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Sample records for algebraic stress models

  1. A New Reynolds Stress Algebraic Equation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Lumley, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A general turbulent constitutive relation is directly applied to propose a new Reynolds stress algebraic equation model. In the development of this model, the constraints based on rapid distortion theory and realizability (i.e. the positivity of the normal Reynolds stresses and the Schwarz' inequality between turbulent velocity correlations) are imposed. Model coefficients are calibrated using well-studied basic flows such as homogeneous shear flow and the surface flow in the inertial sublayer. The performance of this model is then tested in complex turbulent flows including the separated flow over a backward-facing step and the flow in a confined jet. The calculation results are encouraging and point to the success of the present model in modeling turbulent flows with complex geometries.

  2. On explicit algebraic stress models for complex turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Explicit algebraic stress models that are valid for three-dimensional turbulent flows in noninertial frames are systematically derived from a hierarchy of second-order closure models. This represents a generalization of the model derived by Pope who based his analysis on the Launder, Reece, and Rodi model restricted to two-dimensional turbulent flows in an inertial frame. The relationship between the new models and traditional algebraic stress models -- as well as anistropic eddy visosity models -- is theoretically established. The need for regularization is demonstrated in an effort to explain why traditional algebraic stress models have failed in complex flows. It is also shown that these explicit algebraic stress models can shed new light on what second-order closure models predict for the equilibrium states of homogeneous turbulent flows and can serve as a useful alternative in practical computations.

  3. A Realizable Reynolds Stress Algebraic Equation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Lumley, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The invariance theory in continuum mechanics is applied to analyze Reynolds stresses in high Reynolds number turbulent flows. The analysis leads to a turbulent constitutive relation that relates the Reynolds stresses to the mean velocity gradients in a more general form in which the classical isotropic eddy viscosity model is just the linear approximation of the general form. On the basis of realizability analysis, a set of model coefficients are obtained which are functions of the time scale ratios of the turbulence to the mean strain rate and the mean rotation rate. The coefficients will ensure the positivity of each component of the mean rotation rate. These coefficients will ensure the positivity of each component of the turbulent kinetic energy - realizability that most existing turbulence models fail to satisfy. Separated flows over backward-facing step configurations are taken as applications. The calculations are performed with a conservative finite-volume method. Grid-independent and numerical diffusion-free solutions are obtained by using differencing schemes of second-order accuracy on sufficiently fine grids. The calculated results are compared in detail with the experimental data for both mean and turbulent quantities. The comparison shows that the present proposal significantly improves the predictive capability of K-epsilon based two equation models. In addition, the proposed model is able to simulate rotational homogeneous shear flows with large rotation rates which all conventional eddy viscosity models fail to simulate.

  4. Assessment of an Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses an explicit algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence model in the in the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver, ISAAC (Integrated Solution Algorithm for Arbitrary Con gurations). Additionally, it compares solutions for two select configurations between ISAAC and the RANS solver PAB3D. This study compares with either direct numerical simulation data, experimental data, or empirical models for several different geometries with compressible, separated, and high Reynolds number flows. In general, the turbulence model matched data or followed experimental trends well, and for the selected configurations, the computational results of ISAAC closely matched those of PAB3D using the same turbulence model.

  5. Fully-Explicit and Self-Consistent Algebraic Reynolds Stress Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1995-01-01

    A fully-explicit, self-consistent algebraic expression for the Reynolds stress, which is the exact solution to the Reynolds stress transport equation in the 'weak equilibrium' limit for two-dimensional mean flows for all linear and some quasi-linear pressure-strain models, is derived. Current explicit algebraic Reynolds stress models derived by employing the 'weak equilibrium' assumption treat the production-to-dissipation (P/epsilon) ratio implicitly, resulting in an effective viscosity that can be singular away from the equilibrium limit. In the present paper, the set of simultaneous algebraic Reynolds stress equations are solved in the full non-linear form and the eddy viscosity is found to be non-singular. Preliminary tests indicate that the model performs adequately, even for three dimensional mean flow cases. Due to the explicit and non-singular nature of the effective viscosity, this model should mitigate many of the difficulties encountered in computing complex turbulent flows with the algebraic Reynolds stress models.

  6. Predicting NonInertial Effects with Algebraic Stress Models which Account for Dissipation Rate Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongen, T.; Machiels, L.; Gatski, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    Three types of turbulence models which account for rotational effects in noninertial frames of reference are evaluated for the case of incompressible, fully developed rotating turbulent channel flow. The different types of models are a Coriolis-modified eddy-viscosity model, a realizable algebraic stress model, and an algebraic stress model which accounts for dissipation rate anisotropies. A direct numerical simulation of a rotating channel flow is used for the turbulent model validation. This simulation differs from previous studies in that significantly higher rotation numbers are investigated. Flows at these higher rotation numbers are characterized by a relaminarization on the cyclonic or suction side of the channel, and a linear velocity profile on the anticyclonic or pressure side of the channel. The predictive performance of the three types of models are examined in detail, and formulation deficiencies are identified which cause poor predictive performance for some of the models. Criteria are identified which allow for accurate prediction of such flows by algebraic stress models and their corresponding Reynolds stress formulations.

  7. Explicit algebraic reynolds stress models for anisotropic wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menter, F. R.; Garbaruk, A. V.; Egorov, Y.

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, two variants of Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model (EARSM) are presented and applied to a number of test cases. Both formulations start from the Wallin Johansson (WJ) EARSM stress-strain relationship. The goal of the first step was to combine the EARSM with the ω-equation-based Baseline (BSL) model, to avoid freestream sensitivities and ambiguities in comparison with the Shear Stress Transport (SST) model. This could be achieved by a slight change in the A1 constant. In addition, the standard eddy-viscosity formulation is used in the diffusion terms of the k- and the ω-equations. Secondly, a simplified version of the stress-strain relationship was developed. It is based on a linear form of the implicit algebraic model. It is not clear at the time if this formulation possess significant advantages against the WJ stress-strain model. For the current cases, both variants produced essentially identical results. Several test cases have been computed. The main interest in the simulations was on corner flow separation.

  8. Development of an algebraic stress/two-layer model for calculating thrust chamber flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Huang, J.

    1993-07-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modeling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data, to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  9. Development of an algebraic stress/two-layer model for calculating thrust chamber flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Huang, J.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modeling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data, to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  10. A realizable explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model for compressible turbulent flow with significant mean dilatation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, I. A.; Wallin, S.; Brethouwer, G.; Johansson, A. V.

