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Sample records for algebraic multigrid solver

  1. Scalable Parallel Algebraic Multigrid Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, R; Lu, S; Tong, C; Vassilevski, P

    2005-03-23

    The authors propose a parallel algebraic multilevel algorithm (AMG), which has the novel feature that the subproblem residing in each processor is defined over the entire partition domain, although the vast majority of unknowns for each subproblem are associated with the partition owned by the corresponding processor. This feature ensures that a global coarse description of the problem is contained within each of the subproblems. The advantages of this approach are that interprocessor communication is minimized in the solution process while an optimal order of convergence rate is preserved; and the speed of local subproblem solvers can be maximized using the best existing sequential algebraic solvers.

  2. Scaling Algebraic Multigrid Solvers: On the Road to Exascale

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A H; Falgout, R D; Gamblin, T; Kolev, T; Schulz, M; Yang, U M

    2010-12-12

    Algebraic Multigrid (AMG) solvers are an essential component of many large-scale scientific simulation codes. Their continued numerical scalability and efficient implementation is critical for preparing these codes for exascale. Our experiences on modern multi-core machines show that significant challenges must be addressed for AMG to perform well on such machines. We discuss our experiences and describe the techniques we have used to overcome scalability challenges for AMG on hybrid architectures in preparation for exascale.

  3. Parallel Multigrid Equation Solver

    2001-09-07

    Prometheus is a fully parallel multigrid equation solver for matrices that arise in unstructured grid finite element applications. It includes a geometric and an algebraic multigrid method and has solved problems of up to 76 mullion degrees of feedom, problems in linear elasticity on the ASCI blue pacific and ASCI red machines.

  4. Algebraic Multigrid Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    2013-05-06

    AMG2013 is a parallel algebraic multigrid solver for linear systems arising from problems on unstructured grids. It has been derived directly from the Boomer AMG solver in the hypre library, a large linear solvers library that is being developed in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) at LLNL. The driver provided in the benchmark can build various test problems. The default problem is a Laplace type problem on an unstructured domain with various jumps and an anisotropy in one part.

  5. On the Performance of an Algebraic Multigrid Solver on Multicore Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A; Schulz, M; Yang, U M

    2009-11-24

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) solvers have proven to be extremely efficient on distributed-memory architectures. However, when executed on modern multicore cluster architectures, we face new challenges that can significantly harm AMG's performance. We discuss our experiences on such an architecture and present a set of techniques that help users to overcome the associated problems, including thread and process pinning and correct memory associations. We have implemented most of the techniques in a MultiCore SUPport library (MCSup), which helps to map OpenMP applications to multicore machines. We present results using both an MPI-only and a hybrid MPI/OpenMP model.

  6. On the Performance of an Algebraic MultigridSolver on Multicore Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A H; Schulz, M; Yang, U M

    2010-04-29

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) solvers have proven to be extremely efficient on distributed-memory architectures. However, when executed on modern multicore cluster architectures, we face new challenges that can significantly harm AMG's performance. We discuss our experiences on such an architecture and present a set of techniques that help users to overcome the associated problems, including thread and process pinning and correct memory associations. We have implemented most of the techniques in a MultiCore SUPport library (MCSup), which helps to map OpenMP applications to multicore machines. We present results using both an MPI-only and a hybrid MPI/OpenMP model.

  7. Algebraic Multigrid Benchmark

    2013-05-06

    AMG2013 is a parallel algebraic multigrid solver for linear systems arising from problems on unstructured grids. It has been derived directly from the Boomer AMG solver in the hypre library, a large linear solvers library that is being developed in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) at LLNL. The driver provided in the benchmark can build various test problems. The default problem is a Laplace type problem on an unstructured domain with various jumpsmore » and an anisotropy in one part.« less

  8. Algebraic multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruge, J. W.; Stueben, K.

    1987-01-01

    The state of the art in algebraic multgrid (AMG) methods is discussed. The interaction between the relaxation process and the coarse grid correction necessary for proper behavior of the solution probes is discussed in detail. Sufficient conditions on relaxation and interpolation for the convergence of the V-cycle are given. The relaxation used in AMG, what smoothing means in an algebraic setting, and how it relates to the existing theory are considered. Some properties of the coarse grid operator are discussed, and results on the convergence of two-level and multilevel convergence are given. Details of an algorithm particularly studied for problems obtained by discretizing a single elliptic, second order partial differential equation are given. Results of experiments with such problems using both finite difference and finite element discretizations are presented.

  9. Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, M; Falgout, R; MacLachlan, S; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J

    2004-04-09

    Our ability to simulate physical processes numerically is constrained by our ability to solve the resulting linear systems, prompting substantial research into the development of multiscale iterative methods capable of solving these linear systems with an optimal amount of effort. Overcoming the limitations of geometric multigrid methods to simple geometries and differential equations, algebraic multigrid methods construct the multigrid hierarchy based only on the given matrix. While this allows for efficient black-box solution of the linear systems associated with discretizations of many elliptic differential equations, it also results in a lack of robustness due to assumptions made on the near-null spaces of these matrices. This paper introduces an extension to algebraic multigrid methods that removes the need to make such assumptions by utilizing an adaptive process. The principles which guide the adaptivity are highlighted, as well as their application to algebraic multigrid solution of certain symmetric positive-definite linear systems.

  10. Comparison of an algebraic multigrid algorithm to two iterative solvers used for modeling ground water flow and transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detwiler, R.L.; Mehl, S.; Rajaram, H.; Cheung, W.W.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical solution of large-scale ground water flow and transport problems is often constrained by the convergence behavior of the iterative solvers used to solve the resulting systems of equations. We demonstrate the ability of an algebraic multigrid algorithm (AMG) to efficiently solve the large, sparse systems of equations that result from computational models of ground water flow and transport in large and complex domains. Unlike geometric multigrid methods, this algorithm is applicable to problems in complex flow geometries, such as those encountered in pore-scale modeling of two-phase flow and transport. We integrated AMG into MODFLOW 2000 to compare two- and three-dimensional flow simulations using AMG to simulations using PCG2, a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver that uses the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioner and is included with MODFLOW 2000. CPU times required for convergence with AMG were up to 140 times faster than those for PCG2. The cost of this increased speed was up to a nine-fold increase in required random access memory (RAM) for the three-dimensional problems and up to a four-fold increase in required RAM for the two-dimensional problems. We also compared two-dimensional numerical simulations of steady-state transport using AMG and the generalized minimum residual method with an incomplete LU-decomposition preconditioner. For these transport simulations, AMG yielded increased speeds of up to 17 times with only a 20% increase in required RAM. The ability of AMG to solve flow and transport problems in large, complex flow systems and its ready availability make it an ideal solver for use in both field-scale and pore-scale modeling.

  11. Algebraic multigrid preconditioning within parallel finite-element solvers for 3-D electromagnetic modelling problems in geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldan, Jelena; Puzyrev, Vladimir; de la Puente, Josep; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Cela, José María

    2014-06-01

    We present an elaborate preconditioning scheme for Krylov subspace methods which has been developed to improve the performance and reduce the execution time of parallel node-based finite-element (FE) solvers for 3-D electromagnetic (EM) numerical modelling in exploration geophysics. This new preconditioner is based on algebraic multigrid (AMG) that uses different basic relaxation methods, such as Jacobi, symmetric successive over-relaxation (SSOR) and Gauss-Seidel, as smoothers and the wave front algorithm to create groups, which are used for a coarse-level generation. We have implemented and tested this new preconditioner within our parallel nodal FE solver for 3-D forward problems in EM induction geophysics. We have performed series of experiments for several models with different conductivity structures and characteristics to test the performance of our AMG preconditioning technique when combined with biconjugate gradient stabilized method. The results have shown that, the more challenging the problem is in terms of conductivity contrasts, ratio between the sizes of grid elements and/or frequency, the more benefit is obtained by using this preconditioner. Compared to other preconditioning schemes, such as diagonal, SSOR and truncated approximate inverse, the AMG preconditioner greatly improves the convergence of the iterative solver for all tested models. Also, when it comes to cases in which other preconditioners succeed to converge to a desired precision, AMG is able to considerably reduce the total execution time of the forward-problem code-up to an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the tests have confirmed that our AMG scheme ensures grid-independent rate of convergence, as well as improvement in convergence regardless of how big local mesh refinements are. In addition, AMG is designed to be a black-box preconditioner, which makes it easy to use and combine with different iterative methods. Finally, it has proved to be very practical and efficient in the

  12. Full Multigrid Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Thomas, James L.; Biedron, Robert T.; Diskin, Boris

    2005-01-01

    FMG3D (full multigrid 3 dimensions) is a pilot computer program that solves equations of fluid flow using a finite difference representation on a structured grid. Infrastructure exists for three dimensions but the current implementation treats only two dimensions. Written in Fortran 90, FMG3D takes advantage of the recursive subroutine feature, dynamic memory allocation, and structured-programming constructs of that language. FMG3D supports multi-block grids with three types of block-to-block interfaces: periodic, C-zero, and C-infinity. For all three types, grid points must match at interfaces. For periodic and C-infinity types, derivatives of grid metrics must be continuous at interfaces. The available equation sets are as follows: scalar elliptic equations, scalar convection equations, and the pressure-Poisson formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible fluid. All the equation sets are implemented with nonzero forcing functions to enable the use of user-specified solutions to assist in verification and validation. The equations are solved with a full multigrid scheme using a full approximation scheme to converge the solution on each succeeding grid level. Restriction to the next coarser mesh uses direct injection for variables and full weighting for residual quantities; prolongation of the coarse grid correction from the coarse mesh to the fine mesh uses bilinear interpolation; and prolongation of the coarse grid solution uses bicubic interpolation.

  13. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which are not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  14. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which is not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  15. Analysis Tools for CFD Multigrid Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Analysis tools are needed to guide the development and evaluate the performance of multigrid solvers for the fluid flow equations. Classical analysis tools, such as local mode analysis, often fail to accurately predict performance. Two-grid analysis tools, herein referred to as Idealized Coarse Grid and Idealized Relaxation iterations, have been developed and evaluated within a pilot multigrid solver. These new tools are applicable to general systems of equations and/or discretizations and point to problem areas within an existing multigrid solver. Idealized Relaxation and Idealized Coarse Grid are applied in developing textbook-efficient multigrid solvers for incompressible stagnation flow problems.

  16. Parallel Algebraic Multigrid Methods - High Performance Preconditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, U M

    2004-11-11

    The development of high performance, massively parallel computers and the increasing demands of computationally challenging applications have necessitated the development of scalable solvers and preconditioners. One of the most effective ways to achieve scalability is the use of multigrid or multilevel techniques. Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a very efficient algorithm for solving large problems on unstructured grids. While much of it can be parallelized in a straightforward way, some components of the classical algorithm, particularly the coarsening process and some of the most efficient smoothers, are highly sequential, and require new parallel approaches. This chapter presents the basic principles of AMG and gives an overview of various parallel implementations of AMG, including descriptions of parallel coarsening schemes and smoothers, some numerical results as well as references to existing software packages.

  17. Reducing Communication in Algebraic Multigrid Using Additive Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Yang, Ulrike Meier

    2014-02-12

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) has proven to be an effective scalable solver on many high performance computers. However, its increasing communication complexity on coarser levels has shown to seriously impact its performance on computers with high communication cost. Moreover, additive AMG variants provide not only increased parallelism as well as decreased numbers of messages per cycle but also generally exhibit slower convergence. Here we present various new additive variants with convergence rates that are significantly improved compared to the classical additive algebraic multigrid method and investigate their potential for decreased communication, and improved communication-computation overlap, features that are essential for good performance on future exascale architectures.

  18. A multigrid solver for the semiconductor equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Bernhard

    1993-01-01

    We present a multigrid solver for the exponential fitting method. The solver is applied to the current continuity equations of semiconductor device simulation in two dimensions. The exponential fitting method is based on a mixed finite element discretization using the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas triangular element. This discretization method yields a good approximation of front layers and guarantees current conservation. The corresponding stiffness matrix is an M-matrix. 'Standard' multigrid solvers, however, cannot be applied to the resulting system, as this is dominated by an unsymmetric part, which is due to the presence of strong convection in part of the domain. To overcome this difficulty, we explore the connection between Raviart-Thomas mixed methods and the nonconforming Crouzeix-Raviart finite element discretization. In this way we can construct nonstandard prolongation and restriction operators using easily computable weighted L(exp 2)-projections based on suitable quadrature rules and the upwind effects of the discretization. The resulting multigrid algorithm shows very good results, even for real-world problems and for locally refined grids.

  19. Challenges of Algebraic Multigrid across Multicore Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A H; Gamblin, T; Schulz, M; Yang, U M

    2010-04-12

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a popular solver for large-scale scientific computing and an essential component of many simulation codes. AMG has shown to be extremely efficient on distributed-memory architectures. However, when executed on modern multicore architectures, we face new challenges that can significantly deteriorate AMG's performance. We examine its performance and scalability on three disparate multicore architectures: a cluster with four AMD Opteron Quad-core processors per node (Hera), a Cray XT5 with two AMD Opteron Hex-core processors per node (Jaguar), and an IBM BlueGene/P system with a single Quad-core processor (Intrepid). We discuss our experiences on these platforms and present results using both an MPI-only and a hybrid MPI/OpenMP model. We also discuss a set of techniques that helped to overcome the associated problems, including thread and process pinning and correct memory associations.

  20. Solving Upwind-Biased Discretizations. 2; Multigrid Solver Using Semicoarsening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies a novel multigrid approach to the solution for a second order upwind biased discretization of the convection equation in two dimensions. This approach is based on semi-coarsening and well balanced explicit correction terms added to coarse-grid operators to maintain on coarse-grid the same cross-characteristic interaction as on the target (fine) grid. Colored relaxation schemes are used on all the levels allowing a very efficient parallel implementation. The results of the numerical tests can be summarized as follows: 1) The residual asymptotic convergence rate of the proposed V(0, 2) multigrid cycle is about 3 per cycle. This convergence rate far surpasses the theoretical limit (4/3) predicted for standard multigrid algorithms using full coarsening. The reported efficiency does not deteriorate with increasing the cycle, depth (number of levels) and/or refining the target-grid mesh spacing. 2) The full multi-grid algorithm (FMG) with two V(0, 2) cycles on the target grid and just one V(0, 2) cycle on all the coarse grids always provides an approximate solution with the algebraic error less than the discretization error. Estimates of the total work in the FMG algorithm are ranged between 18 and 30 minimal work units (depending on the target (discretizatioin). Thus, the overall efficiency of the FMG solver closely approaches (if does not achieve) the goal of the textbook multigrid efficiency. 3) A novel approach to deriving a discrete solution approximating the true continuous solution with a relative accuracy given in advance is developed. An adaptive multigrid algorithm (AMA) using comparison of the solutions on two successive target grids to estimate the accuracy of the current target-grid solution is defined. A desired relative accuracy is accepted as an input parameter. The final target grid on which this accuracy can be achieved is chosen automatically in the solution process. the actual relative accuracy of the discrete solution approximation

  1. Reducing Communication in Algebraic Multigrid Using Additive Variants

    DOE PAGES

    Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Yang, Ulrike Meier

    2014-02-12

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) has proven to be an effective scalable solver on many high performance computers. However, its increasing communication complexity on coarser levels has shown to seriously impact its performance on computers with high communication cost. Moreover, additive AMG variants provide not only increased parallelism as well as decreased numbers of messages per cycle but also generally exhibit slower convergence. Here we present various new additive variants with convergence rates that are significantly improved compared to the classical additive algebraic multigrid method and investigate their potential for decreased communication, and improved communication-computation overlap, features that are essential for goodmore » performance on future exascale architectures.« less

  2. Parallel Algebraic Multigrids for Structural mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, M; Tong, C; Becker, R

    2004-05-11

    This paper presents the results of a comparison of three parallel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioners for structural mechanics applications. In particular, they are interested in investigating both the scalability and robustness of the preconditioners. Numerical results are given for a range of structural mechanics problems with various degrees of difficulty.

  3. An evaluation of parallel multigrid as a solver and a preconditioner for singular perturbed problems

    SciTech Connect

    Oosterlee, C.W.; Washio, T.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we try to achieve h-independent convergence with preconditioned GMRES and BiCGSTAB for 2D singular perturbed equations. Three recently developed multigrid methods are adopted as a preconditioner. They are also used as solution methods in order to compare the performance of the methods as solvers and as preconditioners. Two of the multigrid methods differ only in the transfer operators. One uses standard matrix- dependent prolongation operators from. The second uses {open_quotes}upwind{close_quotes} prolongation operators, developed. Both employ the Galerkin coarse grid approximation and an alternating zebra line Gauss-Seidel smoother. The third method is based on the block LU decomposition of a matrix and on an approximate Schur complement. This multigrid variant is presented in. All three multigrid algorithms are algebraic methods.

  4. Agglomeration Multigrid for an Unstructured-Grid Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal; Pandya, Mohagna J.

    2004-01-01

    An agglomeration multigrid scheme has been implemented into the sequential version of the NASA code USM3Dns, tetrahedral cell-centered finite volume Euler/Navier-Stokes flow solver. Efficiency and robustness of the multigrid-enhanced flow solver have been assessed for three configurations assuming an inviscid flow and one configuration assuming a viscous fully turbulent flow. The inviscid studies include a transonic flow over the ONERA M6 wing and a generic business jet with flow-through nacelles and a low subsonic flow over a high-lift trapezoidal wing. The viscous case includes a fully turbulent flow over the RAE 2822 rectangular wing. The multigrid solutions converged with 12%-33% of the Central Processing Unit (CPU) time required by the solutions obtained without multigrid. For all of the inviscid cases, multigrid in conjunction with an explicit time-stepping scheme performed the best with regard to the run time memory and CPU time requirements. However, for the viscous case multigrid had to be used with an implicit backward Euler time-stepping scheme that increased the run time memory requirement by 22% as compared to the run made without multigrid.

  5. Multigrid solvers and multigrid preconditioners for the solution of variational data assimilation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debreu, Laurent; Neveu, Emilie; Simon, Ehouarn; Le Dimet, Francois Xavier; Vidard, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    In order to lower the computational cost of the variational data assimilation process, we investigate the use of multigrid methods to solve the associated optimal control system. On a linear advection equation, we study the impact of the regularization term on the optimal control and the impact of discretization errors on the efficiency of the coarse grid correction step. We show that even if the optimal control problem leads to the solution of an elliptic system, numerical errors introduced by the discretization can alter the success of the multigrid methods. The view of the multigrid iteration as a preconditioner for a Krylov optimization method leads to a more robust algorithm. A scale dependent weighting of the multigrid preconditioner and the usual background error covariance matrix based preconditioner is proposed and brings significant improvements. [1] Laurent Debreu, Emilie Neveu, Ehouarn Simon, François-Xavier Le Dimet and Arthur Vidard, 2014: Multigrid solvers and multigrid preconditioners for the solution of variational data assimilation problems, submitted to QJRMS, http://hal.inria.fr/hal-00874643 [2] Emilie Neveu, Laurent Debreu and François-Xavier Le Dimet, 2011: Multigrid methods and data assimilation - Convergence study and first experiments on non-linear equations, ARIMA, 14, 63-80, http://intranet.inria.fr/international/arima/014/014005.html

  6. Compatible Relaxation and Coarsening in Algebraic Multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Brannick, J J; Falgout, R D

    2009-09-22

    We introduce a coarsening algorithm for algebraic multigrid (AMG) based on the concept of compatible relaxation (CR). The algorithm is significantly different from standard methods, most notably because it does not rely on any notion of strength of connection. We study its behavior on a number of model problems, and evaluate the performance of an AMG algorithm that incorporates the coarsening approach. Lastly, we introduce a variant of CR that provides a sharper metric of coarse-grid quality and demonstrate its potential with two simple examples.

  7. Two-Level Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid for a Sequence of Problems with Slowly Varying Random Coefficients [Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid for Sequence of Problems with Slowly Varying Random Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchev, D.; Ketelsen, C.; Vassilevski, P. S.

    2013-11-07

    Our paper proposes an adaptive strategy for reusing a previously constructed coarse space by algebraic multigrid to construct a two-level solver for a problem with nearby characteristics. Furthermore, a main target application is the solution of the linear problems that appear throughout a sequence of Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of subsurface flow with uncertain permeability field. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method with extensive set of numerical experiments.

  8. Layout optimization with algebraic multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regler, Hans; Ruede, Ulrich

    1993-01-01

    Finding the optimal position for the individual cells (also called functional modules) on the chip surface is an important and difficult step in the design of integrated circuits. This paper deals with the problem of relative placement, that is the minimization of a quadratic functional with a large, sparse, positive definite system matrix. The basic optimization problem must be augmented by constraints to inhibit solutions where cells overlap. Besides classical iterative methods, based on conjugate gradients (CG), we show that algebraic multigrid methods (AMG) provide an interesting alternative. For moderately sized examples with about 10000 cells, AMG is already competitive with CG and is expected to be superior for larger problems. Besides the classical 'multiplicative' AMG algorithm where the levels are visited sequentially, we propose an 'additive' variant of AMG where levels may be treated in parallel and that is suitable as a preconditioner in the CG algorithm.

  9. Non-Galerkin Coarse Grids for Algebraic Multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout, Robert D.; Schroder, Jacob B.

    2014-06-26

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a popular and effective solver for systems of linear equations that arise from discretized partial differential equations. And while AMG has been effectively implemented on large scale parallel machines, challenges remain, especially when moving to exascale. Particularly, stencil sizes (the number of nonzeros in a row) tend to increase further down in the coarse grid hierarchy, and this growth leads to more communication. Therefore, as problem size increases and the number of levels in the hierarchy grows, the overall efficiency of the parallel AMG method decreases, sometimes dramatically. This growth in stencil size is due to the standard Galerkin coarse grid operator, $P^T A P$, where $P$ is the prolongation (i.e., interpolation) operator. For example, the coarse grid stencil size for a simple three-dimensional (3D) seven-point finite differencing approximation to diffusion can increase into the thousands on present day machines, causing an associated increase in communication costs. We therefore consider algebraically truncating coarse grid stencils to obtain a non-Galerkin coarse grid. First, the sparsity pattern of the non-Galerkin coarse grid is determined by employing a heuristic minimal “safe” pattern together with strength-of-connection ideas. Second, the nonzero entries are determined by collapsing the stencils in the Galerkin operator using traditional AMG techniques. The result is a reduction in coarse grid stencil size, overall operator complexity, and parallel AMG solve phase times.

  10. LDRD Final Report-New Directions for Algebraic Multigrid: Solutions for Large Scale Multiphysics Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, V E

    2003-02-06

    The purpose of this research project was to investigate, design, and implement new algebraic multigrid (AMG) algorithms to enable the effective use of AMG in large-scale multiphysics simulation codes. These problems are extremely large; storage requirements and excessive run-time make direct solvers infeasible. The problems are highly ill-conditioned, so that existing iterative solvers either fail or converge very slowly. While existing AMG algorithms have been shown to be robust and stable for a large class of problems, there are certain problems of great interest to the Laboratory for which no effective algorithm existed prior to this research.

  11. Algebraic multigrid domain and range decomposition (AMG-DD / AMG-RD)*

    DOE PAGES

    Bank, R.; Falgout, R. D.; Jones, T.; Manteuffel, T. A.; McCormick, S. F.; Ruge, J. W.

    2015-10-29

    In modern large-scale supercomputing applications, algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a leading choice for solving matrix equations. However, the high cost of communication relative to that of computation is a concern for the scalability of traditional implementations of AMG on emerging architectures. This paper introduces two new algebraic multilevel algorithms, algebraic multigrid domain decomposition (AMG-DD) and algebraic multigrid range decomposition (AMG-RD), that replace traditional AMG V-cycles with a fully overlapping domain decomposition approach. While the methods introduced here are similar in spirit to the geometric methods developed by Brandt and Diskin [Multigrid solvers on decomposed domains, in Domain Decomposition Methods inmore » Science and Engineering, Contemp. Math. 157, AMS, Providence, RI, 1994, pp. 135--155], Mitchell [Electron. Trans. Numer. Anal., 6 (1997), pp. 224--233], and Bank and Holst [SIAM J. Sci. Comput., 22 (2000), pp. 1411--1443], they differ primarily in that they are purely algebraic: AMG-RD and AMG-DD trade communication for computation by forming global composite “grids” based only on the matrix, not the geometry. (As is the usual AMG convention, “grids” here should be taken only in the algebraic sense, regardless of whether or not it corresponds to any geometry.) Another important distinguishing feature of AMG-RD and AMG-DD is their novel residual communication process that enables effective parallel computation on composite grids, avoiding the all-to-all communication costs of the geometric methods. The main purpose of this paper is to study the potential of these two algebraic methods as possible alternatives to existing AMG approaches for future parallel machines. As a result, this paper develops some theoretical properties of these methods and reports on serial numerical tests of their convergence properties over a spectrum of problem parameters.« less

  12. Algebraic multigrid domain and range decomposition (AMG-DD / AMG-RD)*

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, R.; Falgout, R. D.; Jones, T.; Manteuffel, T. A.; McCormick, S. F.; Ruge, J. W.

    2015-10-29

    In modern large-scale supercomputing applications, algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a leading choice for solving matrix equations. However, the high cost of communication relative to that of computation is a concern for the scalability of traditional implementations of AMG on emerging architectures. This paper introduces two new algebraic multilevel algorithms, algebraic multigrid domain decomposition (AMG-DD) and algebraic multigrid range decomposition (AMG-RD), that replace traditional AMG V-cycles with a fully overlapping domain decomposition approach. While the methods introduced here are similar in spirit to the geometric methods developed by Brandt and Diskin [Multigrid solvers on decomposed domains, in Domain Decomposition Methods in Science and Engineering, Contemp. Math. 157, AMS, Providence, RI, 1994, pp. 135--155], Mitchell [Electron. Trans. Numer. Anal., 6 (1997), pp. 224--233], and Bank and Holst [SIAM J. Sci. Comput., 22 (2000), pp. 1411--1443], they differ primarily in that they are purely algebraic: AMG-RD and AMG-DD trade communication for computation by forming global composite “grids” based only on the matrix, not the geometry. (As is the usual AMG convention, “grids” here should be taken only in the algebraic sense, regardless of whether or not it corresponds to any geometry.) Another important distinguishing feature of AMG-RD and AMG-DD is their novel residual communication process that enables effective parallel computation on composite grids, avoiding the all-to-all communication costs of the geometric methods. The main purpose of this paper is to study the potential of these two algebraic methods as possible alternatives to existing AMG approaches for future parallel machines. As a result, this paper develops some theoretical properties of these methods and reports on serial numerical tests of their convergence properties over a spectrum of problem parameters.

  13. Transonic Drag Prediction Using an Unstructured Multigrid Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Levy, David W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results obtained with the NSU-3D unstructured multigrid solver for the AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop held in Anaheim, CA, June 2001. The test case for the workshop consists of a wing-body configuration at transonic flow conditions. Flow analyses for a complete test matrix of lift coefficient values and Mach numbers at a constant Reynolds number are performed, thus producing a set of drag polars and drag rise curves which are compared with experimental data. Results were obtained independently by both authors using an identical baseline grid and different refined grids. Most cases were run in parallel on commodity cluster-type machines while the largest cases were run on an SGI Origin machine using 128 processors. The objective of this paper is to study the accuracy of the subject unstructured grid solver for predicting drag in the transonic cruise regime, to assess the efficiency of the method in terms of convergence, cpu time, and memory, and to determine the effects of grid resolution on this predictive ability and its computational efficiency. A good predictive ability is demonstrated over a wide range of conditions, although accuracy was found to degrade for cases at higher Mach numbers and lift values where increasing amounts of flow separation occur. The ability to rapidly compute large numbers of cases at varying flow conditions using an unstructured solver on inexpensive clusters of commodity computers is also demonstrated.

  14. Efficient Implementation of Multigrid Solvers on Message-Passing Parrallel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, John

    1994-01-01

    We discuss our implementation strategies for finite difference multigrid partial differential equation (PDE) solvers on message-passing systems. Our target parallel architecture is Intel parallel computers: the Delta and Paragon system.

  15. Coarse-grid selection for parallel algebraic multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, A. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The need to solve linear systems arising from problems posed on extremely large, unstructured grids has sparked great interest in parallelizing algebraic multigrid (AMG) To date, however, no parallel AMG algorithms exist We introduce a parallel algorithm for the selection of coarse-grid points, a crucial component of AMG, based on modifications of certain paallel independent set algorithms and the application of heuristics designed to insure the quality of the coarse grids A prototype serial version of the algorithm is implemented, and tests are conducted to determine its effect on multigrid convergence, and AMG complexity

  16. Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-11

    ELAG is a serial C++ library for numerical upscaling of finite element discretizations. It provides optimal complexity algorithms to build multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for solving a wide class of partial differential equation (elliptic, hyperbolic, saddle point problems) on general unstructured mesh. Additionally, a novel multilevel solver for saddle point problems with divergence constraint is implemented.

  17. A multigrid solver for semi-implicit global shallow-water models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barros, Saulo R. M.; Dee, Dick P.; Dickstein, Flavio

    1990-01-01

    A multigrid solver is developed for the discretized two-dimensional elliptic equation on the sphere that arises from a semiimplicit time discretization of the global shallow-water equations. Different formulations of the semiimplicit scheme result in variable-coefficient Helmholtz-type equations for which no fast direct solvers are available. The efficiency of the multigrid solver is optimal, in the sense that the total operation count is proportional to the number of unknowns. Numerical experiments using initial data derived from actual 300-mb height and wind velocity fields indicate that the present model has very good accuracy and stability properties.

  18. Vectorized multigrid Poisson solver for the CDC CYBER 205

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkai, D.; Brandt, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    The full multigrid (FMG) method is applied to the two dimensional Poisson equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions. This has been chosen as a relatively simple test case for examining the efficiency of fully vectorizing of the multigrid method. Data structure and programming considerations and techniques are discussed, accompanied by performance details.

  19. Coarse Spaces by Algebraic Multigrid: Multigrid Convergence and Upscaled Error Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, P S

    2010-04-30

    We give an overview of a number of algebraic multigrid methods targeting finite element discretization problems. The focus is on the properties of the constructed hierarchy of coarse spaces that guarantee (two-grid) convergence. In particular, a necessary condition known as 'weak approximation property', and a sufficient one, referred to as 'strong approximation property' are discussed. Their role in proving convergence of the TG method (as iterative method) and also on the approximation properties of the AMG coarse spaces if used as discretization tool is pointed out. Some preliminary numerical results illustrating the latter aspect are also reported.

  20. Algebraic multigrid methods applied to problems in computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, Steve; Ruge, John

    1989-01-01

    The development of algebraic multigrid (AMG) methods and their application to certain problems in structural mechanics are described with emphasis on two- and three-dimensional linear elasticity equations and the 'jacket problems' (three-dimensional beam structures). Various possible extensions of AMG are also described. The basic idea of AMG is to develop the discretization sequence based on the target matrix and not the differential equation. Therefore, the matrix is analyzed for certain dependencies that permit the proper construction of coarser matrices and attendant transfer operators. In this manner, AMG appears to be adaptable to structural analysis applications.

  1. Black box multigrid solver for definite and indefinite problems

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Yair

    1997-02-01

    A two-level analysis method for certain separable problems is introduced. It motivates the definition of improved versions of Black Box Multigrid for diffusion problems with discontinuous coefficients and indefinite Helmholtz equations. For anisotropic problems, it helps in choosing suitable implementations for frequency decomposition multigrid methods. For highly indefinite problems, it provides a way to choose in advance a suitable mesh size for the coarsest grid used. Numerical experiments confirm the analysis and show the advantage of the present methods for several examples.

  2. A Parallel Multigrid Solver for Viscous Flows on Anisotropic Structured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prieto, Manuel; Montero, Ruben S.; Llorente, Ignacio M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient parallel multigrid solver for speeding up the computation of a 3-D model that treats the flow of a viscous fluid over a flat plate. The main interest of this simulation lies in exhibiting some basic difficulties that prevent optimal multigrid efficiencies from being achieved. As the computing platform, we have used Coral, a Beowulf-class system based on Intel Pentium processors and equipped with GigaNet cLAN and switched Fast Ethernet networks. Our study not only examines the scalability of the solver but also includes a performance evaluation of Coral where the investigated solver has been used to compare several of its design choices, namely, the interconnection network (GigaNet versus switched Fast-Ethernet) and the node configuration (dual nodes versus single nodes). As a reference, the performance results have been compared with those obtained with the NAS-MG benchmark.

  3. Directional Agglomeration Multigrid Techniques for High Reynolds Number Viscous Flow Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A preconditioned directional-implicit agglomeration algorithm is developed for solving two- and three-dimensional viscous flows on highly anisotropic unstructured meshes of mixed-element types. The multigrid smoother consists of a pre-conditioned point- or line-implicit solver which operates on lines constructed in the unstructured mesh using a weighted graph algorithm. Directional coarsening or agglomeration is achieved using a similar weighted graph algorithm. A tight coupling of the line construction and directional agglomeration algorithms enables the use of aggressive coarsening ratios in the multigrid algorithm, which in turn reduces the cost of a multigrid cycle. Convergence rates which are independent of the degree of grid stretching are demonstrated in both two and three dimensions. Further improvement of the three-dimensional convergence rates through a GMRES technique is also demonstrated.

  4. A geometric multigrid Poisson solver for domains containing solid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botto, Lorenzo

    2013-03-01

    A Cartesian grid method for the fast solution of the Poisson equation in three-dimensional domains with embedded solid inclusions is presented and its performance analyzed. The efficiency of the method, which assume Neumann conditions at the immersed boundaries, is comparable to that of a multigrid method for regular domains. The method is light in terms of memory usage, and easily adaptable to parallel architectures. Tests with random and ordered arrays of solid inclusions, including spheres and ellipsoids, demonstrate smooth convergence of the residual for small separation between the inclusion surfaces. This feature is important, for instance, in simulations of nearly-touching finite-size particles. The implementation of the method, “MG-Inc”, is available online. Catalogue identifier: AEOE_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOE_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19068 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 215118 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ (fully tested with GNU GCC compiler). Computer: Any machine supporting standard C++ compiler. Operating system: Any OS supporting standard C++ compiler. RAM: About 150MB for 1283 resolution Classification: 4.3. Nature of problem: Poisson equation in domains containing inclusions; Neumann boundary conditions at immersed boundaries. Solution method: Geometric multigrid with finite-volume discretization. Restrictions: Stair-case representation of the immersed boundaries. Running time: Typically a fraction of a minute for 1283 resolution.

  5. Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid for Finite Element Elliptic Equations with Random Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchev, D

    2012-04-02

    This thesis presents a two-grid algorithm based on Smoothed Aggregation Spectral Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid (SA-{rho}AMGe) combined with adaptation. The aim is to build an efficient solver for the linear systems arising from discretization of second-order elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) with stochastic coefficients. Examples include PDEs that model subsurface flow with random permeability field. During a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation process, that draws PDE coefficient samples from a certain distribution, the PDE coefficients change, hence the resulting linear systems to be solved change. At every such step the system (discretized PDE) needs to be solved and the computed solution used to evaluate some functional(s) of interest that then determine if the coefficient sample is acceptable or not. The MCMC process is hence computationally intensive and requires the solvers used to be efficient and fast. This fact that at every step of MCMC the resulting linear system changes, makes an already existing solver built for the old problem perhaps not as efficient for the problem corresponding to the new sampled coefficient. This motivates the main goal of our study, namely, to adapt an already existing solver to handle the problem (with changed coefficient) with the objective to achieve this goal to be faster and more efficient than building a completely new solver from scratch. Our approach utilizes the local element matrices (for the problem with changed coefficients) to build local problems associated with constructed by the method agglomerated elements (a set of subdomains that cover the given computational domain). We solve a generalized eigenproblem for each set in a subspace spanned by the previous local coarse space (used for the old solver) and a vector, component of the error, that the old solver cannot handle. A portion of the spectrum of these local eigen-problems (corresponding to eigenvalues close to zero) form the

  6. Using computer algebra and SMT solvers in algebraic biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda Osorio, Mateo

    2014-05-01

    Biologic processes are represented as Boolean networks, in a discrete time. The dynamics within these networks are approached with the help of SMT Solvers and the use of computer algebra. Software such as Maple and Z3 was used in this case. The number of stationary states for each network was calculated. The network studied here corresponds to the immune system under the effects of drastic mood changes. Mood is considered as a Boolean variable that affects the entire dynamics of the immune system, changing the Boolean satisfiability and the number of stationary states of the immune network. Results obtained show Z3's great potential as a SMT Solver. Some of these results were verified in Maple, even though it showed not to be as suitable for the problem approach. The solving code was constructed using Z3-Python and Z3-SMT-LiB. Results obtained are important in biology systems and are expected to help in the design of immune therapies. As a future line of research, more complex Boolean network representations of the immune system as well as the whole psychological apparatus are suggested.

  7. Three-Dimensional High-Lift Analysis Using a Parallel Unstructured Multigrid Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1998-01-01

    A directional implicit unstructured agglomeration multigrid solver is ported to shared and distributed memory massively parallel machines using the explicit domain-decomposition and message-passing approach. Because the algorithm operates on local implicit lines in the unstructured mesh, special care is required in partitioning the problem for parallel computing. A weighted partitioning strategy is described which avoids breaking the implicit lines across processor boundaries, while incurring minimal additional communication overhead. Good scalability is demonstrated on a 128 processor SGI Origin 2000 machine and on a 512 processor CRAY T3E machine for reasonably fine grids. The feasibility of performing large-scale unstructured grid calculations with the parallel multigrid algorithm is demonstrated by computing the flow over a partial-span flap wing high-lift geometry on a highly resolved grid of 13.5 million points in approximately 4 hours of wall clock time on the CRAY T3E.

  8. Distance-Two Interpolation for Parallel Algebraic Multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    De Sterck, H; Falgout, R; Nolting, J; Yang, U M

    2007-05-08

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is one of the most efficient and scalable parallel algorithms for solving sparse linear systems on unstructured grids. However, for large three-dimensional problems, the coarse grids that are normally used in AMG often lead to growing complexity in terms of memory use and execution time per AMG V-cycle. Sparser coarse grids, such as those obtained by the Parallel Modified Independent Set coarsening algorithm (PMIS) [7], remedy this complexity growth, but lead to non-scalable AMG convergence factors when traditional distance-one interpolation methods are used. In this paper we study the scalability of AMG methods that combine PMIS coarse grids with long distance interpolation methods. AMG performance and scalability is compared for previously introduced interpolation methods as well as new variants of them for a variety of relevant test problems on parallel computers. It is shown that the increased interpolation accuracy largely restores the scalability of AMG convergence factors for PMIS-coarsened grids, and in combination with complexity reducing methods, such as interpolation truncation, one obtains a class of parallel AMG methods that enjoy excellent scalability properties on large parallel computers.

  9. A quadtree-adaptive multigrid solver for the Serre-Green-Naghdi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popinet, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    The Serre-Green-Naghdi (SGN) equations, also known as the fully-nonlinear Boussinesq wave equations, accurately describe the behaviour of dispersive shoaling water waves. This article presents and validates a novel combination of methods for the numerical approximation of solutions to the SGN equations. The approach preserves the robustness of the original finite-volume Saint-Venant solver, in particular for the treatment of wetting/drying and equilibrium states. The linear system of coupled vector equations governing the dispersive SGN momentum sources is solved simply and efficiently using a generic multigrid solver. This approach generalises automatically to adaptive quadtree meshes. Adaptive mesh refinement is shown to provide orders-of-magnitude gains in speed and memory when applied to the dispersive propagation of waves during the Tohoku tsunami. The source code, test cases and examples are freely available.

  10. A fast accurate approximation method with multigrid solver for two-dimensional fractional sub-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xue-lei; Lu, Xin; Ng, Micheal K.; Sun, Hai-Wei

    2016-10-01

    A fast accurate approximation method with multigrid solver is proposed to solve a two-dimensional fractional sub-diffusion equation. Using the finite difference discretization of fractional time derivative, a block lower triangular Toeplitz matrix is obtained where each main diagonal block contains a two-dimensional matrix for the Laplacian operator. Our idea is to make use of the block ɛ-circulant approximation via fast Fourier transforms, so that the resulting task is to solve a block diagonal system, where each diagonal block matrix is the sum of a complex scalar times the identity matrix and a Laplacian matrix. We show that the accuracy of the approximation scheme is of O (ɛ). Because of the special diagonal block structure, we employ the multigrid method to solve the resulting linear systems. The convergence of the multigrid method is studied. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the accuracy of the proposed approximation scheme and the efficiency of the proposed solver.

  11. A three dimensional multigrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes solver is described. Turbulence is simulated using a single field-equation model. Computational overheads are minimized through the use of a single edge-based data-structure, and efficient multigrid solution technique, and the use of multi-tasking on shared memory multi-processors. The accuracy and efficiency of the code are evaluated by computing two-dimensional flows in three dimensions and comparing with results from a previously validated two-dimensional code which employs the same solution algorithm. The feasibility of computing three-dimensional flows on grids of several million points in less than two hours of wall clock time is demonstrated.

  12. Final Report for "Implimentation and Evaluation of Multigrid Linear Solvers into Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Codes for Petascale Computing"

    SciTech Connect

    Srinath Vadlamani; Scott Kruger; Travis Austin

    2008-06-19

    Extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes are used to model the large, slow-growing instabilities that are projected to limit the performance of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The multiscale nature of the extended MHD equations requires an implicit approach. The current linear solvers needed for the implicit algorithm scale poorly because the resultant matrices are so ill-conditioned. A new solver is needed, especially one that scales to the petascale. The most successful scalable parallel processor solvers to date are multigrid solvers. Applying multigrid techniques to a set of equations whose fundamental modes are dispersive waves is a promising solution to CEMM problems. For the Phase 1, we implemented multigrid preconditioners from the HYPRE project of the Center for Applied Scientific Computing at LLNL via PETSc of the DOE SciDAC TOPS for the real matrix systems of the extended MHD code NIMROD which is a one of the primary modeling codes of the OFES-funded Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling (CEMM) SciDAC. We implemented the multigrid solvers on the fusion test problem that allows for real matrix systems with success, and in the process learned about the details of NIMROD data structures and the difficulties of inverting NIMROD operators. The further success of this project will allow for efficient usage of future petascale computers at the National Leadership Facilities: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. The project will be a collaborative effort between computational plasma physicists and applied mathematicians at Tech-X Corporation, applied mathematicians Front Range Scientific Computations, Inc. (who are collaborators on the HYPRE project), and other computational plasma physicists involved with the CEMM project.

  13. LAPACKrc: Fast linear algebra kernels/solvers for FPGA accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Juan; Núñez, Rafael C.

    2009-07-01

    We present LAPACKrc, a family of FPGA-based linear algebra solvers able to achieve more than 100x speedup per commodity processor on certain problems. LAPACKrc subsumes some of the LAPACK and ScaLAPACK functionalities, and it also incorporates sparse direct and iterative matrix solvers. Current LAPACKrc prototypes demonstrate between 40x-150x speedup compared against top-of-the-line hardware/software systems. A technology roadmap is in place to validate current performance of LAPACKrc in HPC applications, and to increase the computational throughput by factors of hundreds within the next few years.

  14. Smoothed aggregation adaptive spectral element-based algebraic multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-20

    SAAMGE provides parallel methods for building multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for elliptic equations with highly heterogeneous coefficients. Additionally, hierarchy adaptation is implemented allowing solving multiple problems with close coefficients without rebuilding the hierarchy.

  15. Parallel Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-19

    ParFELAG is a parallel distributed memory C++ library for numerical upscaling of finite element discretizations. It provides optimal complesity algorithms ro build multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for solving a wide class of partial differential equations (elliptic, hyperbolic, saddle point problems) on general unstructured mesh (under the assumption that the topology of the agglomerated entities is correct). Additionally, a novel multilevel solver for saddle point problems with divergence constraint is implemented.

  16. An improved convergence analysis of smoothed aggregation algebraic multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, Marian; Vaněk, Petr; Vassilevski, Panayot S.

    2011-03-02

    We present an improved analysis of the smoothed aggregation (SA) alge- braic multigrid method (AMG) extending the original proof in [SA] and its modification in [Va08]. The new result imposes fewer restrictions on the aggregates that makes it eas- ier to verify in practice. Also, we extend a result in [Van] that allows us to use aggressive coarsening at all levels due to the special properties of the polynomial smoother, that we use and analyze, and thus provide a multilevel convergence estimate with bounds independent of the coarsening ratio.

  17. A nonlinear multigrid solver for a semi-Lagrangian potential vorticity-based barotropic model on the sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Ruge, J.; Li, Y.; McCormick, S.F.

    1994-12-31

    The formulation and time discretization of problems in meteorology are often tailored to the type of efficient solvers available for use on the discrete problems obtained. A common procedure is to formulate the problem so that a constant (or latitude-dependent) coefficient Poisson-like equation results at each time step, which is then solved using spectral methods. This both limits the scope of problems that can be handled and requires linearization by forward extrapolation of nonlinear terms, which, in turn, requires filtering to control noise. Multigrid methods do not suffer these limitations, and can be applied directly to systems of nonlinear equations with variable coefficients. Here, a global barotropic semi-Lagrangian model, developed by the authors, is presented which results in a system of three coupled nonlinear equations to be solved at each time step. A multigrid method for the solution of these equations is described, and results are presented.

  18. The development of an algebraic multigrid algorithm for symmetric positive definite linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vanek, P.; Mandel, J.; Brezina, M.

    1996-12-31

    An algebraic multigrid algorithm for symmetric, positive definite linear systems is developed based on the concept of prolongation by smoothed aggregation. Coarse levels are generated automatically. We present a set of requirements motivated heuristically by a convergence theory. The algorithm then attempts to satisfy the requirements. Input to the method are the coefficient matrix and zero energy modes, which are determined from nodal coordinates and knowledge of the differential equation. Efficiency of the resulting algorithm is demonstrated by computational results on real world problems from solid elasticity, plate blending, and shells.

  19. Recent Advances in Agglomerated Multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Hammond, Dana P.

    2013-01-01

    We report recent advancements of the agglomerated multigrid methodology for complex flow simulations on fully unstructured grids. An agglomerated multigrid solver is applied to a wide range of test problems from simple two-dimensional geometries to realistic three- dimensional configurations. The solver is evaluated against a single-grid solver and, in some cases, against a structured-grid multigrid solver. Grid and solver issues are identified and overcome, leading to significant improvements over single-grid solvers.

