introduced for percolation networks, statistical physics is of high relevance to get a deep account of topological and statistical properties of a network. Then their consequences on the dynamics taking place in the network should be investigated. Impact of network theory is huge in all natural sciences, especially in biology with gene networks, metabolic networks, neural networks or food webs. I illustrate this brief overview with a recent work on the influence of network topology on the dynamics of coupled excitable units, and the insights it provides about network emerging features, robustness of network behaviors, and the notion of static or dynamic motif.

  15. Learning Intermediate Algebra with Graphing Calculator in Community College: A Study of Graphing Calculator Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reznichenko, Nataliya

    2012-01-01

    Since technology has taken its place in almost all classrooms in schools and colleges across the country, there is a need to know how technology influences the mathematics that is taught and how students learn. In this study, the graphing calculator (GC) (namely the Texas Instruments TI-83) was implemented as a tool to enhance learning of function…

  16. Orders on Intervals Over Partially Ordered Sets: Extending Allen's Algebra and Interval Graph Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Francisco; Kreinovich, Vladik; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.

    2013-08-01

    To make a decision, we need to compare the values of quantities. In many practical situations, we know the values with interval uncertainty. In such situations, we need to compare intervals. Allen’s algebra describes all possible relations between intervals on the real line, and ordering relations between such intervals are well studied. In this paper, we extend this description to intervals in an arbitrary partially ordered set (poset). In particular, we explicitly describe ordering relations between intervals that generalize relation between points. As auxiliary results, we provide a logical interpretation of the relation between intervals, and extend the results about interval graphs to intervals over posets.

  17. Decomposition Theory in the Teaching of Elementary Linear Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, R. R.; Rogosinski, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a decomposition theory from which the Cayley-Hamilton theorem, the diagonalizability of complex square matrices, and functional calculus can be developed. The theory and its applications are based on elementary polynomial algebra. (KR)

  18. L∞-algebra models and higher Chern-Simons theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Patricia; Sämann, Christian

    2016-10-01

    We continue our study of zero-dimensional field theories in which the fields take values in a strong homotopy Lie algebra. In the first part, we review in detail how higher Chern-Simons theories arise in the AKSZ-formalism. These theories form a universal starting point for the construction of L∞-algebra models. We then show how to describe superconformal field theories and how to perform dimensional reductions in this context. In the second part, we demonstrate that Nambu-Poisson and multisymplectic manifolds are closely related via their Heisenberg algebras. As a byproduct of our discussion, we find central Lie p-algebra extensions of 𝔰𝔬(p + 2). Finally, we study a number of L∞-algebra models which are physically interesting and which exhibit quantized multisymplectic manifolds as vacuum solutions.

  19. Metric Lie 3-algebras in Bagger-Lambert theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros, Paul; Figueroa-O'Farrill, José; Méndez-Escobar, Elena

    2008-08-01

    We recast physical properties of the Bagger-Lambert theory, such as shift-symmetry and decoupling of ghosts, the absence of scale and parity invariance, in Lie 3-algebraic terms, thus motivating the study of metric Lie 3-algebras and their Lie algebras of derivations. We prove a structure theorem for metric Lie 3-algebras in arbitrary signature showing that they can be constructed out of the simple and one-dimensional Lie 3-algebras iterating two constructions: orthogonal direct sum and a new construction called a double extension, by analogy with the similar construction for Lie algebras. We classify metric Lie 3-algebras of signature (2, p) and study their Lie algebras of derivations, including those which preserve the conformal class of the inner product. We revisit the 3-algebraic criteria spelt out at the start of the paper and select those algebras with signature (2, p) which satisfy them, as well as indicate the construction of more general metric Lie 3-algebras satisfying the ghost-decoupling criterion.

  20. Applications of graph theory to landscape genetics

    PubMed Central

    Garroway, Colin J; Bowman, Jeff; Carr, Denis; Wilson, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the relationships among landscape quality, gene flow, and population genetic structure of fishers (Martes pennanti) in ON, Canada. We used graph theory as an analytical framework considering each landscape as a network node. The 34 nodes were connected by 93 edges. Network structure was characterized by a higher level of clustering than expected by chance, a short mean path length connecting all pairs of nodes, and a resiliency to the loss of highly connected nodes. This suggests that alleles can be efficiently spread through the system and that extirpations and conservative harvest are not likely to affect their spread. Two measures of node centrality were negatively related to both the proportion of immigrants in a node and node snow depth. This suggests that central nodes are producers of emigrants, contain high-quality habitat (i.e., deep snow can make locomotion energetically costly) and that fishers were migrating from high to low quality habitat. A method of community detection on networks delineated five genetic clusters of nodes suggesting cryptic population structure. Our analyses showed that network models can provide system-level insight into the process of gene flow with implications for understanding how landscape alterations might affect population fitness and evolutionary potential. PMID:25567802

  1. Protein flexibility predictions using graph theory.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, D J; Rader, A J; Kuhn, L A; Thorpe, M F

    2001-08-01

    Techniques from graph theory are applied to analyze the bond networks in proteins and identify the flexible and rigid regions. The bond network consists of distance constraints defined by the covalent and hydrogen bonds and salt bridges in the protein, identified by geometric and energetic criteria. We use an algorithm that counts the degrees of freedom within this constraint network and that identifies all the rigid and flexible substructures in the protein, including overconstrained regions (with more crosslinking bonds than are needed to rigidify the region) and underconstrained or flexible regions, in which dihedral bond rotations can occur. The number of extra constraints or remaining degrees of bond-rotational freedom within a substructure quantifies its relative rigidity/flexibility and provides a flexibility index for each bond in the structure. This novel computational procedure, first used in the analysis of glassy materials, is approximately a million times faster than molecular dynamics simulations and captures the essential conformational flexibility of the protein main and side-chains from analysis of a single, static three-dimensional structure. This approach is demonstrated by comparison with experimental measures of flexibility for three proteins in which hinge and loop motion are essential for biological function: HIV protease, adenylate kinase, and dihydrofolate reductase.

  2. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Mniszewski, Susan M; Negre, Christian F A; Cawkwell, Marc J; Swart, Pieter J; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C; Wall, Michael E; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-21

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27334148

  3. Fourier theory and C∗-algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédos, Erik; Conti, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    We discuss a number of results concerning the Fourier series of elements in reduced twisted group C∗-algebras of discrete groups, and, more generally, in reduced crossed products associated to twisted actions of discrete groups on unital C∗-algebras. A major part of the article gives a review of our previous work on this topic, but some new results are also included.

  4. Symmetric linear systems - An application of algebraic systems theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazewinkel, M.; Martin, C.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamical systems which contain several identical subsystems occur in a variety of applications ranging from command and control systems and discretization of partial differential equations, to the stability augmentation of pairs of helicopters lifting a large mass. Linear models for such systems display certain obvious symmetries. In this paper, we discuss how these symmetries can be incorporated into a mathematical model that utilizes the modern theory of algebraic systems. Such systems are inherently related to the representation theory of algebras over fields. We will show that any control scheme which respects the dynamical structure either implicitly or explicitly uses the underlying algebra.

  5. Using Graphing Software to Teach about Algebraic Forms: A Study of Technology-Supported Practice in Secondary-School Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthven, Kenneth; Deaney, Rosemary; Hennessy, Sara

    2009-01-01

    From preliminary analysis of teacher-nominated examples of successful technology-supported practice in secondary-school mathematics, the use of graphing software to teach about algebraic forms was identified as being an important archetype. Employing evidence from lesson observation and teacher interview, such practice was investigated in greater…

  6. The Effect of Graphing Calculators on Student Achievement in College Algebra and Pre-Calculus Mathematics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatem, Neil

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the use of graphing calculators employed as Type II technology and student achievement, as determined by assessing students' problem solving skills associated with the concept of function, at the college algebra and pre-calculus level. In addition, this study explores the integration of graphing…

  7. Graph theory - recent developments of its application in geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckmann, Tobias; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Pillips, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Graph theory has been widely applied across a range of disciplines as different as population and landscape ecology, sociology, economic and transportation geography, informatics and climatology - yet these disciplines have in common that they deal with systems consisting of multiple subsystems or compartments that are coupled by relations. Although geomorphic systems lend themselves to network representations (see e.g. Chorley and Kennedy's systems approach to physical geography, 1971), the application of the conceptional and methodological toolbox of graph theory has been quite rare and restricted. In the 1960ies, graph theory was used to study the topology of river networks; since the 1970ies, studies in geomorphometry have employed it to model the topological structure of topographic surfaces. The recent re-discovery and development of graph theory applications in geomorphology run on two lines. (a) The spatially explicit analysis of sediment cascades in geomorphic systems where nodes represent their compartments (depending on the spatial scale of the study the latter can be single landforms or larger terrain subunits up to whole catchments), and edges represent the linkage of system components through water or sediment flux. This approach is closely related to the analysis of hydrological and/or sediment connectivity. (b) The analysis of geomorphic systems whose properties are represented by graph nodes, and the relations between them by graph edges. Graph theoretical measures, derived e.g. by eigenvalue analysis of the adjacency matrix, have been shown to reflect system properties such as synchronization and scale relations. Our contribution reports on these recent developments. We present case studies and discuss future applications in geomorphology that could benefit from graph theory.

  8. Three-Dimensional Algebraic Models of the tRNA Code and 12 Graphs for Representing the Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    José, Marco V; Morgado, Eberto R; Guimarães, Romeu Cardoso; Zamudio, Gabriel S; de Farías, Sávio Torres; Bobadilla, Juan R; Sosa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional algebraic models, also called Genetic Hotels, are developed to represent the Standard Genetic Code, the Standard tRNA Code (S-tRNA-C), and the Human tRNA code (H-tRNA-C). New algebraic concepts are introduced to be able to describe these models, to wit, the generalization of the 2n-Klein Group and the concept of a subgroup coset with a tail. We found that the H-tRNA-C displayed broken symmetries in regard to the S-tRNA-C, which is highly symmetric. We also show that there are only 12 ways to represent each of the corresponding phenotypic graphs of amino acids. The averages of statistical centrality measures of the 12 graphs for each of the three codes are carried out and they are statistically compared. The phenotypic graphs of the S-tRNA-C display a common triangular prism of amino acids in 10 out of the 12 graphs, whilst the corresponding graphs for the H-tRNA-C display only two triangular prisms. The graphs exhibit disjoint clusters of amino acids when their polar requirement values are used. We contend that the S-tRNA-C is in a frozen-like state, whereas the H-tRNA-C may be in an evolving state. PMID:25370377

  9. Three-Dimensional Algebraic Models of the tRNA Code and 12 Graphs for Representing the Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    José, Marco V.; Morgado, Eberto R.; Guimarães, Romeu Cardoso; Zamudio, Gabriel S.; de Farías, Sávio Torres; Bobadilla, Juan R.; Sosa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional algebraic models, also called Genetic Hotels, are developed to represent the Standard Genetic Code, the Standard tRNA Code (S-tRNA-C), and the Human tRNA code (H-tRNA-C). New algebraic concepts are introduced to be able to describe these models, to wit, the generalization of the 2n-Klein Group and the concept of a subgroup coset with a tail. We found that the H-tRNA-C displayed broken symmetries in regard to the S-tRNA-C, which is highly symmetric. We also show that there are only 12 ways to represent each of the corresponding phenotypic graphs of amino acids. The averages of statistical centrality measures of the 12 graphs for each of the three codes are carried out and they are statistically compared. The phenotypic graphs of the S-tRNA-C display a common triangular prism of amino acids in 10 out of the 12 graphs, whilst the corresponding graphs for the H-tRNA-C display only two triangular prisms. The graphs exhibit disjoint clusters of amino acids when their polar requirement values are used. We contend that the S-tRNA-C is in a frozen-like state, whereas the H-tRNA-C may be in an evolving state. PMID:25370377

  10. Three-Dimensional Algebraic Models of the tRNA Code and 12 Graphs for Representing the Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    José, Marco V; Morgado, Eberto R; Guimarães, Romeu Cardoso; Zamudio, Gabriel S; de Farías, Sávio Torres; Bobadilla, Juan R; Sosa, Daniela

    2014-08-11

    Three-dimensional algebraic models, also called Genetic Hotels, are developed to represent the Standard Genetic Code, the Standard tRNA Code (S-tRNA-C), and the Human tRNA code (H-tRNA-C). New algebraic concepts are introduced to be able to describe these models, to wit, the generalization of the 2n-Klein Group and the concept of a subgroup coset with a tail. We found that the H-tRNA-C displayed broken symmetries in regard to the S-tRNA-C, which is highly symmetric. We also show that there are only 12 ways to represent each of the corresponding phenotypic graphs of amino acids. The averages of statistical centrality measures of the 12 graphs for each of the three codes are carried out and they are statistically compared. The phenotypic graphs of the S-tRNA-C display a common triangular prism of amino acids in 10 out of the 12 graphs, whilst the corresponding graphs for the H-tRNA-C display only two triangular prisms. The graphs exhibit disjoint clusters of amino acids when their polar requirement values are used. We contend that the S-tRNA-C is in a frozen-like state, whereas the H-tRNA-C may be in an evolving state.

  11. Quantifying Riverscape Connectivity with Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonneau, P.; Milledge, D.; Sinha, R.; Tandon, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    Fluvial catchments convey fluxes of water, sediment, nutrients and aquatic biota. At continental scales, crustal topography defines the overall path of channels whilst at local scales depositional and/or erosional features generally determine the exact path of a channel. Furthermore, constructions such as dams, for either water abstraction or hydropower, often have a significant impact on channel networks.The concept of ';connectivity' is commonly invoked when conceptualising the structure of a river network.This concept is easy to grasp but there have been uneven efforts across the environmental sciences to actually quantify connectivity. Currently there have only been a few studies reporting quantitative indices of connectivity in river sciences, notably, in the study of avulsion processes. However, the majority of current work describing some form of environmental connectivity in a quantitative manner is in the field of landscape ecology. Driven by the need to quantify habitat fragmentation, landscape ecologists have returned to graph theory. Within this formal setting, landscape ecologists have successfully developed a range of indices which can model connectivity loss. Such formal connectivity metrics are currently needed for a range of applications in fluvial sciences. One of the most urgent needs relates to dam construction. In the developed world, hydropower development has generally slowed and in many countries, dams are actually being removed. However, this is not the case in the developing world where hydropower is seen as a key element to low-emissions power-security. For example, several dam projects are envisaged in Himalayan catchments in the next 2 decades. This region is already under severe pressure from climate change and urbanisation, and a better understanding of the network fragmentation which can be expected in this system is urgently needed. In this paper, we apply and adapt connectivity metrics from landscape ecology. We then examine the

  12. Equity trees and graphs via information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harré, M.; Bossomaier, T.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the similarities and differences between two measures of the relationship between equities traded in financial markets. Our measures are the correlation coefficients and the mutual information. In the context of financial markets correlation coefficients are well established whereas mutual information has not previously been as well studied despite its theoretically appealing properties. We show that asset trees which are derived from either the correlation coefficients or the mutual information have a mixture of both similarities and differences at the individual equity level and at the macroscopic level. We then extend our consideration from trees to graphs using the "genus 0" condition recently introduced in order to study the networks of equities.

  13. Clinical correlates of graph theory findings in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Zulfi; Chiang, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is considered a brain network disorder, additionally representing the most common form of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy in adults. There is increasing evidence that seizures in TLE arise from abnormal epileptogenic networks, which extend beyond the clinico-radiologically determined epileptogenic zone and may contribute to the failure rate of 30–50% following epilepsy surgery. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks using several neuroimaging and electrophysiologic modalities, and has potential to provide clinicians with clinically useful biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Methods We performed a review of the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain to localization of the epileptogenic zone, prediction of pre- and post-surgical seizure frequency and cognitive performance, and monitoring cognitive decline in TLE. Results Although different neuroimaging and electrophysiologic modalities have yielded occasionally conflicting results, several potential biomarkers have been characterized for identifying the epileptogenic zone, pre-/post-surgical seizure prediction, and assessing cognitive performance. For localization, graph theory measures of centrality have shown the most potential, including betweenness centrality, outdegree, and graph index complexity, whereas for prediction of seizure frequency, measures of synchronizability have shown the most potential. The utility of clustering coefficient and characteristic path length for assessing cognitive performance in TLE is also discussed. Conclusions Future studies integrating data from multiple modalities and testing predictive models are needed to clarify findings and develop graph theory for its clinical utility. PMID:25127370

  14. From string theory to algebraic geometry and back

    SciTech Connect

    Brinzanescu, Vasile

    2011-02-10

    We describe some facts in physics which go up to the modern string theory and the related concepts in algebraic geometry. Then we present some recent results on moduli-spaces of vector bundles on non-Kaehler Calabi-Yau 3-folds and their consequences for heterotic string theory.

  15. On directed information theory and Granger causality graphs.

    PubMed

    Amblard, Pierre-Olivier; Michel, Olivier J J

    2011-02-01

    Directed information theory deals with communication channels with feedback. When applied to networks, a natural extension based on causal conditioning is needed. We show here that measures built from directed information theory in networks can be used to assess Granger causality graphs of stochastic processes. We show that directed information theory includes measures such as the transfer entropy, and that it is the adequate information theoretic framework needed for neuroscience applications, such as connectivity inference problems.

  16. Graph theory findings in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Sharon; Haneef, Zulfi

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy. Accumulating evidence has shown that TLE is a disorder of abnormal epileptogenic networks, rather than focal sources. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks, and has potential to illuminate characteristics of brain topology conducive to TLE pathophysiology, including seizure initiation and spread. We review basic concepts which we believe will prove helpful in interpreting results rapidly emerging from graph theory research in TLE. In addition, we summarize the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain its pathophysiology. Several common findings have emerged from the many modalities which have been used to study TLE using graph theory, including structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, surface EEG, intracranial EEG, magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, cell cultures, simulated models, and mouse models, involving increased regularity of the interictal network configuration, altered local segregation and global integration of the TLE network, and network reorganization of temporal lobe and limbic structures. As different modalities provide different views of the same phenomenon, future studies integrating data from multiple modalities are needed to clarify findings and contribute to the formation of a coherent theory on the pathophysiology of TLE. PMID:24831083

  17. Graph theory findings in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Sharon; Haneef, Zulfi

    2014-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy. Accumulating evidence has shown that TLE is a disorder of abnormal epileptogenic networks, rather than focal sources. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks, and has potential to illuminate characteristics of brain topology conducive to TLE pathophysiology, including seizure initiation and spread. We review basic concepts which we believe will prove helpful in interpreting results rapidly emerging from graph theory research in TLE. In addition, we summarize the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain its pathophysiology. Several common findings have emerged from the many modalities which have been used to study TLE using graph theory, including structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, surface EEG, intracranial EEG, magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, cell cultures, simulated models, and mouse models, involving increased regularity of the interictal network configuration, altered local segregation and global integration of the TLE network, and network reorganization of temporal lobe and limbic structures. As different modalities provide different views of the same phenomenon, future studies integrating data from multiple modalities are needed to clarify findings and contribute to the formation of a coherent theory on the pathophysiology of TLE.

  18. Algebraic isomorphism in two-dimensional anomalous gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalhaes, C.G.; Natividade, C.P.

    1997-08-01

    The operator solution of the anomalous chiral Schwinger model is discussed on the basis of the general principles of Wightman field theory. Some basic structural properties of the model are analyzed taking a careful control on the Hilbert space associated with the Wightman functions. The isomorphism between gauge noninvariant and gauge invariant descriptions of the anomalous theory is established in terms of the corresponding field algebras. We show that (i) the {Theta}-vacuum representation and (ii) the suggested equivalence of vector Schwinger model and chiral Schwinger model cannot be established in terms of the intrinsic field algebra. {copyright} 1997 Academic Press, Inc.

  19. BootGraph: probabilistic fiber tractography using bootstrap algorithms and graph theory.

    PubMed

    Vorburger, Robert S; Reischauer, Carolin; Boesiger, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Bootstrap methods have recently been introduced to diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to estimate the measurement uncertainty of ensuing diffusion parameters directly from the acquired data without the necessity to assume a noise model. These methods have been previously combined with deterministic streamline tractography algorithms to allow for the assessment of connection probabilities in the human brain. Thereby, the local noise induced disturbance in the diffusion data is accumulated additively due to the incremental progression of streamline tractography algorithms. Graph based approaches have been proposed to overcome this drawback of streamline techniques. For this reason, the bootstrap method is in the present work incorporated into a graph setup to derive a new probabilistic fiber tractography method, called BootGraph. The acquired data set is thereby converted into a weighted, undirected graph by defining a vertex in each voxel and edges between adjacent vertices. By means of the cone of uncertainty, which is derived using the wild bootstrap, a weight is thereafter assigned to each edge. Two path finding algorithms are subsequently applied to derive connection probabilities. While the first algorithm is based on the shortest path approach, the second algorithm takes all existing paths between two vertices into consideration. Tracking results are compared to an established algorithm based on the bootstrap method in combination with streamline fiber tractography and to another graph based algorithm. The BootGraph shows a very good performance in crossing situations with respect to false negatives and permits incorporating additional constraints, such as a curvature threshold. By inheriting the advantages of the bootstrap method and graph theory, the BootGraph method provides a computationally efficient and flexible probabilistic tractography setup to compute connection probability maps and virtual fiber pathways without the drawbacks of

  20. Algebraic formulation of quantum theory, particle identity and entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, T. R.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum theory as formulated in conventional framework using statevectors in Hilbert spaces misses the statistical nature of the underlying quantum physics. Formulation using operators 𝒞∗ algebra and density matrices appropriately captures this feature in addition leading to the correct formulation of particle identity. In this framework, Hilbert space is an emergent concept. Problems related to anomalies and quantum epistemology are discussed.

  1. Partial Fractions in Calculus, Number Theory, and Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yackel, C. A.; Denny, J. K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the development of the method of partial fraction decomposition from elementary number theory through calculus to its abstraction in modern algebra. This unusual perspective makes the topic accessible and relevant to readers from high school through seasoned calculus instructors.

  2. Category of trees in representation theory of quantum algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Moskaliuk, N. M.; Moskaliuk, S. S.

    2013-10-15

    New applications of categorical methods are connected with new additional structures on categories. One of such structures in representation theory of quantum algebras, the category of Kuznetsov-Smorodinsky-Vilenkin-Smirnov (KSVS) trees, is constructed, whose objects are finite rooted KSVS trees and morphisms generated by the transition from a KSVS tree to another one.

  3. Vortex lattice theory: A linear algebra approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamoun, George C.

    Vortex lattices are prevalent in a large class of physical settings that are characterized by different mathematical models. We present a coherent and generalized Hamiltonian fluid mechanics-based formulation that reduces all vortex lattices into a classic problem in linear algebra for a non-normal matrix A. Via Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), the solution lies in the null space of the matrix (i.e., we require nullity( A) > 0) as well as the distribution of its singular values. We demonstrate that this approach provides a good model for various types of vortex lattices, and makes it possible to extract a rich amount of information on them. The contributions of this thesis can be classified into four main points. The first is asymmetric equilibria. A 'Brownian ratchet' construct was used which converged to asymmetric equilibria via a random walk scheme that utilized the smallest singular value of A. Distances between configurations and equilibria were measured using the Frobenius norm ||·||F and 2-norm ||·||2, and conclusions were made on the density of equilibria within the general configuration space. The second contribution used Shannon Entropy, which we interpret as a scalar measure of the robustness, or likelihood of lattices to occur in a physical setting. Third, an analytic model was produced for vortex street patterns on the sphere by using SVD in conjunction with expressions for the center of vorticity vector and angular velocity. Equilibrium curves within the configuration space were presented as a function of the geometry, and pole vortices were shown to have a critical role in the formation and destruction of vortex streets. The fourth contribution entailed a more complete perspective of the streamline topology of vortex streets, linking the bifurcations to critical points on the equilibrium curves.

  4. Stationary waves on nonlinear quantum graphs: General framework and canonical perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Gnutzmann, Sven; Waltner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a general framework for solving the stationary nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) on a network of one-dimensional wires modeled by a metric graph with suitable matching conditions at the vertices. A formal solution is given that expresses the wave function and its derivative at one end of an edge (wire) nonlinearly in terms of the values at the other end. For the cubic NLSE this nonlinear transfer operation can be expressed explicitly in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Its application reduces the problem of solving the corresponding set of coupled ordinary nonlinear differential equations to a finite set of nonlinear algebraic equations. For sufficiently small amplitudes we use canonical perturbation theory, which makes it possible to extract the leading nonlinear corrections over large distances.

  5. C*-algebraic scattering theory and explicitly solvable quantum field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warchall, Henry A.

    1985-06-01

    A general theoretical framework is developed for the treatment of a class of quantum field theories that are explicitly exactly solvable, but require the use of C*-algebraic techniques because time-dependent scattering theory cannot be constructed in any one natural representation of the observable algebra. The purpose is to exhibit mechanisms by which inequivalent representations of the observable algebra can arise in quantum field theory, in a setting free of other complications commonly associated with the specification of dynamics. One of two major results is the development of necessary and sufficient conditions for the concurrent unitary implementation of two automorphism groups in a class of quasifree representations of the algebra of the canonical commutation relations (CCR). The automorphism groups considered are induced by one-parameter groups of symplectic transformations on the classical phase space over which the Weyl algebra of the CCR is built; each symplectic group is conjugate by a fixed symplectic transformation to a one-parameter unitary group. The second result, an analog to the Birman-Belopol'skii theorem in two-Hilbert-space scattering theory, gives sufficient conditions for the existence of Mo/ller wave morphisms in theories with time-development automorphism groups of the above type. In a paper which follows, this framework is used to analyze a particular model system for which wave operators fail to exist in any natural representation of the observable algebra, but for which wave morphisms and an associated S matrix are easily constructed.

  6. Equivalent D = 3 supergravity amplitudes from double copies of three-algebra and two-algebra gauge theories.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-tin; Johansson, Henrik

    2013-04-26

    We show that three-dimensional supergravity amplitudes can be obtained as double copies of either three-algebra super-Chern-Simons matter theory or two-algebra super-Yang-Mills theory when either theory is organized to display the color-kinematics duality. We prove that only helicity-conserving four-dimensional gravity amplitudes have nonvanishing descendants when reduced to three dimensions, implying the vanishing of odd-multiplicity S-matrix elements, in agreement with Chern-Simons matter theory. We explicitly verify the double-copy correspondence at four and six points for N = 12,10,8 supergravity theories and discuss its validity for all multiplicity.

  7. Graph Theory Roots of Spatial Operators for Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan

    2011-01-01

    Spatial operators have been used to analyze the dynamics of robotic multibody systems and to develop novel computational dynamics algorithms. Mass matrix factorization, inversion, diagonalization, and linearization are among several new insights obtained using such operators. While initially developed for serial rigid body manipulators, the spatial operators and the related mathematical analysis have been shown to extend very broadly including to tree and closed topology systems, to systems with flexible joints, links, etc. This work uses concepts from graph theory to explore the mathematical foundations of spatial operators. The goal is to study and characterize the properties of the spatial operators at an abstract level so that they can be applied to a broader range of dynamics problems. The rich mathematical properties of the kinematics and dynamics of robotic multibody systems has been an area of strong research interest for several decades. These properties are important to understand the inherent physical behavior of systems, for stability and control analysis, for the development of computational algorithms, and for model development of faithful models. Recurring patterns in spatial operators leads one to ask the more abstract question about the properties and characteristics of spatial operators that make them so broadly applicable. The idea is to step back from the specific application systems, and understand more deeply the generic requirements and properties of spatial operators, so that the insights and techniques are readily available across different kinematics and dynamics problems. In this work, techniques from graph theory were used to explore the abstract basis for the spatial operators. The close relationship between the mathematical properties of adjacency matrices for graphs and those of spatial operators and their kernels were established. The connections hold across very basic requirements on the system topology, the nature of the component

  8. Do malaria parasites follow the algebra of sex ratio theory?

    PubMed

    Schall, Jos J

    2009-03-01

    The ratio of male to female gametocytes seen in infections of Plasmodium and related haemosporidian parasites varies substantially, both within and among parasite species. Sex ratio theory, a mainstay of evolutionary biology, accounts for this variation. The theory provides an algebraic solution for the optimal sex ratio that will maximize parasite fitness. A crucial term in this solution is the probability of selfing by clone-mates within the vector (based on the clone number and their relative abundance). Definitive tests of the theory have proven elusive because of technical challenges in measuring clonal diversity within infections. Newly developed molecular methods now provide opportunities to test the theory with an exquisite precision. PMID:19201653

  9. n-Nucleotide circular codes in graph theory.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Michel, Christian J; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-03-13

    The circular code theory proposes that genes are constituted of two trinucleotide codes: the classical genetic code with 61 trinucleotides for coding the 20 amino acids (except the three stop codons {TAA,TAG,TGA}) and a circular code based on 20 trinucleotides for retrieving, maintaining and synchronizing the reading frame. It relies on two main results: the identification of a maximal C(3) self-complementary trinucleotide circular code X in genes of bacteria, eukaryotes, plasmids and viruses (Michel 2015 J. Theor. Biol. 380, 156-177. (doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.04.009); Arquès & Michel 1996 J. Theor. Biol. 182, 45-58. (doi:10.1006/jtbi.1996.0142)) and the finding of X circular code motifs in tRNAs and rRNAs, in particular in the ribosome decoding centre (Michel 2012 Comput. Biol. Chem. 37, 24-37. (doi:10.1016/j.compbiolchem.2011.10.002); El Soufi & Michel 2014 Comput. Biol. Chem. 52, 9-17. (doi:10.1016/j.compbiolchem.2014.08.001)). The univerally conserved nucleotides A1492 and A1493 and the conserved nucleotide G530 are included in X circular code motifs. Recently, dinucleotide circular codes were also investigated (Michel & Pirillo 2013 ISRN Biomath. 2013, 538631. (doi:10.1155/2013/538631); Fimmel et al. 2015 J. Theor. Biol. 386, 159-165. (doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.08.034)). As the genetic motifs of different lengths are ubiquitous in genes and genomes, we introduce a new approach based on graph theory to study in full generality n-nucleotide circular codes X, i.e. of length 2 (dinucleotide), 3 (trinucleotide), 4 (tetranucleotide), etc. Indeed, we prove that an n-nucleotide code X is circular if and only if the corresponding graph [Formula: see text] is acyclic. Moreover, the maximal length of a path in [Formula: see text] corresponds to the window of nucleotides in a sequence for detecting the correct reading frame. Finally, the graph theory of tournaments is applied to the study of dinucleotide circular codes. It has full equivalence between the combinatorics

  10. n-Nucleotide circular codes in graph theory.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Michel, Christian J; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-03-13

    The circular code theory proposes that genes are constituted of two trinucleotide codes: the classical genetic code with 61 trinucleotides for coding the 20 amino acids (except the three stop codons {TAA,TAG,TGA}) and a circular code based on 20 trinucleotides for retrieving, maintaining and synchronizing the reading frame. It relies on two main results: the identification of a maximal C(3) self-complementary trinucleotide circular code X in genes of bacteria, eukaryotes, plasmids and viruses (Michel 2015 J. Theor. Biol. 380, 156-177. (doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.04.009); Arquès & Michel 1996 J. Theor. Biol. 182, 45-58. (doi:10.1006/jtbi.1996.0142)) and the finding of X circular code motifs in tRNAs and rRNAs, in particular in the ribosome decoding centre (Michel 2012 Comput. Biol. Chem. 37, 24-37. (doi:10.1016/j.compbiolchem.2011.10.002); El Soufi & Michel 2014 Comput. Biol. Chem. 52, 9-17. (doi:10.1016/j.compbiolchem.2014.08.001)). The univerally conserved nucleotides A1492 and A1493 and the conserved nucleotide G530 are included in X circular code motifs. Recently, dinucleotide circular codes were also investigated (Michel & Pirillo 2013 ISRN Biomath. 2013, 538631. (doi:10.1155/2013/538631); Fimmel et al. 2015 J. Theor. Biol. 386, 159-165. (doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.08.034)). As the genetic motifs of different lengths are ubiquitous in genes and genomes, we introduce a new approach based on graph theory to study in full generality n-nucleotide circular codes X, i.e. of length 2 (dinucleotide), 3 (trinucleotide), 4 (tetranucleotide), etc. Indeed, we prove that an n-nucleotide code X is circular if and only if the corresponding graph [Formula: see text] is acyclic. Moreover, the maximal length of a path in [Formula: see text] corresponds to the window of nucleotides in a sequence for detecting the correct reading frame. Finally, the graph theory of tournaments is applied to the study of dinucleotide circular codes. It has full equivalence between the combinatorics

  11. Bagger-Lambert theory for general Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, Jaume; Milanesi, Giuseppe; Russo, Jorge G.

    2008-06-01

    We construct the totally antisymmetric structure constants fABCD of a 3-algebra with a Lorentzian bi-invariant metric starting from an arbitrary semi-simple Lie algebra. The structure constants fABCD can be used to write down a maximally superconformal 3d theory that incorporates the expected degrees of freedom of multiple M2 branes, including the ``center-of-mass" mode described by free scalar and fermion fields. The gauge field sector reduces to a three dimensional BF term, which underlies the gauge symmetry of the theory. We comment on the issue of unitarity of the quantum theory, which is problematic, despite the fact that the specific form of the interactions prevent the ghost fields from running in the internal lines of any Feynman diagram. Giving an expectation value to one of the scalar fields leads to the maximally supersymmetric 3d Yang-Mills Lagrangian with the addition of two U(1) multiplets, one of them ghost-like, which is decoupled at large gYM.

  12. Use of graph theory measures to identify errors in record linkage.

    PubMed

    Randall, Sean M; Boyd, James H; Ferrante, Anna M; Bauer, Jacqueline K; Semmens, James B

    2014-07-01

    Ensuring high linkage quality is important in many record linkage applications. Current methods for ensuring quality are manual and resource intensive. This paper seeks to determine the effectiveness of graph theory techniques in identifying record linkage errors. A range of graph theory techniques was applied to two linked datasets, with known truth sets. The ability of graph theory techniques to identify groups containing errors was compared to a widely used threshold setting technique. This methodology shows promise; however, further investigations into graph theory techniques are required. The development of more efficient and effective methods of improving linkage quality will result in higher quality datasets that can be delivered to researchers in shorter timeframes.

  13. Hopf algebras of rooted forests, cocyles, and free Rota-Baxter algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianjie; Gao, Xing; Guo, Li

    2016-10-01

    The Hopf algebra and the Rota-Baxter algebra are the two algebraic structures underlying the algebraic approach of Connes and Kreimer to renormalization of perturbative quantum field theory. In particular, the Hopf algebra of rooted trees serves as the "baby model" of Feynman graphs in their approach and can be characterized by certain universal properties involving a Hochschild 1-cocycle. Decorated rooted trees have also been applied to study Feynman graphs. We will continue the study of universal properties of various spaces of decorated rooted trees with such a 1-cocycle, leading to the concept of a cocycle Hopf algebra. We further apply the universal properties to equip a free Rota-Baxter algebra with the structure of a cocycle Hopf algebra.

  14. Noncommutative Common Cause Principles in algebraic quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer-Szabo, Gabor; Vecsernyes, Peter

    2013-04-15

    States in algebraic quantum field theory 'typically' establish correlation between spacelike separated events. Reichenbach's Common Cause Principle, generalized to the quantum field theoretical setting, offers an apt tool to causally account for these superluminal correlations. In the paper we motivate first why commutativity between the common cause and the correlating events should be abandoned in the definition of the common cause. Then we show that the Noncommutative Weak Common Cause Principle holds in algebraic quantum field theory with locally finite degrees of freedom. Namely, for any pair of projections A, B supported in spacelike separated regions V{sub A} and V{sub B}, respectively, there is a local projection C not necessarily commuting with A and B such that C is supported within the union of the backward light cones of V{sub A} and V{sub B} and the set {l_brace}C, C{sup Up-Tack }{r_brace} screens off the correlation between A and B.

  15. Calculation of exchange energies using algebraic perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, B. L.; Dalgarno, A.; Cohen, M.

    2010-04-15

    An algebraic perturbation theory is presented for efficient calculations of localized states and hence of exchange energies, which are the differences between low-lying states of the valence electron of a molecule, formed by the collision of an ion Y{sup +} with an atom X. For the case of a homonuclear molecule these are the gerade and ungerade states and the exchange energy is an exponentially decreasing function of the internuclear distance. For such homonuclear systems the theory is used in conjunction with the Herring-Holstein technique to give accurate exchange energies for a range of intermolecular separations R. Since the perturbation parameter is essentially 1/R, this method is suitable for large R. In particular, exchange energies are calculated for X{sub 2}{sup +} systems, where X is H, Li, Na, K, Rb, or Cs.

  16. On a programming language for graph algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinboldt, W. C.; Basili, V. R.; Mesztenyi, C. K.

    1971-01-01

    An algorithmic language, GRAAL, is presented for describing and implementing graph algorithms of the type primarily arising in applications. The language is based on a set algebraic model of graph theory which defines the graph structure in terms of morphisms between certain set algebraic structures over the node set and arc set. GRAAL is modular in the sense that the user specifies which of these mappings are available with any graph. This allows flexibility in the selection of the storage representation for different graph structures. In line with its set theoretic foundation, the language introduces sets as a basic data type and provides for the efficient execution of all set and graph operators. At present, GRAAL is defined as an extension of ALGOL 60 (revised) and its formal description is given as a supplement to the syntactic and semantic definition of ALGOL. Several typical graph algorithms are written in GRAAL to illustrate various features of the language and to show its applicability.

  17. Alternative Representations for Algebraic Problem Solving: When Are Graphs Better than Equations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielicki, Marta K.; Wiley, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Successful algebraic problem solving entails adaptability of solution methods using different representations. Prior research has suggested that students are more likely to prefer symbolic solution methods (equations) over graphical ones, even when graphical methods should be more efficient. However, this research has not tested how representation…

  18. Graph theory and qubit information systems of extremal black branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhaj, Adil; Brahim Sedra, Moulay; Segui, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Using graph theory based on Adinkras, we reconsider the study of extremal black branes in the framework of quantum information. More precisely, we propose a one-to-one correspondence between qubit systems, Adinkras and certain extremal black branes obtained from a type IIA superstring compactified on T n. We accordingly interpret the real Hodge diagram of T n as the geometry of a class of Adinkras formed by {{2}n} bosonic nodes representing n qubits. In this graphic representation, each node encodes information on the qubit quantum states and the charges of the extremal black branes built on T n. The correspondence is generalized to n superqubits associated with odd and even geometries on the real supermanifold {{T}n|n}. Using a combinatorial computation, general expressions describing the number of the bosonic and the fermionic states are obtained.

  19. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimer, Dirk; Sars, Matthias; Suijlekom, Walter D. van

    2013-09-15

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

  20. Spectral theory and spectral gaps for periodic Schrödinger operators on product graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Floquet theory and its applications to spectral theory are developed for periodic Schrödinger operators on product graphs {\\mathbb {G}} \\times {\\mathbb {Z}} , where {\\mathbb {G}} is a finite graph. The resolvent and the spectrum have detailed descriptions which involve the eigenvalues and singularities of the meromorphic Floquet matrix function. Existence and size estimates for sequences of spectral gaps are established.

  1. An Algebraic Construction of Boundary Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Roberto; Witten, Edward

    2011-04-01

    We build up local, time translation covariant Boundary Quantum Field Theory nets of von Neumann algebras {mathcal A_V} on the Minkowski half-plane M + starting with a local conformal net {mathcal A} of von Neumann algebras on {mathbb R} and an element V of a unitary semigroup {mathcal E(mathcal A)} associated with {mathcal A}. The case V = 1 reduces to the net {mathcal A_+} considered by Rehren and one of the authors; if the vacuum character of {mathcal A} is summable, {mathcal A_V} is locally isomorphic to {mathcal A_+}. We discuss the structure of the semigroup {mathcal E(mathcal A)}. By using a one-particle version of Borchers theorem and standard subspace analysis, we provide an abstract analog of the Beurling-Lax theorem that allows us to describe, in particular, all unitaries on the one-particle Hilbert space whose second quantization promotion belongs to {mathcal E(mathcal A^{(0)})} with {mathcal A^{(0)}} the U(1)-current net. Each such unitary is attached to a scattering function or, more generally, to a symmetric inner function. We then obtain families of models via any Buchholz-Mack-Todorov extension of {mathcal A^{(0)}}. A further family of models comes from the Ising model.

  2. Topological insulators and C∗-algebras: Theory and numerical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Matthew B.; Loring, Terry A.

    2011-07-01

    We apply ideas from C∗-algebra to the study of disordered topological insulators. We extract certain almost commuting matrices from the free Fermi Hamiltonian, describing band projected coordinate matrices. By considering topological obstructions to approximating these matrices by exactly commuting matrices, we are able to compute invariants quantifying different topological phases. We generalize previous two dimensional results to higher dimensions; we give a general expression for the topological invariants for arbitrary dimension and several symmetry classes, including chiral symmetry classes, and we present a detailed K-theory treatment of this expression for time reversal invariant three dimensional systems. We can use these results to show non-existence of localized Wannier functions for these systems. We use this approach to calculate the index for time-reversal invariant systems with spin-orbit scattering in three dimensions, on sizes up to 12 3, averaging over a large number of samples. The results show an interesting separation between the localization transition and the point at which the average index (which can be viewed as an "order parameter" for the topological insulator) begins to fluctuate from sample to sample, implying the existence of an unsuspected quantum phase transition separating two different delocalized phases in this system. One of the particular advantages of the C∗-algebraic technique that we present is that it is significantly faster in practice than other methods of computing the index, allowing the study of larger systems. In this paper, we present a detailed discussion of numerical implementation of our method.

  3. K-theory of the chair tiling via AF-algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Antoine; Savinien, Jean

    2016-08-01

    We compute the K-theory groups of the groupoid C∗-algebra of the chair tiling, using a new method. We use exact sequences of Putnam to compute these groups from the K-theory groups of the AF-algebras of the substitution and the induced lower dimensional substitutions on edges and vertices.

  4. The Clifford algebra of physical space and Dirac theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Jayme, Jr.

    2016-09-01

    The claim found in many textbooks that the Dirac equation cannot be written solely in terms of Pauli matrices is shown to not be completely true. It is only true as long as the term β \\psi in the usual Dirac factorization of the Klein–Gordon equation is assumed to be the product of a square matrix β and a column matrix ψ. In this paper we show that there is another possibility besides this matrix product, in fact a possibility involving a matrix operation, and show that it leads to another possible expression for the Dirac equation. We show that, behind this other possible factorization is the formalism of the Clifford algebra of physical space. We exploit this fact, and discuss several different aspects of Dirac theory using this formalism. In particular, we show that there are four different possible sets of definitions for the parity, time reversal, and charge conjugation operations for the Dirac equation.

  5. The Clifford algebra of physical space and Dirac theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Jayme, Jr.

    2016-09-01

    The claim found in many textbooks that the Dirac equation cannot be written solely in terms of Pauli matrices is shown to not be completely true. It is only true as long as the term β \\psi in the usual Dirac factorization of the Klein-Gordon equation is assumed to be the product of a square matrix β and a column matrix ψ. In this paper we show that there is another possibility besides this matrix product, in fact a possibility involving a matrix operation, and show that it leads to another possible expression for the Dirac equation. We show that, behind this other possible factorization is the formalism of the Clifford algebra of physical space. We exploit this fact, and discuss several different aspects of Dirac theory using this formalism. In particular, we show that there are four different possible sets of definitions for the parity, time reversal, and charge conjugation operations for the Dirac equation.

  6. Hopf algebras and topological recursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, João N.

    2015-11-01

    We consider a model for topological recursion based on the Hopf algebra of planar binary trees defined by Loday and Ronco (1998 Adv. Math. 139 293-309 We show that extending this Hopf algebra by identifying pairs of nearest neighbor leaves, and thus producing graphs with loops, we obtain the full recursion formula discovered by Eynard and Orantin (2007 Commun. Number Theory Phys. 1 347-452).

  7. A Theory of Graphs for Reading Comprehension and Writing Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Edward

    Graphs are increasingly being used in written communication and writers expect readers to understand them. One definition of graphs--information transmitted by position of point, line or area on a two dimensional surface--excludes displays composed chiefly of numbers or words such as tables or outlines. However, it does include time lines, flow…

  8. Augmenting Conceptual Design Trajectory Tradespace Exploration with Graph Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dees, Patrick D.; Zwack, Mathew R.; Steffens, Michael; Edwards, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Within conceptual design changes occur rapidly due to a combination of uncertainty and shifting requirements. To stay relevant in this fluid time, trade studies must also be performed rapidly. In order to drive down analysis time while improving the information gained by these studies, surrogate models can be created to represent the complex output of a tool or tools within a specified tradespace. In order to create this model however, a large amount of data must be collected in a short amount of time. By this method, the historical approach of relying on subject matter experts to generate the data required is schedule infeasible. However, by implementing automation and distributed analysis the required data can be generated in a fraction of the time. Previous work focused on setting up a tool called multiPOST capable of orchestrating many simultaneous runs of an analysis tool assessing these automated analyses utilizing heuristics gleaned from the best practices of current subject matter experts. In this update to the previous work, elements of graph theory are included to further drive down analysis time by leveraging data previously gathered. It is shown to outperform the previous method in both time required, and the quantity and quality of data produced.

  9. Fragmentation network of doubly charged methionine: Interpretation using graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, D. T.; Yamazaki, K.; Wang, Y.; Alcamí, M.; Maeda, S.; Kono, H.; Martín, F.; Kukk, E.