    2013-10-01

    The explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model of Wallin and Johansson [J. Fluid Mech. 403, 89 (2000)] is extended to compressible and variable-density turbulent flows. This is achieved by correctly taking into account the influence of the mean dilatation on the rapid pressure-strain correlation. The resulting model is formally identical to the original model in the limit of constant density. For two-dimensional mean flows the model is analyzed and the physical root of the resulting quartic equation is identified. Using a fixed-point analysis of homogeneously sheared and strained compressible flows, we show that the new model is realizable, unlike the previous model. Application of the model together with a K - ω model to quasi one-dimensional plane nozzle flow, transcending from subsonic to supersonic regime, also demonstrates realizability. Negative "dilatational" production of turbulence kinetic energy competes with positive "incompressible" production, eventually making the total production negative during the spatial evolution of the nozzle flow. Finally, an approach to include the baroclinic effect into the dissipation equation is proposed and an algebraic model for density-velocity correlations is outlined to estimate the corrections associated with density fluctuations. All in all, the new model can become a significant tool for CFD (computational fluid dynamics) of compressible flows.

  11. Computation of turbulent boundary layer flows with an algebraic stress turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook; Chen, Yen-Sen

    1986-01-01

    An algebraic stress turbulence model is presented, characterized by the following: (1) the eddy viscosity expression is derived from the Reynolds stress turbulence model; (2) the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation is improved by including a production range time scale; and (3) the diffusion coefficients for turbulence equations are adjusted so that the kinetic energy profile extends further into the free stream region found in most experimental data. The turbulent flow equations were solved using a finite element method. Examples include: fully developed channel flow, fully developed pipe flow, flat plate boundary layer flow, plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, circular jet exhausting into a moving stream, and wall jet flow. Computational results compare favorably with experimental data for most of the examples considered. Significantly improved results were obtained for the plane jet flow, the circular jet flow, and the wall jet flow; whereas the remainder are comparable to those obtained by finite difference methods using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model. The latter seems to be promising with further improvement of the expression for the eddy viscosity coefficient.

  12. Nonlinear Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model for Two-Phase Turbulent Flows Laden with Small Heavy Particles in Circular Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukin, R. V.; Alipchenkov, V. M.; Zaichik, L. I.; Mukina, L. S.; Strizhov, V. F.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to present an explicit algebraic Reynolds stress (nonlinear turbulent viscosity) model combined with modified k - ɛ turbulence model taking into account particles effect on turbulence for calculating the main turbulent characteristics of two-phase flows. For calculating particles distribution in space we used diffusion-inertia model (DIM). The turbulence attenuating in the presence of particles is clearly observed, investigated and compared with the experimental data. The developed model adequately described turbulence anisotropy and the influence of particles inertia and concentration on the turbulence intensity.

  13. Comparison of different algebraic stress models in predicting temperature fluctuations and mean velocity in liquid-metals

    SciTech Connect

    de Lemos, M.J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The present work consists of a numerical investigation comparing three algebraic stress closures for turbulence in predicting the variance of temperature fluctuations and mean velocity for flow of mercury. The models of Ljuboja and Rodi, Sha and Launder, and Lemos and Sesonske are used, as they handle differently the modeling of the dissipation rate of temperature fluctuations, and several terms in the algebraic equations for the turbulent fluxes. A sensitivity analysis on some constants of the latter model is also presented. Pipe flow with constant wall heat flux were the geometry and boundary condition. The range for Re was from 30000 to 60000, and the buoyancy parameter Ra/Re/sup 2/ was varied from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -4/, where Ra is the Rayleigh number. The model of Lemos and Sesonske shows a substantial improvement in predicting temperature fluctuations, whereas predictions for the mean velocity show a weak dependence on the model used. Nevertheless, the model of Lemos and Sesonske gives results closer to available experimental data.

  14. Algebraic Reynolds stress modeling of turbulence subject to rapid homogeneous and non-homogeneous compression or expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, I. A.; Wallin, S.; Brethouwer, G.; Grundestam, O.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model (EARSM) by Grigoriev et al. ["A realizable explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model for compressible turbulent flow with significant mean dilatation," Phys. Fluids 25(10), 105112 (2013)] and the related differential Reynolds stress model (DRSM) are used to investigate the influence of homogeneous shear and compression on the evolution of turbulence in the limit of rapid distortion theory (RDT). The DRSM predictions of the turbulence kinetic energy evolution are in reasonable agreement with RDT while the evolution of diagonal components of anisotropy correctly captures the essential features, which is not the case for standard compressible extensions of DRSMs. The EARSM is shown to give a realizable anisotropy tensor and a correct trend of the growth of turbulence kinetic energy K, which saturates at a power law growth versus compression ratio, as well as retaining a normalized strain in the RDT regime. In contrast, an eddy-viscosity model results in a rapid exponential growth of K and excludes both realizability and high magnitude of the strain rate. We illustrate the importance of using a proper algebraic treatment of EARSM in systems with high values of dilatation and vorticity but low shear. A homogeneously compressed and rotating gas cloud with cylindrical symmetry, related to astrophysical flows and swirling supercritical flows, was investigated too. We also outline the extension of DRSM and EARSM to include the effect of non-homogeneous density coupled with "local mean acceleration" which can be important for, e.g., stratified flows or flows with heat release. A fixed-point analysis of direct numerical simulation data of combustion in a wall-jet flow demonstrates that our model gives quantitatively correct predictions of both streamwise and cross-stream components of turbulent density flux as well as their influence on the anisotropies. In summary, we believe that our approach, based on a proper

  15. Implementation of algebraic stress models in a general 3-D Navier-Stokes method (PAB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional multiblock Navier-Stokes code, PAB3D, which was developed for propulsion integration and general aerodynamic analysis, has been used extensively by NASA Langley and other organizations to perform both internal (exhaust) and external flow analysis of complex aircraft configurations. This code was designed to solve the simplified Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model has been used with considerable success, especially for attached flows. Accurate predicting of transonic shock wave location and pressure recovery in separated flow regions has been more difficult. Two algebraic Reynolds stress models (ASM) have been recently implemented in the code that greatly improved the code's ability to predict these difficult flow conditions. Good agreement with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) for a subsonic flat plate was achieved with ASM's developed by Shih, Zhu, and Lumley and Gatski and Speziale. Good predictions were also achieved at subsonic and transonic Mach numbers for shock location and trailing edge boattail pressure recovery on a single-engine afterbody/nozzle model.