  20. An overlapped grid method for multigrid, finite volume/difference flow solvers: MaGGiE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Lessard, Victor R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to develop a domain decomposition method via overlapping/embedding the component grids, which is to be used by upwind, multi-grid, finite volume solution algorithms. A computer code, given the name MaGGiE (Multi-Geometry Grid Embedder) is developed to meet this objective. MaGGiE takes independently generated component grids as input, and automatically constructs the composite mesh and interpolation data, which can be used by the finite volume solution methods with or without multigrid convergence acceleration. Six demonstrative examples showing various aspects of the overlap technique are presented and discussed. These cases are used for developing the procedure for overlapping grids of different topologies, and to evaluate the grid connection and interpolation data for finite volume calculations on a composite mesh. Time fluxes are transferred between mesh interfaces using a trilinear interpolation procedure. Conservation losses are minimal at the interfaces using this method. The multi-grid solution algorithm, using the coaser grid connections, improves the convergence time history as compared to the solution on composite mesh without multi-gridding.

  1. Implementation of the Vanka-type multigrid solver for the finite element approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Petr; Klement, Vladimír; Oberhuber, Tomáš; Žabka, Vítězslav

    2016-03-01

    We present a complete GPU implementation of a geometric multigrid solver for the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow. The approximate solution is constructed on a two-dimensional unstructured triangular mesh. The problem is discretized by means of the mixed finite element method with semi-implicit timestepping. The linear saddle-point problem arising from the scheme is solved by the geometric multigrid method with a Vanka-type smoother. The parallel solver is based on the red-black coloring of the mesh triangles. We achieved a speed-up of 11 compared to a parallel (4 threads) code based on OpenMP and 19 compared to a sequential code.

  2. A unified multigrid solver for the Navier-Stokes equations on mixed element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    A unified multigrid solution technique is presented for solving the Euler and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes using mixed elements consisting of triangles and quadrilaterals in two dimensions, and of hexahedra, pyramids, prisms, and tetrahedra in three dimensions. While the use of mixed elements is by no means a novel idea, the contribution of the paper lies in the formulation of a complete solution technique which can handle structured grids, block structured grids, and unstructured grids of tetrahedra or mixed elements without any modification. This is achieved by discretizing the full Navier-Stokes equations on tetrahedral elements, and the thin layer version of these equations on other types of elements, while using a single edge-based data-structure to construct the discretization over all element types. An agglomeration multigrid algorithm, which naturally handles meshes of any types of elements, is employed to accelerate convergence. An automatic algorithm which reduces the complexity of a given triangular or tetrahedral mesh by merging candidate triangular or tetrahedral elements into quadrilateral or prismatic elements is also described. The gains in computational efficiency afforded by the use of non-simplicial meshes over fully tetrahedral meshes are demonstrated through several examples.

  3. An algebraic variational multiscale-multigrid method for large-eddy simulation of turbulent variable-density flow at low Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravemeier, Volker; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2010-08-01

    An algebraic variational multiscale-multigrid method is proposed for large-eddy simulation of turbulent variable-density flow at low Mach number. Scale-separating operators generated by level-transfer operators from plain aggregation algebraic multigrid methods enable the application of modeling terms to selected scale groups (here, the smaller of the resolved scales) in a purely algebraic way. Thus, for scale separation, no additional discretization besides the basic one is required, in contrast to earlier approaches based on geometric multigrid methods. The proposed method is thoroughly validated via three numerical test cases of increasing complexity: a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, turbulent channel flow with a heated and a cooled wall, and turbulent flow past a backward-facing step with heating. Results obtained with the algebraic variational multiscale-multigrid method are compared to results obtained with residual-based variational multiscale methods as well as reference results from direct numerical simulation, experiments and LES published elsewhere. Particularly, mean and various second-order velocity and temperature results obtained for turbulent channel flow with a heated and a cooled wall indicate the higher prediction quality achievable when adding a small-scale subgrid-viscosity term within the algebraic multigrid framework instead of residual-based terms accounting for the subgrid-scale part of the non-linear convective term.

  4. Development of an explicit multiblock/multigrid flow solver for viscous flows in complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, E.; Liou, M. S.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1993-01-01

    A new computer program is being developed for doing accurate simulations of compressible viscous flows in complex geometries. The code employs the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The eddy viscosity model of Baldwin and Lomax is used to model the effects of turbulence on the flow. A cell centered finite volume discretization is used for all terms in the governing equations. The Advection Upwind Splitting Method (AUSM) is used to compute the inviscid fluxes, while central differencing is used for the diffusive fluxes. A four-stage Runge-Kutta time integration scheme is used to march solutions to steady state, while convergence is enhanced by a multigrid scheme, local time-stepping, and implicit residual smoothing. To enable simulations of flows in complex geometries, the code uses composite structured grid systems where all grid lines are continuous at block boundaries (multiblock grids). Example results shown are a flow in a linear cascade, a flow around a circular pin extending between the main walls in a high aspect-ratio channel, and a flow of air in a radial turbine coolant passage.

  5. A 3D agglomeration multigrid solver for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    An agglomeration multigrid strategy is developed and implemented for the solution of three-dimensional steady viscous flows. The method enables convergence acceleration with minimal additional memory overheads, and is completely automated, in that it can deal with grids of arbitrary construction. The multigrid technique is validated by comparing the delivered convergence rates with those obtained by a previously developed overset-mesh multigrid approach, and by demonstrating grid independent convergence rates for aerodynamic problems on very large grids. Prospects for further increases in multigrid efficiency for high-Reynolds number viscous flows on highly stretched meshes are discussed.

  6. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Leading Edge Stagnation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2004-01-01

    A multigrid solver is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in evaluating the discrete residuals. TME in solving the incompressible inviscid fluid equations is demonstrated for leading- edge stagnation flows. The contributions of this paper include (1) a special formulation of the boundary conditions near stagnation allowing convergence of the Newton iterations on coarse grids, (2) the boundary relaxation technique to facilitate relaxation and residual restriction near the boundaries, (3) a modified relaxation scheme to prevent initial error amplification, and (4) new general analysis techniques for multigrid solvers. Convergence of algebraic errors below the level of discretization errors is attained by a full multigrid (FMG) solver with one full approximation scheme (F.4S) cycle per grid. Asymptotic convergence rates of the F.4S cycles for the full system of flow equations are very fast, approaching those for scalar elliptic equations.

  7. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Leading Edge Stagnation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2004-01-01

    A multigrid solver is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in evaluating the discrete residuals. TME in solving the incompressible inviscid fluid equations is demonstrated for leading-edge stagnation flows. The contributions of this paper include (1) a special formulation of the boundary conditions near stagnation allowing convergence of the Newton iterations on coarse grids, (2) the boundary relaxation technique to facilitate relaxation and residual restriction near the boundaries, (3) a modified relaxation scheme to prevent initial error amplification, and (4) new general analysis techniques for multigrid solvers. Convergence of algebraic errors below the level of discretization errors is attained by a full multigrid (FMG) solver with one full approximation scheme (FAS) cycle per grid. Asymptotic convergence rates of the FAS cycles for the full system of flow equations are very fast, approaching those for scalar elliptic equations.

  8. MueLu Multigrid Preconditioning Package

    2012-09-11

    MueLu is intended for the research and development of multigrid algorithms used in the solution of sparse linear systems arising from systems of partial differential equations. The software provides multigrid source code, test programs, and short example programs to demonstrate the various interfaces for creating, accessing, and applying the solvers. MueLu currently provides an implementation of smoothed aggregation algebraic multigrid method and interfaces to many commonly used smoothers. However, the software is intended to bemore » extensible, and new methods can be incorporated easily. MueLu also allows for advanced usage, such as combining multiple methods and segregated solves. The library supports point and block access to matrix data. All algorithms and methods in MueLu have been or will be published in the open scientific literature.« less

  9. Description of DASSL: a differential/algebraic system solver

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, L.R.

    1982-09-01

    This paper describes a new code DASSL, for the numerical solution of implicit systems of differential/algebraic equations. These equations are written in the form F(t,y,y') = 0, and they can include systems which are substantially more complex than standard form ODE systems y' = f(t,y). Differential/algebraic equations occur in several diverse applications in the physical world. We outline the algorithms and strategies used in DASSL, and explain some of the features of the code. In addition, we outline briefly what needs to be done to solve a problem using DASSL.

  10. Final Report on Subcontract B591217: Multigrid Methods for Systems of PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J; Brannick, J J; Zikatanov, L

    2011-10-25

    Progress is summarized in the following areas of study: (1) Compatible relaxation; (2) Improving aggregation-based MG solver performance - variable cycle; (3) First Order System Least Squares (FOSLS) for LQCD; (4) Auxiliary space preconditioners; (5) Bootstrap algebraic multigrid; and (6) Practical applications of AMG and fast auxiliary space preconditioners.

  11. Final report on the Copper Mountain conference on multigrid methods

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods was held on April 6-11, 1997. It took the same format used in the previous Copper Mountain Conferences on Multigrid Method conferences. Over 87 mathematicians from all over the world attended the meeting. 56 half-hour talks on current research topics were presented. Talks with similar content were organized into sessions. Session topics included: fluids; domain decomposition; iterative methods; basics; adaptive methods; non-linear filtering; CFD; applications; transport; algebraic solvers; supercomputing; and student paper winners.

  12. Using computer algebra and SMT-solvers to analyze a mathematical model of cholera propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo Arredondo, Mariana

    2014-06-01

    We analyze a mathematical model for the transmission of cholera. The model is already defined and involves variables such as the pathogen agent, which in this case is the bacterium Vibrio cholera, and the human population. The human population is divided into three classes: susceptible, infectious and removed. Using Computer Algebra, specifically Maple we obtain two equilibrium states: the disease free state and the endemic state. Using Maple it is possible to prove that the disease free state is locally asymptotically stable if and only if R0 < 1. Using Maple it is possible to prove that the endemic equilibrium state is locally stable when it exists, it is to say when R0 > 1. Using the package Red-Log of the Computer algebra system Reduce and the SMT-Solver Z3Py it is possible to obtain numerical conditions for the model. The formula for the basic reproductive number makes a synthesis with all epidemic parameters in the model. Also it is possible to make numerical simulations which are very illustrative about the epidemic patters that are expected to be observed in real situations. We claim that these kinds of software are very useful in the analysis of epidemic models given that the symbolic computation provides algebraic formulas for the basic reproductive number and such algebraic formulas are very useful to derive control measures. For other side, computer algebra software is a powerful tool to make the stability analysis for epidemic models given that the all steps in the stability analysis can be made automatically: finding the equilibrium points, computing the jacobian, computing the characteristic polynomial for the jacobian, and applying the Routh-Hurwitz theorem to the characteristic polynomial. Finally, using SMT-Solvers is possible to make automatically checks of satisfiability, validity and quantifiers elimination being these computations very useful to analyse complicated epidemic models.

  13. Multigrid techniques for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current multigrid techniques for unstructured meshes is given. The basic principles of the multigrid approach are first outlined. Application of these principles to unstructured mesh problems is then described, illustrating various different approaches, and giving examples of practical applications. Advanced multigrid topics, such as the use of algebraic multigrid methods, and the combination of multigrid techniques with adaptive meshing strategies are dealt with in subsequent sections. These represent current areas of research, and the unresolved issues are discussed. The presentation is organized in an educational manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  14. Integration of the shallow water equations on the sphere using a vector semi-Lagrangian scheme with a multigrid solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. R.; Semazzi, F. H. M.; Higgins, R. W.; Barros, Saulo R. M.

    1990-01-01

    A vector semi-Lagrangian semi-implicit two-time-level finite-difference integration scheme for the shallow water equations on the sphere is presented. A C-grid is used for the spatial differencing. The trajectory-centered discretization of the momentum equation in vector form eliminates pole problems and, at comparable cost, gives greater accuracy than a previous semi-Lagrangian finite-difference scheme which used a rotated spherical coordinate system. In terms of the insensitivity of the results to increasing timestep, the new scheme is as successful as recent spectral semi-Lagrangian schemes. In addition, the use of a multigrid method for solving the elliptic equation for the geopotential allows efficient integration with an operation count which, at high resolution, is of lower order than in the case of the spectral models. The properties of the new scheme should allow finite-difference models to compete with spectral models more effectively than has previously been possible.

  15. Report on the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    2001-04-06

    OAK B188 Report on the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods. The Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods was held on April 11-16, 1999. Over 100 mathematicians from all over the world attended the meeting. The conference had two major themes: algebraic multigrid and parallel multigrid. During the five day meeting 69 talks on current research topics were presented as well as 3 tutorials. Talks with similar content were organized into sessions. Session topics included: Fluids; Multigrid and Multilevel Methods; Applications; PDE Reformulation; Inverse Problems; Special Methods; Decomposition Methods; Student Paper Winners; Parallel Multigrid; Parallel Algebraic Multigrid; and FOSLS.

  16. Multigrid methods for numerical simulation of laminar diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, Z.; Mccormick, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents the result of a computational study of multigrid methods for numerical simulation of 2D diffusion flames. The focus is on a simplified combustion model, which is assumed to be a single step, infinitely fast and irreversible chemical reaction with five species (C3H8, O2, N2, CO2 and H2O). A fully-implicit second-order hybrid scheme is developed on a staggered grid, which is stretched in the streamwise coordinate direction. A full approximation multigrid scheme (FAS) based on line distributive relaxation is developed as a fast solver for the algebraic equations arising at each time step. Convergence of the process for the simplified model problem is more than two-orders of magnitude faster than other iterative methods, and the computational results show good grid convergence, with second-order accuracy, as well as qualitatively agreement with the results of other researchers.

  17. Simulation and optimization of Al-Fe aerospace alloy processed by laser surface remelting using geometric Multigrid solver and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariona, Moisés Meza; de Oliveira, Fabiane; Teleginski, Viviane; Machado, Siliane; Pinto, Marcio Augusto Villela

    2016-05-01

    Al-1.5 wt% Fe alloy was irradiate by Yb-fiber laser beam using the laser surface remelting (LSR) technique, generating weld fillets that covered the whole surface of the sample. The laser-treatment showed to be an efficient technology for corrosion resistance improvements. In this study, the finite element method was used to simulate the solidification processes by LSR technique. The method Multigrid was employed in order to reduce the CPU time, which is important to the viability for industrial applications. Multigrid method is a technique very promising of optimization that reduced drastically the CPU time. The result was highly satisfactory, because the CPU time has fallen dramatically in comparison when it was not used Multigrid method. To validate the result of numerical simulation with the experimental result was done the microstructural characterization of laser-treated layer by the optical microscopy and SEM techniques and however, that both results showing be consistent.

  18. Another look at neural multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Baeker, M.

    1997-04-01

    We present a new multigrid method called neural multigrid which is based on joining multigrid ideas with concepts from neural nets. The main idea is to use the Greenbaum criterion as a cost functional for the neural net. The algorithm is able to learn efficient interpolation operators in the case of the ordered Laplace equation with only a very small critical slowing down and with a surprisingly small amount of work comparable to that of a Conjugate Gradient solver. In the case of the two-dimensional Laplace equation with SU(2) gauge fields at {beta}=0 the learning exhibits critical slowing down with an exponent of about z {approx} 0.4. The algorithm is able to find quite good interpolation operators in this case as well. Thereby it is proven that a practical true multigrid algorithm exists even for a gauge theory. An improved algorithm using dynamical blocks that will hopefully overcome the critical slowing down completely is sketched.

  19. On Multigrid for Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W

    2004-01-13

    The solution of elliptic partial differential equations on composite overlapping grids using multigrid is discussed. An approach is described that provides a fast and memory efficient scheme for the solution of boundary value problems in complex geometries. The key aspects of the new scheme are an automatic coarse grid generation algorithm, an adaptive smoothing technique for adjusting residuals on different component grids, and the use of local smoothing near interpolation boundaries. Other important features include optimizations for Cartesian component grids, the use of over-relaxed Red-Black smoothers and the generation of coarse grid operators through Galerkin averaging. Numerical results in two and three dimensions show that very good multigrid convergence rates can be obtained for both Dirichlet and Neumann/mixed boundary conditions. A comparison to Krylov based solvers shows that the multigrid solver can be much faster and require significantly less memory.

  20. Parallel H1-based auxiliary space AMG solver for H(curl) problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, T V; Vassilevski, P S

    2006-06-30

    This report describes a parallel implementation of the auxiliary space methods for definite Maxwell problems proposed in [4]. The solver, named AMS, extends our previous study [7]. AMS uses ParCSR sparse matrix storage and the parallel AMG (algebraic multigrid) solver BoomerAMG [1] from the hypre library. It is designed for general unstructured finite element discretizations of (semi)definite H(curl) problems discretized by Nedelec elements. We document the usage of AMS and illustrate its parallel scalability and overall performance.

  1. MGLab: An Interactive Multigrid Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bordner, James; Saied, Faisal

    1996-01-01

    MGLab is a set of Matlab functions that defines an interactive environment for experimenting with multigrid algorithms. The package solves two-dimensional elliptic partial differential equations discretized using either finite differences or finite volumes, depending on the problem. Built-in problems include the Poisson equation, the Helmholtz equation, a convection-diffusion problem, and a discontinuous coefficient problem. A number of parameters controlling the multigrid V-cycle can be set using a point-and-click mechanism. The menu-based user interface also allows a choice of several Krylov subspace methods, including CG, GMRES(k), and Bi-CGSTAB, which can be used either as stand-alone solvers or as multigrid acceleration schemes. The package exploits Matlab's visualization and sparse matrix features and has been structured to be easily extensible.

  2. A multigrid method for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    A multigrid algorithm has been developed for the numerical solution of the steady two-dimensional Euler equations. Flux vector splitting and one-sided differencing are employed to define the spatial discretization. Newton's method is used to solve the nonlinear equations, and a multigrid solver is used on each linear problem. The relaxation scheme for the linear problems is symmetric Gauss-Seidel. Standard restriction and interpolation operators are employed. Local mode analysis is used to predict the convergence rate of the multigrid process on the linear problems. Computed results for transonic flows over airfoils are presented.

  3. 3-D radiative transfer in large-eddy simulations - experiences coupling the TenStream solver to the UCLA-LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakub, Fabian; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The recently developed 3-D TenStream radiative transfer solver was integrated into the University of California, Los Angeles large-eddy simulation (UCLA-LES) cloud-resolving model. This work documents the overall performance of the TenStream solver as well as the technical challenges of migrating from 1-D schemes to 3-D schemes. In particular the employed Monte Carlo spectral integration needed to be reexamined in conjunction with 3-D radiative transfer. Despite the fact that the spectral sampling has to be performed uniformly over the whole domain, we find that the Monte Carlo spectral integration remains valid. To understand the performance characteristics of the coupled TenStream solver, we conducted weak as well as strong-scaling experiments. In this context, we investigate two matrix preconditioner: geometric algebraic multigrid preconditioning (GAMG) and block Jacobi incomplete LU (ILU) factorization and find that algebraic multigrid preconditioning performs well for complex scenes and highly parallelized simulations. The TenStream solver is tested for up to 4096 cores and shows a parallel scaling efficiency of 80-90 % on various supercomputers. Compared to the widely employed 1-D delta-Eddington two-stream solver, the computational costs for the radiative transfer solver alone increases by a factor of 5-10.

  4. A Generalized Eigensolver based on Smoothed Aggregation (GES-SA) for Initializing Smoothed Aggregation Multigrid (SA)

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, M; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J; Sanders, G; Vassilevski, P S

    2007-05-31

    Consider the linear system Ax = b, where A is a large, sparse, real, symmetric, and positive definite matrix and b is a known vector. Solving this system for unknown vector x using a smoothed aggregation multigrid (SA) algorithm requires a characterization of the algebraically smooth error, meaning error that is poorly attenuated by the algorithm's relaxation process. For relaxation processes that are typically used in practice, algebraically smooth error corresponds to the near-nullspace of A. Therefore, having a good approximation to a minimal eigenvector is useful to characterize the algebraically smooth error when forming a linear SA solver. This paper discusses the details of a generalized eigensolver based on smoothed aggregation (GES-SA) that is designed to produce an approximation to a minimal eigenvector of A. GES-SA might be very useful as a standalone eigensolver for applications that desire an approximate minimal eigenvector, but the primary aim here is for GES-SA to produce an initial algebraically smooth component that may be used to either create a black-box SA solver or initiate the adaptive SA ({alpha}SA) process.

  5. Multigrid methods with applications to reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Shengyou

    1994-05-01

    Multigrid methods are studied for solving elliptic partial differential equations. Focus is on parallel multigrid methods and their use for reservoir simulation. Multicolor Fourier analysis is used to analyze the behavior of standard multigrid methods for problems in one and two dimensions. Relation between multicolor and standard Fourier analysis is established. Multiple coarse grid methods for solving model problems in 1 and 2 dimensions are considered; at each coarse grid level we use more than one coarse grid to improve convergence. For a given Dirichlet problem, a related extended problem is first constructed; a purification procedure can be used to obtain Moore-Penrose solutions of the singular systems encountered. For solving anisotropic equations, semicoarsening and line smoothing techniques are used with multiple coarse grid methods to improve convergence. Two-level convergence factors are estimated using multicolor. In the case where each operator has the same stencil on each grid point on one level, exact multilevel convergence factors can be obtained. For solving partial differential equations with discontinuous coefficients, interpolation and restriction operators should include information about the equation coefficients. Matrix-dependent interpolation and restriction operators based on the Schur complement can be used in nonsymmetric cases. A semicoarsening multigrid solver with these operators is used in UTCOMP, a 3-D, multiphase, multicomponent, compositional reservoir simulator. The numerical experiments are carried out on different computing systems. Results indicate that the multigrid methods are promising.

  6. Multigrid with red black SOR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Yavneh, I.

    1994-12-31

    Optimal relaxation parameters are obtained for red-black point Gauss-Seidel relaxation in multigrid solvers of a family of elliptic equations. The resulting relaxation schemes are found to retain high efficiency over an appreciable range of coefficients of the elliptic operator, yielding simple, inexpensive and fully parallelizable smoothers in many situations where more complicated and less cost-effective block-relaxation and/or partial coarsening are commonly used.

  7. New Nonlinear Multigrid Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Dexuan

    1996-01-01

    The nonlinear multigrid is an efficient algorithm for solving the system of nonlinear equations arising from the numerical discretization of nonlinear elliptic boundary problems. In this paper, we present a new nonlinear multigrid analysis as an extension of the linear multigrid theory presented by Bramble. In particular, we prove the convergence of the nonlinear V-cycle method for a class of mildly nonlinear second order elliptic boundary value problems which do not have full elliptic regularity.

  8. Evaluation of a Multigrid Scheme for the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    A fast multigrid solver for the steady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The multigrid solver is based upon a factorizable discrete scheme for the velocity-pressure form of the Navier-Stokes equations. This scheme correctly distinguishes between the advection-diffusion and elliptic parts of the operator, allowing efficient smoothers to be constructed. To evaluate the multigrid algorithm, solutions are computed for flow over a flat plate, parabola, and a Karman-Trefftz airfoil. Both nonlifting and lifting airfoil flows are considered, with a Reynolds number range of 200 to 800. Convergence and accuracy of the algorithm are discussed. Using Gauss-Seidel line relaxation in alternating directions, multigrid convergence behavior approaching that of O(N) methods is achieved. The computational efficiency of the numerical scheme is compared with that of Runge-Kutta and implicit upwind based multigrid methods.

  9. Multigrid approaches to non-linear diffusion problems on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The efficiency of three multigrid methods for solving highly non-linear diffusion problems on two-dimensional unstructured meshes is examined. The three multigrid methods differ mainly in the manner in which the nonlinearities of the governing equations are handled. These comprise a non-linear full approximation storage (FAS) multigrid method which is used to solve the non-linear equations directly, a linear multigrid method which is used to solve the linear system arising from a Newton linearization of the non-linear system, and a hybrid scheme which is based on a non-linear FAS multigrid scheme, but employs a linear solver on each level as a smoother. Results indicate that all methods are equally effective at converging the non-linear residual in a given number of grid sweeps, but that the linear solver is more efficient in cpu time due to the lower cost of linear versus non-linear grid sweeps.

  10. Introduction to multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesseling, P.

    1995-01-01

    These notes were written for an introductory course on the application of multigrid methods to elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations for engineers, physicists and applied mathematicians. The use of more advanced mathematical tools, such as functional analysis, is avoided. The course is intended to be accessible to a wide audience of users of computational methods. We restrict ourselves to finite volume and finite difference discretization. The basic principles are given. Smoothing methods and Fourier smoothing analysis are reviewed. The fundamental multigrid algorithm is studied. The smoothing and coarse grid approximation properties are discussed. Multigrid schedules and structured programming of multigrid algorithms are treated. Robustness and efficiency are considered.

  11. Black box multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dendy, J. E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The black box multigrid (BOXMG) code, which only needs specification of the matrix problem for application in the multigrid method was investigated. It is contended that a major problem with the multigrid method is that each new grid configuration requires a major programming effort to develop a code that specifically handles that grid configuration. The SOR and ICCG methods only specify the matrix problem, no matter what the grid configuration. It is concluded that the BOXMG does everything else necessary to set up the auxiliary coarser problems to achieve a multigrid solution.

  12. Numerical solvers to the stabilizing solution of perturbed algebraic Riccati equations in LQ zero-sum games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. G.; Netov, N. C.; Bogdanova, B. C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of solving a generalized algebraic Riccati equation with an indefinite sign of its quadratic term. We extend the approach introduced by Lanzon, Feng, Anderson and Rotkowitz (2008) for solving similar Riccati equations. We numerically investigate two types of iterative methods for computing the stabilizing solution. The first type of iterative methods constructs two matrix sequences, where the sum of them converges to the stabilizing solution. The second type of methods defines one matrix sequence which converges to the stabilizing solution. Computer realizations of the presented methods are numerically tested and compared on the test of family examples. Based on the experiments some conclusions are derived.

  13. Implementing abstract multigrid or multilevel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Craig C.

    1993-01-01

    Multigrid methods can be formulated as an algorithm for an abstract problem that is independent of the partial differential equation, domain, and discretization method. In such an abstract setting, problems not arising from partial differential equations can be treated. A general theory exists for linear problems. The general theory was motivated by a series of abstract solvers (Madpack). The latest version was motivated by the theory. Madpack now allows for a wide variety of iterative and direct solvers, preconditioners, and interpolation and projection schemes, including user callback ones. It allows for sparse, dense, and stencil matrices. Mildly nonlinear problems can be handled. Also, there is a fast, multigrid Poisson solver (two and three dimensions). The type of solvers and design decisions (including language, data structures, external library support, and callbacks) are discussed. Based on the author's experiences with two versions of Madpack, a better approach is proposed. This is based on a mixed language formulation (C and FORTRAN + preprocessor). Reasons for not using FORTRAN, C, or C++ (individually) are given. Implementing the proposed strategy is not difficult.

  14. Performance Models for the Spike Banded Linear System Solver

    DOE PAGES

    Manguoglu, Murat; Saied, Faisal; Sameh, Ahmed; Grama, Ananth

    2011-01-01

    With availability of large-scale parallel platforms comprised of tens-of-thousands of processors and beyond, there is significant impetus for the development of scalable parallel sparse linear system solvers and preconditioners. An integral part of this design process is the development of performance models capable of predicting performance and providing accurate cost models for the solvers and preconditioners. There has been some work in the past on characterizing performance of the iterative solvers themselves. In this paper, we investigate the problem of characterizing performance and scalability of banded preconditioners. Recent work has demonstrated the superior convergence properties and robustness of banded preconditioners,more » compared to state-of-the-art ILU family of preconditioners as well as algebraic multigrid preconditioners. Furthermore, when used in conjunction with efficient banded solvers, banded preconditioners are capable of significantly faster time-to-solution. Our banded solver, the Truncated Spike algorithm is specifically designed for parallel performance and tolerance to deep memory hierarchies. Its regular structure is also highly amenable to accurate performance characterization. Using these characteristics, we derive the following results in this paper: (i) we develop parallel formulations of the Truncated Spike solver, (ii) we develop a highly accurate pseudo-analytical parallel performance model for our solver, (iii) we show excellent predication capabilities of our model – based on which we argue the high scalability of our solver. Our pseudo-analytical performance model is based on analytical performance characterization of each phase of our solver. These analytical models are then parameterized using actual runtime information on target platforms. An important consequence of our performance models is that they reveal underlying performance bottlenecks in both serial and parallel formulations. All of our results are validated

  15. NON-CONFORMING FINITE ELEMENTS; MESH GENERATION, ADAPTIVITY AND RELATED ALGEBRAIC MULTIGRID AND DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION METHODS IN MASSIVELY PARALLEL COMPUTING ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarov, R; Pasciak, J; Jones, J

    2002-02-01

    Construction, analysis and numerical testing of efficient solution techniques for solving elliptic PDEs that allow for parallel implementation have been the focus of the research. A number of discretization and solution methods for solving second order elliptic problems that include mortar and penalty approximations and domain decomposition methods for finite elements and finite volumes have been investigated and analyzed. Techniques for parallel domain decomposition algorithms in the framework of PETC and HYPRE have been studied and tested. Hierarchical parallel grid refinement and adaptive solution methods have been implemented and tested on various model problems. A parallel code implementing the mortar method with algebraically constructed multiplier spaces was developed.

  16. Conduct of the International Multigrid Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, S.

    1984-01-01

    The 1983 International Multigrid Conference was held at Colorado's Copper Mountain Ski Resort, April 5-8. It was organized jointly by the Institute for Computational Studies at Colorado State University, U.S.A., and the Gasellschaft fur Mathematik und Datenverarbeitung Bonn, F.R. Germany, and was sponsored by the Air Force Office of Sponsored Research and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Headquarters. The conference was attended by 80 scientists, divided by institution almost equally into private industry, research laboratories, and academia. Fifteen attendees came from countries other than the U.S.A. In addition to the fruitful discussions, the most significant factor of the conference was of course the lectures. The lecturers include most of the leaders in the field of multigrid research. The program offered a nice integrated blend of theory, numerical studies, basic research, and applications. Some of the new areas of research that have surfaced since the Koln-Porz conference include: the algebraic multigrid approach; multigrid treatment of Euler equations for inviscid fluid flow problems; 3-D problems; and the application of MG methods on vector and parallel computers.

  17. Towards Optimal Multigrid Efficiency for the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    A fast multigrid solver for the steady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented. Unlike time-marching schemes, this approach uses relaxation of the steady equations. Application of this method results in a discretization that correctly distinguishes between the advection and elliptic parts of the operator, allowing efficient smoothers to be constructed. Numerical solutions are shown for flow over a flat plate and a Karman-Trefftz airfoil. Using collective Gauss-Seidel line relaxation in both the vertical and horizontal directions, multigrid convergence behavior approaching that of O(N) methods is achieved. The computational efficiency of the numerical scheme is compared with that of a Runge-Kutta based multigrid method.

  18. Parallelization of an Adaptive Multigrid Algorithm for Fast Solution of Finite Element Structural Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, N K; Parsons, I D; Hjelmstad, K D

    2002-03-21

    Adaptive mesh refinement selectively subdivides the elements of a coarse user supplied mesh to produce a fine mesh with reduced discretization error. Effective use of adaptive mesh refinement coupled with an a posteriori error estimator can produce a mesh that solves a problem to a given discretization error using far fewer elements than uniform refinement. A geometric multigrid solver uses increasingly finer discretizations of the same geometry to produce a very fast and numerically scalable solution to a set of linear equations. Adaptive mesh refinement is a natural method for creating the different meshes required by the multigrid solver. This paper describes the implementation of a scalable adaptive multigrid method on a distributed memory parallel computer. Results are presented that demonstrate the parallel performance of the methodology by solving a linear elastic rocket fuel deformation problem on an SGI Origin 3000. Two challenges must be met when implementing adaptive multigrid algorithms on massively parallel computing platforms. First, although the fine mesh for which the solution is desired may be large and scaled to the number of processors, the multigrid algorithm must also operate on much smaller fixed-size data sets on the coarse levels. Second, the mesh must be repartitioned as it is adapted to maintain good load balancing. In an adaptive multigrid algorithm, separate mesh levels may require separate partitioning, further complicating the load balance problem. This paper shows that, when the proper optimizations are made, parallel adaptive multigrid algorithms perform well on machines with several hundreds of processors.

  19. General purpose nonlinear system solver based on Newton-Krylov method.

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    KINSOL is part of a software family called SUNDIALS: SUite of Nonlinear and Differential/Algebraic equation Solvers [1]. KINSOL is a general-purpose nonlinear system solver based on Newton-Krylov and fixed-point solver technologies [2].

  20. Geometric multigrid for an implicit-time immersed boundary method

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, Robert D.; Philip, Bobby; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2014-10-12

    The immersed boundary (IB) method is an approach to fluid-structure interaction that uses Lagrangian variables to describe the deformations and resulting forces of the structure and Eulerian variables to describe the motion and forces of the fluid. Explicit time stepping schemes for the IB method require solvers only for Eulerian equations, for which fast Cartesian grid solution methods are available. Such methods are relatively straightforward to develop and are widely used in practice but often require very small time steps to maintain stability. Implicit-time IB methods permit the stable use of large time steps, but efficient implementations of such methods require significantly more complex solvers that effectively treat both Lagrangian and Eulerian variables simultaneously. Moreover, several different approaches to solving the coupled Lagrangian-Eulerian equations have been proposed, but a complete understanding of this problem is still emerging. This paper presents a geometric multigrid method for an implicit-time discretization of the IB equations. This multigrid scheme uses a generalization of box relaxation that is shown to handle problems in which the physical stiffness of the structure is very large. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the algorithms described herein. Finally, these tests show that using multigrid as a preconditioner for a Krylov method yields improvements in both robustness and efficiency as compared to using multigrid as a solver. They also demonstrate that with a time step 100–1000 times larger than that permitted by an explicit IB method, the multigrid-preconditioned implicit IB method is approximately 50–200 times more efficient than the explicit method.

  1. Geometric multigrid for an implicit-time immersed boundary method

    DOE PAGES

    Guy, Robert D.; Philip, Bobby; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2014-10-12

    The immersed boundary (IB) method is an approach to fluid-structure interaction that uses Lagrangian variables to describe the deformations and resulting forces of the structure and Eulerian variables to describe the motion and forces of the fluid. Explicit time stepping schemes for the IB method require solvers only for Eulerian equations, for which fast Cartesian grid solution methods are available. Such methods are relatively straightforward to develop and are widely used in practice but often require very small time steps to maintain stability. Implicit-time IB methods permit the stable use of large time steps, but efficient implementations of such methodsmore » require significantly more complex solvers that effectively treat both Lagrangian and Eulerian variables simultaneously. Moreover, several different approaches to solving the coupled Lagrangian-Eulerian equations have been proposed, but a complete understanding of this problem is still emerging. This paper presents a geometric multigrid method for an implicit-time discretization of the IB equations. This multigrid scheme uses a generalization of box relaxation that is shown to handle problems in which the physical stiffness of the structure is very large. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the algorithms described herein. Finally, these tests show that using multigrid as a preconditioner for a Krylov method yields improvements in both robustness and efficiency as compared to using multigrid as a solver. They also demonstrate that with a time step 100–1000 times larger than that permitted by an explicit IB method, the multigrid-preconditioned implicit IB method is approximately 50–200 times more efficient than the explicit method.« less

  2. Multigrid-sinc methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, Steve; Stenger, Frank

    1986-01-01

    A Galerkin method using Whittaker cardinal or 'sinc' functions as basis functions is described for the solution of boundary-value problems. When the solution is analytic in the interior of the domain, the error of approximation using 2N + 1 points is O(e exp /-gamma sq rt N/) even if derivatives of the solution are singular at the boundaries. A multigrid method with overall complexity O(N log N) is used to solve the discrete equations. This paper contains a description of the multigrid-sinc algorithm along with some preliminary numerical results for two-point boundary-value problems.

  3. Unstructured multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.

    1987-01-01

    The use of the multigrid procedure with a sequence of unnested coarser grids is discussed. Validity of the procedure is assessed by considering the solution of a single linear elliptic equation. It is demonstrated how a scheme with the optimum order of operations can be constructed. Application to the solution of the Euler equations is considered.

  4. Unstructured multigrid through agglomeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Berger, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    In this work the compressible Euler equations are solved using finite volume techniques on unstructured grids. The spatial discretization employs a central difference approximation augmented by dissipative terms. Temporal discretization is done using a multistage Runge-Kutta scheme. A multigrid technique is used to accelerate convergence to steady state. The coarse grids are derived directly from the given fine grid through agglomeration of the control volumes. This agglomeration is accomplished by using a greedy-type algorithm and is done in such a way that the load, which is proportional to the number of edges, goes down by nearly a factor of 4 when moving from a fine to a coarse grid. The agglomeration algorithm has been implemented and the grids have been tested in a multigrid code. An area-weighted restriction is applied when moving from fine to coarse grids while a trivial injection is used for prolongation. Across a range of geometries and flows, it is shown that the agglomeration multigrid scheme compares very favorably with an unstructured multigrid algorithm that makes use of independent coarse meshes, both in terms of convergence and elapsed times.

  5. Large-Scale Parallel Viscous Flow Computations using an Unstructured Multigrid Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1999-01-01

    The development and testing of a parallel unstructured agglomeration multigrid algorithm for steady-state aerodynamic flows is discussed. The agglomeration multigrid strategy uses a graph algorithm to construct the coarse multigrid levels from the given fine grid, similar to an algebraic multigrid approach, but operates directly on the non-linear system using the FAS (Full Approximation Scheme) approach. The scalability and convergence rate of the multigrid algorithm are examined on the SGI Origin 2000 and the Cray T3E. An argument is given which indicates that the asymptotic scalability of the multigrid algorithm should be similar to that of its underlying single grid smoothing scheme. For medium size problems involving several million grid points, near perfect scalability is obtained for the single grid algorithm, while only a slight drop-off in parallel efficiency is observed for the multigrid V- and W-cycles, using up to 128 processors on the SGI Origin 2000, and up to 512 processors on the Cray T3E. For a large problem using 25 million grid points, good scalability is observed for the multigrid algorithm using up to 1450 processors on a Cray T3E, even when the coarsest grid level contains fewer points than the total number of processors.

  6. Adaptive Multigrid Solution of Stokes' Equation on CELL Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgersma, M. R.; Yuen, D. A.; Pratt, S. G.

    2006-12-01

    We are developing an adaptive multigrid solver for treating nonlinear elliptic partial-differential equations, needed for mantle convection problems. Since multigrid is being used for the complete solution, not just as a preconditioner, spatial difference operators are kept nearly diagonally dominant by increasing density of the coarsest grid in regions where coefficients have rapid spatial variation. At each time step, the unstructured coarse grid is refined in regions where coefficients associated with the differential operators or boundary conditions have rapid spatial variation, and coarsened in regions where there is more gradual spatial variation. For three-dimensional problems, the boundary is two-dimensional, and regions where coefficients change rapidly are often near two-dimensional surfaces, so the coarsest grid is only fine near two-dimensional subsets of the three-dimensional space. Coarse grid density drops off exponentially with distance from boundary surfaces and rapid-coefficient-change surfaces. This unstructured coarse grid results in the number of coarse grid voxels growing proportional to surface area, rather than proportional to volume. This results in significant computational savings for the coarse-grid solution. This coarse-grid solution is then refined for the fine-grid solution, and multigrid methods have memory usage and runtime proportional to the number of fine-grid voxels. This adaptive multigrid algorithm is being implemented on the CELL processor, where each chip has eight floating point processors and each processor operates on four floating point numbers each clock cycle. Both the adaptive grid algorithm and the multigrid solver have very efficient parallel implementations, in order to take advantage of the CELL processor architecture.

  7. Multigrid solution of the Navier-Stokes equations on highly stretched grids with defect correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sockol, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    Relaxation-based multigrid solvers for the steady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are examined to determine their computational speed and robustness. Four relaxation methods with a common discretization have been used as smoothers in a single tailored multigrid procedure. The equations are discretized on a staggered grid with first order upwind used for convection in the relaxation process on all grids and defect correction to second order central on the fine grid introduced once per multigrid cycle. A fixed W(1,1) cycle with full weighting of residuals is used in the FAS multigrid process. The resulting solvers have been applied to three 2D flow problems, over a range of Reynolds numbers, on both uniform and highly stretched grids. In all cases the L(sub 2) norm of the velocity changes is reduced to 10(exp -6) in a few 10's of fine grid sweeps. The results from this study are used to draw conclusions on the strengths and weaknesses of the individual relaxation schemes as well as those of the overall multigrid procedure when used as a solver on highly stretched grids.

  8. Multigrid Methods for EHL Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurgat, Elyas; Berzins, Martin

    1996-01-01

    In many bearings and contacts, forces are transmitted through thin continuous fluid films which separate two contacting elements. Objects in contact are normally subjected to friction and wear which can be reduced effectively by using lubricants. If the lubricant film is sufficiently thin to prevent the opposing solids from coming into contact and carries the entire load, then we have hydrodynamic lubrication, where the lubricant film is determined by the motion and geometry of the solids. However, for loaded contacts of low geometrical conformity, such as gears, rolling contact bearings and cams, this is not the case due to high pressures and this is referred to as Elasto-Hydrodynamic Lubrication (EHL) In EHL, elastic deformation of the contacting elements and the increase in fluid viscosity with pressure are very significant and cannot be ignored. Since the deformation results in changing the geometry of the lubricating film, which in turn determines the pressure distribution, an EHL mathematical model must simultaneously satisfy the complex elasticity (integral) and the Reynolds lubrication (differential) equations. The nonlinear and coupled nature of the two equations makes numerical calculations computationally intensive. This is especially true for highly loaded problems found in practice. One novel feature of these problems is that the solution may exhibit sharp pressure spikes in the outlet region. To this date both finite element and finite difference methods have been used to solve EHL problems with perhaps greater emphasis on the use of the finite difference approach. In both cases, a major computational difficulty is ensuring convergence of the nonlinear equations solver to a steady state solution. Two successful methods for achieving this are direct iteration and multigrid methods. Direct iteration methods (e.g Gauss Seidel) have long been used in conjunction with finite difference discretizations on regular meshes. Perhaps one of the best examples of

  9. Multigrid-based 'shifted-Laplacian' preconditioning for the time-harmonic elastic wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzuti, G.; Mulder, W. A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the numerical performance of an iterative solver for a frequency-domain finite-difference discretization of the isotropic elastic wave equation. The solver is based on the 'shifted-Laplacian' preconditioner, originally designed for the acoustic wave equation. This preconditioner represents a discretization of a heavily damped wave equation and can be efficiently inverted by a multigrid iteration. However, the application of multigrid to the elastic case is not straightforward because standard methods, such as point-Jacobi, fail to smooth the S-wave wavenumber components of the error when high P-to-S velocity ratios are present. We consider line smoothers as an alternative and apply local-mode analysis to evaluate the performance of the various components of the multigrid preconditioner. Numerical examples in 2-D demonstrate the efficacy of our method.

  10. A multigrid preconditioner for the semiconductor equations

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, J.C.; Tuminaro, R.S.

    1994-12-31

    Currently, integrated circuits are primarily designed in a {open_quote}trial and error{close_quote} fashion. That is, prototypes are built and improved via experimentation and testing. In the near future, however, it may be possible to significantly reduce the time and cost of designing new devices by using computer simulations. To accurately perform these complex simulations in three dimensions, however, new algorithms and high performance computers are necessary. In this paper the authors discuss the use of multigrid preconditioning inside a semiconductor device modeling code, DANCIR. The DANCIR code is a full three-dimensional simulator capable of computing steady-state solutions of the drift-diffusion equations for a single semiconductor device and has been used to simulate a wide variety of different devices. At the inner core of DANCIR is a solver for the nonlinear equations that arise from the spatial discretization of the drift-diffusion equations on a rectangular grid. These nonlinear equations are resolved using Gummel`s method which requires three symmetric linear systems to be solved within each Gummel iteration. It is the resolution of these linear systems which comprises the dominant computational cost of this code. The original version of DANCIR uses a Cholesky preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm to solve these linear systems. Unfortunately, this algorithm has a number of disadvantages: (1) it takes many iterations to converge (if it converges), (2) it can require a significant amount of computing time, and (3) it is not very parallelizable. To improve the situation, the authors consider a multigrid preconditioner. The multigrid method uses iterations on a hierarchy of grids to accelerate the convergence on the finest grid.

  11. An efficient non-linear multigrid procedure for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaloganathan, S.; Shaw, G. J.

    An efficient Full Approximation multigrid scheme for finite volume discretizations of the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The algorithm is applied to the driven cavity test problem. Numerical results are presented and a comparison made with PACE, a Rolls-Royce industrial code, which uses the SIMPLE pressure correction method as an iterative solver.

  12. Multigrid Methods for Fully Implicit Oil Reservoir Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molenaar, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we consider the simultaneous flow of oil and water in reservoir rock. This displacement process is modeled by two basic equations: the material balance or continuity equations and the equation of motion (Darcy's law). For the numerical solution of this system of nonlinear partial differential equations there are two approaches: the fully implicit or simultaneous solution method and the sequential solution method. In the sequential solution method the system of partial differential equations is manipulated to give an elliptic pressure equation and a hyperbolic (or parabolic) saturation equation. In the IMPES approach the pressure equation is first solved, using values for the saturation from the previous time level. Next the saturations are updated by some explicit time stepping method; this implies that the method is only conditionally stable. For the numerical solution of the linear, elliptic pressure equation multigrid methods have become an accepted technique. On the other hand, the fully implicit method is unconditionally stable, but it has the disadvantage that in every time step a large system of nonlinear algebraic equations has to be solved. The most time-consuming part of any fully implicit reservoir simulator is the solution of this large system of equations. Usually this is done by Newton's method. The resulting systems of linear equations are then either solved by a direct method or by some conjugate gradient type method. In this paper we consider the possibility of applying multigrid methods for the iterative solution of the systems of nonlinear equations. There are two ways of using multigrid for this job: either we use a nonlinear multigrid method or we use a linear multigrid method to deal with the linear systems that arise in Newton's method. So far only a few authors have reported on the use of multigrid methods for fully implicit simulations. Two-level FAS algorithm is presented for the black-oil equations, and linear multigrid for

  13. Some Aspects of Multigrid Methods on Non-Structured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillard, H.; Marco, N.

    1996-01-01

    To solve a given fine mesh problem, the design of a multigrid method requires the definition of coarse levels, associated coarse grid operators and inter-grid transfer operators. For non-structured simplified meshes, these definitions can rely on the use of non-nested triangulations. These definitions can also be founded on agglomeration/aggregation techniques in a purely algebraic manner. This paper analyzes these two options, shows the connections of the volume-agglomeration method with algebraic methods and proposes a new definition of prolongation operator suitable for the application of the volume-agglomeration method to elliptic problems.