    2016-09-01

    The fragmentation of doubly charged gas-phase methionine (HO2CCH(NH2)CH2CH2SCH3) is systematically studied using the self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. We applied graph theory to analyze the large number of the calculated MD trajectories, which appears to be a highly effective and convenient means of extracting versatile information from the large data. The present theoretical results strongly concur with the earlier studied experimental ones. Essentially, the dication dissociates into acidic group CO2H and basic group C4NSH10. The former may carry a single or no charge and stays intact in most cases, whereas the latter may hold either a single or a double charge and tends to dissociate into smaller fragments. The decay of the basic group is observed to follow the Arrhenius law. The dissociation pathways to CO2H and C4NSH10 and subsequent fragmentations are also supported by ab initio calculations.

  10. Fragmentation network of doubly charged methionine: Interpretation using graph theory.

    PubMed

    Ha, D T; Yamazaki, K; Wang, Y; Alcamí, M; Maeda, S; Kono, H; Martín, F; Kukk, E

    2016-09-01

    The fragmentation of doubly charged gas-phase methionine (HO2CCH(NH2)CH2CH2SCH3) is systematically studied using the self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. We applied graph theory to analyze the large number of the calculated MD trajectories, which appears to be a highly effective and convenient means of extracting versatile information from the large data. The present theoretical results strongly concur with the earlier studied experimental ones. Essentially, the dication dissociates into acidic group CO2H and basic group C4NSH10. The former may carry a single or no charge and stays intact in most cases, whereas the latter may hold either a single or a double charge and tends to dissociate into smaller fragments. The decay of the basic group is observed to follow the Arrhenius law. The dissociation pathways to CO2H and C4NSH10 and subsequent fragmentations are also supported by ab initio calculations. PMID:27608997

  11. Fibonacci Identities, Matrices, and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Danrun

    2005-01-01

    General strategies used to help discover, prove, and generalize identities for Fibonacci numbers are described along with some properties about the determinants of square matrices. A matrix proof for identity (2) that has received immense attention from many branches of mathematics, like linear algebra, dynamical systems, graph theory and others…

  12. A Brief Historical Introduction to Euler's Formula for Polyhedra, Topology, Graph Theory and Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2010-01-01

    This article is essentially devoted to a brief historical introduction to Euler's formula for polyhedra, topology, theory of graphs and networks with many examples from the real-world. Celebrated Konigsberg seven-bridge problem and some of the basic properties of graphs and networks for some understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of real…

  13. Chemical Applications of Graph Theory: Part I. Fundamentals and Topological Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Peter J.; Jurs, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Explores graph theory and use of topological indices to predict boiling points. Lists three indices: Wiener Number, Randic Branching Index and Molecular Connectivity, and Molecular Identification numbers. Warns of inadequacies with stereochemistry. (ML)

  14. A brief historical introduction to Euler's formula for polyhedra, topology, graph theory and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2010-09-01

    This article is essentially devoted to a brief historical introduction to Euler's formula for polyhedra, topology, theory of graphs and networks with many examples from the real-world. Celebrated Königsberg seven-bridge problem and some of the basic properties of graphs and networks for some understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of real physical systems are included. We also mention some important and modern applications of graph theory or network problems from transportation to telecommunications. Graphs or networks are effectively used as powerful tools in industrial, electrical and civil engineering, communication networks in the planning of business and industry. Graph theory and combinatorics can be used to understand the changes that occur in many large and complex scientific, technical and medical systems. With the advent of fast large computers and the ubiquitous Internet consisting of a very large network of computers, large-scale complex optimization problems can be modelled in terms of graphs or networks and then solved by algorithms available in graph theory. Many large and more complex combinatorial problems dealing with the possible arrangements of situations of various kinds, and computing the number and properties of such arrangements can be formulated in terms of networks. The Knight's tour problem, Hamilton's tour problem, problem of magic squares, the Euler Graeco-Latin squares problem and their modern developments in the twentieth century are also included.

  15. Realization theory and quadratic optimal controllers for systems defined over Banach and Frechet algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, C. I.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that recent work by Kamen (1979) on the stability of half-plane digital filters shows that the problem of the existence of a feedback law also arises for other Banach algebras in applications. This situation calls for a realization theory and stabilizability criteria for systems defined over Banach for Frechet algebra A. Such a theory is developed here, with special emphasis placed on the construction of finitely generated realizations, the existence of coprime factorizations for T(s) defined over A, and the solvability of the quadratic optimal control problem and the associated algebraic Riccati equation over A.

  16. Detecting labor using graph theory on connectivity matrices of uterine EMG.

    PubMed

    Al-Omar, S; Diab, A; Nader, N; Khalil, M; Karlsson, B; Marque, C

    2015-08-01

    Premature labor is one of the most serious health problems in the developed world. One of the main reasons for this is that no good way exists to distinguish true labor from normal pregnancy contractions. The aim of this paper is to investigate if the application of graph theory techniques to multi-electrode uterine EMG signals can improve the discrimination between pregnancy contractions and labor. To test our methods we first applied them to synthetic graphs where we detected some differences in the parameters results and changes in the graph model from pregnancy-like graphs to labor-like graphs. Then, we applied the same methods to real signals. We obtained the best differentiation between pregnancy and labor through the same parameters. Major improvements in differentiating between pregnancy and labor were obtained using a low pass windowing preprocessing step. Results show that real graphs generally became more organized when moving from pregnancy, where the graph showed random characteristics, to labor where the graph became a more small-world like graph.

  17. Description of the human hand grasp using graph theory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiancan; Zhan, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a method to describe and analyze the human hand grasp postures so as to indicate which fingers should act during grasping and the required movements of those fingers. The method first describes the human hand with human hand tree graph and incidence matrix, and then the relationship between the human hand and the grasped object is described by grasp contact graph and basic cycle matrix that can be divided into an identity matrix and a Bf12 matrix. The nonzero columns of the Bf12 matrix can be described by a graph called VF-tree, which can indicate which fingers are active while grasping and the required degree of freedom of each finger. The method is validated by describing and analyzing the six basic grasp postures of the human hand.

  18. Time-dependence of graph theory metrics in functional connectivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Sharon; Cassese, Alberto; Guindani, Michele; Vannucci, Marina; Yeh, Hsiang J; Haneef, Zulfi; Stern, John M

    2016-01-15

    Brain graphs provide a useful way to computationally model the network structure of the connectome, and this has led to increasing interest in the use of graph theory to quantitate and investigate the topological characteristics of the healthy brain and brain disorders on the network level. The majority of graph theory investigations of functional connectivity have relied on the assumption of temporal stationarity. However, recent evidence increasingly suggests that functional connectivity fluctuates over the length of the scan. In this study, we investigate the stationarity of brain network topology using a Bayesian hidden Markov model (HMM) approach that estimates the dynamic structure of graph theoretical measures of whole-brain functional connectivity. In addition to extracting the stationary distribution and transition probabilities of commonly employed graph theory measures, we propose two estimators of temporal stationarity: the S-index and N-index. These indexes can be used to quantify different aspects of the temporal stationarity of graph theory measures. We apply the method and proposed estimators to resting-state functional MRI data from healthy controls and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Our analysis shows that several graph theory measures, including small-world index, global integration measures, and betweenness centrality, may exhibit greater stationarity over time and therefore be more robust. Additionally, we demonstrate that accounting for subject-level differences in the level of temporal stationarity of network topology may increase discriminatory power in discriminating between disease states. Our results confirm and extend findings from other studies regarding the dynamic nature of functional connectivity, and suggest that using statistical models which explicitly account for the dynamic nature of functional connectivity in graph theory analyses may improve the sensitivity of investigations and consistency across investigations.

  19. Time-dependence of graph theory metrics in functional connectivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Sharon; Cassese, Alberto; Guindani, Michele; Vannucci, Marina; Yeh, Hsiang J; Haneef, Zulfi; Stern, John M

    2016-01-15

    Brain graphs provide a useful way to computationally model the network structure of the connectome, and this has led to increasing interest in the use of graph theory to quantitate and investigate the topological characteristics of the healthy brain and brain disorders on the network level. The majority of graph theory investigations of functional connectivity have relied on the assumption of temporal stationarity. However, recent evidence increasingly suggests that functional connectivity fluctuates over the length of the scan. In this study, we investigate the stationarity of brain network topology using a Bayesian hidden Markov model (HMM) approach that estimates the dynamic structure of graph theoretical measures of whole-brain functional connectivity. In addition to extracting the stationary distribution and transition probabilities of commonly employed graph theory measures, we propose two estimators of temporal stationarity: the S-index and N-index. These indexes can be used to quantify different aspects of the temporal stationarity of graph theory measures. We apply the method and proposed estimators to resting-state functional MRI data from healthy controls and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Our analysis shows that several graph theory measures, including small-world index, global integration measures, and betweenness centrality, may exhibit greater stationarity over time and therefore be more robust. Additionally, we demonstrate that accounting for subject-level differences in the level of temporal stationarity of network topology may increase discriminatory power in discriminating between disease states. Our results confirm and extend findings from other studies regarding the dynamic nature of functional connectivity, and suggest that using statistical models which explicitly account for the dynamic nature of functional connectivity in graph theory analyses may improve the sensitivity of investigations and consistency across investigations. PMID

  20. A review of evolutionary graph theory with applications to game theory.

    PubMed

    Shakarian, Paulo; Roos, Patrick; Johnson, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    Evolutionary graph theory (EGT), studies the ability of a mutant gene to overtake a finite structured population. In this review, we describe the original framework for EGT and the major work that has followed it. This review looks at the calculation of the "fixation probability" - the probability of a mutant taking over a population and focuses on game-theoretic applications. We look at varying topics such as alternate evolutionary dynamics, time to fixation, special topological cases, and game theoretic results. Throughout the review, we examine several interesting open problems that warrant further research.

  1. Quantum Algorithms for Problems in Number Theory, Algebraic Geometry, and Group Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Wim; Sasaki, Yoshitaka

    2013-09-01

    Quantum computers can execute algorithms that sometimes dramatically outperform classical computation. Undoubtedly the best-known example of this is Shor's discovery of an efficient quantum algorithm for factoring integers, whereas the same problem appears to be intractable on classical computers. Understanding what other computational problems can be solved significantly faster using quantum algorithms is one of the major challenges in the theory of quantum computation, and such algorithms motivate the formidable task of building a large-scale quantum computer. This article will review the current state of quantum algorithms, focusing on algorithms for problems with an algebraic flavor that achieve an apparent superpolynomial speedup over classical computation.

  2. Numerical algebraic geometry: a new perspective on gauge and string theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Dhagash; He, Yang-Hui; Hauensteine, Jonathan D.

    2012-07-01

    There is a rich interplay between algebraic geometry and string and gauge theories which has been recently aided immensely by advances in computational algebra. However, symbolic (Gröbner) methods are severely limited by algorithmic issues such as exponential space complexity and being highly sequential. In this paper, we introduce a novel paradigm of numerical algebraic geometry which in a plethora of situations overcomes these shortcomings. The so-called `embarrassing parallelizability' allows us to solve many problems and extract physical information which elude symbolic methods. We describe the method and then use it to solve various problems arising from physics which could not be otherwise solved.

  3. Poor Textural Image Matching Based on Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shiyu; Yuan, Xiuxiao; Yuan, Wei; Cai, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Image matching lies at the heart of photogrammetry and computer vision. For poor textural images, the matching result is affected by low contrast, repetitive patterns, discontinuity or occlusion, few or homogeneous textures. Recently, graph matching became popular for its integration of geometric and radiometric information. Focused on poor textural image matching problem, it is proposed an edge-weight strategy to improve graph matching algorithm. A series of experiments have been conducted including 4 typical landscapes: Forest, desert, farmland, and urban areas. And it is experimentally found that our new algorithm achieves better performance. Compared to SIFT, doubled corresponding points were acquired, and the overall recall rate reached up to 68%, which verifies the feasibility and effectiveness of the algorithm.

  4. Towards a classification of modular invariant partition functions for theories based on N=4 superconformal algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Anne

    1993-05-01

    The representation theory of the doubly extended N=4 superconformal algebra is reviewed. The modular properties of the corresponding characters can be derived, using characters sumrules for coset realizations of these N=4 algebras. Some particular combinations of massless characters are shown to transform as affine SU(2) characters under S and T, a fact used to completely classify the massless sector of the partition function.

  5. Analysis of Computer Algebra System Tutorials Using Cognitive Load Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Most research in the area of Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) has been designed to compare the effectiveness of instructional technology to traditional lecture-based formats. While results are promising, research also indicates evidence of the steep learning curve imposed by the technology. Yet no studies have been conducted to investigate this…

  6. Higher gauge theories from Lie n-algebras and off-shell covariantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, Ursula; Heller, Marc Andre; Ikeda, Noriaki; Kaneko, Yukio; Watamura, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    We analyze higher gauge theories in various dimensions using a supergeometric method based on a differential graded symplectic manifold, called a QP-manifold, which is closely related to the BRST-BV formalism in gauge theories. Extensions of the Lie 2-algebra gauge structure are formulated within the Lie n-algebra induced by the QP-structure. We find that in 5 and 6 dimensions there are special extensions of the gauge algebra. In these cases, a restriction of the gauge symmetry by imposing constraints on the auxiliary gauge fields leads to a covariantized theory. As an example we show that we can obtain an off-shell covariantized higher gauge theory in 5 dimensions, which is similar to the one proposed in [1].

  7. Support vector machine classification of major depressive disorder using diffusion-weighted neuroimaging and graph theory.

    PubMed

    Sacchet, Matthew D; Prasad, Gautam; Foland-Ross, Lara C; Thompson, Paul M; Gotlib, Ian H

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in understanding brain networks in major depressive disorder (MDD). Neural pathways can be tracked in the living brain using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI); graph theory can then be used to study properties of the resulting fiber networks. To date, global abnormalities have not been reported in tractography-based graph metrics in MDD, so we used a machine learning approach based on "support vector machines" to differentiate depressed from healthy individuals based on multiple brain network properties. We also assessed how important specific graph metrics were for this differentiation. Finally, we conducted a local graph analysis to identify abnormal connectivity at specific nodes of the network. We were able to classify depression using whole-brain graph metrics. Small-worldness was the most useful graph metric for classification. The right pars orbitalis, right inferior parietal cortex, and left rostral anterior cingulate all showed abnormal network connectivity in MDD. This is the first use of structural global graph metrics to classify depressed individuals. These findings highlight the importance of future research to understand network properties in depression across imaging modalities, improve classification results, and relate network alterations to psychiatric symptoms, medication, and comorbidities.

  8. Safety models incorporating graph theory based transit indicators.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Liliana; Sayed, Tarek; Wahba, Mohamed M

    2013-01-01

    There is a considerable need for tools to enable the evaluation of the safety of transit networks at the planning stage. One interesting approach for the planning of public transportation systems is the study of networks. Network techniques involve the analysis of systems by viewing them as a graph composed of a set of vertices (nodes) and edges (links). Once the transport system is visualized as a graph, various network properties can be evaluated based on the relationships between the network elements. Several indicators can be calculated including connectivity, coverage, directness and complexity, among others. The main objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between network-based transit indicators and safety. The study develops macro-level collision prediction models that explicitly incorporate transit physical and operational elements and transit network indicators as explanatory variables. Several macro-level (zonal) collision prediction models were developed using a generalized linear regression technique, assuming a negative binomial error structure. The models were grouped into four main themes: transit infrastructure, transit network topology, transit route design, and transit performance and operations. The safety models showed that collisions were significantly associated with transit network properties such as: connectivity, coverage, overlapping degree and the Local Index of Transit Availability. As well, the models showed a significant relationship between collisions and some transit physical and operational attributes such as the number of routes, frequency of routes, bus density, length of bus and 3+ priority lanes.

  9. Using graph theory to describe and model chromosome aberrations.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Rainer K; Arsuaga, Javier; Vázquez, Mariel; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2002-11-01

    A comprehensive description of chromosome aberrations is introduced that is suitable for all cytogenetic protocols (e.g. solid staining, banding, FISH, mFISH, SKY, bar coding) and for mathematical analyses. "Aberration multigraphs" systematically characterize and interrelate three basic aberration elements: (1) the initial configuration of chromosome breaks; (2) the exchange process, whose cycle structure helps to describe aberration complexity; and (3) the final configuration of rearranged chromosomes, which determines the observed pattern but may contain cryptic misrejoinings in addition. New aberration classification methods and a far-reaching generalization of mPAINT descriptors, applicable to any protocol, emerge. The difficult problem of trying to infer actual exchange processes from cytogenetically observed final patterns is analyzed using computer algorithms, adaptations of known theorems on cubic graphs, and some new graph-theoretical constructs. Results include the following: (1) For a painting protocol, unambiguously inferring the occurrence of a high-order cycle requires a corresponding number of different colors; (2) cycle structure can be computed by a simple trick directly from mPAINT descriptors if the initial configuration has no more than one break per homologue pair; and (3) higher-order cycles are more frequent than the obligate cycle structure specifies. Aberration multigraphs are a powerful new way to describe, classify and quantitatively analyze radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. They pinpoint (but do not eliminate) the problem that, with present cytogenetic techniques, one observed pattern corresponds to many possible initial configurations and exchange processes. PMID:12385633

  10. N=2 gauge theories: Congruence subgroups, coset graphs, and modular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui; McKay, John

    2013-01-01

    We establish a correspondence between generalized quiver gauge theories in four dimensions and congruence subgroups of the modular group, hinging upon the trivalent graphs, which arise in both. The gauge theories and the graphs are enumerated and their numbers are compared. The correspondence is particularly striking for genus zero torsion-free congruence subgroups as exemplified by those which arise in Moonshine. We analyze in detail the case of index 24, where modular elliptic K3 surfaces emerge: here, the elliptic j-invariants can be recast as dessins d'enfant, which dictate the Seiberg-Witten curves.

  11. Revealing Long-Range Interconnected Hubs in Human Chromatin Interaction Data Using Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulos, R. E.; Arneodo, A.; Jensen, P.; Audit, B.

    2013-09-01

    We use graph theory to analyze chromatin interaction (Hi-C) data in the human genome. We show that a key functional feature of the genome—“master” replication origins—corresponds to DNA loci of maximal network centrality. These loci form a set of interconnected hubs both within chromosomes and between different chromosomes. Our results open the way to a fruitful use of graph theory concepts to decipher DNA structural organization in relation to genome functions such as replication and transcription. This quantitative information should prove useful to discriminate between possible polymer models of nuclear organization.

  12. A graph-theory approach to designing deployable mechanism of reflector antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. M.; Liu, T. S.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an exhaustive search method for designing new deployable mechanisms of reflector antennas. The procedure is based on the graph theory and a flow value method. The mechanism is composed of links and joints. Connections between links are represented by using the graph theory. Rules representing design criteria and the flow value method based on load flow are taken into account to evaluate and select mechanisms among those that are enumerated in the database. Finally, this study presents a deployable mechanism that transmits load the most efficiently.

  13. Insights into the organization of biochemical regulatory networks using graph theory analyses.

    PubMed

    Ma'ayan, Avi

    2009-02-27

    Graph theory has been a valuable mathematical modeling tool to gain insights into the topological organization of biochemical networks. There are two types of insights that may be obtained by graph theory analyses. The first provides an overview of the global organization of biochemical networks; the second uses prior knowledge to place results from multivariate experiments, such as microarray data sets, in the context of known pathways and networks to infer regulation. Using graph analyses, biochemical networks are found to be scale-free and small-world, indicating that these networks contain hubs, which are proteins that interact with many other molecules. These hubs may interact with many different types of proteins at the same time and location or at different times and locations, resulting in diverse biological responses. Groups of components in networks are organized in recurring patterns termed network motifs such as feedback and feed-forward loops. Graph analysis revealed that negative feedback loops are less common and are present mostly in proximity to the membrane, whereas positive feedback loops are highly nested in an architecture that promotes dynamical stability. Cell signaling networks have multiple pathways from some input receptors and few from others. Such topology is reminiscent of a classification system. Signaling networks display a bow-tie structure indicative of funneling information from extracellular signals and then dispatching information from a few specific central intracellular signaling nexuses. These insights show that graph theory is a valuable tool for gaining an understanding of global regulatory features of biochemical networks.

  14. Insights into the organization of biochemical regulatory networks using graph theory analyses.

    PubMed

    Ma'ayan, Avi

    2009-02-27

    Graph theory has been a valuable mathematical modeling tool to gain insights into the topological organization of biochemical networks. There are two types of insights that may be obtained by graph theory analyses. The first provides an overview of the global organization of biochemical networks; the second uses prior knowledge to place results from multivariate experiments, such as microarray data sets, in the context of known pathways and networks to infer regulation. Using graph analyses, biochemical networks are found to be scale-free and small-world, indicating that these networks contain hubs, which are proteins that interact with many other molecules. These hubs may interact with many different types of proteins at the same time and location or at different times and locations, resulting in diverse biological responses. Groups of components in networks are organized in recurring patterns termed network motifs such as feedback and feed-forward loops. Graph analysis revealed that negative feedback loops are less common and are present mostly in proximity to the membrane, whereas positive feedback loops are highly nested in an architecture that promotes dynamical stability. Cell signaling networks have multiple pathways from some input receptors and few from others. Such topology is reminiscent of a classification system. Signaling networks display a bow-tie structure indicative of funneling information from extracellular signals and then dispatching information from a few specific central intracellular signaling nexuses. These insights show that graph theory is a valuable tool for gaining an understanding of global regulatory features of biochemical networks. PMID:18940806

  15. Real forms of very extended Kac-Moody algebras and theories with eight supersymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccioni, Fabio; West, Peter; Van Proeyen, Antoine

    2008-05-01

    We consider all theories with eight supersymmetries whose reduction to three dimensions gives rise to scalars that parametrise symmetric manifolds. We conjecture that these theories are non-linear realisations of very-extended Kac-Moody algebras for suitable choices of real forms. We show for the most interesting cases that the bosonic sector of the supersymmetric theory is precisely reproduced by the corresponding non-linear realisation.

  16. Region Graph Partition Function Expansion and Approximate Free Energy Landscapes: Theory and Some Numerical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haijun; Wang, Chuang

    2012-08-01

    Graphical models for finite-dimensional spin glasses and real-world combinatorial optimization and satisfaction problems usually have an abundant number of short loops. The cluster variation method and its extension, the region graph method, are theoretical approaches for treating the complicated short-loop-induced local correlations. For graphical models represented by non-redundant or redundant region graphs, approximate free energy landscapes are constructed in this paper through the mathematical framework of region graph partition function expansion. Several free energy functionals are obtained, each of which use a set of probability distribution functions or functionals as order parameters. These probability distribution function/functionals are required to satisfy the region graph belief-propagation equation or the region graph survey-propagation equation to ensure vanishing correction contributions of region subgraphs with dangling edges. As a simple application of the general theory, we perform region graph belief-propagation simulations on the square-lattice ferromagnetic Ising model and the Edwards-Anderson model. Considerable improvements over the conventional Bethe-Peierls approximation are achieved. Collective domains of different sizes in the disordered and frustrated square lattice are identified by the message-passing procedure. Such collective domains and the frustrations among them are responsible for the low-temperature glass-like dynamical behaviors of the system.

  17. Topics in Computational Learning Theory and Graph Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board, Raymond Acton

    This thesis addresses problems from two areas of theoretical computer science. The first area is that of computational learning theory, which is the study of the phenomenon of concept learning using formal mathematical models. The goal of computational learning theory is to investigate learning in a rigorous manner through the use of techniques…

  18. What Can Graph Theory Tell Us about Word Learning and Lexical Retrieval?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitevitch, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Graph theory and the new science of networks provide a mathematically rigorous approach to examine the development and organization of complex systems. These tools were applied to the mental lexicon to examine the organization of words in the lexicon and to explore how that structure might influence the acquisition and retrieval of…

  19. A Qualitative Analysis Framework Using Natural Language Processing and Graph Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a method of extending natural language-based processing of qualitative data analysis with the use of a very quantitative tool--graph theory. It is not an attempt to convert qualitative research to a positivist approach with a mathematical black box, nor is it a "graphical solution". Rather, it is a method to help qualitative…

  20. Untangling Word Webs: Graph Theory and the Notion of Density in Second Language Word Association Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Clarissa; Meara, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Examines the implications of the metaphor of the vocabulary network. Takes a formal approach to the exploration of this metaphor by applying the principles of graph theory to word association data to compare the relative densities of the first language and second language lexical networks. (Author/VWL)

  1. Superspace formulation in a three-algebra approach to D=3, N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Famin; Wu Yongshi

    2010-11-15

    We present a superspace formulation of the D=3, N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons Matter theories, with matter supermultiplets valued in a symplectic 3-algebra. We first construct an N=1 superconformal action and then generalize a method used by Gaitto and Witten to enhance the supersymmetry from N=1 to N=5. By decomposing the N=5 supermultiplets and the symplectic 3-algebra properly and proposing a new superpotential term, we construct the N=4 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories in terms of two sets of generators of a (quaternion) symplectic 3-algebra. The N=4 theories can also be derived by requiring that the supersymmetry transformations are closed on-shell. The relationship between the 3-algebras, Lie superalgebras, Lie algebras, and embedding tensors (proposed in [E. A. Bergshoeff, O. Hohm, D. Roest, H. Samtleben, and E. Sezgin, J. High Energy Phys. 09 (2008) 101.]) is also clarified. The general N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories in terms of ordinary Lie algebras can be re-derived in our 3-algebra approach. All known N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories can be recovered in the present superspace formulation for super-Lie algebra realization of symplectic 3-algebras.

  2. Superspace formulation in a three-algebra approach to D=3, N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fa-Min; Wu, Yong-Shi

    2010-11-01

    We present a superspace formulation of the D=3, N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons Matter theories, with matter supermultiplets valued in a symplectic 3-algebra. We first construct an N=1 superconformal action and then generalize a method used by Gaitto and Witten to enhance the supersymmetry from N=1 to N=5. By decomposing the N=5 supermultiplets and the symplectic 3-algebra properly and proposing a new superpotential term, we construct the N=4 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories in terms of two sets of generators of a (quaternion) symplectic 3-algebra. The N=4 theories can also be derived by requiring that the supersymmetry transformations are closed on-shell. The relationship between the 3-algebras, Lie superalgebras, Lie algebras, and embedding tensors (proposed in [E. A. Bergshoeff, O. Hohm, D. Roest, H. Samtleben, and E. Sezgin, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 09 (2008) 101.10.1088/1126-6708/2008/09/101]) is also clarified. The general N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories in terms of ordinary Lie algebras can be re-derived in our 3-algebra approach. All known N=4, 5 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theories can be recovered in the present superspace formulation for super-Lie algebra realization of symplectic 3-algebras.

  3. Experimental demonstration of the connection between quantum contextuality and graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañas, Gustavo; Acuña, Evelyn; Cariñe, Jaime; Barra, Johanna F.; Gómez, Esteban S.; Xavier, Guilherme B.; Lima, Gustavo; Cabello, Adán

    2016-07-01

    We report a method that exploits a connection between quantum contextuality and graph theory to reveal any form of quantum contextuality in high-precision experiments. We use this technique to identify a graph which corresponds to an extreme form of quantum contextuality unnoticed before and test it using high-dimensional quantum states encoded in the linear transverse momentum of single photons. Our results open the door to the experimental exploration of quantum contextuality in all its forms, including those needed for quantum computation.

  4. Lamplighter groups, de Brujin graphs, spider-web graphs and their spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorchuk, R.; Leemann, P.-H.; Nagnibeda, T.

    2016-05-01

    We study the infinite family of spider-web graphs \\{{{ S }}k,N,M\\}, k≥slant 2, N≥slant 0 and M≥slant 1, initiated in the 50s in the context of network theory. It was later shown in physical literature that these graphs have remarkable percolation and spectral properties. We provide a mathematical explanation of these properties by putting the spider-web graphs in the context of group theory and algebraic graph theory. Namely, we realize them as tensor products of the well-known de Bruijn graphs \\{{{ B }}k,N\\} with cyclic graphs \\{{C}M\\} and show that these graphs are described by the action of the lamplighter group {{ L }}k={Z}/k{Z}\\wr {Z} on the infinite binary tree. Our main result is the identification of the infinite limit of \\{{{ S }}k,N,M\\}, as N,M\\to ∞ , with the Cayley graph of the lamplighter group {{ L }}k which, in turn, is one of the famous Diestel–Leader graphs {{DL}}k,k. As an application we compute the spectra of all spider-web graphs and show their convergence to the discrete spectral distribution associated with the Laplacian on the lamplighter group.

  5. Lamplighter groups, de Brujin graphs, spider-web graphs and their spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorchuk, R.; Leemann, P.-H.; Nagnibeda, T.

    2016-05-01

    We study the infinite family of spider-web graphs \\{{{ S }}k,N,M\\}, k≥slant 2, N≥slant 0 and M≥slant 1, initiated in the 50s in the context of network theory. It was later shown in physical literature that these graphs have remarkable percolation and spectral properties. We provide a mathematical explanation of these properties by putting the spider-web graphs in the context of group theory and algebraic graph theory. Namely, we realize them as tensor products of the well-known de Bruijn graphs \\{{{ B }}k,N\\} with cyclic graphs \\{{C}M\\} and show that these graphs are described by the action of the lamplighter group {{ L }}k={Z}/k{Z}\\wr {Z} on the infinite binary tree. Our main result is the identification of the infinite limit of \\{{{ S }}k,N,M\\}, as N,M\\to ∞ , with the Cayley graph of the lamplighter group {{ L }}k which, in turn, is one of the famous Diestel-Leader graphs {{DL}}k,k. As an application we compute the spectra of all spider-web graphs and show their convergence to the discrete spectral distribution associated with the Laplacian on the lamplighter group.

  6. From matrix models' topological expansion to topological string theories: counting surfaces with algebraic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orantin, N.

    2007-09-01

    The 2-matrix model has been introduced to study Ising model on random surfaces. Since then, the link between matrix models and combinatorics of discrete surfaces has strongly tightened. This manuscript aims to investigate these deep links and extend them beyond the matrix models, following my work's evolution. First, I take care to define properly the hermitian 2 matrix model which gives rise to generating functions of discrete surfaces equipped with a spin structure. Then, I show how to compute all the terms in the topological expansion of any observable by using algebraic geometry tools. They are obtained as differential forms on an algebraic curve associated to the model: the spectral curve. In a second part, I show how to define such differentials on any algebraic curve even if it does not come from a matrix model. I then study their numerous symmetry properties under deformations of the algebraic curve. In particular, I show that these objects coincide with the topological expansion of the observable of a matrix model if the algebraic curve is the spectral curve of this model. Finally, I show that fine tuning the parameters ensure that these objects can be promoted to modular invariants and satisfy the holomorphic anomaly equation of the Kodaira-Spencer theory. This gives a new hint that the Dijkgraaf-Vafa conjecture is correct.

  7. Connections between the Sznajd model with general confidence rules and graph theory.

    PubMed

    Timpanaro, André M; Prado, Carmen P C

    2012-10-01

    The Sznajd model is a sociophysics model that is used to model opinion propagation and consensus formation in societies. Its main feature is that its rules favor bigger groups of agreeing people. In a previous work, we generalized the bounded confidence rule in order to model biases and prejudices in discrete opinion models. In that work, we applied this modification to the Sznajd model and presented some preliminary results. The present work extends what we did in that paper. We present results linking many of the properties of the mean-field fixed points, with only a few qualitative aspects of the confidence rule (the biases and prejudices modeled), finding an interesting connection with graph theory problems. More precisely, we link the existence of fixed points with the notion of strongly connected graphs and the stability of fixed points with the problem of finding the maximal independent sets of a graph. We state these results and present comparisons between the mean field and simulations in Barabási-Albert networks, followed by the main mathematical ideas and appendices with the rigorous proofs of our claims and some graph theory concepts, together with examples. We also show that there is no qualitative difference in the mean-field results if we require that a group of size q>2, instead of a pair, of agreeing agents be formed before they attempt to convince other sites (for the mean field, this would coincide with the q-voter model).

  8. Connections between the Sznajd model with general confidence rules and graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpanaro, André M.; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2012-10-01

    The Sznajd model is a sociophysics model that is used to model opinion propagation and consensus formation in societies. Its main feature is that its rules favor bigger groups of agreeing people. In a previous work, we generalized the bounded confidence rule in order to model biases and prejudices in discrete opinion models. In that work, we applied this modification to the Sznajd model and presented some preliminary results. The present work extends what we did in that paper. We present results linking many of the properties of the mean-field fixed points, with only a few qualitative aspects of the confidence rule (the biases and prejudices modeled), finding an interesting connection with graph theory problems. More precisely, we link the existence of fixed points with the notion of strongly connected graphs and the stability of fixed points with the problem of finding the maximal independent sets of a graph. We state these results and present comparisons between the mean field and simulations in Barabási-Albert networks, followed by the main mathematical ideas and appendices with the rigorous proofs of our claims and some graph theory concepts, together with examples. We also show that there is no qualitative difference in the mean-field results if we require that a group of size q>2, instead of a pair, of agreeing agents be formed before they attempt to convince other sites (for the mean field, this would coincide with the q-voter model).

  9. Supersymmetry and the discrete light-cone quantization limit of the Lie 3-algebra model of M theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Matsuo

    2012-02-01

    In M. Sato, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 07 (2010) 02610.1007/JHEP07(2010)026, we proposed two models of M theory, the Hermitian 3-algebra model and Lie 3-algebra model. In this paper, we study the Lie 3-algebra model with a Lorentzian Lie 3-algebra. This model is ghost-free despite the Lorentzian 3-algebra. We show that our model satisfies two criteria as a model of M theory. First, we show that the model possesses N=1 supersymmetry in 11 dimensions. Second, we show the model reduces to Banks-Fischler-Shenker-Susskind matrix theory with finite size matrices in a discrete light-cone quantization limit.

  10. Visibility graph analysis on quarterly macroeconomic series of China based on complex network theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Na; Li, Dong; Wang, Qiwen

    2012-12-01

    The visibility graph approach and complex network theory provide a new insight into time series analysis. The inheritance of the visibility graph from the original time series was further explored in the paper. We found that degree distributions of visibility graphs extracted from Pseudo Brownian Motion series obtained by the Frequency Domain algorithm exhibit exponential behaviors, in which the exponential exponent is a binomial function of the Hurst index inherited in the time series. Our simulations presented that the quantitative relations between the Hurst indexes and the exponents of degree distribution function are different for different series and the visibility graph inherits some important features of the original time series. Further, we convert some quarterly macroeconomic series including the growth rates of value-added of three industry series and the growth rates of Gross Domestic Product series of China to graphs by the visibility algorithm and explore the topological properties of graphs associated from the four macroeconomic series, namely, the degree distribution and correlations, the clustering coefficient, the average path length, and community structure. Based on complex network analysis we find degree distributions of associated networks from the growth rates of value-added of three industry series are almost exponential and the degree distributions of associated networks from the growth rates of GDP series are scale free. We also discussed the assortativity and disassortativity of the four associated networks as they are related to the evolutionary process of the original macroeconomic series. All the constructed networks have “small-world” features. The community structures of associated networks suggest dynamic changes of the original macroeconomic series. We also detected the relationship among government policy changes, community structures of associated networks and macroeconomic dynamics. We find great influences of government

  11. The Data-Ink Ratio and Accuracy of Information Derived from Newspaper Graphs: An Experimental Test of the Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, James D.

    A study tested the data-ink ratio theory, which holds that a reader's recall of quantitative data displayed in a graph containing a substantial amount of non-data-ink will be significantly less than recall from a graph containing little non-data-ink, as it might apply to graphics used in mass circulation newspapers. The experiment employed a…

  12. The Casimir Effect from the Point of View of Algebraic Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio; Nosari, Gabriele; Pinamonti, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    We consider a region of Minkowski spacetime bounded either by one or by two parallel, infinitely extended plates orthogonal to a spatial direction and a real Klein-Gordon field satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions. We quantize these two systems within the algebraic approach to quantum field theory using the so-called functional formalism. As a first step we construct a suitable unital ∗-algebra of observables whose generating functionals are characterized by a labelling space which is at the same time optimal and separating and fulfils the F-locality property. Subsequently we give a definition for these systems of Hadamard states and we investigate explicit examples. In the case of a single plate, it turns out that one can build algebraic states via a pull-back of those on the whole Minkowski spacetime, moreover inheriting from them the Hadamard property. When we consider instead two plates, algebraic states can be put in correspondence with those on flat spacetime via the so-called method of images, which we translate to the algebraic setting. For a massless scalar field we show that this procedure works perfectly for a large class of quasi-free states including the Poincaré vacuum and KMS states. Eventually Wick polynomials are introduced. Contrary to the Minkowski case, the extended algebras, built in globally hyperbolic subregions can be collected in a global counterpart only after a suitable deformation which is expressed locally in terms of a *-isomorphism. As a last step, we construct explicitly the two-point function and the regularized energy density, showing, moreover, that the outcome is consistent with the standard results of the Casimir effect.

  13. Scale-adaptive tensor algebra for local many-body methods of electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liakh, Dmitry I

    2014-01-01

    While the formalism of multiresolution analysis (MRA), based on wavelets and adaptive integral representations of operators, is actively progressing in electronic structure theory (mostly on the independent-particle level and, recently, second-order perturbation theory), the concepts of multiresolution and adaptivity can also be utilized within the traditional formulation of correlated (many-particle) theory which is based on second quantization and the corresponding (generally nonorthogonal) tensor algebra. In this paper, we present a formalism called scale-adaptive tensor algebra (SATA) which exploits an adaptive representation of tensors of many-body operators via the local adjustment of the basis set quality. Given a series of locally supported fragment bases of a progressively lower quality, we formulate the explicit rules for tensor algebra operations dealing with adaptively resolved tensor operands. The formalism suggested is expected to enhance the applicability and reliability of local correlated many-body methods of electronic structure theory, especially those directly based on atomic orbitals (or any other localized basis functions).

  14. Geomorphic coupling and sediment connectivity in an alpine catchment — Exploring sediment cascades using graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckmann, Tobias; Schwanghart, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Through their relevance for sediment budgets and the sensitivity of geomorphic systems, geomorphic coupling and (sediment) connectivity represent important topics in geomorphology. Since the introduction of the systems perspective to physical geography by Chorley and Kennedy (1971), a catchment has been perceived as consisting of landscape elements (e.g. landforms, subcatchments) that are coupled by geomorphic processes through sediment transport. In this study, we present a novel application of mathematical graph theory to explore the network structure of coarse sediment pathways in a central alpine catchment. Numerical simulation models for rockfall, debris flows, and (hillslope and channel) fluvial processes are used to establish a spatially explicit graph model of sediment sources, pathways and sinks. The raster cells of a digital elevation model form the nodes of this graph, and simulated sediment trajectories represent the corresponding edges. Model results are validated by visual comparison with the field situation and aerial photos. The interaction of sediment pathways, i.e. where the deposits of a geomorphic process form the sources of another process, forms sediment cascades, represented by paths (a succession of edges) in the graph model. We show how this graph can be used to explore upslope (contributing area) and downslope (source to sink) functional connectivity by analysing its nodes, edges and paths. The analysis of the spatial distribution, composition and frequency of sediment cascades yields information on the relative importance of geomorphic processes and their interaction (however regardless of their transport capacity). In the study area, the analysis stresses the importance of mass movements and their interaction, e.g. the linkage of large rockfall source areas to debris flows that potentially enter the channel network. Moreover, it is shown that only a small percentage of the study area is coupled to the channel network which itself is

  15. Characterizing brain anatomical connections using diffusion weighted MRI and graph theory.

    PubMed

    Iturria-Medina, Y; Canales-Rodríguez, E J; Melie-García, L; Valdés-Hernández, P A; Martínez-Montes, E; Alemán-Gómez, Y; Sánchez-Bornot, J M

    2007-07-01

    A new methodology based on Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DW-MRI) and Graph Theory is presented for characterizing the anatomical connections between brain gray matter areas. In a first step, brain voxels are modeled as nodes of a non-directed graph in which the weight of an arc linking two neighbor nodes is assumed to be proportional to the probability of being connected by nervous fibers. This probability is estimated by means of probabilistic tissue segmentation and intravoxel white matter orientational distribution function, obtained from anatomical MRI and DW-MRI, respectively. A new tractography algorithm for finding white matter routes is also introduced. This algorithm solves the most probable path problem between any two nodes, leading to the assessment of probabilistic brain anatomical connection maps. In a second step, for assessing anatomical connectivity between K gray matter structures, the previous graph is redefined as a K+1 partite graph by partitioning the initial nodes set in K non-overlapped gray matter subsets and one subset clustering the remaining nodes. Three different measures are proposed for quantifying anatomical connections between any pair of gray matter subsets: Anatomical Connection Strength (ACS), Anatomical Connection Density (ACD) and Anatomical Connection Probability (ACP). This methodology was applied to both artificial and actual human data. Results show that nervous fiber pathways between some regions of interest were reconstructed correctly. Additionally, mean connectivity maps of ACS, ACD and ACP between 71 gray matter structures for five healthy subjects are presented.

  16. Sparsified-dynamics modeling of discrete point vortices with graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Kunihiko; Nair, Aditya

    2014-11-01

    We utilize graph theory to derive a sparsified interaction-based model that captures unsteady point vortex dynamics. The present model builds upon the Biot-Savart law and keeps the number of vortices (graph nodes) intact and reduces the number of inter-vortex interactions (graph edges). We achieve this reduction in vortex interactions by spectral sparsification of graphs. This approach drastically reduces the computational cost to predict the dynamical behavior, sharing characteristics of reduced-order models. Sparse vortex dynamics are illustrated through an example of point vortex clusters interacting amongst themselves. We track the centroids of the individual vortex clusters to evaluate the error in bulk motion of the point vortices in the sparsified setup. To further improve the accuracy in predicting the nonlinear behavior of the vortices, resparsification strategies are employed for the sparsified interaction-based models. The model retains the nonlinearity of the interaction and also conserves the invariants of discrete vortex dynamics; namely the Hamiltonian, linear impulse, and angular impulse as well as circulation. Work supported by US Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0386) and US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (YIP: FA9550-13-1-0183).

  17. Energy Minimization of Discrete Protein Titration State Models Using Graph Theory.

    PubMed

    Purvine, Emilie; Monson, Kyle; Jurrus, Elizabeth; Star, Keith; Baker, Nathan A

    2016-08-25

    There are several applications in computational biophysics that require the optimization of discrete interacting states, for example, amino acid titration states, ligand oxidation states, or discrete rotamer angles. Such optimization can be very time-consuming as it scales exponentially in the number of sites to be optimized. In this paper, we describe a new polynomial time algorithm for optimization of discrete states in macromolecular systems. This algorithm was adapted from image processing and uses techniques from discrete mathematics and graph theory to restate the optimization problem in terms of "maximum flow-minimum cut" graph analysis. The interaction energy graph, a graph in which vertices (amino acids) and edges (interactions) are weighted with their respective energies, is transformed into a flow network in which the value of the minimum cut in the network equals the minimum free energy of the protein and the cut itself encodes the state that achieves the minimum free energy. Because of its deterministic nature and polynomial time performance, this algorithm has the potential to allow for the ionization state of larger proteins to be discovered.

  18. Aspects of Coding. Applications of Linear Algebra to Communication and Information Science. [and] A Double-Error Correcting Code. Applications of Algebra to Information Theory. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Units 336 and 337.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Simon; Sherman, Gary J.

    These two modules cover aspects of the coding process and algebraic coding theory. The first unit defines coding as a branch of information and communication science, which draws extensively upon many diverse mathematical fields, primarily abstract and linear algebra, number theory, probability and statistics, and combinatorial theory. Aspects of…

  19. The theory of Enceladus and Dione: An application of computerized algebra in dynamical astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferys, W. H.; Ries, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    A theory of Saturn's satellites Enceladus and Dione is discussed which is literal (all constants of integration appear explicitly), canonically invariant (the Hori-Lie method is used), and which correctly handles the eccentricity-type resonance between the two satellites. Algebraic manipulations are designed to be performed using the TRIGMAN formula manipulation language, and computer programs were developed so that, with minor modifications, they can be used on the Mimas-Tethys and Titan-Hyperion systems.

  20. Mathematic Modeling of Complex Hydraulic Machinery Systems When Evaluating Reliability Using Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemenkova, M. Yu; Shipovalov, A. N.; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-04-01

    The main technological equipment of pipeline transport of hydrocarbons are hydraulic machines. During transportation of oil mainly used of centrifugal pumps, designed to work in the “pumping station-pipeline” system. Composition of a standard pumping station consists of several pumps, complex hydraulic piping. The authors have developed a set of models and algorithms for calculating system reliability of pumps. It is based on the theory of reliability. As an example, considered one of the estimation methods with the application of graph theory.

  1. Functional Organization of the Action Observation Network in Autism: A Graph Theory Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alaerts, Kaat; Geerlings, Franca; Herremans, Lynn; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Verhoeven, Judith; Sunaert, Stefan; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability to recognize, understand and interpret other’s actions and emotions has been linked to the mirror system or action-observation-network (AON). Although variations in these abilities are prevalent in the neuro-typical population, persons diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have deficits in the social domain and exhibit alterations in this neural network. Method Here, we examined functional network properties of the AON using graph theory measures and region-to-region functional connectivity analyses of resting-state fMRI-data from adolescents and young adults with ASD and typical controls (TC). Results Overall, our graph theory analyses provided convergent evidence that the network integrity of the AON is altered in ASD, and that reductions in network efficiency relate to reductions in overall network density (i.e., decreased overall connection strength). Compared to TC, individuals with ASD showed significant reductions in network efficiency and increased shortest path lengths and centrality. Importantly, when adjusting for overall differences in network density between ASD and TC groups, participants with ASD continued to display reductions in network integrity, suggesting that also network-level organizational properties of the AON are altered in ASD. Conclusion While differences in empirical connectivity contributed to reductions in network integrity, graph theoretical analyses provided indications that also changes in the high-level network organization reduced integrity of the AON. PMID:26317222

  2. Sharing Teaching Ideas: Graphing Families of Curves Using Transformations of Reference Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, David

    2007-01-01

    This article provides for a fast extremely accurate approach to graphing functions that is based on learning function reference graphs and then applying algebraic transformations to these reference graphs.