  16. MODEL IDENTIFICATION AND COMPUTER ALGEBRA

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Kenneth A.; Bauldry, Shawn

    2011-01-01

    Multiequation models that contain observed or latent variables are common in the social sciences. To determine whether unique parameter values exist for such models, one needs to assess model identification. In practice analysts rely on empirical checks that evaluate the singularity of the information matrix evaluated at sample estimates of parameters. The discrepancy between estimates and population values, the limitations of numerical assessments of ranks, and the difference between local and global identification make this practice less than perfect. In this paper we outline how to use computer algebra systems (CAS) to determine the local and global identification of multiequation models with or without latent variables. We demonstrate a symbolic CAS approach to local identification and develop a CAS approach to obtain explicit algebraic solutions for each of the model parameters. We illustrate the procedures with several examples, including a new proof of the identification of a model for handling missing data using auxiliary variables. We present an identification procedure for Structural Equation Models that makes use of CAS and that is a useful complement to current methods. PMID:21769158

  17. MODEL IDENTIFICATION AND COMPUTER ALGEBRA.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Kenneth A; Bauldry, Shawn

    2010-10-01

    Multiequation models that contain observed or latent variables are common in the social sciences. To determine whether unique parameter values exist for such models, one needs to assess model identification. In practice analysts rely on empirical checks that evaluate the singularity of the information matrix evaluated at sample estimates of parameters. The discrepancy between estimates and population values, the limitations of numerical assessments of ranks, and the difference between local and global identification make this practice less than perfect. In this paper we outline how to use computer algebra systems (CAS) to determine the local and global identification of multiequation models with or without latent variables. We demonstrate a symbolic CAS approach to local identification and develop a CAS approach to obtain explicit algebraic solutions for each of the model parameters. We illustrate the procedures with several examples, including a new proof of the identification of a model for handling missing data using auxiliary variables. We present an identification procedure for Structural Equation Models that makes use of CAS and that is a useful complement to current methods.

  18. Bohr model as an algebraic collective model

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, D. J.; Welsh, T. A.; Caprio, M. A.

    2009-05-15

    Developments and applications are presented of an algebraic version of Bohr's collective model. Illustrative examples show that fully converged calculations can be performed quickly and easily for a large range of Hamiltonians. As a result, the Bohr model becomes an effective tool in the analysis of experimental data. The examples are chosen both to confirm the reliability of the algebraic collective model and to show the diversity of results that can be obtained by its use. The focus of the paper is to facilitate identification of the limitations of the Bohr model with a view to developing more realistic, computationally tractable models.

  19. Using Students' Interests as Algebraic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whaley, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Fostering algebraic thinking is an important goal for middle-grades mathematics teachers. Developing mathematical reasoning requires that teachers cultivate students' habits of mind. Teachers develop students' understanding of algebra by engaging them in tasks that involve modeling and representation. This study was designed to investigate how…

  20. Teaching Modeling and Axiomatization with Boolean Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Villiers, Michael D.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is an alternative approach to the traditional teaching of Boolean algebra for secondary school mathematics. The main aim of the approach is to use Boolean algebra to teach pupils such mathematical processes as modeling and axiomatization. A course using the approach is described. (RH)

  1. Algebraic operator approach to gas kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ichov, L. V.

    1997-02-01

    Some general properties of the linear Boltzmann kinetic equation are used to present it in the form ∂ tϕ = - †Âϕ with the operators Âand† possessing some nontrivial algebraic properties. When applied to the Keilson-Storer kinetic model, this method gives an example of quantum ( q-deformed) Lie algebra. This approach provides also a natural generalization of the “kangaroo model”.

  2. Computational algebraic geometry of epidemic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Vega, Martín.

    2014-06-01

    Computational Algebraic Geometry is applied to the analysis of various epidemic models for Schistosomiasis and Dengue, both, for the case without control measures and for the case where control measures are applied. The models were analyzed using the mathematical software Maple. Explicitly the analysis is performed using Groebner basis, Hilbert dimension and Hilbert polynomials. These computational tools are included automatically in Maple. Each of these models is represented by a system of ordinary differential equations, and for each model the basic reproductive number (R0) is calculated. The effects of the control measures are observed by the changes in the algebraic structure of R0, the changes in Groebner basis, the changes in Hilbert dimension, and the changes in Hilbert polynomials. It is hoped that the results obtained in this paper become of importance for designing control measures against the epidemic diseases described. For future researches it is proposed the use of algebraic epidemiology to analyze models for airborne and waterborne diseases.

  3. Solving stochastic epidemiological models using computer algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincapie, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan

    2011-06-01

    Mathematical modeling in Epidemiology is an important tool to understand the ways under which the diseases are transmitted and controlled. The mathematical modeling can be implemented via deterministic or stochastic models. Deterministic models are based on short systems of non-linear ordinary differential equations and the stochastic models are based on very large systems of linear differential equations. Deterministic models admit complete, rigorous and automatic analysis of stability both local and global from which is possible to derive the algebraic expressions for the basic reproductive number and the corresponding epidemic thresholds using computer algebra software. Stochastic models are more difficult to treat and the analysis of their properties requires complicated considerations in statistical mathematics. In this work we propose to use computer algebra software with the aim to solve epidemic stochastic models such as the SIR model and the carrier-borne model. Specifically we use Maple to solve these stochastic models in the case of small groups and we obtain results that do not appear in standard textbooks or in the books updated on stochastic models in epidemiology. From our results we derive expressions which coincide with those obtained in the classical texts using advanced procedures in mathematical statistics. Our algorithms can be extended for other stochastic models in epidemiology and this shows the power of computer algebra software not only for analysis of deterministic models but also for the analysis of stochastic models. We also perform numerical simulations with our algebraic results and we made estimations for the basic parameters as the basic reproductive rate and the stochastic threshold theorem. We claim that our algorithms and results are important tools to control the diseases in a globalized world.

  4. Shapes and stability of algebraic nuclear models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Moreno, Enrique; Castanos, Octavio

    1995-01-01

    A generalization of the procedure to study shapes and stability of algebraic nuclear models introduced by Gilmore is presented. One calculates the expectation value of the Hamiltonian with respect to the coherent states of the algebraic structure of the system. Then equilibrium configurations of the resulting energy surface, which depends in general on state variables and a set of parameters, are classified through the Catastrophe theory. For one- and two-body interactions in the Hamiltonian of the interacting Boson model-1, the critical points are organized through the Cusp catastrophe. As an example, we apply this Separatrix to describe the energy surfaces associated to the Rutenium and Samarium isotopes.

  5. A process algebra model of QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulis, William

    2016-03-01

    The process algebra approach to quantum mechanics posits a finite, discrete, determinate ontology of primitive events which are generated by processes (in the sense of Whitehead). In this ontology, primitive events serve as elements of an emergent space-time and of emergent fundamental particles and fields. Each process generates a set of primitive elements, using only local information, causally propagated as a discrete wave, forming a causal space termed a causal tapestry. Each causal tapestry forms a discrete and finite sampling of an emergent causal manifold (space-time) M and emergent wave function. Interactions between processes are described by a process algebra which possesses 8 commutative operations (sums and products) together with a non-commutative concatenation operator (transitions). The process algebra possesses a representation via nondeterministic combinatorial games. The process algebra connects to quantum mechanics through the set valued process and configuration space covering maps, which associate each causal tapestry with sets of wave functions over M. Probabilities emerge from interactions between processes. The process algebra model has been shown to reproduce many features of the theory of non-relativistic scalar particles to a high degree of accuracy, without paradox or divergences. This paper extends the approach to a semi-classical form of quantum electrodynamics.

  6. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Jain, A.; Kreutz-Delgado, K.