  14. Multigrid contact detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kejing; Dong, Shoubin; Zhou, Zhaoyao

    2007-03-01

    Contact detection is a general problem of many physical simulations. This work presents a O(N) multigrid method for general contact detection problems (MGCD). The multigrid idea is integrated with contact detection problems. Both the time complexity and memory consumption of the MGCD are O(N) . Unlike other methods, whose efficiencies are influenced strongly by the object size distribution, the performance of MGCD is insensitive to the object size distribution. We compare the MGCD with the no binary search (NBS) method and the multilevel boxing method in three dimensions for both time complexity and memory consumption. For objects with similar size, the MGCD is as good as the NBS method, both of which outperform the multilevel boxing method regarding memory consumption. For objects with diverse size, the MGCD outperform both the NBS method and the multilevel boxing method. We use the MGCD to solve the contact detection problem for a granular simulation system based on the discrete element method. From this granular simulation, we get the density property of monosize packing and binary packing with size ratio equal to 10. The packing density for monosize particles is 0.636. For binary packing with size ratio equal to 10, when the number of small particles is 300 times as the number of big particles, the maximal packing density 0.824 is achieved.

  15. Preconditioners for the spectral multigrid method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. N.; Zang, T. A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The systems of algebraic equations which arise from spectral discretizations of elliptic equations are full and direct solutions of them are rarely feasible. Iterative methods are an attractive alternative because Fourier transform techniques enable the discrete matrix-vector products to be computed with nearly the same efficiency as is possible for corresponding but sparse finite difference discretizations. For realistic Dirichlet problems preconditioning is essential for acceptable convergence rates. A brief description of Chebyshev spectral approximations and spectral multigrid methods for elliptic problems is given. A survey of preconditioners for Dirichlet problems based on second-order finite difference methods is made. New preconditioning techniques based on higher order finite differences and on the spectral matrix itself are presented. The preconditioners are analyzed in terms of their spectra and numerical examples are presented.

  16. Preconditioners for the spectral multigrid method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. N.; Hussaini, M. Y.; Zang, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    The systems of algebraic equations which arise from spectral discretizations of elliptic equations are full and direct solutions of them are rarely feasible. Iterative methods are an attractive alternative because Fourier transform techniques enable the discrete matrix-vector products to be computed with nearly the same efficiency as is possible for corresponding but sparse finite difference discretizations. For realistic Dirichlet problem preconditioning is essential for acceptable convergence rates. A brief description of Chebyshev spectral approximations and spectral multigrid methods for elliptic problems is given. A survey of preconditioners for Dirichlet problems based on second-order finite difference methods is made. New preconditioning techniques based on higher order finite differences and on the spectral matrix itself are presented. The preconditioners are analyzed in terms of their spectra and numerical examples are presented.

  17. Simulation of viscous flows using a multigrid-control volume finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Hookey, N.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses a multigrid control volume finite element method (MG CVFEM) for the simulation of viscous fluid flows. The CVFEM is an equal-order primitive variables formulation that avoids spurious solution fields by incorporating an appropriate pressure gradient in the velocity interpolation functions. The resulting set of discretized equations is solved using a coupled equation line solver (CELS) that solves the discretized momentum and continuity equations simultaneously along lines in the calculation domain. The CVFEM has been implemented in the context of both FMV- and V-cycle multigrid algorithms, and preliminary results indicate a five to ten fold reduction in execution times.

  18. The block adaptive multigrid method applied to the solution of the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantelelis, Nikos

    1993-01-01

    In the present study, a scheme capable of solving very fast and robust complex nonlinear systems of equations is presented. The Block Adaptive Multigrid (BAM) solution method offers multigrid acceleration and adaptive grid refinement based on the prediction of the solution error. The proposed solution method was used with an implicit upwind Euler solver for the solution of complex transonic flows around airfoils. Very fast results were obtained (18-fold acceleration of the solution) using one fourth of the volumes of a global grid with the same solution accuracy for two test cases.

  19. Implicit Multigrid Solutions for Compressible Flows in Complex Geometries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixia

    Two implicit multigrid algorithms for the two and three dimensional compressible Euler equations have been developed in this dissertation. First, a diagonal implicit multigrid method is developed for solving a finite-volume approximation to the Euler equations in which the dependent variables are stored at the cell vertices. The spatial derivatives in the two dimensional Euler equations are approximated using a conservative cell-vertex finite volume formulation. Artificial dissipation is provided by adding an adaptive blend of second and fourth differences of the solution to maintain stability and accuracy. A Diagonal Alternating Directional Implicit method is used to advance the solution in time. Rapid convergence to a steady-state solution is achieved with local time stepping and the multigrid algorithm. Results for the transonic flow past the NACA 0012 airfoil are presented to verify the accuracy and efficiency of the scheme. Second, the development of an efficient and flexible multiblock/multigrid Euler solver and its application to realistic engineering problems are presented. A cell-centered finite volume method with a multigrid implementation of the Diagonal Alternating Direction Implicit algorithm is used to solve the Euler equations. A fully conservative inter-block boundary condition, which permits the passage of discontinuities across block boundaries with minimum distortion of the solution, is developed for cases in which the grid lines at the inter-block boundaries can be completely continuous or discontinuous. Information is exchanged between blocks by using surface arrays, which contain all the data needed to update the inter-block boundary conditions. Results demonstrate the feasibility of using the present multi -block/multigrid approach to solve flow problems involving complex geometries. Two dimensional results for several types of grids and various free stream conditions have been presented to verify the accuracy and computational efficiency of

  20. Implicit multigrid solutions for compressible flows in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixia

    Two implicit multigrid algorithms for the two and three dimensional compressible Euler equations are developed. First, a diagonal implicit multigrid method is developed for solving a finite-volume approximation to the Euler equations in which the dependent variables are stored at the cell vertices. The spatial derivatives in the two dimensional Euler equations are approximated using a conservative cell-vertex finite volume formulation. Artificial dissipation is provided by adding an adaptive blend of second and fourth differences of the solution to maintain stability and accuracy. A diagonal alternating directional implicit method is used to advance the solution in time. Rapid convergence to a steady-state solution is achieved with local time stepping and the multigrid algorithm. Results for the transonic flow past the NACA 0012 airfoil are presented to verify the accuracy and efficiency of the scheme. Second, the development of an efficient and flexible multiblock/multigrid Euler solver and its application to realistic engineering problems are presented. A cell-centered finite volume method with a multigrid implementation of the diagonal alternating direction implicit algorithm is used to solve the Euler equations. A fully conservative interblock boundary condition, which permits the passage of discontinuities across block boundaries with minimum distortion of the solution, is developed for cases in which the grid lines at the interblock boundaries can be completely continuous or discontinuous. Information is exchanged between blocks by using surface arrays, which contain all the data needed to update the interblock boundary conditions. Results demonstrate the feasibility of using the present multiblock/multigrid approach to solve flow problems involving complex geometries. Two dimensional results for several types of grids and various free stream conditions have been presented to verify the accuracy and computational efficiency of the method. The application of

  1. Fast multigrid solution of the advection problem with closed characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Yavneh, I.; Venner, C.H.; Brandt, A.

    1996-12-31

    The numerical solution of the advection-diffusion problem in the inviscid limit with closed characteristics is studied as a prelude to an efficient high Reynolds-number flow solver. It is demonstrated by a heuristic analysis and numerical calculations that using upstream discretization with downstream relaxation-ordering and appropriate residual weighting in a simple multigrid V cycle produces an efficient solution process. We also derive upstream finite-difference approximations to the advection operator, whose truncation terms approximate {open_quotes}physical{close_quotes} (Laplacian) viscosity, thus avoiding spurious solutions to the homogeneous problem when the artificial diffusivity dominates the physical viscosity.

  2. Kinds of Knowledge in Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Clayton

    Solving equations in elementary algebra requires knowledge of the permitted operations, and knowledge of what operation to use at a given point in the solution process. While just these kinds of knowledge would be adequate for an ideal solver, human solvers appear to need and use other kinds of knowledge. First, many errors seem to indicate that…

  3. Highly scalable linear solvers on thousands of processors.

    SciTech Connect

    Domino, Stefan Paul; Karlin, Ian; Siefert, Christopher; Hu, Jonathan Joseph; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Tuminaro, Raymond Stephen

    2009-09-01

    In this report we summarize research into new parallel algebraic multigrid (AMG) methods. We first provide a introduction to parallel AMG. We then discuss our research in parallel AMG algorithms for very large scale platforms. We detail significant improvements in the AMG setup phase to a matrix-matrix multiplication kernel. We present a smoothed aggregation AMG algorithm with fewer communication synchronization points, and discuss its links to domain decomposition methods. Finally, we discuss a multigrid smoothing technique that utilizes two message passing layers for use on multicore processors.

  4. Symmetric Gauss-Seidel multigrid solution of the Euler equations on structured and unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughey, David A.

    2005-11-01

    The efficient symmetric Gauss-Seidel (SGS) algorithm for solving the Euler equations of inviscid, compressible flow on structured grids, developed in collaboration with Jameson of Stanford University, is extended to unstructured grids. The algorithm uses a nonlinear formulation of an SGS solver, implemented within the framework of multigrid. The earlier form of the algorithm used the natural (lexicographic) ordering of the mesh cells available on structured grids for the SGS sweeps, but a number of features of the method that are believed to contribute to its success can also be implemented for computations on unstructured grids. The present paper reviews, the features of the SGS multigrid solver for structured gr0ids, including its nonlinear implementation, its use of “absolute” Jacobian matrix preconditioning, and its incorporation of multigrid, and then describes the incorporation of these features into an algorithm suitable for computations on unstructured grids. The implementation on unstructured grids is based on the agglomerated multigrid method developed by Sørensen, which uses an explicit Runge-Kutta smoothing algorithm. Results of computations for steady, transonic flows past two-dimensional airfoils are presented, and the efficiency of the method is evaluated for computations on both structured and unstructured meshes.

  5. Comparative Convergence Analysis of Nonlinear AMLI-Cycle Multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaozhe; Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Xu, Jinchao

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of our paper is to provide a comprehensive convergence analysis of the nonlinear algebraic multilevel iteration (AMLI)-cycle multigrid (MG) method for symmetric positive definite problems. We show that the nonlinear AMLI-cycle MG method is uniformly convergent, based on classical assumptions for approximation and smoothing properties. Furthermore, under only the assumption that the smoother is convergent, we show that the nonlinear AMLI-cycle method is always better (or not worse) than the respective V-cycle MG method. Finally, numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  6. Sixth Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    During the 5-day meeting, 112 half-hour talks on current research topics were presented. Session topics included: fluids, domain decomposition, iterative methods, Basics I and II, adaptive methods, nonlinear filtering, CFD I, II, and III, applications, transport, algebraic solvers, supercomputing, and student paper winners.

  7. Rotor-stator interaction analysis using the Navier-Stokes equations and a multigrid method

    SciTech Connect

    Arnone, A.; Pacciani, R.

    1996-10-01

    A recently developed, time-accurate multigrid viscous solver has been extended to the analysis of unsteady rotor-stator interaction. In the proposed method, a fully implicit discretization is used to remove stability limitations. By means of a dual time-stepping approach, a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is used in conjunction with several accelerating techniques typical of steady-state solvers, instead of traditional time-expensive factorizations. The accelerating strategies include local time stepping, residual smoothing, and multigrid. Two-dimensional viscous calculations of unsteady rotor-stator interaction in the first stage of a modern gas turbine are presented. The stage analysis is based on the introduction of several blade passages to approximate the stator:rotor count ratio. Particular attention is dedicated to grid dependency in space and time as well as to the influence of the number of blades included in the calculations.

  8. A multigrid based computational procedure to predict internal flows with heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kiris, I.; Parameswaran, S.; Carroll, G.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, a formally third-order, finite volume, unstaggered (co-located), modified SIMPLE algorithm-based 2D code was created utilizing multigrid for fast convergence. Stone`s Strongly Implicit Procedure (SIP) is employed as a relaxation (smoother, matrix eq. solver) method, due to its high performance. The quadratic formulations QUICK, mixed and UTOPIA were used to discretize the convective terms in momentum equations. Velocity and pressure coupling was addressed via modified SIMPLE algorithm. Due to the co-located nature of method, the cell fact velocities are obtained via the so called momentum balancing technique introduced before. The Multigrid idea is implemented to the solution of pressure correction equation. Various ways of implementing Multigrid algorithms are discussed. An ASME benchmark case (backward facing step with heat transfer) is chosen as the problem. The so called accommodative FAS-FMG was used. Predictions show that high order convective term discretization improves the predictions, while multigrid enables about an order of magnitude CPU time savings. Results point out that the promises of both high order discretization and multigrid can be harvested for recirculating flows.

  9. Implementation and Optimization of miniGMG - a Compact Geometric Multigrid Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Samuel; Kalamkar, Dhiraj; Singh, Amik; Deshpande, Anand M.; Straalen, Brian Van; Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; Almgren, Ann; Dubey, Pradeep; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid

    2012-12-01

    Multigrid methods are widely used to accelerate the convergence of iterative solvers for linear systems used in a number of different application areas. In this report, we describe miniGMG, our compact geometric multigrid benchmark designed to proxy the multigrid solves found in AMR applications. We explore optimization techniques for geometric multigrid on existing and emerging multicore systems including the Opteron-based Cray XE6, Intel Sandy Bridge and Nehalem-based Infiniband clusters, as well as manycore-based architectures including NVIDIA's Fermi and Kepler GPUs and Intel's Knights Corner (KNC) co-processor. This report examines a variety of novel techniques including communication-aggregation, threaded wavefront-based DRAM communication-avoiding, dynamic threading decisions, SIMDization, and fusion of operators. We quantify performance through each phase of the V-cycle for both single-node and distributed-memory experiments and provide detailed analysis for each class of optimization. Results show our optimizations yield significant speedups across a variety of subdomain sizes while simultaneously demonstrating the potential of multi- and manycore processors to dramatically accelerate single-node performance. However, our analysis also indicates that improvements in networks and communication will be essential to reap the potential of manycore processors in large-scale multigrid calculations.

  10. Multistage Schemes with Multigrid for Euler and Navier-Strokes Equations: Components and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Turkel, Eli

    1997-01-01

    A class of explicit multistage time-stepping schemes with centered spatial differencing and multigrids are considered for the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. These schemes are the basis for a family of computer programs (flow codes with multigrid (FLOMG) series) currently used to solve a wide range of fluid dynamics problems, including internal and external flows. In this paper, the components of these multistage time-stepping schemes are defined, discussed, and in many cases analyzed to provide additional insight into their behavior. Special emphasis is given to numerical dissipation, stability of Runge-Kutta schemes, and the convergence acceleration techniques of multigrid and implicit residual smoothing. Both the Baldwin and Lomax algebraic equilibrium model and the Johnson and King one-half equation nonequilibrium model are used to establish turbulence closure. Implementation of these models is described.

  11. New convergence estimates for multigrid algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1987-10-01

    In this paper, new convergence estimates are proved for both symmetric and nonsymmetric multigrid algorithms applied to symmetric positive definite problems. Our theory relates the convergence of multigrid algorithms to a ''regularity and approximation'' parameter ..cap alpha.. epsilon (0, 1) and the number of relaxations m. We show that for the symmetric and nonsymmetric ..nu.. cycles, the multigrid iteration converges for any positive m at a rate which deteriorates no worse than 1-cj/sup -(1-//sup ..cap alpha..//sup )///sup ..cap alpha../, where j is the number of grid levels. We then define a generalized ..nu.. cycle algorithm which involves exponentially increasing (for example, doubling) the number of smoothings on successively coarser grids. We show that the resulting symmetric and nonsymmetric multigrid iterations converge for any ..cap alpha.. with rates that are independent of the mesh size. The theory is presented in an abstract setting which can be applied to finite element multigrid and finite difference multigrid methods.

  12. Analysis of a parallel multigrid algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Tuminaro, Ray S.

    1989-01-01

    The parallel multigrid algorithm of Frederickson and McBryan (1987) is considered. This algorithm uses multiple coarse-grid problems (instead of one problem) in the hope of accelerating convergence and is found to have a close relationship to traditional multigrid methods. Specifically, the parallel coarse-grid correction operator is identical to a traditional multigrid coarse-grid correction operator, except that the mixing of high and low frequencies caused by aliasing error is removed. Appropriate relaxation operators can be chosen to take advantage of this property. Comparisons between the standard multigrid and the new method are made.

  13. Multigrid lattice Boltzmann method for accelerated solution of elliptic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Dhiraj V.; Premnath, Kannan N.; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2014-05-01

    A new solver for second-order elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and the multigrid (MG) technique is presented. Several benchmark elliptic equations are solved numerically with the inclusion of multiple grid-levels in two-dimensional domains at an optimal computational cost within the LB framework. The results are compared with the corresponding analytical solutions and numerical solutions obtained using the Stone's strongly implicit procedure. The classical PDEs considered in this article include the Laplace and Poisson equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions, with the latter involving both constant and variable coefficients. A detailed analysis of solution accuracy, convergence and computational efficiency of the proposed solver is given. It is observed that the use of a high-order stencil (for smoothing) improves convergence and accuracy for an equivalent number of smoothing sweeps. The effect of the type of scheduling cycle (V- or W-cycle) on the performance of the MG-LBM is analyzed. Next, a parallel algorithm for the MG-LBM solver is presented and then its parallel performance on a multi-core cluster is analyzed. Lastly, a practical example is provided wherein the proposed elliptic PDE solver is used to compute the electro-static potential encountered in an electro-chemical cell, which demonstrates the effectiveness of this new solver in complex coupled systems. Several orders of magnitude gains in convergence and parallel scaling for the canonical problems, and a factor of 5 reduction for the multiphysics problem are achieved using the MG-LBM.

  14. Numerical Solvers for Generalized Algebraic Riccati Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. G.; Rusinova, R. I.

    2009-10-01

    We consider a new type nonlinear matrix equation. We investigate the existence a positive definite solution and two iterative methods for computing this solution. The first method is the classical Newton procedure and the second is a new Stein iteration. In this paper it is proved that a new Stein iteration has convergence properties to those of the Newton iteration.

  15. Application of an unstructured grid flow solver to planes, trains and automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spragle, Gregory S.; Smith, Wayne A.; Yadlin, Yoram

    1993-01-01

    Rampant, an unstructured flow solver developed at Fluent Inc., is used to compute three-dimensional, viscous, turbulent, compressible flow fields within complex solution domains. Rampant is an explicit, finite-volume flow solver capable of computing flow fields using either triangular (2d) or tetrahedral (3d) unstructured grids. Local time stepping, implicit residual smoothing, and multigrid techniques are used to accelerate the convergence of the explicit scheme. The paper describes the Rampant flow solver and presents flow field solutions about a plane, train, and automobile.

  16. Robust Multigrid Smoothers for Three Dimensional Elliptic Equations with Strong Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llorente, Ignacio M.; Melson, N. Duane

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the behavior of several plane relaxation methods as multigrid smoothers for the solution of a discrete anisotropic elliptic model problem on cell-centered grids. The methods compared are plane Jacobi with damping, plane Jacobi with partial damping, plane Gauss-Seidel, plane zebra Gauss-Seidel, and line Gauss-Seidel. Based on numerical experiments and local mode analysis, we compare the smoothing factor of the different methods in the presence of strong anisotropies. A four-color Gauss-Seidel method is found to have the best numerical and architectural properties of the methods considered in the present work. Although alternating direction plane relaxation schemes are simpler and more robust than other approaches, they are not currently used in industrial and production codes because they require the solution of a two-dimensional problem for each plane in each direction. We verify the theoretical predictions of Thole and Trottenberg that an exact solution of each plane is not necessary and that a single two-dimensional multigrid cycle gives the same result as an exact solution, in much less execution time. Parallelization of the two-dimensional multigrid cycles, the kernel of the three-dimensional implicit solver, is also discussed. Alternating-plane smoothers are found to be highly efficient multigrid smoothers for anisotropic elliptic problems.

  17. MGLab3D: An interactive environment for iterative solvers for elliptic PDEs in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bordner, J.; Saied, F.

    1996-12-31

    GLab3D is an enhancement of an interactive environment (MGLab) for experimenting with iterative solvers and multigrid algorithms. It is implemented in MATLAB. The new version has built-in 3D elliptic pde`s and several iterative methods and preconditioners that were not available in the original version. A sparse direct solver option has also been included. The multigrid solvers have also been extended to 3D. The discretization and pde domains are restricted to standard finite differences on the unit square/cube. The power of this software studies in the fact that no programming is needed to solve, for example, the convection-diffusion equation in 3D with TFQMR and a customized V-cycle preconditioner, for a variety of problem sizes and mesh Reynolds, numbers. In addition to the graphical user interface, some sample drivers are included to show how experiments can be composed using the underlying suite of problems and solvers.

  18. A multigrid approach to the global stability of swept attachment-line boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghello, Gianluca; Schmid, Peter; Huerre, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    A novel numerical approach to global stability analysis is presented. A multigrid framework is leveraged in order to achieve a high computational efficiency for both the base flow and eigenvalue/eigenmode computations. The base flow is obtained as the solution of the non-linear, steady-state Navier-Stokes equations at a computational cost of nearly O (n) , where n denotes the number of degrees of freedom. The eigenvectors are obtained using the same multigrid solver, coupled to an iterative shift-invert Arnoldi algorithm. The global stability analysis of the incompressible, viscous flow near the attachment line of a swept wing is then examined for a range of Reynolds numbers up to 10000. Different families of global modes are identified together with the dominant physical mechanisms underlying the perturbation dynamics in the vicinity of the swept attachment line. Financial support from Airbus and the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Iterative and multigrid methods in the finite element solution of incompressible and turbulent fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavery, N.; Taylor, C.

    1999-07-01

    Multigrid and iterative methods are used to reduce the solution time of the matrix equations which arise from the finite element (FE) discretisation of the time-independent equations of motion of the incompressible fluid in turbulent motion. Incompressible flow is solved by using the method of reduce interpolation for the pressure to satisfy the Brezzi-Babuska condition. The k-l model is used to complete the turbulence closure problem. The non-symmetric iterative matrix methods examined are the methods of least squares conjugate gradient (LSCG), biconjugate gradient (BCG), conjugate gradient squared (CGS), and the biconjugate gradient squared stabilised (BCGSTAB). The multigrid algorithm applied is based on the FAS algorithm of Brandt, and uses two and three levels of grids with a V-cycling schedule. These methods are all compared to the non-symmetric frontal solver. Copyright

  20. Elliptic Solvers for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.J.; Dendy, J.E., Jr.; Shapira, Y.

    1999-06-03

    We are developing multigrid methods that will efficiently solve elliptic problems with anisotropic and discontinuous coefficients on adaptive grids. The final product will be a library that provides for the simplified solution of such problems. This library will directly benefit the efforts of other Laboratory groups. The focus of this work is research on serial and parallel elliptic algorithms and the inclusion of our black-box multigrid techniques into this new setting. The approach applies the Los Alamos object-oriented class libraries that greatly simplify the development of serial and parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications. In the final year of this LDRD, we focused on putting the software together; in particular we completed the final AMR++ library, we wrote tutorials and manuals, and we built example applications. We implemented the Fast Adaptive Composite Grid method as the principal elliptic solver. We presented results at the Overset Grid Conference and other more AMR specific conferences. We worked on optimization of serial and parallel performance and published several papers on the details of this work. Performance remains an important issue and is the subject of continuing research work.

  1. Amesos Solver Package

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Vendall S.; Heroux, Michael A.; Hoekstra, Robert J.; Sala, Marzio

    2004-03-01

    Amesos is the Direct Sparse Solver Package in Trilinos. The goal of Amesos is to make AX=S as easy as it sounds, at least for direct methods. Amesos provides interfaces to a number of third party sparse direct solvers, including SuperLU, SuperLU MPI, DSCPACK, UMFPACK and KLU. Amesos provides a common object oriented interface to the best sparse direct solvers in the world. A sparse direct solver solves for x in Ax = b. where A is a matrix and x and b are vectors (or multi-vectors). A sparse direct solver flrst factors A into trinagular matrices L and U such that A = LU via gaussian elimination and then solves LU x = b. Switching amongst solvers in Amesos roquires a change to a single parameter. Yet, no solver needs to be linked it, unless it is used. All conversions between the matrices provided by the user and the format required by the underlying solver is performed by Amesos. As new sparse direct solvers are created, they will be incorporated into Amesos, allowing the user to simpty link with the new solver, change a single parameter in the calling sequence, and use the new solver. Amesos allows users to specify whether the matrix has changed. Amesos can be used anywhere that any sparse direct solver is needed.

  2. Amesos Solver Package

    2004-03-01

    Amesos is the Direct Sparse Solver Package in Trilinos. The goal of Amesos is to make AX=S as easy as it sounds, at least for direct methods. Amesos provides interfaces to a number of third party sparse direct solvers, including SuperLU, SuperLU MPI, DSCPACK, UMFPACK and KLU. Amesos provides a common object oriented interface to the best sparse direct solvers in the world. A sparse direct solver solves for x in Ax = b. wheremore » A is a matrix and x and b are vectors (or multi-vectors). A sparse direct solver flrst factors A into trinagular matrices L and U such that A = LU via gaussian elimination and then solves LU x = b. Switching amongst solvers in Amesos roquires a change to a single parameter. Yet, no solver needs to be linked it, unless it is used. All conversions between the matrices provided by the user and the format required by the underlying solver is performed by Amesos. As new sparse direct solvers are created, they will be incorporated into Amesos, allowing the user to simpty link with the new solver, change a single parameter in the calling sequence, and use the new solver. Amesos allows users to specify whether the matrix has changed. Amesos can be used anywhere that any sparse direct solver is needed.« less

  3. Extending the applicability of multigrid methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brannick, J; Brezina, M; Falgout, R; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J; Sheehan, B; Xu, J; Zikatanov, L

    2006-09-25

    Multigrid methods are ideal for solving the increasingly large-scale problems that arise in numerical simulations of physical phenomena because of their potential for computational costs and memory requirements that scale linearly with the degrees of freedom. Unfortunately, they have been historically limited by their applicability to elliptic-type problems and the need for special handling in their implementation. In this paper, we present an overview of several recent theoretical and algorithmic advances made by the TOPS multigrid partners and their collaborators in extending applicability of multigrid methods. Specific examples that are presented include quantum chromodynamics, radiation transport, and electromagnetics.

  4. Using SPARK as a Solver for Modelica

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael; Wetter, Michael; Haves, Philip; Moshier, Michael A.; Sowell, Edward F.

    2008-06-30

    Modelica is an object-oriented acausal modeling language that is well positioned to become a de-facto standard for expressing models of complex physical systems. To simulate a model expressed in Modelica, it needs to be translated into executable code. For generating run-time efficient code, such a translation needs to employ algebraic formula manipulations. As the SPARK solver has been shown to be competitive for generating such code but currently cannot be used with the Modelica language, we report in this paper how SPARK's symbolic and numerical algorithms can be implemented in OpenModelica, an open-source implementation of a Modelica modeling and simulation environment. We also report benchmark results that show that for our air flow network simulation benchmark, the SPARK solver is competitive with Dymola, which is believed to provide the best solver for Modelica.

  5. New iterative solvers for the NAG Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Salvini, S.; Shaw, G.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the work which has been carried out at NAG Ltd to update the iterative solvers for sparse systems of linear equations, both symmetric and unsymmetric, in the NAG Fortran 77 Library. Our current plans to extend this work and include it in our other numerical libraries in our range are also briefly mentioned. We have added to the Library the new Chapter F11, entirely dedicated to sparse linear algebra. At Mark 17, the F11 Chapter includes sparse iterative solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-box routines for sparse symmetric (both positive-definite and indefinite) linear systems. Mark 18 will add solvers, preconditioners, utilities and black-boxes for sparse unsymmetric systems: the development of these has already been completed.

  6. Multigrid applied to implicit well problems

    SciTech Connect

    Dendy, J.E. Jr.; Tchelepi, Hamdi

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses the application of multigrid techniques to the solution of implicit well equations, which arise in the numerical simulation of oil reservoirs. The emphasis is on techniques which can exploit parallel computation.

  7. A full multigrid method for eigenvalue problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongtao; Xie, Hehu; Xu, Fei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a full (nested) multigrid scheme is proposed to solve eigenvalue problems. The idea here is to use a correction method to transform the eigenvalue problem solving to a series of corresponding boundary value problem solving and eigenvalue problems defined on a very low-dimensional finite element space. The boundary value problems which are defined on a sequence of multilevel finite element spaces can be solved by some multigrid iteration steps. The computational work of this new scheme can reach the same optimal order as solving the corresponding boundary value problem by the full multigrid method. Therefore, this type of full multigrid method improves the overfull efficiency of the eigenvalue problem solving.

  8. Robust parallel iterative solvers for linear and least-squares problems, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, Yousef

    2014-01-16

    The primary goal of this project is to study and develop robust iterative methods for solving linear systems of equations and least squares systems. The focus of the Minnesota team is on algorithms development, robustness issues, and on tests and validation of the methods on realistic problems. 1. The project begun with an investigation on how to practically update a preconditioner obtained from an ILU-type factorization, when the coefficient matrix changes. 2. We investigated strategies to improve robustness in parallel preconditioners in a specific case of a PDE with discontinuous coefficients. 3. We explored ways to adapt standard preconditioners for solving linear systems arising from the Helmholtz equation. These are often difficult linear systems to solve by iterative methods. 4. We have also worked on purely theoretical issues related to the analysis of Krylov subspace methods for linear systems. 5. We developed an effective strategy for performing ILU factorizations for the case when the matrix is highly indefinite. The strategy uses shifting in some optimal way. The method was extended to the solution of Helmholtz equations by using complex shifts, yielding very good results in many cases. 6. We addressed the difficult problem of preconditioning sparse systems of equations on GPUs. 7. A by-product of the above work is a software package consisting of an iterative solver library for GPUs based on CUDA. This was made publicly available. It was the first such library that offers complete iterative solvers for GPUs. 8. We considered another form of ILU which blends coarsening techniques from Multigrid with algebraic multilevel methods. 9. We have released a new version on our parallel solver - called pARMS [new version is version 3]. As part of this we have tested the code in complex settings - including the solution of Maxwell and Helmholtz equations and for a problem of crystal growth.10. As an application of polynomial preconditioning we considered the

  9. A Full Multi-Grid Method for the Solution of the Cell Vertex Finite Volume Cauchy-Riemann Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borzi, A.; Morton, K. W.; Sueli, E.; Vanmaele, M.

    1996-01-01

    The system of inhomogeneous Cauchy-Riemann equations defined on a square domain and subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions is considered. This problem is discretised by using the cell vertex finite volume method on quadrilateral meshes. The resulting algebraic problem is overdetermined and the solution is defined in a least squares sense. By this approach a consistent algebraic problem is obtained which differs from the original one by O(h(exp 2)) perturbations of the right-hand side. A suitable cell-based convergent smoothing iteration is presented which is naturally linked to the least squares formulation. Hence, a standard multi-grid algorithm is reported which combines the given smoother and cell-based transfer operators. Some remarkable reduction properties of these operators are shown. A full multi-grid method is discussed which solves the discrete problem to the level of truncation error by employing one multi-grid cycle at each current level of discretisation. Experiments and applications of the full multi-grid scheme are presented.

  10. Teaching Algebra without Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Algebra is, among other things, a shorthand way to express quantitative reasoning. This article illustrates ways for the classroom teacher to convert algebraic solutions to verbal problems into conversational solutions that can be understood by students in the lower grades. Three reasonably typical verbal problems that either appeared as or…

  11. Multigrid-based grid-adaptive solution of the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, Jess

    A finite volume scheme for solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions and axisymmetry is described. Solutions are obtained on nonorthogonal, solution adaptive BFC grids, based on the Brackbill-Saltzman generator. Adaptivity is achieved by the use of a single control function based on the local kinetic energy production. Nonstaggered allocation of pressure and Cartesian velocity components avoids the introduction of curvature terms associated with the use of a grid-direction vector-base. A special interpolation of the pressure correction equation in the SIMPLE algorithm ensures firm coupling between velocity and pressure field. Steady-state solutions are accelerated by a full approximation multigrid scheme working on the decoupled grid-flow problem, while an algebraic multigrid scheme is employed for the pressure correction equation.

  12. An automatic multigrid method for the solution of sparse linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapira, Yair; Israeli, Moshe; Sidi, Avram

    1993-01-01

    An automatic version of the multigrid method for the solution of linear systems arising from the discretization of elliptic PDE's is presented. This version is based on the structure of the algebraic system solely, and does not use the original partial differential operator. Numerical experiments show that for the Poisson equation the rate of convergence of our method is equal to that of classical multigrid methods. Moreover, the method is robust in the sense that its high rate of convergence is conserved for other classes of problems: non-symmetric, hyperbolic (even with closed characteristics) and problems on non-uniform grids. No double discretization or special treatment of sub-domains (e.g. boundaries) is needed. When supplemented with a vector extrapolation method, high rates of convergence are achieved also for anisotropic and discontinuous problems and also for indefinite Helmholtz equations. A new double discretization strategy is proposed for finite and spectral element schemes and is found better than known strategies.

  13. Algebraic multiscale method for flow in heterogeneous porous media with embedded discrete fractures (F-AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ţene, Matei; Al Kobaisi, Mohammed Saad; Hajibeygi, Hadi

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces an Algebraic MultiScale method for simulation of flow in heterogeneous porous media with embedded discrete Fractures (F-AMS). First, multiscale coarse grids are independently constructed for both porous matrix and fracture networks. Then, a map between coarse- and fine-scale is obtained by algebraically computing basis functions with local support. In order to extend the localization assumption to the fractured media, four types of basis functions are investigated: (1) Decoupled-AMS, in which the two media are completely decoupled, (2) Frac-AMS and (3) Rock-AMS, which take into account only one-way transmissibilities, and (4) Coupled-AMS, in which the matrix and fracture interpolators are fully coupled. In order to ensure scalability, the F-AMS framework permits full flexibility in terms of the resolution of the fracture coarse grids. Numerical results are presented for two- and three-dimensional heterogeneous test cases. During these experiments, the performance of F-AMS, paired with ILU(0) as second-stage smoother in a convergent iterative procedure, is studied by monitoring CPU times and convergence rates. Finally, in order to investigate the scalability of the method, an extensive benchmark study is conducted, where a commercial algebraic multigrid solver is used as reference. The results show that, given an appropriate coarsening strategy, F-AMS is insensitive to severe fracture and matrix conductivity contrasts, as well as the length of the fracture networks. Its unique feature is that a fine-scale mass conservative flux field can be reconstructed after any iteration, providing efficient approximate solutions in time-dependent simulations.

  14. Multigrid computations of unsteady rotor-stator interaction using the Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Arnone, A.; Sestini, A.; Pacciani, R.

    1995-12-01

    A Navier-Stokes time-accurate solver has been extended to the analysis of unsteady rotor-stator interaction. In the proposed method, a fully-implicit time discretization is used to remove stability limitations. A four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is used in conjunction with several accelerating techniques typical of steady-state solvers, instead of traditional time-expensive factorizations. Those accelerating strategies include local time stepping, residual smoothing, and multigrid. Direct interpolation of the conservative variables is used to handle the interfaces between blade rows. Two-dimensional viscous calculations of unsteady rotor-stator interaction in a modern gas turbine stage are presented to check for the capability of the procedure.

  15. Elliptic Solvers with Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip, B.

    2000-07-24

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a numerical technique for locally tailoring the resolution computational grids. Multilevel algorithms for solving elliptic problems on adaptive grids include the Fast Adaptive Composite grid method (FAC) and its parallel variants (AFAC and AFACx). Theory that confirms the independence of the convergence rates of FAC and AFAC on the number of refinement levels exists under certain ellipticity and approximation property conditions. Similar theory needs to be developed for AFACx. The effectiveness of multigrid-based elliptic solvers such as FAC, AFAC, and AFACx on adaptively refined overlapping grids is not clearly understood. Finally, a non-trivial eye model problem will be solved by combining the power of using overlapping grids for complex moving geometries, AMR, and multilevel elliptic solvers.

  16. FAS multigrid calculations of three dimensional flow using non-staggered grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matovic, D.; Pollard, A.; Becker, H. A.; Grandmaison, E. W.

    1993-01-01

    Grid staggering is a well known remedy for the problem of velocity/pressure coupling in incompressible flow calculations. Numerous inconveniences occur, however, when staggered grids are implemented, particularly when a general-purpose code, capable of handling irregular three-dimensional domains, is sought. In several non-staggered grid numerical procedures proposed in the literature, the velocity/pressure coupling is achieved by either pressure or velocity (momentum) averaging. This approach is not convenient for simultaneous (block) solvers that are preferred when using multigrid methods. A new method is introduced in this paper that is based upon non-staggered grid formulation with a set of virtual cell face velocities used for pressure/velocity coupling. Instead of pressure or velocity averaging, a momentum balance at the cell face is used as a link between the momentum and mass balance constraints. The numerical stencil is limited to 9 nodes (in 2D) or 27 nodes (in 3D), both during the smoothing and inter-grid transfer, which is a convenient feature when a block point solver is applied. The results for a lid-driven cavity and a cube in a lid-driven cavity are presented and compared to staggered grid calculations using the same multigrid algorithm. The method is shown to be stable and produce a smooth (wiggle-free) pressure field.

  17. Higher-order ice-sheet modelling accelerated by multigrid on graphics cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brædstrup, Christian; Egholm, David

    2013-04-01

    Higher-order ice flow modelling is a very computer intensive process owing primarily to the nonlinear influence of the horizontal stress coupling. When applied for simulating long-term glacial landscape evolution, the ice-sheet models must consider very long time series, while both high temporal and spatial resolution is needed to resolve small effects. The use of higher-order and full stokes models have therefore seen very limited usage in this field. However, recent advances in graphics card (GPU) technology for high performance computing have proven extremely efficient in accelerating many large-scale scientific computations. The general purpose GPU (GPGPU) technology is cheap, has a low power consumption and fits into a normal desktop computer. It could therefore provide a powerful tool for many glaciologists working on ice flow models. Our current research focuses on utilising the GPU as a tool in ice-sheet and glacier modelling. To this extent we have implemented the Integrated Second-Order Shallow Ice Approximation (iSOSIA) equations on the device using the finite difference method. To accelerate the computations, the GPU solver uses a non-linear Red-Black Gauss-Seidel iterator coupled with a Full Approximation Scheme (FAS) multigrid setup to further aid convergence. The GPU finite difference implementation provides the inherent parallelization that scales from hundreds to several thousands of cores on newer cards. We demonstrate the efficiency of the GPU multigrid solver using benchmark experiments.

  18. Multitasked embedded multigrid for three-dimensional flow simulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.M.; Swisshelm, J.M.; Pryor, D.V.; Ziebarth, J.P.

    1986-06-01

    This project explored fast algorithms for Euler and Navier-Stokes simulations. A particular issue pursued under the grant was the integration of an explicit three dimensional flow solver, embedded mesh refinements, a model equation hierarchy, multiple grid acceleration and extensive rectorization and multi tasking. Several papers were produced during this effort including such titles as Multitasked embedded multigrid for three-dimensional flow simulation and Multigrid approaches to the Euler equations. An efficient algorithm designed to be used for Navier-Stokes simulations of complex flows over complete configurations is described. The algorithm incorporates a number of elements, including an explicit three-dimensional flow solver, embedded mesh refinements, a model equation hierarchy ranging from the Euler equations through the full Navier-Stokes equations, multiple-grid convergence acceleration and extensive vectorization and multitasking for efficient execution on parallel-processing supercomputers. Results are presented for a preliminary trial of the method on a problem representative of turbomachinery applications. Based on this performance data, it is estimated that a mature implementation of the algorithm will yield overall speedups ranging as high as 100.

  19. A GPU-accelerated flow solver for incompressible two-phase fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codyer, Stephen; Raessi, Mehdi; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-11-01

    We present a numerical solver for incompressible, immiscible, two-phase fluid flows that is accelerated by using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the projection method, which involves solving a pressure Poisson problem at each time step. A second-order discretization of the Poisson problem leads to a sparse matrix with five and seven diagonals for two- and three-dimensional simulations, respectively. Running a serial linear algebra solver on a single CPU can take 50-99.9% of the total simulation time to solve the above system for pressure. To remove this bottleneck, we utilized the large parallelization capabilities of GPUs; we developed a linear algebra solver based on the conjugate gradient iterative method (CGIM) by using CUDA 4.0 libraries and compared its performance with CUSP, an open-source, GPU library for linear algebra. Compared to running the CGIM solver on a single CPU core, for a 2D case, our GPU solver yields speedups of up to 88x in solver time and 81x overall time on a single GPU card. In 3D cases, the speedups are up to 81x (solver) and 15x (overall). Speedup is faster at higher grid resolutions and our GPU solver outperforms CUSP. Current work examines the acceleration versus a parallel CGIM CPU solver.

  20. Spectral multigrid methods for elliptic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.; Wong, Y. S.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1981-01-01

    An alternative approach which employs multigrid concepts in the iterative solution of spectral equations was examined. Spectral multigrid methods are described for self adjoint elliptic equations with either periodic or Dirichlet boundary conditions. For realistic fluid calculations the relevant boundary conditions are periodic in at least one (angular) coordinate and Dirichlet (or Neumann) in the remaining coordinates. Spectral methods are always effective for flows in strictly rectangular geometries since corners generally introduce singularities into the solution. If the boundary is smooth, then mapping techniques are used to transform the problem into one with a combination of periodic and Dirichlet boundary conditions. It is suggested that spectral multigrid methods in these geometries can be devised by combining the techniques.

  1. Multigrid Approach to Incompressible Viscous Cavity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional incompressible viscous driven-cavity flows are computed for Reynolds numbers on the range 100-20,000 using a loosely coupled, implicit, second-order centrally-different scheme. Mesh sequencing and three-level V-cycle multigrid error smoothing are incorporated into the symmetric Gauss-Seidel time-integration algorithm. Parametrics on the numerical parameters are performed, achieving reductions in solution times by more than 60 percent with the full multigrid approach. Details of the circulation patterns are investigated in cavities of 2-to-1, 1-to-1, and 1-to-2 depth to width ratios.

  2. Some multigrid algorithms for SIMD machines

    SciTech Connect

    Dendy, J.E. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Previously a semicoarsening multigrid algorithm suitable for use on SIMD architectures was investigated. Through the use of new software tools, the performance of this algorithm has been considerably improved. The method has also been extended to three space dimensions. The method performs well for strongly anisotropic problems and for problems with coefficients jumping by orders of magnitude across internal interfaces. The parallel efficiency of this method is analyzed, and its actual performance on the CM-5 is compared with its performance on the CRAY-YMP. A standard coarsening multigrid algorithm is also considered, and we compare its performance on these two platforms as well.

  3. Highly indefinite multigrid for eigenvalue problems

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, L.; Oliveira, S.

    1996-12-31

    Eigenvalue problems are extremely important in understanding dynamic processes such as vibrations and control systems. Large scale eigenvalue problems can be very difficult to solve, especially if a large number of eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors need to be computed. For solving this problem a multigrid preconditioned algorithm is presented in {open_quotes}The Davidson Algorithm, preconditioning and misconvergence{close_quotes}. Another approach for solving eigenvalue problems is by developing efficient solutions for highly indefinite problems. In this paper we concentrate on the use of new highly indefinite multigrid algorithms for the eigenvalue problem.

  4. A multigrid method for variational inequalities

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, S.; Stewart, D.E.; Wu, W.

    1996-12-31

    Multigrid methods have been used with great success for solving elliptic partial differential equations. Penalty methods have been successful in solving finite-dimensional quadratic programs. In this paper these two techniques are combined to give a fast method for solving obstacle problems. A nonlinear penalized problem is solved using Newton`s method for large values of a penalty parameter. Multigrid methods are used to solve the linear systems in Newton`s method. The overall numerical method developed is based on an exterior penalty function, and numerical results showing the performance of the method have been obtained.

  5. Multigrid iterative method with adaptive spatial support for computed tomography reconstruction from few-view data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ping-Chang

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) plays a key role in modern medical system, whether it be for diagnosis or therapy. As an increased risk of cancer development is associated with exposure to radiation, reducing radiation exposure in CT becomes an essential issue. Based on the compressive sensing (CS) theory, iterative based method with total variation (TV) minimization is proven to be a powerful framework for few-view tomographic image reconstruction. Multigrid method is an iterative method for solving both linear and nonlinear systems, especially when the system contains a huge number of components. In medical imaging, image background is often defined by zero intensity, thus attaining spatial support of the image, which is helpful for iterative reconstruction. In the proposed method, the image support is not considered as a priori knowledge. Rather, it evolves during the reconstruction process. Based on the CS framework, we proposed a multigrid method with adaptive spatial support constraint. The simultaneous algebraic reconstruction (SART) with TV minimization is implemented for comparison purpose. The numerical result shows: 1. Multigrid method has better performance while less than 60 views of projection data were used, 2. Spatial support highly improves the CS reconstruction, and 3. When few views of projection data were measured, our method performs better than the SART+TV method with spatial support constraint.

  6. Application of p-Multigrid to Discontinuous Galerkin Formulations of the Poisson Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helenbrook, B. T.; Atkins, H. L.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate p-multigrid as a solution method for several different discontinuous Galerkin (DG) formulations of the Poisson equation. Different combinations of relaxation schemes and basis sets have been combined with the DG formulations to find the best performing combination. The damping factors of the schemes have been determined using Fourier analysis for both one and two-dimensional problems. One important finding is that when using DG formulations, the standard approach of forming the coarse p matrices separately for each level of multigrid is often unstable. To ensure stability the coarse p matrices must be constructed from the fine grid matrices using algebraic multigrid techniques. Of the relaxation schemes, we find that the combination of Jacobi relaxation with the spectral element basis is fairly effective. The results using this combination are p sensitive in both one and two dimensions, but reasonable convergence rates can still be achieved for moderate values of p and isotropic meshes. A competitive alternative is a block Gauss-Seidel relaxation. This actually out performs a more expensive line relaxation when the mesh is isotropic. When the mesh becomes highly anisotropic, the implicit line method and the Gauss-Seidel implicit line method are the only effective schemes. Adding the Gauss-Seidel terms to the implicit line method gives a significant improvement over the line relaxation method.

  7. A multiple-block multigrid method for the solution of the three-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, Harold

    1991-01-01

    A multiple block multigrid method for the solution of the three dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The basic flow solver is a cell vertex method which employs central difference spatial approximations and Runge-Kutta time stepping. The use of local time stepping, implicit residual smoothing, multigrid techniques and variable coefficient numerical dissipation results in an efficient and robust scheme is discussed. The multiblock strategy places the block loop within the Runge-Kutta Loop such that accuracy and convergence are not affected by block boundaries. This has been verified by comparing the results of one and two block calculations in which the two block grid is generated by splitting the one block grid. Results are presented for both Euler and Navier-Stokes computations of wing/fuselage combinations.