  3. Representations of Conformal Nets, Universal C*-Algebras and K-Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Sebastiano; Conti, Roberto; Hillier, Robin; Weiner, Mihály

    2013-05-01

    We study the representation theory of a conformal net {{A}} on S 1 from a K-theoretical point of view using its universal C*-algebra {C^*({A})}. We prove that if {{A}} satisfies the split property then, for every representation π of {{A}} with finite statistical dimension, {π(C^*({A}))} is weakly closed and hence a finite direct sum of type I∞ factors. We define the more manageable locally normal universal C*-algebra {C_ln^*({A})} as the quotient of {C^*({A})} by its largest ideal vanishing in all locally normal representations and we investigate its structure. In particular, if {{A}} is completely rational with n sectors, then {C_ln^*({A})} is a direct sum of n type I∞ factors. Its ideal {{K}_{A}} of compact operators has nontrivial K-theory, and we prove that the DHR endomorphisms of {C^*({A})} with finite statistical dimension act on {{K}_{A}}, giving rise to an action of the fusion semiring of DHR sectors on {K_0({K}_{A})}. Moreover, we show that this action corresponds to the regular representation of the associated fusion algebra.

  4. Random partitions and asymptotic theory of symmetric groups, Hecke algebras and finite Chevalley groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méliot, Pierre-Loïc

    2010-12-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the asymptotics of random partitions chosen according to probability measures coming from the representation theory of the symmetric groups S_n and of the finite Chevalley groups GL(n,F_q) and Sp(2n,F_q). More precisely, we prove laws of large numbers and central limit theorems for the q-Plancherel measures of type A and B, the Schur-Weyl measures and the Gelfand measures. Using the RSK algorithm, it also gives results on longest increasing subsequences in random words. We develop a technique of moments (and cumulants) for random partitions, thereby using the polynomial functions on Young diagrams in the sense of Kerov and Olshanski. The algebra of polynomial functions, or observables of Young diagrams is isomorphic to the algebra of partial permutations; in the last part of the thesis, we try to generalize this beautiful construction.

  5. Supersymmetric correspondence in spectra on a graph and its line graph: From circuit theory to spoof plasmons on metallic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Yosuke; Urade, Yoshiro; Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Miyamaru, Fumiaki; Takeda, Mitsuo Wada; Kitano, Masao

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the supersymmetry (SUSY) structures for inductor-capacitor circuit networks on a simple regular graph and its line graph. We show that their eigenspectra must coincide (except, possibly, for the highest eigenfrequency) due to SUSY, which is derived from the topological nature of the circuits. To observe this spectra correspondence in the high-frequency range, we study spoof plasmons on metallic hexagonal and kagomé lattices. The band correspondence between them is predicted by a simulation. Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, we demonstrate the band correspondence of fabricated metallic hexagonal and kagomé lattices.

  6. Graphs and Zero-Divisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axtell, M.; Stickles, J.

    2010-01-01

    The last ten years have seen an explosion of research in the zero-divisor graphs of commutative rings--by professional mathematicians "and" undergraduates. The objective is to find algebraic information within the geometry of these graphs. This topic is approachable by anyone with one or two semesters of abstract algebra. This article gives the…

  7. Discovering Authorities and Hubs in Different Topological Web Graph Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meghabghab, George

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of citation analysis on the Web considers Web hyperlinks as a source to analyze citations. Topics include basic graph theory applied to Web pages, including matrices, linear algebra, and Web topology; and hubs and authorities, including a search technique called HITS (Hyperlink Induced Topic Search). (Author/LRW)

  8. A Novel Model for DNA Sequence Similarity Analysis Based on Graph Theory

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xingqin; Wu, Qin; Zhang, Yusen; Fuller, Eddie; Zhang, Cun-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Determination of sequence similarity is one of the major steps in computational phylogenetic studies. As we know, during evolutionary history, not only DNA mutations for individual nucleotide but also subsequent rearrangements occurred. It has been one of major tasks of computational biologists to develop novel mathematical descriptors for similarity analysis such that various mutation phenomena information would be involved simultaneously. In this paper, different from traditional methods (eg, nucleotide frequency, geometric representations) as bases for construction of mathematical descriptors, we construct novel mathematical descriptors based on graph theory. In particular, for each DNA sequence, we will set up a weighted directed graph. The adjacency matrix of the directed graph will be used to induce a representative vector for DNA sequence. This new approach measures similarity based on both ordering and frequency of nucleotides so that much more information is involved. As an application, the method is tested on a set of 0.9-kb mtDNA sequences of twelve different primate species. All output phylogenetic trees with various distance estimations have the same topology, and are generally consistent with the reported results from early studies, which proves the new method’s efficiency; we also test the new method on a simulated data set, which shows our new method performs better than traditional global alignment method when subsequent rearrangements happen frequently during evolutionary history. PMID:22065497

  9. A graph theory practice on transformed image: a random image steganography.

    PubMed

    Thanikaiselvan, V; Arulmozhivarman, P; Subashanthini, S; Amirtharajan, Rengarajan

    2013-01-01

    Modern day information age is enriched with the advanced network communication expertise but unfortunately at the same time encounters infinite security issues when dealing with secret and/or private information. The storage and transmission of the secret information become highly essential and have led to a deluge of research in this field. In this paper, an optimistic effort has been taken to combine graceful graph along with integer wavelet transform (IWT) to implement random image steganography for secure communication. The implementation part begins with the conversion of cover image into wavelet coefficients through IWT and is followed by embedding secret image in the randomly selected coefficients through graph theory. Finally stegoimage is obtained by applying inverse IWT. This method provides a maximum of 44 dB peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) for 266646 bits. Thus, the proposed method gives high imperceptibility through high PSNR value and high embedding capacity in the cover image due to adaptive embedding scheme and high robustness against blind attack through graph theoretic random selection of coefficients.

  10. A Graph Theory Practice on Transformed Image: A Random Image Steganography

    PubMed Central

    Thanikaiselvan, V.; Arulmozhivarman, P.; Subashanthini, S.; Amirtharajan, Rengarajan

    2013-01-01

    Modern day information age is enriched with the advanced network communication expertise but unfortunately at the same time encounters infinite security issues when dealing with secret and/or private information. The storage and transmission of the secret information become highly essential and have led to a deluge of research in this field. In this paper, an optimistic effort has been taken to combine graceful graph along with integer wavelet transform (IWT) to implement random image steganography for secure communication. The implementation part begins with the conversion of cover image into wavelet coefficients through IWT and is followed by embedding secret image in the randomly selected coefficients through graph theory. Finally stegoimage is obtained by applying inverse IWT. This method provides a maximum of 44 dB peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) for 266646 bits. Thus, the proposed method gives high imperceptibility through high PSNR value and high embedding capacity in the cover image due to adaptive embedding scheme and high robustness against blind attack through graph theoretic random selection of coefficients. PMID:24453857

  11. S-duality and the prepotential in N={2}^{star } theories (I): the ADE algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billó, M.; Frau, M.; Fucito, F.; Lerda, A.; Morales, J. F.

    2015-11-01

    The prepotential of N={2}^{star } supersymmetric theories with unitary gauge groups in an Ω background satisfies a modular anomaly equation that can be recursively solved order by order in an expansion for small mass. By requiring that S-duality acts on the prepotential as a Fourier transform we generalise this result to N={2}^{star } theories with gauge algebras of the D and E type and show that their prepotentials can be written in terms of quasi-modular forms of SL(2, {Z}) . The results are checked against microscopic multi-instanton calculus based on localization for the A and D series and reproduce the known 1-instanton prepotential of the pure N=2 theories for any gauge group of ADE type. Our results can also be used to obtain the multi-instanton terms in the exceptional theories for which the microscopic instanton calculus and the ADHM construction are not available.

  12. Modeling spatial decisions with graph theory: logging roads and forest fragmentation in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert; Arima, Eugenio; Messina, Joe; Soares-Filho, Britaldo; Perz, Stephen; Vergara, Dante; Sales, Marcio; Pereira, Ritaumaria; Castro, Williams

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the spatial decision-making of loggers and implications for forest fragmentation in the Amazon basin. It provides a behavioral explanation for fragmentation by modeling how loggers build road networks, typically abandoned upon removal of hardwoods. Logging road networks provide access to land, and the settlers who take advantage of them clear fields and pastures that accentuate their spatial signatures. In shaping agricultural activities, these networks organize emergent patterns of forest fragmentation, even though the loggers move elsewhere. The goal of the article is to explicate how loggers shape their road networks, in order to theoretically explain an important type of forest fragmentation found in the Amazon basin, particularly in Brazil. This is accomplished by adapting graph theory to represent the spatial decision-making of loggers, and by implementing computational algorithms that build graphs interpretable as logging road networks. The economic behavior of loggers is conceptualized as a profit maximization problem, and translated into spatial decision-making by establishing a formal correspondence between mathematical graphs and road networks. New computational approaches, adapted from operations research, are used to construct graphs and simulate spatial decision-making as a function of discount rates, land tenure, and topographic constraints. The algorithms employed bracket a range of behavioral settings appropriate for areas of terras de volutas, public lands that have not been set aside for environmental protection, indigenous peoples, or colonization. The simulation target sites are located in or near so-called Terra do Meio, once a major logging frontier in the lower Amazon Basin. Simulation networks are compared to empirical ones identified by remote sensing and then used to draw inferences about factors influencing the spatial behavior of loggers. Results overall suggest that Amazonia's logging road networks induce more

  13. Multiscale connectivity and graph theory highlight critical areas for conservation under climate change.

    PubMed

    Dilt, Thomas E; Weisberg, Peter J; Leitner, Philip; Matocq, Marjorie D; Inman, Richard D; Nussear, Kenneth E; Esque, Todd C

    2016-06-01

    Conservation planning and biodiversity management require information on landscape connectivity across a range of spatial scales from individual home ranges to large regions. Reduction in landscape connectivity due changes in land use or development is expected to act synergistically with alterations to habitat mosaic configuration arising from climate change. We illustrate a multiscale connectivity framework to aid habitat conservation prioritization in the context of changing land use and climate. Our approach, which builds upon the strengths of multiple landscape connectivity methods, including graph theory, circuit theory, and least-cost path analysis, is here applied to the conservation planning requirements of the Mohave ground squirrel. The distribution of this threatened Californian species, as for numerous other desert species, overlaps with the proposed placement of several utility-scale renewable energy developments in the American southwest. Our approach uses information derived at three spatial scales to forecast potential changes in habitat connectivity under various scenarios of energy development and climate change. By disentangling the potential effects of habitat loss and fragmentation across multiple scales, we identify priority conservation areas for both core habitat and critical corridor or stepping stone habitats. This approach is a first step toward applying graph theory to analyze habitat connectivity for species with continuously distributed habitat and should be applicable across a broad range of taxa. PMID:27509760

  14. Multi-scale connectivity and graph theory highlight critical areas for conservation under climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dilts, Thomas E.; Weisberg, Peter J.; Leitner, Phillip; Matocq, Marjorie D.; Inman, Richard D.; Nussear, Ken E.; Esque, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Conservation planning and biodiversity management require information on landscape connectivity across a range of spatial scales from individual home ranges to large regions. Reduction in landscape connectivity due changes in land-use or development is expected to act synergistically with alterations to habitat mosaic configuration arising from climate change. We illustrate a multi-scale connectivity framework to aid habitat conservation prioritization in the context of changing land use and climate. Our approach, which builds upon the strengths of multiple landscape connectivity methods including graph theory, circuit theory and least-cost path analysis, is here applied to the conservation planning requirements of the Mohave ground squirrel. The distribution of this California threatened species, as for numerous other desert species, overlaps with the proposed placement of several utility-scale renewable energy developments in the American Southwest. Our approach uses information derived at three spatial scales to forecast potential changes in habitat connectivity under various scenarios of energy development and climate change. By disentangling the potential effects of habitat loss and fragmentation across multiple scales, we identify priority conservation areas for both core habitat and critical corridor or stepping stone habitats. This approach is a first step toward applying graph theory to analyze habitat connectivity for species with continuously-distributed habitat, and should be applicable across a broad range of taxa.

  15. Multiscale connectivity and graph theory highlight critical areas for conservation under climate change.

    PubMed

    Dilt, Thomas E; Weisberg, Peter J; Leitner, Philip; Matocq, Marjorie D; Inman, Richard D; Nussear, Kenneth E; Esque, Todd C

    2016-06-01

    Conservation planning and biodiversity management require information on landscape connectivity across a range of spatial scales from individual home ranges to large regions. Reduction in landscape connectivity due changes in land use or development is expected to act synergistically with alterations to habitat mosaic configuration arising from climate change. We illustrate a multiscale connectivity framework to aid habitat conservation prioritization in the context of changing land use and climate. Our approach, which builds upon the strengths of multiple landscape connectivity methods, including graph theory, circuit theory, and least-cost path analysis, is here applied to the conservation planning requirements of the Mohave ground squirrel. The distribution of this threatened Californian species, as for numerous other desert species, overlaps with the proposed placement of several utility-scale renewable energy developments in the American southwest. Our approach uses information derived at three spatial scales to forecast potential changes in habitat connectivity under various scenarios of energy development and climate change. By disentangling the potential effects of habitat loss and fragmentation across multiple scales, we identify priority conservation areas for both core habitat and critical corridor or stepping stone habitats. This approach is a first step toward applying graph theory to analyze habitat connectivity for species with continuously distributed habitat and should be applicable across a broad range of taxa.

  16. An Automated Method to Identify Mesoscale Convective Complexes (MCCs) Implementing Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehall, K. D.; Mattmann, C. A.; Jenkins, G. S.; Waliser, D. E.; Rwebangira, R.; Demoz, B.; Kim, J.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.; Ramirez, P.; Joyce, M. J.; Loikith, P.; Lee, H.; Khudikyan, S.; Boustani, M.; Goodman, A.; Zimdars, P. A.; Whittell, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) are convectively-driven weather systems with a duration of ~10 - 12 hours and contributions of large amounts to the rainfall daily and monthly totals. More than 400 MCCs occur annually over various locations on the globe. In West Africa, ~170 MCCs occur annually during the 180 days representing the summer months (June - November), and contribute ~75% of the annual wet season rainfall. The main objective of this study is to improve automatic identification of MCC over West Africa. The spatial expanse of MCCs and the spatio-temporal variability in their convective characteristics make them difficult to characterize even in dense networks of radars and/or surface gauges. As such there exist criteria for identifying MCCs with satellite images - mostly using infrared (IR) data. Automated MCC identification methods are based on forward and/or backward in time spatial-temporal analysis of the IR satellite data and characteristically incorporate a manual component as these algorithms routinely falter with merging and splitting cloud systems between satellite images. However, these algorithms are not readily transferable to voluminous data or other satellite-derived datasets (e.g. TRMM), thus hindering comprehensive studies of these features both at weather and climate timescales. Recognizing the existing limitations of automated methods, this study explores the applicability of graph theory to creating a fully automated method for deriving a West African MCC dataset from hourly infrared satellite images between 2001- 2012. Graph theory, though not heavily implemented in the atmospheric sciences, has been used for the predicting (nowcasting) of thunderstorms from radar and satellite data by considering the relationship between atmospheric variables at a given time, or for the spatial-temporal analysis of cloud volumes. From these few studies, graph theory appears to be innately applicable to the complexity, non-linearity and inherent

  17. Box graphs and singular fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hirotaka; Lawrie, Craig; Morrison, David R.; Schafer-Nameki, Sakura

    2014-05-01

    We determine the higher codimension fibers of elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau fourfolds with section by studying the three-dimensional = 2 supersymmetric gauge theory with matter which describes the low energy effective theory of M-theory compactified on the associated Weierstrass model, a singular model of the fourfold. Each phase of the Coulomb branch of this theory corresponds to a particular resolution of the Weierstrass model, and we show that these have a concise description in terms of decorated box graphs based on the representation graph of the matter multiplets, or alternatively by a class of convex paths on said graph. Transitions between phases have a simple interpretation as "flopping" of the path, and in the geometry correspond to actual flop transitions. This description of the phases enables us to enumerate and determine the entire network between them, with various matter representations for all reductive Lie groups. Furthermore, we observe that each network of phases carries the structure of a (quasi-)minuscule representation of a specific Lie algebra. Interpreted from a geometric point of view, this analysis determines the generators of the cone of effective curves as well as the network of flop transitions between crepant resolutions of singular elliptic Calabi-Yau fourfolds. From the box graphs we determine all fiber types in codimensions two and three, and we find new, non-Kodaira, fiber types for E 6, E7 and E 8.

  18. The signed permutation group on Feynman graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purkart, Julian

    2016-08-01

    The Feynman rules assign to every graph an integral which can be written as a function of a scaling parameter L. Assuming L for the process under consideration is very small, so that contributions to the renormalization group are small, we can expand the integral and only consider the lowest orders in the scaling. The aim of this article is to determine specific combinations of graphs in a scalar quantum field theory that lead to a remarkable simplification of the first non-trivial term in the perturbation series. It will be seen that the result is independent of the renormalization scheme and the scattering angles. To achieve that goal we will utilize the parametric representation of scalar Feynman integrals as well as the Hopf algebraic structure of the Feynman graphs under consideration. Moreover, we will present a formula which reduces the effort of determining the first-order term in the perturbation series for the specific combination of graphs to a minimum.

  19. The theory of Enceladus and Dione - An application of computerized algebra in dynamical astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferys, W. H.; Ries, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    The orbits of the satellites of the outer planets are poorly known, due to lack of attention over the past half century. We have been developing a new theory of Saturn's satellites Enceladus and Dione which is literal (all constants of integration appear explicitly), canonically invariant (the Hori-Lie method is used), and which correctly handles the eccentricity-type resonance between the two satellites. The algebraic manipulations are being performed using the TRIGMAN formula manipulation language, and the programs have been developed so that with minor modifications they can be used on the Mimas-Tethys and Titan-Hyperion systems.

  20. Differences in graph theory functional connectivity in left and right temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Sharon; Stern, John M.; Engel, Jerome; Levin, Harvey S.; Haneef, Zulfi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Purpose To investigate lateralized differences in limbic system functional connectivity between left and right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using graph theory. Methods Interictal resting state fMRI was performed in 14 left TLE patients, 11 right TLE patients, and 12 controls. Graph theory analysis of 10 bilateral limbic regions of interest was conducted. Changes in edgewise functional connectivity, network topology, and regional topology were quantified, and then left and right TLE were compared. Results Limbic edgewise functional connectivity was predominantly reduced in both left and right TLE. More regional connections were reduced in right TLE, most prominently involving reduced interhemispheric connectivity between the bilateral insula and bilateral hippocampi. A smaller number of limbic connections were increased in TLE, more so in left than in right TLE. Topologically, the most pronounced change was a reduction in average network betweenness centrality and concurrent increase in left hippocampal betweenness centrality in right TLE. In contrast, left TLE exhibited a weak trend toward increased right hippocampal betweenness centrality, with no change in average network betweenness centrality. Conclusion Limbic functional connectivity is predominantly reduced in both left and right TLE, with more pronounced reductions in right TLE. In contrast, left TLE exhibits both edgewise and topological changes that suggest a tendency toward reorganization. Network changes in TLE and lateralized differences thereof may have important diagnostic and prognostic implications. PMID:25445238

  1. Rule-based graph theory to enable exploration of the space system architecture design space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arney, Dale Curtis

    The primary goal of this research is to improve upon system architecture modeling in order to enable the exploration of design space options. A system architecture is the description of the functional and physical allocation of elements and the relationships, interactions, and interfaces between those elements necessary to satisfy a set of constraints and requirements. The functional allocation defines the functions that each system (element) performs, and the physical allocation defines the systems required to meet those functions. Trading the functionality between systems leads to the architecture-level design space that is available to the system architect. The research presents a methodology that enables the modeling of complex space system architectures using a mathematical framework. To accomplish the goal of improved architecture modeling, the framework meets five goals: technical credibility, adaptability, flexibility, intuitiveness, and exhaustiveness. The framework is technically credible, in that it produces an accurate and complete representation of the system architecture under consideration. The framework is adaptable, in that it provides the ability to create user-specified locations, steady states, and functions. The framework is flexible, in that it allows the user to model system architectures to multiple destinations without changing the underlying framework. The framework is intuitive for user input while still creating a comprehensive mathematical representation that maintains the necessary information to completely model complex system architectures. Finally, the framework is exhaustive, in that it provides the ability to explore the entire system architecture design space. After an extensive search of the literature, graph theory presents a valuable mechanism for representing the flow of information or vehicles within a simple mathematical framework. Graph theory has been used in developing mathematical models of many transportation and

  2. Conceptualizing Routines of Practice That Support Algebraic Reasoning in Elementary Schools: A Constructivist Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Store, Jessie Chitsanzo

    2012-01-01

    There is ample literature documenting that, for many decades, high school students view algebra as difficult and do not demonstrate understanding of algebraic concepts. Algebraic reasoning in elementary school aims at meaningfully introducing algebra to elementary school students in preparation for higher-level mathematics. While there is research…

  3. SPECTRAL GRAPH THEORY AND GRAPH ENERGY METRICS SHOW EVIDENCE FOR THE ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE DISCONNECTION SYNDROME IN APOE-4 RISK GENE CARRIERS

    PubMed Central

    Daianu, Madelaine; Mezher, Adam; Jahanshad, Neda; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Bernstein, Matt A.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of network breakdown in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is likely to be enhanced through advanced mathematical descriptors. Here, we applied spectral graph theory to provide novel metrics of structural connectivity based on 3-Tesla diffusion weighted images in 42 AD patients and 50 healthy controls. We reconstructed connectivity networks using whole-brain tractography and examined, for the first time here, cortical disconnection based on the graph energy and spectrum. We further assessed supporting metrics - link density and nodal strength - to better interpret our results. Metrics were analyzed in relation to the well-known APOE-4 genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. The number of disconnected cortical regions increased with the number of copies of the APOE-4 risk gene in people with AD. Each additional copy of the APOE-4 risk gene may lead to more dysfunctional networks with weakened or abnormal connections, providing evidence for the previously hypothesized “disconnection syndrome”. PMID:26413205

  4. Affine.m—Mathematica package for computations in representation theory of finite-dimensional and affine Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Anton

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we present Affine.m-a program for computations in representation theory of finite-dimensional and affine Lie algebras and describe implemented algorithms. The algorithms are based on the properties of weights and Weyl symmetry. Computation of weight multiplicities in irreducible and Verma modules, branching of representations and tensor product decomposition are the most important problems for us. These problems have numerous applications in physics and we provide some examples of these applications. The program is implemented in the popular computer algebra system Mathematica and works with finite-dimensional and affine Lie algebras. Catalogue identifier: AENA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, UK Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 24 844 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 045 908 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica. Computer: i386-i686, x86_64. Operating system: Linux, Windows, Mac OS, Solaris. RAM: 5-500 Mb Classification: 4.2, 5. Nature of problem: Representation theory of finite-dimensional Lie algebras has many applications in different branches of physics, including elementary particle physics, molecular physics, nuclear physics. Representations of affine Lie algebras appear in string theories and two-dimensional conformal field theory used for the description of critical phenomena in two-dimensional systems. Also Lie symmetries play a major role in a study of quantum integrable systems. Solution method: We work with weights and roots of finite-dimensional and affine Lie algebras and use Weyl symmetry extensively. Central problems which are the computations of weight multiplicities, branching and fusion coefficients are solved using one general recurrent

  5. Network reconstruction based on proteomic data and prior knowledge of protein connectivity using graph theory.

    PubMed

    Stavrakas, Vassilis; Melas, Ioannis N; Sakellaropoulos, Theodore; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of signal transduction pathways is instrumental for understanding cells' function. People have been tackling modeling of signaling pathways in order to accurately represent the signaling events inside cells' biochemical microenvironment in a way meaningful for scientists in a biological field. In this article, we propose a method to interrogate such pathways in order to produce cell-specific signaling models. We integrate available prior knowledge of protein connectivity, in a form of a Prior Knowledge Network (PKN) with phosphoproteomic data to construct predictive models of the protein connectivity of the interrogated cell type. Several computational methodologies focusing on pathways' logic modeling using optimization formulations or machine learning algorithms have been published on this front over the past few years. Here, we introduce a light and fast approach that uses a breadth-first traversal of the graph to identify the shortest pathways and score proteins in the PKN, fitting the dependencies extracted from the experimental design. The pathways are then combined through a heuristic formulation to produce a final topology handling inconsistencies between the PKN and the experimental scenarios. Our results show that the algorithm we developed is efficient and accurate for the construction of medium and large scale signaling networks. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by interrogating a manually curated interaction graph model of EGF/TNFA stimulation against made up experimental data. To avoid the possibility of erroneous predictions, we performed a cross-validation analysis. Finally, we validate that the introduced approach generates predictive topologies, comparable to the ILP formulation. Overall, an efficient approach based on graph theory is presented herein to interrogate protein-protein interaction networks and to provide meaningful biological insights. PMID:26020784

  6. Network reconstruction based on proteomic data and prior knowledge of protein connectivity using graph theory.

    PubMed

    Stavrakas, Vassilis; Melas, Ioannis N; Sakellaropoulos, Theodore; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of signal transduction pathways is instrumental for understanding cells' function. People have been tackling modeling of signaling pathways in order to accurately represent the signaling events inside cells' biochemical microenvironment in a way meaningful for scientists in a biological field. In this article, we propose a method to interrogate such pathways in order to produce cell-specific signaling models. We integrate available prior knowledge of protein connectivity, in a form of a Prior Knowledge Network (PKN) with phosphoproteomic data to construct predictive models of the protein connectivity of the interrogated cell type. Several computational methodologies focusing on pathways' logic modeling using optimization formulations or machine learning algorithms have been published on this front over the past few years. Here, we introduce a light and fast approach that uses a breadth-first traversal of the graph to identify the shortest pathways and score proteins in the PKN, fitting the dependencies extracted from the experimental design. The pathways are then combined through a heuristic formulation to produce a final topology handling inconsistencies between the PKN and the experimental scenarios. Our results show that the algorithm we developed is efficient and accurate for the construction of medium and large scale signaling networks. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by interrogating a manually curated interaction graph model of EGF/TNFA stimulation against made up experimental data. To avoid the possibility of erroneous predictions, we performed a cross-validation analysis. Finally, we validate that the introduced approach generates predictive topologies, comparable to the ILP formulation. Overall, an efficient approach based on graph theory is presented herein to interrogate protein-protein interaction networks and to provide meaningful biological insights.

  7. Hydrogen bond network topology in liquid water and methanol: a graph theory approach.

    PubMed

    Bakó, Imre; Bencsura, Akos; Hermannson, Kersti; Bálint, Szabolcs; Grósz, Tamás; Chihaia, Viorel; Oláh, Julianna

    2013-09-28

    Networks are increasingly recognized as important building blocks of various systems in nature and society. Water is known to possess an extended hydrogen bond network, in which the individual bonds are broken in the sub-picosecond range and still the network structure remains intact. We investigated and compared the topological properties of liquid water and methanol at various temperatures using concepts derived within the framework of graph and network theory (neighbour number and cycle size distribution, the distribution of local cyclic and local bonding coefficients, Laplacian spectra of the network, inverse participation ratio distribution of the eigenvalues and average localization distribution of a node) and compared them to small world and Erdős-Rényi random networks. Various characteristic properties (e.g. the local cyclic and bonding coefficients) of the network in liquid water could be reproduced by small world and/or Erdős-Rényi networks, but the ring size distribution of water is unique and none of the studied graph models could describe it. Using the inverse participation ratio of the Laplacian eigenvectors we characterized the network inhomogeneities found in water and showed that similar phenomena can be observed in Erdős-Rényi and small world graphs. We demonstrated that the topological properties of the hydrogen bond network found in liquid water systematically change with the temperature and that increasing temperature leads to a broader ring size distribution. We applied the studied topological indices to the network of water molecules with four hydrogen bonds, and showed that at low temperature (250 K) these molecules form a percolated or nearly-percolated network, while at ambient or high temperatures only small clusters of four-hydrogen bonded water molecules exist.

  8. Motor execution and motor imagery: a comparison of functional connectivity patterns based on graph theory.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Zhang, H; Hui, M; Long, Z; Jin, Z; Liu, Y; Yao, L

    2014-03-01

    Motor execution and imagery (ME and MI), as the basic abilities of human beings, have been considered to be effective strategies in motor skill learning and motor abilities rehabilitation. Neuroimaging studies have revealed several critical regions from functional activation for ME as well as MI. Recently, investigations have probed into functional connectivity of ME; however, few explorations compared the functional connectivity between the two tasks. With betweenness centrality (BC) of graph theory, we explored and compared the functional connectivity between two finger tapping tasks of ME and MI. Our results showed that using BC, the key node for the ME task mainly focused on the supplementary motor area, while the key node for the MI task mainly located in the right premotor area. These results characterized the connectivity patterns of ME and MI and may provide new insights into the neural mechanism underlying motor execution and imagination of movements.

  9. Graph theory approach to the eigenvalue problem of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Graph theory is used to obtain numerical solutions to eigenvalue problems of large space structures (LSS) characterized by a state vector of large dimensions. The LSS are considered as large, flexible systems requiring both orientation and surface shape control. Graphic interpretation of the determinant of a matrix is employed to reduce a higher dimensional matrix into combinations of smaller dimensional sub-matrices. The reduction is implemented by means of a Boolean equivalent of the original matrices formulated to obtain smaller dimensional equivalents of the original numerical matrix. Computation time becomes less and more accurate solutions are possible. An example is provided in the form of a free-free square plate. Linearized system equations and numerical values of a stiffness matrix are presented, featuring a state vector with 16 components.

  10. What graph theory actually tells us about resting state interictal MEG epileptic activity.

    PubMed

    Niso, Guiomar; Carrasco, Sira; Gudín, María; Maestú, Fernando; Del-Pozo, Francisco; Pereda, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory provides a useful framework to study functional brain networks from neuroimaging data. In epilepsy research, recent findings suggest that it offers unique insight into the fingerprints of this pathology on brain dynamics. Most studies hitherto have focused on seizure activity during focal epilepsy, but less is known about functional epileptic brain networks during interictal activity in frontal focal and generalized epilepsy. Besides, it is not clear yet which measures are most suitable to characterize these networks. To address these issues, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data using two orthogonal planar gradiometers from 45 subjects from three groups (15 healthy controls (7 males, 24 ± 6 years), 15 frontal focal (8 male, 32 ± 16 years) and 15 generalized epileptic (6 male, 27 ± 7 years) patients) during interictal resting state with closed eyes. Then, we estimated the total and relative spectral power of the largest principal component of the gradiometers, and the degree of phase synchronization between each sensor site in the frequency range [0.5-40 Hz]. We further calculated a comprehensive battery of 15 graph-theoretic measures and used the affinity propagation clustering algorithm to elucidate the minimum set of them that fully describe these functional brain networks. The results show that differences in spectral power between the control and the other two groups have a distinctive pattern: generalized epilepsy presents higher total power for all frequencies except the alpha band over a widespread set of sensors; frontal focal epilepsy shows higher relative power in the beta band bilaterally in the fronto-central sensors. Moreover, all network indices can be clustered into three groups, whose exemplars are the global network efficiency, the eccentricity and the synchronizability. Again, the patterns of differences were clear: the brain network of the generalized epilepsy patients presented greater efficiency and lower

  11. Classification of two-dimensional conformal supergravity theories with finite-dimensional algebras

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, J.; Velikson, B.

    1989-07-15

    We present a list of all the finite supersymmetric extensions of thetwo-dimensional (2D) conformal algebra SO(2,2), which could lead to 2D superconformal gravity theories. The on-shell matter multiplets of the algebrasallowing canonical spin-0 and -1/2 matter are constructed. Usingthese multiplets the Weyl and Yang-Mills anomalies are calculated. There aremany new models. One new model is free of both Yang-Mills and Weyl anomalies,SU(1,1)/times/SU(2/vert bar/1,1), but only the algebrasSU(1,1)/sup 2/, OSP(1/vert bar/2)/sup 2/,OSP(2/vert bar/2)/sup 2/, SU(1,1)/times/OSP(1/vert bar/2),OSP(1/vert bar/2)/times/OSP(2/vert bar/2), andSU(1,1)/times/OSP(2/vert bar/2) lead to models free of all anomalies. Thesemodels correspond to the known string models.

  12. Reichenbach's Common Cause Principle in Algebraic Quantum Field Theory with Locally Finite Degrees of Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer-Szabó, Gábor; Vecsernyés, Péter

    2012-02-01

    In the paper it will be shown that Reichenbach's Weak Common Cause Principle is not valid in algebraic quantum field theory with locally finite degrees of freedom in general. Namely, for any pair of projections A, B supported in spacelike separated double cones {mathcal{O}}a and {mathcal{O}}b, respectively, a correlating state can be given for which there is no nontrivial common cause (system) located in the union of the backward light cones of {mathcal{O}}a and {mathcal{O}}b and commuting with the both A and B. Since noncommuting common cause solutions are presented in these states the abandonment of commutativity can modulate this result: noncommutative Common Cause Principles might survive in these models.

  13. Application of graph theory to the statistical thermodynamics of lattice polymers. I. Elements of theory and test for dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhnik, Olga D.; Freed, Karl F.

    1996-07-01

    The lattice cluster theory (LCT) is extended to enable inclusion of longer range correlation contributions to the partition function of lattice model polymers in the athermal limit. A diagrammatic technique represents the expansion of the partition function in powers of the inverse lattice coordination number. Graph theory is applied to sort, classify, and evaluate the numerous diagrams appearing in higher orders. New general theorems are proven that provide a significant reduction in the computational labor required to evaluate the contributions from higher order correlations. The new algorithm efficiently generates the correction to the Flory mean field approximation from as many as eight sterically interacting bonds. While the new results contain the essential ingredients for treating a system of flexible chains with arbitrary lengths and concentrations, the complexity of our new algorithm motivates us to test the theory here for the simplest case of a system of lattice dimers by comparison to the dimer packing entropies from the work of Gaunt. This comparison demonstrates that the eight bond LCT is exact through order φ5 for dimers in one through three dimensions, where φ is the volume fraction of dimers. A subsequent work will use the contracted diagrams, derived and tested here, to treat the packing entropy for a system of flexible N-mers at a volume fraction of φ on hypercubic lattices.

  14. Derivatives in discrete mathematics: a novel graph-theoretical invariant for generating new 2/3D molecular descriptors. I. Theory and QSPR application.

    PubMed

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Santiago, Oscar Martínez; López, Yoan Martínez; Barigye, Stephen J; Torrens, Francisco

    2012-11-01

    In this report, we present a new mathematical approach for describing chemical structures of organic molecules at atomic-molecular level, proposing for the first time the use of the concept of the derivative ([Formula: see text]) of a molecular graph (MG) with respect to a given event (E), to obtain a new family of molecular descriptors (MDs). With this purpose, a new matrix representation of the MG, which generalizes graph's theory's traditional incidence matrix, is introduced. This matrix, denominated the generalized incidence matrix, Q, arises from the Boolean representation of molecular sub-graphs that participate in the formation of the graph molecular skeleton MG and could be complete (representing all possible connected sub-graphs) or constitute sub-graphs of determined orders or types as well as a combination of these. The Q matrix is a non-quadratic and unsymmetrical in nature, its columns (n) and rows (m) are conditions (letters) and collection of conditions (words) with which the event occurs. This non-quadratic and unsymmetrical matrix is transformed, by algebraic manipulation, to a quadratic and symmetric matrix known as relations frequency matrix, F, which characterizes the participation intensity of the conditions (letters) in the events (words). With F, we calculate the derivative over a pair of atomic nuclei. The local index for the atomic nuclei i, Δ(i), can therefore be obtained as a linear combination of all the pair derivatives of the atomic nuclei i with all the rest of the j's atomic nuclei. Here, we also define new strategies that generalize the present form of obtaining global or local (group or atom-type) invariants from atomic contributions (local vertex invariants, LOVIs). In respect to this, metric (norms), means and statistical invariants are introduced. These invariants are applied to a vector whose components are the values Δ(i) for the atomic nuclei of the molecule or its fragments. Moreover, with the purpose of differentiating

  15. Radiation Induced Chromatin Conformation Changes Analysed by Fluorescent Localization Microscopy, Statistical Physics, and Graph Theory

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Patrick; Hillebrandt, Sabina; Krufczik, Matthias; Bach, Margund; Kaufmann, Rainer; Hausmann, Michael; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that the architecture of chromatin in cell nuclei is not random but functionally correlated. Chromatin damage caused by ionizing radiation raises complex repair machineries. This is accompanied by local chromatin rearrangements and structural changes which may for instance improve the accessibility of damaged sites for repair protein complexes. Using stably transfected HeLa cells expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP) labelled histone H2B or yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) labelled histone H2A, we investigated the positioning of individual histone proteins in cell nuclei by means of high resolution localization microscopy (Spectral Position Determination Microscopy = SPDM). The cells were exposed to ionizing radiation of different doses and aliquots were fixed after different repair times for SPDM imaging. In addition to the repair dependent histone protein pattern, the positioning of antibodies specific for heterochromatin and euchromatin was separately recorded by SPDM. The present paper aims to provide a quantitative description of structural changes of chromatin after irradiation and during repair. It introduces a novel approach to analyse SPDM images by means of statistical physics and graph theory. The method is based on the calculation of the radial distribution functions as well as edge length distributions for graphs defined by a triangulation of the marker positions. The obtained results show that through the cell nucleus the different chromatin re-arrangements as detected by the fluorescent nucleosomal pattern average themselves. In contrast heterochromatic regions alone indicate a relaxation after radiation exposure and re-condensation during repair whereas euchromatin seemed to be unaffected or behave contrarily. SPDM in combination with the analysis techniques applied allows the systematic elucidation of chromatin re-arrangements after irradiation and during repair, if selected sub-regions of nuclei are

  16. Radiation induced chromatin conformation changes analysed by fluorescent localization microscopy, statistical physics, and graph theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Máté, Gabriell; Müller, Patrick; Hillebrandt, Sabina; Krufczik, Matthias; Bach, Margund; Kaufmann, Rainer; Hausmann, Michael; Heermann, Dieter W

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that the architecture of chromatin in cell nuclei is not random but functionally correlated. Chromatin damage caused by ionizing radiation raises complex repair machineries. This is accompanied by local chromatin rearrangements and structural changes which may for instance improve the accessibility of damaged sites for repair protein complexes. Using stably transfected HeLa cells expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP) labelled histone H2B or yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) labelled histone H2A, we investigated the positioning of individual histone proteins in cell nuclei by means of high resolution localization microscopy (Spectral Position Determination Microscopy = SPDM). The cells were exposed to ionizing radiation of different doses and aliquots were fixed after different repair times for SPDM imaging. In addition to the repair dependent histone protein pattern, the positioning of antibodies specific for heterochromatin and euchromatin was separately recorded by SPDM. The present paper aims to provide a quantitative description of structural changes of chromatin after irradiation and during repair. It introduces a novel approach to analyse SPDM images by means of statistical physics and graph theory. The method is based on the calculation of the radial distribution functions as well as edge length distributions for graphs defined by a triangulation of the marker positions. The obtained results show that through the cell nucleus the different chromatin re-arrangements as detected by the fluorescent nucleosomal pattern average themselves. In contrast heterochromatic regions alone indicate a relaxation after radiation exposure and re-condensation during repair whereas euchromatin seemed to be unaffected or behave contrarily. SPDM in combination with the analysis techniques applied allows the systematic elucidation of chromatin re-arrangements after irradiation and during repair, if selected sub-regions of nuclei are

  17. Prognostic value of graph theory-based tissue architecture analysis in carcinomas of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Sudbø, J; Bankfalvi, A; Bryne, M; Marcelpoil, R; Boysen, M; Piffko, J; Hemmer, J; Kraft, K; Reith, A

    2000-12-01

    Several studies on oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) suggest that the clinical value of traditional histologic grading is limited both by poor reproducibility and by low prognostic impact. However, the prognostic potential of a strictly quantitative and highly reproducible assessment of the tissue architecture in OSCC has not been evaluated. Using image analysis, in 193 cases of T1-2 (Stage I-II) OSCC we retrospectively investigated the prognostic impact of two graph theory-derived structural features: the average Delaunay Edge Length (DEL_av) and the average homogeneity of the Ulam Tree (ELH_av). Both structural features were derived from subgraphs of the Voronoi Diagram. The geometric centers of the cell nuclei were computed, generating a two-dimensional swarm of point-like seeds from which graphs could be constructed. The impact on survival of the computed values of ELH_av and DEL_av was estimated by the method of Kaplan and Meier, with relapse-free survival and overall survival as end-points. The prognostic values of DEL_av and ELH_av as computed for the invasive front, the superficial part of the carcinoma, the total carcinoma, and the normal-appearing oral mucosa were compared. For DEL_av, significant prognostic information was found in the invasive front (p < 0.001). No significant prognostic information was found in superficial part of the carcinoma (p = 0.34), in the carcinoma as a whole (p = 0.35), or in the normal-appearing mucosa (p = 0.27). For ELH_av, significant prognostic information was found in the invasive front (p = 0.01) and, surprisingly, in putatively normal mucosa (p = 0.03). No significant prognostic information was found in superficial parts of the carcinoma (p = 0.34) or in the total carcinoma (p = 0.11). In conclusion, strictly quantitative assessment of tissue architecture in the invasive front of OSCC yields highly prognostic information. PMID:11140700

  18. An efficient graph theory based method to identify every minimal reaction set in a metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of cells with minimal metabolic functionality is gaining importance due to their efficiency in producing chemicals and fuels. Existing computational methods to identify minimal reaction sets in metabolic networks are computationally expensive. Further, they identify only one of the several possible minimal reaction sets. Results In this paper, we propose an efficient graph theory based recursive optimization approach to identify all minimal reaction sets. Graph theoretical insights offer systematic methods to not only reduce the number of variables in math programming and increase its computational efficiency, but also provide efficient ways to find multiple optimal solutions. The efficacy of the proposed approach is demonstrated using case studies from Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In case study 1, the proposed method identified three minimal reaction sets each containing 38 reactions in Escherichia coli central metabolic network with 77 reactions. Analysis of these three minimal reaction sets revealed that one of them is more suitable for developing minimal metabolism cell compared to other two due to practically achievable internal flux distribution. In case study 2, the proposed method identified 256 minimal reaction sets from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome scale metabolic network with 620 reactions. The proposed method required only 4.5 hours to identify all the 256 minimal reaction sets and has shown a significant reduction (approximately 80%) in the solution time when compared to the existing methods for finding minimal reaction set. Conclusions Identification of all minimal reactions sets in metabolic networks is essential since different minimal reaction sets have different properties that effect the bioprocess development. The proposed method correctly identified all minimal reaction sets in a both the case studies. The proposed method is computationally efficient compared to other methods for finding minimal

  19. Prognostic value of graph theory-based tissue architecture analysis in carcinomas of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Sudbø, J; Bankfalvi, A; Bryne, M; Marcelpoil, R; Boysen, M; Piffko, J; Hemmer, J; Kraft, K; Reith, A

    2000-12-01

    Several studies on oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) suggest that the clinical value of traditional histologic grading is limited both by poor reproducibility and by low prognostic impact. However, the prognostic potential of a strictly quantitative and highly reproducible assessment of the tissue architecture in OSCC has not been evaluated. Using image analysis, in 193 cases of T1-2 (Stage I-II) OSCC we retrospectively investigated the prognostic impact of two graph theory-derived structural features: the average Delaunay Edge Length (DEL_av) and the average homogeneity of the Ulam Tree (ELH_av). Both structural features were derived from subgraphs of the Voronoi Diagram. The geometric centers of the cell nuclei were computed, generating a two-dimensional swarm of point-like seeds from which graphs could be constructed. The impact on survival of the computed values of ELH_av and DEL_av was estimated by the method of Kaplan and Meier, with relapse-free survival and overall survival as end-points. The prognostic values of DEL_av and ELH_av as computed for the invasive front, the superficial part of the carcinoma, the total carcinoma, and the normal-appearing oral mucosa were compared. For DEL_av, significant prognostic information was found in the invasive front (p < 0.001). No significant prognostic information was found in superficial part of the carcinoma (p = 0.34), in the carcinoma as a whole (p = 0.35), or in the normal-appearing mucosa (p = 0.27). For ELH_av, significant prognostic information was found in the invasive front (p = 0.01) and, surprisingly, in putatively normal mucosa (p = 0.03). No significant prognostic information was found in superficial parts of the carcinoma (p = 0.34) or in the total carcinoma (p = 0.11). In conclusion, strictly quantitative assessment of tissue architecture in the invasive front of OSCC yields highly prognostic information.