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling, control, and trajectory design is discussed. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of a manipulator. Inversion of operators can be efficiently obtained via techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator algebra provides a high-level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and for control and trajectory design algorithms. The interpretation of expressions within the algebraic framework leads to enhanced conceptual and physical understanding of manipulator dynamics and kinematics.

  7. Preparing Secondary Mathematics Teachers: A Focus on Modeling in Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Hyunyi; Mintos, Alexia; Newton, Jill

    2015-01-01

    This study addressed the opportunities to learn (OTL) modeling in algebra provided to secondary mathematics pre-service teachers (PSTs). To investigate these OTL, we interviewed five instructors of required mathematics and mathematics education courses that had the potential to include opportunities for PSTs to learn algebra at three universities.…

  8. L∞-algebra models and higher Chern-Simons theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Patricia; Sämann, Christian

    2016-10-01

    We continue our study of zero-dimensional field theories in which the fields take values in a strong homotopy Lie algebra. In the first part, we review in detail how higher Chern-Simons theories arise in the AKSZ-formalism. These theories form a universal starting point for the construction of L∞-algebra models. We then show how to describe superconformal field theories and how to perform dimensional reductions in this context. In the second part, we demonstrate that Nambu-Poisson and multisymplectic manifolds are closely related via their Heisenberg algebras. As a byproduct of our discussion, we find central Lie p-algebra extensions of 𝔰𝔬(p + 2). Finally, we study a number of L∞-algebra models which are physically interesting and which exhibit quantized multisymplectic manifolds as vacuum solutions.

  9. Action Algebras and Model Algebras in Denotational Semantics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, Luiz Carlos Castro; Haeusler, Edward Hermann

    This article describes some results concerning the conceptual separation of model dependent and language inherent aspects in a denotational semantics of a programming language. Before going into the technical explanation, the authors wish to relate a story that illustrates how correctly and precisely posed questions can influence the direction of research. By means of his questions, Professor Mosses aided the PhD research of one of the authors of this article and taught the other, who at the time was a novice supervisor, the real meaning of careful PhD supervision. The student’s research had been partially developed towards the implementation of programming languages through denotational semantics specification, and the student had developed a prototype [12] that compared relatively well to some industrial compilers of the PASCAL language. During a visit to the BRICS lab in Aarhus, the student’s supervisor gave Professor Mosses a draft of an article describing the prototype and its implementation experiments. The next day, Professor Mosses asked the supervisor, “Why is the generated code so efficient when compared to that generated by an industrial compiler?” and “You claim that the efficiency is simply a consequence of the Object- Orientation mechanisms used by the prototype programming language (C++); this should be better investigated. Pay more attention to the class of programs that might have this good comparison profile.” As a result of these aptly chosen questions and comments, the student and supervisor made great strides in the subsequent research; the advice provided by Professor Mosses made them perceive that the code generated for certain semantic domains was efficient because it mapped to the “right aspect” of the language semantics. (Certain functional types, used to represent mappings such as Stores and Environments, were pushed to the level of the object language (as in gcc). This had the side-effect of generating

  10. A stochastic extension of the explicit algebraic subgrid-scale models

    SciTech Connect

    Rasam, A. Brethouwer, G.; Johansson, A. V.

    2014-05-15

    The explicit algebraic subgrid-scale (SGS) stress model (EASM) of Marstorp et al. [“Explicit algebraic subgrid stress models with application to rotating channel flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 639, 403–432 (2009)] and explicit algebraic SGS scalar flux model (EASFM) of Rasam et al. [“An explicit algebraic model for the subgrid-scale passive scalar flux,” J. Fluid Mech. 721, 541–577 (2013)] are extended with stochastic terms based on the Langevin equation formalism for the subgrid-scales by Marstorp et al. [“A stochastic subgrid model with application to turbulent flow and scalar mixing,” Phys. Fluids 19, 035107 (2007)]. The EASM and EASFM are nonlinear mixed and tensor eddy-diffusivity models, which improve large eddy simulation (LES) predictions of the mean flow, Reynolds stresses, and scalar fluxes of wall-bounded flows compared to isotropic eddy-viscosity and eddy-diffusivity SGS models, especially at coarse resolutions. The purpose of the stochastic extension of the explicit algebraic SGS models is to further improve the characteristics of the kinetic energy and scalar variance SGS dissipation, which are key quantities that govern the small-scale mixing and dispersion dynamics. LES of turbulent channel flow with passive scalar transport shows that the stochastic terms enhance SGS dissipation statistics such as length scale, variance, and probability density functions and introduce a significant amount of backscatter of energy from the subgrid to the resolved scales without causing numerical stability problems. The improvements in the SGS dissipation predictions in turn enhances the predicted resolved statistics such as the mean scalar, scalar fluxes, Reynolds stresses, and correlation lengths. Moreover, the nonalignment between the SGS stress and resolved strain-rate tensors predicted by the EASM with stochastic extension is in much closer agreement with direct numerical simulation data.

  11. Applied Algebra: The Modeling Technique of Least Squares

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelkowski, Jeremy; Mayes, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The article focuses on engaging students in algebra through modeling real-world problems. The technique of least squares is explored, encouraging students to develop a deeper understanding of the method. (Contains 2 figures and a bibliography.)

  12. Algebraic Modeling of Information Retrieval in XML Documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Bozhidar; Georgieva, Adriana

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents an information retrieval approach in XML documents using tools, based on the linear algebra. The well-known transformation languages as XSLT (XPath) are grounded on the features of higher-order logic for manipulating hierarchical trees. The presented conception is compared to existing higher-order logic formalisms, where the queries are realized by both languages XSLT and XPath. The possibilities of the proposed linear algebraic model combined with hierarchy data models permit more efficient solutions for searching, extracting and manipulating semi-structured data with hierarchical structures avoiding the global navigation over the XML tree components. The main purpose of this algebraic model representation, applied to the hierarchical relationships in the XML data structures, is to make the implementation of linear algebra tools possible for XML data manipulations and to eliminate existing problems, related to regular grammars theory and also to avoid the difficulties, connected with higher -order logic (first-order logic, monadic second- order logic etc.).

  13. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, K.; Milman, M.

    1988-01-01

    A powerful new spatial operator algebra for modeling, control, and trajectory design of manipulators is discussed along with its implementation in the Ada programming language. Applications of this algebra to robotics include an operator representation of the manipulator Jacobian matrix; the robot dynamical equations formulated in terms of the spatial algebra, showing the complete equivalence between the recursive Newton-Euler formulations to robot dynamics; the operator factorization and inversion of the manipulator mass matrix which immediately results in O(N) recursive forward dynamics algorithms; the joint accelerations of a manipulator due to a tip contact force; the recursive computation of the equivalent mass matrix as seen at the tip of a manipulator; and recursive forward dynamics of a closed chain system. Finally, additional applications and current research involving the use of the spatial operator algebra are discussed in general terms.