  8. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  9. Multigrid semi-implicit hydrodynamics revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Dendy, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The multigrid method has for several years been very successful for simple equations like Laplace's equation on a rectangle. For more complicated situations, however, success has been more elusive. Indeeed, there are only a few applications in which the multigrid method is now being successfully used in complicated production codes. The one with which we are most familiar is the application by Alcouffe to TTDAMG. We are more familiar with this second application in which, for a set of test problems, TTDAMG ran seven to twenty times less expensively (on a CRAY-1 computer) than its best competitor. This impressive performance, in a field where a factor of two improvement is considered significant, encourages one to attempt the application of the multigrid method in other complicated situations. The application discussed in this paper was actually attempted several years ago. In that paper the multigrid method was applied to the pressure iteration in three Eulerian and Lagrangian codes. The application to the Eulerian codes, both incompressible and compressible, was successful, but the application to the Lagrangian code was less so. The reason given for this lack of success was that the differencing for the pressure equation in the Lagrangian code, SALE, was bad. In this paper, we examine again the application of multigrad to the pressure equation in SALE with the goal of succeeding this time without cheating.

  10. Spectral multigrid methods for elliptic equations II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.; Wong, Y. S.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed description of spectral multigrid methods is provided. This includes the interpolation and coarse-grid operators for both periodic and Dirichlet problems. The spectral methods for periodic problems use Fourier series and those for Dirichlet problems are based upon Chebyshev polynomials. An improved preconditioning for Dirichlet problems is given. Numerical examples and practical advice are included.

  11. Spectral multigrid methods for elliptic equations 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.; Wong, Y. S.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed description of spectral multigrid methods is provided. This includes the interpolation and coarse-grid operators for both periodic and Dirichlet problems. The spectral methods for periodic problems use Fourier series and those for Dirichlet problems are based upon Chebyshev polynomials. An improved preconditioning for Dirichlet problems is given. Numerical examples and practical advice are included.

  12. Multigrid Methods in Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Emil

    1996-03-01

    Multigrid techniques have become the method of choice for a broad range of computational problems. Their use in electronic structure calculations introduces a new set of issues when compared to traditional plane wave approaches. We have developed a set of techniques that address these issues and permit multigrid algorithms to be applied to the electronic structure problem in an efficient manner. In our approach the Kohn-Sham equations are discretized on a real-space mesh using a compact representation of the Hamiltonian. The resulting equations are solved directly on the mesh using multigrid iterations. This produces rapid convergence rates even for ill-conditioned systems with large length and/or energy scales. The method has been applied to both periodic and non-periodic systems containing over 400 atoms and the results are in very good agreement with both theory and experiment. Example applications include a vacancy in diamond, an isolated C60 molecule, and a 64-atom cell of GaN with the Ga d-electrons in valence which required a 250 Ry cutoff. A particular strength of a real-space multigrid approach is its ready adaptability to massively parallel computer architectures. The compact representation of the Hamiltonian is especially well suited to such machines. Tests on the Cray-T3D have shown nearly linear scaling of the execution time up to the maximum number of processors (512). The MPP implementation has been used for studies of a large Amyloid Beta Peptide (C_146O_45N_42H_210) found in the brains of Alzheimers disease patients. Further applications of the multigrid method will also be described. (in collaboration D. J. Sullivan and J. Bernholc)

  13. Computer Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavelle, Richard; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the nature and use of computer algebra and its applications to various physical sciences. Includes diagrams illustrating, among others, a computer algebra system and flow chart of operation of the Euclidean algorithm. (SK)

  14. Textbook Multigrid Efficiency for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Achi; Thomas, James L.; Diskin, Boris

    2001-01-01

    Considerable progress over the past thirty years has been made in the development of large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Computations are used routinely to design the cruise shapes of transport aircraft through complex-geometry simulations involving the solution of 25-100 million equations; in this arena the number of wind-tunnel tests for a new design has been substantially reduced. However, simulations of the entire flight envelope of the vehicle, including maximum lift, buffet onset, flutter, and control effectiveness have not been as successful in eliminating the reliance on wind-tunnel testing. These simulations involve unsteady flows with more separation and stronger shock waves than at cruise. The main reasons limiting further inroads of CFD into the design process are: (1) the reliability of turbulence models; and (2) the time and expense of the numerical simulation. Because of the prohibitive resolution requirements of direct simulations at high Reynolds numbers, transition and turbulence modeling is expected to remain an issue for the near term. The focus of this paper addresses the latter problem by attempting to attain optimal efficiencies in solving the governing equations. Typically current CFD codes based on the use of multigrid acceleration techniques and multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping schemes are able to converge lift and drag values for cruise configurations within approximately 1000 residual evaluations. An optimally convergent method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME), meaning the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work which is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in the discretized system of equations (residual equations). In this paper, a distributed relaxation approach to achieving TME for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RNAS) equations are discussed along with the foundations that form the

  15. Lecture Notes on Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, P S

    2010-06-28

    The Lecture Notes are primarily based on a sequence of lectures given by the author while been a Fulbright scholar at 'St. Kliment Ohridski' University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria during the winter semester of 2009-2010 academic year. The notes are somewhat expanded version of the actual one semester class he taught there. The material covered is slightly modified and adapted version of similar topics covered in the author's monograph 'Multilevel Block-Factorization Preconditioners' published in 2008 by Springer. The author tried to keep the notes as self-contained as possible. That is why the lecture notes begin with some basic introductory matrix-vector linear algebra, numerical PDEs (finite element) facts emphasizing the relations between functions in finite dimensional spaces and their coefficient vectors and respective norms. Then, some additional facts on the implementation of finite elements based on relation tables using the popular compressed sparse row (CSR) format are given. Also, typical condition number estimates of stiffness and mass matrices, the global matrix assembly from local element matrices are given as well. Finally, some basic introductory facts about stationary iterative methods, such as Gauss-Seidel and its symmetrized version are presented. The introductory material ends up with the smoothing property of the classical iterative methods and the main definition of two-grid iterative methods. From here on, the second part of the notes begins which deals with the various aspects of the principal TG and the numerous versions of the MG cycles. At the end, in part III, we briefly introduce algebraic versions of MG referred to as AMG, focusing on classes of AMG specialized for finite element matrices.

  16. Time-parallel iterative methods for parabolic PDES: Multigrid waveform relaxation and time-parallel multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Vandewalle, S.

    1994-12-31

    Time-stepping methods for parabolic partial differential equations are essentially sequential. This prohibits the use of massively parallel computers unless the problem on each time-level is very large. This observation has led to the development of algorithms that operate on more than one time-level simultaneously; that is to say, on grids extending in space and in time. The so-called parabolic multigrid methods solve the time-dependent parabolic PDE as if it were a stationary PDE discretized on a space-time grid. The author has investigated the use of multigrid waveform relaxation, an algorithm developed by Lubich and Ostermann. The algorithm is based on a multigrid acceleration of waveform relaxation, a highly concurrent technique for solving large systems of ordinary differential equations. Another method of this class is the time-parallel multigrid method. This method was developed by Hackbusch and was recently subject of further study by Horton. It extends the elliptic multigrid idea to the set of equations that is derived by discretizing a parabolic problem in space and in time.

  17. Multigrid calculations of 3-D turbulent viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.

    1989-01-01

    Convergence properties of a multigrid algorithm, developed to calculate compressible viscous flows, are analyzed by a vector sequence eigenvalue estimate. The full 3-D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are integrated by an implicit multigrid scheme while a k-epsilon turbulence model is solved, uncoupled from the flow equations. Estimates of the eigenvalue structure for both single and multigrid calculations are compared in an attempt to analyze the process as well as the results of the multigrid technique. The flow through an annular turbine is used to illustrate the scheme's ability to calculate complex 3-D flows.

  18. Updated users' guide for TAWFIVE with multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, N. Duane; Streett, Craig L.

    1989-01-01

    A program for the Transonic Analysis of a Wing and Fuselage with Interacted Viscous Effects (TAWFIVE) was improved by the incorporation of multigrid and a method to specify lift coefficient rather than angle-of-attack. A finite volume full potential multigrid method is used to model the outer inviscid flow field. First order viscous effects are modeled by a 3-D integral boundary layer method. Both turbulent and laminar boundary layers are treated. Wake thickness effects are modeled using a 2-D strip method. A brief discussion of the engineering aspects of the program is given. The input, output, and use of the program are covered in detail. Sample results are given showing the effects of boundary layer corrections and the capability of the lift specification method.

  19. Agglomeration multigrid for viscous turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1994-01-01

    Agglomeration multigrid, which has been demonstrated as an efficient and automatic technique for the solution of the Euler equations on unstructured meshes, is extended to viscous turbulent flows. For diffusion terms, coarse grid discretizations are not possible, and more accurate grid transfer operators are required as well. A Galerkin coarse grid operator construction and an implicit prolongation operator are proposed. Their suitability is evaluated by examining their effect on the solution of Laplace's equation. The resulting strategy is employed to solve the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for aerodynamic flows. Convergence rates comparable to those obtained by a previously developed non-nested mesh multigrid approach are demonstrated, and suggestions for further improvements are given.

  20. Grandchild of the frequency: Decomposition multigrid method

    SciTech Connect

    Dendy, J.E. Jr.; Tazartes, C.C.

    1994-12-31

    Previously the authors considered the frequency decomposition multigrid method and rejected it because it was not robust for problems with discontinuous coefficients. In this paper they show how to modify the method so as to obtain such robustness while retaining robustness for problems with anisotropic coefficients. They also discuss application of this method to a problem arising in global ocean modeling on the CM-5.

  1. An optimal iterative solver for the Stokes problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wathen, A.; Silvester, D.

    1994-12-31

    Discretisations of the classical Stokes Problem for slow viscous incompressible flow gives rise to systems of equations in matrix form for the velocity u and the pressure p, where the coefficient matrix is symmetric but necessarily indefinite. The square submatrix A is symmetric and positive definite and represents a discrete (vector) Laplacian and the submatrix C may be the zero matrix or more generally will be symmetric positive semi-definite. For `stabilised` discretisations (C {ne} 0) and descretisations which are inherently `stable` (C = 0) and so do not admit spurious pressure components even as the mesh size, h approaches zero, the Schur compliment of the matrix has spectral condition number independent of h (given also that B is bounded). Here the authors will show how this property together with a multigrid preconditioner only for the Laplacian block A yields an optimal solver for the Stokes problem through use of the Minimum Residual iteration. That is, combining Minimum Residual iteration for the matrix equation with a block preconditioner which comprises a small number of multigrid V-cycles for the Laplacian block A together with a simple diagonal scaling block provides an iterative solution procedure for which the computational work grows only linearly with the problem size.

  2. Canonical-variables multigrid method for steady-state Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, Shlomo

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach for the solution of inviscid flow problems for subsonic compressible flows is described. The approach is based on canonical forms of the equations, in which subsystems governed by hyperbolic operators are separated from those governed by elliptic ones. The discretizations used as well as the iterative techniques for the different subsystems are inherently different. Hyperbolic parts, which describe, in general, propagation phenomena, are discretized using upwind schemes and are solved by marching techniques. Elliptic parts, which are directionally unbiased, are discretized using h-elliptic central discretizations, and are solved by pointwise relaxations together with coarse grid acceleration. The resulting discretization schemes introduce artificial viscosity only for the hyperbolic parts of the system; thus a smaller total artificial viscosity is used, while the multigrid solvers used are much more efficient. Solutions of the subsonic compressible Euler equations are achieved at the same efficiency as the full potential equation.

  3. Multigrid Method for Modeling Multi-Dimensional Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xiaoqing; Liu, Chaoqun; Liao, Changming; Liu, Zhining; McCormick, Steve

    1996-01-01

    A highly accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for modeling 3-D reacting flows with detailed chemistry. A contravariant velocity-based governing system is developed for general curvilinear coordinates to maintain simplicity of the continuity equation and compactness of the discretization stencil. A fully-implicit backward Euler technique and a third-order monotone upwind-biased scheme on a staggered grid are used for the respective temporal and spatial terms. An efficient semi-coarsening multigrid method based on line-distributive relaxation is used as the flow solver. The species equations are solved in a fully coupled way and the chemical reaction source terms are treated implicitly. Example results are shown for a 3-D gas turbine combustor with strong swirling inflows.

  4. AN ADAPTIVE PARTICLE-MESH GRAVITY SOLVER FOR ENZO

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-11-01

    We describe and implement an adaptive particle-mesh algorithm to solve the Poisson equation for grid-based hydrodynamics codes with nested grids. The algorithm is implemented and extensively tested within the astrophysical code Enzo against the multigrid solver available by default. We find that while both algorithms show similar accuracy for smooth mass distributions, the adaptive particle-mesh algorithm is more accurate for the case of point masses, and is generally less noisy. We also demonstrate that the two-body problem can be solved accurately in a configuration with nested grids. In addition, we discuss the effect of subcycling, and demonstrate that evolving all the levels with the same timestep yields even greater precision.

  5. Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multilevel Monte-Carlo Library

    SciTech Connect

    2015-02-19

    ElagMC is a parallel C++ library for Multilevel Monte Carlo simulations with algebraically constructed coarse spaces. ElagMC enables Multilevel variance reduction techniques in the context of general unstructured meshes by using the specialized element-based agglomeration techniques implemented in ELAG (the Element-Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library developed by U. Villa and P. Vassilevski and currently under review for public release). The ElabMC library can support different type of deterministic problems, including mixed finite element discretizations of subsurface flow problems.

  6. Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multilevel Monte-Carlo Library

    2015-02-19

    ElagMC is a parallel C++ library for Multilevel Monte Carlo simulations with algebraically constructed coarse spaces. ElagMC enables Multilevel variance reduction techniques in the context of general unstructured meshes by using the specialized element-based agglomeration techniques implemented in ELAG (the Element-Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library developed by U. Villa and P. Vassilevski and currently under review for public release). The ElabMC library can support different type of deterministic problems, including mixed finite element discretizationsmore » of subsurface flow problems.« less

  7. Semi-coarsening multigrid methods for parallel computing

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Standard multigrid methods are not well suited for problems with anisotropic coefficients which can occur, for example, on grids that are stretched to resolve a boundary layer. There are several different modifications of the standard multigrid algorithm that yield efficient methods for anisotropic problems. In the paper, we investigate the parallel performance of these multigrid algorithms. Multigrid algorithms which work well for anisotropic problems are based on line relaxation and/or semi-coarsening. In semi-coarsening multigrid algorithms a grid is coarsened in only one of the coordinate directions unlike standard or full-coarsening multigrid algorithms where a grid is coarsened in each of the coordinate directions. When both semi-coarsening and line relaxation are used, the resulting multigrid algorithm is robust and automatic in that it requires no knowledge of the nature of the anisotropy. This is the basic multigrid algorithm whose parallel performance we investigate in the paper. The algorithm is currently being implemented on an IBM SP2 and its performance is being analyzed. In addition to looking at the parallel performance of the basic semi-coarsening algorithm, we present algorithmic modifications with potentially better parallel efficiency. One modification reduces the amount of computational work done in relaxation at the expense of using multiple coarse grids. This modification is also being implemented with the aim of comparing its performance to that of the basic semi-coarsening algorithm.

  8. Toward textbook multigrid efficiency for fully implicit resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, Mark F.; Samtaney, Ravi; Brandt, Achi

    2010-09-01

    Multigrid methods can solve some classes of elliptic and parabolic equations to accuracy below the truncation error with a work-cost equivalent to a few residual calculations – so-called ‘‘textbook” multigrid efficiency. We investigate methods to solve the system of equations that arise in time dependent magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with textbook multigrid efficiency. We apply multigrid techniques such as geometric interpolation, full approximate storage, Gauss–Seidel smoothers, and defect correction for fully implicit, nonlinear, second-order finite volume discretizations of MHD. We apply these methods to a standard resistive MHD benchmark problem, the GEM reconnection problem, and add a strong magnetic guide field,more » which is a critical characteristic of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We show that our multigrid methods can achieve near textbook efficiency on fully implicit resistive MHD simulations.« less

  9. Toward textbook multigrid efficiency for fully implicit resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Mark F.; Samtaney, Ravi; Brandt, Achi

    2010-09-01

    Multigrid methods can solve some classes of elliptic and parabolic equations to accuracy below the truncation error with a work-cost equivalent to a few residual calculations – so-called ‘‘textbook” multigrid efficiency. We investigate methods to solve the system of equations that arise in time dependent magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with textbook multigrid efficiency. We apply multigrid techniques such as geometric interpolation, full approximate storage, Gauss–Seidel smoothers, and defect correction for fully implicit, nonlinear, second-order finite volume discretizations of MHD. We apply these methods to a standard resistive MHD benchmark problem, the GEM reconnection problem, and add a strong magnetic guide field, which is a critical characteristic of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We show that our multigrid methods can achieve near textbook efficiency on fully implicit resistive MHD simulations.

  10. Toward textbook multigrid efficiency for fully implicit resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Mark F.; Samtaney, Ravi; Brandt, Achi

    2013-12-14

    Multigrid methods can solve some classes of elliptic and parabolic equations to accuracy below the truncation error with a work-cost equivalent to a few residual calculations – so-called “textbook” multigrid efficiency. We investigate methods to solve the system of equations that arise in time dependent magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with textbook multigrid efficiency. We apply multigrid techniques such as geometric interpolation, full approximate storage, Gauss-Seidel smoothers, and defect correction for fully implicit, nonlinear, second-order finite volume discretizations of MHD. We apply these methods to a standard resistive MHD benchmark problem, the GEM reconnection problem, and add a strong magnetic guide field, which is a critical characteristic of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We show that our multigrid methods can achieve near textbook efficiency on fully implicit resistive MHD simulations.

  11. Agglomeration multigrid for the three-dimensional Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.; Mavriplis, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    A multigrid procedure that makes use of coarse grids generated by the agglomeration of control volumes is advocated as a practical approach for solving the three dimensional Euler equations on unstructured grids about complex configurations. It is shown that the agglomeration procedure can be tailored to achieve certain coarse grid properties such as the sizes of the coarse grids and aspect ratios of the coarse grid cells. The agglomeration is done as a preprocessing step and runs in linear time. The implications for multigrid of using arbitrary polyhedral coarse grids are discussed. The agglomeration multigrid technique compares very favorably with existing multigrid procedures both in terms of convergence rates and elapsed times. The main advantage of the present approach is the ease with which coarse grids of any desired degree of coarseness may be generated in three dimensions, without being constrained by considerations of geometry. Inviscid flows over a variety of complex configurations are computed using the agglomeration multigrid strategy.

  12. Structured Multifrontal Sparse Solver

    2014-05-01

    StruMF is an algebraic structured preconditioner for the interative solution of large sparse linear systems. The preconditioner corresponds to a multifrontal variant of sparse LU factorization in which some dense blocks of the factors are approximated with low-rank matrices. It is algebraic in that it only requires the linear system itself, and the approximation threshold that determines the accuracy of individual low-rank approximations. Favourable rank properties are obtained using a block partitioning which is amore » refinement of the partitioning induced by nested dissection ordering.« less

  13. Pliris Solver Package

    2004-03-01

    PLIRIS is an object-oriented solver built on top of a previous matrix solver used in a number of application codes. Puns solves a linear system directly via LU factorization with partial pivoting. The user provides the linear system in terms of Epetra Objects including a matrix and right-hand-sides. The user can then factor the matrix and perform the forward and back solve at a later time or solve for multiple right-hand-sides at once. This packagemore » is used when dense matrices are obtained in the problem formulation. These dense matrices occur whenever boundary element techniques are chosen for the solution procedure. This has been used in electromagnetics for both static and frequency domain problems.« less

  14. Earth Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufele, Christopher; Zumoff, Nancy

    Earth Algebra is an entry level college algebra course that incorporates the spirit of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics at the college level. The context of the course places mathematics at the center of one of the major current concerns of the world. Through…

  15. Kiddie Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2009-01-01

    As educators and policymakers search for ways to prepare students for the rigors of algebra, teachers in the Helena, Montana, school system are starting early by attempting to nurture students' algebraic-reasoning ability, as well as their basic number skills, in early elementary school, rather than waiting until middle or early high school.…

  16. A diagonally inverted LU implicit multigrid scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.; Caughey, David A.; Chima, Rodrick V.

    1988-01-01

    A new Diagonally Inverted LU Implicit scheme is developed within the framework of the multigrid method for the 3-D unsteady Euler equations. The matrix systems that are to be inverted in the LU scheme are treated by local diagonalizing transformations that decouple them into systems of scalar equations. Unlike the Diagonalized ADI method, the time accuracy of the LU scheme is not reduced since the diagonalization procedure does not destroy time conservation. Even more importantly, this diagonalization significantly reduces the computational effort required to solve the LU approximation and therefore transforms it into a more efficient method of numerically solving the 3-D Euler equations.

  17. Design and implementation of parallel multigrid algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Tuminaro, Ray S.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques for mapping multigrid algorithms to solve elliptic PDEs on hypercube parallel computers are described and demonstrated. The need for proper data mapping to minimize communication distances is stressed, and an execution-time model is developed to show how algorithm efficiency is affected by changes in the machine and algorithm parameters. Particular attention is then given to the case of coarse computational grids, which can lead to idle processors, load imbalances, and inefficient performance. It is shown that convergence can be improved by using idle processors to solve a new problem concurrently on the fine grid defined by a splitting.

  18. Multigrid applied to singular perturbation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamowitz, David

    1987-01-01

    The solution of the singular perturbation problem by a multigrid algorithm is considered. Theoretical and experimental results for a number of different discretizations are presented. The theoretical and observed rates agree with the results developed in an earlier work of Kamowitz and Parter. In addition, the rate of convergence of the algorithm when the coarse grid operator is the natural finite difference analog of the fine grid operator is presented. This is in contrast to the case in the previous work where the Galerkin choice (I sup H sub h L sub h,I sup h sub H) was used for the coarse grid operators.

  19. Multigrid solution strategies for adaptive meshing problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues which arise when combining multigrid strategies with adaptive meshing techniques for solving steady-state problems on unstructured meshes. A basic strategy is described, and demonstrated by solving several inviscid and viscous flow cases. Potential inefficiencies in this basic strategy are exposed, and various alternate approaches are discussed, some of which are demonstrated with an example. Although each particular approach exhibits certain advantages, all methods have particular drawbacks, and the formulation of a completely optimal strategy is considered to be an open problem.

  20. Convergence acceleration of the Proteus computer code with multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Ibraheem, S. O.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to implement convergence acceleration techniques based on the multigrid concept in the two-dimensional and three-dimensional versions of the Proteus computer code. The first section presents a review of the relevant literature on the implementation of the multigrid methods in computer codes for compressible flow analysis. The next two sections present detailed stability analysis of numerical schemes for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, based on conventional von Neumann analysis and the bi-grid analysis, respectively. The next section presents details of the computational method used in the Proteus computer code. Finally, the multigrid implementation and applications to several two-dimensional and three-dimensional test problems are presented. The results of the present study show that the multigrid method always leads to a reduction in the number of iterations (or time steps) required for convergence. However, there is an overhead associated with the use of multigrid acceleration. The overhead is higher in 2-D problems than in 3-D problems, thus overall multigrid savings in CPU time are in general better in the latter. Savings of about 40-50 percent are typical in 3-D problems, but they are about 20-30 percent in large 2-D problems. The present multigrid method is applicable to steady-state problems and is therefore ineffective in problems with inherently unstable solutions.

  1. Some Approaches Towards Constructing Optimally Efficient Multigrid Solvers for the Inviscid Flow Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidilkover, David

    1997-01-01

    Some important advances took place during the last several years in the development of genuinely multidimensional upwind schemes for the compressible Euler equations. In particular, a robust, high-resolution genuinely multidimensional scheme which can be used for any of the flow regimes computations was constructed. This paper summarizes briefly these developments and outlines the fundamental advantages of this approach.

  2. Operator induced multigrid algorithms using semirefinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Naomi; Vanrosendale, John

    1989-01-01

    A variant of multigrid, based on zebra relaxation, and a new family of restriction/prolongation operators is described. Using zebra relaxation in combination with an operator-induced prolongation leads to fast convergence, since the coarse grid can correct all error components. The resulting algorithms are not only fast, but are also robust, in the sense that the convergence rate is insensitive to the mesh aspect ratio. This is true even though line relaxation is performed in only one direction. Multigrid becomes a direct method if an operator-induced prolongation is used, together with the induced coarse grid operators. Unfortunately, this approach leads to stencils which double in size on each coarser grid. The use of an implicit three point restriction can be used to factor these large stencils, in order to retain the usual five or nine point stencils, while still achieving fast convergence. This algorithm achieves a V-cycle convergence rate of 0.03 on Poisson's equation, using 1.5 zebra sweeps per level, while the convergence rate improves to 0.003 if optimal nine point stencils are used. Numerical results for two and three dimensional model problems are presented, together with a two level analysis explaining these results.

  3. Operator induced multigrid algorithms using semirefinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Naomi Henderson; Van Rosendale, John

    1989-01-01

    A variant of multigrid, based on zebra relaxation, and a new family of restriction/prolongation operators is described. Using zebra relaxation in combination with an operator-induced prolongation leads to fast convergence, since the coarse grid can correct all error components. The resulting algorithms are not only fast, but are also robust, in the sense that the convergence rate is insensitive to the mesh aspect ratio. This is true even though line relaxation is performed in only one direction. Multigrid becomes a direct method if an operator-induced prolongation is used, together with the induced coarse grid operators. Unfortunately, this approach leads to stencils which double in size on each coarser grid. The use of an implicit three point restriction can be used to factor these large stencils, in order to retain the usual five or nine point stencils, while still achieving fast convergence. This algorithm achieves a V-cycle convergence rate of 0.03 on Poisson's equation, using 1.5 zebra sweeps per level, while the convergence rate improves to 0.003 if optimal nine point stencils are used. Numerical results for two- and three-dimensional model problems are presented, together with a two level analysis explaining these results.

  4. Multigrid solutions of elliptic fluid flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Nigel George

    1988-06-01

    An efficient FAS multigrid solution strategy is presented for the accurate and economic simulation of convection dominated flows. The use of a high-order approximation to the convective transport terms found in the governing equations of motion was investigated in conjunction with an unsegregated smoothing technique. Results are presented for a sequence of problems of increasing complexity requiring that careful attention be directed toward the proper treatment of different types of boundary condition. The classical two-dimensional problem of flow in a lid-driven cavity is investigated in depth for flows at Reynolds number of 100, 400 and 1000. This gives an extremely good indication of the power of a multigrid approach. Next, the solution methodology is applied to flow in a three-dimensional lid-driven cavity at different Reynolds numbers, with cross-reference being made to predictions obtained in the corresponding two-dimensional simulations, and to the flow over a step discontinuity in the case of an abruptly expanding channel. Although, at first sight, these problems appear to require only minor extensions to the existing approach, it is found that they are rather more idiosyncratic. Finally, the governing equations and numerical algorithm are extended to encompass the treatment of thermally driven flows. The solution to two such problems is presented and compared with corresponding results obtained by traditional methods.

  5. The Development of a Factorizable Multigrid Algorithm for Subsonic and Transonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Thomas W.

    2001-01-01

    The factorizable discretization of Sidilkover for the compressible Euler equations previously demonstrated for channel flows has been extended to external flows.The dissipation of the original scheme has been modified to maintain stability for moderately stretched grids. The discrete equations are solved by symmetric collective Gauss-Seidel relaxation and FAS multigrid. Unlike the earlier work ordering the grid vertices in the flow direction has been found to be unnecessary. Solutions for essential incompressible flow (Mach 0.01) and supercritical flows have obtained for a Karman-Trefftz airfoil with it conformally mapped grid,as well as a NACA 0012 on an algebraically generated grid. The current work demonstrates nearly 0(n) convergence for subsonic and slightly transonic flows.

  6. Convergence acceleration of the Proteus computer code with multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Ibraheem, S. O.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here is the first part of a study to implement convergence acceleration techniques based on the multigrid concept in the Proteus computer code. A review is given of previous studies on the implementation of multigrid methods in computer codes for compressible flow analysis. Also presented is a detailed stability analysis of upwind and central-difference based numerical schemes for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Results are given of a convergence study of the Proteus code on computational grids of different sizes. The results presented here form the foundation for the implementation of multigrid methods in the Proteus code.

  7. Application of the multigrid solution technique to hypersonic entry vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Francis A.

    1993-01-01

    A multigrid solution procedure has been incorporated in a version of the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm. The multigrid scheme is based on the Full Approximation Storage approach and uses Full Multigrid to obtain a well defined fine mesh starting solution. Predictions were obtained using standard transfer operators and a 'V-cycle' was used to control grid sequencing. Computed hypersonic flow solutions compared with experimental data for a 15 degree sphere cone, blended-wing body, and shuttle-like geometries are presented. It is shown that the algorithm accurately predicts heating rates, and when compared with the single grid algorithm computes solutions in one-third the computational time.

  8. HPCCG Solver Package

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, Michael A.

    2007-03-01

    HPCCG is a simple PDE application and preconditioned conjugate gradient solver that solves a linear system on a beam-shaped domain. Although it does not address many performance issues present in real engineering applications, such as load imbalance and preconditioner scalability, it can serve as a first "sanity test" of new processor design choices, inter-connect network design choices and the scalability of a new computer system. Because it is self-contained, easy to compile and easily scaled to 100s or 1000s of porcessors, it can be an attractive study code for computer system designers.

  9. Scalable solvers and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ribbens, C J

    2000-10-27

    The purpose of this report is to summarize research activities carried out under Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) research subcontract B501073. This contract supported the principal investigator (P1), Dr. Calvin Ribbens, during his sabbatical visit to LLNL from August 1999 through June 2000. Results and conclusions from the work are summarized below in two major sections. The first section covers contributions to the Scalable Linear Solvers and hypre projects in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC). The second section describes results from collaboration with Patrice Turchi of LLNL's Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate (CMS). A list of publications supported by this subcontract appears at the end of the report.

  10. HPCCG Solver Package

    2007-03-01

    HPCCG is a simple PDE application and preconditioned conjugate gradient solver that solves a linear system on a beam-shaped domain. Although it does not address many performance issues present in real engineering applications, such as load imbalance and preconditioner scalability, it can serve as a first "sanity test" of new processor design choices, inter-connect network design choices and the scalability of a new computer system. Because it is self-contained, easy to compile and easily scaledmore » to 100s or 1000s of porcessors, it can be an attractive study code for computer system designers.« less

  11. Oasis: A high-level/high-performance open source Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Mikael; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian

    2015-03-01

    Oasis is a high-level/high-performance finite element Navier-Stokes solver written from scratch in Python using building blocks from the FEniCS project (fenicsproject.org). The solver is unstructured and targets large-scale applications in complex geometries on massively parallel clusters. Oasis utilizes MPI and interfaces, through FEniCS, to the linear algebra backend PETSc. Oasis advocates a high-level, programmable user interface through the creation of highly flexible Python modules for new problems. Through the high-level Python interface the user is placed in complete control of every aspect of the solver. A version of the solver, that is using piecewise linear elements for both velocity and pressure, is shown to reproduce very well the classical, spectral, turbulent channel simulations of Moser et al. (1999). The computational speed is strongly dominated by the iterative solvers provided by the linear algebra backend, which is arguably the best performance any similar implicit solver using PETSc may hope for. Higher order accuracy is also demonstrated and new solvers may be easily added within the same framework.

  12. A robust multilevel simultaneous eigenvalue solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costiner, Sorin; Taasan, Shlomo

    1993-01-01

    Multilevel (ML) algorithms for eigenvalue problems are often faced with several types of difficulties such as: the mixing of approximated eigenvectors by the solution process, the approximation of incomplete clusters of eigenvectors, the poor representation of solution on coarse levels, and the existence of close or equal eigenvalues. Algorithms that do not treat appropriately these difficulties usually fail, or their performance degrades when facing them. These issues motivated the development of a robust adaptive ML algorithm which treats these difficulties, for the calculation of a few eigenvectors and their corresponding eigenvalues. The main techniques used in the new algorithm include: the adaptive completion and separation of the relevant clusters on different levels, the simultaneous treatment of solutions within each cluster, and the robustness tests which monitor the algorithm's efficiency and convergence. The eigenvectors' separation efficiency is based on a new ML projection technique generalizing the Rayleigh Ritz projection, combined with a technique, the backrotations. These separation techniques, when combined with an FMG formulation, in many cases lead to algorithms of O(qN) complexity, for q eigenvectors of size N on the finest level. Previously developed ML algorithms are less focused on the mentioned difficulties. Moreover, algorithms which employ fine level separation techniques are of O(q(sub 2)N) complexity and usually do not overcome all these difficulties. Computational examples are presented where Schrodinger type eigenvalue problems in 2-D and 3-D, having equal and closely clustered eigenvalues, are solved with the efficiency of the Poisson multigrid solver. A second order approximation is obtained in O(qN) work, where the total computational work is equivalent to only a few fine level relaxations per eigenvector.

  13. A fast and robust computational method for the ionization cross sections of the driven Schrödinger equation using an O (N) multigrid-based scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cools, S.; Vanroose, W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper improves the convergence and robustness of a multigrid-based solver for the cross sections of the driven Schrödinger equation. Adding a Coupled Channel Correction Step (CCCS) after each multigrid (MG) V-cycle efficiently removes the errors that remain after the V-cycle sweep. The combined iterative solution scheme (MG-CCCS) is shown to feature significantly improved convergence rates over the classical MG method at energies where bound states dominate the solution, resulting in a fast and scalable solution method for the complex-valued Schrödinger break-up problem for any energy regime. The proposed solver displays optimal scaling; a solution is found in a time that is linear in the number of unknowns. The method is validated on a 2D Temkin-Poet model problem, and convergence results both as a solver and preconditioner are provided to support the O (N) scalability of the method. This paper extends the applicability of the complex contour approach for far field map computation (Cools et al. (2014) [10]).

  14. Progress with multigrid schemes for hypersonic flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    Several multigrid schemes are considered for the numerical computation of viscous hypersonic flows. For each scheme, the basic solution algorithm uses upwind spatial discretization with explicit multistage time stepping. Two level versions of the various multigrid algorithms are applied to the two dimensional advection equation, and Fourier analysis is used to determine their damping properties. The capabilities of the multigrid methods are assessed by solving three different hypersonic flow problems. Some new multigrid schemes based on semicoarsening strategies are shown to be quite effective in relieving the stiffness caused by the high aspect ratio cells required to resolve high Reynolds number flows. These schemes exhibit good convergence rates for Reynolds numbers up to 200 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers up to 25.

  15. Segmental Refinement: A Multigrid Technique for Data Locality

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Mark

    2014-10-27

    We investigate a technique - segmental refinement (SR) - proposed by Brandt in the 1970s as a low memory multigrid method. The technique is attractive for modern computer architectures because it provides high data locality, minimizes network communication, is amenable to loop fusion, and is naturally highly parallel and asynchronous. The network communication minimization property was recognized by Brandt and Diskin in 1994; we continue this work by developing a segmental refinement method for a finite volume discretization of the 3D Laplacian on massively parallel computers. An understanding of the asymptotic complexities, required to maintain textbook multigrid efficiency, are explored experimentally with a simple SR method. A two-level memory model is developed to compare the asymptotic communication complexity of a proposed SR method with traditional parallel multigrid. Performance and scalability are evaluated with a Cray XC30 with up to 64K cores. We achieve modest improvement in scalability from traditional parallel multigrid with a simple SR implementation.

  16. Progress with multigrid schemes for hypersonic flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Several multigrid schemes are considered for the numerical computation of viscous hypersonic flows. For each scheme, the basic solution algorithm employs upwind spatial discretization with explicit multistage time stepping. Two-level versions of the various multigrid algorithms are applied to the two-dimensional advection equation, and Fourier analysis is used to determine their damping properties. The capabilities of the multigrid methods are assessed by solving three different hypersonic flow problems. Some new multigrid schemes based on semicoarsening strategies are shown to be quite effective in relieving the stiffness caused by the high-aspect-ratio cells required to resolve high Reynolds number flows. These schemes exhibit good convergence rates for Reynolds numbers up to 200 X 10{sup 6} and Mach numbers up to 25. 32 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab.

  17. On the connection between multigrid and cyclic reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    A technique is shown whereby it is possible to relate a particular multigrid process to cyclic reduction using purely mathematical arguments. This technique suggest methods for solving Poisson's equation in 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensions with Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions. In one dimension the method is exact and, in fact, reduces to cyclic reduction. This provides a valuable reference point for understanding multigrid techniques. The particular multigrid process analyzed is referred to here as Approximate Cyclic Reduction (ACR) and is one of a class known as Multigrid Reduction methods in the literature. It involves one approximation with a known error term. It is possible to relate the error term in this approximation with certain eigenvector components of the error. These are sharply reduced in amplitude by classical relaxation techniques. The approximation can thus be made a very good one.

  18. Applications of multigrid software in the atmospheric sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J.; Garcia, R.; Gross, B.; Hack, J.; Haidvogel, D.; Pizzo, V.

    1992-01-01

    Elliptic partial differential equations from different areas in the atmospheric sciences are efficiently and easily solved utilizing the multigrid software package named MUDPACK. It is demonstrated that the multigrid method is more efficient than other commonly employed techniques, such as Gaussian elimination and fixed-grid relaxation. The efficiency relative to other techniques, both in terms of storage requirement and computational time, increases quickly with grid size.

  19. Matrix-dependent multigrid-homogenization for diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Knapek, S.

    1996-12-31

    We present a method to approximately determine the effective diffusion coefficient on the coarse scale level of problems with strongly varying or discontinuous diffusion coefficients. It is based on techniques used also in multigrid, like Dendy`s matrix-dependent prolongations and the construction of coarse grid operators by means of the Galerkin approximation. In numerical experiments, we compare our multigrid-homogenization method with homogenization, renormalization and averaging approaches.

  20. Multiple Coarse Grid Multigrid Methods for Solving Elliptic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, Shengyou; Young, David

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe some classes of multigrid methods for solving large linear systems arising in the solution by finite difference methods of certain boundary value problems involving Poisson's equation on rectangular regions. If parallel computing systems are used, then with standard multigrid methods many of the processors will be idle when one is working at the coarsest grid levels. We describe the use of Multiple Coarse Grid MultiGrid (MCGMG) methods. Here one first constructs a periodic set of equations corresponding to the given system. One then constructs a set of coarse grids such that for each grid corresponding to the grid size h there are four grids corresponding to the grid size 2*h. Multigrid operations such as restriction of residuals and interpolation of corrections are done in parallel at each grid level. For suitable choices of the multigrid operators the MCGMG method is equivalent to the Parallel Superconvergent MultiGrid (PSMG) method of Frederickson and McBryan. The convergence properties of MCGMG methods can be accurately analyzed using spectral methods.

  1. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Convergence rates of multigrid cycles are verified with quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the two-grid cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  2. Parallel tridiagonal equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Three parallel algorithms were compared for the direct solution of tridiagonal linear systems of equations. The algorithms are suitable for computers such as ILLIAC 4 and CDC STAR. For array computers similar to ILLIAC 4, cyclic odd-even reduction has the least operation count for highly structured sets of equations, and recursive doubling has the least count for relatively unstructured sets of equations. Since the difference in operation counts for these two algorithms is not substantial, their relative running times may be more related to overhead operations, which are not measured in this paper. The third algorithm, based on Buneman's Poisson solver, has more arithmetic operations than the others, and appears to be the least favorable. For pipeline computers similar to CDC STAR, cyclic odd-even reduction appears to be the most preferable algorithm for all cases.

  3. Amesos2 Templated Direct Sparse Solver Package

    2011-05-24

    Amesos2 is a templated direct sparse solver package. Amesos2 provides interfaces to direct sparse solvers, rather than providing native solver capabilities. Amesos2 is a derivative work of the Trilinos package Amesos.

  4. Application of an Upwind High Resolution Finite-Differencing Scheme and Multigrid Method in Steady-State Incompressible Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Cheng I.; Guo, Yan-Hu; Liu, C.- H.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis and design of a submarine propulsor requires the ability to predict the characteristics of both laminar and turbulent flows to a higher degree of accuracy. This report presents results of certain benchmark computations based on an upwind, high-resolution, finite-differencing Navier-Stokes solver. The purpose of the computations is to evaluate the ability, the accuracy and the performance of the solver in the simulation of detailed features of viscous flows. Features of interest include flow separation and reattachment, surface pressure and skin friction distributions. Those features are particularly relevant to the propulsor analysis. Test cases with a wide range of Reynolds numbers are selected; therefore, the effects of the convective and the diffusive terms of the solver can be evaluated separately. Test cases include flows over bluff bodies, such as circular cylinders and spheres, at various low Reynolds numbers, flows over a flat plate with and without turbulence effects, and turbulent flows over axisymmetric bodies with and without propulsor effects. Finally, to enhance the iterative solution procedure, a full approximation scheme V-cycle multigrid method is implemented. Preliminary results indicate that the method significantly reduces the computational effort.

  5. Numerical linear algebra for reconstruction inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachaoui, Abdeljalil

    2004-01-01

    Our goal in this paper is to discuss various issues we have encountered in trying to find and implement efficient solvers for a boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation of an iterative method for solving a reconstruction problem. We survey some methods from numerical linear algebra, which are relevant for the solution of this class of inverse problems. We motivate the use of our constructing algorithm, discuss its implementation and mention the use of preconditioned Krylov methods.

  6. A fast parallel solver for the forward problem in electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Jehl, Markus; Dedner, Andreas; Betcke, Timo; Aristovich, Kirill; Klöfkorn, Robert; Holder, David

    2015-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a noninvasive imaging modality, where imperceptible currents are applied to the skin and the resulting surface voltages are measured. It has the potential to distinguish between ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke with a portable and inexpensive device. The image reconstruction relies on an accurate forward model of the experimental setup. Because of the relatively small signal in stroke EIT, the finite-element modeling requires meshes of more than 10 million elements. To study the requirements in the forward modeling in EIT and also to reduce the time for experimental image acquisition, it is necessary to reduce the run time of the forward computation. We show the implementation of a parallel forward solver for EIT using the Dune-Fem C++ library and demonstrate its performance on many CPU's of a computer cluster. For a typical EIT application a direct solver was significantly slower and not an alternative to iterative solvers with multigrid preconditioning. With this new solver, we can compute the forward solutions and the Jacobian matrix of a typical EIT application with 30 electrodes on a 15-million element mesh in less than 15 min. This makes it a valuable tool for simulation studies and EIT applications with high precision requirements. It is freely available for download. PMID:25069109

  7. On several aspects and applications of the multigrid method for solving partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinar, N.

    1978-01-01

    Several aspects of multigrid methods are briefly described. The main subjects include the development of very efficient multigrid algorithms for systems of elliptic equations (Cauchy-Riemann, Stokes, Navier-Stokes), as well as the development of control and prediction tools (based on local mode Fourier analysis), used to analyze, check and improve these algorithms. Preliminary research on multigrid algorithms for time dependent parabolic equations is also described. Improvements in existing multigrid processes and algorithms for elliptic equations were studied.

  8. A Nonlinear Modal Aeroelastic Solver for FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Bartels, Robert E.; Biedron, Robert T.; Scott, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    A nonlinear structural solver has been implemented internally within the NASA FUN3D computational fluid dynamics code, allowing for some new aeroelastic capabilities. Using a modal representation of the structure, a set of differential or differential-algebraic equations are derived for general thin structures with geometric nonlinearities. ODEPACK and LAPACK routines are linked with FUN3D, and the nonlinear equations are solved at each CFD time step. The existing predictor-corrector method is retained, whereby the structural solution is updated after mesh deformation. The nonlinear solver is validated using a test case for a flexible aeroshell at transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow conditions. Agreement with linear theory is seen for the static aeroelastic solutions at relatively low dynamic pressures, but structural nonlinearities limit deformation amplitudes at high dynamic pressures. No flutter was found at any of the tested trajectory points, though LCO may be possible in the transonic regime.

  9. Parallel Auxiliary Space AMG Solver for $H(div)$ Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, Tzanio V.; Vassilevski, Panayot S.

    2012-12-18

    We present a family of scalable preconditioners for matrices arising in the discretization of $H(div)$ problems using the lowest order Raviart--Thomas finite elements. Our approach belongs to the class of “auxiliary space''--based methods and requires only the finite element stiffness matrix plus some minimal additional discretization information about the topology and orientation of mesh entities. Also, we provide a detailed algebraic description of the theory, parallel implementation, and different variants of this parallel auxiliary space divergence solver (ADS) and discuss its relations to the Hiptmair--Xu (HX) auxiliary space decomposition of $H(div)$ [SIAM J. Numer. Anal., 45 (2007), pp. 2483--2509] and to the auxiliary space Maxwell solver AMS [J. Comput. Math., 27 (2009), pp. 604--623]. Finally, an extensive set of numerical experiments demonstrates the robustness and scalability of our implementation on large-scale $H(div)$ problems with large jumps in the material coefficients.

  10. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  11. Sherlock Holmes, Master Problem Solver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballew, Hunter

    1994-01-01

    Shows the connections between Sherlock Holmes's investigative methods and mathematical problem solving, including observations, characteristics of the problem solver, importance of data, questioning the obvious, learning from experience, learning from errors, and indirect proof. (MKR)

  12. Mapping robust parallel multigrid algorithms to scalable memory architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overman, Andrea; Vanrosendale, John

    1993-01-01

    The convergence rate of standard multigrid algorithms degenerates on problems with stretched grids or anisotropic operators. The usual cure for this is the use of line or plane relaxation. However, multigrid algorithms based on line and plane relaxation have limited and awkward parallelism and are quite difficult to map effectively to highly parallel architectures. Newer multigrid algorithms that overcome anisotropy through the use of multiple coarse grids rather than relaxation are better suited to massively parallel architectures because they require only simple point-relaxation smoothers. In this paper, we look at the parallel implementation of a V-cycle multiple semicoarsened grid (MSG) algorithm on distributed-memory architectures such as the Intel iPSC/860 and Paragon computers. The MSG algorithms provide two levels of parallelism: parallelism within the relaxation or interpolation on each grid and across the grids on each multigrid level. Both levels of parallelism must be exploited to map these algorithms effectively to parallel architectures. This paper describes a mapping of an MSG algorithm to distributed-memory architectures that demonstrates how both levels of parallelism can be exploited. The result is a robust and effective multigrid algorithm for distributed-memory machines.