  20. Anticipation-related brain connectivity in bipolar and unipolar depression: a graph theory approach.

    PubMed

    Manelis, Anna; Almeida, Jorge R C; Stiffler, Richelle; Lockovich, Jeanette C; Aslam, Haris A; Phillips, Mary L

    2016-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is often misdiagnosed as major depressive disorder, which leads to inadequate treatment. Depressed individuals versus healthy control subjects, show increased expectation of negative outcomes. Due to increased impulsivity and risk for mania, however, depressed individuals with bipolar disorder may differ from those with major depressive disorder in neural mechanisms underlying anticipation processes. Graph theory methods for neuroimaging data analysis allow the identification of connectivity between multiple brain regions without prior model specification, and may help to identify neurobiological markers differentiating these disorders, thereby facilitating development of better therapeutic interventions. This study aimed to compare brain connectivity among regions involved in win/loss anticipation in depressed individuals with bipolar disorder (BDD) versus depressed individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) versus healthy control subjects using graph theory methods. The study was conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and included 31 BDD, 39 MDD, and 36 healthy control subjects. Participants were scanned while performing a number guessing reward task that included the periods of win and loss anticipation. We first identified the anticipatory network across all 106 participants by contrasting brain activation during all anticipation periods (win anticipation + loss anticipation) versus baseline, and win anticipation versus loss anticipation. Brain connectivity within the identified network was determined using the Independent Multiple sample Greedy Equivalence Search (IMaGES) and Linear non-Gaussian Orientation, Fixed Structure (LOFS) algorithms. Density of connections (the number of connections in the network), path length, and the global connectivity direction ('top-down' versus 'bottom-up') were compared across groups (BDD/MDD/healthy control subjects) and conditions (win/loss anticipation). These analyses showed that

  1. Anticipation-related brain connectivity in bipolar and unipolar depression: a graph theory approach.

    PubMed

    Manelis, Anna; Almeida, Jorge R C; Stiffler, Richelle; Lockovich, Jeanette C; Aslam, Haris A; Phillips, Mary L

    2016-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is often misdiagnosed as major depressive disorder, which leads to inadequate treatment. Depressed individuals versus healthy control subjects, show increased expectation of negative outcomes. Due to increased impulsivity and risk for mania, however, depressed individuals with bipolar disorder may differ from those with major depressive disorder in neural mechanisms underlying anticipation processes. Graph theory methods for neuroimaging data analysis allow the identification of connectivity between multiple brain regions without prior model specification, and may help to identify neurobiological markers differentiating these disorders, thereby facilitating development of better therapeutic interventions. This study aimed to compare brain connectivity among regions involved in win/loss anticipation in depressed individuals with bipolar disorder (BDD) versus depressed individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) versus healthy control subjects using graph theory methods. The study was conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and included 31 BDD, 39 MDD, and 36 healthy control subjects. Participants were scanned while performing a number guessing reward task that included the periods of win and loss anticipation. We first identified the anticipatory network across all 106 participants by contrasting brain activation during all anticipation periods (win anticipation + loss anticipation) versus baseline, and win anticipation versus loss anticipation. Brain connectivity within the identified network was determined using the Independent Multiple sample Greedy Equivalence Search (IMaGES) and Linear non-Gaussian Orientation, Fixed Structure (LOFS) algorithms. Density of connections (the number of connections in the network), path length, and the global connectivity direction ('top-down' versus 'bottom-up') were compared across groups (BDD/MDD/healthy control subjects) and conditions (win/loss anticipation). These analyses showed that

  2. Kumjian-Pask algebras of desourcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosjanuardi, Rizky; Yusnitha, Isnie

    2016-02-01

    Kumjian-Pask algebra which was introduced by Pino, Clark, an Huef and Raeburn [1] in 2013, gives a purely algebraic version of a k-graph algebra. Rosjanuardi [2] gave necessary and sufficient condition of finitely dimensional complex Kumjian-Pask algebra of row-finite k-graph without sources. We will improve the previous results which allows us to deal with sources. We will consider Kumjian-Pask algebra for locally convex row-finite k-graph which was introduced by Clark, Flynn and an Huef [3], and use the desourcification of the graph to get conditions which characterise when the complex Kumjian-Pask algebra of locally convex row-finite k-graph is finite dimensional.

  3. Morphology and Performance of Polymer Solar Cell Characterized by DPD Simulation and Graph Theory.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunmiao; Ji, Yujin; Xue, Junwei; Hou, Tingjun; Tang, Jianxin; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Li, Youyong

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of active layers in the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is critical to the performance of organic photovoltaics (OPV). Currently, there is limited information for the morphology from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Meanwhile, there are limited approaches to predict the morphology /efficiency of OPV. Here we use Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) to determine 3D morphology of BHJ solar cells and show DPD to be an efficient approach to predict the 3D morphology. Based on the 3D morphology, we estimate the performance indicator of BHJ solar cells by using graph theory. Specifically, we study poly (3-hexylthiophene)/[6, 6]-phenyl-C61butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM) BHJ solar cells. We find that, when the volume fraction of PCBM is in the region 0.4 ∼ 0.5, P3HT/PCBM will show bi-continuous morphology and optimum performance, consistent with experimental results. Further, the optimum temperature (413 K) for the morphology and performance of P3HT/PCBM is in accord with annealing results. We find that solvent additive plays a critical role in the desolvation process of P3HT/PCBM BHJ solar cell. Our approach provides a direct method to predict dynamic 3D morphology and performance indicator for BHJ solar cells. PMID:26581407

  4. Morphology and Performance of Polymer Solar Cell Characterized by DPD Simulation and Graph Theory.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunmiao; Ji, Yujin; Xue, Junwei; Hou, Tingjun; Tang, Jianxin; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Li, Youyong

    2015-11-19

    The morphology of active layers in the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is critical to the performance of organic photovoltaics (OPV). Currently, there is limited information for the morphology from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Meanwhile, there are limited approaches to predict the morphology /efficiency of OPV. Here we use Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) to determine 3D morphology of BHJ solar cells and show DPD to be an efficient approach to predict the 3D morphology. Based on the 3D morphology, we estimate the performance indicator of BHJ solar cells by using graph theory. Specifically, we study poly (3-hexylthiophene)/[6, 6]-phenyl-C61butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM) BHJ solar cells. We find that, when the volume fraction of PCBM is in the region 0.4 ∼ 0.5, P3HT/PCBM will show bi-continuous morphology and optimum performance, consistent with experimental results. Further, the optimum temperature (413 K) for the morphology and performance of P3HT/PCBM is in accord with annealing results. We find that solvent additive plays a critical role in the desolvation process of P3HT/PCBM BHJ solar cell. Our approach provides a direct method to predict dynamic 3D morphology and performance indicator for BHJ solar cells.

  5. Morphology and Performance of Polymer Solar Cell Characterized by DPD Simulation and Graph Theory

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chunmiao; Ji, Yujin; Xue, Junwei; Hou, Tingjun; Tang, Jianxin; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Li, Youyong

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of active layers in the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is critical to the performance of organic photovoltaics (OPV). Currently, there is limited information for the morphology from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Meanwhile, there are limited approaches to predict the morphology /efficiency of OPV. Here we use Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) to determine 3D morphology of BHJ solar cells and show DPD to be an efficient approach to predict the 3D morphology. Based on the 3D morphology, we estimate the performance indicator of BHJ solar cells by using graph theory. Specifically, we study poly (3-hexylthiophene)/[6, 6]-phenyl-C61butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM) BHJ solar cells. We find that, when the volume fraction of PCBM is in the region 0.4 ∼ 0.5, P3HT/PCBM will show bi-continuous morphology and optimum performance, consistent with experimental results. Further, the optimum temperature (413 K) for the morphology and performance of P3HT/PCBM is in accord with annealing results. We find that solvent additive plays a critical role in the desolvation process of P3HT/PCBM BHJ solar cell. Our approach provides a direct method to predict dynamic 3D morphology and performance indicator for BHJ solar cells. PMID:26581407

  6. Morphology and Performance of Polymer Solar Cell Characterized by DPD Simulation and Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Chunmiao; Ji, Yujin; Xue, Junwei; Hou, Tingjun; Tang, Jianxin; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Li, Youyong

    2015-11-01

    The morphology of active layers in the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is critical to the performance of organic photovoltaics (OPV). Currently, there is limited information for the morphology from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Meanwhile, there are limited approaches to predict the morphology /efficiency of OPV. Here we use Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) to determine 3D morphology of BHJ solar cells and show DPD to be an efficient approach to predict the 3D morphology. Based on the 3D morphology, we estimate the performance indicator of BHJ solar cells by using graph theory. Specifically, we study poly (3-hexylthiophene)/[6, 6]-phenyl-C61butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM) BHJ solar cells. We find that, when the volume fraction of PCBM is in the region 0.4 ∼ 0.5, P3HT/PCBM will show bi-continuous morphology and optimum performance, consistent with experimental results. Further, the optimum temperature (413 K) for the morphology and performance of P3HT/PCBM is in accord with annealing results. We find that solvent additive plays a critical role in the desolvation process of P3HT/PCBM BHJ solar cell. Our approach provides a direct method to predict dynamic 3D morphology and performance indicator for BHJ solar cells.

  7. Development of a Computerized Adaptive Testing for Diagnosing the Cognitive Process of Grade 7 Students in Learning Algebra, Using Multidimensional Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senarat, Somprasong; Tayraukham, Sombat; Piyapimonsit, Chatsiri; Tongkhambanjong, Sakesan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a multidimensional computerized adaptive test for diagnosing the cognitive process of grade 7 students in learning algebra by applying multidimensional item response theory. The research is divided into 4 steps: 1) the development of item bank of algebra, 2) the development of the multidimensional…

  8. Applications of automata and graphs: Labeling operators in Hilbert space. II

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Ilwoo; Jorgensen, Palle E. T.

    2009-06-15

    We introduced a family of infinite graphs directly associated with a class of von Neumann automaton model A{sub G}. These are finite state models used in symbolic dynamics: stimuli models and in control theory. In the context of groupoid von Neumann algebras, and an associated fractal group, we prove a classification theorem for representations of automata.

  9. Orientation in operator algebras

    PubMed Central

    Alfsen, Erik M.; Shultz, Frederic W.

    1998-01-01

    A concept of orientation is relevant for the passage from Jordan structure to associative structure in operator algebras. The research reported in this paper bridges the approach of Connes for von Neumann algebras and ourselves for C*-algebras in a general theory of orientation that is of geometric nature and is related to dynamics. PMID:9618457

  10. Cytoscape.js: a graph theory library for visualisation and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Max; Lopes, Christian T.; Huck, Gerardo; Dong, Yue; Sumer, Onur; Bader, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Cytoscape.js is an open-source JavaScript-based graph library. Its most common use case is as a visualization software component, so it can be used to render interactive graphs in a web browser. It also can be used in a headless manner, useful for graph operations on a server, such as Node.js. Availability and implementation: Cytoscape.js is implemented in JavaScript. Documentation, downloads and source code are available at http://js.cytoscape.org. Contact: gary.bader@utoronto.ca PMID:26415722

  11. Graph theory enables drug repurposing--how a mathematical model can drive the discovery of hidden mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Ruggero; Di Matteo, T; Giorgetti, Stefano; Barbiani, Massimo; Bevec, Dorian; Aste, Tomaso

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a methodology to efficiently exploit natural-language expressed biomedical knowledge for repurposing existing drugs towards diseases for which they were not initially intended. Leveraging on developments in Computational Linguistics and Graph Theory, a methodology is defined to build a graph representation of knowledge, which is automatically analysed to discover hidden relations between any drug and any disease: these relations are specific paths among the biomedical entities of the graph, representing possible Modes of Action for any given pharmacological compound. We propose a measure for the likeliness of these paths based on a stochastic process on the graph. This measure depends on the abundance of indirect paths between a peptide and a disease, rather than solely on the strength of the shortest path connecting them. We provide real-world examples, showing how the method successfully retrieves known pathophysiological Mode of Action and finds new ones by meaningfully selecting and aggregating contributions from known bio-molecular interactions. Applications of this methodology are presented, and prove the efficacy of the method for selecting drugs as treatment options for rare diseases.

  12. Graph Theory Enables Drug Repurposing – How a Mathematical Model Can Drive the Discovery of Hidden Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Gramatica, Ruggero; Di Matteo, T.; Giorgetti, Stefano; Barbiani, Massimo; Bevec, Dorian; Aste, Tomaso

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a methodology to efficiently exploit natural-language expressed biomedical knowledge for repurposing existing drugs towards diseases for which they were not initially intended. Leveraging on developments in Computational Linguistics and Graph Theory, a methodology is defined to build a graph representation of knowledge, which is automatically analysed to discover hidden relations between any drug and any disease: these relations are specific paths among the biomedical entities of the graph, representing possible Modes of Action for any given pharmacological compound. We propose a measure for the likeliness of these paths based on a stochastic process on the graph. This measure depends on the abundance of indirect paths between a peptide and a disease, rather than solely on the strength of the shortest path connecting them. We provide real-world examples, showing how the method successfully retrieves known pathophysiological Mode of Action and finds new ones by meaningfully selecting and aggregating contributions from known bio-molecular interactions. Applications of this methodology are presented, and prove the efficacy of the method for selecting drugs as treatment options for rare diseases. PMID:24416311

  13. Lie algebra extensions of current algebras on S3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kori, Tosiaki; Imai, Yuto

    2015-06-01

    An affine Kac-Moody algebra is a central extension of the Lie algebra of smooth mappings from S1 to the complexification of a Lie algebra. In this paper, we shall introduce a central extension of the Lie algebra of smooth mappings from S3 to the quaternization of a Lie algebra and investigate its root space decomposition. We think this extension of current algebra might give a mathematical tool for four-dimensional conformal field theory as Kac-Moody algebras give it for two-dimensional conformal field theory.

  14. Connectomics and graph theory analyses: Novel insights into network abnormalities in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Kocher, Madison; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    The assessment of neural networks in epilepsy has become increasingly relevant in the context of translational research, given that localized forms of epilepsy are more likely to be related to abnormal function within specific brain networks, as opposed to isolated focal brain pathology. It is notable that variability in clinical outcomes from epilepsy treatment may be a reflection of individual patterns of network abnormalities. As such, network endophenotypes may be important biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy. Despite its exceptional potential, measuring abnormal networks in translational research has been thus far constrained by methodologic limitations. Fortunately, recent advancements in neuroscience, particularly in the field of connectomics, permit a detailed assessment of network organization, dynamics, and function at an individual level. Data from the personal connectome can be assessed using principled forms of network analyses based on graph theory, which may disclose patterns of organization that are prone to abnormal dynamics and epileptogenesis. Although the field of connectomics is relatively new, there is already a rapidly growing body of evidence to suggest that it can elucidate several important and fundamental aspects of abnormal networks to epilepsy. In this article, we provide a review of the emerging evidence from connectomics research regarding neural network architecture, dynamics, and function related to epilepsy. We discuss how connectomics may bring together pathophysiologic hypotheses from conceptual and basic models of epilepsy and in vivo biomarkers for clinical translational research. By providing neural network information unique to each individual, the field of connectomics may help to elucidate variability in clinical outcomes and open opportunities for personalized medicine approaches to epilepsy. Connectomics involves complex and rich data from each subject, thus collaborative efforts to enable the

  15. Enhancing multiple-point geostatistical modeling: 1. Graph theory and pattern adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, Pejman; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, higher-order geostatistical methods have been used for modeling of a wide variety of large-scale porous media, such as groundwater aquifers and oil reservoirs. Their popularity stems from their ability to account for qualitative data and the great flexibility that they offer for conditioning the models to hard (quantitative) data, which endow them with the capability for generating realistic realizations of porous formations with very complex channels, as well as features that are mainly a barrier to fluid flow. One group of such models consists of pattern-based methods that use a set of data points for generating stochastic realizations by which the large-scale structure and highly-connected features are reproduced accurately. The cross correlation-based simulation (CCSIM) algorithm, proposed previously by the authors, is a member of this group that has been shown to be capable of simulating multimillion cell models in a matter of a few CPU seconds. The method is, however, sensitive to pattern's specifications, such as boundaries and the number of replicates. In this paper the original CCSIM algorithm is reconsidered and two significant improvements are proposed for accurately reproducing large-scale patterns of heterogeneities in porous media. First, an effective boundary-correction method based on the graph theory is presented by which one identifies the optimal cutting path/surface for removing the patchiness and discontinuities in the realization of a porous medium. Next, a new pattern adjustment method is proposed that automatically transfers the features in a pattern to one that seamlessly matches the surrounding patterns. The original CCSIM algorithm is then combined with the two methods and is tested using various complex two- and three-dimensional examples. It should, however, be emphasized that the methods that we propose in this paper are applicable to other pattern-based geostatistical simulation methods.

  16. Identification of the Epileptogenic Zone from Stereo-EEG Signals: A Connectivity-Graph Theory Approach.

    PubMed

    Panzica, Ferruccio; Varotto, Giulia; Rotondi, Fabio; Spreafico, Roberto; Franceschetti, Silvana

    2013-11-06

    In the context of focal drug-resistant epilepsies, the surgical resection of the epileptogenic zone (EZ), the cortical region responsible for the onset, early seizures organization, and propagation, may be the only therapeutic option for reducing or suppressing seizures. The rather high rate of failure in epilepsy surgery of extra-temporal epilepsies highlights that the precise identification of the EZ, mandatory objective to achieve seizure freedom, is still an unsolved problem that requires more sophisticated methods of investigation. Despite the wide range of non-invasive investigations, intracranial stereo-EEG (SEEG) recordings still represent, in many patients, the gold standard for the EZ identification. In this contest, the EZ localization is still based on visual analysis of SEEG, inevitably affected by the drawback of subjectivity and strongly time-consuming. Over the last years, considerable efforts have been made to develop advanced signal analysis techniques able to improve the identification of the EZ. Particular attention has been paid to those methods aimed at quantifying and characterizing the interactions and causal relationships between neuronal populations, since is nowadays well assumed that epileptic phenomena are associated with abnormal changes in brain synchronization mechanisms, and initial evidence has shown the suitability of this approach for the EZ localization. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the different EEG signal processing methods applied to study connectivity between distinct brain cortical regions, namely in focal epilepsies. In addition, with the aim of localizing the EZ, the approach based on graph theory will be described, since the study of the topological properties of the networks has strongly improved the study of brain connectivity mechanisms.

  17. Introduction to Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokol, William

    In this autoinstructional packet, the student is given an experimental situation which introduces him to the process of graphing. The lesson is presented for secondary school students in chemistry. Algebra I and a Del Mod System program (indicated as SE 018 020) are suggested prerequisites for the use of this program. Behavioral objectives are…

  18. Open-Closed Homotopy Algebras and Strong Homotopy Leibniz Pairs Through Koszul Operad Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefel, Eduardo; Livernet, Muriel

    2012-08-01

    Open-closed homotopy algebras (OCHA) and strong homotopy Leibniz pairs (SHLP) were introduced by Kajiura and Stasheff in 2004. In an appendix to their paper, Markl observed that an SHLP is equivalent to an algebra over the minimal model of a certain operad, without showing that the operad is Koszul. In the present paper, we show that both OCHA and SHLP are algebras over the minimal model of the zeroth homology of two versions of the Swiss-cheese operad and prove that these two operads are Koszul. As an application, we show that the OCHA operad is non-formal as a 2-colored operad but is formal as an algebra in the category of 2-collections.

  19. Theory of equivalence systems for describing algebraic closures of a generalized estimation model. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Yakonov, A. G.

    2011-03-01

    Characteristic matrices and metrics of equivalence systems are studied that help give an efficient description of conjunctions of equivalence systems. Using these results, families of correct polynomials in the algebraic approach to classification are described.

  20. The Algebra of the Arches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buerman, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Finding real-world examples for middle school algebra classes can be difficult but not impossible. As we strive to accomplish teaching our students how to solve and graph equations, we neglect to teach the big ideas of algebra. One of those big ideas is functions. This article gives three examples of functions that are found in Arches National…

  1. N = 2 Maxwell-Einstein Supergravity theories: their compact and non-compact gaugings and Jordan algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Guenaydin, M.; Sierra, G.; Townsend, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    In this talk we give a review of our work on the construction and classification of N = 2 Maxwell-Einstein Supergravity theories (MESGT), study of the underlying algebraical and geometrical structure of these theories, and their compact and non-compact gaugings. We begin by summarizing our construction of the N = 2 MESGT's in five dimensions and give a geometrical interpretation to various scalar dependent quantities in the Lagrangian, based on the constraiants implied by supersymmetry. This is followed by a complete classification of the N = 2 MESGT's whose target manifolds parametrized by the scalar fields are symmetric spaces. 39 refs.

  2. An Application of Cartesian Graphing to Seismic Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Douglas Frederick

    1992-01-01

    Describes how college students enrolled in a course in elementary algebra apply graphing and algebra to data collected from a seismic profile to uncover the structure of a subterranean rock formation. Includes steps guiding the activity. (MDH)

  3. Plethystic algebras and vector symmetric functions.

    PubMed Central

    Rota, G C; Stein, J A

    1994-01-01

    An isomorphism is established between the plethystic Hopf algebra Pleth(Super[L]) and the algebra of vector symmetric functions. The Hall inner product of symmetric function theory is extended to the Hopf algebra Pleth(Super[L]). PMID:11607504

  4. Box graphs and resolutions II: From Coulomb phases to fiber faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas P.; Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura

    2016-04-01

    Box graphs, or equivalently Coulomb phases of three-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories with matter, give a succinct, comprehensive and elegant characterization of crepant resolutions of singular elliptically fibered varieties. Furthermore, the box graphs predict that the phases are organized in terms of a network of flop transitions. The geometric construction of the resolutions associated to the phases is, however, a difficult problem. Here, we identify a correspondence between box graphs for the gauge algebras su (2 k + 1) with resolutions obtained using toric tops and generalizations thereof. Moreover, flop transitions between different such resolutions agree with those predicted by the box graphs. Our results thereby provide explicit realizations of the box graph resolutions.

  5. Anatomy of a gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimer, Dirk . E-mail: kreimer@ihes.fr

    2006-12-15

    We exhibit the role of Hochschild cohomology in quantum field theory with particular emphasis on gauge theory and Dyson-Schwinger equations, the quantum equations of motion. These equations emerge from Hopf- and Lie algebra theory and free quantum field theory only. In the course of our analysis, we exhibit an intimate relation between the Slavnov-Taylor identities for the couplings and the existence of Hopf sub-algebras defined on the sum of all graphs at a given loop order, surpassing the need to work on single diagrams.

  6. Control by quantum dynamics on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Godsil, Chris; Severini, Simone

    2010-05-15

    We address the study of controllability of a closed quantum system whose dynamical Lie algebra is generated by adjacency matrices of graphs. We characterize a large family of graphs that renders a system controllable. The key property is a graph-theoretic feature consisting of a particularly disordered cycle structure. Disregarding efficiency of control functions, but choosing subfamilies of sparse graphs, the results translate into continuous-time quantum walks for universal computation.

  7. Automorphisms of Order Structures of Abelian Parts of Operator Algebras and Their Role in Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamhalter, Jan; Turilova, Ekaterina

    2014-10-01

    It is shown that any order isomorphism between the structures of unital associative JB subalgebras of JB algebras is given naturally by a partially linear Jordan isomorphism. The same holds for nonunital subalgebras and order isomorphisms preserving the unital subalgebra. Finally, we recover usual action of time evolution group on a von Neumann factor from group of automorphisms of the structure of Abelian subalgebras.

  8. Combinatorics of n-point functions via Hopf algebra in quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mestre, Angela; Oeckl, Robert

    2006-05-15

    We use a coproduct on the time-ordered algebra of field operators to derive simple relations between complete, connected and 1-particle irreducible n-point functions. Compared to traditional functional methods our approach is much more intrinsic and leads to efficient algorithms suitable for concrete computations. It may also be used to efficiently perform tree level computations.

  9. Characterizing the Development of Specialized Mathematical Content Knowledge for Teaching in Algebraic Reasoning and Number Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bair, Sherry L.; Rich, Beverly S.

    2011-01-01

    This article characterizes the development of a deep and connected body of mathematical knowledge categorized by Ball and Bass' (2003b) model of Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching (MKT), as Specialized Content Knowledge for Teaching (SCK) in algebraic reasoning and number sense. The research employed multiple cases across three years from two…

  10. Student Reactions to Learning Theory Based Curriculum Materials in Linear Algebra--A Survey Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Laurel; Vidakovic, Draga; Martin, William O.; Dexter, Scott; Suzuki, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In this report we examine students' perceptions of the implementation of carefully designed curriculum materials (called modules) in linear algebra courses at three different universities. The curricular materials were produced collaboratively by STEM and mathematics education faculty as members of a professional learning community (PLC) over…

  11. Classification of pregnancy and labor contractions using a graph theory based analysis.

    PubMed

    Nader, N; Hassan, M; Falou, W; Diab, A; Al-Omar, S; Khalil, M; Marque, C

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new framework to characterize the electrohysterographic (EHG) signals recorded during pregnancy and labor. The approach is based on the analysis of the propagation of the uterine electrical activity. The processing pipeline includes i) the estimation of the statistical dependencies between the different recorded EHG signals, ii) the characterization of the obtained connectivity matrices using network measures and iii) the use of these measures in clinical application: the classification between pregnancy and labor. Due to its robustness to volume conductor, we used the imaginary part of coherence in order to produce the connectivity matrix which is then transformed into a graph. We evaluate the performance of several graph measures. We also compare the results with the parameter mostly used in the literature: the peak frequency combined with the propagation velocity (PV +PF). Our results show that the use of the network measures is a promising tool to classify labor and pregnancy contractions with a small superiority of the graph strength over PV+PF.

  12. Teaching Algebra without Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Algebra is, among other things, a shorthand way to express quantitative reasoning. This article illustrates ways for the classroom teacher to convert algebraic solutions to verbal problems into conversational solutions that can be understood by students in the lower grades. Three reasonably typical verbal problems that either appeared as or…

  13. Prospective Teachers' Views on the Use of Calculators with Computer Algebra System in Algebra Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgun-Koca, S. Ash

    2010-01-01

    Although growing numbers of secondary school mathematics teachers and students use calculators to study graphs, they mainly rely on paper-and-pencil when manipulating algebraic symbols. However, the Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) on computers or handheld calculators create new possibilities for teaching and learning algebraic manipulation. This…

  14. Ezekiel graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    In spite of the old adage that No finite sequence of symbols is random,'' there are many instances in which it is desirable to quantify how random'' a finite sequence is. Pseudorandom number generators and cryptographic key generators typically expand a short, randomly chosen, seed sequence into a much longer sequence which should appear random to anyone ignorant of the seed. Unique initiating signals chosen to minimize the likelihood of an accidental initiation of an important action should be random'' to lessen the chance of their natural occurrence, etc. Consequently, numerous tests for the randomness of finite sequences have been proposed. John Milnor argued that if a binary sequence is random then the fraction of 1's, r{sub 1}, should be very nearly 1/2 in it and in all of what he called its derivatives. Since every sequence has a unique derivative this defines a natural family of digraphs, G{sub n}, on 2{sup n} vertices in which vertices are labeled with n-bit binary sequences and an edge is directed from the vertex labeled with the sequence A to the vertex labeled with the sequence B if B is the derivative of A. Each component of G{sub n} is eventually cyclic. This paper is concerned with a special case in which the sequences in a cycle are all cyclic shifts of a single sequence -- hence the name of Ezekiel graphs. Surprising, there are Ezekiel graphs for which r{sub 1} is as close to 1/2 as is numerically possible, i.e., that satisfy Milnor's test for randomness as closely as it can be satisfied, even though the sequence of sequences are about as far from random as is conceivable. In this paper the existence and properties of Ezekiel sequences are investigated from an algebraic standpoint.

  15. Hyperspectral target detection using graph theory models and manifold geometry via an adaptive implementation of locally linear embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Amanda K.; Messinger, David W.

    2014-06-01

    Hyperspectral images comprise, by design, high dimensional image data. However, research has shown that for a d-dimensional hyperspectral image, it is typical for the data to inherently occupy an m-dimensional space, with m << d. In the remote sensing community, this has led to a recent increase in the use of non-linear manifold learning, which aims to characterize the embedded lower-dimensional, non-linear manifold upon which the hyperspectral data inherently lie. Classic hyperspectral data models include statistical, linear subspace, and linear mixture models, but these can place restrictive assumptions on the distribution of the data. With graph theory and manifold learning based models, the only assumption is that the data reside on an underlying manifold. In previous publications, we have shown that manifold coordinate approximation using locally linear embedding (LLE) is a viable pre-processing step for target detection with the Adaptive Cosine/Coherence Estimator (ACE) algorithm. Here, we improve upon that methodology using a more rigorous, data-driven implementation of LLE that incorporates the injection of a cloud" of target pixels and the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) detector. The LLE algorithm, which holds that the data is locally linear, is typically governed by a user defined parameter k, indicating the number of nearest neighbors to use in the initial graph model. We use an adaptive approach to building the graph that is governed by the data itself and does not rely upon user input. This implementation of LLE can yield greater separation between the target pixels and the background pixels in the manifold space. We present an analysis of target detection performance in the manifold coordinates using scene-derived target spectra and laboratory-measured target spectra across two different data sets.

  16. Algebraic multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruge, J. W.; Stueben, K.

    1987-01-01

    The state of the art in algebraic multgrid (AMG) methods is discussed. The interaction between the relaxation process and the coarse grid correction necessary for proper behavior of the solution probes is discussed in detail. Sufficient conditions on relaxation and interpolation for the convergence of the V-cycle are given. The relaxation used in AMG, what smoothing means in an algebraic setting, and how it relates to the existing theory are considered. Some properties of the coarse grid operator are discussed, and results on the convergence of two-level and multilevel convergence are given. Details of an algorithm particularly studied for problems obtained by discretizing a single elliptic, second order partial differential equation are given. Results of experiments with such problems using both finite difference and finite element discretizations are presented.

  17. A study of chemical systems using signal flow graph theory: application to Neptune.

    PubMed

    Dobrijevic, M; Parisot, J P; Dutour, I

    1995-01-01

    Photochemistry of giant planets and their satellites is characterized by numerous reactions involving many chemical species. In the present paper, chemical systems are modeled by signal flow graphs. Such a technique evaluates the transmission of any input into the system (solar flux, electrons...) and gives access to the identification of the most important mechanisms in the chemical system. For a given chemical system, we first evaluate rate coefficients. Then, in order to obtain concentrations of each compound, we integrate the set of continuity equations by Gear's method. Gear's method is chosen rather than another classical method because it is recommended for a system of stiff equations due to the existence of greatly differing time constants. Finally, the technique of signal flow graphs is used. This method is applied to the production of hydrocarbons in the atmospheres of giant planets. In particular, the production of C2H6 in the atmosphere of Neptune from the photodissociation of CH4 is investigated. Different paths of dissociation of CH4 are possible from L alpha radiations. A chemical system containing 14 species and 30 reactions including these different paths of dissociation is integrated. The main mechanism of production of C2H6 is identified and evaluated for each model of dissociation. The importance of various reaction paths as a function of time is discussed.

  18. Network representation of protein interactions: Theory of graph description and analysis.

    PubMed

    Kurzbach, Dennis

    2016-09-01

    A methodological framework is presented for the graph theoretical interpretation of NMR data of protein interactions. The proposed analysis generalizes the idea of network representations of protein structures by expanding it to protein interactions. This approach is based on regularization of residue-resolved NMR relaxation times and chemical shift data and subsequent construction of an adjacency matrix that represents the underlying protein interaction as a graph or network. The network nodes represent protein residues. Two nodes are connected if two residues are functionally correlated during the protein interaction event. The analysis of the resulting network enables the quantification of the importance of each amino acid of a protein for its interactions. Furthermore, the determination of the pattern of correlations between residues yields insights into the functional architecture of an interaction. This is of special interest for intrinsically disordered proteins, since the structural (three-dimensional) architecture of these proteins and their complexes is difficult to determine. The power of the proposed methodology is demonstrated at the example of the interaction between the intrinsically disordered protein osteopontin and its natural ligand heparin.

  19. Teaching Waves with a Graphing Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raggett, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    Stresses the value of graphing and computer algebra systems calculators when teaching about waves. Discusses how to input data into these calculators. Highlights the Texas Instruments' (TI) Web site at http://www.ti.com. (YDS)

  20. Teaching and Learning about Graphing through Computer-Assisted Problem Solving: Issues in the Design and Interpretation of Graphs, the Design and Use of Educational Software, and Classroom Research Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, David F.; And Others

    Recent research has demonstrated the promise of graphing software as an aid to teaching graphs in two content areas: line graphs of aspects of motion and graphs of algebraic functions. This study attempted to generalize the idea of computer-assisted graphing to include the use of several kinds of graphs to solve a wider range of problems. A unit…

  1. Geometric Algebra for Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Chris; Lasenby, Anthony

    2007-11-01

    Preface; Notation; 1. Introduction; 2. Geometric algebra in two and three dimensions; 3. Classical mechanics; 4. Foundations of geometric algebra; 5. Relativity and spacetime; 6. Geometric calculus; 7. Classical electrodynamics; 8. Quantum theory and spinors; 9. Multiparticle states and quantum entanglement; 10. Geometry; 11. Further topics in calculus and group theory; 12. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian techniques; 13. Symmetry and gauge theory; 14. Gravitation; Bibliography; Index.

  2. Box graphs and resolutions I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas P.; Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura

    2016-04-01

    Box graphs succinctly and comprehensively characterize singular fibers of elliptic fibrations in codimension two and three, as well as flop transitions connecting these, in terms of representation theoretic data. We develop a framework that provides a systematic map between a box graph and a crepant algebraic resolution of the singular elliptic fibration, thus allowing an explicit construction of the fibers from a singular Weierstrass or Tate model. The key tool is what we call a fiber face diagram, which shows the relevant information of a (partial) toric triangulation and allows the inclusion of more general algebraic blowups. We shown that each such diagram defines a sequence of weighted algebraic blowups, thus providing a realization of the fiber defined by the box graph in terms of an explicit resolution. We show this correspondence explicitly for the case of SU (5) by providing a map between box graphs and fiber faces, and thereby a sequence of algebraic resolutions of the Tate model, which realizes each of the box graphs.

  3. A conceptual model for quantifying connectivity using graph theory and cellular (per-pixel) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manudeo; Sinha, Rajiv; Tandon, Sampat K.

    2016-04-01

    pathways will show changes under different LULC conditions even if the slope remains the same. The graphical approach provides the statistics of connected and disconnected graph elements (edges, nodes) and graph components, thereby allowing the quantification of structural connectivity. This approach also quantifies the dynamic connectivity by allowing the measurement of the fluxes (e.g. via hydrographs or sedimentographs) at any node as well as at any system outlet. The contribution of any sub-system can be understood by removing the remaining sub-systems which can be conveniently achieved by masking associated graph elements.

  4. Toward an Integration of Item-Response Theory and Cognitive Error Diagnoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatsuoka, Kikumi K.

    The Rule Space Model, a cognitive error diagnostic methodology, is discussed, and the philosophy behind it is related to the question of what really determines item response curves. The Rule Space approach integrates Item Response Theory and the algebraic theory of databases. An application of Graph Theory is introduced as a way to acquire a list…

  5. Recursive neural networks for processing graphs with labelled edges: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, M; Maggini, M; Sarti, L; Scarselli, F

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new recursive neural network model able to process directed acyclic graphs with labelled edges. The model uses a state transition function which considers the edge labels and is independent both from the number and the order of the children of each node. The computational capabilities of the new recursive architecture are assessed. Moreover, in order to test the proposed architecture on a practical challenging application, the problem of object detection in images is also addressed. In fact, the localization of target objects is a preliminary step in any recognition system. The proposed technique is general and can be applied in different detection systems, since it does not exploit any a priori knowledge on the particular problem. Some experiments on face detection, carried out on scenes acquired by an indoor camera, are reported, showing very promising results. PMID:16181770

  6. Wasatch: An architecture-proof multiphysics development environment using a Domain Specific Language and graph theory

    DOE PAGES

    Saad, Tony; Sutherland, James C.

    2016-05-04

    To address the coding and software challenges of modern hybrid architectures, we propose an approach to multiphysics code development for high-performance computing. This approach is based on using a Domain Specific Language (DSL) in tandem with a directed acyclic graph (DAG) representation of the problem to be solved that allows runtime algorithm generation. When coupled with a large-scale parallel framework, the result is a portable development framework capable of executing on hybrid platforms and handling the challenges of multiphysics applications. In addition, we share our experience developing a code in such an environment – an effort that spans an interdisciplinarymore » team of engineers and computer scientists.« less

  7. Random graph theory and neuropercolation for modeling brain oscillations at criticality.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Robert; Puljic, Marko

    2015-04-01

    Mathematical approaches are reviewed to interpret intermittent singular space-time dynamics observed in brain imaging experiments. The following aspects of brain dynamics are considered: nonlinear dynamics (chaos), phase transitions, and criticality. Probabilistic cellular automata and random graph models are described, which develop equations for the probability distributions of macroscopic state variables as an alternative to differential equations. The introduced modular neuropercolation model is motivated by the multilayer structure and dynamical properties of the cortex, and it describes critical brain oscillations, including background activity, narrow-band oscillations in excitatory-inhibitory populations, and broadband oscillations in the cortex. Input-induced and spontaneous transitions between states with large-scale synchrony and without synchrony exhibit brief episodes with long-range spatial correlations as observed in experiments.

  8. Wasatch: An architecture-proof multiphysics development environment using a Domain Specific Language and graph theory

    DOE PAGES

    Saad, Tony; Sutherland, James C.

    2016-05-04

    To address the coding and software challenges of modern hybrid architectures, we propose an approach to multiphysics code development for high-performance computing. This approach is based on using a Domain Specific Language (DSL) in tandem with a directed acyclic graph (DAG) representation of the problem to be solved that allows runtime algorithm generation. When coupled with a large-scale parallel framework, the result is a portable development framework capable of executing on hybrid platforms and handling the challenges of multiphysics applications. In conclusion, we share our experience developing a code in such an environment – an effort that spans an interdisciplinarymore » team of engineers and computer scientists.« less

  9. Dynamical basis sets for algebraic variational calculations in quantum-mechanical scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Yan; Kouri, Donald J.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1990-01-01

    New basis sets are proposed for linear algebraic variational calculations of transition amplitudes in quantum-mechanical scattering problems. These basis sets are hybrids of those that yield the Kohn variational principle (KVP) and those that yield the generalized Newton variational principle (GNVP) when substituted in Schlessinger's stationary expression for the T operator. Trial calculations show that efficiencies almost as great as that of the GNVP and much greater than the KVP can be obtained, even for basis sets with the majority of the members independent of energy.

  10. Models construction for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentations with acetate/butyrate consecutively feeding by graph theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongping; Li, Xin

    2014-05-01

    Several fermentations with consecutively feeding of acetate/butyrate were conducted in a 7 L fermentor and the results indicated that exogenous acetate/butyrate enhanced solvents productivities by 47.1% and 39.2% respectively, and changed butyrate/acetate ratios greatly. Then extracellular butyrate/acetate ratios were utilized for calculation of acids rates and the results revealed that acetate and butyrate formation pathways were almost blocked by corresponding acids feeding. In addition, models for acetate/butyrate feeding fermentations were constructed by graph theory based on calculation results and relevant reports. Solvents concentrations and butanol/acetone ratios of these fermentations were also calculated and the results of models calculation matched fermentation data accurately which demonstrated that models were constructed in a reasonable way.

  11. Graph Library

    2007-06-12

    GraphLib is a support library used by other tools to create, manipulate, store, and export graphs. It provides a simple interface to specifS’ arbitrary directed and undirected graphs by adding nodes and edges. Each node and edge can be associated with a set of attributes describing size, color, and shape. Once created, graphs can be manipulated using a set of graph analysis algorithms, including merge, prune, and path coloring operations. GraphLib also has the abilitymore » to export graphs into various open formats such as DOT and GML.« less

  12. A Note on Hamiltonian Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald; Davi, Charles; Skurnick, Mia

    2005-01-01

    Since 1952, several well-known graph theorists have proven numerous results regarding Hamiltonian graphs. In fact, many elementary graph theory textbooks contain the theorems of Ore, Bondy and Chvatal, Chvatal and Erdos, Posa, and Dirac, to name a few. In this note, the authors state and prove some propositions of their own concerning Hamiltonian…

  13. An extension of the classical theory of algebraic invariants to pseudo-Riemannian geometry and Hamiltonian mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLenaghan, Raymond G.; Smirnov, Roman G.; The, Dennis

    2004-03-01

    We develop a new approach to the study of Killing tensors defined in pseudo-Riemannian spaces of constant curvature that is ideologically close to the classical theory of invariants. The main idea, which provides the foundation of the new approach, is to treat a Killing tensor as an algebraic object determined by a set of parameters of the corresponding vector space of Killing tensors under the action of the isometry group. The spaces of group invariants and conformal group invariants of valence two Killing tensors defined in the Minkowski plane are described. The group invariants, which are the generators of the space of invariants, are applied to the problem of classification of orthogonally separable Hamiltonian systems defined in the Minkowski plane. Transformation formulas to separable coordinates expressed in terms of the parameters of the corresponding space of Killing tensors are presented. The results are applied to the problem of orthogonal separability of the Drach superintegrable potentials.

  14. A Systematic Composite Service Design Modeling Method Using Graph-Based Theory

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, Arafat Abdulgader Mohammed; Mohamad, Radziah; Aziz, Muhammad Waqar; Zeshan, Furkh

    2015-01-01

    The composite service design modeling is an essential process of the service-oriented software development life cycle, where the candidate services, composite services, operations and their dependencies are required to be identified and specified before their design. However, a systematic service-oriented design modeling method for composite services is still in its infancy as most of the existing approaches provide the modeling of atomic services only. For these reasons, a new method (ComSDM) is proposed in this work for modeling the concept of service-oriented design to increase the reusability and decrease the complexity of system while keeping the service composition considerations in mind. Furthermore, the ComSDM method provides the mathematical representation of the components of service-oriented design using the graph-based theoryto facilitate the design quality measurement. To demonstrate that the ComSDM method is also suitable for composite service design modeling of distributed embedded real-time systems along with enterprise software development, it is implemented in the case study of a smart home. The results of the case study not only check the applicability of ComSDM, but can also be used to validate the complexity and reusability of ComSDM. This also guides the future research towards the design quality measurement such as using the ComSDM method to measure the quality of composite service design in service-oriented software system. PMID:25928358

  15. A systematic composite service design modeling method using graph-based theory.

    PubMed

    Elhag, Arafat Abdulgader Mohammed; Mohamad, Radziah; Aziz, Muhammad Waqar; Zeshan, Furkh

    2015-01-01

    The composite service design modeling is an essential process of the service-oriented software development life cycle, where the candidate services, composite services, operations and their dependencies are required to be identified and specified before their design. However, a systematic service-oriented design modeling method for composite services is still in its infancy as most of the existing approaches provide the modeling of atomic services only. For these reasons, a new method (ComSDM) is proposed in this work for modeling the concept of service-oriented design to increase the reusability and decrease the complexity of system while keeping the service composition considerations in mind. Furthermore, the ComSDM method provides the mathematical representation of the components of service-oriented design using the graph-based theoryto facilitate the design quality measurement. To demonstrate that the ComSDM method is also suitable for composite service design modeling of distributed embedded real-time systems along with enterprise software development, it is implemented in the case study of a smart home. The results of the case study not only check the applicability of ComSDM, but can also be used to validate the complexity and reusability of ComSDM. This also guides the future research towards the design quality measurement such as using the ComSDM method to measure the quality of composite service design in service-oriented software system.

  16. Algebraic Semantics for Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper uses discussion of Edmund Spenser's "The Faerie Queene" to present a theoretical framework for explaining the semantics of narrative discourse. The algebraic theory of finite automata is used. (CK)

  17. Linear algebraic calculation of the Green's function for large-scale electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, R.; Hoshi, T.; Sogabe, T.; Zhang, S.-L.; Fujiwara, T.

    2006-04-01

    A linear algebraic method named the shifted conjugate-orthogonal conjugate-gradient method is introduced for large-scale electronic structure calculation. The method gives an iterative solver algorithm of the Green’s function and the density matrix without calculating eigenstates. The problem is reduced to independent linear equations at many energy points and the calculation is actually carried out only for a single energy point. The method is robust against the round-off error and the calculation can reach the machine accuracy. With the observation of residual vectors, the accuracy can be controlled, microscopically, independently for each element of the Green’s function, and dynamically, at each step in dynamical simulations. The method is applied to both a semiconductor and a metal.