  14. An algebraic cluster model based on the harmonic oscillator basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levai, Geza; Cseh, J.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the semimicroscopic algebraic cluster model introduced recently, in which the internal structure of the nuclear clusters is described by the harmonic oscillator shell model, while their relative motion is accounted for by the Vibron model. The algebraic formulation of the model makes extensive use of techniques associated with harmonic oscillators and their symmetry group, SU(3). The model is applied to some cluster systems and is found to reproduce important characteristics of nuclei in the sd-shell region. An approximate SU(3) dynamical symmetry is also found to hold for the C-12 + C-12 system.

  15. A Cognitive Model of Experts' Algebraic Solving Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Anibal

    2003-01-01

    We studied experts' solving methods and analyzed the nature of mathematical knowledge as well as their efficiency in algebraic calculations. We constructed a model of the experts cognitive functioning (notably teachers) in which the observed automatisms were modeled in terms of schemes and instruments. Mathematical justification of transformation…

  16. Inverse Modelling Problems in Linear Algebra Undergraduate Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will offer an analysis from a theoretical point of view of mathematical modelling, applications and inverse problems of both causation and specification types. Inverse modelling problems give the opportunity to establish connections between theory and practice and to show this fact, a simple linear algebra example in two different…

  17. Optical linear algebra processors: noise and error-source modeling.

    PubMed

    Casasent, D; Ghosh, A

    1985-06-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAP's) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  18. Optical linear algebra processors - Noise and error-source modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Ghosh, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAPs) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  19. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, Kenneth; Jain, Abhinandan

    1989-01-01

    A recently developed spatial operator algebra, useful for modeling, control, and trajectory design of manipulators is discussed. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of a manipulator. Inversion of operators can be efficiently obtained via techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator algebra provides a high level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and control and trajectory design algorithms. The interpretation of expressions within the algebraic framework leads to enhanced conceptual and physical understanding of manipulator dynamics and kinematics. Furthermore, implementable recursive algorithms can be immediately derived from the abstract operator expressions by inspection. Thus, the transition from an abstract problem formulation and solution to the detailed mechanizaton of specific algorithms is greatly simplified. The analytical formulation of the operator algebra, as well as its implementation in the Ada programming language are discussed.

  20. Algebraic approach to small-world network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph-Lilith, Michelle; Muller, Lyle E.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an analytic model for directed Watts-Strogatz small-world graphs and deduce an algebraic expression of its defining adjacency matrix. The latter is then used to calculate the small-world digraph's asymmetry index and clustering coefficient in an analytically exact fashion, valid nonasymptotically for all graph sizes. The proposed approach is general and can be applied to all algebraically well-defined graph-theoretical measures, thus allowing for an analytical investigation of finite-size small-world graphs.

  1. Seeking Simplicity: Algebraic and Topological Modelling in Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, Peter F. W.

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative algebraic and qualitative topological models can be used in the quest for simple explanations in the field of teaching and learning. The examples described cover such diverse topics as teacher anxiety and classroom control, process-product studies, aptitude-treatment interactions, the pace of instruction, the size of classes, and…

  2. Phase transitions for rotational states within an algebraic cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Moreno, E.; Morales Hernández, G. E.; Hess, P. O.; Yépez Martínez, H.

    2016-07-01

    The ground state and excited, rotational phase transitions are investigated within the Semimicroscopic Algebraic Cluster Model (SACM). The catastrophe theory is used to describe these phase transitions. Short introductions to the SACM and the catastrophe theory are given. We apply the formalism to the case of 16O+α→20Ne.

  3. Generalization of Richardson-Gaudin models to rank-2 algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Errea, B; Lerma, S; Dukelsky, J; Dimitrova, S S; Pittel, S; Van Isacker, P; Gueorguiev, V G

    2006-07-20

    A generalization of Richardson-Gaudin models to the rank-2 SO(5) and SO(3,2) algebras is used to describe systems of two kinds of fermions or bosons interacting through a pairing force. They are applied to the proton-neutron neutron isovector pairing model and to the Interacting Boson Model 2, in the transition from vibration to gamma-soft nuclei, respectively. In both cases, the integrals of motion and their eigenvalues are obtained.

  4. Models of quadratic quantum algebras and their relation to classical superintegrable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalnins, E. G.; Miller, W.; Post, S.

    2009-05-15

    We show how to construct realizations (models) of quadratic algebras for 2D second order superintegrable systems in terms of differential or difference operators in one variable. We demonstrate how various models of the quantum algebras arise naturally from models of the Poisson algebras for the corresponding classical superintegrable system. These techniques extend to quadratic algebras related to superintegrable systems in n dimensions and are intimately related to multivariable orthogonal polynomials.

  5. Inverse modelling problems in linear algebra undergraduate courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor E.

    2013-10-01

    This paper will offer an analysis from a theoretical point of view of mathematical modelling, applications and inverse problems of both causation and specification types. Inverse modelling problems give the opportunity to establish connections between theory and practice and to show this fact, a simple linear algebra example in two different presentations will be discussed. Finally, several results will be presented and some conclusions proposed.

  6. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, K.; Jain, A.

    1989-01-01

    A spatial operator algebra for modeling the control and trajectory design of manipulation is discussed, with emphasis on its analytical formulation and implementation in the Ada programming language. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of the manipulator. Inversion is obtained using techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator alegbra provides a high-level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and control and trajectory design algorithms. Implementable recursive algorithms can be immediately derived from the abstract operator expressions by inspection, thus greatly simplifying the transition from an abstract problem formulation and solution to the detailed mechanization of a specific algorithm.

  7. Algebraic Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    The results of a series of Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) and Partially Stirred Reactor (PaSR) simulations are compared to each other over a wide range of operating conditions. It is found that the PaSR results can be simulated by a PSR solution with just an adjusted chemical reaction rate. A simple expression has been developed that gives the required change in reaction rate for a PSR solution to simulate the PaSR results. This expression is the basis of a simple turbulence-chemistry interaction model. The interaction model that has been developed is intended for use with simple one-step global reaction mechanisms and for steady-state flow simulations. Due to the simplicity of the model there is very little additional computational cost in adding it to existing CFD codes.

  8. Modelling Simply, Without Algebra: Beyond the Spreadsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Using computers to provide dynamic modelling of physical situations is a valuable teaching tool. This is the first of two articles which look in detail at the use of two tools: this article considers the use of VnR whilst the second considers Modellus. This article provides useful approaches using VnR to teach physics. It also considers the…

  9. Numerical investigation of algebraic oceanic turbulent mixing-layer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón-Rebollo, T.; Gómez-Mármol, M.; Rubino, S.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the finite-time and asymptotic behaviour of algebraic turbulent mixing-layer models by numerical simulation. We compare the performances given by three different settings of the eddy viscosity. We consider Richardson number-based vertical eddy viscosity models. Two of these are classical algebraic turbulence models usually used in numerical simulations of global oceanic circulation, i.e. the Pacanowski-Philander and the Gent models, while the other one is a more recent model (Bennis et al., 2010) proposed to prevent numerical instabilities generated by physically unstable configurations. The numerical schemes are based on the standard finite element method. We perform some numerical tests for relatively large deviations of realistic initial conditions provided by the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) array. These initial conditions correspond to states close to mixing-layer profiles, measured on the Equatorial Pacific region called the West-Pacific Warm Pool. We conclude that mixing-layer profiles could be considered as kinds of "absorbing configurations" in finite time that asymptotically evolve to steady states under the application of negative surface energy fluxes.