  13. Mapping robust parallel multigrid algorithms to scalable memory architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overman, Andrea; Vanrosendale, John

    1993-01-01

    The convergence rate of standard multigrid algorithms degenerates on problems with stretched grids or anisotropic operators. The usual cure for this is the use of line or plane relaxation. However, multigrid algorithms based on line and plane relaxation have limited and awkward parallelism and are quite difficult to map effectively to highly parallel architectures. Newer multigrid algorithms that overcome anisotropy through the use of multiple coarse grids rather than line relaxation are better suited to massively parallel architectures because they require only simple point-relaxation smoothers. The parallel implementation of a V-cycle multiple semi-coarsened grid (MSG) algorithm or distributed-memory architectures such as the Intel iPSC/860 and Paragon computers is addressed. The MSG algorithms provide two levels of parallelism: parallelism within the relaxation or interpolation on each grid and across the grids on each multigrid level. Both levels of parallelism must be exploited to map these algorithms effectively to parallel architectures. A mapping of an MSG algorithm to distributed-memory architectures that demonstrate how both levels of parallelism can be exploited is described. The results is a robust and effective multigrid algorithm for distributed-memory machines.

  14. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James L.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and highly stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Actual cycle results are verified using quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  15. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, W.

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  16. Analysis of multigrid algorithms for nonsymmetric and indefinite elliptic problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.; Xu, J.

    1988-10-01

    We prove some new estimates for the convergence of multigrid algorithms applied to nonsymmetric and indefinite elliptic boundary value problems. We provide results for the so-called 'symmetric' multigrid schemes. We show that for the variable V-script-cycle and the W-script-cycle schemes, multigrid algorithms with any amount of smoothing on the finest grid converge at a rate that is independent of the number of levels or unknowns, provided that the initial grid is sufficiently fine. We show that the V-script-cycle algorithm also converges (under appropriate assumptions on the coarsest grid) but at a rate which may deteriorate as the number of levels increases. This deterioration for the V-script-cycle may occur even in the case of full elliptic regularity. Finally, the results of numerical experiments are given which illustrate the convergence behavior suggested by the theory.

  17. Multigrid and multilevel domain decomposition for unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.; Smith, B.

    1994-12-31

    Multigrid has proven itself to be a very versatile method for the iterative solution of linear and nonlinear systems of equations arising from the discretization of PDES. In some applications, however, no natural multilevel structure of grids is available, and these must be generated as part of the solution procedure. In this presentation the authors will consider the problem of generating a multigrid algorithm when only a fine, unstructured grid is given. Their techniques generate a sequence of coarser grids by first forming an approximate maximal independent set of the vertices and then applying a Cavendish type algorithm to form the coarser triangulation. Numerical tests indicate that convergence using this approach can be as fast as standard multigrid on a structured mesh, at least in two dimensions.

  18. Migration of vectorized iterative solvers to distributed memory architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Pommerell, C.; Ruehl, R.

    1994-12-31

    Both necessity and opportunity motivate the use of high-performance computers for iterative linear solvers. Necessity results from the size of the problems being solved-smaller problems are often better handled by direct methods. Opportunity arises from the formulation of the iterative methods in terms of simple linear algebra operations, even if this {open_quote}natural{close_quotes} parallelism is not easy to exploit in irregularly structured sparse matrices and with good preconditioners. As a result, high-performance implementations of iterative solvers have attracted a lot of interest in recent years. Most efforts are geared to vectorize or parallelize the dominating operation-structured or unstructured sparse matrix-vector multiplication, or to increase locality and parallelism by reformulating the algorithm-reducing global synchronization in inner products or local data exchange in preconditioners. Target architectures for iterative solvers currently include mostly vector supercomputers and architectures with one or few optimized (e.g., super-scalar and/or super-pipelined RISC) processors and hierarchical memory systems. More recently, parallel computers with physically distributed memory and a better price/performance ratio have been offered by vendors as a very interesting alternative to vector supercomputers. However, programming comfort on such distributed memory parallel processors (DMPPs) still lags behind. Here the authors are concerned with iterative solvers and their changing computing environment. In particular, they are considering migration from traditional vector supercomputers to DMPPs. Application requirements force one to use flexible and portable libraries. They want to extend the portability of iterative solvers rather than reimplementing everything for each new machine, or even for each new architecture.

  19. Multigrid Methods for Aerodynamic Problems in Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caughey, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Work has been directed at the development of efficient multigrid methods for the solution of aerodynamic problems involving complex geometries, including the development of computational methods for the solution of both inviscid and viscous transonic flow problems. The emphasis is on problems of complex, three-dimensional geometry. The methods developed are based upon finite-volume approximations to both the Euler and the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The methods are developed for use on multi-block grids using diagonalized implicit multigrid methods to achieve computational efficiency. The work is focused upon aerodynamic problems involving complex geometries, including advanced engine inlets.

  20. Development and Application of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    We report progress in the development of agglomerated multigrid techniques for fully un- structured grids in three dimensions, building upon two previous studies focused on efficiently solving a model diffusion equation. We demonstrate a robust fully-coarsened agglomerated multigrid technique for 3D complex geometries, incorporating the following key developments: consistent and stable coarse-grid discretizations, a hierarchical agglomeration scheme, and line-agglomeration/relaxation using prismatic-cell discretizations in the highly-stretched grid regions. A signi cant speed-up in computer time is demonstrated for a model diffusion problem, the Euler equations, and the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for 3D realistic complex geometries.

  1. Seventh Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, N. Duane (Editor); Manteuffel, Tom A. (Editor); McCormick, Steve F. (Editor); Douglas, Craig C. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Seventh Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods was held on April 2-7, 1995 at Copper Mountain, Colorado. This book is a collection of many of the papers presented at the conference and so represents the conference proceedings. NASA Langley graciously provided printing of this document so that all of the papers could be presented in a single forum. Each paper was reviewed by a member of the conference organizing committee under the coordination of the editors. The vibrancy and diversity in this field are amply expressed in these important papers, and the collection clearly shows the continuing rapid growth of the use of multigrid acceleration techniques.

  2. Fast Multigrid Techniques in Total Variation-Based Image Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Mary Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Existing multigrid techniques are used to effect an efficient method for reconstructing an image from noisy, blurred data. Total Variation minimization yields a nonlinear integro-differential equation which, when discretized using cell-centered finite differences, yields a full matrix equation. A fixed point iteration is applied with the intermediate matrix equations solved via a preconditioned conjugate gradient method which utilizes multi-level quadrature (due to Brandt and Lubrecht) to apply the integral operator and a multigrid scheme (due to Ewing and Shen) to invert the differential operator. With effective preconditioning, the method presented seems to require Omicron(n) operations. Numerical results are given for a two-dimensional example.

  3. Relaxation schemes for spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Timothy N.

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of relaxation schemes for solving the systems of algebraic equations which arise from spectral discretizations of elliptic equations is examined. Iterative methods are an attractive alternative to direct methods because Fourier transform techniques enable the discrete matrix-vector products to be computed almost as efficiently as for corresponding but sparse finite difference discretizations. Preconditioning is found to be essential for acceptable rates of convergence. Preconditioners based on second-order finite difference methods are used. A comparison is made of the performance of different relaxation methods on model problems with a variety of conditions specified around the boundary. The investigations show that iterations based on incomplete LU decompositions provide the most efficient methods for solving these algebraic systems.

  4. 3D inversion based on multi-grid approach of magnetotelluric data from Northern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevatova, M.; Smirnov, M.; Korja, T. J.; Egbert, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we investigate the geoelectrical structure of the cratonic margin of Fennoscandian Shield by means of magnetotelluric (MT) measurements carried out in Northern Norway and Sweden during summer 2011-2012. The project Magnetotellurics in the Scandes (MaSca) focuses on the investigation of the crust, upper mantle and lithospheric structure in a transition zone from a stable Precambrian cratonic interior to a passive continental margin beneath the Caledonian Orogen and the Scandes Mountains in western Fennoscandia. Recent MT profiles in the central and southern Scandes indicated a large contrast in resistivity between Caledonides and Precambrian basement. The alum shales as a highly conductive layers between the resistive Precambrian basement and the overlying Caledonian nappes are revealed from this profiles. Additional measurements in the Northern Scandes were required. All together data from 60 synchronous long period (LMT) and about 200 broad band (BMT) sites were acquired. The array stretches from Lofoten and Bodo (Norway) in the west to Kiruna and Skeleftea (Sweden) in the east covering an area of 500x500 square kilometers. LMT sites were occupied for about two months, while most of the BMT sites were measured during one day. We have used new multi-grid approach for 3D electromagnetic (EM) inversion and modelling. Our approach is based on the OcTree discretization where the spatial domain is represented by rectangular cells, each of which might be subdivided (recursively) into eight sub-cells. In this simplified implementation the grid is refined only in the horizontal direction, uniformly in each vertical layer. Using multi-grid we manage to have a high grid resolution near the surface (for instance, to tackle with galvanic distortions) and lower resolution at greater depth as the EM fields decay in the Earth according to the diffusion equation. We also have a benefit in computational costs as number of unknowns decrease. The multi-grid forward

  5. An investigation of design optimization using a 2-D viscous flow code with multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doria, Michael L.

    1990-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes have advanced to the point where they are effective analytical tools for solving flow fields around complex geometries. There is also a need for their use as a design tool to find optimum aerodynamic shapes. In the area of design, however, a difficulty arises due to the large amount of computer resources required by these codes. It is desired to streamline the design process so that a large number of design options and constraints can be investigated without overloading the system. There are several techniques which have been proposed to help streamline the design process. The feasibility of one of these techniques is investigated. The technique under consideration is the interaction of the geometry change with the flow calculation. The problem of finding the value of camber which maximizes the ratio of lift over drag for a particular airfoil is considered. In order to test out this technique, a particular optimization problem was tried. A NACA 0012 airfoil was considered at free stream Mach number of 0.5 with a zero angle of attack. Camber was added to the mean line of the airfoil. The goal was to find the value of camber for which the ratio of lift over drag is a maximum. The flow code used was FLOMGE which is a two dimensional viscous flow solver which uses multigrid to speed up convergence. A hyperbolic grid generation program was used to construct the grid for each value of camber.

  6. Algebraic trigonometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaninsky, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    This article introduces a trigonometric field (TF) that extends the field of real numbers by adding two new elements: sin and cos - satisfying an axiom sin2 + cos2 = 1. It is shown that by assigning meaningful names to particular elements of the field, all known trigonometric identities may be introduced and proved. Two different interpretations of the TF are discussed with many others potentially possible. The main objective of this article is to introduce a broader view of trigonometry that can serve as motivation for mathematics students and teachers to study and teach abstract algebraic structures.

  7. Multigrid and cyclic reduction applied to the Helmholtz equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackenridge, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    We consider the Helmholtz equation with a discontinuous complex parameter and inhomogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions in a rectangular domain. A variant of the direct method of cyclic reduction (CR) is employed to facilitate the design of improved multigrid (MG) components, resulting in the method of CR-MG. We demonstrate the improved convergence properties of this method.

  8. Recent developments in multigrid methods for the steady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    The solution by multigrid techniques of the steady inviscid compressible equations of gas dynamics, the Euler equations is investigated. Steady two dimensional transonic flow over an airfoil section is studied intensively. Most of the material is applicable to three dimensional flow problems of aerodynamic interest.

  9. Multigrid methods for bifurcation problems: The self adjoint case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, Shlomo

    1987-01-01

    This paper deals with multigrid methods for computational problems that arise in the theory of bifurcation and is restricted to the self adjoint case. The basic problem is to solve for arcs of solutions, a task that is done successfully with an arc length continuation method. Other important issues are, for example, detecting and locating singular points as part of the continuation process, switching branches at bifurcation points, etc. Multigrid methods have been applied to continuation problems. These methods work well at regular points and at limit points, while they may encounter difficulties in the vicinity of bifurcation points. A new continuation method that is very efficient also near bifurcation points is presented here. The other issues mentioned above are also treated very efficiently with appropriate multigrid algorithms. For example, it is shown that limit points and bifurcation points can be solved for directly by a multigrid algorithm. Moreover, the algorithms presented here solve the corresponding problems in just a few work units (about 10 or less), where a work unit is the work involved in one local relaxation on the finest grid.

  10. An installed nacelle design code using a multiblock Euler solver. Volume 1: Theory document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. C.

    1992-01-01

    An efficient multiblock Euler design code was developed for designing a nacelle installed on geometrically complex airplane configurations. This approach employed a design driver based on a direct iterative surface curvature method developed at LaRC. A general multiblock Euler flow solver was used for computing flow around complex geometries. The flow solver used a finite-volume formulation with explicit time-stepping to solve the Euler Equations. It used a multiblock version of the multigrid method to accelerate the convergence of the calculations. The design driver successively updated the surface geometry to reduce the difference between the computed and target pressure distributions. In the flow solver, the change in surface geometry was simulated by applying surface transpiration boundary conditions to avoid repeated grid generation during design iterations. Smoothness of the designed surface was ensured by alternate application of streamwise and circumferential smoothings. The capability and efficiency of the code was demonstrated through the design of both an isolated nacelle and an installed nacelle at various flow conditions. Information on the execution of the computer program is provided in volume 2.

  11. NITSOL: A Newton iterative solver for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, M.; Walker, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Newton iterative methods, also known as truncated Newton methods, are implementations of Newton`s method in which the linear systems that characterize Newton steps are solved approximately using iterative linear algebra methods. Here, we outline a well-developed Newton iterative algorithm together with a Fortran implementation called NITSOL. The basic algorithm is an inexact Newton method globalized by backtracking, in which each initial trial step is determined by applying an iterative linear solver until an inexact Newton criterion is satisfied. In the implementation, the user can specify inexact Newton criteria in several ways and select an iterative linear solver from among several popular {open_quotes}transpose-free{close_quotes} Krylov subspace methods. Jacobian-vector products used by the Krylov solver can be either evaluated analytically with a user-supplied routine or approximated using finite differences of function values. A flexible interface permits a wide variety of preconditioning strategies and allows the user to define a preconditioner and optionally update it periodically. We give details of these and other features and demonstrate the performance of the implementation on a representative set of test problems.

  12. A mixed method Poisson solver for three-dimensional self-gravitating astrophysical fluid dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Comer; Jones, Jim

    1993-01-01

    A key ingredient in the simulation of self-gravitating astrophysical fluid dynamical systems is the gravitational potential and its gradient. This paper focuses on the development of a mixed method multigrid solver of the Poisson equation formulated so that both the potential and the Cartesian components of its gradient are self-consistently and accurately generated. The method achieves this goal by formulating the problem as a system of four equations for the gravitational potential and the three Cartesian components of the gradient and solves them using a distributed relaxation technique combined with conventional full multigrid V-cycles. The method is described, some tests are presented, and the accuracy of the method is assessed. We also describe how the method has been incorporated into our three-dimensional hydrodynamics code and give an example of an application to the collision of two stars. We end with some remarks about the future developments of the method and some of the applications in which it will be used in astrophysics.

  13. Multigrid solution of incompressible turbulent flows by using two-equation turbulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.; Liu, C.; Sung, C.H.

    1996-12-31

    Most of practical flows are turbulent. From the interest of engineering applications, simulation of realistic flows is usually done through solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and turbulence model equations. It has been widely accepted that turbulence modeling plays a very important role in numerical simulation of practical flow problem, particularly when the accuracy is of great concern. Among the most used turbulence models today, two-equation models appear to be favored for the reason that they are more general than algebraic models and affordable with current available computer resources. However, investigators using two-equation models seem to have been more concerned with the solution of N-S equations. Less attention is paid to the solution method for the turbulence model equations. In most cases, the turbulence model equations are loosely coupled with N-S equations, multigrid acceleration is only applied to the solution of N-S equations due to perhaps the fact the turbulence model equations are source-term dominant and very stiff in sublayer region.

  14. Time-domain Raman analytical forward solvers.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Binzoni, Tiziano; Sekar, Sanathana Konugolu Venkata; Farina, Andrea; Cavalieri, Stefano; Pifferi, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    A set of time-domain analytical forward solvers for Raman signals detected from homogeneous diffusive media is presented. The time-domain solvers have been developed for two geometries: the parallelepiped and the finite cylinder. The potential presence of a background fluorescence emission, contaminating the Raman signal, has also been taken into account. All the solvers have been obtained as solutions of the time dependent diffusion equation. The validation of the solvers has been performed by means of comparisons with the results of "gold standard" Monte Carlo simulations. These forward solvers provide an accurate tool to explore the information content encoded in the time-resolved Raman measurements. PMID:27607645

  15. Assessment of an Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses an explicit algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence model in the in the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver, ISAAC (Integrated Solution Algorithm for Arbitrary Con gurations). Additionally, it compares solutions for two select configurations between ISAAC and the RANS solver PAB3D. This study compares with either direct numerical simulation data, experimental data, or empirical models for several different geometries with compressible, separated, and high Reynolds number flows. In general, the turbulence model matched data or followed experimental trends well, and for the selected configurations, the computational results of ISAAC closely matched those of PAB3D using the same turbulence model.

  16. Computing Ro in a population with heterogeneity in sexual activity and proportionate mixing using a STM-solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez A., Natalia A.

    2014-06-01

    A model to determinate the reproductive basic number, detonated Ro, for the case of population with heterogeneity in sexual activity and proportionate mixing is solved using computer algebra and SMT solvers. Specifically Maple and Z3 were used. The code for the solution of the model was written in Z3-Python, but it can also be played by Z3-SMT-Lib. Ro represents an algebraic synthesis of every epidemiological parameter. Numerical simulations were done to prove the effectiveness of the model and the code. The algebraic structure of Ro suggests the possible control measurements that should be implemented to avoid the propagation of the sexual transmitted diseases. The obtained results are important on the computational epidemiology field. As a future investigation, it is suggested to apply the STM solvers to analyze models for other kinds of epidemic diseases.

  17. Formulation of boundary conditions for the multigrid acceleration of the Euler and Navier Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Thomas Neil; Usab, William J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An explicit, Multigrid algorithm was written to solve the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with special consideration given to the coarse mesh boundary conditions. These are formulated in a manner consistent with the interior solution, utilizing forcing terms to prevent coarse-mesh truncation error from affecting the fine-mesh solution. A 4-Stage Hybrid Runge-Kutta Scheme is used to advance the solution in time, and Multigrid convergence is further enhanced by using local time-stepping and implicit residual smoothing. Details of the algorithm are presented along with a description of Jameson's standard Multigrid method and a new approach to formulating the Multigrid equations.

  18. On unstructured grids and solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals and the state-of-the-art technology for unstructured grids and solvers are highlighted. Algorithms and techniques pertinent to mesh generation are discussed. It is shown that grid generation and grid manipulation schemes rely on fast multidimensional searching. Flow solution techniques for the Euler equations, which can be derived from the integral form of the equations are discussed. Sample calculations are also provided.

  19. Frequency Domain Modelling by a Direct-Iterative Solver: A Space and Wavelet Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hustedt, B.; Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2002-12-01

    complex wave propagation phenomena spatial aliasing of interpolated fields is unavoidable and should be in principle corrected through V- and W-cycles used in multigrid techniques. This aliasing-error correction is costly and convergence cannot be guaranteed. Therefore, we propose a wavelet-based FDFD strategy, called the Direct-Iterative-Wavelet Solver (DIWS). The wavelet basis transformation provides a decomposition of the signal on a sequence of resolution grids. Instead of bilinear interpolation, we formally recast the coarse-grid solution in the wavelet expansion of the desired fine-grid solution. The coarse-grid solution approximates the scaling coefficients in the fine-grid wavelet expansion, while all other fine-grid wavelet coefficients are unknown, therefore set to zero. We construct the complex impedance matrix A and right-hand-side b in the wavelet domain. Then, the iterative solver is applied in the wavelet space, which fills-in all missing fine-grid wavelet coefficients. The final wavefield is obtained by an inverse wavelet transform. Additional V- and W-cycles, as required for the DISS approach, are unnecessary for the DIWS scheme. The formal expansion of fields into an orthogonal wavelet basis permits the construction of the true solution projected on each resolution grid, where all interactions between sub-grids of different resolution are accounted by the wavele decomposition. We have implemented the DISS and DIWS strategy for the first-order hyperbolic system of equation, that allows SH-wave propagation simulations in structurally complex heterogeneous media. We illustrate the performance of both schemes for the complex Marmousi model.

  20. On multigrid methods for the Navier-Stokes Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosenchuck, D. M.; Krist, S. E.; Zang, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    The overall architecture of the multipurpose parallel-processing Navier-Stokes Computer (NSC) being developed by Princeton and NASA Langley (Nosenchuck et al., 1986) is described and illustrated with extensive diagrams, and the NSC implementation of an elementary multigrid algorithm for simulating isotropic turbulence (based on solution of the incompressible time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations with constant viscosity) is characterized in detail. The present NSC design concept calls for 64 nodes, each with the performance of a class VI supercomputer, linked together by a fiber-optic hypercube network and joined to a front-end computer by a global bus. In this configuration, the NSC would have a storage capacity of over 32 Gword and a peak speed of over 40 Gflops. The multigrid Navier-Stokes code discussed would give sustained operation rates of about 25 Gflops.

  1. The Sixth Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, N. Duane (Editor); Mccormick, Steve F. (Editor); Manteuffel, Thomas A. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Sixth Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods was held on April 4-9, 1993, at Copper Mountain, Colorado. This book is a collection of many of the papers presented at the conference and so represents the conference proceedings. NASA Langley graciously provided printing of this document so that all of the papers could be presented in a single forum. Each paper was reviewed by a member of the conference organizing committee under the coordination of the editors. The multigrid discipline continues to expand and mature, as is evident from these proceedings. The vibrancy in this field is amply expressed in these important papers, and the collection clearly shows its rapid trend to further diversity and depth.

  2. Segmented Domain Decomposition Multigrid For 3-D Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celestina, M. L.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Rubin, S. G.

    2001-01-01

    A Segmented Domain Decomposition Multigrid (SDDMG) procedure was developed for three-dimensional viscous flow problems as they apply to turbomachinery flows. The procedure divides the computational domain into a coarse mesh comprised of uniformly spaced cells. To resolve smaller length scales such as the viscous layer near a surface, segments of the coarse mesh are subdivided into a finer mesh. This is repeated until adequate resolution of the smallest relevant length scale is obtained. Multigrid is used to communicate information between the different grid levels. To test the procedure, simulation results will be presented for a compressor and turbine cascade. These simulations are intended to show the ability of the present method to generate grid independent solutions. Comparisons with data will also be presented. These comparisons will further demonstrate the usefulness of the present work for they allow an estimate of the accuracy of the flow modeling equations independent of error attributed to numerical discretization.

  3. Seventh Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, N. Duane; Manteuffel, Tom A.; McCormick, Steve F.; Douglas, Craig C.

    1996-01-01

    The Seventh Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods was held on 2-7 Apr. 1995 at Copper Mountain, Colorado. This book is a collection of many of the papers presented at the conference and so represents the conference proceedings. NASA Langley graciously provided printing of this document so that all of the papers could be presented in a single forum. Each paper was reviewed by a member of the conference organizing committee under the coordination of the editors. The multigrid discipline continues to expand and mature, as is evident from these proceedings. The vibrancy in this field is amply expressed in these important papers, and the collection shows its rapid trend to further diversity and depth.

  4. The Sixth Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, N. Duane (Editor); Manteuffel, T. A. (Editor); Mccormick, S. F. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Sixth Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods was held on 4-9 Apr. 1993, at Copper Mountain, CO. This book is a collection of many of the papers presented at the conference and as such represents the conference proceedings. NASA LaRC graciously provided printing of this document so that all of the papers could be presented in a single forum. Each paper was reviewed by a member of the conference organizing committee under the coordination of the editors. The multigrid discipline continues to expand and mature, as is evident from these proceedings. The vibrancy in this field is amply expressed in these important papers, and the collection clearly shows its rapid trend to further diversity and depth.

  5. Linear Multigrid Techniques in Self-consistent Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fattebert, J-L

    2000-05-23

    Ab initio DFT electronic structure calculations involve an iterative process to solve the Kohn-Sham equations for an Hamiltonian depending on the electronic density. We discretize these equations on a grid by finite differences. Trial eigenfunctions are improved at each step of the algorithm using multigrid techniques to efficiently reduce the error at all length scale, until self-consistency is achieved. In this paper we focus on an iterative eigensolver based on the idea of inexact inverse iteration, using multigrid as a preconditioner. We also discuss how this technique can be used for electrons described by general non-orthogonal wave functions, and how that leads to a linear scaling with the system size for the computational cost of the most expensive parts of the algorithm.

  6. Numerical algebraic geometry and algebraic kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wampler, Charles W.; Sommese, Andrew J.

    In this article, the basic constructs of algebraic kinematics (links, joints, and mechanism spaces) are introduced. This provides a common schema for many kinds of problems that are of interest in kinematic studies. Once the problems are cast in this algebraic framework, they can be attacked by tools from algebraic geometry. In particular, we review the techniques of numerical algebraic geometry, which are primarily based on homotopy methods. We include a review of the main developments of recent years and outline some of the frontiers where further research is occurring. While numerical algebraic geometry applies broadly to any system of polynomial equations, algebraic kinematics provides a body of interesting examples for testing algorithms and for inspiring new avenues of work.

  7. Development of an efficient multigrid method for the NEM form of the multigroup neutron diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Chalabi, Rifat M. Khalil

    1997-09-01

    Development of an improvement to the computational efficiency of the existing nested iterative solution strategy of the Nodal Exapansion Method (NEM) nodal based neutron diffusion code NESTLE is presented. The improvement in the solution strategy is the result of developing a multilevel acceleration scheme that does not suffer from the numerical stalling associated with a number of iterative solution methods. The acceleration scheme is based on the multigrid method, which is specifically adapted for incorporation into the NEM nonlinear iterative strategy. This scheme optimizes the computational interplay between the spatial discretization and the NEM nonlinear iterative solution process through the use of the multigrid method. The combination of the NEM nodal method, calculation of the homogenized, neutron nodal balance coefficients (i.e. restriction operator), efficient underlying smoothing algorithm (power method of NESTLE), and the finer mesh reconstruction algorithm (i.e. prolongation operator), all operating on a sequence of coarser spatial nodes, constitutes the multilevel acceleration scheme employed in this research. Two implementations of the multigrid method into the NESTLE code were examined; the Imbedded NEM Strategy and the Imbedded CMFD Strategy. The main difference in implementation between the two methods is that in the Imbedded NEM Strategy, the NEM solution is required at every MG level. Numerical tests have shown that the Imbedded NEM Strategy suffers from divergence at coarse- grid levels, hence all the results for the different benchmarks presented here were obtained using the Imbedded CMFD Strategy. The novelties in the developed MG method are as follows: the formulation of the restriction and prolongation operators, and the selection of the relaxation method. The restriction operator utilizes a variation of the reactor physics, consistent homogenization technique. The prolongation operator is based upon a variant of the pin power

  8. Monolithic multigrid methods for two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Adler, James H.; Benson, Thomas R.; Cyr, Eric C.; MacLachlan, Scott P.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.

    2016-01-06

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) representations are used to model a wide range of plasma physics applications and are characterized by a nonlinear system of partial differential equations that strongly couples a charged fluid with the evolution of electromagnetic fields. The resulting linear systems that arise from discretization and linearization of the nonlinear problem are generally difficult to solve. In this paper, we investigate multigrid preconditioners for this system. We consider two well-known multigrid relaxation methods for incompressible fluid dynamics: Braess--Sarazin relaxation and Vanka relaxation. We first extend these to the context of steady-state one-fluid viscoresistive MHD. Then we compare the two relaxationmore » procedures within a multigrid-preconditioned GMRES method employed within Newton's method. To isolate the effects of the different relaxation methods, we use structured grids, inf-sup stable finite elements, and geometric interpolation. Furthermore, we present convergence and timing results for a two-dimensional, steady-state test problem.« less

  9. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (FEI) version 2.9 : users guide and reference manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan B.

    2005-02-01

    The Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (FEI) is a linear system assembly library. Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many computational engineering applications, and the solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver package capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the need to switch an application from one solver library to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by various solver libraries for data assembly and problem solution differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer that puts a 'common face' on various solver libraries. The FEI has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The original FEI offered several advantages over using linear algebra libraries directly, but also imposed significant limitations and disadvantages. A new set of interfaces has been added with the goal of removing the limitations of the original FEI while maintaining and extending its strengths.

  10. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  11. Multigrid methods and the surface consistent equations of Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, John

    The surface consistent equations are a large linear system that is frequently used in signal enhancement for land seismic surveys. Different signatures may be consistent with a particular dynamite (or other) source. Each receiver and the conditions around the receiver will have different impact on the signal. Seismic deconvolution operators, amplitude corrections and static shifts of traces are calculated using the surface consistent equations, both in commercial and scientific seismic processing software. The system of equations is singular, making direct methods such as Gaussian elimination impossible to implement. Iterative methods such as Gauss-Seidel and conjugate gradient are frequently used. A limitation in the nature of the methods leave the long wavelengths of the solution poorly resolved. To reduce the limitations of traditional iterative methods, we employ a multigrid method. Multigrid methods re-sample the entire system of equations on a more coarse grid. An iterative method is employed on the coarse grid. The long wavelengths of the solutions that traditional iterative methods were unable to resolve are calculated on the reduced system of equations. The coarse estimate can be interpolated back up to the original sample rate, and refined using a standard iterative procedure. Multigrid methods provide more accurate solutions to the surface consistent equations, with the largest improvement concentrated in the long wavelengths. Synthetic models and tests on field data show that multigrid solutions to the system of equations can significantly increase the resolution of the seismic data, when used to correct both static time shifts and in calculating deconvolution operators. The first chapter of this thesis is a description of the physical model we are addressing. It reviews some of the literature concerning the surface consistent equations, and provides background on the nature of the problem. Chapter 2 contains a review of iterative and multigrid methods

  12. Quantization of Algebraic Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sniatycki, Jeodrzej

    2007-11-14

    For a Poisson algebra obtained by algebraic reduction of symmetries of a quantizable system we develop an analogue of geometric quantization based on the quantization structure of the original system.

  13. Analysis of incomplete matrix factorizations as multigrid smoothers for vector and parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Axelsson, O.

    1986-07-01

    The cost of smoothing is usually a major expense in multigrid codes. Efficient vectorizable and parallelizable versions of incomplete block-matrix factorization methods used as smoothers for multigrid methods are discussed in this paper. The methods are particularly interesting for computers with parallel processors with pipelines, because both multitasking with little overhead and vectorization can be achieved. 21 references.

  14. Multigrid method for the equilibrium equations of elasticity using a compact scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, S.

    1986-01-01

    A compact difference scheme is derived for treating the equilibrium equations of elasticity. The scheme is inconsistent and unstable. A multigrid method which takes into account these properties is described. The solution of the discrete equations, up to the level of discretization errors, is obtained by this method in just two multigrid cycles.

  15. Multigrid solution of the convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun

    1996-12-31

    A fourth-order compact finite difference scheme is employed with the multigrid technique to solve the variable coefficient convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number. Scaled inter-grid transfer operators and potential on vectorization and parallelization are discussed. The high-order multigrid method is unconditionally stable and produces solution of 4th-order accuracy. Numerical experiments are included.

  16. Implementation of multigrid methods for solving Navier-Stokes equations on a multiprocessor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Vijay K.; Taasan, Shlomo

    1987-01-01

    Presented are schemes for implementing multigrid algorithms on message based MIMD multiprocessor systems. To address the various issues involved, a nontrivial problem of solving the 2-D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is considered as the model problem. Three different multigrid algorithms are considered. Results from implementing these algorithms on an Intel iPSC are presented.

  17. Learning Algebra in a Computer Algebra Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drijvers, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This article summarises a doctoral thesis entitled "Learning algebra in a computer algebra environment, design research on the understanding of the concept of parameter" (Drijvers, 2003). It describes the research questions, the theoretical framework, the methodology and the results of the study. The focus of the study is on the understanding of…

  18. Algebraic theory of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iachello, Franco

    1995-01-01

    An algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics is presented. In this formulation, operators of interest are expanded onto elements of an algebra, G. For bound state problems in nu dimensions the algebra G is taken to be U(nu + 1). Applications to the structure of molecules are presented.

  19. Profiles of Algebraic Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humberstone, J.; Reeve, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The algebraic competence of 72 12-year-old female students was examined to identify profiles of understanding reflecting different algebraic knowledge states. Beginning algebraic competence (mapping abilities: word-to-symbol and vice versa, classifying, and solving equations) was assessed. One week later, the nature of assistance required to map…

  20. Orientation in operator algebras

    PubMed Central

    Alfsen, Erik M.; Shultz, Frederic W.

    1998-01-01

    A concept of orientation is relevant for the passage from Jordan structure to associative structure in operator algebras. The research reported in this paper bridges the approach of Connes for von Neumann algebras and ourselves for C*-algebras in a general theory of orientation that is of geometric nature and is related to dynamics. PMID:9618457

  1. Developing Thinking in Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, John; Graham, Alan; Johnson-Wilder, Sue

    2005-01-01

    This book is for people with an interest in algebra whether as a learner, or as a teacher, or perhaps as both. It is concerned with the "big ideas" of algebra and what it is to understand the process of thinking algebraically. The book has been structured according to a number of pedagogic principles that are exposed and discussed along the way,…

  2. Connecting Arithmetic to Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darley, Joy W.; Leapard, Barbara B.

    2010-01-01

    Algebraic thinking is a top priority in mathematics classrooms today. Because elementary school teachers lay the groundwork to develop students' capacity to think algebraically, it is crucial for teachers to have a conceptual understanding of the connections between arithmetic and algebra and be confident in communicating these connections. Many…

  3. A generalized BPX multigrid framework covering nonnested V-cycle methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Huo-Yuan; Gao, Shao-Qin; Tan, Roger C. E.; Zhang, Shangyou

    2007-03-01

    More than a decade ago, Bramble, Pasciak and Xu developed a framework in analyzing the multigrid methods with nonnested spaces or noninherited quadratic forms. It was subsequently known as the BPX multigrid framework, which was widely used in the analysis of multigrid and domain decomposition methods. However, the framework has an apparent limit in the analysis of nonnested V-cycle methods, and it produces a variable V-cycle, or nonuniform convergence rate V-cycle methods, or other nonoptimal results in analysis thus far. This paper completes a long-time effort in extending the BPX multigrid framework so that it truly covers the nonnested V-cycle. We will apply the extended BPX framework to the analysis of many V-cycle nonnested multigrid methods. Some of them were proven previously only for two-level and W-cycle iterations. Some numerical results are presented to support the theoretical analysis of this paper.

  4. The analysis of multigrid algorithms for pseudodifferential operators of order minus one

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Leyk, Z.; Pasciak, J.E. ||

    1994-10-01

    Multigrid algorithms are developed to solve the discrete systems approximating the solutions of operator equations involving pseudodifferential operators of order minus one. Classical multigrid theory deals with the case of differential operators of positive order. The pseudodifferential operator gives rise to a coercive form on H{sup {minus}1/2}({Omega}). Effective multigrid algorithms are developed for this problem. These algorithms are novel in that they use the inner product on H{sup {minus}1}({Omega}) as a base inner product for the multigrid development. The authors show that the resulting rate of iterative convergence can, at worst, depend linearly on the number of levels in these novel multigrid algorithms. In addition, it is shown that the convergence rate is independent of the number of levels (and unknowns) in the case of a pseudodifferential operator defined by a single-layer potential. Finally, the results of numerical experiments illustrating the theory are presented. 19 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Application of multi-grid methods for solving the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1989-01-01

    The application of a class of multi-grid methods to the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for two-dimensional laminar flow problems is discussed. The methods consist of combining the full approximation scheme-full multi-grid technique (FAS-FMG) with point-, line-, or plane-relaxation routines for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables. The performance of the multi-grid methods is compared to that of several single-grid methods. The results show that much faster convergence can be procured through the use of the multi-grid approach than through the various suggestions for improving single-grid methods. The importance of the choice of relaxation scheme for the multi-grid method is illustrated.

  6. Application of multi-grid methods for solving the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a class of multi-grid methods to the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for two-dimensional laminar flow problems. The methods consists of combining the full approximation scheme-full multi-grid technique (FAS-FMG) with point-, line- or plane-relaxation routines for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables. The performance of the multi-grid methods is compared to those of several single-grid methods. The results show that much faster convergence can be procured through the use of the multi-grid approach than through the various suggestions for improving single-grid methods. The importance of the choice of relaxation scheme for the multi-grid method is illustrated.

  7. Multilayer shallow shelf approximation: Minimisation formulation, finite element solvers and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jouvet, Guillaume

    2015-04-15

    In this paper, a multilayer generalisation of the Shallow Shelf Approximation (SSA) is considered. In this recent hybrid ice flow model, the ice thickness is divided into thin layers, which can spread out, contract and slide over each other in such a way that the velocity profile is layer-wise constant. Like the SSA (1-layer model), the multilayer model can be reformulated as a minimisation problem. However, unlike the SSA, the functional to be minimised involves a new penalisation term for the interlayer jumps of the velocity, which represents the vertical shear stresses induced by interlayer sliding. Taking advantage of this reformulation, numerical solvers developed for the SSA can be naturally extended layer-wise or column-wise. Numerical results show that the column-wise extension of a Newton multigrid solver proves to be robust in the sense that its convergence is barely influenced by the number of layers and the type of ice flow. In addition, the multilayer formulation appears to be naturally better conditioned than the one of the first-order approximation to face the anisotropic conditions of the sliding-dominant ice flow of ISMIP-HOM experiments.

  8. A massively parallel fractional step solver for incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Houzeaux, G. Vazquez, M. Aubry, R. Cela, J.M.

    2009-09-20

    This paper presents a parallel implementation of fractional solvers for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using an algebraic approach. Under this framework, predictor-corrector and incremental projection schemes are seen as sub-classes of the same class, making apparent its differences and similarities. An additional advantage of this approach is to set a common basis for a parallelization strategy, which can be extended to other split techniques or to compressible flows. The predictor-corrector scheme consists in solving the momentum equation and a modified 'continuity' equation (namely a simple iteration for the pressure Schur complement) consecutively in order to converge to the monolithic solution, thus avoiding fractional errors. On the other hand, the incremental projection scheme solves only one iteration of the predictor-corrector per time step and adds a correction equation to fulfill the mass conservation. As shown in the paper, these two schemes are very well suited for massively parallel implementation. In fact, when compared with monolithic schemes, simpler solvers and preconditioners can be used to solve the non-symmetric momentum equations (GMRES, Bi-CGSTAB) and to solve the symmetric continuity equation (CG, Deflated CG). This gives good speedup properties of the algorithm. The implementation of the mesh partitioning technique is presented, as well as the parallel performances and speedups for thousands of processors.

  9. A New Robust Solver for Saturated-Unsaturated Richards' Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barajas-Solano, D. A.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    We present a novel approach for the numerical integration of the saturated-unsaturated Richards' equation, a degenerate parabolic partial differential equation that models flow in porous media. The method is based on the mixed (pore pressure-water content) form of RE, written as a set of differential algebraic equations (DAEs) of index-1 for the fully saturated case and index-2 for the partially saturated case. A DAE-based approach allows us to overcome the numerical challenges posed by the degenerate nature of the Richards' equation. The resulting set of DAEs is solved using the stiffly-accurate, single-step, 3-stage implicit Runge-Kutta method Radau IIA, chosen for its favorable accuracy and stability properties, and its ease of implementation. For each time step a nonlinear system of equations on the intermediate Runge-Kutta states of the pore pressure is solved, written so to ensure that the next step pore pressure and water content correspond to one another correctly. The implementation of our approach compares favorably to state-of-the-art DAE-based solvers in both one- and two-dimensional simulations. These solvers use multi-step backward difference formulas together with a pressure-based form of Richards' equation. To the best of our knowledge, our method is the first instance of a successful DAE-based solver that uses the mixed form of Richards' equation. We consider this a promising line of research, with future work to be done on the use of globally convergent methods for the solution of the occurring nonlinear systems of equations.

  10. A Fast and Robust Poisson-Boltzmann Solver Based on Adaptive Cartesian Grids.

    PubMed

    Boschitsch, Alexander H; Fenley, Marcia O

    2011-05-10

    An adaptive Cartesian grid (ACG) concept is presented for the fast and robust numerical solution of the 3D Poisson-Boltzmann Equation (PBE) governing the electrostatic interactions of large-scale biomolecules and highly charged multi-biomolecular assemblies such as ribosomes and viruses. The ACG offers numerous advantages over competing grid topologies such as regular 3D lattices and unstructured grids. For very large biological molecules and multi-biomolecule assemblies, the total number of grid-points is several orders of magnitude less than that required in a conventional lattice grid used in the current PBE solvers thus allowing the end user to obtain accurate and stable nonlinear PBE solutions on a desktop computer. Compared to tetrahedral-based unstructured grids, ACG offers a simpler hierarchical grid structure, which is naturally suited to multigrid, relieves indirect addressing requirements and uses fewer neighboring nodes in the finite difference stencils. Construction of the ACG and determination of the dielectric/ionic maps are straightforward, fast and require minimal user intervention. Charge singularities are eliminated by reformulating the problem to produce the reaction field potential in the molecular interior and the total electrostatic potential in the exterior ionic solvent region. This approach minimizes grid-dependency and alleviates the need for fine grid spacing near atomic charge sites. The technical portion of this paper contains three parts. First, the ACG and its construction for general biomolecular geometries are described. Next, a discrete approximation to the PBE upon this mesh is derived. Finally, the overall solution procedure and multigrid implementation are summarized. Results obtained with the ACG-based PBE solver are presented for: (i) a low dielectric spherical cavity, containing interior point charges, embedded in a high dielectric ionic solvent - analytical solutions are available for this case, thus allowing rigorous

  11. Computer algebra and operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fateman, Richard; Grossman, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The symbolic computation of operator expansions is discussed. Some of the capabilities that prove useful when performing computer algebra computations involving operators are considered. These capabilities may be broadly divided into three areas: the algebraic manipulation of expressions from the algebra generated by operators; the algebraic manipulation of the actions of the operators upon other mathematical objects; and the development of appropriate normal forms and simplification algorithms for operators and their actions. Brief descriptions are given of the computer algebra computations that arise when working with various operators and their actions.

  12. Discrete Minimal Surface Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnlind, Joakim; Hoppe, Jens

    2010-05-01

    We consider discrete minimal surface algebras (DMSA) as generalized noncommutative analogues of minimal surfaces in higher dimensional spheres. These algebras appear naturally in membrane theory, where sequences of their representations are used as a regularization. After showing that the defining relations of the algebra are consistent, and that one can compute a basis of the enveloping algebra, we give several explicit examples of DMSAs in terms of subsets of sln (any semi-simple Lie algebra providing a trivial example by itself). A special class of DMSAs are Yang-Mills algebras. The representation graph is introduced to study representations of DMSAs of dimension d ≤ 4, and properties of representations are related to properties of graphs. The representation graph of a tensor product is (generically) the Cartesian product of the corresponding graphs. We provide explicit examples of irreducible representations and, for coinciding eigenvalues, classify all the unitary representations of the corresponding algebras.

  13. KLU2 Direct Linear Solver Package

    2012-01-04

    KLU2 is a direct sparse solver for solving unsymmetric linear systems. It is related to the existing KLU solver, (in Amesos package and also as a stand-alone package from University of Florida) but provides template support for scalar and ordinal types. It uses a left looking LU factorization method.

  14. Spectral multigrid methods for the solution of homogeneous turbulence problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Zang, T. A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    New three-dimensional spectral multigrid algorithms are analyzed and implemented to solve the variable coefficient Helmholtz equation. Periodicity is assumed in all three directions which leads to a Fourier collocation representation. Convergence rates are theoretically predicted and confirmed through numerical tests. Residual averaging results in a spectral radius of 0.2 for the variable coefficient Poisson equation. In general, non-stationary Richardson must be used for the Helmholtz equation. The algorithms developed are applied to the large-eddy simulation of incompressible isotropic turbulence.

  15. Improving Resource-Unaware SAT Solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölldobler, Steffen; Manthey, Norbert; Saptawijaya, Ari

    The paper discusses cache utilization in state-of-the-art SAT solvers. The aim of the study is to show how a resource-unaware SAT solver can be improved by utilizing the cache sensibly. The analysis is performed on a CDCL-based SAT solver using a subset of the industrial SAT Competition 2009 benchmark. For the analysis, the total cycles, the resource stall cycles, the L2 cache hits and the L2 cache misses are traced using sample based profiling. Based on the analysis, several techniques - some of which have not been used in SAT solvers so far - are proposed resulting in a combined speedup up to 83% without affecting the search path of the solver. The average speedup on the benchmark is 60%. The new techniques are also applied to MiniSAT2.0 improving its runtime by 20% on average.

  16. Belos Block Linear Solvers Package

    2004-03-01

    Belos is an extensible and interoperable framework for large-scale, iterative methods for solving systems of linear equations with multiple right-hand sides. The motivation for this framework is to provide a generic interface to a collection of algorithms for solving large-scale linear systems. Belos is interoperable because both the matrix and vectors are considered to be opaque objects--only knowledge of the matrix and vectors via elementary operations is necessary. An implementation of Balos is accomplished viamore » the use of interfaces. One of the goals of Belos is to allow the user flexibility in specifying the data representation for the matrix and vectors and so leverage any existing software investment. The algorithms that will be included in package are Krylov-based linear solvers, like Block GMRES (Generalized Minimal RESidual) and Block CG (Conjugate-Gradient).« less

  17. Algebraic turbulence models for the computation of two-dimensional high speed flows using unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostand, Philippe

    1988-01-01

    The incorporation of algebraic turbulence models in a solver for the 2-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations using triangular grids is described. A practical way to use the Cebeci Smith model, and to modify it in separated regions is proposed. The ability of the model to predict high speed, perfect gas boundary layers is investigated from a numerical point of view.

  18. Accelerating sparse linear algebra using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnoli, Kyle E.; Humphrey, John R.; Price, Daniel K.; Kelmelis, Eric J.

    2011-06-01

    The modern graphics processing unit (GPU) found in many standard personal computers is a highly parallel math processor capable of over 1 TFLOPS of peak computational throughput at a cost similar to a high-end CPU with excellent FLOPS-to-watt ratio. High-level sparse linear algebra operations are computationally intense, often requiring large amounts of parallel operations and would seem a natural fit for the processing power of the GPU. Our work is on a GPU accelerated implementation of sparse linear algebra routines. We present results from both direct and iterative sparse system solvers. The GPU execution model featured by NVIDIA GPUs based on CUDA demands very strong parallelism, requiring between hundreds and thousands of simultaneous operations to achieve high performance. Some constructs from linear algebra map extremely well to the GPU and others map poorly. CPUs, on the other hand, do well at smaller order parallelism and perform acceptably during low-parallelism code segments. Our work addresses this via hybrid a processing model, in which the CPU and GPU work simultaneously to produce results. In many cases, this is accomplished by allowing each platform to do the work it performs most naturally. For example, the CPU is responsible for graph theory portion of the direct solvers while the GPU simultaneously performs the low level linear algebra routines.