  18. Altered Brain Network in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Resting Graph Theory-Based Network Study at Voxel-Wise Level.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chaoyang; Hu, Xiaofei; Hu, Jun; Liang, Minglong; Yin, Xuntao; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Jiuquan; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rare degenerative disorder characterized by loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Neuroimaging has provided noticeable evidence that ALS is a complex disease, and shown that anatomical and functional lesions extend beyond precentral cortices and corticospinal tracts, to include the corpus callosum; frontal, sensory, and premotor cortices; thalamus; and midbrain. The aim of this study is to investigate graph theory-based functional network abnormalities at voxel-wise level in ALS patients on a whole brain scale. Forty-three ALS patients and 44 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled. The voxel-wise network degree centrality (DC), a commonly employed graph-based measure of network organization, was used to characterize the alteration of whole brain functional network. Compared with the controls, the ALS patients showed significant increase of DC in the left cerebellum posterior lobes, bilateral cerebellum crus, bilateral occipital poles, right orbital frontal lobe, and bilateral prefrontal lobes; significant decrease of DC in the bilateral primary motor cortex, bilateral sensory motor region, right prefrontal lobe, left bilateral precuneus, bilateral lateral temporal lobes, left cingulate cortex, and bilateral visual processing cortex. The DC's z-scores of right inferior occipital gyrus were significant negative correlated with the ALSFRS-r scores. Our findings confirm that the regions with abnormal network DC in ALS patients were located in multiple brain regions including primary motor, somatosensory and extra-motor areas, supporting the concept that ALS is a multisystem disorder. Specifically, our study found that DC in the visual areas was altered and ALS patients with higher DC in right inferior occipital gyrus have more severity of disease. The result demonstrated that the altered DC value in this region can probably be used to assess severity of ALS. PMID:27242409

  19. Altered Brain Network in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Resting Graph Theory-Based Network Study at Voxel-Wise Level

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chaoyang; Hu, Xiaofei; Hu, Jun; Liang, Minglong; Yin, Xuntao; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Jiuquan; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rare degenerative disorder characterized by loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Neuroimaging has provided noticeable evidence that ALS is a complex disease, and shown that anatomical and functional lesions extend beyond precentral cortices and corticospinal tracts, to include the corpus callosum; frontal, sensory, and premotor cortices; thalamus; and midbrain. The aim of this study is to investigate graph theory-based functional network abnormalities at voxel-wise level in ALS patients on a whole brain scale. Forty-three ALS patients and 44 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled. The voxel-wise network degree centrality (DC), a commonly employed graph-based measure of network organization, was used to characterize the alteration of whole brain functional network. Compared with the controls, the ALS patients showed significant increase of DC in the left cerebellum posterior lobes, bilateral cerebellum crus, bilateral occipital poles, right orbital frontal lobe, and bilateral prefrontal lobes; significant decrease of DC in the bilateral primary motor cortex, bilateral sensory motor region, right prefrontal lobe, left bilateral precuneus, bilateral lateral temporal lobes, left cingulate cortex, and bilateral visual processing cortex. The DC's z-scores of right inferior occipital gyrus were significant negative correlated with the ALSFRS-r scores. Our findings confirm that the regions with abnormal network DC in ALS patients were located in multiple brain regions including primary motor, somatosensory and extra-motor areas, supporting the concept that ALS is a multisystem disorder. Specifically, our study found that DC in the visual areas was altered and ALS patients with higher DC in right inferior occipital gyrus have more severity of disease. The result demonstrated that the altered DC value in this region can probably be used to assess severity of ALS. PMID:27242409

  20. Altered Brain Network in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Resting Graph Theory-Based Network Study at Voxel-Wise Level.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chaoyang; Hu, Xiaofei; Hu, Jun; Liang, Minglong; Yin, Xuntao; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Jiuquan; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rare degenerative disorder characterized by loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Neuroimaging has provided noticeable evidence that ALS is a complex disease, and shown that anatomical and functional lesions extend beyond precentral cortices and corticospinal tracts, to include the corpus callosum; frontal, sensory, and premotor cortices; thalamus; and midbrain. The aim of this study is to investigate graph theory-based functional network abnormalities at voxel-wise level in ALS patients on a whole brain scale. Forty-three ALS patients and 44 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled. The voxel-wise network degree centrality (DC), a commonly employed graph-based measure of network organization, was used to characterize the alteration of whole brain functional network. Compared with the controls, the ALS patients showed significant increase of DC in the left cerebellum posterior lobes, bilateral cerebellum crus, bilateral occipital poles, right orbital frontal lobe, and bilateral prefrontal lobes; significant decrease of DC in the bilateral primary motor cortex, bilateral sensory motor region, right prefrontal lobe, left bilateral precuneus, bilateral lateral temporal lobes, left cingulate cortex, and bilateral visual processing cortex. The DC's z-scores of right inferior occipital gyrus were significant negative correlated with the ALSFRS-r scores. Our findings confirm that the regions with abnormal network DC in ALS patients were located in multiple brain regions including primary motor, somatosensory and extra-motor areas, supporting the concept that ALS is a multisystem disorder. Specifically, our study found that DC in the visual areas was altered and ALS patients with higher DC in right inferior occipital gyrus have more severity of disease. The result demonstrated that the altered DC value in this region can probably be used to assess severity of ALS.

  1. Graph Theory Analysis of Functional Brain Networks and Mobility Disability in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, Jonathan H.; Morgan, Ashley R.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Laurienti, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The brain’s structural integrity is associated with mobility function in older adults. Changes in function may be evident earlier than changes in structure and may be more directly related to mobility. Therefore, we assessed whether functional brain networks varied with mobility function in older adults. Methods. Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging were collected on 24 young (mean age = 26.4±5.1) and 48 older (mean age = 72.04±5.1) participants. Older participants were divided into three groups by SPPB score: Low SPPB (score = 7–9), Mid SPPB (score = 10), High SPPB (score = 11–12).Graph theory–based methods were used to characterize and compare brain network organization. Results. Connectivity in the somatomotor cortex distinguished between groups based on SPPB score. The community structure of the somatomotor cortex was significantly less consistent in the Low SPPB group (mean = 0.097±0.05) compared with Young (mean = 0.163±0.09, p = .03) SPPB group. Striking differences were evident in second-order connections between somatomotor cortex and superior temporal gyrus and insula that reached statistical significance. The Low SPPB group (mean = 140.87±109.30) had a significantly higher number of connections than Young (mean = 45.05±33.79, p = .0003) or High (mean = 49.61±35.31, p = .002) SPPB group. Conclusions. Older adults with poorer mobility function exhibited reduced consistency of somatomotor community structure and a greater number of secondary connections with vestibular and multisensory regions of the brain. Further study is needed to fully interpret these effects, but analysis of functional brain networks adds new insights to the contribution of the brain to mobility. PMID:24717331

  2. Semi-Markov Graph Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Raberto, Marco; Rapallo, Fabio; Scalas, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we outline a model of graph (or network) dynamics based on two ingredients. The first ingredient is a Markov chain on the space of possible graphs. The second ingredient is a semi-Markov counting process of renewal type. The model consists in subordinating the Markov chain to the semi-Markov counting process. In simple words, this means that the chain transitions occur at random time instants called epochs. The model is quite rich and its possible connections with algebraic geometry are briefly discussed. Moreover, for the sake of simplicity, we focus on the space of undirected graphs with a fixed number of nodes. However, in an example, we present an interbank market model where it is meaningful to use directed graphs or even weighted graphs. PMID:21887245

  3. Lattices of processes in graphs with inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Shakhbazyan, K.V.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a continuation of others work, presenting a detailed analysis of finite lattices of processes in graphs with input nodes. Lattices of processes in such graphs are studied by representing the lattices in the form of an algebra of pairs. We define the algebra of pairs somewhat generalizing the definition. Let K and D be bounded distributive lattices. A sublattice {delta} {contained_in} K x D is called an algebra of pairs if for all K {element_of} K we have (K, 1{sub D}) {element_of} {delta} and for all d {element_of} D we have (O{sub K}).

  4. I Teach Economics, Not Algebra and Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hey, John D.

    2005-01-01

    Most people learn to drive without knowing how the engine works. In a similar vein, the author believes that students can learn economics without knowing the algebra and calculus underlying the results. If instructors follow the philosophy of other economics courses in using graphs to illustrate the results, and draw the graphs accurately, then…

  5. Algebraic connectivity analysis in molecular electronic structure theory II: total exponential formulation of second-quantised correlated methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakh, Dmitry I.; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamentality of the exponential representation of a second-quantised correlated wave function is emphasised with an accent on the physical sense of cluster amplitudes as cumulants of the correlated ansatz. Three main wave function formalisms, namely, the configuration-interaction theory, the coupled-cluster approach, and the many-body perturbation theory (as well as their extensions, e.g. the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method, multireference schemes, etc.), are represented in an exponential form, leading to a formulation of the working equations in terms of cluster amplitudes. By expressing the corresponding many-body tensor equations in terms of cluster amplitudes, we could unambiguously check connectivity types and the asymptotic behaviour of all tensors/scalars involved (in the formal limit of an infinite number of correlated particles). In particular, the appearance of disconnected cluster amplitudes corresponds to unphysical correlations. Besides, we demonstrate that the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster approach, as well as certain excited-state configuration-interaction methods, can be recast in a fully connected (exponential) form, thus breaking the common belief that all truncated configuration-interaction methods violate connectivity. Our work is based on the recently developed algebraic framework which can be viewed as a complement to the classical diagrammatic analysis.

  6. Algebraic Activities Aid Discovery Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace-Gomez, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    After a unit on the rules for positive and negative numbers and the order of operations for evaluating algebraic expressions, many students believe that they understand these principles well enough, but they really do not. They clearly need more practice, but not more of the same kind of drill. Wallace-Gomez provides three graphing activities that…

  7. Math for All Learners: Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meader, Pam; Storer, Judy

    This book consists of a series of activities aimed at providing a problem solving, hands-on approach so that students can experience concepts in algebra. Topics include ratio and proportion, patterns and formulas, integers, polynomials, linear equations, graphs, and probability. The activities come in the form of reproducible blackline masters…

  8. Perspective - Open problems in earth surface dynamics require innovative new methodologies from graph theory and non-linear analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Schwenk, Jon; Tejedor, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    Are the dynamics of meandering rivers non-linear? What information does the shape of an oxbow lake carry about its forming process? How to characterize self-dissimilar landscapes carrying the signature of larger-scale geologic or tectonic controls? Do we have proper frameworks for quantifying the topology and dynamics of deltaic systems? What can the structural complexity of river networks (erosional and depositional) reveal about their vulnerability and response to change? Can the structure and dynamics of river networks reveal potential hotspots of geomorphic change? All of the above problems are at the heart of understanding landscape evolution, relating process to structure and form, and developing methodologies for inferring how a system might respond to future changes. We argue that a new surge of rigorous methodologies is needed to address these problems. The innovations introduced herein are: (1) gradual wavelet reconstruction for depicting threshold nonlinearity (due to cutoffs) versus inherent nonlinearity (due to underlying dynamics) in river meandering, (2) graph theory for studying the topology and dynamics of deltaic river networks and their response to change, and (3) Lagrangian approaches combined with topology and non-linear dynamics for inferring sediment-driven hotspots of geomorphic change.

  9. Acoustic emission source location and damage detection in a metallic structure using a graph-theory-based geodesic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadharan, R.; Prasanna, G.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2009-11-01

    A geodesic-based approach using Lamb waves is proposed to locate the acoustic emission (AE) source and damage in an isotropic metallic structure. In the case of the AE (passive) technique, the elastic waves take the shortest path from the source to the sensor array distributed in the structure. The geodesics are computed on the meshed surface of the structure using graph theory based on Dijkstra's algorithm. By propagating the waves in reverse virtually from these sensors along the geodesic path and by locating the first intersection point of these waves, one can get the AE source location. The same approach is extended for detection of damage in a structure. The wave response matrix of the given sensor configuration for the healthy and the damaged structure is obtained experimentally. The healthy and damage response matrix is compared and their difference gives the information about the reflection of waves from the damage. These waves are backpropagated from the sensors and the above method is used to locate the damage by finding the point where intersection of geodesics occurs. In this work, the geodesic approach is shown to be suitable to obtain a practicable source location solution in a more general set-up on any arbitrary surface containing finite discontinuities. Experiments were conducted on aluminum specimens of simple and complex geometry to validate this new method.

  10. Computer Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavelle, Richard; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the nature and use of computer algebra and its applications to various physical sciences. Includes diagrams illustrating, among others, a computer algebra system and flow chart of operation of the Euclidean algorithm. (SK)

  11. Spectral fluctuations of quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhař, Z.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2014-10-01

    We prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture in its most general form for completely connected simple graphs with incommensurate bond lengths. We show that for graphs that are classically mixing (i.e., graphs for which the spectrum of the classical Perron-Frobenius operator possesses a finite gap), the generating functions for all (P,Q) correlation functions for both closed and open graphs coincide (in the limit of infinite graph size) with the corresponding expressions of random-matrix theory, both for orthogonal and for unitary symmetry.

  12. Spectral fluctuations of quantum graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Pluhař, Z.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2014-10-15

    We prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture in its most general form for completely connected simple graphs with incommensurate bond lengths. We show that for graphs that are classically mixing (i.e., graphs for which the spectrum of the classical Perron-Frobenius operator possesses a finite gap), the generating functions for all (P,Q) correlation functions for both closed and open graphs coincide (in the limit of infinite graph size) with the corresponding expressions of random-matrix theory, both for orthogonal and for unitary symmetry.

  13. Bethe Ansatz and the Spectral Theory of Affine Lie algebra-Valued Connections II: The Non Simply-Laced Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoero, Davide; Raimondo, Andrea; Valeri, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    We assess the ODE/IM correspondence for the quantum g -KdV model, for a non-simply laced Lie algebra g. This is done by studying a meromorphic connection with values in the Langlands dual algebra of the affine Lie algebra g^{(1)} , and constructing the relevant {Ψ} -system among subdominant solutions. We then use the {Ψ} -system to prove that the generalized spectral determinants satisfy the Bethe Ansatz equations of the quantum g -KdV model. We also consider generalized Airy functions for twisted Kac-Moody algebras and we construct new explicit solutions to the Bethe Ansatz equations. The paper is a continuation of our previous work on the ODE/IM correspondence for simply-laced Lie algebras.

  14. Example of a quantum field theory based on a nonlinear Lie algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Schoutens, K. . Inst. for Theoretical Physics); Sevrin, A. ); van Nieuwenhuizen, P. . Theory Div.)

    1991-11-01

    In this contribution to Tini Veltman's Festschrift we shall give a paedagogical account of our work on a new class of gauge theories called W gravities. They contain higher spin gauge fields, but the usual no-go theorems for interacting field theories with spins exceeding two do not apply since these theories are in two dimensions. It is, of course, well known that ghost-free interacting massless spin 2 fields ( the metric') are gauge fields, and correspond to the geometrical notion of general coordinate transformations in general relativity, but it is yet unknown what extension of these ideas is introduced by the presence of massless higher spin gauge fields. A parallel with supergravity may be drawn: there the presence of massless spin 3/2 fields (gravitinos) corresponds to local fermi-bose symmetries of which these gravitinos are the gauge fields. Their geometrical meaning becomes only clear if one introduces superspace (with bosonic and fermionic coordinates): they correspond to local transformations of the fermionic coordinates. For W gravity one might speculate on a kind of W-superspace with extra bosonic coordinates.

  15. Example of a quantum field theory based on a nonlinear Lie algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Schoutens, K.; Sevrin, A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, P.

    1991-11-01

    In this contribution to Tini Veltman`s Festschrift we shall give a paedagogical account of our work on a new class of gauge theories called W gravities. They contain higher spin gauge fields, but the usual no-go theorems for interacting field theories with spins exceeding two do not apply since these theories are in two dimensions. It is, of course, well known that ghost-free interacting massless spin 2 fields (`the metric`) are gauge fields, and correspond to the geometrical notion of general coordinate transformations in general relativity, but it is yet unknown what extension of these ideas is introduced by the presence of massless higher spin gauge fields. A parallel with supergravity may be drawn: there the presence of massless spin 3/2 fields (gravitinos) corresponds to local fermi-bose symmetries of which these gravitinos are the gauge fields. Their geometrical meaning becomes only clear if one introduces superspace (with bosonic and fermionic coordinates): they correspond to local transformations of the fermionic coordinates. For W gravity one might speculate on a kind of W-superspace with extra bosonic coordinates.

  16. Network science and the human brain: Using graph theory to understand the brain and one of its hubs, the amygdala, in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Mears, David; Pollard, Harvey B

    2016-06-01

    Over the past 15 years, the emerging field of network science has revealed the key features of brain networks, which include small-world topology, the presence of highly connected hubs, and hierarchical modularity. The value of network studies of the brain is underscored by the range of network alterations that have been identified in neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, depression, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and many others. Here we briefly summarize the concepts of graph theory that are used to quantify network properties and describe common experimental approaches for analysis of brain networks of structural and functional connectivity. These range from tract tracing to functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, electroencephalography, and magnetoencephalography. We then summarize the major findings from the application of graph theory to nervous systems ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to more complex primate brains, including man. Focusing, then, on studies involving the amygdala, a brain region that has attracted intense interest as a center for emotional processing, fear, and motivation, we discuss the features of the amygdala in brain networks for fear conditioning and emotional perception. Finally, to highlight the utility of graph theory for studying dysfunction of the amygdala in mental illness, we review data with regard to changes in the hub properties of the amygdala in brain networks of patients with depression. We suggest that network studies of the human brain may serve to focus attention on regions and connections that act as principal drivers and controllers of brain function in health and disease.

  17. Network science and the human brain: Using graph theory to understand the brain and one of its hubs, the amygdala, in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Mears, David; Pollard, Harvey B

    2016-06-01

    Over the past 15 years, the emerging field of network science has revealed the key features of brain networks, which include small-world topology, the presence of highly connected hubs, and hierarchical modularity. The value of network studies of the brain is underscored by the range of network alterations that have been identified in neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, depression, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and many others. Here we briefly summarize the concepts of graph theory that are used to quantify network properties and describe common experimental approaches for analysis of brain networks of structural and functional connectivity. These range from tract tracing to functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, electroencephalography, and magnetoencephalography. We then summarize the major findings from the application of graph theory to nervous systems ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to more complex primate brains, including man. Focusing, then, on studies involving the amygdala, a brain region that has attracted intense interest as a center for emotional processing, fear, and motivation, we discuss the features of the amygdala in brain networks for fear conditioning and emotional perception. Finally, to highlight the utility of graph theory for studying dysfunction of the amygdala in mental illness, we review data with regard to changes in the hub properties of the amygdala in brain networks of patients with depression. We suggest that network studies of the human brain may serve to focus attention on regions and connections that act as principal drivers and controllers of brain function in health and disease. PMID:26771046

  18. Escape from intermittent repellers: periodic orbit theory for crossover from exponential to algebraic decay.

    PubMed

    Dahlqvist, P

    1999-12-01

    We apply periodic orbit theory to study the asymptotic distribution of escape times from an intermittent map. The dynamical zeta function exhibits a branch point which is associated with an asymptotic power law escape. By an analytic continuation technique we compute a pair of complex conjugate zeroes beyond the branch point, associated with a preasymptotic exponential decay. The crossover time from an exponential to a power law is also predicted. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by numerical simulation. Applications to conductance fluctuations in quantum dots are discussed.

  19. Campaign graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    We define a class of geometrical constructions in the plane in which each (unextended) line lies on (precisely) k points, and every point is an endpoint of (precisely) one line. We will refer to any construction satisfying these conditions as a campaign graph, or as a k-campaign graph if the value of k isn't clear from the context. A k-campaign graph, G, is said to be critical if no subgraph of G is also a k-campaign graph. 11 figs.

  20. Deciphering the Prokaryotic Community and Metabolisms in South African Deep-Mine Biofilms through Antibody Microarrays and Graph Theory

    PubMed Central

    García-Moyano, Antonio; Aguirre, Jacobo; Cruz-Gil, Patricia; Palacín, Arantxa; van Heerden, Esta; Parro, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    In the South African deep mines, a variety of biofilms growing in mine corridor walls as water seeps from intersections or from fractures represents excellent proxies for deep-subsurface environments. However, they may be greatly affected by the oxygen inputs through the galleries of mining activities. As a consequence, the interaction between the anaerobic water coming out from the walls with the oxygen inputs creates new conditions that support rich microbial communities. The inherent difficulties for sampling these delicate habitats, together with transport and storage conditions may alter the community features and composition. Therefore, the development of in situ monitoring methods would be desirable for quick evaluation of the microbial community. In this work, we report the usefulness of an antibody-microarray (EMChip66) immunoassay for a quick check of the microbial diversity of biofilms located at 1.3 km below surface within the Beatrix deep gold mine (South Africa). In addition, a deconvolution method, previously described and used for environmental monitoring, based on graph theory and applied on antibody cross-reactivity was used to interpret the immunoassay results. The results were corroborated and further expanded by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Both culture-independent techniques coincided in detecting features related to aerobic sulfur-oxidizers, aerobic chemoorganotrophic Alphaproteobacteria and metanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene sequencing detected phylotypes related to nitrate-reducers and anaerobic sulfur-oxidizers, whereas the EMChip66 detected immunological features from methanogens and sulfate-reducers. The results reveal a diverse microbial community with syntrophic metabolisms both anaerobic (fermentation, methanogenesis, sulphate and nitrate reduction) and aerobic (methanotrophy, sulphur oxidation). The presence of oxygen-scavenging microbes might indicate that the system is modified by the artificial oxygen inputs

  1. Informatic system for a global tissue-fluid biorepository with a graph theory-oriented graphical user interface.

    PubMed

    Butler, William E; Atai, Nadia; Carter, Bob; Hochberg, Fred

    2014-01-01

    The Richard Floor Biorepository supports collaborative studies of extracellular vesicles (EVs) found in human fluids and tissue specimens. The current emphasis is on biomarkers for central nervous system neoplasms but its structure may serve as a template for collaborative EV translational studies in other fields. The informatic system provides specimen inventory tracking with bar codes assigned to specimens and containers and projects, is hosted on globalized cloud computing resources, and embeds a suite of shared documents, calendars, and video-conferencing features. Clinical data are recorded in relation to molecular EV attributes and may be tagged with terms drawn from a network of externally maintained ontologies thus offering expansion of the system as the field matures. We fashioned the graphical user interface (GUI) around a web-based data visualization package. This system is now in an early stage of deployment, mainly focused on specimen tracking and clinical, laboratory, and imaging data capture in support of studies to optimize detection and analysis of brain tumour-specific mutations. It currently includes 4,392 specimens drawn from 611 subjects, the majority with brain tumours. As EV science evolves, we plan biorepository changes which may reflect multi-institutional collaborations, proteomic interfaces, additional biofluids, changes in operating procedures and kits for specimen handling, novel procedures for detection of tumour-specific EVs, and for RNA extraction and changes in the taxonomy of EVs. We have used an ontology-driven data model and web-based architecture with a graph theory-driven GUI to accommodate and stimulate the semantic web of EV science.

  2. Informatic system for a global tissue-fluid biorepository with a graph theory-oriented graphical user interface.

    PubMed

    Butler, William E; Atai, Nadia; Carter, Bob; Hochberg, Fred

    2014-01-01

    The Richard Floor Biorepository supports collaborative studies of extracellular vesicles (EVs) found in human fluids and tissue specimens. The current emphasis is on biomarkers for central nervous system neoplasms but its structure may serve as a template for collaborative EV translational studies in other fields. The informatic system provides specimen inventory tracking with bar codes assigned to specimens and containers and projects, is hosted on globalized cloud computing resources, and embeds a suite of shared documents, calendars, and video-conferencing features. Clinical data are recorded in relation to molecular EV attributes and may be tagged with terms drawn from a network of externally maintained ontologies thus offering expansion of the system as the field matures. We fashioned the graphical user interface (GUI) around a web-based data visualization package. This system is now in an early stage of deployment, mainly focused on specimen tracking and clinical, laboratory, and imaging data capture in support of studies to optimize detection and analysis of brain tumour-specific mutations. It currently includes 4,392 specimens drawn from 611 subjects, the majority with brain tumours. As EV science evolves, we plan biorepository changes which may reflect multi-institutional collaborations, proteomic interfaces, additional biofluids, changes in operating procedures and kits for specimen handling, novel procedures for detection of tumour-specific EVs, and for RNA extraction and changes in the taxonomy of EVs. We have used an ontology-driven data model and web-based architecture with a graph theory-driven GUI to accommodate and stimulate the semantic web of EV science. PMID:25317275

  3. Twining characters and orbit Lie algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Jurgen; Ray, Urmie; Schellekens, Bert; Schweigert, Christoph

    1996-12-05

    We associate to outer automorphisms of generalized Kac-Moody algebras generalized character-valued indices, the twining characters. A character formula for twining characters is derived which shows that they coincide with the ordinary characters of some other generalized Kac-Moody algebra, the so-called orbit Lie algebra. Some applications to problems in conformal field theory, algebraic geometry and the theory of sporadic simple groups are sketched.

  4. Theory of the Decoherence Effect in Finite and Infinite Open Quantum Systems Using the Algebraic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Philippe; Hellmich, Mario; Ługiewicz, Piotr; Olkiewicz, Robert

    Quantum mechanics is the greatest revision of our conception of the character of the physical world since Newton. Consequently, David Hilbert was very interested in quantum mechanics. He and John von Neumann discussed it frequently during von Neumann's residence in Göttingen. He published in 1932 his book Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. In Hilbert's opinion it was the first exposition of quantum mechanics in a mathematically rigorous way. The pioneers of quantum mechanics, Heisenberg and Dirac, neither had use for rigorous mathematics nor much interest in it. Conceptually, quantum theory as developed by Bohr and Heisenberg is based on the positivism of Mach as it describes only observable quantities. It first emerged as a result of experimental data in the form of statistical observations of quantum noise, the basic concept of quantum probability.

  5. Algebraic quantum gravity (AQG): I. Conceptual setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesel, K.; Thiemann, T.

    2007-05-01

    We introduce a new top down approach to canonical quantum gravity, called algebraic quantum gravity (AQG). The quantum kinematics of AQG is determined by an abstract *-algebra generated by a countable set of elementary operators labelled by an algebraic graph. The quantum dynamics of AQG is governed by a single master constraint operator. While AQG is inspired by loop quantum gravity (LQG), it differs drastically from it because in AQG there is fundamentally no topology or differential structure. A natural Hilbert space representation acquires the structure of an infinite tensor product (ITP) whose separable strong equivalence class Hilbert subspaces (sectors) are left invariant by the quantum dynamics. The missing information about the topology and differential structure of the spacetime manifold as well as about the background metric to be approximated is supplied by coherent states. Given such data, the corresponding coherent state defines a sector in the ITP which can be identified with a usual QFT on the given manifold and background. Thus, AQG contains QFT on all curved spacetimes at once, possibly has something to say about topology change and provides the contact with the familiar low energy physics. In particular, in two companion papers we develop semiclassical perturbation theory for AQG and LQG and thereby show that the theory admits a semiclassical limit whose infinitesimal gauge symmetry agrees with that of general relativity. In AQG everything is computable with sufficient precision and no UV divergences arise due to the background independence of the fundamental combinatorial structure. Hence, in contrast to lattice gauge theory on a background metric, no continuum limit has to be taken. There simply is no lattice regulator that must be sent to zero.

  6. Graphing Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connery, Keely Flynn

    2007-01-01

    Graphing predictions is especially important in classes where relationships between variables need to be explored and derived. In this article, the author describes how his students sketch the graphs of their predictions before they begin their investigations on two laboratory activities: Distance Versus Time Cart Race Lab and Resistance; and…

  7. Lorentz-diffeomorphism quasi-local conserved charges and Virasoro algebra in Chern-Simons-like theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Adami, H.

    2016-08-01

    The Chern-Simons-like theories of gravity (CSLTG) are formulated at first order formalism. In this formalism, the derivation of the entropy of a black hole on bifurcation surface, as a quasi-local conserved charge is problematic. In this paper we overcome these problems by considering the concept of total variation and the Lorentz-Lie derivative. We firstly find an expression for the ADT conserved current in the context of the CSLTG which is based on the concept of the Killing vector fields. Then, we generalize it to be conserved for all diffeomorphism generators. Thus, we can extract an off-shell conserved charge for any vector field which generates a diffeomorphism. The formalism presented here is based on the concept of quasi-local conserved charges which are off-shell. The charges can be calculated on any codimension two space-like surface surrounding a black hole and the results are independent of the chosen surface. By using the off-shell quasi-local conserved charge, we investigate the Virasoro algebra and find a formula to calculate the central extension term. We apply the formalism to the BTZ black hole solution in the context of the Einstein gravity and the Generalized massive gravity, then we find the eigenvalues of their Virasoro generators as well as the corresponding central charges. Eventually, we calculate the entropy of the BTZ black hole by the Cardy formula and we show that the result exactly matches the one obtained by the concept of the off-shell conserved charges.

  8. Array algebra estimation in signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauhala, U. A.

    A general theory of linear estimators called array algebra estimation is interpreted in some terms of multidimensional digital signal processing, mathematical statistics, and numerical analysis. The theory has emerged during the past decade from the new field of a unified vector, matrix and tensor algebra called array algebra. The broad concepts of array algebra and its estimation theory cover several modern computerized sciences and technologies converting their established notations and terminology into one common language. Some concepts of digital signal processing are adopted into this language after a review of the principles of array algebra estimation and its predecessors in mathematical surveying sciences.

  9. Accelerating sparse linear algebra using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, Kyle E.; Humphrey, John R.; Price, Daniel K.; Kelmelis, Eric J.

    2011-06-01

    The modern graphics processing unit (GPU) found in many standard personal computers is a highly parallel math processor capable of over 1 TFLOPS of peak computational throughput at a cost similar to a high-end CPU with excellent FLOPS-to-watt ratio. High-level sparse linear algebra operations are computationally intense, often requiring large amounts of parallel operations and would seem a natural fit for the processing power of the GPU. Our work is on a GPU accelerated implementation of sparse linear algebra routines. We present results from both direct and iterative sparse system solvers. The GPU execution model featured by NVIDIA GPUs based on CUDA demands very strong parallelism, requiring between hundreds and thousands of simultaneous operations to achieve high performance. Some constructs from linear algebra map extremely well to the GPU and others map poorly. CPUs, on the other hand, do well at smaller order parallelism and perform acceptably during low-parallelism code segments. Our work addresses this via hybrid a processing model, in which the CPU and GPU work simultaneously to produce results. In many cases, this is accomplished by allowing each platform to do the work it performs most naturally. For example, the CPU is responsible for graph theory portion of the direct solvers while the GPU simultaneously performs the low level linear algebra routines.

  10. Algebraic approach to small-world network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph-Lilith, Michelle; Muller, Lyle E.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an analytic model for directed Watts-Strogatz small-world graphs and deduce an algebraic expression of its defining adjacency matrix. The latter is then used to calculate the small-world digraph's asymmetry index and clustering coefficient in an analytically exact fashion, valid nonasymptotically for all graph sizes. The proposed approach is general and can be applied to all algebraically well-defined graph-theoretical measures, thus allowing for an analytical investigation of finite-size small-world graphs.

  11. Relativity on Rotated Graph Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    We present visual calculations in special relativity using spacetime diagrams drawn on graph paper that has been rotated by 45 degrees. The rotated lines represent lightlike directions in Minkowski spacetime, and the boxes in the grid (called light-clock diamonds) represent ticks of an inertial observer's lightclock. We show that many quantitative results can be read off a spacetime diagram by counting boxes, using a minimal amount of algebra.

  12. Earth Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufele, Christopher; Zumoff, Nancy

    Earth Algebra is an entry level college algebra course that incorporates the spirit of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics at the college level. The context of the course places mathematics at the center of one of the major current concerns of the world. Through…

  13. Kiddie Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2009-01-01

    As educators and policymakers search for ways to prepare students for the rigors of algebra, teachers in the Helena, Montana, school system are starting early by attempting to nurture students' algebraic-reasoning ability, as well as their basic number skills, in early elementary school, rather than waiting until middle or early high school.…

  14. New family of Maxwell like algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha, P. K.; Durka, R.; Merino, N.; Rodríguez, E. K.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce an alternative way of closing Maxwell like algebras. We show, through a suitable change of basis, that resulting algebras are given by the direct sums of the AdS and the Maxwell algebras already known in the literature. Casting the result into the S-expansion method framework ensures the straightaway construction of the gravity theories based on a found enlargement.

  15. Discriminating Micropathogen Lineages and Their Reticulate Evolution through Graph Theory-Based Network Analysis: The Case of Trypanosoma cruzi, the Agent of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Moalic, Yann; Barnabé, Christian; Ayala, Francisco José; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Micropathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasitic protozoa) share a common trait, which is partial clonality, with wide variance in the respective influence of clonality and sexual recombination on the dynamics and evolution of taxa. The discrimination of distinct lineages and the reconstruction of their phylogenetic history are key information to infer their biomedical properties. However, the phylogenetic picture is often clouded by occasional events of recombination across divergent lineages, limiting the relevance of classical phylogenetic analysis and dichotomic trees. We have applied a network analysis based on graph theory to illustrate the relationships among genotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasitic protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, to identify major lineages and to unravel their past history of divergence and possible recombination events. At the scale of T. cruzi subspecific diversity, graph theory-based networks applied to 22 isoenzyme loci (262 distinct Multi-Locus-Enzyme-Electrophoresis -MLEE) and 19 microsatellite loci (66 Multi-Locus-Genotypes -MLG) fully confirms the high clustering of genotypes into major lineages or “near-clades”. The release of the dichotomic constraint associated with phylogenetic reconstruction usually applied to Multilocus data allows identifying putative hybrids and their parental lineages. Reticulate topology suggests a slightly different history for some of the main “near-clades”, and a possibly more complex origin for the putative hybrids than hitherto proposed. Finally the sub-network of the near-clade T. cruzi I (28 MLG) shows a clustering subdivision into three differentiated lesser near-clades (“Russian doll pattern”), which confirms the hypothesis recently proposed by other investigators. The present study broadens and clarifies the hypotheses previously obtained from classical markers on the same sets of data, which demonstrates the added value of this approach. This underlines the

  16. Discriminating micropathogen lineages and their reticulate evolution through graph theory-based network analysis: the case of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Moalic, Yann; Barnabé, Christian; Ayala, Francisco José; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Micropathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasitic protozoa) share a common trait, which is partial clonality, with wide variance in the respective influence of clonality and sexual recombination on the dynamics and evolution of taxa. The discrimination of distinct lineages and the reconstruction of their phylogenetic history are key information to infer their biomedical properties. However, the phylogenetic picture is often clouded by occasional events of recombination across divergent lineages, limiting the relevance of classical phylogenetic analysis and dichotomic trees. We have applied a network analysis based on graph theory to illustrate the relationships among genotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasitic protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, to identify major lineages and to unravel their past history of divergence and possible recombination events. At the scale of T. cruzi subspecific diversity, graph theory-based networks applied to 22 isoenzyme loci (262 distinct Multi-Locus-Enzyme-Electrophoresis -MLEE) and 19 microsatellite loci (66 Multi-Locus-Genotypes -MLG) fully confirms the high clustering of genotypes into major lineages or "near-clades". The release of the dichotomic constraint associated with phylogenetic reconstruction usually applied to Multilocus data allows identifying putative hybrids and their parental lineages. Reticulate topology suggests a slightly different history for some of the main "near-clades", and a possibly more complex origin for the putative hybrids than hitherto proposed. Finally the sub-network of the near-clade T. cruzi I (28 MLG) shows a clustering subdivision into three differentiated lesser near-clades ("Russian doll pattern"), which confirms the hypothesis recently proposed by other investigators. The present study broadens and clarifies the hypotheses previously obtained from classical markers on the same sets of data, which demonstrates the added value of this approach. This underlines the potential of graph

  17. [Feature extraction for breast cancer data based on geometric algebra theory and feature selection using differential evolution].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hong, Wenxue

    2014-12-01

    The feature extraction and feature selection are the important issues in pattern recognition. Based on the geometric algebra representation of vector, a new feature extraction method using blade coefficient of geometric algebra was proposed in this study. At the same time, an improved differential evolution (DE) feature selection method was proposed to solve the elevated high dimension issue. The simple linear discriminant analysis was used as the classifier. The result of the 10-fold cross-validation (10 CV) classification of public breast cancer biomedical dataset was more than 96% and proved superior to that of the original features and traditional feature extraction method. PMID:25868233

  18. [Feature extraction for breast cancer data based on geometric algebra theory and feature selection using differential evolution].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hong, Wenxue

    2014-12-01

    The feature extraction and feature selection are the important issues in pattern recognition. Based on the geometric algebra representation of vector, a new feature extraction method using blade coefficient of geometric algebra was proposed in this study. At the same time, an improved differential evolution (DE) feature selection method was proposed to solve the elevated high dimension issue. The simple linear discriminant analysis was used as the classifier. The result of the 10-fold cross-validation (10 CV) classification of public breast cancer biomedical dataset was more than 96% and proved superior to that of the original features and traditional feature extraction method.

  19. Graph theory for analyzing pair-wise data: application to geophysical model parameters estimated from interferometric synthetic aperture radar data at Okmok volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Elena C.; Cardiff, Michael; Feigl, Kurt L.

    2016-07-01

    Graph theory is useful for analyzing time-dependent model parameters estimated from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data in the temporal domain. Plotting acquisition dates (epochs) as vertices and pair-wise interferometric combinations as edges defines an incidence graph. The edge-vertex incidence matrix and the normalized edge Laplacian matrix are factors in the covariance matrix for the pair-wise data. Using empirical measures of residual scatter in the pair-wise observations, we estimate the relative variance at each epoch by inverting the covariance of the pair-wise data. We evaluate the rank deficiency of the corresponding least-squares problem via the edge-vertex incidence matrix. We implement our method in a MATLAB software package called GraphTreeTA available on GitHub (https://github.com/feigl/gipht). We apply temporal adjustment to the data set described in Lu et al. (Geophys Res Solid Earth 110, 2005) at Okmok volcano, Alaska, which erupted most recently in 1997 and 2008. The data set contains 44 differential volumetric changes and uncertainties estimated from interferograms between 1997 and 2004. Estimates show that approximately half of the magma volume lost during the 1997 eruption was recovered by the summer of 2003. Between June 2002 and September 2003, the estimated rate of volumetric increase is (6.2 ± 0.6) × 10^6~m^3/year . Our preferred model provides a reasonable fit that is compatible with viscoelastic relaxation in the five years following the 1997 eruption. Although we demonstrate the approach using volumetric rates of change, our formulation in terms of incidence graphs applies to any quantity derived from pair-wise differences, such as range change, range gradient, or atmospheric delay.

  20. Discrimination in a General Algebraic Setting.

    PubMed

    Fine, Benjamin; Gaglione, Anthony; Lipschutz, Seymour; Spellman, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Discriminating groups were introduced by G. Baumslag, A. Myasnikov, and V. Remeslennikov as an outgrowth of their theory of algebraic geometry over groups. Algebraic geometry over groups became the main method of attack on the solution of the celebrated Tarski conjectures. In this paper we explore the notion of discrimination in a general universal algebra context. As an application we provide a different proof of a theorem of Malcev on axiomatic classes of Ω-algebras.

  1. Discrimination in a General Algebraic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Benjamin; Gaglione, Anthony; Lipschutz, Seymour; Spellman, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Discriminating groups were introduced by G. Baumslag, A. Myasnikov, and V. Remeslennikov as an outgrowth of their theory of algebraic geometry over groups. Algebraic geometry over groups became the main method of attack on the solution of the celebrated Tarski conjectures. In this paper we explore the notion of discrimination in a general universal algebra context. As an application we provide a different proof of a theorem of Malcev on axiomatic classes of Ω-algebras. PMID:26171421

  2. Redesigning College Algebra: Combining Educational Theory and Web-Based Learning to Improve Student Attitudes and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagerty, Gary; Smith, Stanley; Goodwin, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, Black Hills State University (BHSU) redesigned college algebra to use the computer-based mastery learning program, Assessment and Learning in Knowledge Spaces [1], historical development of concepts modules, whole class discussions, cooperative activities, relevant applications problems, and many fewer lectures. This resulted in a 21%…

  3. Topology and graph theory applied to cortical anatomy may help explain working memory capacity for three or four simultaneous items.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Robert B

    2003-04-15

    Cognitive experimentation suggests that at any single instant only three or four items ("chunks") are simultaneously prominent as a working memory (WM) trace, if we disregard the rehearsal component of WM. The reason for small WM capacity may concern combinatorial manageability. How might the neural representations of these few coactive chunks occupy a spatially distributed set of areas of the sheet-like cortex, while providing both order and flexibility to associate items in WM? Each attribute of each simultaneously active WM item must have broad access to the representational facilities of the cortical sheet, comprising tens of thousands of modular "cortical columns." The two hypothesized neural levels of WM during any moment of cognition comprise (a) "binding" together of many distributed attribute representations within each respective WM chunk, and (b) combinatorial play among three or four WM chunk-representations. Anatomical and functional evidence of cortical unity through its depth suggests that cortex may be viewed as essentially planar in its distribution of activations. Thus, a moment's WM is hypothesized here to reside in myriad activated cortical planar "patches," each subdivided into up to four amoeboid "subpatches." Two different lines of topological reasoning suggest orderly associations of such representations. (1) The four-color principle of map topology, and the related K(4) is planar theorem of graph theory, imply that if a small cortical area is dynamically subdivided into no more than four, discretely bounded planar subareas, then each such segment has ample free access to each of the others. (2) A hypothetical alternative to such associative adjacency of simultaneously active cortical representations of chunk-attributes is associative overlap, whereby, in dense cortical neuropil, activated subpatches behave like Venn diagrams of intersecting sets. As the number of Venn-like coactive subpatches within a patch increases, maintaining ad hoc

  4. Jucys-Murphy elements for Birman-Murakami-Wenzl algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A. P.; Ogievetsky, O. V.

    2011-05-01

    The Burman-Wenzl-Murakami algebra, considered as the quotient of the braid group algebra, possesses the commutative set of Jucys-Murphy elements. We show that the set of Jucys-Murphy elements is maximal commutative for the generic Birman-Wenzl-Murakami algebra and reconstruct the representation theory of the tower of Birman-Wenzl-Murakami algebras.

  5. Constructing Graphs over with Small Prescribed Mean-Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, Holly; Kiessling, Michael K.-H.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper nonlinear Hodge theory and Banach algebra estimates are employed to construct a convergent series expansion which solves the prescribed mean curvature equation for n-dimensional hypersurfaces in (+ sign) and (- sign) which are graphs of a smooth function , and whose mean curvature function H is α-Hölder continuous and integrable, with small norm. The radius of convergence is estimated explicitly from below. Our approach is inspired by, and applied to, the Maxwell-Born-Infeld theory of electromagnetism in , for which our method yields the first systematic way of explicitly computing the electrostatic potential for regular charge densities and small Born parameter, with explicit error estimates at any order of truncation of the series. In particular, our results level the ground for a controlled computation of Born-Infeld effects on the Hydrogen spectrum.

  6. Graph Mining Meets the Semantic Web

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangkeun; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Lim, Seung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The Resource Description Framework (RDF) and SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) were introduced about a decade ago to enable flexible schema-free data interchange on the Semantic Web. Today, data scientists use the framework as a scalable graph representation for integrating, querying, exploring and analyzing data sets hosted at different sources. With increasing adoption, the need for graph mining capabilities for the Semantic Web has emerged. We address that need through implementation of three popular iterative Graph Mining algorithms (Triangle count, Connected component analysis, and PageRank). We implement these algorithms as SPARQL queries, wrapped within Python scripts. We evaluate the performance of our implementation on 6 real world data sets and show graph mining algorithms (that have a linear-algebra formulation) can indeed be unleashed on data represented as RDF graphs using the SPARQL query interface.

  7. Graphing Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science.1 Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations.2 Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary school instruction, the job of graphing skills falls heavily on physics teachers. By virtue of the nature of the topics we cover, it is our mission to develop this skill to the fine art that it is.

  8. Novel Linear Algebraic Theory and One-Hundred-Million-Atom Electronic Structure Calculation on The K Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Takeo; Yamazaki, Keita; Akiyama, Yohei

    A novel linear-algebraic algorithm, multiple Arnoldi method, was developed in an interdisciplinary study between physics and applied mathematics and realized one-hundred-million-atom (100-nm-scale) electronic state calculations on the K computer. The algorithms are Krylov-subspace solvers for generalized shifted linear equations and were implemented in our order-N calculation code ELSES (http://www.elses.jp/). Moreover, a method for calculating eigen states is presented as a theoretical extension.

  9. Bethe Ansatz and the Spectral Theory of Affine Lie Algebra-Valued Connections I. The simply-laced Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoero, Davide; Raimondo, Andrea; Valeri, Daniele

    2016-06-01

    We study the ODE/IM correspondence for ODE associated to {widehat{mathfrak{g}}}-valued connections, for a simply-laced Lie algebra {mathfrak{g}}. We prove that subdominant solutions to the ODE defined in different fundamental representations satisfy a set of quadratic equations called {Ψ}-system. This allows us to show that the generalized spectral determinants satisfy the Bethe Ansatz equations.

  10. A graph-theory method for pattern identification in geographical epidemiology – a preliminary application to deprivation and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, Ravi; Craigs, Cheryl; Read, Simon; Bath, Peter A; Willett, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Graph theoretical methods are extensively used in the field of computational chemistry to search datasets of compounds to see if they contain particular molecular sub-structures or patterns. We describe a preliminary application of a graph theoretical method, developed in computational chemistry, to geographical epidemiology in relation to testing a prior hypothesis. We tested the methodology on the hypothesis that if a socioeconomically deprived neighbourhood is situated in a wider deprived area, then that neighbourhood would experience greater adverse effects on mortality compared with a similarly deprived neighbourhood which is situated in a wider area with generally less deprivation. Methods We used the Trent Region Health Authority area for this study, which contained 10,665 census enumeration districts (CED). Graphs are mathematical representations of objects and their relationships and within the context of this study, nodes represented CEDs and edges were determined by whether or not CEDs were neighbours (shared a common boundary). The overall area in this study was represented by one large graph comprising all CEDs in the region, along with their adjacency information. We used mortality data from 1988–1998, CED level population estimates and the Townsend Material Deprivation Index as an indicator of neighbourhood level deprivation. We defined deprived CEDs as those in the top 20% most deprived in the Region. We then set out to classify these deprived CEDs into seven groups defined by increasing deprivation levels in the neighbouring CEDs. 506 (24.2%) of the deprived CEDs had five adjacent CEDs and we limited pattern development and searching to these CEDs. We developed seven query patterns and used the RASCAL (Rapid Similarity Calculator) program to carry out the search for each of the query patterns. This program used a maximum common subgraph isomorphism method which was modified to handle geographical data. Results Of the 506 deprived CEDs

  11. Linear game non-contextuality and Bell inequalities—a graph-theoretic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosicka, M.; Ramanathan, R.; Gnaciński, P.; Horodecki, K.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, P.; Severini, S.

    2016-04-01

    We study the classical and quantum values of a class of one- and two-party unique games, that generalizes the well-known XOR games to the case of non-binary outcomes. In the bipartite case the generalized XOR (XOR-d) games we study are a subclass of the well-known linear games. We introduce a ‘constraint graph’ associated to such a game, with the constraints defining the game represented by an edge-coloring of the graph. We use the graph-theoretic characterization to relate the task of finding equivalent games to the notion of signed graphs and switching equivalence from graph theory. We relate the problem of computing the classical value of single-party anti-correlation XOR games to finding the edge bipartization number of a graph, which is known to be MaxSNP hard, and connect the computation of the classical value of XOR-d games to the identification of specific cycles in the graph. We construct an orthogonality graph of the game from the constraint graph and study its Lovász theta number as a general upper bound on the quantum value even in the case of single-party contextual XOR-d games. XOR-d games possess appealing properties for use in device-independent applications such as randomness of the local correlated outcomes in the optimal quantum strategy. We study the possibility of obtaining quantum algebraic violation of these games, and show that no finite XOR-d game possesses the property of pseudo-telepathy leaving the frequently used chained Bell inequalities as the natural candidates for such applications. We also show this lack of pseudo-telepathy for multi-party XOR-type inequalities involving two-body correlation functions.