  10. Topological basis realization for BMW algebra and Heisenberg XXZ spin chain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Xue, Kang; Wang, Gangcheng; Liu, Ying; Sun, Chunfang

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we study three-dimensional (3D) reduced Birman-Murakami-Wenzl (BMW) algebra based on topological basis theory. Several examples of BMW algebra representations are reviewed. We also discuss a special solution of BMW algebra, which can be used to construct Heisenberg XXZ model. The theory of topological basis provides a useful method to solve quantum spin chain models. It is also shown that the ground state of XXZ spin chain is superposition state of topological basis.

  11. A Frame Manipulation Algebra for ER Logical Stage Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, Antonio L.; Casanova, Marco A.; Breitman, Karin K.; Barbosa, Simone D. J.

    The ER model is arguably today's most widely accepted basis for the conceptual specification of information systems. A further common practice is to use the Relational Model at an intermediate logical stage, in order to adequately prepare for physical implementation. Although the Relational Model still works well in contexts relying on standard databases, it imposes certain restrictions, not inherent in ER specifications, which make it less suitable in Web environments. This paper proposes frames as an alternative to move from ER specifications to logical stage modelling, and treats frames as an abstract data type equipped with a Frame Manipulation Algebra (FMA). It is argued that frames, with a long tradition in AI applications, are able to accommodate the irregularities of semi-structured data, and that frame-sets generalize relational tables, allowing to drop the strict homogeneity requirement. A prototype logic-programming tool has been developed to experiment with FMA. Examples are included to help describe the use of the operators.

  12. A Process Algebraic Framework for Modeling Resource Demand and Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippou, Anna; Lee, Insup; Sokolsky, Oleg; Choi, Jin-Young

    As real-time embedded systems become more complex, resource partitioning is increasingly used to guarantee real-time performance. Recently, several compositional frameworks of resource partitioning have been proposed using real-time scheduling theory with various notions of real-time tasks running under restricted resource supply environments. However, these real-time scheduling-based approaches are limited in their expressiveness in that, although capable of describing resource-demand tasks, they are unable to model resource supply. This paper describes a process algebraic framework for reasoning about resource demand and supply inspired by the timed process algebra ACSR. In ACSR, real-time tasks are specified by enunciating their consumption needs for resources. To also accommodate resource-supply processes we define PADS where, given a resource CPU, the complimented resource overline{CPU} denotes for availability of CPU for the corresponding demand process. Using PADS, we define a supply-demand relation where a pair (S, T) belongs to the relation if the demand process T can be scheduled under supply S. We develop a theory of compositional schedulability analysis as well as a technique for synthesizing an optimal supply process for a set of tasks. We illustrate our technique via a number of examples.

  13. Lie algebraic similarity transformed Hamiltonians for lattice model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlen-Strothman, Jacob M.; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a class of Lie algebraic similarity transformations generated by exponentials of two-body on-site Hermitian operators whose Hausdorff series can be summed exactly without truncation. The correlators are defined over the entire lattice and include the Gutzwiller factor ni ↑ni ↓ , and two-site products of density (ni ↑+ni ↓) and spin (ni ↑-ni ↓) operators. The resulting non-Hermitian many-body Hamiltonian can be solved in a biorthogonal mean-field approach with polynomial computational cost. The proposed similarity transformation generates locally weighted orbital transformations of the reference determinant. Although the energy of the model is unbound, projective equations in the spirit of coupled cluster theory lead to well-defined solutions. The theory is tested on the one- and two-dimensional repulsive Hubbard model where it yields accurate results for small and medium sized interaction strengths.

  14. An algebraic turbulence model for three-dimensional viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Giel, P. W.; Boyle, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    An algebraic turbulence model is proposed for use with three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses. It incorporates features of both the Baldwin-Lomax and Cebeci-Smith models. The Baldwin-Lomax model uses the maximum of a function f(y) to determine length and velocity scales. An analysis of the Baldwin-Lomax model shows that f(y) can have a spurious maximum close to the wall, causing numerical problems and non-physical results. The proposed model uses integral relations to determine delta(*) u(sub e) and delta used in the Cebeci-Smith mode. It eliminates a constant in the Baldwin-Lomax model and determines the two remaining constants by comparison to the Cebeci-Smith formulation. Pressure gradient effects, a new wake model, and the implementation of these features in a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code are also described. Results are shown for a flat plate boundary layer, an annular turbine cascade, and endwall heat transfer in a linear turbine cascade. The heat transfer results agree well with experimental data which shows large variations in endwall Stanton number contours with Reynolds number.

  15. Re"modeling" College Algebra: An Active Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinzon, D.; Pinzon, K.; Stackpole, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss active learning in College Algebra at Georgia Gwinnett College. This approach has been used in more than 20 sections of College Algebra taught by the authors in the past four semesters. Students work in small, structured groups on guided inquiry activities after watching 15-20 minutes of videos before class. We discuss a…

  16. A Modeling-Based College Algebra Course and Its Effect on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Aimee J.

    2005-01-01

    In Fall 2004, Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) piloted a modeling-based approach to college algebra. This paper describes the course and an assessment that was conducted to determine the effect of this approach on student achievement in comparison to a traditional approach to college algebra. The results show that compared with their…

  17. Excited states of the Calogero-Sutherland model and singular vectors of the WN algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awata, Hidetoshi; Matsuo, Yutaka; Odake, Satoru; Shiraishi, Jun'ichi

    1995-02-01

    Using the collective field method, we find a relation between the Jack symmetric polynomials, which describe the excited states of the Calogero-Sutherland model, and the singular vectors of the WN algebra. Based on this relation, we obtain their integral representations. We also give a direct algebraic method which leads to the same result, and integral representations of the skew-Jack polynomials.