  19. User documentation for PVODE, an ODE solver for parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, A.C., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    PVODE is a general purpose ordinary differential equation (ODE) solver for stiff and nonstiff ODES It is based on CVODE [5] [6], which is written in ANSI- standard C PVODE uses MPI (Message-Passing Interface) [8] and a revised version of the vector module in CVODE to achieve parallelism and portability PVODE is intended for the SPMD (Single Program Multiple Data) environment with distributed memory, in which all vectors are identically distributed across processors In particular, the vector module is designed to help the user assign a contiguous segment of a given vector to each of the processors for parallel computation The idea is for each processor to solve a certain fixed subset of the ODES To better understand PVODE, we first need to understand CVODE and its historical background The ODE solver CVODE, which was written by Cohen and Hindmarsh, combines features of two earlier Fortran codes, VODE [l] and VODPK [3] Those two codes were written by Brown, Byrne, and Hindmarsh. Both use variable-coefficient multi-step integration methods, and address both stiff and nonstiff systems (Stiffness is defined as the presence of one or more very small damping time constants ) VODE uses direct linear algebraic techniques to solve the underlying banded or dense linear systems of equations in conjunction with a modified Newton method in the stiff ODE case On the other hand, VODPK uses a preconditioned Krylov iterative method [2] to solve the underlying linear system User-supplied preconditioners directly address the dominant source of stiffness Consequently, CVODE implements both the direct and iterative methods Currently, with regard to the nonlinear and linear system solution, PVODE has three method options available. functional iteration, Newton iteration with a diagonal approximate Jacobian, and Newton iteration with the iterative method SPGMR (Scaled Preconditioned Generalized Minimal Residual method) Both CVODE and PVODE are written in such a way that other linear

  20. A Cell-Centered Multigrid Algorithm for All Grid Sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gjesdal, Thor

    1996-01-01

    Multigrid methods are optimal; that is, their rate of convergence is independent of the number of grid points, because they use a nested sequence of coarse grids to represent different scales of the solution. This nesting does, however, usually lead to certain restrictions of the permissible size of the discretised problem. In cases where the modeler is free to specify the whole problem, such constraints are of little importance because they can be taken into consideration from the outset. We consider the situation in which there are other competing constraints on the resolution. These restrictions may stem from the physical problem (e.g., if the discretised operator contains experimental data measured on a fixed grid) or from the need to avoid limitations set by the hardware. In this paper we discuss a modification to the cell-centered multigrid algorithm, so that it can be used br problems with any resolution. We discuss in particular a coarsening strategy and choice of intergrid transfer operators that can handle grids with both an even or odd number of cells. The method is described and applied to linear equations obtained by discretization of two- and three-dimensional second-order elliptic PDEs.

  1. Constructive interference II: Semi-chaotic multigrid methods

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, C.C.

    1994-12-31

    Parallel computer vendors have mostly decided to move towards multi-user, multi-tasking per node machines. A number of these machines already exist today. Self load balancing on these machines is not an option to the users except when the user can convince someone to boot the entire machine in single user mode, which may have to be done node by node. Chaotic relaxation schemes were considered for situations like this as far back as the middle 1960`s. However, very little convergence theory exists. Further, what exists indicates that this is not really a good method. Besides chaotic relaxation, chaotic conjugate direction and minimum residual methods are explored as smoothers for symmetric and nonsymmetric problems. While having each processor potentially going off in a different direction from the rest is not what one would strive for in a unigrid situation, the change of grid procedures in multigrid provide a natural way of aiming all of the processors in the right direction. The author presents some new results for multigrid methods in which synchronization of the calculations on one or more levels is not assumed. However, he assumes that he knows how far out of synch neighboring subdomains are with respect to each other. Thus the author can show that the combination of a limited chaotic smoother and coarse level corrections produces a better algorithm than would be expected.

  2. Multigrid MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (mMALDI MSI).

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Annett; Hölzer, Stefan; Knop, Katrin; Schubert, Ulrich S; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is an important technique for the spatially resolved molecular analysis of tissue sections. The selection of matrices influences the resulting mass spectra to a high degree. For extensive and simultaneous analysis, the application of different matrices to one tissue sample is desirable. To date, only a single matrix could be applied to a tissue section per experiment. However, repetitive removal of the matrix makes this approach time-consuming and damaging to tissue samples. To overcome these drawbacks, we developed a multigrid MALDI MSI technique (mMALDI MSI) that relies on automated inkjet printing to place differing matrices onto predefined dot grids. We used a cooled printhead to prevent cavitation of low viscosity solvents in the printhead nozzle. Improved spatial resolution of the dot grids was achieved by using a triple-pulse procedure that reduced droplet volume. The matrices can either be applied directly to the thaw-mounted tissue sample or by precoating the slide followed by mounting of the tissue sample. During the MALDI imaging process, we were able to precisely target different matrix point grids with the laser to simultaneously produce distinct mass spectra. Unlike the standard method, the prespotting approach optimizes the spectra quality, avoids analyte delocalization, and enables subsequent hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Graphical Abstract Scheme of the pre-spotted multigrid MALDI MSI workflow. PMID:27039200

  3. A multigrid method for variable coefficient Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J E; Lee, B

    2004-05-13

    This paper presents a multigrid method for solving variable coefficient Maxwell's equations. The novelty in this method is the use of interpolation operators that do not produce multilevel commutativity complexes that lead to multilevel exactness. Rather, the effects of multilevel exactness are built into the level equations themselves--on the finest level using a discrete T-V formulation, and on the coarser grids through the Galerkin coarsening procedure of a T-V formulation. These built-in structures permit the levelwise use of an effective hybrid smoother on the curl-free near-nullspace components, and these structures permit the development of interpolation operators for handling the curl-free and divergence-free error components separately, with the resulting block diagonal interpolation operator not satisfying multilevel commutativity but having good approximation properties for both of these error components. Applying operator-dependent interpolation for each of these error components leads to an effective multigrid scheme for variable coefficient Maxwell's equations, where multilevel commutativity-based methods can degrade. Numerical results are presented to verify the effectiveness of this new scheme.

  4. A Richer Understanding of Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Algebra is one of those hard-to-teach topics where pupils seem to struggle to see it as more than a set of rules to learn, but this author recently used the software "Grid Algebra" from ATM, which engaged her Year 7 pupils in exploring algebraic concepts for themselves. "Grid Algebra" allows pupils to experience number, pre-algebra, and algebra…

  5. Distributed Relaxation Multigrid and Defect Correction Applied to the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. L.; Diskin, B.; Brandt, A.

    1999-01-01

    The distributed-relaxation multigrid and defect- correction methods are applied to the two- dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The formulation is intended for high Reynolds number applications and several applications are made at a laminar Reynolds number of 10,000. A staggered- grid arrangement of variables is used; the coupled pressure and internal energy equations are solved together with multigrid, requiring a block 2x2 matrix solution. Textbook multigrid efficiencies are attained for incompressible and slightly compressible simulations of the boundary layer on a flat plate. Textbook efficiencies are obtained for compressible simulations up to Mach numbers of 0.7 for a viscous wake simulation.

  6. ALPS - A LINEAR PROGRAM SOLVER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Linear programming is a widely-used engineering and management tool. Scheduling, resource allocation, and production planning are all well-known applications of linear programs (LP's). Most LP's are too large to be solved by hand, so over the decades many computer codes for solving LP's have been developed. ALPS, A Linear Program Solver, is a full-featured LP analysis program. ALPS can solve plain linear programs as well as more complicated mixed integer and pure integer programs. ALPS also contains an efficient solution technique for pure binary (0-1 integer) programs. One of the many weaknesses of LP solvers is the lack of interaction with the user. ALPS is a menu-driven program with no special commands or keywords to learn. In addition, ALPS contains a full-screen editor to enter and maintain the LP formulation. These formulations can be written to and read from plain ASCII files for portability. For those less experienced in LP formulation, ALPS contains a problem "parser" which checks the formulation for errors. ALPS creates fully formatted, readable reports that can be sent to a printer or output file. ALPS is written entirely in IBM's APL2/PC product, Version 1.01. The APL2 workspace containing all the ALPS code can be run on any APL2/PC system (AT or 386). On a 32-bit system, this configuration can take advantage of all extended memory. The user can also examine and modify the ALPS code. The APL2 workspace has also been "packed" to be run on any DOS system (without APL2) as a stand-alone "EXE" file, but has limited memory capacity on a 640K system. A numeric coprocessor (80X87) is optional but recommended. The standard distribution medium for ALPS is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. IBM, IBM PC and IBM APL2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  7. SUDOKU A STORY & A SOLVER

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER, P.R.

    2006-04-01

    Sudoku, also known as Number Place, is a logic-based placement puzzle. The aim of the puzzle is to enter a numerical digit from 1 through 9 in each cell of a 9 x 9 grid made up of 3 x 3 subgrids (called ''regions''), starting with various digits given in some cells (the ''givens''). Each row, column, and region must contain only one instance of each numeral. Completing the puzzle requires patience and logical ability. Although first published in a U.S. puzzle magazine in 1979, Sudoku initially caught on in Japan in 1986 and attained international popularity in 2005. Last fall, after noticing Sudoku puzzles in some newspapers and magazines, I attempted a few just to see how hard they were. Of course, the difficulties varied considerably. ''Obviously'' one could use Trial and Error but all the advice was to ''Use Logic''. Thinking to flex, and strengthen, those powers, I began to tackle the puzzles systematically. That is, when I discovered a new tactical rule, I would write it down, eventually generating a list of ten or so, with some having overlap. They served pretty well except for the more difficult puzzles, but even then I managed to develop an additional three rules that covered all of them until I hit the Oregonian puzzle shown. With all of my rules, I could not seem to solve that puzzle. Initially putting my failure down to rapid mental fatigue (being unable to hold a sufficient quantity of information in my mind at one time), I decided to write a program to implement my rules and see what I had failed to notice earlier. The solver, too, failed. That is, my rules were insufficient to solve that particular puzzle. I happened across a book written by a fellow who constructs such puzzles and who claimed that, sometimes, the only tactic left was trial and error. With a trial and error routine implemented, my solver successfully completed the Oregonian puzzle, and has successfully solved every puzzle submitted to it since.

  8. SIERRA framework version 4 : solver services.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan B.

    2005-02-01

    Several SIERRA applications make use of third-party libraries to solve systems of linear and nonlinear equations, and to solve eigenproblems. The classes and interfaces in the SIERRA framework that provide linear system assembly services and access to solver libraries are collectively referred to as solver services. This paper provides an overview of SIERRA's solver services including the design goals that drove the development, and relationships and interactions among the various classes. The process of assembling and manipulating linear systems will be described, as well as access to solution methods and other operations.

  9. Connecting Algebra and Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Sean

    2003-01-01

    Correlates high school chemistry curriculum with high school algebra curriculum and makes the case for an integrated approach to mathematics and science instruction. Focuses on process integration. (DDR)

  10. Extending Clause Learning of SAT Solvers with Boolean Gröbner Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengler, Christoph; Küchlin, Wolfgang

    We extend clause learning as performed by most modern SAT Solvers by integrating the computation of Boolean Gröbner bases into the conflict learning process. Instead of learning only one clause per conflict, we compute and learn additional binary clauses from a Gröbner basis of the current conflict. We used the Gröbner basis engine of the logic package Redlog contained in the computer algebra system Reduce to extend the SAT solver MiniSAT with Gröbner basis learning. Our approach shows a significant reduction of conflicts and a reduction of restarts and computation time on many hard problems from the SAT 2009 competition.

  11. ALPS: A Linear Program Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferencz, Donald C.; Viterna, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    ALPS is a computer program which can be used to solve general linear program (optimization) problems. ALPS was designed for those who have minimal linear programming (LP) knowledge and features a menu-driven scheme to guide the user through the process of creating and solving LP formulations. Once created, the problems can be edited and stored in standard DOS ASCII files to provide portability to various word processors or even other linear programming packages. Unlike many math-oriented LP solvers, ALPS contains an LP parser that reads through the LP formulation and reports several types of errors to the user. ALPS provides a large amount of solution data which is often useful in problem solving. In addition to pure linear programs, ALPS can solve for integer, mixed integer, and binary type problems. Pure linear programs are solved with the revised simplex method. Integer or mixed integer programs are solved initially with the revised simplex, and the completed using the branch-and-bound technique. Binary programs are solved with the method of implicit enumeration. This manual describes how to use ALPS to create, edit, and solve linear programming problems. Instructions for installing ALPS on a PC compatible computer are included in the appendices along with a general introduction to linear programming. A programmers guide is also included for assistance in modifying and maintaining the program.

  12. Euler solvers for transonic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleer, Bram

    1989-01-01

    The 1980s may well be called the Euler era of applied aerodynamics. Computer codes based on discrete approximations of the Euler equations are now routinely used to obtain solutions of transonic flow problems in which the effects of entropy and vorticity production are significant. Such codes can even predict separation from a sharp edge, owing to the inclusion of artificial dissipation, intended to lend numerical stability to the calculation but at the same time enforcing the Kutta condition. One effect not correctly predictable by Euler codes is the separation from a smooth surface, and neither is viscous drag; for these some form of the Navier-Stokes equation is needed. It, therefore, comes as no surprise to observe that the Navier-Stokes has already begun before Euler solutions were fully exploited. Moreover, most numerical developments for the Euler equations are now constrained by the requirement that the techniques introduced, notably artificial dissipation, must not interfere with the new physics added when going from an Euler to a full Navier-Stokes approximation. In order to appreciate the contributions of Euler solvers to the understanding of transonic aerodynamics, it is useful to review the components of these computational tools. Space discretization, time- or pseudo-time marching and boundary procedures, the essential constituents are discussed. The subject of grid generation and grid adaptation to the solution are touched upon only where relevant. A list of unanswered questions and an outlook for the future are covered.

  13. Parallelizing alternating direction implicit solver on GPUs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a parallel Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) solver on GPUs. Our implementation significantly improves existing implementations in two aspects. First, we address the scalability issue of existing Parallel Cyclic Reduction (PCR) implementations by eliminating their hardware resource con...

  14. Uniform convergence of multigrid v-cycle iterations for indefinite and nonsymmetric problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H. . Dept. of Mathematics); Kwak, D.Y. . Dept. of Mathematics); Pasciak, J.E. . Dept. of Applied Science)

    1994-12-01

    In this paper, an analysis of a multigrid method for nonsymmetric and/or indefinite elliptic problems is presented. In this multigrid method various types of smothers may be used. One type of smoother considered is defined in terms of an associated symmetric problem and includes point and line, Jacobi, and Gauss-Seidel iterations. Smothers based entirely on the original operator are also considered. One smoother is based on the normal form, that is, the product of the operator and its transpose. Other smothers studied include point and line, Jacobi, and Gauss-Seidel. It is shown that the uniform estimates for symmetric positive definite problems carry over to these algorithms. More precisely, the multigrid iteration for the nonsymmetric and/or indefinite problem is shown to converge at a uniform rate provided that the coarsest grid in the multilevel iteration is sufficiently fine (but not dependent on the number of multigrid levels).

  15. Uniform convergence of multigrid V-cycle iterations for indefinite and nonsymmetric problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bramble, James H.; Kwak, Do Y.; Pasciak, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of a multigrid method for nonsymmetric and/or indefinite elliptic problems. In this multigrid method various types of smoothers may be used. One type of smoother which we consider is defined in terms of an associated symmetric problem and includes point and line, Jacobi, and Gauss-Seidel iterations. We also study smoothers based entirely on the original operator. One is based on the normal form, that is, the product of the operator and its transpose. Other smoothers studied include point and line, Jacobi, and Gauss-Seidel. We show that the uniform estimates for symmetric positive definite problems carry over to these algorithms. More precisely, the multigrid iteration for the nonsymmetric and/or indefinite problem is shown to converge at a uniform rate provided that the coarsest grid in the multilevel iteration is sufficiently fine (but not depending on the number of multigrid levels).

  16. Stability analysis of multigrid acceleration methods for the solution of partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, John F.

    1990-01-01

    A calculation is made of the stability of various relaxation schemes for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. A multigrid acceleration method is introduced, and its effects on stability are explored. A detailed stability analysis of a simple case is carried out and verified by numerical experiment. It is shown that the use of multigrids can speed convergence by several orders of magnitude without adversely affecting stability.

  17. Copper Mountain conference on multigrid methods. Preliminary proceedings -- List of abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This report contains abstracts of the papers presented at the conference. Papers cover multigrid algorithms and applications of multigrid methods. Applications include the following: solution of elliptical problems; electric power grids; fluid mechanics; atmospheric data assimilation; thermocapillary effects on weld pool shape; boundary-value problems; prediction of hurricane tracks; modeling multi-dimensional combustion and detailed chemistry; black-oil reservoir simulation; image processing; and others.

  18. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on themore » problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  19. A parallel PCG solver for MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanhui; Li, Guomin

    2009-01-01

    In order to simulate large-scale ground water flow problems more efficiently with MODFLOW, the OpenMP programming paradigm was used to parallelize the preconditioned conjugate-gradient (PCG) solver with in this study. Incremental parallelization, the significant advantage supported by OpenMP on a shared-memory computer, made the solver transit to a parallel program smoothly one block of code at a time. The parallel PCG solver, suitable for both MODFLOW-2000 and MODFLOW-2005, is verified using an 8-processor computer. Both the impact of compilers and different model domain sizes were considered in the numerical experiments. Based on the timing results, execution times using the parallel PCG solver are typically about 1.40 to 5.31 times faster than those using the serial one. In addition, the simulation results are the exact same as the original PCG solver, because the majority of serial codes were not changed. It is worth noting that this parallelizing approach reduces cost in terms of software maintenance because only a single source PCG solver code needs to be maintained in the MODFLOW source tree. PMID:19563427

  20. Linear-Algebra Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, C. L.; Krogh, F. T.; Gold, S. S.; Kincaid, D. R.; Sullivan, J.; Williams, E.; Hanson, R. J.; Haskell, K.; Dongarra, J.; Moler, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) library is a collection of 38 FORTRAN-callable routines for performing basic operations of numerical linear algebra. BLAS library is portable and efficient source of basic operations for designers of programs involving linear algebriac computations. BLAS library is supplied in portable FORTRAN and Assembler code versions for IBM 370, UNIVAC 1100 and CDC 6000 series computers.

  1. Ready, Set, Algebra?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Alissa Beth

    2012-01-01

    The California Department of Education (CDE) has long asserted that success Algebra I by Grade 8 is the goal for all California public school students. In fact, the state's accountability system penalizes schools that do not require all of their students to take the Algebra I end-of-course examination by Grade 8 (CDE, 2009). In this…

  2. Algebraic Reasoning through Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, F. D.; Becker, Joanne Rossi

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the results of a three-year study that explores students' performance on patterning tasks involving prealgebra and algebra. The findings, insights, and issues drawn from the study are intended to help teach prealgebra and algebra. In the remainder of the article, the authors take a more global view of the three-year study on…

  3. Teaching Structure in Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlin, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how the author has developed tasks for students that address the missed "essence of the matter" of algebraic transformations. Specifically, he has found that having students practice "perceiving" algebraic structure--by naming the "glue" in the expressions, drawing expressions using…

  4. Proteus-MOC: A 3D deterministic solver incorporating 2D method of characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Marin-Lafleche, A.; Smith, M. A.; Lee, C.

    2013-07-01

    A new transport solution methodology was developed by combining the two-dimensional method of characteristics with the discontinuous Galerkin method for the treatment of the axial variable. The method, which can be applied to arbitrary extruded geometries, was implemented in PROTEUS-MOC and includes parallelization in group, angle, plane, and space using a top level GMRES linear algebra solver. Verification tests were performed to show accuracy and stability of the method with the increased number of angular directions and mesh elements. Good scalability with parallelism in angle and axial planes is displayed. (authors)

  5. Development of a multigrid transonic potential flow code for cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinhoff, John

    1992-01-01

    Finite-volume methods for discretizing transonic potential flow equations have proven to be very flexible and accurate for both two and three dimensional problems. Since they only use local properties of the mapping, they allow decoupling of the grid generation from the rest of the problem. A very effective method for solving the discretized equations and converging to a solution is the multigrid-ADI technique. It has been successfully applied to airfoil problems where O type, C type and slit mappings have been used. Convergence rates for these cases are more than an order of magnitude faster than with relaxation techniques. In this report, we describe a method to extend the above methods, with the C type mappings, to airfoil cascade problems.

  6. Multigrid calculation of three-dimensional viscous cascade flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnone, A.; Liou, M.-S.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    A three-dimensional code for viscous cascade flow prediction has been developed. The space discretization uses a cell-centered scheme with eigenvalue scaling to weigh the artificial dissipation terms. Computational efficiency of a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is enhanced by using variable coefficients, implicit residual smoothing, and a full-multigrid method. The Baldwin-Lomax eddy-viscosity model is used for turbulence closure. A zonal, nonperiodic grid is used to minimize mesh distortion in and downstream of the throat region. Applications are presented for an annular vane with and without end wall contouring, and for a large-scale linear cascade. The calculation is validated by comparing with experiments and by studying grid dependency.

  7. Multigrid calculation of three-dimensional viscous cascade flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnone, A.; Liou, M.-S.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    A 3-D code for viscous cascade flow prediction was developed. The space discretization uses a cell-centered scheme with eigenvalue scaling to weigh the artificial dissipation terms. Computational efficiency of a four stage Runge-Kutta scheme is enhanced by using variable coefficients, implicit residual smoothing, and a full multigrid method. The Baldwin-Lomax eddy viscosity model is used for turbulence closure. A zonal, nonperiodic grid is used to minimize mesh distortion in and downstream of the throat region. Applications are presented for an annular vane with and without end wall contouring, and for a large scale linear cascade. The calculation is validated by comparing with experiments and by studying grid dependency.

  8. Multigrid hierarchical simulated annealing method for reconstructing heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Lalit M.; Mitra, Sushanta K.; Secanell, Marc

    2015-12-01

    A reconstruction methodology based on different-phase-neighbor (DPN) pixel swapping and multigrid hierarchical annealing is presented. The method performs reconstructions by starting at a coarse image and successively refining it. The DPN information is used at each refinement stage to freeze interior pixels of preformed structures. This preserves the large-scale structures in refined images and also reduces the number of pixels to be swapped, thereby resulting in a decrease in the necessary computational time to reach a solution. Compared to conventional single-grid simulated annealing, this method was found to reduce the required computation time to achieve a reconstruction by around a factor of 70-90, with the potential of even higher speedups for larger reconstructions. The method is able to perform medium sized (up to 3003 voxels) three-dimensional reconstructions with multiple correlation functions in 36-47 h.

  9. Revenge of the Semicoarsening Frequency Decomposition Multigrid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dendy, J. E., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The frequency decomposition multigrid method was previously considered and modified so as to obtain robustness for problems with discontinuous coefficients while retaining robustness for problems with anisotropic coefficients. The application of this modified method to a problem arising in global ocean modeling was also considered. For this problem it was shown that the discretization employed gives rise to an operator for which point relaxation is not robust. In fact, alternating line relaxation is required for robustness, negating the main advantage of the frequency decomposition method: robustness for anisotropic operators using only point relaxation. In this paper a semicoarsening variant, which requires line relaxation in one direction only is considered, and it is shown that this variant works well for the global ocean modeling problem.

  10. Multigrid methods for differential equations with highly oscillatory coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engquist, Bjorn; Luo, Erding

    1993-01-01

    New coarse grid multigrid operators for problems with highly oscillatory coefficients are developed. These types of operators are necessary when the characters of the differential equations on coarser grids or longer wavelengths are different from that on the fine grid. Elliptic problems for composite materials and different classes of hyperbolic problems are practical examples. The new coarse grid operators can be constructed directly based on the homogenized differential operators or hierarchically computed from the finest grid. Convergence analysis based on the homogenization theory is given for elliptic problems with periodic coefficients and some hyperbolic problems. These are classes of equations for which there exists a fairly complete theory for the interaction between shorter and longer wavelengths in the problems. Numerical examples are presented.

  11. Adaptive multigrid domain decomposition solutions for viscous interacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Stanley G.; Srinivasan, Kumar

    1992-01-01

    Several viscous incompressible flows with strong pressure interaction and/or axial flow reversal are considered with an adaptive multigrid domain decomposition procedure. Specific examples include the triple deck structure surrounding the trailing edge of a flat plate, the flow recirculation in a trough geometry, and the flow in a rearward facing step channel. For the latter case, there are multiple recirculation zones, of different character, for laminar and turbulent flow conditions. A pressure-based form of flux-vector splitting is applied to the Navier-Stokes equations, which are represented by an implicit lowest-order reduced Navier-Stokes (RNS) system and a purely diffusive, higher-order, deferred-corrector. A trapezoidal or box-like form of discretization insures that all mass conservation properties are satisfied at interfacial and outflow boundaries, even for this primitive-variable, non-staggered grid computation.

  12. Development of a New and Fast Linear Solver for Multi-component Reactive Transport Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, C.; Li, L.; Bao, C.; Hu, X.; Johns, R.; Xu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Reactive transport models (RTM) have been extensively used to understand the coupling between solute transport and (bio) geochemical reactions in complex earth systems. RTM typically involves a large number of primary and secondary species with a complex reaction network in large domains. The computational expenses increase significantly with the number of grid blocks and the number of chemical species. Within both the operator splitting approach (OS) and the global implicit approach (GI) that are commonly used, the steps that involve Newton-Raphson method are typically one of the most time-consuming parts (up to 80% to 90% of CPU times). Under such circumstances, accelerating reactive transport simulation is very essential. In this research, we present a physics-based linear system solution strategy for general reactive transport models with many species. We observed up to five times speed up for the linear solver portion of the simulations in our test cases. Our new linear solver takes advantage of the sparsity of the Jacobian matrix arising from the reaction network. The Jacobian matrix for the speciation problem is typically considered as a dense matrix and solved with a direct method such as Gaussian elimination. For the reactive transport problem, the graph of the local Jacobian matrix has a one-to-one correspondence to the reaction network graph. The Jacobian matrix is commonly sparse and has the same sparsity structure for the same reaction network. We developed a strategy that performs a minimum degree of reordering and symbolic factorization to determine the non-zero pattern at the beginning of the OS and GI simulation. During the speciation calculation in OS, we calculate the L and U factors and solve the triangular matrices according to the non-zero pattern. For GI, our strategy can be applied to inverse the diagonal blocks in the block-Jacobi preconditioner and smoothers of the multigrid preconditioners in iterative solvers. Our strategy is naturally

  13. Lie algebra extensions of current algebras on S3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kori, Tosiaki; Imai, Yuto

    2015-06-01

    An affine Kac-Moody algebra is a central extension of the Lie algebra of smooth mappings from S1 to the complexification of a Lie algebra. In this paper, we shall introduce a central extension of the Lie algebra of smooth mappings from S3 to the quaternization of a Lie algebra and investigate its root space decomposition. We think this extension of current algebra might give a mathematical tool for four-dimensional conformal field theory as Kac-Moody algebras give it for two-dimensional conformal field theory.

  14. Leibniz algebras associated with representations of filiform Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayupov, Sh. A.; Camacho, L. M.; Khudoyberdiyev, A. Kh.; Omirov, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we investigate Leibniz algebras whose quotient Lie algebra is a naturally graded filiform Lie algebra nn,1. We introduce a Fock module for the algebra nn,1 and provide classification of Leibniz algebras L whose corresponding Lie algebra L / I is the algebra nn,1 with condition that the ideal I is a Fock nn,1-module, where I is the ideal generated by squares of elements from L. We also consider Leibniz algebras with corresponding Lie algebra nn,1 and such that the action I ×nn,1 → I gives rise to a minimal faithful representation of nn,1. The classification up to isomorphism of such Leibniz algebras is given for the case of n = 4.

  15. Degenerate Sklyanin algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Andrey

    2010-08-01

    New trigonometric and rational solutions of the quantum Yang-Baxter equation (QYBE) are obtained by applying some singular gauge transformations to the known Belavin-Drinfeld elliptic R-matrix for sl(2;?). These solutions are shown to be related to the standard ones by the quasi-Hopf twist. We demonstrate that the quantum algebras arising from these new R-matrices can be obtained as special limits of the Sklyanin algebra. A representation for these algebras by the difference operators is found. The sl( N;?)-case is discussed.

  16. Degenerate Sklyanin algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Andrey

    2010-08-01

    New trigonometric and rational solutions of the quantum Yang-Baxter equation (QYBE) are obtained by applying some singular gauge transformations to the known Belavin-Drinfeld elliptic R-matrix for sl(2;?). These solutions are shown to be related to the standard ones by the quasi-Hopf twist. We demonstrate that the quantum algebras arising from these new R-matrices can be obtained as special limits of the Sklyanin algebra. A representation for these algebras by the difference operators is found. The sl(N;?)-case is discussed.

  17. Acceleration of the chemistry solver for modeling DI engine combustion using dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Liang, Long; Ge, Hai-Wen; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2010-03-01

    Acceleration of the chemistry solver for engine combustion is of much interest due to the fact that in practical engine simulations extensive computational time is spent solving the fuel oxidation and emission formation chemistry. A dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) scheme based on a directed relation graph error propagation (DRGEP) method has been applied to study homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine combustion with detailed chemistry (over 500 species) previously using an R-value-based breadth-first search (RBFS) algorithm, which significantly reduced computational times (by as much as 30-fold). The present paper extends the use of this on-the-fly kinetic mechanism reduction scheme to model combustion in direct-injection (DI) engines. It was found that the DAC scheme becomes less efficient when applied to DI engine simulations using a kinetic mechanism of relatively small size and the accuracy of the original DAC scheme decreases for conventional non-premixed combustion engine. The present study also focuses on determination of search-initiating species, involvement of the NOx chemistry, selection of a proper error tolerance, as well as treatment of the interaction of chemical heat release and the fuel spray. Both the DAC schemes were integrated into the ERC KIVA-3v2 code, and simulations were conducted to compare the two schemes. In general, the present DAC scheme has better efficiency and similar accuracy compared to the previous DAC scheme. The efficiency depends on the size of the chemical kinetics mechanism used and the engine operating conditions. For cases using a small n-heptane kinetic mechanism of 34 species, 30% of the computational time is saved, and 50% for a larger n-heptane kinetic mechanism of 61 species. The paper also demonstrates that by combining the present DAC scheme with an adaptive multi-grid chemistry (AMC) solver, it is feasible to simulate a direct-injection engine using a detailed n-heptane mechanism with 543 species

  18. Algebraic turbulence models for the computation of two-dimensional high-speed flows using unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostand, Philippe

    1989-01-01

    The incorporation of algebraic turbulence models in a solver for the 2-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations using triangular grids is described. A practial way to use the Cebeci Smith model, and to modify it in separated regions is proposed. The ability of the model to predict high speed, perfect gas boundary layers is investigated from a numerical point of view.

  19. Algebraic integrability: a survey.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecke, Pol

    2008-03-28

    We give a concise introduction to the notion of algebraic integrability. Our exposition is based on examples and phenomena, rather than on detailed proofs of abstract theorems. We mainly focus on algebraic integrability in the sense of Adler-van Moerbeke, where the fibres of the momentum map are affine parts of Abelian varieties; as it turns out, most examples from classical mechanics are of this form. Two criteria are given for such systems (Kowalevski-Painlevé and Lyapunov) and each is illustrated in one example. We show in the case of a relatively simple example how one proves algebraic integrability, starting from the differential equations for the integrable vector field. For Hamiltonian systems that are algebraically integrable in the generalized sense, two examples are given, which illustrate the non-compact analogues of Abelian varieties which typically appear in such systems. PMID:17588863

  20. Algebraic Semantics for Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper uses discussion of Edmund Spenser's "The Faerie Queene" to present a theoretical framework for explaining the semantics of narrative discourse. The algebraic theory of finite automata is used. (CK)

  1. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  2. Aprepro - Algebraic Preprocessor

    2005-08-01

    Aprepro is an algebraic preprocessor that reads a file containing both general text and algebraic, string, or conditional expressions. It interprets the expressions and outputs them to the output file along witht the general text. Aprepro contains several mathematical functions, string functions, and flow control constructs. In addition, functions are included that, with some additional files, implement a units conversion system and a material database lookup system.

  3. Geometric Algebra for Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Chris; Lasenby, Anthony

    2007-11-01

    Preface; Notation; 1. Introduction; 2. Geometric algebra in two and three dimensions; 3. Classical mechanics; 4. Foundations of geometric algebra; 5. Relativity and spacetime; 6. Geometric calculus; 7. Classical electrodynamics; 8. Quantum theory and spinors; 9. Multiparticle states and quantum entanglement; 10. Geometry; 11. Further topics in calculus and group theory; 12. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian techniques; 13. Symmetry and gauge theory; 14. Gravitation; Bibliography; Index.

  4. Verification of continuum drift kinetic equation solvers in NIMROD

    SciTech Connect

    Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y.; Kruger, S. E.; Belli, E. A.; Lyons, B. C.

    2015-03-15

    Verification of continuum solutions to the electron and ion drift kinetic equations (DKEs) in NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comp. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is demonstrated through comparison with several neoclassical transport codes, most notably NEO [E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 015015 (2012)]. The DKE solutions use NIMROD's spatial representation, 2D finite-elements in the poloidal plane and a 1D Fourier expansion in toroidal angle. For 2D velocity space, a novel 1D expansion in finite elements is applied for the pitch angle dependence and a collocation grid is used for the normalized speed coordinate. The full, linearized Coulomb collision operator is kept and shown to be important for obtaining quantitative results. Bootstrap currents, parallel ion flows, and radial particle and heat fluxes show quantitative agreement between NIMROD and NEO for a variety of tokamak equilibria. In addition, velocity space distribution function contours for ions and electrons show nearly identical detailed structure and agree quantitatively. A Θ-centered, implicit time discretization and a block-preconditioned, iterative linear algebra solver provide efficient electron and ion DKE solutions that ultimately will be used to obtain closures for NIMROD's evolving fluid model.

  5. Verification of continuum drift kinetic equation solvers in NIMROD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, E. D.; Kruger, S. E.; Ji, J.-Y.; Belli, E. A.; Lyons, B. C.

    2015-03-01

    Verification of continuum solutions to the electron and ion drift kinetic equations (DKEs) in NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comp. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is demonstrated through comparison with several neoclassical transport codes, most notably NEO [E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 015015 (2012)]. The DKE solutions use NIMROD's spatial representation, 2D finite-elements in the poloidal plane and a 1D Fourier expansion in toroidal angle. For 2D velocity space, a novel 1D expansion in finite elements is applied for the pitch angle dependence and a collocation grid is used for the normalized speed coordinate. The full, linearized Coulomb collision operator is kept and shown to be important for obtaining quantitative results. Bootstrap currents, parallel ion flows, and radial particle and heat fluxes show quantitative agreement between NIMROD and NEO for a variety of tokamak equilibria. In addition, velocity space distribution function contours for ions and electrons show nearly identical detailed structure and agree quantitatively. A Θ-centered, implicit time discretization and a block-preconditioned, iterative linear algebra solver provide efficient electron and ion DKE solutions that ultimately will be used to obtain closures for NIMROD's evolving fluid model.

  6. The Algebraic Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiley, B. J.

    In this chapter, we examine in detail the non-commutative symplectic algebra underlying quantum dynamics. By using this algebra, we show that it contains both the Weyl-von Neumann and the Moyal quantum algebras. The latter contains the Wigner distribution as the kernel of the density matrix. The underlying non-commutative geometry can be projected into either of two Abelian spaces, so-called `shadow phase spaces'. One of these is the phase space of Bohmian mechanics, showing that it is a fragment of the basic underlying algebra. The algebraic approach is much richer, giving rise to two fundamental dynamical time development equations which reduce to the Liouville equation and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the classical limit. They also include the Schrödinger equation and its wave-function, showing that these features are a partial aspect of the more general non-commutative structure. We discuss briefly the properties of this more general mathematical background from which the non-commutative symplectic algebra emerges.

  7. ODE System Solver W. Krylov Iteration & Rootfinding

    1991-09-09

    LSODKR is a new initial value ODE solver for stiff and nonstiff systems. It is a variant of the LSODPK and LSODE solvers, intended mainly for large stiff systems. The main differences between LSODKR and LSODE are the following: (a) for stiff systems, LSODKR uses a corrector iteration composed of Newton iteration and one of four preconditioned Krylov subspace iteration methods. The user must supply routines for the preconditioning operations, (b) Within the corrector iteration,more » LSODKR does automatic switching between functional (fixpoint) iteration and modified Newton iteration, (c) LSODKR includes the ability to find roots of given functions of the solution during the integration.« less

  8. A highly parallel multigrid-like method for the solution of the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuminaro, Ray S.

    1989-01-01

    We consider a highly parallel multigrid-like method for the solution of the two dimensional steady Euler equations. The new method, introduced as filtering multigrid, is similar to a standard multigrid scheme in that convergence on the finest grid is accelerated by iterations on coarser grids. In the filtering method, however, additional fine grid subproblems are processed concurrently with coarse grid computations to further accelerate convergence. These additional problems are obtained by splitting the residual into a smooth and an oscillatory component. The smooth component is then used to form a coarse grid problem (similar to standard multigrid) while the oscillatory component is used for a fine grid subproblem. The primary advantage in the filtering approach is that fewer iterations are required and that most of the additional work per iteration can be performed in parallel with the standard coarse grid computations. We generalize the filtering algorithm to a version suitable for nonlinear problems. We emphasize that this generalization is conceptually straight-forward and relatively easy to implement. In particular, no explicit linearization (e.g., formation of Jacobians) needs to be performed (similar to the FAS multigrid approach). We illustrate the nonlinear version by applying it to the Euler equations, and presenting numerical results. Finally, a performance evaluation is made based on execution time models and convergence information obtained from numerical experiments.

  9. A mimetic spectral element solver for the Grad-Shafranov equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palha, A.; Koren, B.; Felici, F.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we present a robust and accurate arbitrary order solver for the fixed-boundary plasma equilibria in toroidally axisymmetric geometries. To achieve this we apply the mimetic spectral element formulation presented in [56] to the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation. This approach combines a finite volume discretization with the mixed finite element method. In this way the discrete differential operators (∇, ∇×, ∇ṡ) can be represented exactly and metric and all approximation errors are present in the constitutive relations. The result of this formulation is an arbitrary order method even on highly curved meshes. Additionally, the integral of the toroidal current Jϕ is exactly equal to the boundary integral of the poloidal field over the plasma boundary. This property can play an important role in the coupling between equilibrium and transport solvers. The proposed solver is tested on a varied set of plasma cross sections (smooth and with an X-point) and also for a wide range of pressure and toroidal magnetic flux profiles. Equilibria accurate up to machine precision are obtained. Optimal algebraic convergence rates of order p + 1 and geometric convergence rates are shown for Soloviev solutions (including high Shafranov shifts), field-reversed configuration (FRC) solutions and spheromak analytical solutions. The robustness of the method is demonstrated for non-linear test cases, in particular on an equilibrium solution with a pressure pedestal.

  10. Amesos2 and Belos: Direct and Iterative Solvers for Large Sparse Linear Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Bavier, Eric; Hoemmen, Mark; Rajamanickam, Sivasankaran; Thornquist, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Solvers for large sparse linear systems come in two categories: direct and iterative. Amesos2, a package in the Trilinos software project, provides direct methods, and Belos, another Trilinos package, provides iterative methods. Amesos2 offers a common interface to many different sparse matrix factorization codes, and can handle any implementation of sparse matrices and vectors, via an easy-to-extend C++ traits interface. It can also factor matrices whose entries have arbitrary “Scalar” type, enabling extended-precision and mixed-precision algorithms. Belos includes many different iterative methods for solving large sparse linear systems and least-squares problems. Unlike competing iterative solver libraries, Belos completely decouples themore » algorithms from the implementations of the underlying linear algebra objects. This lets Belos exploit the latest hardware without changes to the code. Belos favors algorithms that solve higher-level problems, such as multiple simultaneous linear systems and sequences of related linear systems, faster than standard algorithms. The package also supports extended-precision and mixed-precision algorithms. Together, Amesos2 and Belos form a complete suite of sparse linear solvers.« less

  11. Structured adaptive grid generation using algebraic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann-Cherng; Soni, Bharat K.; Roger, R. P.; Chan, Stephen C.

    1993-01-01

    of points to the grid redistribution scheme. The evaluation of the weighting mesh is accomplished by utilizing the weight function representing the solution variation and the equidistribution law. The selection of the weight function plays a key role in grid adaptation. A new weight function utilizing a properly weighted boolean sum of various flowfield characteristics is defined. The redistribution scheme is developed utilizing Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) representation. The application of NURBS representation results in a well distributed smooth grid by maintaining the fidelity of the geometry associated with boundary curves. Several algebraic methods are applied to smooth and/or nearly orthogonalize the grid lines. An elliptic solver is utilized to smooth the grid lines if there are grid crossings. Various computational examples of practical interest are presented to demonstrate the success of these methods.

  12. Solvers for the Cardiac Bidomain Equations

    PubMed Central

    Vigmond, E.J.; Weber dos Santos, R.; Prassl, A.J.; Deo, M.; Plank, G.

    2010-01-01

    The bidomain equations are widely used for the simulation of electrical activity in cardiac tissue. They are especially important for accurately modelling extracellular stimulation, as evidenced by their prediction of virtual electrode polarization before experimental verification. However, solution of the equations is computationally expensive due to the fine spatial and temporal discretization needed. This limits the size and duration of the problem which can be modeled. Regardless of the specific form into which they are cast, the computational bottleneck becomes the repeated solution of a large, linear system. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the equations, and the methods by which they have been solved. Of particular note are recent developments in multigrid methods, which have proven to be the most efficient. PMID:17900668

  13. Analysis of multigrid methods on massively parallel computers: Architectural implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matheson, Lesley R.; Tarjan, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    We study the potential performance of multigrid algorithms running on massively parallel computers with the intent of discovering whether presently envisioned machines will provide an efficient platform for such algorithms. We consider the domain parallel version of the standard V cycle algorithm on model problems, discretized using finite difference techniques in two and three dimensions on block structured grids of size 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 9), respectively. Our models of parallel computation were developed to reflect the computing characteristics of the current generation of massively parallel multicomputers. These models are based on an interconnection network of 256 to 16,384 message passing, 'workstation size' processors executing in an SPMD mode. The first model accomplishes interprocessor communications through a multistage permutation network. The communication cost is a logarithmic function which is similar to the costs in a variety of different topologies. The second model allows single stage communication costs only. Both models were designed with information provided by machine developers and utilize implementation derived parameters. With the medium grain parallelism of the current generation and the high fixed cost of an interprocessor communication, our analysis suggests an efficient implementation requires the machine to support the efficient transmission of long messages, (up to 1000 words) or the high initiation cost of a communication must be significantly reduced through an alternative optimization technique. Furthermore, with variable length message capability, our analysis suggests the low diameter multistage networks provide little or no advantage over a simple single stage communications network.

  14. Multigrid optimal mass transport for image registration and morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we present a computationally efficient Optimal Mass Transport algorithm. This method is based on the Monge-Kantorovich theory and is used for computing elastic registration and warping maps in image registration and morphing applications. This is a parameter free method which utilizes all of the grayscale data in an image pair in a symmetric fashion. No landmarks need to be specified for correspondence. In our work, we demonstrate significant improvement in computation time when our algorithm is applied as compared to the originally proposed method by Haker et al [1]. The original algorithm was based on a gradient descent method for removing the curl from an initial mass preserving map regarded as 2D vector field. This involves inverting the Laplacian in each iteration which is now computed using full multigrid technique resulting in an improvement in computational time by a factor of two. Greater improvement is achieved by decimating the curl in a multi-resolutional framework. The algorithm was applied to 2D short axis cardiac MRI images and brain MRI images for testing and comparison.

  15. Equation solvers for distributed-memory computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, Olaf O.

    1994-01-01

    A large number of scientific and engineering problems require the rapid solution of large systems of simultaneous equations. The performance of parallel computers in this area now dwarfs traditional vector computers by nearly an order of magnitude. This talk describes the major issues involved in parallel equation solvers with particular emphasis on the Intel Paragon, IBM SP-1 and SP-2 processors.

  16. Parallel solvers for reservoir simulation on MIMD computers

    SciTech Connect

    Piault, E.; Willien, F.; Roux, F.X.

    1995-12-01

    We have investigated parallel solvers for reservoir simulation. We compare different solvers and preconditioners using T3D and SP1 parallel computers. We use block diagonal domain decomposition preconditioner with non-overlapping sub-domains.

  17. Multigrid on unstructured grids using an auxiliary set of structured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, C.C.; Malhotra, S.; Schultz, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Unstructured grids do not have a convenient and natural multigrid framework for actually computing and maintaining a high floating point rate on standard computers. In fact, just the coarsening process is expensive for many applications. Since unstructured grids play a vital role in many scientific computing applications, many modifications have been proposed to solve this problem. One suggested solution is to map the original unstructured grid onto a structured grid. This can be used as a fine grid in a standard multigrid algorithm to precondition the original problem on the unstructured grid. We show that unless extreme care is taken, this mapping can lead to a system with a high condition number which eliminates the usefulness of the multigrid method. Theorems with lower and upper bounds are provided. Simple examples show that the upper bounds are sharp.

  18. A positivity-preserving, implicit defect-correction multigrid method for turbulent combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, M.; Mor-Yossef, Y.; Greenberg, J. B.

    2016-07-01

    A novel, robust multigrid method for the simulation of turbulent and chemically reacting flows is developed. A survey of previous attempts at implementing multigrid for the problems at hand indicated extensive use of artificial stabilization to overcome numerical instability arising from non-linearity of turbulence and chemistry model source-terms, small-scale physics of combustion, and loss of positivity. These issues are addressed in the current work. The highly stiff Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, coupled with turbulence and finite-rate chemical kinetics models, are integrated in time using the unconditionally positive-convergent (UPC) implicit method. The scheme is successfully extended in this work for use with chemical kinetics models, in a fully-coupled multigrid (FC-MG) framework. To tackle the degraded performance of multigrid methods for chemically reacting flows, two major modifications are introduced with respect to the basic, Full Approximation Storage (FAS) approach. First, a novel prolongation operator that is based on logarithmic variables is proposed to prevent loss of positivity due to coarse-grid corrections. Together with the extended UPC implicit scheme, the positivity-preserving prolongation operator guarantees unconditional positivity of turbulence quantities and species mass fractions throughout the multigrid cycle. Second, to improve the coarse-grid-correction obtained in localized regions of high chemical activity, a modified defect correction procedure is devised, and successfully applied for the first time to simulate turbulent, combusting flows. The proposed modifications to the standard multigrid algorithm create a well-rounded and robust numerical method that provides accelerated convergence, while unconditionally preserving the positivity of model equation variables. Numerical simulations of various flows involving premixed combustion demonstrate that the proposed MG method increases the efficiency by a factor of

  19. Abstract Algebra for Algebra Teaching: Influencing School Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the potential for aspects of abstract algebra to be influential for the teaching of school algebra (and early algebra). Using national standards for analysis, four primary areas common in school mathematics--and their progression across elementary, middle, and secondary mathematics--where teaching may be transformed by…

  20. Vectorizable multigrid algorithms for transonic flow calculations. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, N. D.