  12. First time combination of frozen density embedding theory with the algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme for the polarization propagator of second order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, Stefan; Zech, Alexander; Aquilante, Francesco; Dreuw, Andreas; Wesolowski, Tomasz A.

    2016-05-01

    The combination of Frozen Density Embedding Theory (FDET) and the Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction (ADC) scheme for the polarization propagator for describing environmental effects on electronically excited states is presented. Two different ways of interfacing and expressing the so-called embedding operator are introduced. The resulting excited states are compared with supermolecular calculations of the total system at the ADC(2) level of theory. Molecular test systems were chosen to investigate molecule-environment interactions of varying strength from dispersion interaction up to multiple hydrogen bonds. The overall difference between the supermolecular and the FDE-ADC calculations in excitation energies is lower than 0.09 eV (max) and 0.032 eV in average, which is well below the intrinsic error of the ADC(2) method itself.

  13. Filiform Lie algebras of order 3

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, R. M.

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this work is to generalize a very important type of Lie algebras and superalgebras, i.e., filiform Lie (super)algebras, into the theory of Lie algebras of order F. Thus, the concept of filiform Lie algebras of order F is obtained. In particular, for F = 3 it has been proved that by using infinitesimal deformations of the associated model elementary Lie algebra it can be obtained families of filiform elementary lie algebras of order 3, analogously as that occurs into the theory of Lie algebras [M. Vergne, “Cohomologie des algèbres de Lie nilpotentes. Application à l’étude de la variété des algèbres de Lie nilpotentes,” Bull. Soc. Math. France 98, 81–116 (1970)]. Also we give the dimension, using an adaptation of the sl(2,C)-module Method, and a basis of such infinitesimal deformations in some generic cases.

  14. Graphing Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science. Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations. Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary…

  15. Evolution of graph theory-based QSAR methods and their applications to the search for new antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M N D S

    2013-01-01

    Resistance of bacteria to current antibiotics has increased worldwide, being one of the leading unresolved situations in public health. Due to negligence regarding the treatment of community-acquired diseases, even healthcare facilities have been highly impacted by an emerging problem: nosocomial infections. Moreover, infectious diseases, including nosocomial infections, have been found to depend on multiple pathogenicity factors, confirming the need to discover of multi-target antibacterial agents. Drug discovery is a very complex, expensive, and time-consuming process. In this sense, Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) methods have become complementary tools for medicinal chemistry, permitting the efficient screening of potential drugs, and consequently, rationalizing the organic synthesis as well as the biological evaluation of compounds. In the consolidation of QSAR methods as important components of chemoinformatics, the use of mathematical chemistry, and more specifically, the use of graph-theoretical approaches has played a vital role. Here, we focus our attention on the evolution of QSAR methods, citing the most relevant works devoted to the development of promising graph-theoretical approaches in the last 8 years, and their applications to the prediction of antibacterial activities of chemicals against pathogens causing both community-acquired and nosocomial infections.

  16. Evolution of graph theory-based QSAR methods and their applications to the search for new antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M N D S

    2013-01-01

    Resistance of bacteria to current antibiotics has increased worldwide, being one of the leading unresolved situations in public health. Due to negligence regarding the treatment of community-acquired diseases, even healthcare facilities have been highly impacted by an emerging problem: nosocomial infections. Moreover, infectious diseases, including nosocomial infections, have been found to depend on multiple pathogenicity factors, confirming the need to discover of multi-target antibacterial agents. Drug discovery is a very complex, expensive, and time-consuming process. In this sense, Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) methods have become complementary tools for medicinal chemistry, permitting the efficient screening of potential drugs, and consequently, rationalizing the organic synthesis as well as the biological evaluation of compounds. In the consolidation of QSAR methods as important components of chemoinformatics, the use of mathematical chemistry, and more specifically, the use of graph-theoretical approaches has played a vital role. Here, we focus our attention on the evolution of QSAR methods, citing the most relevant works devoted to the development of promising graph-theoretical approaches in the last 8 years, and their applications to the prediction of antibacterial activities of chemicals against pathogens causing both community-acquired and nosocomial infections. PMID:24200354

  17. Coverings of topological semi-abelian algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucuk, Osman; Demir, Serap

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we study on a category of topological semi-abelian algebras which are topological models of given an algebraic theory T whose category of models is semi-abelian; and investigate some results on the coverings of topological models of such theories yielding semi-abelian categories. We also consider the internal groupoid structure in the semi-abelian category of T-algebras, and give a criteria for the lifting of internal groupoid structure to the covering groupoids.

  18. Graph theoretic analysis of structural connectivity across the spectrum of Alzheimer's disease: The importance of graph creation methods.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David J; McGlaughlin, Alec; Ruth, David; Jager, Leah R; Soldan, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory is increasingly being used to study brain connectivity across the spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but prior findings have been inconsistent, likely reflecting methodological differences. We systematically investigated how methods of graph creation (i.e., type of correlation matrix and edge weighting) affect structural network properties and group differences. We estimated the structural connectivity of brain networks based on correlation maps of cortical thickness obtained from MRI. Four groups were compared: 126 cognitively normal older adults, 103 individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) who retained MCI status for at least 3 years (stable MCI), 108 individuals with MCI who progressed to AD-dementia within 3 years (progressive MCI), and 105 individuals with AD-dementia. Small-world measures of connectivity (characteristic path length and clustering coefficient) differed across groups, consistent with prior studies. Groups were best discriminated by the Randić index, which measures the degree to which highly connected nodes connect to other highly connected nodes. The Randić index differentiated the stable and progressive MCI groups, suggesting that it might be useful for tracking and predicting the progression of AD. Notably, however, the magnitude and direction of group differences in all three measures were dependent on the method of graph creation, indicating that it is crucial to take into account how graphs are constructed when interpreting differences across diagnostic groups and studies. The algebraic connectivity measures showed few group differences, independent of the method of graph construction, suggesting that global connectivity as it relates to node degree is not altered in early AD.

  19. The Multi-State Perfect Phylogeny Problem with missing and removable data: solutions via integer-programming and chordal graph theory.

    PubMed

    Gusfield, Dan

    2010-03-01

    The Multi-State Perfect Phylogeny Problem is an extension of the Binary Perfect Phylogeny Problem, allowing characters to take on more than two states. In this article, we consider three problems that extend the utility of the multi-state perfect phylogeny model: (1) the Missing Data (MD) Problem, where some entries in the input are missing and the question is whether (bounded) values for the missing data can be imputed so that the resulting data has a multi-state perfect phylogeny; (2) the Character-Removal (CR) Problem, where we want to minimize the number of characters to remove from the data so that the resulting data has a multi-state perfect phylogeny; and (3) the Missing-Data Character-Removal (MDCR) Problem, where the input has missing data and we want to impute values for the missing data to minimize the solution to the resulting Character-Removal Problem. We discuss Integer Linear Programming (ILP) solutions to these problems for the special case of three, four, and five permitted states per character, and we report on extensive empirical testing of these solutions. Then we develop a general theory to solve the MD problem for an arbitrary number of permitted states, using chordal graph theory and results on minimal triangulation of non-chordal graphs. This establishes new necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a perfect phylogeny with (or without) missing data. We implement the general theory using integer linear programming, although other optimization methods are possible. We extensively explore the empirical behavior of the general solution, showing that the methods are very practical for data of size and complexity that is characteristic of many current applications in phylogenetics. Some of the empirical results for the MD problem with an arbitrary number of permitted states are very surprising, suggesting the existence of additional combinatorial structure in multi-state perfect phylogenies. Finally, we note some relationships

  20. A Hybrid Parallel Strategy Based on String Graph Theory to Improve De Novo DNA Assembly on the TianHe-2 Supercomputer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Liao, Xiangke; Peng, Shaoliang; Cui, Yingbo; Wang, Bingqiang; Zhu, Xiaoqian; Liu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    ' The de novo assembly of DNA sequences is increasingly important for biological researches in the genomic era. After more than one decade since the Human Genome Project, some challenges still exist and new solutions are being explored to improve de novo assembly of genomes. String graph assembler (SGA), based on the string graph theory, is a new method/tool developed to address the challenges. In this paper, based on an in-depth analysis of SGA we prove that the SGA-based sequence de novo assembly is an NP-complete problem. According to our analysis, SGA outperforms other similar methods/tools in memory consumption, but costs much more time, of which 60-70 % is spent on the index construction. Upon this analysis, we introduce a hybrid parallel optimization algorithm and implement this algorithm in the TianHe-2's parallel framework. Simulations are performed with different datasets. For data of small size the optimized solution is 3.06 times faster than before, and for data of middle size it's 1.60 times. The results demonstrate an evident performance improvement, with the linear scalability for parallel FM-index construction. This results thus contribute significantly to improving the efficiency of de novo assembly of DNA sequences. PMID:26403255

  1. A Hybrid Parallel Strategy Based on String Graph Theory to Improve De Novo DNA Assembly on the TianHe-2 Supercomputer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Liao, Xiangke; Peng, Shaoliang; Cui, Yingbo; Wang, Bingqiang; Zhu, Xiaoqian; Liu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    ' The de novo assembly of DNA sequences is increasingly important for biological researches in the genomic era. After more than one decade since the Human Genome Project, some challenges still exist and new solutions are being explored to improve de novo assembly of genomes. String graph assembler (SGA), based on the string graph theory, is a new method/tool developed to address the challenges. In this paper, based on an in-depth analysis of SGA we prove that the SGA-based sequence de novo assembly is an NP-complete problem. According to our analysis, SGA outperforms other similar methods/tools in memory consumption, but costs much more time, of which 60-70 % is spent on the index construction. Upon this analysis, we introduce a hybrid parallel optimization algorithm and implement this algorithm in the TianHe-2's parallel framework. Simulations are performed with different datasets. For data of small size the optimized solution is 3.06 times faster than before, and for data of middle size it's 1.60 times. The results demonstrate an evident performance improvement, with the linear scalability for parallel FM-index construction. This results thus contribute significantly to improving the efficiency of de novo assembly of DNA sequences.

  2. Insights into Intrinsic Brain Networks based on Graph Theory and PET in right- compared to left-sided Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vanicek, Thomas; Hahn, Andreas; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Hilger, Eva; Spies, Marie; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Pataraia, Ekaterina; Asenbaum-Nan, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The human brain exhibits marked hemispheric differences, though it is not fully understood to what extent lateralization of the epileptic focus is relevant. Preoperative [18F]FDG-PET depicts lateralization of seizure focus in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and reveals dysfunctional metabolic brain connectivity. The aim of the present study was to compare metabolic connectivity, inferred from inter-regional [18F]FDG PET uptake correlations, in right-sided (RTLE; n = 30) and left-sided TLE (LTLE; n = 32) with healthy controls (HC; n = 31) using graph theory based network analysis. Comparing LTLE and RTLE and patient groups separately to HC, we observed higher lobar connectivity weights in RTLE compared to LTLE for connections of the temporal and the parietal lobe of the contralateral hemisphere (CH). Moreover, especially in RTLE compared to LTLE higher local efficiency were found in the temporal cortices and other brain regions of the CH. The results of this investigation implicate altered metabolic networks in patients with TLE specific to the lateralization of seizure focus, and describe compensatory mechanisms especially in the CH of patients with RTLE. We propose that graph theoretical analysis of metabolic connectivity using [18F]FDG-PET offers an important additional modality to explore brain networks. PMID:27349503

  3. Aspects of Performance on Line Graph Description Tasks: Influenced by Graph Familiarity and Different Task Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xi, Xiaoming

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by cognitive theories of graph comprehension, this study systematically manipulated characteristics of a line graph description task in a speaking test in ways to mitigate the influence of graph familiarity, a potential source of construct-irrelevant variance. It extends Xi (2005), which found that the differences in holistic scores on…

  4. Quantum versus classical annealing: insights from scaling theory and results for spin glasses on 3-regular graphs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Wei; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Sandvik, Anders W

    2015-04-10

    We discuss an Ising spin glass where each S=1/2 spin is coupled antiferromagnetically to three other spins (3-regular graphs). Inducing quantum fluctuations by a time-dependent transverse field, we use out-of-equilibrium quantum Monte Carlo simulations to study dynamic scaling at the quantum glass transition. Comparing the dynamic exponent and other critical exponents with those of the classical (temperature-driven) transition, we conclude that quantum annealing is less efficient than classical simulated annealing in bringing the system into the glass phase. Quantum computing based on the quantum annealing paradigm is therefore inferior to classical simulated annealing for this class of problems. We also comment on previous simulations where a parameter is changed with the simulation time, which is very different from the true Hamiltonian dynamics simulated here.

  5. Comparative Effectiveness of TI-84 Graphing Calculators on Algebra I and Geometry Outcomes: A Report of Randomized Experiments in the East Side Union High School District and San Diego Unified School District. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gloria I.; Jaciw, Andrew; Hoshiko, Brandon; Wei, Xin

    2007-01-01

    Texas Instruments has undertaken a research program with the goal of producing scientifically-based evidence of the effectiveness of graphing calculators and the "TI-Navigator"[TM] classroom networking system in the context of a professional development and curriculum framework. The program includes a two-year longitudinal study. The research is…

  6. A Ring Construction Using Finite Directed Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardzell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an interesting class of noncommutative rings which can be constructed using finite directed graphs. This construction also creates a vector space. These structures provide undergraduate students connections between ring theory and graph theory and, among other things, allow them to see a ring unity element that looks quite…

  7. Combinatorics of 1-particle irreducible n-point functions via coalgebra in quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mestre, Angela

    2010-08-15

    We give a coalgebra structure on 1-vertex irreducible graphs which is that of a cocommutative coassociative graded connected coalgebra. We generalize the coproduct to the algebraic representation of graphs so as to express a bare 1-particle irreducible n-point function in terms of its loop order contributions. The algebraic representation is so that graphs can be evaluated as Feynman graphs.

  8. The algebras of large N matrix mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Schwartz, C.

    1999-09-16

    Extending early work, we formulate the large N matrix mechanics of general bosonic, fermionic and supersymmetric matrix models, including Matrix theory: The Hamiltonian framework of large N matrix mechanics provides a natural setting in which to study the algebras of the large N limit, including (reduced) Lie algebras, (reduced) supersymmetry algebras and free algebras. We find in particular a broad array of new free algebras which we call symmetric Cuntz algebras, interacting symmetric Cuntz algebras, symmetric Bose/Fermi/Cuntz algebras and symmetric Cuntz superalgebras, and we discuss the role of these algebras in solving the large N theory. Most important, the interacting Cuntz algebras are associated to a set of new (hidden!) local quantities which are generically conserved only at large N. A number of other new large N phenomena are also observed, including the intrinsic nonlocality of the (reduced) trace class operators of the theory and a closely related large N field identification phenomenon which is associated to another set (this time nonlocal) of new conserved quantities at large N.

  9. Generalized graph states based on Hadamard matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Shawn X.; Yu, Nengkun; Zeng, Bei

    2015-07-15

    Graph states are widely used in quantum information theory, including entanglement theory, quantum error correction, and one-way quantum computing. Graph states have a nice structure related to a certain graph, which is given by either a stabilizer group or an encoding circuit, both can be directly given by the graph. To generalize graph states, whose stabilizer groups are abelian subgroups of the Pauli group, one approach taken is to study non-abelian stabilizers. In this work, we propose to generalize graph states based on the encoding circuit, which is completely determined by the graph and a Hadamard matrix. We study the entanglement structures of these generalized graph states and show that they are all maximally mixed locally. We also explore the relationship between the equivalence of Hadamard matrices and local equivalence of the corresponding generalized graph states. This leads to a natural generalization of the Pauli (X, Z) pairs, which characterizes the local symmetries of these generalized graph states. Our approach is also naturally generalized to construct graph quantum codes which are beyond stabilizer codes.

  10. A note on derivations of Murray–von Neumann algebras

    PubMed Central

    Kadison, Richard V.; Liu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    A Murray–von Neumann algebra is the algebra of operators affiliated with a finite von Neumann algebra. In this article, we first present a brief introduction to the theory of derivations of operator algebras from both the physical and mathematical points of view. We then describe our recent work on derivations of Murray–von Neumann algebras. We show that the “extended derivations” of a Murray–von Neumann algebra, those that map the associated finite von Neumann algebra into itself, are inner. In particular, we prove that the only derivation that maps a Murray–von Neumann algebra associated with a factor of type II1 into that factor is 0. Those results are extensions of Singer’s seminal result answering a question of Kaplansky, as applied to von Neumann algebras: The algebra may be noncommutative and may even contain unbounded elements. PMID:24469831

  11. Fast Approximate Quadratic Programming for Graph Matching

    PubMed Central

    Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Conroy, John M.; Lyzinski, Vince; Podrazik, Louis J.; Kratzer, Steven G.; Harley, Eric T.; Fishkind, Donniell E.; Vogelstein, R. Jacob; Priebe, Carey E.

    2015-01-01

    Quadratic assignment problems arise in a wide variety of domains, spanning operations research, graph theory, computer vision, and neuroscience, to name a few. The graph matching problem is a special case of the quadratic assignment problem, and graph matching is increasingly important as graph-valued data is becoming more prominent. With the aim of efficiently and accurately matching the large graphs common in big data, we present our graph matching algorithm, the Fast Approximate Quadratic assignment algorithm. We empirically demonstrate that our algorithm is faster and achieves a lower objective value on over 80% of the QAPLIB benchmark library, compared with the previous state-of-the-art. Applying our algorithm to our motivating example, matching C. elegans connectomes (brain-graphs), we find that it efficiently achieves performance. PMID:25886624

  12. Cortical brain connectivity evaluated by graph theory in dementia: a correlation study between functional and structural data.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Curcio, Giuseppe; Altavilla, Riccardo; Scrascia, Federica; Giambattistelli, Federica; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Bramanti, Placido; Vernieri, Fabrizio; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2015-01-01

    A relatively new approach to brain function in neuroscience is the "functional connectivity", namely the synchrony in time of activity in anatomically-distinct but functionally-collaborating brain regions. On the other hand, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a recently developed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique with the capability to detect brain structural connection with fractional anisotropy (FA) identification. FA decrease has been observed in the corpus callosum of subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI, an AD prodromal stage). Corpus callosum splenium DTI abnormalities are thought to be associated with functional disconnections among cortical areas. This study aimed to investigate possible correlations between structural damage, measured by MRI-DTI, and functional abnormalities of brain integration, measured by characteristic path length detected in resting state EEG source activity (40 participants: 9 healthy controls, 10 MCI, 10 mild AD, 11 moderate AD). For each subject, undirected and weighted brain network was built to evaluate graph core measures. eLORETA lagged linear connectivity values were used as weight of the edges of the network. Results showed that callosal FA reduction is associated to a loss of brain interhemispheric functional connectivity characterized by increased delta and decreased alpha path length. These findings suggest that "global" (average network shortest path length representing an index of how efficient is the information transfer between two parts of the network) functional measure can reflect the reduction of fiber connecting the two hemispheres as revealed by DTI analysis and also anticipate in time this structural loss. PMID:25613102

  13. Understanding Graphs & Charts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, John J.; Gravely, Mary Liles

    Developed by educators from the Emily Griffith Opportunity School, this teacher's guide was developed for a 4-hour workshop to teach employees how to read the charts and graphs they need in the workplace. The unit covers four types of graphs: pictographs, bar graphs, line graphs, and circle graphs. The guide is divided into four sections: reading…

  14. Replica methods for loopy sparse random graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coolen, ACC

    2016-03-01

    I report on the development of a novel statistical mechanical formalism for the analysis of random graphs with many short loops, and processes on such graphs. The graphs are defined via maximum entropy ensembles, in which both the degrees (via hard constraints) and the adjacency matrix spectrum (via a soft constraint) are prescribed. The sum over graphs can be done analytically, using a replica formalism with complex replica dimensions. All known results for tree-like graphs are recovered in a suitable limit. For loopy graphs, the emerging theory has an appealing and intuitive structure, suggests how message passing algorithms should be adapted, and what is the structure of theories describing spin systems on loopy architectures. However, the formalism is still largely untested, and may require further adjustment and refinement. This paper is dedicated to the memory of our colleague and friend Jun-Ichi Inoue, with whom the author has had the great pleasure and privilege of collaborating.

  15. Partitioning sparse matrices with eigenvectors of graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pothen, Alex; Simon, Horst D.; Liou, Kang-Pu

    1990-01-01

    The problem of computing a small vertex separator in a graph arises in the context of computing a good ordering for the parallel factorization of sparse, symmetric matrices. An algebraic approach for computing vertex separators is considered in this paper. It is shown that lower bounds on separator sizes can be obtained in terms of the eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix associated with a graph. The Laplacian eigenvectors of grid graphs can be computed from Kronecker products involving the eigenvectors of path graphs, and these eigenvectors can be used to compute good separators in grid graphs. A heuristic algorithm is designed to compute a vertex separator in a general graph by first computing an edge separator in the graph from an eigenvector of the Laplacian matrix, and then using a maximum matching in a subgraph to compute the vertex separator. Results on the quality of the separators computed by the spectral algorithm are presented, and these are compared with separators obtained from other algorithms for computing separators. Finally, the time required to compute the Laplacian eigenvector is reported, and the accuracy with which the eigenvector must be computed to obtain good separators is considered. The spectral algorithm has the advantage that it can be implemented on a medium-size multiprocessor in a straightforward manner.

  16. Spectral correlations of individual quantum graphs.

    PubMed

    Gnutzmann, Sven; Altland, Alexander

    2005-11-01

    We investigate the spectral properties of chaotic quantum graphs. We demonstrate that the energy-average over the spectrum of individual graphs can be traded for the functional average over a supersymmetric nonlinear -model action. This proves that spectral correlations of individual quantum graphs behave according to the predictions of Wigner-Dyson random matrix theory. We explore the stability of the universal random matrix behavior with regard to perturbations, and discuss the crossover between different types of symmetries.

  17. Spectral correlations of individual quantum graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Gnutzmann, Sven; Altland, Alexander

    2005-11-01

    We investigate the spectral properties of chaotic quantum graphs. We demonstrate that the energy-average over the spectrum of individual graphs can be traded for the functional average over a supersymmetric nonlinear {sigma}-model action. This proves that spectral correlations of individual quantum graphs behave according to the predictions of Wigner-Dyson random matrix theory. We explore the stability of the universal random matrix behavior with regard to perturbations, and discuss the crossover between different types of symmetries.

  18. A note on probabilistic models over strings: the linear algebra approach.

    PubMed

    Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    Probabilistic models over strings have played a key role in developing methods that take into consideration indels as phylogenetically informative events. There is an extensive literature on using automata and transducers on phylogenies to do inference on these probabilistic models, in which an important theoretical question is the complexity of computing the normalization of a class of string-valued graphical models. This question has been investigated using tools from combinatorics, dynamic programming, and graph theory, and has practical applications in Bayesian phylogenetics. In this work, we revisit this theoretical question from a different point of view, based on linear algebra. The main contribution is a set of results based on this linear algebra view that facilitate the analysis and design of inference algorithms on string-valued graphical models. As an illustration, we use this method to give a new elementary proof of a known result on the complexity of inference on the "TKF91" model, a well-known probabilistic model over strings. Compared to previous work, our proving method is easier to extend to other models, since it relies on a novel weak condition, triangular transducers, which is easy to establish in practice. The linear algebra view provides a concise way of describing transducer algorithms and their compositions, opens the possibility of transferring fast linear algebra libraries (for example, based on GPUs), as well as low rank matrix approximation methods, to string-valued inference problems. PMID:24135792

  19. A note on probabilistic models over strings: the linear algebra approach.

    PubMed

    Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    Probabilistic models over strings have played a key role in developing methods that take into consideration indels as phylogenetically informative events. There is an extensive literature on using automata and transducers on phylogenies to do inference on these probabilistic models, in which an important theoretical question is the complexity of computing the normalization of a class of string-valued graphical models. This question has been investigated using tools from combinatorics, dynamic programming, and graph theory, and has practical applications in Bayesian phylogenetics. In this work, we revisit this theoretical question from a different point of view, based on linear algebra. The main contribution is a set of results based on this linear algebra view that facilitate the analysis and design of inference algorithms on string-valued graphical models. As an illustration, we use this method to give a new elementary proof of a known result on the complexity of inference on the "TKF91" model, a well-known probabilistic model over strings. Compared to previous work, our proving method is easier to extend to other models, since it relies on a novel weak condition, triangular transducers, which is easy to establish in practice. The linear algebra view provides a concise way of describing transducer algorithms and their compositions, opens the possibility of transferring fast linear algebra libraries (for example, based on GPUs), as well as low rank matrix approximation methods, to string-valued inference problems.

  20. The operator algebra approach to quantum groups

    PubMed Central

    Kustermans, Johan; Vaes, Stefaan

    2000-01-01

    A relatively simple definition of a locally compact quantum group in the C*-algebra setting will be explained as it was recently obtained by the authors. At the same time, we put this definition in the historical and mathematical context of locally compact groups, compact quantum groups, Kac algebras, multiplicative unitaries, and duality theory. PMID:10639116

  1. Classical and quantum Kummer shape algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odzijewicz, A.; Wawreniuk, E.

    2016-07-01

    We study a family of integrable systems of nonlinearly coupled harmonic oscillators on the classical and quantum levels. We show that the integrability of these systems follows from their symmetry characterized by algebras, here called Kummer shape algebras. The resolution of identity for a wide class of reproducing kernels is found. A number of examples, illustrating this theory, are also presented.

  2. Some Applications of Algebraic System Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roanes-Lozano, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Technology and, in particular, computer algebra systems, allows us to change both the way we teach mathematics and the mathematical curriculum. Curiously enough, unlike what happens with linear system solving, algebraic system solving is not widely known. The aim of this paper is to show that, although the theory lying behind the "exact solve"…

  3. Laplacian Estrada and normalized Laplacian Estrada indices of evolving graphs.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yilun

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale time-evolving networks have been generated by many natural and technological applications, posing challenges for computation and modeling. Thus, it is of theoretical and practical significance to probe mathematical tools tailored for evolving networks. In this paper, on top of the dynamic Estrada index, we study the dynamic Laplacian Estrada index and the dynamic normalized Laplacian Estrada index of evolving graphs. Using linear algebra techniques, we established general upper and lower bounds for these graph-spectrum-based invariants through a couple of intuitive graph-theoretic measures, including the number of vertices or edges. Synthetic random evolving small-world networks are employed to show the relevance of the proposed dynamic Estrada indices. It is found that neither the static snapshot graphs nor the aggregated graph can approximate the evolving graph itself, indicating the fundamental difference between the static and dynamic Estrada indices. PMID:25822506

  4. Laplacian Estrada and normalized Laplacian Estrada indices of evolving graphs.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yilun

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale time-evolving networks have been generated by many natural and technological applications, posing challenges for computation and modeling. Thus, it is of theoretical and practical significance to probe mathematical tools tailored for evolving networks. In this paper, on top of the dynamic Estrada index, we study the dynamic Laplacian Estrada index and the dynamic normalized Laplacian Estrada index of evolving graphs. Using linear algebra techniques, we established general upper and lower bounds for these graph-spectrum-based invariants through a couple of intuitive graph-theoretic measures, including the number of vertices or edges. Synthetic random evolving small-world networks are employed to show the relevance of the proposed dynamic Estrada indices. It is found that neither the static snapshot graphs nor the aggregated graph can approximate the evolving graph itself, indicating the fundamental difference between the static and dynamic Estrada indices.

  5. Algebraic trigonometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaninsky, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    This article introduces a trigonometric field (TF) that extends the field of real numbers by adding two new elements: sin and cos - satisfying an axiom sin2 + cos2 = 1. It is shown that by assigning meaningful names to particular elements of the field, all known trigonometric identities may be introduced and proved. Two different interpretations of the TF are discussed with many others potentially possible. The main objective of this article is to introduce a broader view of trigonometry that can serve as motivation for mathematics students and teachers to study and teach abstract algebraic structures.

  6. Sequential visibility-graph motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of sequential visibility-graph motifs, smaller substructures of n consecutive nodes that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated with general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable of distinguishing among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification and description of physical, biological, and financial time series.

  7. Classification of central extensions of Lax operator algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichenmaier, Martin

    2008-11-18

    Lax operator algebras were introduced by Krichever and Sheinman as further developments of Krichever's theory of Lax operators on algebraic curves. They are infinite dimensional Lie algebras of current type with meromorphic objects on compact Riemann surfaces (resp. algebraic curves) as elements. Here we report on joint work with Oleg Sheinman on the classification of their almost-graded central extensions. It turns out that in case that the finite-dimensional Lie algebra on which the Lax operator algebra is based on is simple there is a unique almost-graded central extension up to equivalence and rescaling of the central element.

  8. Universal spectral statistics in quantum graphs.

    PubMed

    Gnutzmann, Sven; Altland, Alexander

    2004-11-01

    We prove that the spectrum of an individual chaotic quantum graph shows universal spectral correlations, as predicted by random-matrix theory. The stability of these correlations with regard to nonuniversal corrections is analyzed in terms of the linear operator governing the classical dynamics on the graph.

  9. Fragment Assembly Approach Based on Graph/Network Theory with Quantum Chemistry Verifications for Assigning Multidimensional NMR Signals in Metabolite Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kengo; Tsutsumi, Yu; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-15

    The abundant observation of chemical fragment information for molecular complexities is a major advantage of biological NMR analysis. Thus, the development of a novel technique for NMR signal assignment and metabolite identification may offer new possibilities for exploring molecular complexities. We propose a new signal assignment approach for metabolite mixtures by assembling H-H, H-C, C-C, and Q-C fragmental information obtained by multidimensional NMR, followed by the application of graph and network theory. High-speed experiments and complete automatic signal assignments were achieved for 12 combined mixtures of (13)C-labeled standards. Application to a (13)C-labeled seaweed extract showed 66 H-C, 60 H-H, 326 C-C, and 28 Q-C correlations, which were successfully assembled to 18 metabolites by the automatic assignment. The validity of automatic assignment was supported by quantum chemical calculations. This new approach can predict entire metabolite structures from peak networks of biological extracts.

  10. Algebraic Systems and Pushdown Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Ion; Salomaa, Arto

    We concentrate in this chapter on the core aspects of algebraic series, pushdown automata, and their relation to formal languages. We choose to follow here a presentation of their theory based on the concept of properness. We introduce in Sect. 2 some auxiliary notions and results needed throughout the chapter, in particular the notions of discrete convergence in semirings and C-cycle free infinite matrices. In Sect. 3 we introduce the algebraic power series in terms of algebraic systems of equations. We focus on interconnections with context-free grammars and on normal forms. We then conclude the section with a presentation of the theorems of Shamir and Chomsky-Schützenberger. We discuss in Sect. 4 the algebraic and the regulated rational transductions, as well as some representation results related to them. Section 5 is dedicated to pushdown automata and focuses on the interconnections with classical (non-weighted) pushdown automata and on the interconnections with algebraic systems. We then conclude the chapter with a brief discussion of some of the other topics related to algebraic systems and pushdown automata.

  11. A Metric Conceptual Space Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Benjamin; Raubal, Martin

    The modeling of concepts from a cognitive perspective is important for designing spatial information systems that interoperate with human users. Concept representations that are built using geometric and topological conceptual space structures are well suited for semantic similarity and concept combination operations. In addition, concepts that are more closely grounded in the physical world, such as many spatial concepts, have a natural fit with the geometric structure of conceptual spaces. Despite these apparent advantages, conceptual spaces are underutilized because existing formalizations of conceptual space theory have focused on individual aspects of the theory rather than the creation of a comprehensive algebra. In this paper we present a metric conceptual space algebra that is designed to facilitate the creation of conceptual space knowledge bases and inferencing systems. Conceptual regions are represented as convex polytopes and context is built in as a fundamental element. We demonstrate the applicability of the algebra to spatial information systems with a proof-of-concept application.

  12. Algebraic Lattices in QFT Renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinsky, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The structure of overlapping subdivergences, which appear in the perturbative expansions of quantum field theory, is analyzed using algebraic lattice theory. It is shown that for specific QFTs the sets of subdivergences of Feynman diagrams form algebraic lattices. This class of QFTs includes the standard model. In kinematic renormalization schemes, in which tadpole diagrams vanish, these lattices are semimodular. This implies that the Hopf algebra of Feynman diagrams is graded by the coradical degree or equivalently that every maximal forest has the same length in the scope of BPHZ renormalization. As an application of this framework, a formula for the counter terms in zero-dimensional QFT is given together with some examples of the enumeration of primitive or skeleton diagrams.

  13. Fish gotta swim, Birds gotta fly, I gotta do Feynmann Graphs 'til I die: A continuum Theory of Flocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, John; Tu, Yu-Hai

    2002-05-01

    We have developed a new continuum dynamical model for the collective motion of large "flocks" of biological organisms (e.g., flocks of birds, schools of fish, herds of wildebeest, hordes of bacteria, slime molds, etc.) . This model does for flocks what the Navier-Stokes equation does for fluids. The model predicts that, unlike simple fluids, flocks show huge fluctuation effects in spatial dimensions d < 4 that radically change their behavior. In d=2, it is only these effects that make it possible for the flock to move coherently at all. This explains why a million wildebeest can march together across the Serengeti plain, despite the fact that a million physicists gathered on the same plane could NOT all POINT in the same direction. Detailed quantitative predictions of this theory agree beautifully with computer simulations of flock motion.

  14. Priority in Process Algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleaveland, Rance; Luettgen, Gerald; Natarajan, V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper surveys the semantic ramifications of extending traditional process algebras with notions of priority that allow for some transitions to be given precedence over others. These enriched formalisms allow one to model system features such as interrupts, prioritized choice, or real-time behavior. Approaches to priority in process algebras can be classified according to whether the induced notion of preemption on transitions is global or local and whether priorities are static or dynamic. Early work in the area concentrated on global pre-emption and static priorities and led to formalisms for modeling interrupts and aspects of real-time, such as maximal progress, in centralized computing environments. More recent research has investigated localized notions of pre-emption in which the distribution of systems is taken into account, as well as dynamic priority approaches, i.e., those where priority values may change as systems evolve. The latter allows one to model behavioral phenomena such as scheduling algorithms and also enables the efficient encoding of real-time semantics. Technically, this paper studies the different models of priorities by presenting extensions of Milner's Calculus of Communicating Systems (CCS) with static and dynamic priority as well as with notions of global and local pre- emption. In each case the operational semantics of CCS is modified appropriately, behavioral theories based on strong and weak bisimulation are given, and related approaches for different process-algebraic settings are discussed.

  15. Structural features of algebraic quantum notations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gire, Elizabeth; Price, Edward

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] The formalism of quantum mechanics includes a rich collection of representations for describing quantum systems, including functions, graphs, matrices, histograms of probabilities, and Dirac notation. The varied features of these representations affect how computations are performed. For example, identifying probabilities of measurement outcomes for a state described in Dirac notation may involve identifying expansion coefficients by inspection, but if the state is described as a function, identifying those expansion coefficients often involves performing integrals. In this study, we focus on three notational systems: Dirac notation, algebraic wave-function notation, and matrix notation. These quantum notations must include information about basis states and their associated complex probability amplitudes. In this theory paper, we identify four structural features of quantum notations, which we term individuation, degree of externalization, compactness, and symbolic support for computational rules. We illustrate how student reasoning interacts with these structural features with episodes from interviews with advanced undergraduate physics majors reasoning about a superposition state of an infinite square well system. We find evidence of the students coordinating different notations through the use of Dirac notation, using an expression in Dirac notation to guide their work in another notation. These uses are supported by the high degree of individuation, compactness, and symbolic support for computation and the moderate degree of externalization provided by Dirac notation.

  16. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  17. Graphing for Any Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nibbelink, William

    1982-01-01

    An instructional sequence for teaching graphing that has been extensively field tested in kindergarten through grade six is detailed. The material begins with point graphs, employs a movable y-axis to begin with minimal clutter, and has graphs constructed before reading graphs is required. (MP)

  18. Celestial mechanics with geometric algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hestenes, D.

    1983-01-01

    Geometric algebra is introduced as a general tool for Celestial Mechanics. A general method for handling finite rotations and rotational kinematics is presented. The constants of Kepler motion are derived and manipulated in a new way. A new spinor formulation of perturbation theory is developed.

  19. An Algebraic Route to Pi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakin, Michael A. B.

    1974-01-01

    Euler's famous formula, e to the (i, pi) power equals -1, is developed by a purely algebraic method that avoids the use of both trigonometry and calculus. A heuristic outline is given followed by the rigorous theory. Pedagogical considerations for classroom presentation are suggested. (LS)

  20. Components in time-varying graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Tang, John; Musolesi, Mirco; Russo, Giovanni; Mascolo, Cecilia; Latora, Vito

    2012-06-01

    Real complex systems are inherently time-varying. Thanks to new communication systems and novel technologies, today it is possible to produce and analyze social and biological networks with detailed information on the time of occurrence and duration of each link. However, standard graph metrics introduced so far in complex network theory are mainly suited for static graphs, i.e., graphs in which the links do not change over time, or graphs built from time-varying systems by aggregating all the links as if they were concurrent in time. In this paper, we extend the notion of connectedness, and the definitions of node and graph components, to the case of time-varying graphs, which are represented as time-ordered sequences of graphs defined over a fixed set of nodes. We show that the problem of finding strongly connected components in a time-varying graph can be mapped into the problem of discovering the maximal-cliques in an opportunely constructed static graph, which we name the affine graph. It is, therefore, an NP-complete problem. As a practical example, we have performed a temporal component analysis of time-varying graphs constructed from three data sets of human interactions. The results show that taking time into account in the definition of graph components allows to capture important features of real systems. In particular, we observe a large variability in the size of node temporal in- and out-components. This is due to intrinsic fluctuations in the activity patterns of individuals, which cannot be detected by static graph analysis.

  1. Components in time-varying graphs.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Tang, John; Musolesi, Mirco; Russo, Giovanni; Mascolo, Cecilia; Latora, Vito

    2012-06-01

    Real complex systems are inherently time-varying. Thanks to new communication systems and novel technologies, today it is possible to produce and analyze social and biological networks with detailed information on the time of occurrence and duration of each link. However, standard graph metrics introduced so far in complex network theory are mainly suited for static graphs, i.e., graphs in which the links do not change over time, or graphs built from time-varying systems by aggregating all the links as if they were concurrent in time. In this paper, we extend the notion of connectedness, and the definitions of node and graph components, to the case of time-varying graphs, which are represented as time-ordered sequences of graphs defined over a fixed set of nodes. We show that the problem of finding strongly connected components in a time-varying graph can be mapped into the problem of discovering the maximal-cliques in an opportunely constructed static graph, which we name the affine graph. It is, therefore, an NP-complete problem. As a practical example, we have performed a temporal component analysis of time-varying graphs constructed from three data sets of human interactions. The results show that taking time into account in the definition of graph components allows to capture important features of real systems. In particular, we observe a large variability in the size of node temporal in- and out-components. This is due to intrinsic fluctuations in the activity patterns of individuals, which cannot be detected by static graph analysis. PMID:22757508

  2. Representations of filtered solvable Lie algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Panov, Alexander N

    2012-01-31

    The representation theory of filtered solvable Lie algebras is constructed. In this framework a classification of irreducible representations is obtained and spectra of some reducible representations are found. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  3. Vortices and superfields on a graph

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Nahomi; Kobayashi, Koichiro; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2009-08-15

    We extend the dimensional deconstruction by utilizing the knowledge of graph theory. In the dimensional deconstruction, one uses the moose diagram to exhibit the structure of the 'theory space'. We generalize the moose diagram to a general graph with oriented edges. In the present paper, we consider only the U(1) gauge symmetry. We also introduce supersymmetry into our model by use of superfields. We suppose that vector superfields reside at the vertices and chiral superfields at the edges of a given graph. Then we can consider multivector, multi-Higgs models. In our model, [U(1)]{sup p} (where p is the number of vertices) is broken to a single U(1). Therefore, for specific graphs, we get vortexlike classical solutions in our model. We show some examples of the graphs admitting the vortex solutions of simple structure as the Bogomolnyi solution.

  4. Vortices and superfields on a graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Nahomi; Kobayashi, Koichiro; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2009-08-01

    We extend the dimensional deconstruction by utilizing the knowledge of graph theory. In the dimensional deconstruction, one uses the moose diagram to exhibit the structure of the “theory space.” We generalize the moose diagram to a general graph with oriented edges. In the present paper, we consider only the U(1) gauge symmetry. We also introduce supersymmetry into our model by use of superfields. We suppose that vector superfields reside at the vertices and chiral superfields at the edges of a given graph. Then we can consider multivector, multi-Higgs models. In our model, [U(1)]p (where p is the number of vertices) is broken to a single U(1). Therefore, for specific graphs, we get vortexlike classical solutions in our model. We show some examples of the graphs admitting the vortex solutions of simple structure as the Bogomolnyi solution.

  5. An Algebraic Model for the mathfrak{su}(2|2) Light-Cone String Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, S.

    We first revisit the light-cone string field theory on the flat andpp-wave background. By our systematic analysis, we find that some unsatisfactions in the previous construction can be overcome. After that, we head for the construction of the LCSFT on the bubbling geometry with an isometry [mathfrak{psu}(2|2)]^2 ltimes {mathbb R}. We clarify the structure of expansion and propose toy models for it. This proceeding is based on the collaboration with Kishimoto [I. Kishimoto and S. Moriyama, J. High Energy Phys. textbf{08} (2010), 013, arXiv:1005.4719 (Ref. 1)].

  6. On Ramsey (3K2, K3) - minimal graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaya, Kristiana; Baskoro, Edy Tri; Assiyatun, Hilda; Suprijanto, Djoko

    2016-02-01

    The Ramsey graph theory has many interesting applications, such as in the fields of communications, information retrieval, and decision making. One of growing topics in Ramsey theory is Ramsey minimal graph. For any given graphs G and H, find graphs F such that any red-blue coloring of all edges of F contains either a red copy of G or a blue copy of H. If this condition is not satisfied by the graph F - e, then we call the graph F as a Ramsey (G, H) - minimal. In this paper, we derive the properties of (3K2, K3) - minimal graphs. We, then, characterize all Ramsey (3K2, K3) - minimal graphs.

  7. Some results on the spectra of strongly regular graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Luís António de Almeida; Mano, Vasco Moço

    2016-06-01

    Let G be a strongly regular graph whose adjacency matrix is A. We associate a real finite dimensional Euclidean Jordan algebra 𝒱, of rank three to the strongly regular graph G, spanned by I and the natural powers of A, endowed with the Jordan product of matrices and with the inner product as being the usual trace of matrices. Finally, by the analysis of the binomial Hadamard series of an element of 𝒱, we establish some inequalities on the parameters and on the spectrum of a strongly regular graph like those established in theorems 3 and 4.

  8. Students' Interpretation of a Function Associated with a Real-Life Problem from Its Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahir, Nevin

    2010-01-01

    The properties of a function such as limit, continuity, derivative, growth, or concavity can be determined more easily from its graph than by doing any algebraic operation. For this reason, it is important for students of mathematics to interpret some of the properties of a function from its graph. In this study, we investigated the competence of…

  9. Teaching the "Diagonalization Concept" in Linear Algebra with Technology: A Case Study at Galatasaray University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz Ulus, Aysegul

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines experimental and algorithmic contributions of advanced calculators (graphing and computer algebra system, CAS) in teaching the concept of "diagonalization," one of the key topics in Linear Algebra courses taught at the undergraduate level. Specifically, the proposed hypothesis of this study is to assess the effective…

  10. Introducing Algebra through the Graphical Representation of Functions: A Study among LD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauriol, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study evaluates the impact of a new Algebra 1 course at a High School for language-based learning-disabled (LD) students. The new course prioritized the teaching of relationship graphs and functions as an introduction to algebra. Across three studies, the dissertation documents and evaluates the progress made by LD high school…

  11. Generalizing a Categorization of Students' Interpretations of Linear Kinematics Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollen, Laurens; De Cock, Mieke; Zuza, Kristina; Guisasola, Jenaro; van Kampen, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated whether and how a categorization of responses to questions on linear distance-time graphs, based on a study of Irish students enrolled in an algebra-based course, could be adopted and adapted to responses from students enrolled in calculus-based physics courses at universities in Flanders, Belgium (KU Leuven) and the Basque…

  12. Ecosystem Simulations and Chaos on the Graphing Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinn, Robb

    2007-01-01

    An eighth grade algebra class used graphing calculators to simulate ecosystems. One simulation introduced mathematical chaos. The activities exposed the students to nonlinear patterns and modeling. The rate-of-change investigations related the ideas of intercept and slope to the changing equilibrium. The chaotic model intrigued them and was useful…

  13. R-Matrices and the Tensor Product Graph Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Mark D.; Zhang, Yao-Zhong

    2002-11-01

    A systematic method for constructing trigonometric R-matrices corresponding to the (multiplicity-free) tensor product of any two affinizable representations of a quantum algebra or superalgebra has been developed by the Brisbane group and its collaborators. This method has been referred to as the Tensor Product Graph Method. Here we describe applications of this method to untwisted and twisted quantum affine superalgebras.

  14. R-Matrices and the Tensor Product Graph Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Mark D.; Zhang, Yao-Zhong

    A systematic method for constructing trigonometric R-matrices corresponding to the (multiplicity-free) tensor product of any two affinizable representations of a quantum algebra or superalgebra has been developed by the Brisbane group and its collaborators. This method has been referred to as the Tensor Product Graph Method. Here we describe applications of this method to untwisted and twisted quantum affine superalgebras.