  18. Analysis of DIRAC's behavior using model checking with process algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remenska, Daniela; Templon, Jeff; Willemse, Tim; Bal, Henri; Verstoep, Kees; Fokkink, Wan; Charpentier, Philippe; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Lanciotti, Elisa; Roiser, Stefan; Ciba, Krzysztof

    2012-12-01

    DIRAC is the grid solution developed to support LHCb production activities as well as user data analysis. It consists of distributed services and agents delivering the workload to the grid resources. Services maintain database back-ends to store dynamic state information of entities such as jobs, queues, staging requests, etc. Agents use polling to check and possibly react to changes in the system state. Each agent's logic is relatively simple; the main complexity lies in their cooperation. Agents run concurrently, and collaborate using the databases as shared memory. The databases can be accessed directly by the agents if running locally or through a DIRAC service interface if necessary. This shared-memory model causes entities to occasionally get into inconsistent states. Tracing and fixing such problems becomes formidable due to the inherent parallelism present. We propose more rigorous methods to cope with this. Model checking is one such technique for analysis of an abstract model of a system. Unlike conventional testing, it allows full control over the parallel processes execution, and supports exhaustive state-space exploration. We used the mCRL2 language and toolset to model the behavior of two related DIRAC subsystems: the workload and storage management system. Based on process algebra, mCRL2 allows defining custom data types as well as functions over these. This makes it suitable for modeling the data manipulations made by DIRAC's agents. By visualizing the state space and replaying scenarios with the toolkit's simulator, we have detected race-conditions and deadlocks in these systems, which, in several cases, were confirmed to occur in the reality. Several properties of interest were formulated and verified with the tool. Our future direction is automating the translation from DIRAC to a formal model.

  19. Developing ontological model of computational linear algebra - preliminary considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasielewska, K.; Ganzha, M.; Paprzycki, M.; Lirkov, I.

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a method for application of ontologically represented domain knowledge to support Grid users. The work is presented in the context provided by the Agents in Grid system, which aims at development of an agent-semantic infrastructure for efficient resource management in the Grid. Decision support within the system should provide functionality beyond the existing Grid middleware, specifically, help the user to choose optimal algorithm and/or resource to solve a problem from a given domain. The system assists the user in at least two situations. First, for users without in-depth knowledge about the domain, it should help them to select the method and the resource that (together) would best fit the problem to be solved (and match the available resources). Second, if the user explicitly indicates the method and the resource configuration, it should "verify" if her choice is consistent with the expert recommendations (encapsulated in the knowledge base). Furthermore, one of the goals is to simplify the use of the selected resource to execute the job; i.e., provide a user-friendly method of submitting jobs, without required technical knowledge about the Grid middleware. To achieve the mentioned goals, an adaptable method of expert knowledge representation for the decision support system has to be implemented. The selected approach is to utilize ontologies and semantic data processing, supported by multicriterial decision making. As a starting point, an area of computational linear algebra was selected to be modeled, however, the paper presents a general approach that shall be easily extendable to other domains.

  20. Study of Transitions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Explicit Algebraic Turbulence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazeroms, W. M. J.; Svensson, G.; Bazile, E.; Brethouwer, G.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We test a recently developed engineering turbulence model, a so-called explicit algebraic Reynolds-stress (EARS) model, in the context of the atmospheric boundary layer. First of all, we consider a stable boundary layer used as the well-known first test case from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS1). The model is shown to agree well with data from large-eddy simulations (LES), and this agreement is significantly better than for a standard operational scheme with a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy. Furthermore, we apply the model to a case with a (idealized) diurnal cycle and make a qualitative comparison with a simpler first-order model. Some interesting features of the model are highlighted, pertaining to its stronger foundation on physical principles. In particular, the use of more prognostic equations in the model is shown to give a more realistic dynamical behaviour. This qualitative study is the first step towards a more detailed comparison, for which additional LES data are needed.

  1. Study of Transitions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Explicit Algebraic Turbulence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazeroms, W. M. J.; Svensson, G.; Bazile, E.; Brethouwer, G.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    We test a recently developed engineering turbulence model, a so-called explicit algebraic Reynolds-stress (EARS) model, in the context of the atmospheric boundary layer. First of all, we consider a stable boundary layer used as the well-known first test case from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS1). The model is shown to agree well with data from large-eddy simulations (LES), and this agreement is significantly better than for a standard operational scheme with a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy. Furthermore, we apply the model to a case with a (idealized) diurnal cycle and make a qualitative comparison with a simpler first-order model. Some interesting features of the model are highlighted, pertaining to its stronger foundation on physical principles. In particular, the use of more prognostic equations in the model is shown to give a more realistic dynamical behaviour. This qualitative study is the first step towards a more detailed comparison, for which additional LES data are needed.

  2. Excel Spreadsheets for Algebra: Improving Mental Modeling for Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engerman, Jason; Rusek, Matthew; Clariana, Roy

    2014-01-01

    This experiment investigates the effectiveness of Excel spreadsheets in a high school algebra class. Students in the experiment group convincingly outperformed the control group on a post lesson assessment. The student responses, teacher observations involving Excel spreadsheet revealed that it operated as a mindtool, which formed the users'…

  3. From matrix models' topological expansion to topological string theories: counting surfaces with algebraic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orantin, N.

    2007-09-01

    The 2-matrix model has been introduced to study Ising model on random surfaces. Since then, the link between matrix models and combinatorics of discrete surfaces has strongly tightened. This manuscript aims to investigate these deep links and extend them beyond the matrix models, following my work's evolution. First, I take care to define properly the hermitian 2 matrix model which gives rise to generating functions of discrete surfaces equipped with a spin structure. Then, I show how to compute all the terms in the topological expansion of any observable by using algebraic geometry tools. They are obtained as differential forms on an algebraic curve associated to the model: the spectral curve. In a second part, I show how to define such differentials on any algebraic curve even if it does not come from a matrix model. I then study their numerous symmetry properties under deformations of the algebraic curve. In particular, I show that these objects coincide with the topological expansion of the observable of a matrix model if the algebraic curve is the spectral curve of this model. Finally, I show that fine tuning the parameters ensure that these objects can be promoted to modular invariants and satisfy the holomorphic anomaly equation of the Kodaira-Spencer theory. This gives a new hint that the Dijkgraaf-Vafa conjecture is correct.

  4. Improving model-based diagnosis through algebraic analysis: The Petri net challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Portinale, L.

    1996-12-31

    The present paper describes the empirical evaluation of a linear algebra approach to model-based diagnosis, in case the behavioral model of the device under examination is described through a Petri net model. In particular, we show that algebraic analysis based on P-invariants of the net model, can significantly improve the performance of a model-based diagnostic system, while keeping the integrity of a general framework defined from a formal logical theory. A system called INVADS is described and experimental results, performed on a car fault domain and involving the comparison of different implementations of P-invariant based diagnosis, are then discussed.

  5. Modelling for Feedback Control of Skin Friction Drag in Algebraic Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bryn; Kerrigan, Eric; Naguib, Ahmed; Morrison, Jonathan

    2008-11-01

    We address the following problem: given spanwise arrays of wall- mounted shear-stress sensors at upstream and downstream locations, obtain accurate estimates of the flow field above an array of actuators located between the sensors. The accuracy of these estimates is of crucial importance in the design of any closed-loop drag reduction controller. To achieve satisfactory estimates we employ feedback from the sensors in conjunction with a dynamic model, based on that of Luchini (2000), describing perturbation evolution within a laminar boundary layer. The novelty of this work lies in the derivation of a state-space model of sufficiently low order to enable Kalman filter synthesis. Rather than obtaining a reduced- order model via numerical methods such as balanced truncation (Zhou, Doyle, Glover; 1996), we employ a series of approximations based on the results of Andersson, Berggren et al. (1999), to derive a low-order model analytically. A Kalman filter is synthesised and tested on the algebraic growth region of the DNS of Zaki (2005). Despite the use of a low-order model and significant free-stream turbulence, the results demonstrate good performance of the filter.