    1985-01-01

    The analysis and incorporation into a multigrid scheme of several vectorizable algorithms are discussed. Von Neumann analyses of vertical line, horizontal line, and alternating direction ZEBRA algorithms were performed; and the results were used to predict their multigrid damping rates. The algorithms were then successfully implemented in a transonic conservative full-potential computer program. The convergence acceleration effect of multiple grids is shown and the convergence rates of the vectorizable algorithms are compared to the convergence rates of standard successive line overrelaxation (SLOR) algorithms.

  1. Multigrid for the Galerkin least squares method in linear elasticity: The pure displacement problem

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jaechil

    1996-12-31

    Franca and Stenberg developed several Galerkin least squares methods for the solution of the problem of linear elasticity. That work concerned itself only with the error estimates of the method. It did not address the related problem of finding effective methods for the solution of the associated linear systems. In this work, we prove the convergence of a multigrid (W-cycle) method. This multigrid is robust in that the convergence is uniform as the parameter, v, goes to 1/2 Computational experiments are included.

  2. A dynamically adaptive multigrid algorithm for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations: Validation and model problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. P.; Leaf, G. K.; Vanrosendale, J.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is described for the solution of the laminar, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The basic algorithm is a multigrid based on a robust, box-based smoothing step. Its most important feature is the incorporation of automatic, dynamic mesh refinement. This algorithm supports generalized simple domains. The program is based on a standard staggered-grid formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for robustness and efficiency. Special grid transfer operators were introduced at grid interfaces in the multigrid algorithm to ensure discrete mass conservation. Results are presented for three models: the driven-cavity, a backward-facing step, and a sudden expansion/contraction.

  3. A multigrid algorithm for the cell-centered finite difference scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Richard E.; Shen, Jian

    1993-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a non-variational V-cycle multigrid algorithm based on the cell-centered finite difference scheme for solving a second-order elliptic problem with discontinuous coefficients. Due to the poor approximation property of piecewise constant spaces and the non-variational nature of our scheme, one step of symmetric linear smoothing in our V-cycle multigrid scheme may fail to be a contraction. Again, because of the simple structure of the piecewise constant spaces, prolongation and restriction are trivial; we save significant computation time with very promising computational results.

  4. Computer Program For Linear Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.; Hanson, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of routines provided for basic vector operations. Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is collection from FORTRAN-callable routines for employing standard techniques to perform basic operations of numerical linear algebra.

  5. Algebra for Gifted Third Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borenson, Henry

    1987-01-01

    Elementary school children who are exposed to a concrete, hands-on experience in algebraic linear equations will more readily develop a positive mind-set and expectation for success in later formal, algebraic studies. (CB)

  6. Pseudo Algebraically Closed Extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bary-Soroker, Lior

    2009-07-01

    This PhD deals with the notion of pseudo algebraically closed (PAC) extensions of fields. It develops a group-theoretic machinery, based on a generalization of embedding problems, to study these extensions. Perhaps the main result is that although there are many PAC extensions, the Galois closure of a proper PAC extension is separably closed. The dissertation also contains the following subjects. The group theoretical counterpart of pseudo algebraically closed extensions, the so-called projective pairs. Applications to seemingly unrelated subjects, e.g., an analog of Dirichlet's theorem about primes in arithmetic progression for polynomial rings in one variable over infinite fields.

  7. Energy-Conservative Newton-Krylov Implicit Solver for the Fokker-Planck Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, D. A.; Barnes, D. C.; Chacón, L.

    1998-11-01

    Energy conservation in 1D Fokker-Planck problems has been addressed by Epperlein,(Epperlein, J. Comp. Phys.), 112, 291-297 (1994) who proposed an implicit method that preserves energy exactly for any time step, provided the energy moment cancels exactly. Although this method can be generalized for several dimensions, standard discretization techniques in multidimensional geometries generally do not guarantee the numerical cancellation of the energy moment, hence precluding exact energy conservation. Furthermore, its numerical implementation is non-trivial, as it involves a dense, non-symmetric matrix of coefficients. It is the objective of this poster to describe the implementation of an implicit energy-conservative scheme for multidimensional Fokker-Planck problems. A new discretization procedure that ensures the numerical cancellation of the energy moment will be discussed. The dense algebraic problem that results from this formulation is solved efficiently by the multigrid preconditioned matrix-free GMRES(Saad, Schultz, SIAM J. Scientific and Stat. Comp.), 7, 856-869 (1986) iterative technique, which minimizes storage and runtime requirements, and allows implicit time steps of the order of the collisional time scale of the problem, τ. Results will show that the method preserves particles and energy exactly.

  8. Assessing Elementary Algebra with STACK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangwin, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper concerns computer aided assessment (CAA) of mathematics in which a computer algebra system (CAS) is used to help assess students' responses to elementary algebra questions. Using a methodology of documentary analysis, we examine what is taught in elementary algebra. The STACK CAA system, http://www.stack.bham.ac.uk/, which uses the CAS…

  9. On the structure of parallelism in a highly concurrent PDE solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gannon, D.; Van Rosendale, J.

    1986-01-01

    A parallel multigrid algorithm for solving elliptic partial differential equations is developed and evaluated. A V-cycle multigrid method is altered to increase the degree of parallelism. A numerical analysis of the resulting concurrent-iteration multigrid algorithm is performed; its architectural implications are considered; highly parallel systems without shared memory are examined (including mesh-connected arrays, mesh-shuffle-connected systems, permutation networks, and direct VLSI embeddings); and the results of numerical experiments are presented in tables and graphs.

  10. Aleph Field Solver Challenge Problem Results Summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Russell; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Aleph models continuum electrostatic and steady and transient thermal fields using a finite-element method. Much work has gone into expanding the core solver capability to support enriched mod- eling consisting of multiple interacting fields, special boundary conditions and two-way interfacial coupling with particles modeled using Aleph's complementary particle-in-cell capability. This report provides quantitative evidence for correct implementation of Aleph's field solver via order- of-convergence assessments on a collection of problems of increasing complexity. It is intended to provide Aleph with a pedigree and to establish a basis for confidence in results for more challeng- ing problems important to Sandia's mission that Aleph was specifically designed to address.

  11. Diablo 2.0: A modern DNS/LES code for the incompressible NSE leveraging new time-stepping and multigrid algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaglieri, Daniele; Bewley, Thomas; Mashayek, Ali

    2015-11-01

    We present a new code, Diablo 2.0, for the simulation of the incompressible NSE in channel and duct flows with strong grid stretching near walls. The code leverages the fractional step approach with a few twists. New low-storage IMEX (implicit-explicit) Runge-Kutta time-marching schemes are tested which are superior to the traditional and widely-used CN/RKW3 (Crank-Nicolson/Runge-Kutta-Wray) approach; the new schemes tested are L-stable in their implicit component, and offer improved overall order of accuracy and stability with, remarkably, similar computational cost and storage requirements. For duct flow simulations, our new code also introduces a new smoother for the multigrid solver for the pressure Poisson equation. The classic approach, involving alternating-direction zebra relaxation, is replaced by a new scheme, dubbed tweed relaxation, which achieves the same convergence rate with roughly half the computational cost. The code is then tested on the simulation of a shear flow instability in a duct, a classic problem in fluid mechanics which has been the object of extensive numerical modelling for its role as a canonical pathway to energetic turbulence in several fields of science and engineering.

  12. College Algebra II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Carl; And Others

    Presented are student performance objectives, a student progress chart, and assignment sheets with objective and diagnostic measures for the stated performance objectives in College Algebra II. Topics covered include: differencing and complements; real numbers; factoring; fractions; linear equations; exponents and radicals; complex numbers,…

  13. Thinking Visually about Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroudi, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Many introductions to algebra in high school begin with teaching students to generalise linear numerical patterns. This article argues that this approach needs to be changed so that students encounter variables in the context of modelling visual patterns so that the variables have a meaning. The article presents sample classroom activities,…

  14. Computer Algebra versus Manipulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zand, Hossein; Crowe, David

    2004-01-01

    In the UK there is increasing concern about the lack of skill in algebraic manipulation that is evident in students entering mathematics courses at university level. In this note we discuss how the computer can be used to ameliorate some of the problems. We take as an example the calculations needed in three dimensional vector analysis in polar…

  15. Algebraic Artful Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, David

    1995-01-01

    Presents a technique that helps students concentrate more on the science and less on the mechanics of algebra while dealing with introductory physics formulas. Allows the teacher to do complex problems at a lower level and not be too concerned about the mathematical abilities of the students. (JRH)

  16. Computers in Abstract Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwabueze, Kenneth K.

    2004-01-01

    The current emphasis on flexible modes of mathematics delivery involving new information and communication technology (ICT) at the university level is perhaps a reaction to the recent change in the objectives of education. Abstract algebra seems to be one area of mathematics virtually crying out for computer instructional support because of the…

  17. Domain decomposition for the SPN solver MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Jamelot, Erell; Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2012-07-01

    In this article we present a domain decomposition method for the mixed SPN equations, discretized with Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. This domain decomposition is based on the iterative Schwarz algorithm with Robin interface conditions to handle communications. After having described this method, we give details on how to optimize the convergence. Finally, we give some numerical results computed in a realistic 3D domain. The computations are done with the MINOS solver of the APOLLO3 (R) code. (authors)

  18. A perspective on unstructured grid flow solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    This survey paper assesses the status of compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers on unstructured grids. Different spatial and temporal discretization options for steady and unsteady flows are discussed. The integration of these components into an overall framework to solve practical problems is addressed. Issues such as grid adaptation, higher order methods, hybrid discretizations and parallel computing are briefly discussed. Finally, some outstanding issues and future research directions are presented.

  19. A multigrid LU-SSOR scheme for approximate Newton iteration applied to the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Jameson, Antony

    1986-01-01

    A new efficient relaxation scheme in conjunction with a multigrid method is developed for the Euler equations. The LU SSOR scheme is based on a central difference scheme and does not need flux splitting for Newton iteration. Application to transonic flow shows that the new method surpasses the performance of the LU implicit scheme.

  20. Eigensystem analysis of classical relaxation techniques with applications to multigrid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Harvard; Maksymiuk, Catherine

    1987-01-01

    Classical relaxation techniques are related to numerical methods for solution of ordinary differential equations. Eigensystems for Point-Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel, and SOR methods are presented. Solution techniques such as eigenvector annihilation, eigensystem mixing, and multigrid methods are examined with regard to the eigenstructure.

  1. A multigrid Newton-Krylov method for flux-limited radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.; Knoll, D.A.; Olson, G.L.

    1998-09-01

    The authors focus on the integration of radiation diffusion including flux-limited diffusion coefficients. The nonlinear integration is accomplished with a Newton-Krylov method preconditioned with a multigrid Picard linearization of the governing equations. They investigate the efficiency of the linear and nonlinear iterative techniques.

  2. A fast multigrid algorithm for energy minimization under planar density constraints.

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, D.; Safro, I.; Brandt, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Weizmann Inst. of Science

    2010-09-07

    The two-dimensional layout optimization problem reinforced by the efficient space utilization demand has a wide spectrum of practical applications. Formulating the problem as a nonlinear minimization problem under planar equality and/or inequality density constraints, we present a linear time multigrid algorithm for solving a correction to this problem. The method is demonstrated in various graph drawing (visualization) instances.

  3. Algebraic connectivity and graph robustness.

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Abdallah, Chaouki T.

    2009-07-01

    Recent papers have used Fiedler's definition of algebraic connectivity to show that network robustness, as measured by node-connectivity and edge-connectivity, can be increased by increasing the algebraic connectivity of the network. By the definition of algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian is a lower bound on the node-connectivity. In this paper we show that for circular random lattice graphs and mesh graphs algebraic connectivity is a conservative lower bound, and that increases in algebraic connectivity actually correspond to a decrease in node-connectivity. This means that the networks are actually less robust with respect to node-connectivity as the algebraic connectivity increases. However, an increase in algebraic connectivity seems to correlate well with a decrease in the characteristic path length of these networks - which would result in quicker communication through the network. Applications of these results are then discussed for perimeter security.

  4. MILAMIN 2 - Fast MATLAB FEM solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin; Krotkiewski, Marcin; Schmid, Daniel W.

    2013-04-01

    MILAMIN is a free and efficient MATLAB-based two-dimensional FEM solver utilizing unstructured meshes [Dabrowski et al., G-cubed (2008)]. The code consists of steady-state thermal diffusion and incompressible Stokes flow solvers implemented in approximately 200 lines of native MATLAB code. The brevity makes the code easily customizable. An important quality of MILAMIN is speed - it can handle millions of nodes within minutes on one CPU core of a standard desktop computer, and is faster than many commercial solutions. The new MILAMIN 2 allows three-dimensional modeling. It is designed as a set of functional modules that can be used as building blocks for efficient FEM simulations using MATLAB. The utilities are largely implemented as native MATLAB functions. For performance critical parts we use MUTILS - a suite of compiled MEX functions optimized for shared memory multi-core computers. The most important features of MILAMIN 2 are: 1. Modular approach to defining, tracking, and discretizing the geometry of the model 2. Interfaces to external mesh generators (e.g., Triangle, Fade2d, T3D) and mesh utilities (e.g., element type conversion, fast point location, boundary extraction) 3. Efficient computation of the stiffness matrix for a wide range of element types, anisotropic materials and three-dimensional problems 4. Fast global matrix assembly using a dedicated MEX function 5. Automatic integration rules 6. Flexible prescription (spatial, temporal, and field functions) and efficient application of Dirichlet, Neuman, and periodic boundary conditions 7. Treatment of transient and non-linear problems 8. Various iterative and multi-level solution strategies 9. Post-processing tools (e.g., numerical integration) 10. Visualization primitives using MATLAB, and VTK export functions We provide a large number of examples that show how to implement a custom FEM solver using the MILAMIN 2 framework. The examples are MATLAB scripts of increasing complexity that address a given

  5. Algebraic Mean Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dankova, T. S.; Rosensteel, G.

    1998-10-01

    Mean field theory has an unexpected group theoretic mathematical foundation. Instead of representation theory which applies to most group theoretic quantum models, Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov have been formulated in terms of coadjoint orbits for the groups U(n) and O(2n). The general theory of mean fields is formulated for an arbitrary Lie algebra L of fermion operators. The moment map provides the correspondence between the Hilbert space of microscopic wave functions and the dual space L^* of densities. The coadjoint orbits of the group in the dual space are phase spaces on which time-dependent mean field theory is equivalent to a classical Hamiltonian dynamical system. Indeed it forms a finite-dimensional Lax system. The mean field theories for the Elliott SU(3) and symplectic Sp(3,R) algebras are constructed explicitly in the coadjoint orbit framework.

  6. The Algebra Artist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beigie, Darin

    2014-01-01

    Most people who are attracted to STEM-related fields are drawn not by a desire to take mathematics tests but to create things. The opportunity to create an algebra drawing gives students a sense of ownership and adventure that taps into the same sort of energy that leads a young person to get lost in reading a good book, building with Legos®,…

  7. Algebra of Majorana doubling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehoon; Wilczek, Frank

    2013-11-27

    Motivated by the problem of identifying Majorana mode operators at junctions, we analyze a basic algebraic structure leading to a doubled spectrum. For general (nonlinear) interactions the emergent mode creation operator is highly nonlinear in the original effective mode operators, and therefore also in the underlying electron creation and destruction operators. This phenomenon could open up new possibilities for controlled dynamical manipulation of the modes. We briefly compare and contrast related issues in the Pfaffian quantum Hall state.

  8. Priority in Process Algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleaveland, Rance; Luettgen, Gerald; Natarajan, V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper surveys the semantic ramifications of extending traditional process algebras with notions of priority that allow for some transitions to be given precedence over others. These enriched formalisms allow one to model system features such as interrupts, prioritized choice, or real-time behavior. Approaches to priority in process algebras can be classified according to whether the induced notion of preemption on transitions is global or local and whether priorities are static or dynamic. Early work in the area concentrated on global pre-emption and static priorities and led to formalisms for modeling interrupts and aspects of real-time, such as maximal progress, in centralized computing environments. More recent research has investigated localized notions of pre-emption in which the distribution of systems is taken into account, as well as dynamic priority approaches, i.e., those where priority values may change as systems evolve. The latter allows one to model behavioral phenomena such as scheduling algorithms and also enables the efficient encoding of real-time semantics. Technically, this paper studies the different models of priorities by presenting extensions of Milner's Calculus of Communicating Systems (CCS) with static and dynamic priority as well as with notions of global and local pre- emption. In each case the operational semantics of CCS is modified appropriately, behavioral theories based on strong and weak bisimulation are given, and related approaches for different process-algebraic settings are discussed.

  9. Evaluating the performance of the two-phase flow solver interFoam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Anumolu, Lakshman; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of the open source multiphase flow solver, interFoam, is evaluated in this work. The solver is based on a modified volume of fluid (VoF) approach, which incorporates an interfacial compression flux term to mitigate the effects of numerical smearing of the interface. It forms a part of the C + + libraries and utilities of OpenFOAM and is gaining popularity in the multiphase flow research community. However, to the best of our knowledge, the evaluation of this solver is confined to the validation tests of specific interest to the users of the code and the extent of its applicability to a wide range of multiphase flow situations remains to be explored. In this work, we have performed a thorough investigation of the solver performance using a variety of verification and validation test cases, which include (i) verification tests for pure advection (kinematics), (ii) dynamics in the high Weber number limit and (iii) dynamics of surface tension-dominated flows. With respect to (i), the kinematics tests show that the performance of interFoam is generally comparable with the recent algebraic VoF algorithms; however, it is noticeably worse than the geometric reconstruction schemes. For (ii), the simulations of inertia-dominated flows with large density ratios {\\sim }\\mathscr {O}(10^3) yielded excellent agreement with analytical and experimental results. In regime (iii), where surface tension is important, consistency of pressure-surface tension formulation and accuracy of curvature are important, as established by Francois et al (2006 J. Comput. Phys. 213 141-73). Several verification tests were performed along these lines and the main findings are: (a) the algorithm of interFoam ensures a consistent formulation of pressure and surface tension; (b) the curvatures computed by the solver converge to a value slightly (10%) different from the analytical value and a scope for improvement exists in this respect. To reduce the disruptive effects of spurious

  10. Albany/FELIX: A parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, alongmore » with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.« less

  11. Albany/FELIX: a parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, I.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite-element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and Template-Based Generic Programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using: (1) new test cases derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution is then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using structured and unstructured meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  12. Albany/FELIX: a parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  13. Albany/FELIX: A parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  14. Approximate Riemann solvers for the Godunov SPH (GSPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Kunal; Ramachandran, Prabhu

    2014-08-01

    The Godunov Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (GSPH) method is coupled with non-iterative, approximate Riemann solvers for solutions to the compressible Euler equations. The use of approximate solvers avoids the expensive solution of the non-linear Riemann problem for every interacting particle pair, as required by GSPH. In addition, we establish an equivalence between the dissipative terms of GSPH and the signal based SPH artificial viscosity, under the restriction of a class of approximate Riemann solvers. This equivalence is used to explain the anomalous “wall heating” experienced by GSPH and we provide some suggestions to overcome it. Numerical tests in one and two dimensions are used to validate the proposed Riemann solvers. A general SPH pairing instability is observed for two-dimensional problems when using unequal mass particles. In general, Ducowicz Roe's and HLLC approximate Riemann solvers are found to be suitable replacements for the iterative Riemann solver in the original GSPH scheme.

  15. Introduction to COFFE: The Next-Generation HPCMP CREATE-AV CFD Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasby, Ryan S.; Erwin, J. Taylor; Stefanski, Douglas L.; Allmaras, Steven R.; Galbraith, Marshall C.; Anderson, W. Kyle; Nichols, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    HPCMP CREATE-AV Conservative Field Finite Element (COFFE) is a modular, extensible, robust numerical solver for the Navier-Stokes equations that invokes modularity and extensibility from its first principles. COFFE implores a flexible, class-based hierarchy that provides a modular approach consisting of discretization, physics, parallelization, and linear algebra components. These components are developed with modern software engineering principles to ensure ease of uptake from a user's or developer's perspective. The Streamwise Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin (SU/PG) method is utilized to discretize the compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations tightly coupled with a variety of turbulence models. The mathematics and the philosophy of the methodology that makes up COFFE are presented.

  16. Improving the energy efficiency of sparse linear system solvers on multicore and manycore systems.

    PubMed

    Anzt, H; Quintana-Ortí, E S

    2014-06-28

    While most recent breakthroughs in scientific research rely on complex simulations carried out in large-scale supercomputers, the power draft and energy spent for this purpose is increasingly becoming a limiting factor to this trend. In this paper, we provide an overview of the current status in energy-efficient scientific computing by reviewing different technologies used to monitor power draft as well as power- and energy-saving mechanisms available in commodity hardware. For the particular domain of sparse linear algebra, we analyse the energy efficiency of a broad collection of hardware architectures and investigate how algorithmic and implementation modifications can improve the energy performance of sparse linear system solvers, without negatively impacting their performance. PMID:24842036

  17. Navier-Stokes calculations on multi-element airfoils using a chimera-based solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasper, Donald W.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Robinson, Brian A.

    1993-01-01

    A study of Navier-Stokes calculations of flows about multielement airfoils using a chimera grid approach is presented. The chimera approach utilizes structured, overlapped grids which allow great flexibility of grid arrangement and simplifies grid generation. Calculations are made for two-, three-, and four-element airfoils, and modeling of the effect of gap distance between elements is demonstrated for a two element case. Solutions are obtained using the thin-layer form of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations with turbulence closure provided by the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model or the Baldwin-Barth one equation model. The Baldwin-Barth turbulence model is shown to provide better agreement with experimental data and to dramatically improve convergence rates for some cases. Recently developed, improved farfield boundary conditions are incorporated into the solver for greater efficiency. Computed results show good comparison with experimental data which include aerodynamic forces, surface pressures, and boundary layer velocity profiles.

  18. Improving the energy efficiency of sparse linear system solvers on multicore and manycore systems.

    PubMed

    Anzt, H; Quintana-Ortí, E S

    2014-06-28

    While most recent breakthroughs in scientific research rely on complex simulations carried out in large-scale supercomputers, the power draft and energy spent for this purpose is increasingly becoming a limiting factor to this trend. In this paper, we provide an overview of the current status in energy-efficient scientific computing by reviewing different technologies used to monitor power draft as well as power- and energy-saving mechanisms available in commodity hardware. For the particular domain of sparse linear algebra, we analyse the energy efficiency of a broad collection of hardware architectures and investigate how algorithmic and implementation modifications can improve the energy performance of sparse linear system solvers, without negatively impacting their performance.

  19. A mathematical basis for automated structured grid generation with close coupling to the flow solver

    SciTech Connect

    Barnette, D.W.

    1998-02-01

    The first two truncation error terms resulting from finite differencing the convection terms in the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are examined for the purpose of constructing two-dimensional grid generation schemes. These schemes are constructed such that the resulting grid distributions drive the error terms to zero. Two sets of equations result, one for each error term, that show promise in generating grids that provide more accurate flow solutions and possibly faster convergence. One set results in an algebraic scheme that drives the first truncation term to zero, and the other a hyperbolic scheme that drives the second term to zero. Also discussed is the possibility of using the schemes in sequentially constructing a grid in an iterative algorithm involving the flow solver. In essence, the process is envisioned to generate not only a flow field solution but the grid as well, rendering the approach a hands-off method for grid generation

  20. Implementation of Advanced Two Equation Turbulence Models in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen; Massey, Steven J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2000-01-01

    USM3D is a widely-used unstructured flow solver for simulating inviscid and viscous flows over complex geometries. The current version (version 5.0) of USM3D, however, does not have advanced turbulence models to accurately simulate complicated flow. We have implemented two modified versions of the original Jones and Launder k-epsilon "two-equation" turbulence model and the Girimaji algebraic Reynolds stress model in USM3D. Tests have been conducted for three flat plate boundary layer cases, a RAE2822 airfoil and an ONERA M6 wing. The results are compared with those from direct numerical simulation, empirical formulae, theoretical results, and the existing Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model.

  1. Updates to the NEQAIR Radiation Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    The NEQAIR code is one of the original heritage solvers for radiative heating prediction in aerothermal environments, and is still used today for mission design purposes. This paper discusses the implementation of the first major revision to the NEQAIR code in the last five years, NEQAIR v14.0. The most notable features of NEQAIR v14.0 are the parallelization of the radiation computation, reducing runtimes by about 30×, and the inclusion of mid-wave CO2 infrared radiation.

  2. DPS--a computerised diagnostic problem solver.

    PubMed

    Bartos, P; Gyárfas, F; Popper, M

    1982-01-01

    The paper contains a short description of the DPS system which is a computerized diagnostic problem solver. The system is under development of the Research Institute of Medical Bionics in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia. Its underlying philosophy yields from viewing the diagnostic process as process of cognitive problem solving. The implementation of the system is based on the methods of Artificial Intelligence and utilisation of production systems and frame theory should be noted in this context. Finally a list of program modules and their characterisation is presented.

  3. Input-output-controlled nonlinear equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    To upgrade the efficiency and stability of the successive substitution (SS) and Newton-Raphson (NR) schemes, the concept of input-output-controlled solvers (IOCS) is introduced. By employing the formal properties of the constrained version of the SS and NR schemes, the IOCS algorithm can handle indefiniteness of the system Jacobian, can maintain iterate monotonicity, and provide for separate control of load incrementation and iterate excursions, as well as having other features. To illustrate the algorithmic properties, the results for several benchmark examples are presented. These define the associated numerical efficiency and stability of the IOCS.

  4. On the cohomology of Leibniz conformal algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiao

    2015-04-01

    We construct a new cohomology complex of Leibniz conformal algebras with coefficients in a representation instead of a module. The low-dimensional cohomology groups of this complex are computed. Meanwhile, we construct a Leibniz algebra from a Leibniz conformal algebra and prove that the category of Leibniz conformal algebras is equivalent to the category of equivalence classes of formal distribution Leibniz algebras.

  5. Assessing Algebraic Solving Ability: A Theoretical Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lian, Lim Hooi; Yew, Wun Thiam

    2012-01-01

    Algebraic solving ability had been discussed by many educators and researchers. There exists no definite definition for algebraic solving ability as it can be viewed from different perspectives. In this paper, the nature of algebraic solving ability in terms of algebraic processes that demonstrate the ability in solving algebraic problem is…

  6. A scalable, parallel matrix-free Stokes solver for geodynamic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D.

    2013-12-01

    Here I describe a numerical method suitable for studying non-linear, large deformation processes in crustal and lithopspheric dynamics. The method utilizes a hybrid spatial discretisation which consists of mixed finite elements for the Stokes flow problem, coupled to a Lagrangian marker based discretisation to represent the material properties (viscosity and density). This approach is akin to the classical Marker-And-Cell (MAC) scheme of Harlow and the subsequently developed Material Point Method (MPM) of Sulsky and co-workers. The geometric flexibility and ease of modelling large deformation processes afforded by such mesh-particle methods has been exploited by the lithospheric dynamics community over the last 20 years. The strength of the Stokes preconditioner fundamentally controls the scientific throughput achievable and represents the largest bottleneck in the development of our understanding of geodynamic processes. The possibility to develop a 'cheap' and efficient preconditioning methodology which is suitable for the mixed Q2-P1 element is explored here. I describe a flexible strategy, which aims to address the Stokes preconditioning issue using an upper block triangular preconditioner, together with a geometric multi-grid preconditioner for the viscous block. The key to the approach is to utilize algorithms and data-structures that exploit current multi-core hardware and avoid the need for excessive global reductions. In order to develop a scalable method, special consideration is given to; the definition of the coarse grid operator, the smoother and the coarse grid solver. The performance characteristics of this hybrid matrix-free / partially assembled multi-level preconditioning strategy is examined. The robustness of the preconditioner with respect to the viscosity contrast and the topology of the viscosity field, together with the parallel scalability is demonstrated.

  7. Duncan F. Gregory, William Walton and the development of British algebra: 'algebraical geometry', 'geometrical algebra', abstraction.

    PubMed

    Verburgt, Lukas M

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed account of the period of the complex history of British algebra and geometry between the publication of George Peacock's Treatise on Algebra in 1830 and William Rowan Hamilton's paper on quaternions of 1843. During these years, Duncan Farquharson Gregory and William Walton published several contributions on 'algebraical geometry' and 'geometrical algebra' in the Cambridge Mathematical Journal. These contributions enabled them not only to generalize Peacock's symbolical algebra on the basis of geometrical considerations, but also to initiate the attempts to question the status of Euclidean space as the arbiter of valid geometrical interpretations. At the same time, Gregory and Walton were bound by the limits of symbolical algebra that they themselves made explicit; their work was not and could not be the 'abstract algebra' and 'abstract geometry' of figures such as Hamilton and Cayley. The central argument of the paper is that an understanding of the contributions to 'algebraical geometry' and 'geometrical algebra' of the second generation of 'scientific' symbolical algebraists is essential for a satisfactory explanation of the radical transition from symbolical to abstract algebra that took place in British mathematics in the 1830s-1840s. PMID:26806075

  8. Duncan F. Gregory, William Walton and the development of British algebra: 'algebraical geometry', 'geometrical algebra', abstraction.

    PubMed

    Verburgt, Lukas M

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed account of the period of the complex history of British algebra and geometry between the publication of George Peacock's Treatise on Algebra in 1830 and William Rowan Hamilton's paper on quaternions of 1843. During these years, Duncan Farquharson Gregory and William Walton published several contributions on 'algebraical geometry' and 'geometrical algebra' in the Cambridge Mathematical Journal. These contributions enabled them not only to generalize Peacock's symbolical algebra on the basis of geometrical considerations, but also to initiate the attempts to question the status of Euclidean space as the arbiter of valid geometrical interpretations. At the same time, Gregory and Walton were bound by the limits of symbolical algebra that they themselves made explicit; their work was not and could not be the 'abstract algebra' and 'abstract geometry' of figures such as Hamilton and Cayley. The central argument of the paper is that an understanding of the contributions to 'algebraical geometry' and 'geometrical algebra' of the second generation of 'scientific' symbolical algebraists is essential for a satisfactory explanation of the radical transition from symbolical to abstract algebra that took place in British mathematics in the 1830s-1840s.

  9. Second-Order Algebraic Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Marcelo; Mahmoud, Ola

    Fiore and Hur [10] recently introduced a conservative extension of universal algebra and equational logic from first to second order. Second-order universal algebra and second-order equational logic respectively provide a model theory and a formal deductive system for languages with variable binding and parameterised metavariables. This work completes the foundations of the subject from the viewpoint of categorical algebra. Specifically, the paper introduces the notion of second-order algebraic theory and develops its basic theory. Two categorical equivalences are established: at the syntactic level, that of second-order equational presentations and second-order algebraic theories; at the semantic level, that of second-order algebras and second-order functorial models. Our development includes a mathematical definition of syntactic translation between second-order equational presentations. This gives the first formalisation of notions such as encodings and transforms in the context of languages with variable binding.

  10. How Structure Sense for Algebraic Expressions or Equations Is Related to Structure Sense for Abstract Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotna, Jarmila; Hoch, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Many students have difficulties with basic algebraic concepts at high school and at university. In this paper two levels of algebraic structure sense are defined: for high school algebra and for university algebra. We suggest that high school algebra structure sense components are sub-components of some university algebra structure sense…

  11. Barriers to Achieving Textbook Multigrid Efficiency (TME) in CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Achi

    1998-01-01

    As a guide to attaining this optimal performance for general CFD problems, the table below lists every foreseen kind of computational difficulty for achieving that goal, together with the possible ways for resolving that difficulty, their current state of development, and references. Included in the table are staggered and nonstaggered, conservative and nonconservative discretizations of viscous and inviscid, incompressible and compressible flows at various Mach numbers, as well as a simple (algebraic) turbulence model and comments on chemically reacting flows. The listing of associated computational barriers involves: non-alignment of streamlines or sonic characteristics with the grids; recirculating flows; stagnation points; discretization and relaxation on and near shocks and boundaries; far-field artificial boundary conditions; small-scale singularities (meaning important features, such as the complete airplane, which are not visible on some of the coarse grids); large grid aspect ratios; boundary layer resolution; and grid adaption.

  12. Algebraic Flux Correction II. Compressible Euler Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Dmitri; Möller, Matthias

    Algebraic flux correction schemes of TVD and FCT type are extended to systems of hyperbolic conservation laws. The group finite element formulation is employed for the treatment of the compressible Euler equations. An efficient algorithm is proposed for the edge-by-edge matrix assembly. A generalization of Roe's approximate Riemann solver is derived by rendering all off-diagonal matrix blocks positive semi-definite. Another usable low-order method is constructed by adding scalar artificial viscosity proportional to the spectral radius of the cumulative Roe matrix. The limiting of antidiffusive fluxes is performed using a transformation to the characteristic variables or a suitable synchronization of correction factors for the conservative ones. The outer defect correction loop is equipped with a block-diagonal preconditioner so as to decouple the discretized Euler equations and solve them in a segregated fashion. As an alternative, a strongly coupled solution strategy (global BiCGSTAB method with a block-Gauß-Seidel preconditioner) is introduced for applications which call for the use of large time steps. Various algorithmic aspects including the implementation of characteristic boundary conditions are addressed. Simulation results are presented for inviscid flows in a wide range of Mach numbers.

  13. Efficient Heterogeneous Execution on Large Multicore and Accelerator Platforms: Case Study Using a Block Tridiagonal Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Alfred J; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2013-01-01

    The algorithmic and implementation principles are explored in gainfully exploiting GPU accelerators in conjunction with multicore processors on high-end systems with large numbers of compute nodes, and evaluated in an implementation of a scalable block tridiagonal solver. The accelerator of each compute node is exploited in combination with multicore processors of that node in performing block-level linear algebra operations in the overall, distributed solver algorithm. Optimizations incorporated include: (1) an efficient memory mapping and synchronization interface to minimize data movement, (2) multi-process sharing of the accelerator within a node to obtain balanced load with multicore processors, and (3) an automatic memory management system to efficiently utilize accelerator memory when sub-matrices spill over the limits of device memory. Results are reported from our novel implementation that uses MAGMA and CUBLAS accelerator software systems simultaneously with ACML for multithreaded execution on processors. Overall, using 940 nVidia Tesla X2090 accelerators and 15,040 cores, the best heterogeneous execution delivers a 10.9-fold reduction in run time relative to an already efficient parallel multicore-only baseline implementation that is highly optimized with intra-node and inter-node concurrency and computation-communication overlap. Detailed quantitative results are presented to explain all critical runtime components contributing to hybrid performance.

  14. The a(4) Scheme-A High Order Neutrally Stable CESE Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    2009-01-01

    The CESE development is driven by a belief that a solver should (i) enforce conservation laws in both space and time, and (ii) be built from a nondissipative (i.e., neutrally stable) core scheme so that the numerical dissipation can be controlled effectively. To provide a solid foundation for a systematic CESE development of high order schemes, in this paper we describe a new high order (4-5th order) and neutrally stable CESE solver of a 1D advection equation with a constant advection speed a. The space-time stencil of this two-level explicit scheme is formed by one point at the upper time level and two points at the lower time level. Because it is associated with four independent mesh variables (the numerical analogues of the dependent variable and its first, second, and third-order spatial derivatives) and four equations per mesh point, the new scheme is referred to as the a(4) scheme. As in the case of other similar CESE neutrally stable solvers, the a(4) scheme enforces conservation laws in space-time locally and globally, and it has the basic, forward marching, and backward marching forms. Except for a singular case, these forms are equivalent and satisfy a space-time inversion (STI) invariant property which is shared by the advection equation. Based on the concept of STI invariance, a set of algebraic relations is developed and used to prove the a(4) scheme must be neutrally stable when it is stable. Numerically, it has been established that the scheme is stable if the value of the Courant number is less than 1/3

  15. Using the scalable nonlinear equations solvers package

    SciTech Connect

    Gropp, W.D.; McInnes, L.C.; Smith, B.F.

    1995-02-01

    SNES (Scalable Nonlinear Equations Solvers) is a software package for the numerical solution of large-scale systems of nonlinear equations on both uniprocessors and parallel architectures. SNES also contains a component for the solution of unconstrained minimization problems, called SUMS (Scalable Unconstrained Minimization Solvers). Newton-like methods, which are known for their efficiency and robustness, constitute the core of the package. As part of the multilevel PETSc library, SNES incorporates many features and options from other parts of PETSc. In keeping with the spirit of the PETSc library, the nonlinear solution routines are data-structure-neutral, making them flexible and easily extensible. This users guide contains a detailed description of uniprocessor usage of SNES, with some added comments regarding multiprocessor usage. At this time the parallel version is undergoing refinement and extension, as we work toward a common interface for the uniprocessor and parallel cases. Thus, forthcoming versions of the software will contain additional features, and changes to parallel interface may result at any time. The new parallel version will employ the MPI (Message Passing Interface) standard for interprocessor communication. Since most of these details will be hidden, users will need to perform only minimal message-passing programming.

  16. On code verification of RANS solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eça, L.; Klaij, C. M.; Vaz, G.; Hoekstra, M.; Pereira, F. S.

    2016-04-01

    This article discusses Code Verification of Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers that rely on face based finite volume discretizations for volumes of arbitrary shape. The study includes test cases with known analytical solutions (generated with the method of manufactured solutions) corresponding to laminar and turbulent flow, with the latter using eddy-viscosity turbulence models. The procedure to perform Code Verification based on grid refinement studies is discussed and the requirements for its correct application are illustrated in a simple one-dimensional problem. It is shown that geometrically similar grids are recommended for proper Code Verification and so the data should not have scatter making the use of least square fits unnecessary. Results show that it may be advantageous to determine the extrapolated error to cell size/time step zero instead of assuming that it is zero, especially when it is hard to determine the asymptotic order of grid convergence. In the RANS examples, several of the features of the ReFRESCO solver are checked including the effects of the available turbulence models in the convergence properties of the code. It is shown that it is required to account for non-orthogonality effects in the discretization of the diffusion terms and that the turbulence quantities transport equations can deteriorate the order of grid convergence of mean flow quantities.

  17. 2-Local derivations on matrix algebras over semi-prime Banach algebras and on AW*-algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayupov, Shavkat; Kudaybergenov, Karimbergen

    2016-03-01

    The paper is devoted to 2-local derivations on matrix algebras over unital semi-prime Banach algebras. For a unital semi-prime Banach algebra A with the inner derivation property we prove that any 2-local derivation on the algebra M 2n (A), n ≥ 2, is a derivation. We apply this result to AW*-algebras and show that any 2-local derivation on an arbitrary AW*-algebra is a derivation.

  18. Plethystic algebras and vector symmetric functions.

    PubMed Central

    Rota, G C; Stein, J A

    1994-01-01

    An isomorphism is established between the plethystic Hopf algebra Pleth(Super[L]) and the algebra of vector symmetric functions. The Hall inner product of symmetric function theory is extended to the Hopf algebra Pleth(Super[L]). PMID:11607504

  19. Algebra and Algebraic Thinking in School Math: 70th YB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Algebra is no longer just for college-bound students. After a widespread push by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and teachers across the country, algebra is now a required part of most curricula. However, students' standardized test scores are not at the level they should be. NCTM's seventieth yearbook takes a look at the…

  20. Abstract Algebra to Secondary School Algebra: Building Bridges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Donna; Sparks, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The authors have experience with secondary mathematics teacher candidates struggling to make connections between the theoretical abstract algebra course they take as college students and the algebra they will be teaching in secondary schools. As a mathematician and a mathematics educator, the authors collaborated to create and implement a…

  1. Handheld Computer Algebra Systems in the Pre-Algebra Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantz, Linda Ann Galofaro

    2010-01-01

    This mixed method analysis sought to investigate several aspects of student learning in pre-algebra through the use of computer algebra systems (CAS) as opposed to non-CAS learning. This research was broken into two main parts, one which compared results from both the experimental group (instruction using CAS, N = 18) and the control group…

  2. A high-order integral solver for scalar problems of diffraction by screens and apertures in three-dimensional space

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Oscar P. Lintner, Stéphane K.

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel methodology for the numerical solution of problems of diffraction by infinitely thin screens in three-dimensional space. Our approach relies on new integral formulations as well as associated high-order quadrature rules. The new integral formulations involve weighted versions of the classical integral operators related to the thin-screen Dirichlet and Neumann problems as well as a generalization to the open-surface problem of the classical Calderón formulae. The high-order quadrature rules we introduce for these operators, in turn, resolve the multiple Green function and edge singularities (which occur at arbitrarily close distances from each other, and which include weakly singular as well as hypersingular kernels) and thus give rise to super-algebraically fast convergence as the discretization sizes are increased. When used in conjunction with Krylov-subspace linear algebra solvers such as GMRES, the resulting solvers produce results of high accuracy in small numbers of iterations for low and high frequencies alike. We demonstrate our methodology with a variety of numerical results for screen and aperture problems at high frequencies—including simulation of classical experiments such as the diffraction by a circular disc (featuring in particular the famous Poisson spot), evaluation of interference fringes resulting from diffraction across two nearby circular apertures, as well as solution of problems of scattering by more complex geometries consisting of multiple scatterers and cavities.

  3. Statecharts Via Process Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttgen, Gerald; vonderBeeck, Michael; Cleaveland, Rance

    1999-01-01

    Statecharts is a visual language for specifying the behavior of reactive systems. The Language extends finite-state machines with concepts of hierarchy, concurrency, and priority. Despite its popularity as a design notation for embedded system, precisely defining its semantics has proved extremely challenging. In this paper, a simple process algebra, called Statecharts Process Language (SPL), is presented, which is expressive enough for encoding Statecharts in a structure-preserving and semantic preserving manner. It is establish that the behavioral relation bisimulation, when applied to SPL, preserves Statecharts semantics

  4. Multigrid acceleration and turbulence models for computations of 3D turbulent jets in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1991-01-01

    A multigrid method is presented for the calculation of three-dimensional turbulent jets in crossflow. Turbulence closure is achieved with either the standard k-epsilon model or a Reynolds Stress Model (RSM). Multigrid acceleration enables convergence rates which are far superior to that for a single grid method. With the k-epsilon model the rate approaches that for laminar flow, but with RSM it is somewhat slower. The increased stiffness of the system of equations in the latter may be responsible. Computed results with both turbulence models are compared with experimental data for a pair of opposed jets in crossflow. Both models yield reasonable agreement with mean flow velocity but RSM yields better prediction of the Reynolds stresses.

  5. Multilevel local refinement and multigrid methods for 3-D turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Liu, C.; Sung, C.H.; Huang, T.T.

    1996-12-31

    A numerical approach based on multigrid, multilevel local refinement, and preconditioning methods for solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is presented. 3-D turbulent flow around an underwater vehicle is computed. 3 multigrid levels and 2 local refinement grid levels are used. The global grid is 24 x 8 x 12. The first patch is 40 x 16 x 20 and the second patch is 72 x 32 x 36. 4th order artificial dissipation are used for numerical stability. The conservative artificial compressibility method are used for further improvement of convergence. To improve the accuracy of coarse/fine grid interface of local refinement, flux interpolation method for refined grid boundary is used. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data. The local refinement can improve the prediction accuracy significantly. The flux interpolation method for local refinement can keep conservation for a composite grid, therefore further modify the prediction accuracy.

  6. Three-dimensional multigrid algorithms for the flux-split Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Thomas, James L.; Whitfield, David L.

    1988-01-01

    The Full Approximation Scheme (FAS) multigrid method is applied to several implicit flux-split algorithms for solving the three-dimensional Euler equations in a body fitted coordinate system. Each of the splitting algorithms uses a variation of approximate factorization and is implemented in a finite volume formulation. The algorithms are all vectorizable with little or no scalar computation required. The flux vectors are split into upwind components using both the splittings of Steger-Warming and Van Leer. The stability and smoothing rate of each of the schemes are examined using a Fourier analysis of the complete system of equations. Results are presented for three-dimensional subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows which demonstrate substantially improved convergence rates with the multigrid algorithm. The influence of using both a V-cycle and a W-cycle on the convergence is examined.

  7. Analysis of Angular V-Cycle Multigrid Formulation for Three-Dimensional Discrete Ordinates Shielding Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kucukboyaci, Vefa; Haghighat, Alireza

    2001-06-17

    New angular multigrid formulations have been developed, including the Simplified Angular Multigrid (SAM), Nested Iteration (NI), and V-Cycle schemes, which are compatible with the parallel environment and the adaptive differencing strategy of the PENTRAN three-dimensional parallel S{sub N} code. Through use of the Fourier analysis method for an infinite, homogeneous medium, the effectiveness of the V-Cycle scheme was investigated for different problem parameters including scattering ratio, spatial differencing weights, quadrature order, and mesh size. The theoretical analysis revealed that the V-Cycle scheme is effective for a large range of scattering ratios and is insensitive to mesh size. The effectiveness of the new schemes was also investigated for practical shielding applications such as the Kobayashi benchmark problem and the boiling water reactor core shroud problem.

  8. Design and implementation of a multigrid code for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    The steady-state equations of inviscid fluid flow, the Euler equations, are a nonlinear nonelliptic system of equations admitting solutions with discontinuities (for example, shocks). The efficient numerical solution of these equations poses a strenuous challenge to multigrid methods. A multigrid code has been developed for the numerical solution of the Euler equations. In this paper some of the factors that had to be taken into account in the design and development of the code are reviewed. These factors include the importance of choosing an appropriate difference scheme, the usefulness of local mode analysis as a design tool, and the crucial question of how to treat the nonlinearity. Sample calculations of transonic flow about airfoils will be presented. No claim is made that the particular algorithm presented is optimal.

  9. On Efficient Multigrid Methods for Materials Processing Flows with Small Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James (Technical Monitor); Diskin, Boris; Harik, VasylMichael

    2004-01-01

    Multiscale modeling of materials requires simulations of multiple levels of structural hierarchy. The computational efficiency of numerical methods becomes a critical factor for simulating large physical systems with highly desperate length scales. Multigrid methods are known for their superior efficiency in representing/resolving different levels of physical details. The efficiency is achieved by employing interactively different discretizations on different scales (grids). To assist optimization of manufacturing conditions for materials processing with numerous particles (e.g., dispersion of particles, controlling flow viscosity and clusters), a new multigrid algorithm has been developed for a case of multiscale modeling of flows with small particles that have various length scales. The optimal efficiency of the algorithm is crucial for accurate predictions of the effect of processing conditions (e.g., pressure and velocity gradients) on the local flow fields that control the formation of various microstructures or clusters.