  15. Constraint algebra in bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, V. O.

    2015-07-15

    The number of degrees of freedom in bigravity theory is found for a potential of general form and also for the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley (dRGT). This aim is pursued via constructing a Hamiltonian formalismand studying the Poisson algebra of constraints. A general potential leads to a theory featuring four first-class constraints generated by general covariance. The vanishing of the respective Hessian is a crucial property of the dRGT potential, and this leads to the appearance of two additional second-class constraints and, hence, to the exclusion of a superfluous degree of freedom—that is, the Boulware—Deser ghost. The use of a method that permits avoiding an explicit expression for the dRGT potential is a distinctive feature of the present study.

  16. Constraint algebra in bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, V. O.

    2015-07-01

    The number of degrees of freedom in bigravity theory is found for a potential of general form and also for the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley (dRGT). This aim is pursued via constructing a Hamiltonian formalismand studying the Poisson algebra of constraints. A general potential leads to a theory featuring four first-class constraints generated by general covariance. The vanishing of the respective Hessian is a crucial property of the dRGT potential, and this leads to the appearance of two additional second-class constraints and, hence, to the exclusion of a superfluous degree of freedom—that is, the Boulware—Deser ghost. The use of a method that permits avoiding an explicit expression for the dRGT potential is a distinctive feature of the present study.

  17. Relativity on rotated graph paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Roberto B.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a method for constructing spacetime diagrams for special relativity on graph paper that has been rotated by 45°. The diagonal grid lines represent light-flash worldlines in Minkowski spacetime, and the boxes in the grid (called "clock diamonds") represent units of measurement corresponding to the ticks of an inertial observer's light clock. We show that many quantitative results can be read off a spacetime diagram simply by counting boxes, with very little algebra. In particular, we show that the squared interval between two events is equal to the signed area of the parallelogram on the grid (called the "causal diamond") with opposite vertices corresponding to those events. We use the Doppler effect—without explicit use of the Doppler formula—to motivate the method.

  18. Numerical algebraic geometry and algebraic kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wampler, Charles W.; Sommese, Andrew J.

    In this article, the basic constructs of algebraic kinematics (links, joints, and mechanism spaces) are introduced. This provides a common schema for many kinds of problems that are of interest in kinematic studies. Once the problems are cast in this algebraic framework, they can be attacked by tools from algebraic geometry. In particular, we review the techniques of numerical algebraic geometry, which are primarily based on homotopy methods. We include a review of the main developments of recent years and outline some of the frontiers where further research is occurring. While numerical algebraic geometry applies broadly to any system of polynomial equations, algebraic kinematics provides a body of interesting examples for testing algorithms and for inspiring new avenues of work.

  19. Private quantum subsystems and quasiorthogonal operator algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levick, Jeremy; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Kribs, David W.; Laflamme, Raymond; Pereira, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    We generalize a recently discovered example of a private quantum subsystem to find private subsystems for Abelian subgroups of the n-qubit Pauli group, which exist in the absence of private subspaces. In doing so, we also connect these quantum privacy investigations with the theory of quasiorthogonal operator algebras through the use of tools from group theory and operator theory.

  20. Consensus dynamics on random rectangular graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Sheerin, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    A random rectangular graph (RRG) is a generalization of the random geometric graph (RGG) in which the nodes are embedded into a rectangle with side lengths a and b = 1 / a, instead of on a unit square [ 0 , 1 ] 2. Two nodes are then connected if and only if they are separated at a Euclidean distance smaller than or equal to a certain threshold radius r. When a = 1 the RRG is identical to the RGG. Here we apply the consensus dynamics model to the RRG. Our main result is a lower bound for the time of consensus, i.e., the time at which the network reaches a global consensus state. To prove this result we need first to find an upper bound for the algebraic connectivity of the RRG, i.e., the second smallest eigenvalue of the combinatorial Laplacian of the graph. This bound is based on a tight lower bound found for the graph diameter. Our results prove that as the rectangle in which the nodes are embedded becomes more elongated, the RRG becomes a 'large-world', i.e., the diameter grows to infinity, and a poorly-connected graph, i.e., the algebraic connectivity decays to zero. The main consequence of these findings is the proof that the time of consensus in RRGs grows to infinity as the rectangle becomes more elongated. In closing, consensus dynamics in RRGs strongly depend on the geometric characteristics of the embedding space, and reaching the consensus state becomes more difficult as the rectangle is more elongated.

  1. Graphing Inequalities, Connecting Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2014-01-01

    Students often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and J. Matt Switzer's students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an…

  2. Graph-Plotting Routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1987-01-01

    Plotter routine for IBM PC (AKPLOT) designed for engineers and scientists who use graphs as integral parts of their documentation. Allows user to generate graph and edit its appearance on cathode-ray tube. Graph may undergo many interactive alterations before finally dumped from screen to be plotted by printer. Written in BASIC.

  3. Graphing Important People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Toolbox" column features content adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans and provides practical tools for classroom teachers. This issue's column features a lesson plan adapted from "Graphing Plot and Character in a Novel" by Lisa Storm Fink and "Bio-graph: Graphing Life Events" by Susan Spangler. Students retell biographic events…

  4. Universal Quantum Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhař, Z.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2014-04-01

    For time-reversal invariant graphs we prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture in its most general form: For graphs that are mixing in the classical limit, all spectral correlation functions coincide with those of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices. For open graphs, we derive the analogous identities for all S-matrix correlation functions.

  5. First Course in Algebra, Student's Text, Part II, Unit 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    Unit 10 in the SMSG's secondary school mathematics series is a student text covering the following topics in Algebra I: factors and exponents, radicals, polynomial and rational expressions, truth sets of open sentences, graphs of open sentences in two variables, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic polynomials, and functions. (DT)

  6. Writing to Promote and Assess Conceptual Understanding in College Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, A. Susan; Peterson, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Concept-focused quiz questions required College Algebra students to write about their understanding. The questions can be viewed in three broad categories: a focus on sense-making, a focus on describing a mathematical object such as a graph or an equation, and a focus on understanding vocabulary. Student responses from 10 classes were analyzed.…

  7. Algebra 2r, Mathematics (Experimental): 5216.23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, June

    The third in a series of six guidebooks on minimum course content for second-year algebra, this booklet covers relations, functions, and solving and graphing linear equations, linear inequalities, systems of equations, and systems of inequalities. Overall course goals are specified, a course outline is provided, performance objectives are listed,…

  8. Learning Activity Package, Algebra 124, LAPs 46-55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Bill

    A series of 10 teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) in advanced algebra and trigonometry, these units cover absolute value, inequalities, exponents, radicals, and complex numbers; functions; higher degree equations and the derivative; the trigonometric functions; graphs and applications of the trigonometric functions; sequences and…

  9. Quantization of Algebraic Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sniatycki, Jeodrzej

    2007-11-14

    For a Poisson algebra obtained by algebraic reduction of symmetries of a quantizable system we develop an analogue of geometric quantization based on the quantization structure of the original system.

  10. Graphing with "LogoWriter."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Sharon K.

    This book discusses four kinds of graphs that are taught in mathematics at the middle school level: pictographs, bar graphs, line graphs, and circle graphs. The chapters on each of these types of graphs contain information such as starting, scaling, drawing, labeling, and finishing the graphs using "LogoWriter." The final chapter of the book…

  11. Learning Algebra in a Computer Algebra Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drijvers, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This article summarises a doctoral thesis entitled "Learning algebra in a computer algebra environment, design research on the understanding of the concept of parameter" (Drijvers, 2003). It describes the research questions, the theoretical framework, the methodology and the results of the study. The focus of the study is on the understanding of…

  12. Methods of visualizing graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Perrine, Kenneth A.; Foote, Harlan P.; Thomas, James J.

    2008-12-23

    Methods for visualizing a graph by automatically drawing elements of the graph as labels are disclosed. In one embodiment, the method comprises receiving node information and edge information from an input device and/or communication interface, constructing a graph layout based at least in part on that information, wherein the edges are automatically drawn as labels, and displaying the graph on a display device according to the graph layout. In some embodiments, the nodes are automatically drawn as labels instead of, or in addition to, the label-edges.

  13. Profiles of Algebraic Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humberstone, J.; Reeve, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The algebraic competence of 72 12-year-old female students was examined to identify profiles of understanding reflecting different algebraic knowledge states. Beginning algebraic competence (mapping abilities: word-to-symbol and vice versa, classifying, and solving equations) was assessed. One week later, the nature of assistance required to map…

  14. Developing Thinking in Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, John; Graham, Alan; Johnson-Wilder, Sue

    2005-01-01

    This book is for people with an interest in algebra whether as a learner, or as a teacher, or perhaps as both. It is concerned with the "big ideas" of algebra and what it is to understand the process of thinking algebraically. The book has been structured according to a number of pedagogic principles that are exposed and discussed along the way,…

  15. Connecting Arithmetic to Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darley, Joy W.; Leapard, Barbara B.

    2010-01-01

    Algebraic thinking is a top priority in mathematics classrooms today. Because elementary school teachers lay the groundwork to develop students' capacity to think algebraically, it is crucial for teachers to have a conceptual understanding of the connections between arithmetic and algebra and be confident in communicating these connections. Many…

  16. Special issue on cluster algebras in mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Philippe; Gekhtman, Michael; Kuniba, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2013-11-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to cluster algebras in mathematical physics. Over the ten years since their introduction by Fomin and Zelevinsky, the theory of cluster algebras has witnessed a spectacular growth, first and foremost due to the many links that have been discovered with a wide range of subjects in mathematics and, increasingly, theoretical and mathematical physics. The main motivation of this special issue is to gather together reviews, recent developments and open problems, mainly from a mathematical physics viewpoint, into a single comprehensive issue. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will consist of invited review articles and contributed papers containing new results on the interplays of cluster algebras with mathematical physics. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Philippe Di Francesco, Michael Gekhtman, Atsuo Kuniba and Masahito Yamazaki. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: discrete integrable systems arising from cluster mutations cluster structure on Poisson varieties cluster algebras and soliton interactions cluster positivity conjecture Y-systems in the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and Zamolodchikov's periodicity conjecture T-system of transfer matrices of integrable lattice models dilogarithm identities in conformal field theory wall crossing in 4d N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories 4d N = 1 quiver gauge theories described by networks scattering amplitudes of 4d N = 4 theories 3d N = 2 gauge theories described by flat connections on 3-manifolds integrability of dimer/Ising models on graphs. All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers is 31 March

  17. Special issue on cluster algebras in mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Philippe; Gekhtman, Michael; Kuniba, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2014-02-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to cluster algebras in mathematical physics. Over the ten years since their introduction by Fomin and Zelevinsky, the theory of cluster algebras has witnessed a spectacular growth, first and foremost due to the many links that have been discovered with a wide range of subjects in mathematics and, increasingly, theoretical and mathematical physics. The main motivation of this special issue is to gather together reviews, recent developments and open problems, mainly from a mathematical physics viewpoint, into a single comprehensive issue. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will consist of invited review articles and contributed papers containing new results on the interplays of cluster algebras with mathematical physics. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Philippe Di Francesco, Michael Gekhtman, Atsuo Kuniba and Masahito Yamazaki. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: discrete integrable systems arising from cluster mutations cluster structure on Poisson varieties cluster algebras and soliton interactions cluster positivity conjecture Y-systems in the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and Zamolodchikov's periodicity conjecture T-system of transfer matrices of integrable lattice models dilogarithm identities in conformal field theory wall crossing in 4d N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories 4d N = 1 quiver gauge theories described by networks scattering amplitudes of 4d N = 4 theories 3d N = 2 gauge theories described by flat connections on 3-manifolds integrability of dimer/Ising models on graphs. All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers is 31 March

  18. Special issue on cluster algebras in mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Philippe; Gekhtman, Michael; Kuniba, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2013-10-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to cluster algebras in mathematical physics. Over the ten years since their introduction by Fomin and Zelevinsky, the theory of cluster algebras has witnessed a spectacular growth, first and foremost due to the many links that have been discovered with a wide range of subjects in mathematics and, increasingly, theoretical and mathematical physics. The main motivation of this special issue is to gather together reviews, recent developments and open problems, mainly from a mathematical physics viewpoint, into a single comprehensive issue. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will consist of invited review articles and contributed papers containing new results on the interplays of cluster algebras with mathematical physics. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Philippe Di Francesco, Michael Gekhtman, Atsuo Kuniba and Masahito Yamazaki. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: discrete integrable systems arising from cluster mutations cluster structure on Poisson varieties cluster algebras and soliton interactions cluster positivity conjecture Y-systems in the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and Zamolodchikov's periodicity conjecture T-system of transfer matrices of integrable lattice models dilogarithm identities in conformal field theory wall crossing in 4d N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories 4d N = 1 quiver gauge theories described by networks scattering amplitudes of 4d N = 4 theories 3d N = 2 gauge theories described by flat connections on 3-manifolds integrability of dimer/Ising models on graphs. All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers is 31 March

  19. Special issue on cluster algebras in mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Philippe; Gekhtman, Michael; Kuniba, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2013-12-01

    This is a call for contributions to a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical dedicated to cluster algebras in mathematical physics. Over the ten years since their introduction by Fomin and Zelevinsky, the theory of cluster algebras has witnessed a spectacular growth, first and foremost due to the many links that have been discovered with a wide range of subjects in mathematics and, increasingly, theoretical and mathematical physics. The main motivation of this special issue is to gather together reviews, recent developments and open problems, mainly from a mathematical physics viewpoint, into a single comprehensive issue. We expect that such a special issue will become a valuable reference for the broad scientific community working in mathematical and theoretical physics. The issue will consist of invited review articles and contributed papers containing new results on the interplays of cluster algebras with mathematical physics. Editorial policy The Guest Editors for this issue are Philippe Di Francesco, Michael Gekhtman, Atsuo Kuniba and Masahito Yamazaki. The areas and topics for this issue include, but are not limited to: discrete integrable systems arising from cluster mutations cluster structure on Poisson varieties cluster algebras and soliton interactions cluster positivity conjecture Y-systems in the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and Zamolodchikov's periodicity conjecture T-system of transfer matrices of integrable lattice models dilogarithm identities in conformal field theory wall crossing in 4d N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories 4d N = 1 quiver gauge theories described by networks scattering amplitudes of 4d N = 4 theories 3d N = 2 gauge theories described by flat connections on 3-manifolds integrability of dimer/Ising models on graphs. All contributions will be refereed and processed according to the usual procedure of the journal. Guidelines for preparation of contributions The deadline for contributed papers is 31 March

  20. Vague Congruences and Quotient Lattice Implication Algebras

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to further develop the congruence theory on lattice implication algebras. Firstly, we introduce the notions of vague similarity relations based on vague relations and vague congruence relations. Secondly, the equivalent characterizations of vague congruence relations are investigated. Thirdly, the relation between the set of vague filters and the set of vague congruences is studied. Finally, we construct a new lattice implication algebra induced by a vague congruence, and the homomorphism theorem is given. PMID:25133207

  1. Product of bipolar fuzzy graphs and their degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashmanlou, Hossein; Samanta, Sovan; Pal, Madhumangal; Borzooei, Rajab Ali

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of graph theory are applied in many areas of computer science including data mining, image segmentation, clustering, image capturing and networking. It is also known that lots of uncertainties occur in these areas. To handle the uncertainty that occurs in graph theory, fuzzy graph theory is successfully used in many problems. A bipolar fuzzy set is a generalization of the fuzzy set. In this paper, two new operations on bipolar fuzzy graphs, viz. normal product and tensor product, are defined. Also, the degrees of the vertices of the resultant graphs which are obtained from two given bipolar fuzzy graphs ? and ? using the operations Cartesian product, composition, tensor and normal product are determined.

  2. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Kac Moody algebras and controlled chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, Daniel H.

    2007-02-01

    Compactification can control chaotic Mixmaster behaviour in gravitational systems with p-form matter: we consider this in light of the connection between supergravity models and Kac Moody algebras. We show that different compactifications define 'mutations' of the algebras associated with the noncompact theories. We list the algebras obtained in this way, and find novel examples of wall systems determined by Lorentzian (but not hyperbolic) algebras. Cosmological models with a smooth pre-big bang phase require that chaos is absent: we show that compactification alone cannot eliminate chaos in the simplest compactifications of the heterotic string on a Calabi Yau, or M theory on a manifold of G2 holonomy.

  3. Computer algebra and operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fateman, Richard; Grossman, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The symbolic computation of operator expansions is discussed. Some of the capabilities that prove useful when performing computer algebra computations involving operators are considered. These capabilities may be broadly divided into three areas: the algebraic manipulation of expressions from the algebra generated by operators; the algebraic manipulation of the actions of the operators upon other mathematical objects; and the development of appropriate normal forms and simplification algorithms for operators and their actions. Brief descriptions are given of the computer algebra computations that arise when working with various operators and their actions.

  4. Modules as Learning Tools in Linear Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Laurel; Vidakovic, Draga; Martin, William O.; Dexter, Scott; Suzuki, Jeff; Loch, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the experience of STEM and mathematics faculty at four different institutions working collaboratively to integrate learning theory with curriculum development in a core undergraduate linear algebra context. The faculty formed a Professional Learning Community (PLC) with a focus on learning theories in mathematics and…

  5. Lie algebras and linear differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, R. W.; Rahimi, A.

    1972-01-01

    Certain symmetry properties possessed by the solutions of linear differential equations are examined. For this purpose, some basic ideas from the theory of finite dimensional linear systems are used together with the work of Wei and Norman on the use of Lie algebraic methods in differential equation theory.

  6. Mathematical formula recognition using graph grammar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavirotte, Stephane; Pottier, Loic

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes current results of Ofr, a system for extracting and understanding mathematical expressions in documents. Such a tool could be really useful to be able to re-use knowledge in scientific books which are not available in electronic form. We currently also study use of this system for direct input of formulas with a graphical tablet for computer algebra system softwares. Existing solutions for mathematical recognition have problems to analyze 2D expressions like vectors and matrices. This is because they often try to use extended classical grammar to analyze formulas, relatively to baseline. But a lot of mathematical notations do not respect rules for such a parsing and that is the reason why they fail to extend text parsing technic. We investigate graph grammar and graph rewriting as a solution to recognize 2D mathematical notations. Graph grammar provide a powerful formalism to describe structural manipulations of multi-dimensional data. The main two problems to solve are ambiguities between rules of grammar and construction of graph.

  7. Superconformal algebras on the boundary of AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Jørgen

    1999-07-01

    Motivated by recent progress on the correspondence between string theory on nti-de Sitter space and conformal field theory, we provide an explicit construction of an infinite dimensional class of superconformal algebras on the boundary of AdS3. These space-time algebras are N extended superconformal algebras of the kind obtainable by hamiltonian reduction of affine SL(2|N/2) current superalgebras for N even, and are induced by the same current superalgebras residing on the world sheet. Thus, such an extended superconformal algebra is generated by N supercurrents and an SL(N/2) current algebra in addition to a U(1) current algebra. The results are obtained within the framework of free field realizations.

  8. Two's company, three (or more) is a simplex : Algebraic-topological tools for understanding higher-order structure in neural data.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Chad; Ghrist, Robert; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-08-01

    The language of graph theory, or network science, has proven to be an exceptional tool for addressing myriad problems in neuroscience. Yet, the use of networks is predicated on a critical simplifying assumption: that the quintessential unit of interest in a brain is a dyad - two nodes (neurons or brain regions) connected by an edge. While rarely mentioned, this fundamental assumption inherently limits the types of neural structure and function that graphs can be used to model. Here, we describe a generalization of graphs that overcomes these limitations, thereby offering a broad range of new possibilities in terms of modeling and measuring neural phenomena. Specifically, we explore the use of simplicial complexes: a structure developed in the field of mathematics known as algebraic topology, of increasing applicability to real data due to a rapidly growing computational toolset. We review the underlying mathematical formalism as well as the budding literature applying simplicial complexes to neural data, from electrophysiological recordings in animal models to hemodynamic fluctuations in humans. Based on the exceptional flexibility of the tools and recent ground-breaking insights into neural function, we posit that this framework has the potential to eclipse graph theory in unraveling the fundamental mysteries of cognition.

  9. AdS box graphs, unitarity and operator product expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, L.; Mesref, L.; Rühl, W.

    2000-11-01

    We develop a method of singularity analysis for conformal graphs which, in particular, is applicable to the holographic image of AdS supergravity theory. It can be used to determine the critical exponents for any such graph in a given channel. These exponents determine the towers of conformal blocks that are exchanged in this channel. We analyze the scalar AdS box graph and show that it has the same critical exponents as the corresponding CFT box graph. Thus pairs of external fields couple to the same exchanged conformal blocks in both theories. This is looked upon as a general structural argument supporting the Maldacena hypothesis.

  10. Topologies on directed graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Given a directed graph, a natural topology is defined and relationships between standard topological properties and graph theoretical concepts are studied. In particular, the properties of connectivity and separatedness are investigated. A metric is introduced which is shown to be related to separatedness. The topological notions of continuity and homeomorphism. A class of maps is studied which preserve both graph and topological properties. Applications involving strong maps and contractions are also presented.

  11. Object Discovery: Soft Attributed Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanshi; Song, Xuan; Shao, Xiaowei; Zhao, Huijing; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2016-03-01

    We categorize this research in terms of its contribution to both graph theory and computer vision. From the theoretical perspective, this study can be considered as the first attempt to formulate the idea of mining maximal frequent subgraphs in the challenging domain of messy visual data, and as a conceptual extension to the unsupervised learning of graph matching. We define a soft attributed pattern (SAP) to represent the common subgraph pattern among a set of attributed relational graphs (ARGs), considering both their structure and attributes. Regarding the differences between ARGs with fuzzy attributes and conventional labeled graphs, we propose a new mining strategy that directly extracts the SAP with the maximal graph size without applying node enumeration. Given an initial graph template and a number of ARGs, we develop an unsupervised method to modify the graph template into the maximal-size SAP. From a practical perspective, this research develops a general platform for learning the category model (i.e., the SAP) from cluttered visual data (i.e., the ARGs) without labeling "what is where," thereby opening the possibility for a series of applications in the era of big visual data. Experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method on RGB/RGB-D images and videos.

  12. Object Discovery: Soft Attributed Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanshi; Song, Xuan; Shao, Xiaowei; Zhao, Huijing; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2016-03-01

    We categorize this research in terms of its contribution to both graph theory and computer vision. From the theoretical perspective, this study can be considered as the first attempt to formulate the idea of mining maximal frequent subgraphs in the challenging domain of messy visual data, and as a conceptual extension to the unsupervised learning of graph matching. We define a soft attributed pattern (SAP) to represent the common subgraph pattern among a set of attributed relational graphs (ARGs), considering both their structure and attributes. Regarding the differences between ARGs with fuzzy attributes and conventional labeled graphs, we propose a new mining strategy that directly extracts the SAP with the maximal graph size without applying node enumeration. Given an initial graph template and a number of ARGs, we develop an unsupervised method to modify the graph template into the maximal-size SAP. From a practical perspective, this research develops a general platform for learning the category model (i.e., the SAP) from cluttered visual data (i.e., the ARGs) without labeling "what is where," thereby opening the possibility for a series of applications in the era of big visual data. Experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method on RGB/RGB-D images and videos. PMID:27046496

  13. Graph Generator Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lothian, Josh; Powers, Sarah S; Sullivan, Blair D; Baker, Matthew B; Schrock, Jonathan; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  14. mpiGraph

    2007-05-22

    MpiGraph consists of an MPI application called mpiGraph written in C to measure message bandwidth and an associated crunch_mpiGraph script written in Perl to process the application output into an HTMO report. The mpiGraph application is designed to inspect the health and scalability of a high-performance interconnect while under heavy load. This is useful to detect hardware and software problems in a system, such as slow nodes, links, switches, or contention in switch routing. Itmore » is also useful to characterize how interconnect performance changes with different settings or how one interconnect type compares to another.« less

  15. Algebraic independence properties related to certain infinite products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Taka-aki

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we establish algebraic independence of the values of a certain infinite product as well as its all successive derivatives at algebraic points other than its zeroes, using the fact that the logarithmic derivative of an infinite product gives a partial fraction expansion. Such an infinite product is generated by a linear recurrence. The method used for proving the algebraic independence is based on the theory of Mahler functions of several variables.

  16. Graph distance for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Hirata, Yoshito; Ikeguchi, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Networks are widely used as a tool for describing diverse real complex systems and have been successfully applied to many fields. The distance between networks is one of the most fundamental concepts for properly classifying real networks, detecting temporal changes in network structures, and effectively predicting their temporal evolution. However, this distance has rarely been discussed in the theory of complex networks. Here, we propose a graph distance between networks based on a Laplacian matrix that reflects the structural and dynamical properties of networked dynamical systems. Our results indicate that the Laplacian-based graph distance effectively quantifies the structural difference between complex networks. We further show that our approach successfully elucidates the temporal properties underlying temporal networks observed in the context of face-to-face human interactions.

  17. Graph distance for complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yutaka; Hirata, Yoshito; Ikeguchi, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Networks are widely used as a tool for describing diverse real complex systems and have been successfully applied to many fields. The distance between networks is one of the most fundamental concepts for properly classifying real networks, detecting temporal changes in network structures, and effectively predicting their temporal evolution. However, this distance has rarely been discussed in the theory of complex networks. Here, we propose a graph distance between networks based on a Laplacian matrix that reflects the structural and dynamical properties of networked dynamical systems. Our results indicate that the Laplacian-based graph distance effectively quantifies the structural difference between complex networks. We further show that our approach successfully elucidates the temporal properties underlying temporal networks observed in the context of face-to-face human interactions. PMID:27725690

  18. Supersymmetric extension of Galilean conformal algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Arjun; Mandal, Ipsita

    2009-10-15

    The Galilean conformal algebra has recently been realized in the study of the nonrelativistic limit of the AdS/CFT conjecture. This was obtained by a systematic parametric group contraction of the parent relativistic conformal field theory. In this paper, we extend the analysis to include supersymmetry. We work at the level of the coordinates in superspace to construct the N=1 super-Galilean conformal algebra. One of the interesting outcomes of the analysis is that one is able to naturally extend the finite algebra to an infinite one. This looks structurally similar to the N=1 superconformal algebra in two dimensions, but is different. We also comment on the extension of our construction to cases of higher N.

  19. Graphs, matrices, and the GraphBLAS: Seven good reasons

    DOE PAGES

    Kepner, Jeremy; Bader, David; Buluç, Aydın; Gilbert, John; Mattson, Timothy; Meyerhenke, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of graphs has become increasingly important to a wide range of applications. Graph analysis presents a number of unique challenges in the areas of (1) software complexity, (2) data complexity, (3) security, (4) mathematical complexity, (5) theoretical analysis, (6) serial performance, and (7) parallel performance. Implementing graph algorithms using matrix-based approaches provides a number of promising solutions to these challenges. The GraphBLAS standard (istcbigdata.org/GraphBlas) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. The GraphBLAS mathematically defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implementmore » a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This paper provides an introduction to the GraphBLAS and describes how the GraphBLAS can be used to address many of the challenges associated with analysis of graphs.« less

  20. Graphs, matrices, and the GraphBLAS: Seven good reasons

    SciTech Connect

    Kepner, Jeremy; Bader, David; Buluç, Aydın; Gilbert, John; Mattson, Timothy; Meyerhenke, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of graphs has become increasingly important to a wide range of applications. Graph analysis presents a number of unique challenges in the areas of (1) software complexity, (2) data complexity, (3) security, (4) mathematical complexity, (5) theoretical analysis, (6) serial performance, and (7) parallel performance. Implementing graph algorithms using matrix-based approaches provides a number of promising solutions to these challenges. The GraphBLAS standard (istcbigdata.org/GraphBlas) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. The GraphBLAS mathematically defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implement a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This paper provides an introduction to the GraphBLAS and describes how the GraphBLAS can be used to address many of the challenges associated with analysis of graphs.

  1. A Richer Understanding of Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Algebra is one of those hard-to-teach topics where pupils seem to struggle to see it as more than a set of rules to learn, but this author recently used the software "Grid Algebra" from ATM, which engaged her Year 7 pupils in exploring algebraic concepts for themselves. "Grid Algebra" allows pupils to experience number, pre-algebra, and algebra…

  2. Hyperspectral image segmentation using spatial-spectral graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, David B.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.

    2012-06-01

    Spectral graph theory has proven to be a useful tool in the analysis of high-dimensional data sets. Recall that, mathematically, a graph is a collection of objects (nodes) and connections between them (edges); a weighted graph additionally assigns numerical values (weights) to the edges. Graphs are represented by their adjacency whose elements are the weights between the nodes. Spectral graph theory uses the eigendecomposition of the adjacency matrix (or, more generally, the Laplacian of the graph) to derive information about the underlying graph. In this paper, we develop a spectral method based on the 'normalized cuts' algorithm to segment hyperspectral image data (HSI). In particular, we model an image as a weighted graph whose nodes are the image pixels, and edges defined as connecting spatial neighbors; the edge weights are given by a weighted combination of the spatial and spectral distances between nodes. We then use the Laplacian of the graph to recursively segment the image. The advantages of our approach are that, first, the graph structure naturally incorporates both the spatial and spectral information present in HSI; also, by using only spatial neighbors, the adjacency matrix is highly sparse; as a result, it is possible to apply our technique to much larger images than previous techniques. In the paper, we present the details of our algorithm, and include experimental results from a variety of hyperspectral images.

  3. Real World Graph Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Joy; Narayan, Darren

    2009-01-01

    We present the topic of graph connectivity along with a famous theorem of Menger in the real-world setting of the national computer network infrastructure of "National LambdaRail". We include a set of exercises where students reinforce their understanding of graph connectivity by analysing the "National LambdaRail" network. Finally, we give…

  4. Walking Out Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Ji

    2009-01-01

    In the Walking Out Graphs Lesson described here, students experience several types of representations used to describe motion, including words, sentences, equations, graphs, data tables, and actions. The most important theme of this lesson is that students have to understand the consistency among these representations and form the habit of…

  5. Reflections on "The Graph"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosino, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This article responds to arguments by Skidmore and Thompson (this issue of "Educational Researcher") that a graph published more than 10 years ago was erroneously reproduced and "gratuitously damaged" perceptions of the quality of education research. After describing the purpose of the original graph, the author counters assertions that the graph…

  6. Exploring Graphs: WYSIWYG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Millie

    1997-01-01

    Graphs from media sources and questions developed from them can be used in the middle school mathematics classroom. Graphs depict storage temperature on a milk carton; air pressure measurements on a package of shock absorbers; sleep-wake patterns of an infant; a dog's breathing patterns; and the angle, velocity, and radius of a leaning bicyclist…

  7. Making "Photo" Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doto, Julianne; Golbeck, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Collecting data and analyzing the results of experiments is difficult for children. The authors found a surprising way to help their third graders make graphs and draw conclusions from their data: digital photographs. The pictures bridged the gap between an abstract graph and the plants it represented. With the support of the photos, students…

  8. ACTIVITIES: Graphs and Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Christian R.

    1975-01-01

    Using a set of worksheets, students will discover and apply Euler's formula regarding connected planar graphs and play and analyze the game of Sprouts. One sheet leads to the discovery of Euler's formula; another concerns traversability of a graph; another gives an example and a game involving these ideas. (Author/KM)

  9. Using Specialized Graph Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of logarithm and reciprocal graphs in the college physics classroom. Provides examples, such as electrical conductivity, reliability function in the Weibull model, and the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for latent heat of vaporation. Shows graphs with weighting of points. (YP)

  10. Connecting Algebra and Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Sean

    2003-01-01

    Correlates high school chemistry curriculum with high school algebra curriculum and makes the case for an integrated approach to mathematics and science instruction. Focuses on process integration. (DDR)

  11. The kinematic algebra from the self-dual sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Ricardo; O'Connell, Donal

    2011-07-01

    We identify a diffeomorphism Lie algebra in the self-dual sector of Yang-Mills theory, and show that it determines the kinematic numerators of tree-level MHV amplitudes in the full theory. These amplitudes can be computed off-shell from Feynman diagrams with only cubic vertices, which are dressed with the structure constants of both the Yang-Mills colour algebra and the diffeomorphism algebra. Therefore, the latter algebra is the dual of the colour algebra, in the sense suggested by the work of Bern, Carrasco and Johansson. We further study perturbative gravity, both in the self-dual and in the MHV sectors, finding that the kinematic numerators of the theory are the BCJ squares of the Yang-Mills numerators.

  12. Equitable random graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E. J.; Martin, Travis

    2014-11-01

    Random graph models have played a dominant role in the theoretical study of networked systems. The Poisson random graph of Erdős and Rényi, in particular, as well as the so-called configuration model, have served as the starting point for numerous calculations. In this paper we describe another large class of random graph models, which we call equitable random graphs and which are flexible enough to represent networks with diverse degree distributions and many nontrivial types of structure, including community structure, bipartite structure, degree correlations, stratification, and others, yet are exactly solvable for a wide range of properties in the limit of large graph size, including percolation properties, complete spectral density, and the behavior of homogeneous dynamical systems, such as coupled oscillators or epidemic models.

  13. Random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E. J.; Strogatz, S. H.; Watts, D. J.

    2001-08-01

    Recent work on the structure of social networks and the internet has focused attention on graphs with distributions of vertex degree that are significantly different from the Poisson degree distributions that have been widely studied in the past. In this paper we develop in detail the theory of random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions. In addition to simple undirected, unipartite graphs, we examine the properties of directed and bipartite graphs. Among other results, we derive exact expressions for the position of the phase transition at which a giant component first forms, the mean component size, the size of the giant component if there is one, the mean number of vertices a certain distance away from a randomly chosen vertex, and the average vertex-vertex distance within a graph. We apply our theory to some real-world graphs, including the world-wide web and collaboration graphs of scientists and Fortune 1000 company directors. We demonstrate that in some cases random graphs with appropriate distributions of vertex degree predict with surprising accuracy the behavior of the real world, while in others there is a measurable discrepancy between theory and reality, perhaps indicating the presence of additional social structure in the network that is not captured by the random graph.

  14. Linear Algebra Revisited: An Attempt to Understand Students' Conceptual Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Sandra; Henderson, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    This article looks at some of the conceptual difficulties that students have in a linear algebra course. An overview of previous research in this area is given, and the various theories that have been espoused regarding the reasons that students find linear algebra so difficult are discussed. Student responses to two questions testing the ability…

  15. The algebra of Grassmann canonical anticommutation relations and its applications to fermionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Keyl, Michael; Schlingemann, Dirk-M.

    2010-02-15

    We present an approach to a noncommutativelike phase space which allows to analyze quasifree states on the algebra of canonical anti-commutation relations (CAR) in analogy to quasifree states on the algebra of canonical commutation relations (CCR). The used mathematical tools are based on a new algebraic structure the 'Grassmann algebra of canonical anticommutation relations' (GAR algebra) which is given by the twisted tensor product of a Grassmann and a CAR algebra. As a new application, the corresponding theory provides an elegant tool for calculating the fidelity of two quasifree fermionic states which is needed for the study of entanglement distillation within fermionic systems.

  16. Operator product expansion algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Jan; Hollands, Stefan

    2013-07-15

    We establish conceptually important properties of the operator product expansion (OPE) in the context of perturbative, Euclidean φ{sup 4}-quantum field theory. First, we demonstrate, generalizing earlier results and techniques of hep-th/1105.3375, that the 3-point OPE, =Σ{sub C}C{sub A{sub 1A{sub 2A{sub 3}{sup C}}}}, usually interpreted only as an asymptotic short distance expansion, actually converges at finite, and even large, distances. We further show that the factorization identity C{sub A{sub 1A{sub 2A{sub 3}{sup B}}}}=Σ{sub C}C{sub A{sub 1A{sub 2}{sup C}}}C{sub CA{sub 3}{sup B}} is satisfied for suitable configurations of the spacetime arguments. Again, the infinite sum is shown to be convergent. Our proofs rely on explicit bounds on the remainders of these expansions, obtained using refined versions, mostly due to Kopper et al., of the renormalization group flow equation method. These bounds also establish that each OPE coefficient is a real analytic function in the spacetime arguments for non-coinciding points. Our results hold for arbitrary but finite loop orders. They lend support to proposals for a general axiomatic framework of quantum field theory, based on such “consistency conditions” and akin to vertex operator algebras, wherein the OPE is promoted to the defining structure of the theory.

  17. An algebra of discrete event processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, Michael; Meyer, George

    1991-01-01

    This report deals with an algebraic framework for modeling and control of discrete event processes. The report consists of two parts. The first part is introductory, and consists of a tutorial survey of the theory of concurrency in the spirit of Hoare's CSP, and an examination of the suitability of such an algebraic framework for dealing with various aspects of discrete event control. To this end a new concurrency operator is introduced and it is shown how the resulting framework can be applied. It is further shown that a suitable theory that deals with the new concurrency operator must be developed. In the second part of the report the formal algebra of discrete event control is developed. At the present time the second part of the report is still an incomplete and occasionally tentative working paper.

  18. Linear-Algebra Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, C. L.; Krogh, F. T.; Gold, S. S.; Kincaid, D. R.; Sullivan, J.; Williams, E.; Hanson, R. J.; Haskell, K.; Dongarra, J.; Moler, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) library is a collection of 38 FORTRAN-callable routines for performing basic operations of numerical linear algebra. BLAS library is portable and efficient source of basic operations for designers of programs involving linear algebriac computations. BLAS library is supplied in portable FORTRAN and Assembler code versions for IBM 370, UNIVAC 1100 and CDC 6000 series computers.

  19. Ready, Set, Algebra?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Alissa Beth

    2012-01-01

    The California Department of Education (CDE) has long asserted that success Algebra I by Grade 8 is the goal for all California public school students. In fact, the state's accountability system penalizes schools that do not require all of their students to take the Algebra I end-of-course examination by Grade 8 (CDE, 2009). In this…

  20. Algebraic Reasoning through Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, F. D.; Becker, Joanne Rossi

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the results of a three-year study that explores students' performance on patterning tasks involving prealgebra and algebra. The findings, insights, and issues drawn from the study are intended to help teach prealgebra and algebra. In the remainder of the article, the authors take a more global view of the three-year study on…

  1. Teaching Structure in Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlin, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how the author has developed tasks for students that address the missed "essence of the matter" of algebraic transformations. Specifically, he has found that having students practice "perceiving" algebraic structure--by naming the "glue" in the expressions, drawing expressions using…

  2. Thinking Graphically: Connecting Vision and Cognition during Graph Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratwani, Raj M.; Trafton, J. Gregory; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A.

    2008-01-01

    Task analytic theories of graph comprehension account for the perceptual and conceptual processes required to extract specific information from graphs. Comparatively, the processes underlying information integration have received less attention. We propose a new framework for information integration that highlights visual integration and cognitive…

  3. Graph representation of protein free energy landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Minghai; Duan, Mojie; Fan, Jue; Huo, Shuanghong; Han, Li

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding and protein conformational changes are governed by the underlying free energy landscape. However, the multidimensional nature of the free energy landscape makes it difficult to describe. We propose to use a weighted-graph approach to depict the free energy landscape with the nodes on the graph representing the conformational states and the edge weights reflecting the free energy barriers between the states. Our graph is constructed from a molecular dynamics trajectory and does not involve projecting the multi-dimensional free energy landscape onto a low-dimensional space defined by a few order parameters. The calculation of free energy barriers was based on transition-path theory using the MSMBuilder2 package. We compare our graph with the widely used transition disconnectivity graph (TRDG) which is constructed from the same trajectory and show that our approach gives more accurate description of the free energy landscape than the TRDG approach even though the latter can be organized into a simple tree representation. The weighted-graph is a general approach and can be used on any complex system.

  4. Graph representation of protein free energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghai; Duan, Mojie; Fan, Jue; Han, Li; Huo, Shuanghong

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding and protein conformational changes are governed by the underlying free energy landscape. However, the multidimensional nature of the free energy landscape makes it difficult to describe. We propose to use a weighted-graph approach to depict the free energy landscape with the nodes on the graph representing the conformational states and the edge weights reflecting the free energy barriers between the states. Our graph is constructed from a molecular dynamics trajectory and does not involve projecting the multi-dimensional free energy landscape onto a low-dimensional space defined by a few order parameters. The calculation of free energy barriers was based on transition-path theory using the MSMBuilder2 package. We compare our graph with the widely used transition disconnectivity graph (TRDG) which is constructed from the same trajectory and show that our approach gives more accurate description of the free energy landscape than the TRDG approach even though the latter can be organized into a simple tree representation. The weighted-graph is a general approach and can be used on any complex system.

  5. Extended conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Anne

    1990-08-01

    Some extended conformal field theories are briefly reviewed. They illustrate how non minimal models of the Virasoro algebra (c≥1) can become minimal with respect to a larger algebra. The accent is put on N-extended superconformal algebras, which are relevant in superstring compactification.

  6. Quasiperiodic Graphs: Structural Design, Scaling and Entropic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, B.; Ballesteros, F. J.; Núñez, A. M.; Robledo, A.

    2013-04-01

    A novel class of graphs, here named quasiperiodic, are constructed via application of the Horizontal Visibility algorithm to the time series generated along the quasiperiodic route to chaos. We show how the hierarchy of mode-locked regions represented by the Farey tree is inherited by their associated graphs. We are able to establish, via Renormalization Group (RG) theory, the architecture of the quasiperiodic graphs produced by irrational winding numbers with pure periodic continued fraction. Finally, we demonstrate that the RG fixed-point degree distributions are recovered via optimization of a suitably defined graph entropy.

  7. From time series to complex networks: the visibility graph.

    PubMed

    Lacasa, Lucas; Luque, Bartolo; Ballesteros, Fernando; Luque, Jordi; Nuño, Juan Carlos

    2008-04-01

    In this work we present a simple and fast computational method, the visibility algorithm, that converts a time series into a graph. The constructed graph inherits several properties of the series in its structure. Thereby, periodic series convert into regular graphs, and random series do so into random graphs. Moreover, fractal series convert into scale-free networks, enhancing the fact that power law degree distributions are related to fractality, something highly discussed recently. Some remarkable examples and analytical tools are outlined to test the method's reliability. Many different measures, recently developed in the complex network theory, could by means of this new approach characterize time series from a new point of view.

  8. RNA graph partitioning for the discovery of RNA modularity: a novel application of graph partition algorithm to biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namhee; Zheng, Zhe; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Graph representations have been widely used to analyze and design various economic, social, military, political, and biological networks. In systems biology, networks of cells and organs are useful for understanding disease and medical treatments and, in structural biology, structures of molecules can be described, including RNA structures. In our RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) framework, we represent RNA structures as tree graphs by translating unpaired regions into vertices and helices into edges. Here we explore the modularity of RNA structures by applying graph partitioning known in graph theory to divide an RNA graph into subgraphs. To our knowledge, this is the first application of graph partitioning to biology, and the results suggest a systematic approach for modular design in general. The graph partitioning algorithms utilize mathematical properties of the Laplacian eigenvector (µ2) corresponding to the second eigenvalues (λ2) associated with the topology matrix defining the graph: λ2 describes the overall topology, and the sum of µ2's components is zero. The three types of algorithms, termed median, sign, and gap cuts, divide a graph by determining nodes of cut by median, zero, and largest gap of µ2's components, respectively. We apply these algorithms to 45 graphs corresponding to all solved RNA structures up through 11 vertices (∼ 220 nucleotides). While we observe that the median cut divides a graph into two similar-sized subgraphs, the sign and gap cuts partition a graph into two topologically-distinct subgraphs. We find that the gap cut produces the best biologically-relevant partitioning for RNA because it divides RNAs at less stable connections while maintaining junctions intact. The iterative gap cuts suggest basic modules and assembly protocols to design large RNA structures. Our graph substructuring thus suggests a systematic approach to explore the modularity of biological networks. In our applications to RNA structures, subgraphs also suggest

  9. Quantitative Literacy: Working with Log Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawl, S.

    2013-04-01

    The need for working with and understanding different types of graphs is a common occurrence in everyday life. Examples include anything having to do investments, being an educated juror in a case that involves evidence presented graphically, and understanding many aspect of our current political discourse. Within a science class graphs play a crucial role in presenting and interpreting data. In astronomy, where the range of graphed values is many orders of magnitude, log-axes must be used and understood. Experience shows that students do not understand how to read and interpret log-axes or how they differ from linear. Alters (1996), in a study of college students in an algebra-based physics class, found little understanding of log plotting. The purpose of this poster is to show the method and progression I have developed for use in my “ASTRO 101” class, with the goal being to help students better understand the H-R diagram, mass-luminosity relationship, and digital spectra.

  10. Reaction route graphs. III. Non-minimal kinetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fishtik, Ilie; Callaghan, Caitlin A; Datta, Ravindra

    2005-02-24

    The concept of reaction route (RR) graphs introduced recently by us for kinetic mechanisms that produce minimal graphs is extended to the problem of non-minimal kinetic mechanisms for the case of a single overall reaction (OR). A RR graph is said to be minimal if all of the stoichiometric numbers in all direct RRs of the mechanism are equal to +/-1 and non-minimal if at least one stoichiometric number in a direct RR is non-unity, e.g., equal to +/-2. For a given mechanism, four unique topological characteristics of RR graphs are defined and enumerated, namely, direct full routes (FRs), empty routes (ERs), intermediate nodes (INs), and terminal nodes (TNs). These are further utilized to construct the RR graphs. One algorithm involves viewing each IN as a central node in a RR sub-graph. As a result, the construction and enumeration of RR graphs are reduced to the problem of balancing the peripheral nodes in the RR sub-graphs according to the list of FRs, ERs, INs, and TNs. An alternate method involves using an independent set of RRs to draw the RR graph while satisfying the INs and TNs. Three examples are presented to illustrate the application of non-minimal RR graph theory.

  11. Horizontal visibility graphs generated by type-I intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Ángel M.; Luque, Bartolo; Lacasa, Lucas; Gómez, Jose Patricio; Robledo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    The type-I intermittency route to (or out of) chaos is investigated within the horizontal visibility (HV) graph theory. For that purpose, we address the trajectories generated by unimodal maps close to an inverse tangent bifurcation and construct their associated HV graphs. We show how the alternation of laminar episodes and chaotic bursts imprints a fingerprint in the resulting graph structure. Accordingly, we derive a phenomenological theory that predicts quantitative values for several network parameters. In particular, we predict that the characteristic power-law scaling of the mean length of laminar trend sizes is fully inherited by the variance of the graph degree distribution, in good agreement with the numerics. We also report numerical evidence on how the characteristic power-law scaling of the Lyapunov exponent as a function of the distance to the tangent bifurcation is inherited in the graph by an analogous scaling of block entropy functionals defined on the graph. Furthermore, we are able to recast the full set of HV graphs generated by intermittent dynamics into a renormalization-group framework, where the fixed points of its graph-theoretical renormalization-group flow account for the different types of dynamics. We also establish that the nontrivial fixed point of this flow coincides with the tangency condition and that the corresponding invariant graph exhibits extremal entropic properties.

  12. Horizontal visibility graphs generated by type-I intermittency.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Ángel M; Luque, Bartolo; Lacasa, Lucas; Gómez, Jose Patricio; Robledo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    The type-I intermittency route to (or out of) chaos is investigated within the horizontal visibility (HV) graph theory. For that purpose, we address the trajectories generated by unimodal maps close to an inverse tangent bifurcation and construct their associated HV graphs. We show how the alternation of laminar episodes and chaotic bursts imprints a fingerprint in the resulting graph structure. Accordingly, we derive a phenomenological theory that predicts quantitative values for several network parameters. In particular, we predict that the characteristic power-law scaling of the mean length of laminar trend sizes is fully inherited by the variance of the graph degree distribution, in good agreement with the numerics. We also report numerical evidence on how the characteristic power-law scaling of the Lyapunov exponent as a function of the distance to the tangent bifurcation is inherited in the graph by an analogous scaling of block entropy functionals defined on the graph. Furthermore, we are able to recast the full set of HV graphs generated by intermittent dynamics into a renormalization-group framework, where the fixed points of its graph-theoretical renormalization-group flow account for the different types of dynamics. We also establish that the nontrivial fixed point of this flow coincides with the tangency condition and that the corresponding invariant graph exhibits extremal entropic properties.

  13. Reaction spreading on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension ds, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension dl. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)˜tdl. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)˜eαt with α proportional to ln, where is the average degree of the graph.

  14. Reasoning about nondeterministic and concurrent actions: A process algebra approach

    SciTech Connect

    De Giacomo, G.; Chen, Xiao Jun

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we study reasoning about actions following a model checking approach in contrast to the usual validity checking one. Specifically, we model a dynamic system as a transition graph which represents all the possible system evolutions in terms of state changes caused by actions. Such a transition graph is defined by means of a suitable process algebra associated with an explicit global store. To reason about system properties we introduce an extension of modal {mu}-calculus. This setting, although directly applicable only when complete information on the system is available, has several interesting features for reasoning about actions. On one hand, it inherits from the vast literature on process algebras tools for dealing with complex systems, treating suitably important aspects like parallelism, communications, interruptions, coordinations among agents. On the other hand, reasoning by model checking is typically much easier than more general logical services such as validity checking.

  15. Exceptional quantum subgroups for the rank two Lie algebras B2 and G2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquereaux, R.; Rais, R.; Tahri, E. H.

    2010-09-01

    Exceptional modular invariants for the Lie algebras B2 (at levels 2, 3, 7, and 12) and G2 (at levels 3 and 4) can be obtained from conformal embeddings. We determine the associated algebras of quantum symmetries and discover or recover, as a by-product, the graphs describing exceptional quantum subgroups of type B2 or G2 that encode their module structure over the associated fusion category. Global dimensions are given.

  16. A study on vague graphs.

    PubMed

    Rashmanlou, Hossein; Samanta, Sovan; Pal, Madhumangal; Borzooei, R A

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to introduce the notion of vague h-morphism on vague graphs and regular vague graphs. The action of vague h-morphism on vague strong regular graphs are studied. Some elegant results on weak and co weak isomorphism are derived. Also, [Formula: see text]-complement of highly irregular vague graphs are defined. PMID:27536517

  17. A Semantic Graph Query Language

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I L

    2006-10-16

    Semantic graphs can be used to organize large amounts of information from a number of sources into one unified structure. A semantic query language provides a foundation for extracting information from the semantic graph. The graph query language described here provides a simple, powerful method for querying semantic graphs.

  18. A Linear Algebra Measure of Cluster Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mather, Laura A.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of models for information retrieval focuses on an application of linear algebra to text clustering, namely, a metric for measuring cluster quality based on the theory that cluster quality is proportional to the number of terms that are disjoint across the clusters. Explains term-document matrices and clustering algorithms. (Author/LRW)

  19. The geometric semantics of algebraic quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Cruz Morales, John Alexander; Zilber, Boris

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we will present an ongoing project that aims to use model theory as a suitable mathematical setting for studying the formalism of quantum mechanics. We argue that this approach provides a geometric semantics for such a formalism by means of establishing a (non-commutative) duality between certain algebraic and geometric objects.

  20. Using Group Explorer in Teaching Abstract Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Claus; Gfeller, Mary; Donohue, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the use of Group Explorer in an undergraduate mathematics course in abstract algebra. The visual nature of Group Explorer in representing concepts in group theory is an attractive incentive to use this software in the classroom. However, little is known about students' perceptions on this technology in learning concepts in…

  1. Leibniz algebras associated with representations of filiform Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayupov, Sh. A.; Camacho, L. M.; Khudoyberdiyev, A. Kh.; Omirov, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we investigate Leibniz algebras whose quotient Lie algebra is a naturally graded filiform Lie algebra nn,1. We introduce a Fock module for the algebra nn,1 and provide classification of Leibniz algebras L whose corresponding Lie algebra L / I is the algebra nn,1 with condition that the ideal I is a Fock nn,1-module, where I is the ideal generated by squares of elements from L. We also consider Leibniz algebras with corresponding Lie algebra nn,1 and such that the action I ×nn,1 → I gives rise to a minimal faithful representation of nn,1. The classification up to isomorphism of such Leibniz algebras is given for the case of n = 4.

  2. Commuting projections on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Zikatanov, Ludmil T.

    2013-02-19

    For a given (connected) graph, we consider vector spaces of (discrete) functions defined on its vertices and its edges. These two spaces are related by a discrete gradient operator, Grad and its adjoint, ₋Div, referred to as (negative) discrete divergence. We also consider a coarse graph obtained by aggregation of vertices of the original one. Then a coarse vertex space is identified with the subspace of piecewise constant functions over the aggregates. We consider the ℓ2-projection QH onto the space of these piecewise constants. In the present paper, our main result is the construction of a projection π H from the original edge-space onto a properly constructed coarse edge-space associated with the edges of the coarse graph. The projections π H and QH commute with the discrete divergence operator, i.e., we have div π H = QH div. The respective pair of coarse edge-space and coarse vertexspace offer the potential to construct two-level, and by recursion, multilevel methods for the mixed formulation of the graph Laplacian which utilizes the discrete divergence operator. The performance of one two-level method with overlapping Schwarz smoothing and correction based on the constructed coarse spaces for solving such mixed graph Laplacian systems is illustrated on a number of graph examples.

  3. The algebra of diffeomorphisms from the world sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulgin, Waldemar; Troost, Jan

    2014-09-01

    The quantum theory of a massless spin two particle is strongly constrained by diffeomorphism invariance, which is in turn implied by unitarity. We explicitly exhibit the space-time diffeomorphism algebra of string theory, realizing it in terms of world sheet vertex operators. Viewing diffeomorphisms as field redefinitions in the two-dimensional conformal field theory renders the calculation of their algebra straightforward. Next, we generalize the analysis to combinations of space-time anti-symmetric tensor gauge transformations and diffeomorphisms. We also point out a left-right split of the algebra combined with a twist that reproduces the C-bracket of double field theory. We further compare our derivation to an analysis in terms of marginal deformations as well as vertex operator algebras.

  4. Generalizing a categorization of students' interpretations of linear kinematics graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollen, Laurens; De Cock, Mieke; Zuza, Kristina; Guisasola, Jenaro; van Kampen, Paul

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated whether and how a categorization of responses to questions on linear distance-time graphs, based on a study of Irish students enrolled in an algebra-based course, could be adopted and adapted to responses from students enrolled in calculus-based physics courses at universities in Flanders, Belgium (KU Leuven) and the Basque Country, Spain (University of the Basque Country). We discuss how we adapted the categorization to accommodate a much more diverse student cohort and explain how the prior knowledge of students may account for many differences in the prevalence of approaches and success rates. Although calculus-based physics students make fewer mistakes than algebra-based physics students, they encounter similar difficulties that are often related to incorrectly dividing two coordinates. We verified that a qualitative understanding of kinematics is an important but not sufficient condition for students to determine a correct value for the speed. When comparing responses to questions on linear distance-time graphs with responses to isomorphic questions on linear water level versus time graphs, we observed that the context of a question influences the approach students use. Neither qualitative understanding nor an ability to find the slope of a context-free graph proved to be a reliable predictor for the approach students use when they determine the instantaneous speed.

  5. Confluences of the Painlevé equations, Cherednik algebras and q-Askey scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we produce seven new algebras as confluences of the Cherednik algebra of type \\check {{{{C}1}}} {{C}1} and we characterise their spherical-sub-algebras. The limit of the spherical sub-algebra of the Cherednik algebra of type \\check {{{{C}1}}} {{C}1} is the monodromy manifold of the Painlevé VI equation (Oblomkov 2004 Int. Math. Res. Not. 2004 877–912). Here we prove that by considering the limits of the spherical sub-algebras of our new confluent algebras, one obtains the monodromy manifolds of all other Painlevé differential equations. Moreover, we introduce confluent versions of the Zhedanov algebra and prove that each of them (quotiented by their Casimir) is isomorphic to the corresponding spherical sub-algebra of our new confluent Cherednik algebras. We show that in the basic representation our confluent Zhedanov algebras act as symmetries of certain elements of the q-Askey scheme, thus setting a stepping stone towards the solution of the open problem of finding the corresponding quantum algebra for each element of the q-Askey scheme. These results establish a new link between the theory of the Painlevé equations and the theory of the q-Askey scheme making a step towards the construction of a representation theoretic approach for the Painlevé theory.

  6. Confluences of the Painlevé equations, Cherednik algebras and q-Askey scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocco, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we produce seven new algebras as confluences of the Cherednik algebra of type \\check {{{{C}1}}} {{C}1} and we characterise their spherical-sub-algebras. The limit of the spherical sub-algebra of the Cherednik algebra of type \\check {{{{C}1}}} {{C}1} is the monodromy manifold of the Painlevé VI equation (Oblomkov 2004 Int. Math. Res. Not. 2004 877-912). Here we prove that by considering the limits of the spherical sub-algebras of our new confluent algebras, one obtains the monodromy manifolds of all other Painlevé differential equations. Moreover, we introduce confluent versions of the Zhedanov algebra and prove that each of them (quotiented by their Casimir) is isomorphic to the corresponding spherical sub-algebra of our new confluent Cherednik algebras. We show that in the basic representation our confluent Zhedanov algebras act as symmetries of certain elements of the q-Askey scheme, thus setting a stepping stone towards the solution of the open problem of finding the corresponding quantum algebra for each element of the q-Askey scheme. These results establish a new link between the theory of the Painlevé equations and the theory of the q-Askey scheme making a step towards the construction of a representation theoretic approach for the Painlevé theory.

  7. Fingerprint recognition system by use of graph matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei; Shen, Jun; Zheng, Huicheng

    2001-09-01

    Fingerprint recognition is an important subject in biometrics to identify or verify persons by physiological characteristics, and has found wide applications in different domains. In the present paper, we present a finger recognition system that combines singular points and structures. The principal steps of processing in our system are: preprocessing and ridge segmentation, singular point extraction and selection, graph representation, and finger recognition by graphs matching. Our fingerprint recognition system is implemented and tested for many fingerprint images and the experimental result are satisfactory. Different techniques are used in our system, such as fast calculation of orientation field, local fuzzy dynamical thresholding, algebraic analysis of connections and fingerprints representation and matching by graphs. Wed find that for fingerprint database that is not very large, the recognition rate is very high even without using a prior coarse category classification. This system works well for both one-to-few and one-to-many problems.

  8. Degenerate Sklyanin algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Andrey

    2010-08-01

    New trigonometric and rational solutions of the quantum Yang-Baxter equation (QYBE) are obtained by applying some singular gauge transformations to the known Belavin-Drinfeld elliptic R-matrix for sl(2;?). These solutions are shown to be related to the standard ones by the quasi-Hopf twist. We demonstrate that the quantum algebras arising from these new R-matrices can be obtained as special limits of the Sklyanin algebra. A representation for these algebras by the difference operators is found. The sl( N;?)-case is discussed.

  9. Degenerate Sklyanin algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Andrey

    2010-08-01

    New trigonometric and rational solutions of the quantum Yang-Baxter equation (QYBE) are obtained by applying some singular gauge transformations to the known Belavin-Drinfeld elliptic R-matrix for sl(2;?). These solutions are shown to be related to the standard ones by the quasi-Hopf twist. We demonstrate that the quantum algebras arising from these new R-matrices can be obtained as special limits of the Sklyanin algebra. A representation for these algebras by the difference operators is found. The sl(N;?)-case is discussed.

  10. Clique graphs and overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to construct a clique graph in which properties of cliques of a fixed order in a given graph are represented by vertices in a weighted graph. Various definitions and motivations for these weights are given. The detection of communities or clusters is used to illustrate how a clique graph may be exploited. In particular a benchmark network is shown where clique graphs find the overlapping communities accurately while vertex partition methods fail.

  11. Change in brain network topology as a function of treatment response in schizophrenia: a longitudinal resting-state fMRI study using graph theory.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Jennifer Ann; Kraguljac, Nina Vanessa; White, David Matthew; Ver Hoef, Lawrence; Tabora, Janell; Lahti, Adrienne Carol

    2016-01-01

    A number of neuroimaging studies have provided evidence in support of the hypothesis that faulty interactions between spatially disparate brain regions underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, but it remains unclear to what degree antipsychotic medications affect these. We hypothesized that the balance between functional integration and segregation of brain networks is impaired in unmedicated patients with schizophrenia, but that it can be partially restored by antipsychotic medications. We included 32 unmedicated patients with schizophrenia (SZ) and 32 matched healthy controls (HC) in this study. We obtained resting-state scans while unmedicated, and again after 6 weeks of treatment with risperidone to assess functional integration and functional segregation of brain networks using graph theoretical measures. Compared with HC, unmedicated SZ showed reduced global efficiency and increased clustering coefficients. This pattern of aberrant functional network integration and segregation was modulated with antipsychotic medications, but only in those who responded to treatment. Our work lends support to the concept of schizophrenia as a dysconnectivity syndrome, and suggests that faulty brain network topology in schizophrenia is modulated by antipsychotic medication as a function of treatment response. PMID:27336056

  12. Change in brain network topology as a function of treatment response in schizophrenia: a longitudinal resting-state fMRI study using graph theory

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Jennifer Ann; Kraguljac, Nina Vanessa; White, David Matthew; Ver Hoef, Lawrence; Tabora, Janell; Lahti, Adrienne Carol

    2016-01-01

    A number of neuroimaging studies have provided evidence in support of the hypothesis that faulty interactions between spatially disparate brain regions underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, but it remains unclear to what degree antipsychotic medications affect these. We hypothesized that the balance between functional integration and segregation of brain networks is impaired in unmedicated patients with schizophrenia, but that it can be partially restored by antipsychotic medications. We included 32 unmedicated patients with schizophrenia (SZ) and 32 matched healthy controls (HC) in this study. We obtained resting-state scans while unmedicated, and again after 6 weeks of treatment with risperidone to assess functional integration and functional segregation of brain networks using graph theoretical measures. Compared with HC, unmedicated SZ showed reduced global efficiency and increased clustering coefficients. This pattern of aberrant functional network integration and segregation was modulated with antipsychotic medications, but only in those who responded to treatment. Our work lends support to the concept of schizophrenia as a dysconnectivity syndrome, and suggests that faulty brain network topology in schizophrenia is modulated by antipsychotic medication as a function of treatment response. PMID:27336056

  13. BPS preons and the AdS-M-algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandos, Igor A.; de Azcárraga, José A.

    2008-04-01

    We present here the AdS generalization of BPS preons, which were introduced as the hypothetical constituents of M-theory preserving all but one supersymmetries. Our construction, suggested by the relation of `lower dimensional preons' with higher spin theories, can be considered as a deformation of the M-algebraic description of the single supersymmetry broken by a preon, and provides another reason to identify the AdS generalization of the M-algebra, which we call the AdS-M-algebra, with osp(1|32).

  14. Higher-order web link analysis using multilinear algebra.

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, Joseph P.; Bader, Brett William; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2005-07-01

    Linear algebra is a powerful and proven tool in web search. Techniques, such as the PageRank algorithm of Brin and Page and the HITS algorithm of Kleinberg, score web pages based on the principal eigenvector (or singular vector) of a particular non-negative matrix that captures the hyperlink structure of the web graph. We propose and test a new methodology that uses multilinear algebra to elicit more information from a higher-order representation of the hyperlink graph. We start by labeling the edges in our graph with the anchor text of the hyperlinks so that the associated linear algebra representation is a sparse, three-way tensor. The first two dimensions of the tensor represent the web pages while the third dimension adds the anchor text. We then use the rank-1 factors of a multilinear PARAFAC tensor decomposition, which are akin to singular vectors of the SVD, to automatically identify topics in the collection along with the associated authoritative web pages.

  15. Shapes and stability of algebraic nuclear models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Moreno, Enrique; Castanos, Octavio

    1995-01-01

    A generalization of the procedure to study shapes and stability of algebraic nuclear models introduced by Gilmore is presented. One calculates the expectation value of the Hamiltonian with respect to the coherent states of the algebraic structure of the system. Then equilibrium configurations of the resulting energy surface, which depends in general on state variables and a set of parameters, are classified through the Catastrophe theory. For one- and two-body interactions in the Hamiltonian of the interacting Boson model-1, the critical points are organized through the Cusp catastrophe. As an example, we apply this Separatrix to describe the energy surfaces associated to the Rutenium and Samarium isotopes.

  16. Algebraic integrability: a survey.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecke, Pol

    2008-03-28

    We give a concise introduction to the notion of algebraic integrability. Our exposition is based on examples and phenomena, rather than on detailed proofs of abstract theorems. We mainly focus on algebraic integrability in the sense of Adler-van Moerbeke, where the fibres of the momentum map are affine parts of Abelian varieties; as it turns out, most examples from classical mechanics are of this form. Two criteria are given for such systems (Kowalevski-Painlevé and Lyapunov) and each is illustrated in one example. We show in the case of a relatively simple example how one proves algebraic integrability, starting from the differential equations for the integrable vector field. For Hamiltonian systems that are algebraically integrable in the generalized sense, two examples are given, which illustrate the non-compact analogues of Abelian varieties which typically appear in such systems. PMID:17588863

  17. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  18. Aprepro - Algebraic Preprocessor

    2005-08-01

    Aprepro is an algebraic preprocessor that reads a file containing both general text and algebraic, string, or conditional expressions. It interprets the expressions and outputs them to the output file along witht the general text. Aprepro contains several mathematical functions, string functions, and flow control constructs. In addition, functions are included that, with some additional files, implement a units conversion system and a material database lookup system.

  19. On Fusion Algebras and Modular Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, T.; Walton, M. A.

    We consider the fusion algebras arising in e.g. Wess-Zumino-Witten conformal field theories, affine Kac-Moody algebras at positive integer level, and quantum groups at roots of unity. Using properties of the modular matrix S, we find small sets of primary fields (equivalently, sets of highest weights) which can be identified with the variables of a polynomial realization of the Ar fusion algebra at level k. We prove that for many choices of rank r and level k, the number of these variables is the minimum possible, and we conjecture that it is in fact minimal for most r and k. We also find new, systematic sources of zeros in the modular matrix S. In addition, we obtain a formula relating the entries of S at fixed points, to entries of S at smaller ranks and levels. Finally, we identify the number fields generated over the rationals by the entries of S, and by the fusion (Verlinde) eigenvalues.

  20. Review and application of group theory to molecular systems biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we provide a review of selected mathematical ideas that can help us better understand the boundary between living and non-living systems. We focus on group theory and abstract algebra applied to molecular systems biology. Throughout this paper we briefly describe possible open problems. In connection with the genetic code we propose that it may be possible to use perturbation theory to explore the adjacent possibilities in the 64-dimensional space-time manifold of the evolving genome. With regards to algebraic graph theory, there are several minor open problems we discuss. In relation to network dynamics and groupoid formalism we suggest that the network graph might not be the main focus for understanding the phenotype but rather the phase space of the network dynamics. We show a simple case of a C6 network and its phase space network. We envision that the molecular network of a cell is actually a complex network of hypercycles and feedback circuits that could be better represented in a higher-dimensional space. We conjecture that targeting nodes in the molecular network that have key roles in the phase space, as revealed by analysis of the automorphism decomposition, might be a better way to drug discovery and treatment of cancer. PMID:21696623

  1. The Algebraic Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiley, B. J.

    In this chapter, we examine in detail the non-commutative symplectic algebra underlying quantum dynamics. By using this algebra, we show that it contains both the Weyl-von Neumann and the Moyal quantum algebras. The latter contains the Wigner distribution as the kernel of the density matrix. The underlying non-commutative geometry can be projected into either of two Abelian spaces, so-called `shadow phase spaces'. One of these is the phase space of Bohmian mechanics, showing that it is a fragment of the basic underlying algebra. The algebraic approach is much richer, giving rise to two fundamental dynamical time development equations which reduce to the Liouville equation and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the classical limit. They also include the Schrödinger equation and its wave-function, showing that these features are a partial aspect of the more general non-commutative structure. We discuss briefly the properties of this more general mathematical background from which the non-commutative symplectic algebra emerges.

  2. A process algebra model of QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulis, William

    2016-03-01

    The process algebra approach to quantum mechanics posits a finite, discrete, determinate ontology of primitive events which are generated by processes (in the sense of Whitehead). In this ontology, primitive events serve as elements of an emergent space-time and of emergent fundamental particles and fields. Each process generates a set of primitive elements, using only local information, causally propagated as a discrete wave, forming a causal space termed a causal tapestry. Each causal tapestry forms a discrete and finite sampling of an emergent causal manifold (space-time) M and emergent wave function. Interactions between processes are described by a process algebra which possesses 8 commutative operations (sums and products) together with a non-commutative concatenation operator (transitions). The process algebra possesses a representation via nondeterministic combinatorial games. The process algebra connects to quantum mechanics through the set valued process and configuration space covering maps, which associate each causal tapestry with sets of wave functions over M. Probabilities emerge from interactions between processes. The process algebra model has been shown to reproduce many features of the theory of non-relativistic scalar particles to a high degree of accuracy, without paradox or divergences. This paper extends the approach to a semi-classical form of quantum electrodynamics.

  3. Optimized Graph Search Using Multi-Level Graph Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, Rahul; Shukla, Anupam; Tiwari, Ritu

    Graphs find a variety of use in numerous domains especially because of their capability to model common problems. The social networking graphs that are used for social networking analysis, a feature given by various social networking sites are an example of this. Graphs can also be visualized in the search engines to carry search operations and provide results. Various searching algorithms have been developed for searching in graphs. In this paper we propose that the entire network graph be clustered. The larger graphs are clustered to make smaller graphs. These smaller graphs can again be clustered to further reduce the size of graph. The search is performed on the smallest graph to identify the general path, which may be further build up to actual nodes by working on the individual clusters involved. Since many searches are carried out on the same graph, clustering may be done once and the data may be used for multiple searches over the time. If the graph changes considerably, only then we may re-cluster the graph.

  4. Open-closed homotopy algebra in mathematical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kajiura, Hiroshige; Stasheff, Jim

    2006-02-15

    In this paper we discuss various aspects of open-closed homotopy algebras (OCHAs) presented in our previous paper, inspired by Zwiebach's open-closed string field theory, but that first paper concentrated on the mathematical aspects. Here we show how an OCHA is obtained by extracting the tree part of Zwiebach's quantum open-closed string field theory. We clarify the explicit relation of an OCHA with Kontsevich's deformation quantization and with the B-models of homological mirror symmetry. An explicit form of the minimal model for an OCHA is given as well as its relation to the perturbative expansion of open-closed string field theory. We show that our open-closed homotopy algebra gives us a general scheme for deformation of open string structures (A{sub {infinity}} algebras) by closed strings (L{sub {infinity}} algebras)

  5. Local Algebras of Differential Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, P. T.; Timourian, J. G.

    2002-05-01

    There is an increasing literature devoted to the study of boundary value problems using singularity theory. The resulting differential operators are typically Fredholm with index 0, defined on infinite-dimensional spaces, and they have often led to folds, cusps, and even higher-order Morin singularities. In this paper we develop some of the local algebras of germs of such differential Fredholm operators, extending the theory of the finite-dimensional case. We apply this work to nonlinear elliptic boundary value problems: in particular, we make further progress on a question proposed and initially studied by Ruf [1999, J. Differential Equations 151, 111-133]. We also make comments on several problems raised by others.

  6. Measuring Graph Comprehension, Critique, and Construction in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Kevin; Cabrera, Julio; Vitale, Jonathan M.; Madhok, Jacquie; Tinker, Robert; Linn, Marcia C.

    2016-08-01

    Interpreting and creating graphs plays a critical role in scientific practice. The K-12 Next Generation Science Standards call for students to use graphs for scientific modeling, reasoning, and communication. To measure progress on this dimension, we need valid and reliable measures of graph understanding in science. In this research, we designed items to measure graph comprehension, critique, and construction and developed scoring rubrics based on the knowledge integration (KI) framework. We administered the items to over 460 middle school students. We found that the items formed a coherent scale and had good reliability using both item response theory and classical test theory. The KI scoring rubric showed that most students had difficulty linking graphs features to science concepts, especially when asked to critique or construct graphs. In addition, students with limited access to computers as well as those who speak a language other than English at home have less integrated understanding than others. These findings point to the need to increase the integration of graphing into science instruction. The results suggest directions for further research leading to comprehensive assessments of graph understanding.

  7. Locally Compact Quantum Groups. A von Neumann Algebra Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Daele, Alfons

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we give an alternative approach to the theory of locally compact quantum groups, as developed by Kustermans and Vaes. We start with a von Neumann algebra and a comultiplication on this von Neumann algebra. We assume that there exist faithful left and right Haar weights. Then we develop the theory within this von Neumann algebra setting. In [Math. Scand. 92 (2003), 68-92] locally compact quantum groups are also studied in the von Neumann algebraic context. This approach is independent of the original C^*-algebraic approach in the sense that the earlier results are not used. However, this paper is not really independent because for many proofs, the reader is referred to the original paper where the C^*-version is developed. In this paper, we give a completely self-contained approach. Moreover, at various points, we do things differently. We have a different treatment of the antipode. It is similar to the original treatment in [Ann. Sci. & #201;cole Norm. Sup. (4) 33 (2000), 837-934]. But together with the fact that we work in the von Neumann algebra framework, it allows us to use an idea from [Rev. Roumaine Math. Pures Appl. 21 (1976), 1411-1449] to obtain the uniqueness of the Haar weights in an early stage. We take advantage of this fact when deriving the other main results in the theory. We also give a slightly different approach to duality. Finally, we collect, in a systematic way, several important formulas. In an appendix, we indicate very briefly how the C^*-approach and the von Neumann algebra approach eventually yield the same objects. The passage from the von Neumann algebra setting to the C^*-algebra setting is more or less standard. For the other direction, we use a new method. It is based on the observation that the Haar weights on the C^*-algebra extend to weights on the double dual with central support and that all these supports are the same. Of course, we get the von Neumann algebra by cutting down the double dual with this unique

  8. Subdominant pseudoultrametric on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Dovgoshei, A A; Petrov, E A

    2013-08-31

    Let (G,w) be a weighted graph. We find necessary and sufficient conditions under which the weight w:E(G)→R{sup +} can be extended to a pseudoultrametric on V(G), and establish a criterion for the uniqueness of such an extension. We demonstrate that (G,w) is a complete k-partite graph, for k≥2, if and only if for any weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric, among all such extensions one can find the least pseudoultrametric consistent with w. We give a structural characterization of graphs for which the subdominant pseudoultrametric is an ultrametric for any strictly positive weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  9. Graphing in Groups: Learning about Lines in a Collaborative Classroom Network Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Tobin; Wallace, Matthew; Lai, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a design experiment in which we explore new structures for classroom collaboration supported by a classroom network of handheld graphing calculators. We describe a design for small group investigations of linear functions and present findings from its implementation in three high school algebra classrooms. Our coding of the…

  10. On vertex algebra representations of the Schrödinger-Virasoro Lie algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterberger, Jérémie

    2009-12-01

    The Schrödinger-Virasoro Lie algebra sv is an extension of the Virasoro Lie algebra by a nilpotent Lie algebra formed with a bosonic current of weight 3/2 and a bosonic current of weight 1. It is also a natural infinite-dimensional extension of the Schrödinger Lie algebra, which — leaving aside the invariance under time-translation — has been proved to be a symmetry algebra for many statistical physics models undergoing a dynamics with dynamical exponent z=2. We define in this article general Schrödinger-Virasoro primary fields by analogy with conformal field theory, characterized by a 'spin' index and a (non-relativistic) mass, and construct vertex algebra representations of sv out of a charged symplectic boson and a free boson and its associated vertex operators. We also compute two- and three-point functions of still conjectural massive fields that are defined by an analytic continuation with respect to a formal parameter.

  11. Graphing Calculator Mini Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karnawat, Sunil R.

    1996-01-01

    The "Graphing Calculator Mini Course" project provided a mathematically-intensive technologically-based summer enrichment workshop for teachers of American Indian students on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Eleven such teachers participated in the six-day workshop in summer of 1996 and three Sunday workshops in the academic year. The project aimed to improve science and mathematics education on the reservation by showing teachers effective ways to use high-end graphing calculators as teaching and learning tools in science and mathematics courses at all levels. In particular, the workshop concentrated on applying TI-82's user-friendly features to understand the various mathematical and scientific concepts.

  12. Topological basis realization for BMW algebra and Heisenberg XXZ spin chain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Xue, Kang; Wang, Gangcheng; Liu, Ying; Sun, Chunfang

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we study three-dimensional (3D) reduced Birman-Murakami-Wenzl (BMW) algebra based on topological basis theory. Several examples of BMW algebra representations are reviewed. We also discuss a special solution of BMW algebra, which can be used to construct Heisenberg XXZ model. The theory of topological basis provides a useful method to solve quantum spin chain models. It is also shown that the ground state of XXZ spin chain is superposition state of topological basis.

  13. Robustness of random graphs based on graph spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Barahona, Mauricio; Tan, Yue-jin; Deng, Hong-zhong

    2012-12-01

    It has been recently proposed that the robustness of complex networks can be efficiently characterized through the natural connectivity, a spectral property of the graph which corresponds to the average Estrada index. The natural connectivity corresponds to an average eigenvalue calculated from the graph spectrum and can also be interpreted as the Helmholtz free energy of the network. In this article, we explore the use of this index to characterize the robustness of Erdős-Rényi (ER) random graphs, random regular graphs, and regular ring lattices. We show both analytically and numerically that the natural connectivity of ER random graphs increases linearly with the average degree. It is also shown that ER random graphs are more robust than the corresponding random regular graphs with the same number of vertices and edges. However, the relative robustness of ER random graphs and regular ring lattices depends on the average degree and graph size: there is a critical graph size above which regular ring lattices are more robust than random graphs. We use our analytical results to derive this critical graph size as a function of the average degree.

  14. Graph ensemble boosting for imbalanced noisy graph stream classification.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shirui; Wu, Jia; Zhu, Xingquan; Zhang, Chengqi

    2015-05-01

    Many applications involve stream data with structural dependency, graph representations, and continuously increasing volumes. For these applications, it is very common that their class distributions are imbalanced with minority (or positive) samples being only a small portion of the population, which imposes significant challenges for learning models to accurately identify minority samples. This problem is further complicated with the presence of noise, because they are similar to minority samples and any treatment for the class imbalance may falsely focus on the noise and result in deterioration of accuracy. In this paper, we propose a classification model to tackle imbalanced graph streams with noise. Our method, graph ensemble boosting, employs an ensemble-based framework to partition graph stream into chunks each containing a number of noisy graphs with imbalanced class distributions. For each individual chunk, we propose a boosting algorithm to combine discriminative subgraph pattern selection and model learning as a unified framework for graph classification. To tackle concept drifting in graph streams, an instance level weighting mechanism is used to dynamically adjust the instance weight, through which the boosting framework can emphasize on difficult graph samples. The classifiers built from different graph chunks form an ensemble for graph stream classification. Experiments on real-life imbalanced graph streams demonstrate clear benefits of our boosting design for handling imbalanced noisy graph stream.

  15. Algebraic description of external and internal attributes of fundamental fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogami, Ikuo S.

    2012-02-01

    To describe external and internal attributes of fundamental fermions, a theory of multi-spinor fields is developed on an algebra, a triplet algebra, which consists of all the triple-direct-products of Dirac γ-matrices. The triplet algebra is decomposed into the product of two subalgebras, an external algebra and an internal algebra, which are exclusively related with external and internal characteristic of the multi-spinor field named triplet fields. All elements of the external algebra which is isomorphic to the original Dirac algebra Aγ are invariant under the action of permutation group S3 which works to exchange the order of the Aγ elements in the triple-direct-product. The internal algebra is decomposed into the product of two 42 dimensional algebras, called the family and color algebras, which describe the family and color degrees of freedom. The family and color algebras have fine substructures with "trio plus solo" (3 + 1) conformations which are irreducible under the action of S3. The triplet field has trio plus solo family modes with ordinary tricolor quark and colorless solo lepton components. To incorporate the Weinberg-Salam mechanism, it is required to introduce two types of triplet fields, a left-handed doublet and right-handed singlets of electroweak iso-spin. It is possible to qualify the Yukawa interaction and to make a new interpretation of its coupling constants naturally in an intrinsic mechanism of the triplet field formalism. The ordinary Higgs mechanism leads to the Dirac mass matrices which can explain all data of quark sector within experimental accuracy.

  16. Graph for locked rotor current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Graph determines effect of stalled motor on a distribution system and eliminates hand calculation of amperage in emergencies. Graph is useful to any manufacturer, contractor, or maintenance department involved in electrical technology.

  17. GraphLib

    2013-02-19

    This library is used in several LLNL projects, including STAT (the Stack Trace Analysis Tool for scalable debugging) and some modules in P^nMPI (a tool MPI tool infrastructure). It can also be used standalone for creating and manipulationg graphs, but its API is primarily tuned to support these other projects

  18. Line Graph Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts Bannister, Vanessa R.; Jamar, Idorenyin; Mutegi, Jomo W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the learning progress of one fifth-grade student is examined with regard to the development of her graph interpretation skills as she participated in the Junior Science Institute (JSI), a two-week, science intensive summer camp in which participants engaged in microbiology research and application. By showcasing the student's…

  19. Straight Line Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Tom

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares one effective lesson idea on straight line graphs that he applied in his lower ability Y9 class. The author wanted something interesting for his class to do, something that was fun and engaging with direct feedback, and something that worked because someone else had tried it before. In a word, the author admits…

  20. Cookies and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Carol

    1975-01-01

    Teachers of an integrated elementary classroom used cookie-sharing time as a learning experience for students. Responsible for dividing varying amounts of cookies daily, the students learned to translate their experiences to graphs of differing sophistication and analyses. Further interpretation and application were done by individual students…

  1. Physics on Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Robert

    This is an extended version of the talk given at the Nato Advanced Research Workshop: New Challenges in Complex System Physics, May 20-24, 2013 in Samarkand (Uzbekistan). We report on results on three topics in joint work with V. Kostrykin (Mainz, Germany) and J. Potthoff (Mannheim, Germany): Propagation of waves on graphs,

  2. Graph-theoretical exorcism

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Given a graph G and an ordering phi of the vertices, V(G), we define a parsimonious proper coloring (PPC) of V(G) under phi to be a proper coloring of V(G) in the order phi, where a new color is introduced only when a vertex cannot be properly colored in its order with any of the colors already used.

  3. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  4. New Conic Graph Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Kenneth

    1974-01-01

    Two new types of graph paper are described; focus-focus conic paper and focus-directrix paper. Both types make it easier to draw families of conics. Suggestions for further work are given as is a method for establishing a connection with other ways of looking at the conic sections. (LS)

  5. Effective action of softly broken supersymmetric theories

    SciTech Connect

    Nibbelink, Stefan Groot; Nyawelo, Tino S.

    2007-02-15

    We study the renormalization of (softly) broken supersymmetric theories at the one loop level in detail. We perform this analysis in a superspace approach in which the supersymmetry breaking interactions are parametrized using spurion insertions. We comment on the uniqueness of this parametrization. We compute the one loop renormalization of such theories by calculating superspace vacuum graphs with multiple spurion insertions. To perform this computation efficiently we develop algebraic properties of spurion operators, that naturally arise because the spurions are often surrounded by superspace projection operators. Our results are general apart from the restrictions that higher super covariant derivative terms and some finite effects due to noncommutativity of superfield dependent mass matrices are ignored. One of the soft potentials induces renormalization of the Kaehler potential.

  6. Query optimization for graph analytics on linked data using SPARQL

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokyong; Lee, Sangkeun; Lim, Seung -Hwan; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju

    2015-07-01

    Triplestores that support query languages such as SPARQL are emerging as the preferred and scalable solution to represent data and meta-data as massive heterogeneous graphs using Semantic Web standards. With increasing adoption, the desire to conduct graph-theoretic mining and exploratory analysis has also increased. Addressing that desire, this paper presents a solution that is the marriage of Graph Theory and the Semantic Web. We present software that can analyze Linked Data using graph operations such as counting triangles, finding eccentricity, testing connectedness, and computing PageRank directly on triple stores via the SPARQL interface. We describe the process of optimizing performance of the SPARQL-based implementation of such popular graph algorithms by reducing the space-overhead, simplifying iterative complexity and removing redundant computations by understanding query plans. Our optimized approach shows significant performance gains on triplestores hosted on stand-alone workstations as well as hardware-optimized scalable supercomputers such as the Cray XMT.

  7. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  8. Quantum walks on quotient graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2007-06-15

    A discrete-time quantum walk on a graph {gamma} is the repeated application of a unitary evolution operator to a Hilbert space corresponding to the graph. If this unitary evolution operator has an associated group of symmetries, then for certain initial states the walk will be confined to a subspace of the original Hilbert space. Symmetries of the original graph, given by its automorphism group, can be inherited by the evolution operator. We show that a quantum walk confined to the subspace corresponding to this symmetry group can be seen as a different quantum walk on a smaller quotient graph. We give an explicit construction of the quotient graph for any subgroup H of the automorphism group and illustrate it with examples. The automorphisms of the quotient graph which are inherited from the original graph are the original automorphism group modulo the subgroup H used to construct it. The quotient graph is constructed by removing the symmetries of the subgroup H from the original graph. We then analyze the behavior of hitting times on quotient graphs. Hitting time is the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given initial vertex. It has been shown in earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 74, 042334 (2006)] that the hitting time for certain initial states of a quantum walks can be infinite, in contrast to classical random walks. We give a condition which determines whether the quotient graph has infinite hitting times given that they exist in the original graph. We apply this condition for the examples discussed and determine which quotient graphs have infinite hitting times. All known examples of quantum walks with hitting times which are short compared to classical random walks correspond to systems with quotient graphs much smaller than the original graph; we conjecture that the existence of a small quotient graph with finite hitting times is necessary for a walk to exhibit a quantum speedup.

  9. Mathematics for High School, First Course in Algebra, Part 3. Preliminary Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    This is the third part of a three-part SMSG algebra text for high school students. Chapter titles include: Truth Sets of Open Sentences; Graphs of Open Sentences in Two Variables; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic Polynomials; and Functions. (MK)

  10. Exploring Interactive and Dynamic Simulations Using a Computer Algebra System in an Advanced Placement Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the use of Mathematica, a computer algebra system (CAS), in a high school chemistry course. Mathematica was used to generate a graph, where a slider controls the value of parameter(s) in the equation; thus, students can visualize the effect of the parameter(s) on the behavior of the system. Also, Mathematica can show the…

  11. The Nakayama Automorphism of the Almost Calabi-Yau Algebras Associated to SU(3) Modular Invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David E.; Pugh, Mathew

    2012-05-01

    We determine the Nakayama automorphism of the almost Calabi-Yau algebra A associated to the braided subfactors or nimrep graphs associated to each SU(3) modular invariant. We use this to determine a resolution of A as an A- A bimodule, which will yield a projective resolution of A.

  12. The Effect of Teaching and Learning with Texas Instruments Handheld Devices on Student Achievement in Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Tournaki, Nelly

    2011-01-01

    This study compares the respective achievement of students in an integrated algebra course taught with two different types of handhelds over a period of one year. The experimental group was taught with TI-Nspire[TM] handhelds and was compared to the control group taught with TI-84 Plus graphing calculators. The teachers of each group received…

  13. A Clustering Graph Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Winlaw, Manda; De Sterck, Hans; Sanders, Geoffrey

    2015-10-26

    In very simple terms a network can be de ned as a collection of points joined together by lines. Thus, networks can be used to represent connections between entities in a wide variety of elds including engi- neering, science, medicine, and sociology. Many large real-world networks share a surprising number of properties, leading to a strong interest in model development research and techniques for building synthetic networks have been developed, that capture these similarities and replicate real-world graphs. Modeling these real-world networks serves two purposes. First, building models that mimic the patterns and prop- erties of real networks helps to understand the implications of these patterns and helps determine which patterns are important. If we develop a generative process to synthesize real networks we can also examine which growth processes are plausible and which are not. Secondly, high-quality, large-scale network data is often not available, because of economic, legal, technological, or other obstacles [7]. Thus, there are many instances where the systems of interest cannot be represented by a single exemplar network. As one example, consider the eld of cybersecurity, where systems require testing across diverse threat scenarios and validation across diverse network structures. In these cases, where there is no single exemplar network, the systems must instead be modeled as a collection of networks in which the variation among them may be just as important as their common features. By developing processes to build synthetic models, so-called graph generators, we can build synthetic networks that capture both the essential features of a system and realistic variability. Then we can use such synthetic graphs to perform tasks such as simulations, analysis, and decision making. We can also use synthetic graphs to performance test graph analysis algorithms, including clustering algorithms and anomaly detection algorithms.

  14. Abstract Algebra for Algebra Teaching: Influencing School Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the potential for aspects of abstract algebra to be influential for the teaching of school algebra (and early algebra). Using national standards for analysis, four primary areas common in school mathematics--and their progression across elementary, middle, and secondary mathematics--where teaching may be transformed by…

  15. Mining and Indexing Graph Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Dayu

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to model structures and relationships of objects in various scientific and commercial fields. Chemical molecules, proteins, malware system-call dependencies and three-dimensional mechanical parts are all modeled as graphs. In this dissertation, we propose to mine and index those graph data to enable fast and scalable search.…

  16. Recursive Feature Extraction in Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-14

    ReFeX extracts recursive topological features from graph data. The input is a graph as a csv file and the output is a csv file containing feature values for each node in the graph. The features are based on topological counts in the neighborhoods of each nodes, as well as recursive summaries of neighbors' features.

  17. Editing graphs for maximum effect

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, P.W.; Rhiner, R.W.

    1991-01-08

    The paper contains over eighty rules for editing graphs, arranged under nine major headings in a logical sequence for editing all the graphs in a manuscript. It is excerpted from a monograph used at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to train beginning technical editors in editing graphs; a corresponding Hypercard stack is also used in this training. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Topic Model for Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Junyu; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Guangquan; Luo, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-01

    Graph mining has been a popular research area because of its numerous application scenarios. Many unstructured and structured data can be represented as graphs, such as, documents, chemical molecular structures, and images. However, an issue in relation to current research on graphs is that they cannot adequately discover the topics hidden in graph-structured data which can be beneficial for both the unsupervised learning and supervised learning of the graphs. Although topic models have proved to be very successful in discovering latent topics, the standard topic models cannot be directly applied to graph-structured data due to the "bag-of-word" assumption. In this paper, an innovative graph topic model (GTM) is proposed to address this issue, which uses Bernoulli distributions to model the edges between nodes in a graph. It can, therefore, make the edges in a graph contribute to latent topic discovery and further improve the accuracy of the supervised and unsupervised learning of graphs. The experimental results on two different types of graph datasets show that the proposed GTM outperforms the latent Dirichlet allocation on classification by using the unveiled topics of these two models to represent graphs.

  19. Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, M; Falgout, R; MacLachlan, S; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J

    2004-04-09

    Our ability to simulate physical processes numerically is constrained by our ability to solve the resulting linear systems, prompting substantial research into the development of multiscale iterative methods capable of solving these linear systems with an optimal amount of effort. Overcoming the limitations of geometric multigrid methods to simple geometries and differential equations, algebraic multigrid methods construct the multigrid hierarchy based only on the given matrix. While this allows for efficient black-box solution of the linear systems associated with discretizations of many elliptic differential equations, it also results in a lack of robustness due to assumptions made on the near-null spaces of these matrices. This paper introduces an extension to algebraic multigrid methods that removes the need to make such assumptions by utilizing an adaptive process. The principles which guide the adaptivity are highlighted, as well as their application to algebraic multigrid solution of certain symmetric positive-definite linear systems.

  20. Computer Program For Linear Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.; Hanson, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of routines provided for basic vector operations. Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is collection from FORTRAN-callable routines for employing standard techniques to perform basic operations of numerical linear algebra.