  10. Numerical solution of flame sheet problems with and without multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Craig C.; Ern, Alexandre

    1993-01-01

    Flame sheet problems are on the natural route to the numerical solution of multidimensional flames, which, in turn, are important in many engineering applications. In order to model the structure of flames more accurately, we use the vorticity-velocity formulation of the fluid flow equations, as opposed to the streamfunction-vorticity approach. The numerical solution of the resulting nonlinear coupled elliptic partial differential equations involves a pseudo transient process and a steady state Newton iteration. Rather than working with dimensionless variables, we introduce scale factors that can yield significant savings in the execution time. In this context, we also investigate the applicability and performance of several multigrid methods, focusing on nonlinear damped Newton multigrid, using either one way or correction schemes.

  11. Multigrid iteration solution procedure for solving three-dimensional sets of coupled equations

    SciTech Connect

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    A procedure of iterative solution was coded in Fortran to apply the multigrid scheme of iteration to a set of coupled equations for three-dimensional problems. The incentive for this effort was to make available an implemented procedure that may be readily used as an alternative to overrelaxation, of special interest in applications where the latter is ineffective. The multigrid process was found to be effective, although noncompetitive with simple overrelaxation for simple, small problems. Absolute error level evaluation was used to support methods assessment. A code source listing is presented to allow ready application when the computer memory size is adequate, avoiding data transfer from auxiliary storage. Included are the capabilities for one-dimensional rebalance and a driver program illustrating use requirements. Feedback of additional experience from application is anticipated.

  12. Multigrid Solution of the Navier-Stokes Equations at Low Speeds with Large Temperature Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sockol, Peter M.

    2002-01-01

    Multigrid methods for the Navier-Stokes equations at low speeds and large temperature variations are investigated. The compressible equations with time-derivative preconditioning and preconditioned flux-difference splitting of the inviscid terms are used. Three implicit smoothers have been incorporated into a common multigrid procedure. Both full coarsening and semi-coarsening with directional fine-grid defect correction have been studied. The resulting methods have been tested on four 2D laminar problems over a range of Reynolds numbers on both uniform and highly stretched grids. Two of the three methods show efficient and robust performance over the entire range of conditions. In addition none of the methods have any difficulty with the large temperature variations.

  13. A Parallel Multigrid Method for the Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical Contact

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J D; Parsons, I D

    2002-03-21

    A geometrical multigrid method for solving the linearized matrix equations arising from node-on-face three-dimensional finite element contact is described. The development of an efficient implementation of this combination that minimizes both the memory requirements and the computational cost requires careful construction and storage of the portion of the coarse mesh stiffness matrices that are associated with the contact stiffness on the fine mesh. The multigrid contact algorithm is parallelized in a manner suitable for distributed memory architectures: results are presented that demonstrates the scheme's scalability. The solution of a large contact problem derived from an analysis of the factory joints present in the Space Shuttle reusable solid rocket motor demonstrates the usefulness of the general approach.

  14. Interpolation between Sobolev spaces in Lipschitz domains with an application to multigrid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H. |

    1995-10-01

    In this paper the author describes an interpolation result for the Sobolev spaces H{sub 0}{sup S}({Omega}) where {Omega} is a bounded domain with a Lipschitz boundary. This result is applied to derive discrete norm estimates related to multilevel preconditioners and multigrid methods in the finite element method. The estimates are valid for operators of order 2m with Dirichlet boundary conditions. 11 refs.

  15. The application of projected conjugate gradient solvers on graphical processing units

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Youzuo; Renaut, Rosemary

    2011-01-26

    Graphical processing units introduce the capability for large scale computation at the desktop. Presented numerical results verify that efficiencies and accuracies of basic linear algebra subroutines of all levels when implemented in CUDA and Jacket are comparable. But experimental results demonstrate that the basic linear algebra subroutines of level three offer the greatest potential for improving efficiency of basic numerical algorithms. We consider the solution of the multiple right hand side set of linear equations using Krylov subspace-based solvers. Thus, for the multiple right hand side case, it is more efficient to make use of a block implementation of the conjugate gradient algorithm, rather than to solve each system independently. Jacket is used for the implementation. Furthermore, including projection from one system to another improves efficiency. A relevant example, for which simulated results are provided, is the reconstruction of a three dimensional medical image volume acquired from a positron emission tomography scanner. Efficiency of the reconstruction is improved by using projection across nearby slices.

  16. jShyLU Scalable Hybrid Preconditioner and Solver

    2012-09-11

    ShyLU is numerical software to solve sparse linear systems of equations. ShyLU uses a hybrid direct-iterative Schur complement method, and may be used either as a preconditioner or as a solver. ShyLU is parallel and optimized for a single compute Solver node. ShyLU will be a package in the Trilinos software framework.

  17. Experiences with linear solvers for oil reservoir simulation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, W.; Janardhan, R.; Biswas, D.; Carey, G.

    1996-12-31

    This talk will focus on practical experiences with iterative linear solver algorithms used in conjunction with Amoco Production Company`s Falcon oil reservoir simulation code. The goal of this study is to determine the best linear solver algorithms for these types of problems. The results of numerical experiments will be presented.

  18. A closure-independent Generalized Roe solver for free-surface, two-phase flows over mobile bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosatti, Giorgio; Begnudelli, Lorenzo

    2013-12-01

    Several different natural phenomena can be studied in the framework of free-surface, two-phase flows over mobile bed. Mathematically, they can be described by the same set of highly nonlinear, hyperbolic nonconservative PDEs but they differ in the possible algebraic closure relations. These affect significantly the relevant eigenvalues and consequently, all finite-volume numerical methods based on upwind Godunov-type fluxes. In this work the Generalized Roe solver, introduced in [29] for the case of a specific closure, is reformulated in a complete closure-independent way. This gives the solver a quite general applicability to the class of problems previously mentioned. Moreover, the new method maintains all the desirable features shown by the original one: full two-dimensionality and exact well-balanceness. This result is made possible thanks to the development of a novel Multiple Averages (MAs) approach that allows a straightforward determination of the matrices required by the solver. Several tests show the capabilities of the proposed numerical strategy.

  19. Linear Algebra and Image Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allali, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    We use the computing technology digital image processing (DIP) to enhance the teaching of linear algebra so as to make the course more visual and interesting. Certainly, this visual approach by using technology to link linear algebra to DIP is interesting and unexpected to both students as well as many faculty. (Contains 2 tables and 11 figures.)

  20. Linear algebra and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allali, Mohamed

    2010-09-01

    We use the computing technology digital image processing (DIP) to enhance the teaching of linear algebra so as to make the course more visual and interesting. Certainly, this visual approach by using technology to link linear algebra to DIP is interesting and unexpected to both students as well as many faculty.

  1. A Programmed Course in Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mewborn, Ancel C.; Hively, Wells II

    This programed textbook consists of short sections of text interspersed with questions designed to aid the student in understanding the material. The course is designed to increase the student's understanding of some of the basic ideas of algebra. Some general experience and manipulative skill with respect to high school algebra is assumed.…

  2. Astro Algebra [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Astro Algebra is one of six titles in the Mighty Math Series from Edmark, a comprehensive line of math software for students from kindergarten through ninth grade. Many of the activities in Astro Algebra contain a unique technology that uses the computer to help students make the connection between concrete and abstract mathematics. This software…

  3. Gamow functionals on operator algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnino, M.; Gadella, M.; Betán, R. Id; Laura, R.

    2001-11-01

    We obtain the precise form of two Gamow functionals representing the exponentially decaying part of a quantum resonance and its mirror image that grows exponentially, as a linear, positive and continuous functional on an algebra containing observables. These functionals do not admit normalization and, with an appropriate choice of the algebra, are time reversal of each other.

  4. Online Algebraic Tools for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.

    2011-01-01

    Many free online tools exist to complement algebraic instruction at the middle school level. This article presents findings that analyzed the features of algebraic tools to support learning. The findings can help teachers select appropriate tools to facilitate specific topics. (Contains 1 table and 4 figures.)

  5. Patterns to Develop Algebraic Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Sheryl L.

    2011-01-01

    What is the role of patterns in developing algebraic reasoning? This important question deserves thoughtful attention. In response, this article examines some differing views of algebraic reasoning, discusses a controversy regarding patterns, and describes how three types of patterns--in contextual problems, in growing geometric figures, and in…

  6. Algebra: Grades 8-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    A complete set of behavioral objectives for first-year algebra taught in any of grades 8 through 12 is presented. Three to six sample test items and answers are provided for each objective. Objectives were determined by surveying the most used secondary school algebra textbooks. Fourteen major categories are included: (1) whole numbers--operations…

  7. Elementary maps on nest algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengtong

    2006-08-01

    Let , be algebras and let , be maps. An elementary map of is an ordered pair (M,M*) such that for all , . In this paper, the general form of surjective elementary maps on standard subalgebras of nest algebras is described. In particular, such maps are automatically additive.

  8. Condensing Algebra for Technical Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Donald R.

    Twenty Algebra-Packets (A-PAKS) were developed by the investigator for technical education students at the community college level. Each packet contained a statement of rationale, learning objectives, performance activities, performance test, and performance test answer key. The A-PAKS condensed the usual sixteen weeks of algebra into a six-week…

  9. The Algebra of the Arches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buerman, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Finding real-world examples for middle school algebra classes can be difficult but not impossible. As we strive to accomplish teaching our students how to solve and graph equations, we neglect to teach the big ideas of algebra. One of those big ideas is functions. This article gives three examples of functions that are found in Arches National…

  10. Novel Linear Algebraic Theory and One-Hundred-Million-Atom Electronic Structure Calculation on The K Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Takeo; Yamazaki, Keita; Akiyama, Yohei

    A novel linear-algebraic algorithm, multiple Arnoldi method, was developed in an interdisciplinary study between physics and applied mathematics and realized one-hundred-million-atom (100-nm-scale) electronic state calculations on the K computer. The algorithms are Krylov-subspace solvers for generalized shifted linear equations and were implemented in our order-N calculation code ELSES (http://www.elses.jp/). Moreover, a method for calculating eigen states is presented as a theoretical extension.

  11. Thermodynamics. [algebraic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental structure of thermodynamics is purely algebraic, in the sense of atopological, and it is also independent of partitions, composite systems, the zeroth law, and entropy. The algebraic structure requires the notion of heat, but not the first law. It contains a precise definition of entropy and identifies it as a purely mathematical concept. It also permits the construction of an entropy function from heat measurements alone when appropriate conditions are satisfied. Topology is required only for a discussion of the continuity of thermodynamic properties, and then the weak topology is the relevant topology. The integrability of the differential form of the first law can be examined independently of Caratheodory's theorem and his inaccessibility axiom. Criteria are established by which one can determine when an integrating factor can be made intensive and the pseudopotential extensive and also an entropy. Finally, a realization of the first law is constructed which is suitable for all systems whether they are solids or fluids, whether they do or do not exhibit chemical reactions, and whether electromagnetic fields are or are not present.

  12. Implicit multigrid algorithms for the three-dimensional flux split Euler equations. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. K.

    1986-01-01

    The full approximation scheme multigrid method is applied to several implicit flux-split algorithms for solving the three-dimensional Euler equations in a body fitted coordinate system. Each uses a variation of approximate factorization and is implemented in a finite volume formulation. The algorithms are all vectorizable with little or no scalar computations required. The flux vectors are split into upwind components using both the splittings of Steger-Warming and Van Leer. Results comparing pressure distributions with experimental data using both splitting types are shown. The stability and smoothing rate of each of the schemes are examined using a Fourier analysis of the complete system of equations. Results are presented for three-dimensional subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows which demonstrate substantially improved convergence rates with the multigrid algorithm. The influence of using both a V-cycle and a W-cycle on the convergence is examined. Using the multigrid method on both subsonic and transonic wing calculations, the final lift coefficient is obtained to within 0.1 percent of its final value in a few as 15 cycles for a mesh with over 210,000 points. A spectral radius of 0.89 is achieved for both subsonic and transonic flow over the ONERA M6 wing while a spectral radius of 0.83 is obtained for supersonic flow over an analytically defined forebody. Results compared with experiment for all cases show good agreement.

  13. Multigrid Acceleration of Time-Accurate DNS of Compressible Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeze, Jan; Geurts, Bernard; Kuerten, Hans; Streng, Martin

    1996-01-01

    An efficient scheme for the direct numerical simulation of 3D transitional and developed turbulent flow is presented. Explicit and implicit time integration schemes for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. The nonlinear system resulting from the implicit time discretization is solved with an iterative method and accelerated by the application of a multigrid technique. Since we use central spatial discretizations and no artificial dissipation is added to the equations, the smoothing method is less effective than in the more traditional use of multigrid in steady-state calculations. Therefore, a special prolongation method is needed in order to obtain an effective multigrid method. This simulation scheme was studied in detail for compressible flow over a flat plate. In the laminar regime and in the first stages of turbulent flow the implicit method provides a speed-up of a factor 2 relative to the explicit method on a relatively coarse grid. At increased resolution this speed-up is enhanced correspondingly.

  14. Multigrid Nonlocal Gaussian Mixture Model for Segmentation of Brain Tissues in Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunjie; Zhan, Tianming; Zhang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel segmentation method based on regional and nonlocal information to overcome the impact of image intensity inhomogeneities and noise in human brain magnetic resonance images. With the consideration of the spatial distribution of different tissues in brain images, our method does not need preestimation or precorrection procedures for intensity inhomogeneities and noise. A nonlocal information based Gaussian mixture model (NGMM) is proposed to reduce the effect of noise. To reduce the effect of intensity inhomogeneity, the multigrid nonlocal Gaussian mixture model (MNGMM) is proposed to segment brain MR images in each nonoverlapping multigrid generated by using a new multigrid generation method. Therefore the proposed model can simultaneously overcome the impact of noise and intensity inhomogeneity and automatically classify 2D and 3D MR data into tissues of white matter, gray matter, and cerebral spinal fluid. To maintain the statistical reliability and spatial continuity of the segmentation, a fusion strategy is adopted to integrate the clustering results from different grid. The experiments on synthetic and clinical brain MR images demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed model comparing with several state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27648448

  15. Multigrid Nonlocal Gaussian Mixture Model for Segmentation of Brain Tissues in Magnetic Resonance Images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjie; Zhan, Tianming; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel segmentation method based on regional and nonlocal information to overcome the impact of image intensity inhomogeneities and noise in human brain magnetic resonance images. With the consideration of the spatial distribution of different tissues in brain images, our method does not need preestimation or precorrection procedures for intensity inhomogeneities and noise. A nonlocal information based Gaussian mixture model (NGMM) is proposed to reduce the effect of noise. To reduce the effect of intensity inhomogeneity, the multigrid nonlocal Gaussian mixture model (MNGMM) is proposed to segment brain MR images in each nonoverlapping multigrid generated by using a new multigrid generation method. Therefore the proposed model can simultaneously overcome the impact of noise and intensity inhomogeneity and automatically classify 2D and 3D MR data into tissues of white matter, gray matter, and cerebral spinal fluid. To maintain the statistical reliability and spatial continuity of the segmentation, a fusion strategy is adopted to integrate the clustering results from different grid. The experiments on synthetic and clinical brain MR images demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed model comparing with several state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27648448

  16. Shape reanalysis and sensitivities utilizing preconditioned iterative boundary solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guru Prasad, K.; Kane, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    The computational advantages associated with the utilization of preconditined iterative equation solvers are quantified for the reanalysis of perturbed shapes using continuum structural boundary element analysis (BEA). Both single- and multi-zone three-dimensional problems are examined. Significant reductions in computer time are obtained by making use of previously computed solution vectors and preconditioners in subsequent analyses. The effectiveness of this technique is demonstrated for the computation of shape response sensitivities required in shape optimization. Computer times and accuracies achieved using the preconditioned iterative solvers are compared with those obtained via direct solvers and implicit differentiation of the boundary integral equations. It is concluded that this approach employing preconditioned iterative equation solvers in reanalysis and sensitivity analysis can be competitive with if not superior to those involving direct solvers.

  17. A real-time impurity solver for DMFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungwon; Aron, Camille; Han, Jong E.; Kotliar, Gabriel

    Dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) offers a non-perturbative approach to problems with strongly correlated electrons. The method heavily relies on the ability to numerically solve an auxiliary Anderson-type impurity problem. While powerful Matsubara-frequency solvers have been developed over the past two decades to tackle equilibrium situations, the status of real-time impurity solvers that could compete with Matsubara-frequency solvers and be readily generalizable to non-equilibrium situations is still premature. We present a real-time solver which is based on a quantum Master equation description of the dissipative dynamics of the impurity and its exact diagonalization. As a benchmark, we illustrate the strengths of our solver in the context of the equilibrium Mott-insulator transition of the one-band Hubbard model and compare it with iterative perturbation theory (IPT) method. Finally, we discuss its direct application to a nonequilibrium situation.

  18. Parallel solver for trajectory optimization search directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psiaki, M. L.; Park, K. H.

    1992-01-01

    A key algorithmic element of a real-time trajectory optimization hardware/software implementation is presented, the search step solver. This is one piece of an algorithm whose overall goal is to make nonlinear trajectory optimization fast enough to provide real-time commands during guidance of a vehicle such as an aeromaneuvering orbiter or the National Aerospace Plane. Many methods of nonlinear programming require the solution of a quadratic program (QP) at each iteration to determine the search step. In the trajectory optimization case, the QP has a special dynamic programming structure. The algorithm exploits this special structure with a divide- and conquer type of parallel implementation. The algorithm solves a (p.N)-stage problem on N processors in O(p + log2 N) operations. The algorithm yields a factor of 8 speed-up over the fastest known serial algorithm when solving a 1024-stage test problem on 32 processors.

  19. Scalable Adaptive Multilevel Solvers for Multiphysics Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinchao

    2014-12-01

    In this project, we investigated adaptive, parallel, and multilevel methods for numerical modeling of various real-world applications, including Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), complex fluids, Electromagnetism, Navier-Stokes equations, and reservoir simulation. First, we have designed improved mathematical models and numerical discretizaitons for viscoelastic fluids and MHD. Second, we have derived new a posteriori error estimators and extended the applicability of adaptivity to various problems. Third, we have developed multilevel solvers for solving scalar partial differential equations (PDEs) as well as coupled systems of PDEs, especially on unstructured grids. Moreover, we have integrated the study between adaptive method and multilevel methods, and made significant efforts and advances in adaptive multilevel methods of the multi-physics problems.

  20. Optimising a parallel conjugate gradient solver

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    This work arises from the introduction of a parallel iterative solver to a large structural analysis finite element code. The code is called FEX and it was developed at Hitachi`s Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. The FEX package can deal with a large range of structural analysis problems using a large number of finite element techniques. FEX can solve either stress or thermal analysis problems of a range of different types from plane stress to a full three-dimensional model. These problems can consist of a number of different materials which can be modelled by a range of material models. The structure being modelled can have the load applied at either a point or a surface, or by a pressure, a centrifugal force or just gravity. Alternatively a thermal load can be applied with a given initial temperature. The displacement of the structure can be constrained by having a fixed boundary or by prescribing the displacement at a boundary.

  1. A two dimensional nodal Riemann solver based on one dimensional Riemann solver for a cell-centered Lagrangian scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Shen, Weidong; Tian, Baolin; Mao, De-kang

    2015-03-01

    We develop a new and more general formula for the construction of two dimensional nodal Riemann solver for a cell-centered Lagrangian scheme developed by Maire and his co-workers which allows us to use general one dimensional Riemann solvers that have intermediate velocity and pressure in the construction. The old formula for the scheme used in the papers of Maire et al. is only a special case of our new formula. We present an entropy discussion, which indicates that the schemes with nodal solvers constructed following the old formula, which can only use the 1D Riemann solvers satisfying our strong entropy condition, are usually numerically very dissipative. To develop numerically less dissipative schemes we introduce a so-called weak entropy condition, and present a one dimensional Riemann solver that satisfies the weak entropy condition but not the strong entropy condition. Analysis shows that the scheme using this 1D solver is numerically less dissipative than the schemes using solvers satisfying the strong condition. Finally, several numerical examples are presented to show that our new formula works well and the scheme using the one dimensional solver satisfying the weak entropy condition improves the accuracy in smooth region, resolution around rarefaction waves and two dimensional symmetry; however it sometimes produces small velocity oscillations and mesh distortions.

  2. Using Linear Algebra to Introduce Computer Algebra, Numerical Analysis, Data Structures and Algorithms (and To Teach Linear Algebra, Too).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Vega, Laureano

    1999-01-01

    Using a Computer Algebra System (CAS) to help with the teaching of an elementary course in linear algebra can be one way to introduce computer algebra, numerical analysis, data structures, and algorithms. Highlights the advantages and disadvantages of this approach to the teaching of linear algebra. (Author/MM)

  3. A Nonlinear Multigrid Solver for an Atmospheric General Circulation Model Based on Semi-Implicit Semi-Lagrangian Advection of Potential Vorticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, S.; Ruge, John W.

    1998-01-01

    This work represents a part of a project to develop an atmospheric general circulation model based on the semi-Lagrangian advection of potential vorticity (PC) with divergence as the companion prognostic variable.

  4. Quantum algebra of N superspace

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, Nicolas; Restuccia, A.; Stephany, J.

    2007-08-15

    We identify the quantum algebra of position and momentum operators for a quantum system bearing an irreducible representation of the super Poincare algebra in the N>1 and D=4 superspace, both in the case where there are no central charges in the algebra, and when they are present. This algebra is noncommutative for the position operators. We use the properties of superprojectors acting on the superfields to construct explicit position and momentum operators satisfying the algebra. They act on the projected wave functions associated to the various supermultiplets with defined superspin present in the representation. We show that the quantum algebra associated to the massive superparticle appears in our construction and is described by a supermultiplet of superspin 0. This result generalizes the construction for D=4, N=1 reported recently. For the case N=2 with central charges, we present the equivalent results when the central charge and the mass are different. For the {kappa}-symmetric case when these quantities are equal, we discuss the reduction to the physical degrees of freedom of the corresponding superparticle and the construction of the associated quantum algebra.

  5. Constraint algebra in bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, V. O.

    2015-07-15

    The number of degrees of freedom in bigravity theory is found for a potential of general form and also for the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley (dRGT). This aim is pursued via constructing a Hamiltonian formalismand studying the Poisson algebra of constraints. A general potential leads to a theory featuring four first-class constraints generated by general covariance. The vanishing of the respective Hessian is a crucial property of the dRGT potential, and this leads to the appearance of two additional second-class constraints and, hence, to the exclusion of a superfluous degree of freedom—that is, the Boulware—Deser ghost. The use of a method that permits avoiding an explicit expression for the dRGT potential is a distinctive feature of the present study.

  6. Constraint algebra in bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, V. O.

    2015-07-01

    The number of degrees of freedom in bigravity theory is found for a potential of general form and also for the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley (dRGT). This aim is pursued via constructing a Hamiltonian formalismand studying the Poisson algebra of constraints. A general potential leads to a theory featuring four first-class constraints generated by general covariance. The vanishing of the respective Hessian is a crucial property of the dRGT potential, and this leads to the appearance of two additional second-class constraints and, hence, to the exclusion of a superfluous degree of freedom—that is, the Boulware—Deser ghost. The use of a method that permits avoiding an explicit expression for the dRGT potential is a distinctive feature of the present study.

  7. Algebraic distance on graphs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Safro, I.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the connection strength between a pair of vertices in a graph is one of the most important concerns in many graph applications. Simple measures such as edge weights may not be sufficient for capturing the effects associated with short paths of lengths greater than one. In this paper, we consider an iterative process that smooths an associated value for nearby vertices, and we present a measure of the local connection strength (called the algebraic distance; see [D. Ron, I. Safro, and A. Brandt, Multiscale Model. Simul., 9 (2011), pp. 407-423]) based on this process. The proposed measure is attractive in that the process is simple, linear, and easily parallelized. An analysis of the convergence property of the process reveals that the local neighborhoods play an important role in determining the connectivity between vertices. We demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the proposed measure through several combinatorial optimization problems on graphs and hypergraphs.

  8. Comparison of open-source linear programming solvers.

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, Jared Lee; Adair, Kristin Lynn; Durfee, Justin David.; Jones, Katherine A.; Martin, Nathaniel; Detry, Richard Joseph

    2013-10-01

    When developing linear programming models, issues such as budget limitations, customer requirements, or licensing may preclude the use of commercial linear programming solvers. In such cases, one option is to use an open-source linear programming solver. A survey of linear programming tools was conducted to identify potential open-source solvers. From this survey, four open-source solvers were tested using a collection of linear programming test problems and the results were compared to IBM ILOG CPLEX Optimizer (CPLEX) [1], an industry standard. The solvers considered were: COIN-OR Linear Programming (CLP) [2], [3], GNU Linear Programming Kit (GLPK) [4], lp_solve [5] and Modular In-core Nonlinear Optimization System (MINOS) [6]. As no open-source solver outperforms CPLEX, this study demonstrates the power of commercial linear programming software. CLP was found to be the top performing open-source solver considered in terms of capability and speed. GLPK also performed well but cannot match the speed of CLP or CPLEX. lp_solve and MINOS were considerably slower and encountered issues when solving several test problems.

  9. Readiness and Preparation for Beginning Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotman, Jack W.

    Drawing from experience at Lansing Community College (LCC), this paper discusses how to best prepare students for success in a beginning algebra course. First, an overview is presented of LCC's developmental math sequence, which includes Basic Arithmetic (MTH 008), Pre-Algebra (MTH 009), Beginning Algebra (MTH 012), and Intermediate Algebra (MTH…

  10. Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper I discuss Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations. This paper starts with an introduction to Hopf algebras, followed by a review of the contribution and application of Hopf algebras to particle physics. The final part of the paper is devoted to the relation between Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations.

  11. Two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Zhang, Honglian

    2016-09-01

    We establish Drinfeld realization for the two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras using a new method. The Hopf algebra structure for Drinfeld generators is given for both untwisted and twisted two-parameter quantum affine algebras, which include the quantum affine algebras as special cases.

  12. A non-conforming 3D spherical harmonic transport solver

    SciTech Connect

    Van Criekingen, S.

    2006-07-01

    A new 3D transport solver for the time-independent Boltzmann transport equation has been developed. This solver is based on the second-order even-parity form of the transport equation. The angular discretization is performed through the expansion of the angular neutron flux in spherical harmonics (PN method). The novelty of this solver is the use of non-conforming finite elements for the spatial discretization. Such elements lead to a discontinuous flux approximation. This interface continuity requirement relaxation property is shared with mixed-dual formulations such as the ones based on Raviart-Thomas finite elements. Encouraging numerical results are presented. (authors)

  13. Multi-GPU kinetic solvers using MPI and CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabelok, Sergey; Arslanbekov, Robert; Kolobov, Vladimir

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes recent progress towards porting a Unified Flow Solver (UFS) to heterogeneous parallel computing. The main challenge of porting UFS to graphics processing units (GPUs) comes from the dynamically adapted mesh, which causes irregular data access. We describe the implementation of CUDA kernels for three modules in UFS: the direct Boltzmann solver using discrete velocity method (DVM), the DSMC module, and the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) solver, all using octree Cartesian mesh with adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). Double digit speedup on single GPU and good scaling for multi-GPU has been demonstrated.

  14. Cartooning in Algebra and Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, L. Jeneva

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses how teachers can create cartoons for undergraduate math classes, such as college algebra and basic calculus. The practice of cartooning for teaching can be helpful for communication with students and for students' conceptual understanding.

  15. Ada Linear-Algebra Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.; Lawson, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    Routines provided for common scalar, vector, matrix, and quaternion operations. Computer program extends Ada programming language to include linear-algebra capabilities similar to HAS/S programming language. Designed for such avionics applications as software for Space Station.

  16. GCD, LCM, and Boolean Algebra?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Martin P.; Juraschek, William A.

    1976-01-01

    This article investigates the algebraic structure formed when the process of finding the greatest common divisor and the least common multiple are considered as binary operations on selected subsets of positive integers. (DT)

  17. Generic task problem solvers in Soar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Todd R.; Smith, Jack W., Jr.; Chandrasekaran, B.

    1989-01-01

    Two trends can be discerned in research in problem solving architectures in the last few years. On one hand, interest in task-specific architectures has grown, wherein types of problems of general utility are identified, and special architectures that support the development of problem solving systems for those types of problems are proposed. These architectures help in the acquisition and specification of knowledge by providing inference methods that are appropriate for the type of problem. However, knowledge based systems which use only one type of problem solving method are very brittle, and adding more types of methods requires a principled approach to integrating them in a flexible way. Contrasting with this trend is the proposal for a flexible, general architecture contained in the work on Soar. Soar has features which make it attractive for flexible use of all potentially relevant knowledge or methods. But as the theory Soar does not make commitments to specific types of problem solvers or provide guidance for their construction. It was investigated how task-specific architectures can be constructed in Soar to retain as many of the advantages as possible of both approaches. Examples were used from the Generic Task approach for building knowledge based systems. Though this approach was developed and applied for a number of problems, the ideas are applicable to other task-specific approaches as well.

  18. A Pseudo-Temporal Multi-Grid Relaxation Scheme for Solving the Parabolized Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. A.; Morrison, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    A multi-grid, flux-difference-split, finite-volume code, VULCAN, is presented for solving the elliptic and parabolized form of the equations governing three-dimensional, turbulent, calorically perfect and non-equilibrium chemically reacting flows. The space marching algorithms developed to improve convergence rate and or reduce computational cost are emphasized. The algorithms presented are extensions to the class of implicit pseudo-time iterative, upwind space-marching schemes. A full approximate storage, full multi-grid scheme is also described which is used to accelerate the convergence of a Gauss-Seidel relaxation method. The multi-grid algorithm is shown to significantly improve convergence on high aspect ratio grids.

  19. A Pseubo-Temporal Multi-Grid Relaxation Scheme for Solving the Parabolized Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. H.; White, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    A multi-grid, flux-difference-split, finite-volume code, VULCAN, is presented for solving the elliptic and parabolized form of the equations governing three-dimensional, turbulent, calorically perfect and non-equilibrium chemically reacting flows. The space marching algorithms developed to improve convergence rate and or reduce computational cost are emphasized. The algorithms presented are extensions to the class of implicit pseudo-time iterative, upwind space-marching schemes. A full approximate storage, full multi-grid scheme is also described which is used to accelerate the convergence of a Gauss-Seidel relaxation method. The multi-grid algorithm is shown to significantly improve convergence on high aspect ratio grids.

  20. LSPRAY: Lagrangian Spray Solver for Applications With Parallel Computing and Unstructured Gas-Phase Flow Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Manthena S.

    1998-01-01

    Sprays occur in a wide variety of industrial and power applications and in the processing of materials. A liquid spray is a phase flow with a gas as the continuous phase and a liquid as the dispersed phase (in the form of droplets or ligaments). Interactions between the two phases, which are coupled through exchanges of mass, momentum, and energy, can occur in different ways at different times and locations involving various thermal, mass, and fluid dynamic factors. An understanding of the flow, combustion, and thermal properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray requires careful modeling of the rate-controlling processes associated with the spray's turbulent transport, mixing, chemical kinetics, evaporation, and spreading rates, as well as other phenomena. In an attempt to advance the state-of-the-art in multidimensional numerical methods, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center extended our previous work on sprays to unstructured grids and parallel computing. LSPRAY, which was developed by M.S. Raju of Nyma, Inc., is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo probability density function (PDF) solver. The LSPRAY solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral elements in the gas-phase solvers. It is used specifically for fuel sprays within gas turbine combustors, but it has many other uses. The spray model used in LSPRAY provided favorable results when applied to stratified-charge rotary combustion (Wankel) engines and several other confined and unconfined spray flames. The source code will be available with the National Combustion Code (NCC) as a complete package.

  1. Hopf algebras and topological recursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, João N.

    2015-11-01

    We consider a model for topological recursion based on the Hopf algebra of planar binary trees defined by Loday and Ronco (1998 Adv. Math. 139 293-309 We show that extending this Hopf algebra by identifying pairs of nearest neighbor leaves, and thus producing graphs with loops, we obtain the full recursion formula discovered by Eynard and Orantin (2007 Commun. Number Theory Phys. 1 347-452).

  2. ALGEBRA v.1.27

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Gilkey, A.; Smith, M.; Forsythe, C.

    2005-04-11

    The ALGEBRA program allows the user to manipulate data from a finite element analysis before it is plotted. The finite element output data is in the form of variable values (e.g., stress, strain, and velocity components) in an EXODUS II database. The ALGEBRA program evaluates user-supplied functions of the data and writes the results to an output EXODUS II database that can be read by plot programs.

  3. Algebraic Systems and Pushdown Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Ion; Salomaa, Arto

    We concentrate in this chapter on the core aspects of algebraic series, pushdown automata, and their relation to formal languages. We choose to follow here a presentation of their theory based on the concept of properness. We introduce in Sect. 2 some auxiliary notions and results needed throughout the chapter, in particular the notions of discrete convergence in semirings and C-cycle free infinite matrices. In Sect. 3 we introduce the algebraic power series in terms of algebraic systems of equations. We focus on interconnections with context-free grammars and on normal forms. We then conclude the section with a presentation of the theorems of Shamir and Chomsky-Schützenberger. We discuss in Sect. 4 the algebraic and the regulated rational transductions, as well as some representation results related to them. Section 5 is dedicated to pushdown automata and focuses on the interconnections with classical (non-weighted) pushdown automata and on the interconnections with algebraic systems. We then conclude the chapter with a brief discussion of some of the other topics related to algebraic systems and pushdown automata.

  4. Performance of NASA Equation Solvers on Computational Mechanics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, Olaf O.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of a new family of NASA-developed equation solvers used for large-scale (i.e. 551,705 equations) structural analysis. To minimize computer time and memory, the solvers are divided by application and matrix characteristics (sparse/dense, real/complex, symmetric/nonsymmetric, size: in-core/out of core) and exploit the hardware features of current and future computers. In this paper, the equation solvers, which are written in FORTRAN, and are therefore easily transportable, are shown to be faster than specialized computer library routines utilizing assembly code. Twenty NASA structural benchmark models with NASA solver timings reside on World Wide Web with a challenge to beat them.

  5. Two-dimensional time dependent Riemann solvers for neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Thomas A. . E-mail: tabrunn@sandia.gov; Holloway, James Paul

    2005-11-20

    A two-dimensional Riemann solver is developed for the spherical harmonics approximation to the time dependent neutron transport equation. The eigenstructure of the resulting equations is explored, giving insight into both the spherical harmonics approximation and the Riemann solver. The classic Roe-type Riemann solver used here was developed for one-dimensional problems, but can be used in multidimensional problems by treating each face of a two-dimensional computation cell in a locally one-dimensional way. Several test problems are used to explore the capabilities of both the Riemann solver and the spherical harmonics approximation. The numerical solution for a simple line source problem is compared to the analytic solution to both the P{sub 1} equation and the full transport solution. A lattice problem is used to test the method on a more challenging problem.

  6. Parallel iterative solvers and preconditioners using approximate hierarchical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Grama, A.; Kumar, V.; Sameh, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we report results of the performance, convergence, and accuracy of a parallel GMRES solver for Boundary Element Methods. The solver uses a hierarchical approximate matrix-vector product based on a hybrid Barnes-Hut / Fast Multipole Method. We study the impact of various accuracy parameters on the convergence and show that with minimal loss in accuracy, our solver yields significant speedups. We demonstrate the excellent parallel efficiency and scalability of our solver. The combined speedups from approximation and parallelism represent an improvement of several orders in solution time. We also develop fast and paralellizable preconditioners for this problem. We report on the performance of an inner-outer scheme and a preconditioner based on truncated Green`s function. Experimental results on a 256 processor Cray T3D are presented.

  7. A survey of deterministic solvers for rarefied flows (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieussens, Luc

    2014-12-01

    Numerical simulations of rarefied gas flows are generally made with DSMC methods. Up to a recent period, deterministic numerical methods based on a discretization of the Boltzmann equation were restricted to simple problems (1D, linearized flows, or simple geometries, for instance). In the last decade, several deterministic solvers have been developed in different teams to tackle more complex problems like 2D and 3D flows. Some of them are based on the full Boltzmann equation. Solving this equation numerically is still very challenging, and 3D solvers are still restricted to monoatomic gases, even if recent works have proved it was possible to simulate simple flows for polyatomic gases. Other solvers are based on simpler BGK like models: they allow for much more intensive simulations on 3D flows for realistic geometries, but treating complex gases requires extended BGK models that are still under development. In this paper, we discuss the main features of these existing solvers, and we focus on their strengths and inefficiencies. We will also review some recent results that show how these solvers can be improved: - higher accuracy (higher order finite volume methods, discontinuous Galerkin approaches) - lower memory and CPU costs with special velocity discretization (adaptive grids, spectral methods) - multi-scale simulations by using hybrid and asymptotic preserving schemes - efficient implementation on high performance computers (parallel computing, hybrid parallelization) Finally, we propose some perspectives to make these solvers more efficient and more popular.

  8. Invertible linear transformations and the Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Tam, Honwah; Guo, Fukui

    2008-07-01

    With the help of invertible linear transformations and the known Lie algebras, a way to generate new Lie algebras is given. These Lie algebras obtained have a common feature, i.e. integrable couplings of solitary hierarchies could be obtained by using them, specially, the Hamiltonian structures of them could be worked out. Some ways to construct the loop algebras of the Lie algebras are presented. It follows that some various loop algebras are given. In addition, a few new Lie algebras are explicitly constructed in terms of the classification of Lie algebras proposed by Ma Wen-Xiu, which are bases for obtaining new Lie algebras by using invertible linear transformations. Finally, some solutions of a (2 + 1)-dimensional partial-differential equation hierarchy are obtained, whose Hamiltonian form-expressions are manifested by using the quadratic-form identity.

  9. Multigrid TVD-type scheme for computing inviscid and viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedermann, Alexander; Iwamoto, Junjiro

    1994-06-01

    A numerical scheme for the computation of steady-state transonic flow fields is presented, which is based on a total variation diminishing (TVD) approach. Various kinds of the anti-diffusive flux terms have been considered, and their effect on the computed results investigated. The time-dependent governing equations are given in a conservative formulation and solved by a hybrid multistage Runge-Kutta scheme. To obtain an improved convergence rate a multigrid procedure has been added to the scheme. The time-marching method presented has been verified by inviscid and viscous two-dimensional flow-field computations.

  10. Adaptive parallel multigrid for Euler and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Trottenberg, U.; Oosterlee, K.; Ritzdorf, H.

    1996-12-31

    The combination of (1) very efficient solution methods (Multigrid), (2) adaptivity, and (3) parallelism (distributed memory) clearly is absolutely necessary for future oriented numerics but still regarded as extremely difficult or even unsolved. We show that very nice results can be obtained for real life problems. Our approach is straightforward (based on {open_quotes}MLAT{close_quotes}). But, of course, reasonable refinement and load-balancing strategies have to be used. Our examples are 2D, but 3D is on the way.

  11. A three dimensional multigrid multiblock multistage time stepping scheme for the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa; Cannizzaro, Frank; Melson, N. D.

    1991-01-01

    A general multiblock method for the solution of the three-dimensional, unsteady, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations has been developed. The convective and pressure terms are spatially discretized using Roe's flux differencing technique while the viscous terms are centrally differenced. An explicit Runge-Kutta method is used to advance the solution in time. Local time stepping, adaptive implicit residual smoothing, and the Full Approximation Storage (FAS) multigrid scheme are added to the explicit time stepping scheme to accelerate convergence to steady state. Results for three-dimensional test cases are presented and discussed.

  12. An investigation of cell centered and cell vertex multigrid schemes for the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Two efficient and robust finite-volume multigrid schemes for solving the Navier-Stokes equations are investigated. These schemes employ either a cell centered or a cell vertex discretization technique. An explicit Runge-Kutta algorithm is used to advance the solution in time. Acceleration techniques are applied to obtain faster steady-state convergence. Accuracy and convergence of the schemes are examined. Computational results for transonic airfoil flows are essentially the same, even for a coarse mesh. Both schemes exhibit good convergence rates for a broad range of artificial dissipation coefficients.

  13. A comparison of locally adaptive multigrid methods: LDC, FAC and FIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khadra, Khodor; Angot, Philippe; Caltagirone, Jean-Paul

    1993-01-01

    This study is devoted to a comparative analysis of three 'Adaptive ZOOM' (ZOom Overlapping Multi-level) methods based on similar concepts of hierarchical multigrid local refinement: LDC (Local Defect Correction), FAC (Fast Adaptive Composite), and FIC (Flux Interface Correction)--which we proposed recently. These methods are tested on two examples of a bidimensional elliptic problem. We compare, for V-cycle procedures, the asymptotic evolution of the global error evaluated by discrete norms, the corresponding local errors, and the convergence rates of these algorithms.

  14. Final Report on Subcontract B605152. Multigrid Methods for Systems of PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Brannick, James; Xu, Jinchao

    2015-07-07

    The project team has continued with work on developing aggressive coarsening techniques for AMG methods. Of particular interest is the idea to use aggressive coarsening with polynomial smoothing. Using local Fourier analysis the optimal values for the parameters involved in defining the polynomial smoothers are determined automatically in a way to achieve fast convergence of cycles with aggressive coarsening. Numerical tests have the sharpness of the theoretical results. The methods are highly parallelizable and efficient multigrid algorithms on structured and semistructured grids in two and three spatial dimensions.

  15. Multigrid Computations of 3-D Incompressible Internal and External Viscous Rotating Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Taylor, Lafayette K.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Jiang, Min-Yee; Whitfield, David L.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents multigrid methods for solving the 3-D incompressible viscous rotating flows in a NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor and a marine propeller 4119. Numerical formulations are given in both the rotating reference frame and the absolute frame. Comparisons are made for the accuracy, efficiency, and robustness between the steady-state scheme and the time-accurate scheme for simulating viscous rotating flows for complex internal and external flow applications. Prospects for further increase in efficiency and accuracy of unsteady time-accurate computations are discussed.

  16. Multigrid methods for a semilinear PDE in the theory of pseudoplastic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henson, Van Emden; Shaker, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    We show that by certain transformations the boundary layer equations for the class of non-Newtonian fluids named pseudoplastic can be generalized in the form the vector differential operator(u) + p(x)u(exp -lambda) = 0, where x is a member of the set Omega and Omega is a subset of R(exp n), n is greater than or equal to 1 under the classical conditions for steady flow over a semi-infinite flat plate. We provide a survey of the existence, uniqueness, and analyticity of the solutions for this problem. We also establish numerical solutions in one- and two-dimensional regions using multigrid methods.

  17. On the effect of linear algebra implementations in real-time multibody system dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Manuel; González, Francisco; Dopico, Daniel; Luaces, Alberto

    2008-03-01

    This paper compares the efficiency of multibody system (MBS) dynamic simulation codes that rely on different implementations of linear algebra operations. The dynamics of an N-loop four-bar mechanism has been solved with an index-3 augmented Lagrangian formulation combined with the trapezoidal rule as numerical integrator. Different implementations for this method, both dense and sparse, have been developed, using a number of linear algebra software libraries (including sparse linear equation solvers) and optimized sparse matrix computation strategies. Numerical experiments have been performed in order to measure their performance, as a function of problem size and matrix filling. Results show that optimal implementations can increase the simulation efficiency in a factor of 2 3, compared with our starting classical implementations, and in some topics they disagree with widespread beliefs in MBS dynamics. Finally, advices are provided to select the implementation which delivers the best performance for a certain MBS dynamic simulation.

  18. A Comparative Study of Randomized Constraint Solvers for Random-Symbolic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takaki, Mitsuo; Cavalcanti, Diego; Gheyi, Rohit; Iyoda, Juliano; dAmorim, Marcelo; Prudencio, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of constraints is a major obstacle for constraint-based software verification. Automatic constraint solvers are fundamentally incomplete: input constraints often build on some undecidable theory or some theory the solver does not support. This paper proposes and evaluates several randomized solvers to address this issue. We compare the effectiveness of a symbolic solver (CVC3), a random solver, three hybrid solvers (i.e., mix of random and symbolic), and two heuristic search solvers. We evaluate the solvers on two benchmarks: one consisting of manually generated constraints and another generated with a concolic execution of 8 subjects. In addition to fully decidable constraints, the benchmarks include constraints with non-linear integer arithmetic, integer modulo and division, bitwise arithmetic, and floating-point arithmetic. As expected symbolic solving (in particular, CVC3) subsumes the other solvers for the concolic execution of subjects that only generate decidable constraints. For the remaining subjects the solvers are complementary.

  19. Quantitative analysis of numerical solvers for oscillatory biomolecular system models

    PubMed Central

    Quo, Chang F; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    Background This article provides guidelines for selecting optimal numerical solvers for biomolecular system models. Because various parameters of the same system could have drastically different ranges from 10-15 to 1010, the ODEs can be stiff and ill-conditioned, resulting in non-unique, non-existing, or non-reproducible modeling solutions. Previous studies have not examined in depth how to best select numerical solvers for biomolecular system models, which makes it difficult to experimentally validate the modeling results. To address this problem, we have chosen one of the well-known stiff initial value problems with limit cycle behavior as a test-bed system model. Solving this model, we have illustrated that different answers may result from different numerical solvers. We use MATLAB numerical solvers because they are optimized and widely used by the modeling community. We have also conducted a systematic study of numerical solver performances by using qualitative and quantitative measures such as convergence, accuracy, and computational cost (i.e. in terms of function evaluation, partial derivative, LU decomposition, and "take-off" points). The results show that the modeling solutions can be drastically different using different numerical solvers. Thus, it is important to intelligently select numerical solvers when solving biomolecular system models. Results The classic Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction is described by the Oregonator model and is used as a case study. We report two guidelines in selecting optimal numerical solver(s) for stiff, complex oscillatory systems: (i) for problems with unknown parameters, ode45 is the optimal choice regardless of the relative error tolerance; (ii) for known stiff problems, both ode113 and ode15s are good choices under strict relative tolerance conditions. Conclusions For any given biomolecular model, by building a library of numerical solvers with quantitative performance assessment metric, we show that it is possible

  20. BRST charges for finite nonlinear algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A. P.; Krivonos, S. O.; Ogievetsky, O. V.

    2010-07-01

    Some ingredients of the BRST construction for quantum Lie algebras are applied to a wider class of quadratic algebras of constraints. We build the BRST charge for a quantum Lie algebra with three generators and ghost-anti-ghosts commuting with constraints. We consider a one-parametric family of quadratic algebras with three generators and show that the BRST charge acquires the conventional form after a redefinition of ghosts. The modified ghosts form a quadratic algebra. The family possesses a nonlinear involution, which implies the existence of two independent BRST charges for each algebra in the family. These BRST charges anticommute and form a double BRST complex.