  6. A novel evolutionary algorithm applied to algebraic modifications of the RANS stress-strain relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatheritt, Jack; Sandberg, Richard

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a novel and promising approach to turbulence model formulation, rather than putting forward a particular new model. Evolutionary computation has brought symbolic regression of scalar fields into the domain of algorithms and this paper describes a novel expansion of Gene Expression Programming for the purpose of tensor modeling. By utilizing high-fidelity data and uncertainty measures, mathematical models for tensors are created. The philosophy behind the framework is to give freedom to the algorithm to produce a constraint-free model; its own functional form that was not previously imposed. Turbulence modeling is the target application, specifically the improvement of separated flow prediction. Models are created by considering the anisotropy of the turbulent stress tensor and formulating non-linear constitutive stress-strain relationships. A previously unseen flow field is computed and compared to the baseline linear model and an established non-linear model of comparable complexity. The results are highly encouraging.

  7. The case of bruce: A teacher's model of his students' algebraic thinking about equivalent expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallagan, Jean E.

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a middle school mathematics teacher's model of his students' responses to algebraic tasks involving equivalent expressions and the distributive property. The teacher engaged in two model-eliciting activities designed for teachers by creating a library of his students' work and an accompanying "Ways of Thinking"[WOT] sheet (Doerr & Lesh, 2003). These activities were designed to help reveal the teachers' models of students' algebraic thinking and to promote the development of that model. Results of the analysis showed that the teacher developed a clearer understanding of the role of a variable in algebraic instruction. The teacher employed visual strategies for the first time and began to perceive their usefulness in helping students understand the equivalence of two expressions.

  8. Algebraic turbulence models for the computation of two-dimensional high speed flows using unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostand, Philippe

    1988-01-01

    The incorporation of algebraic turbulence models in a solver for the 2-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations using triangular grids is described. A practical way to use the Cebeci Smith model, and to modify it in separated regions is proposed. The ability of the model to predict high speed, perfect gas boundary layers is investigated from a numerical point of view.

  9. Designing Tasks for Math Modeling in College Algebra: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staats, Susan; Robertson, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, the pedagogical approach known as mathematical modeling has received increased interest in college algebra classes in the United States. Math modeling assignments ask students to develop their own problem-solving tools to address non-routine, realistic scenarios. The open-ended quality of modeling activities creates dilemmas…

  10. Supersymmetry and the discrete light-cone quantization limit of the Lie 3-algebra model of M theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Matsuo

    2012-02-01

    In M. Sato, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 07 (2010) 02610.1007/JHEP07(2010)026, we proposed two models of M theory, the Hermitian 3-algebra model and Lie 3-algebra model. In this paper, we study the Lie 3-algebra model with a Lorentzian Lie 3-algebra. This model is ghost-free despite the Lorentzian 3-algebra. We show that our model satisfies two criteria as a model of M theory. First, we show that the model possesses N=1 supersymmetry in 11 dimensions. Second, we show the model reduces to Banks-Fischler-Shenker-Susskind matrix theory with finite size matrices in a discrete light-cone quantization limit.

  11. AN ADA LINEAR ALGEBRA PACKAGE MODELED AFTER HAL/S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    This package extends the Ada programming language to include linear algebra capabilities similar to those of the HAL/S programming language. The package is designed for avionics applications such as Space Station flight software. In addition to the HAL/S built-in functions, the package incorporates the quaternion functions used in the Shuttle and Galileo projects, and routines from LINPAK that solve systems of equations involving general square matrices. Language conventions in this package follow those of HAL/S to the maximum extent practical and minimize the effort required for writing new avionics software and translating existent software into Ada. Valid numeric types in this package include scalar, vector, matrix, and quaternion declarations. (Quaternions are fourcomponent vectors used in representing motion between two coordinate frames). Single precision and double precision floating point arithmetic is available in addition to the standard double precision integer manipulation. Infix operators are used instead of function calls to define dot products, cross products, quaternion products, and mixed scalar-vector, scalar-matrix, and vector-matrix products. The package contains two generic programs: one for floating point, and one for integer. The actual component type is passed as a formal parameter to the generic linear algebra package. The procedures for solving systems of linear equations defined by general matrices include GEFA, GECO, GESL, and GIDI. The HAL/S functions include ABVAL, UNIT, TRACE, DET, INVERSE, TRANSPOSE, GET, PUT, FETCH, PLACE, and IDENTITY. This package is written in Ada (Version 1.2) for batch execution and is machine independent. The linear algebra software depends on nothing outside the Ada language except for a call to a square root function for floating point scalars (such as SQRT in the DEC VAX MATHLIB library). This program was developed in 1989, and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA.

  12. Mathematical modelling in engineering: an alternative way to teach Linear Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-García, S.; García-Planas, M. I.; Taberna, J.

    2016-10-01

    Technological advances require that basic science courses for engineering, including Linear Algebra, emphasize the development of mathematical strengths associated with modelling and interpretation of results, which are not limited only to calculus abilities. Based on this consideration, we have proposed a project-based learning, giving a dynamic classroom approach in which students modelled real-world problems and turn gain a deeper knowledge of the Linear Algebra subject. Considering that most students are digital natives, we use the e-portfolio as a tool of communication between students and teachers, besides being a good place making the work visible. In this article, we present an overview of the design and implementation of a project-based learning for a Linear Algebra course taught during the 2014-2015 at the 'ETSEIB'of Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC).

  13. A note on probabilistic models over strings: the linear algebra approach.

    PubMed

    Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    Probabilistic models over strings have played a key role in developing methods that take into consideration indels as phylogenetically informative events. There is an extensive literature on using automata and transducers on phylogenies to do inference on these probabilistic models, in which an important theoretical question is the complexity of computing the normalization of a class of string-valued graphical models. This question has been investigated using tools from combinatorics, dynamic programming, and graph theory, and has practical applications in Bayesian phylogenetics. In this work, we revisit this theoretical question from a different point of view, based on linear algebra. The main contribution is a set of results based on this linear algebra view that facilitate the analysis and design of inference algorithms on string-valued graphical models. As an illustration, we use this method to give a new elementary proof of a known result on the complexity of inference on the "TKF91" model, a well-known probabilistic model over strings. Compared to previous work, our proving method is easier to extend to other models, since it relies on a novel weak condition, triangular transducers, which is easy to establish in practice. The linear algebra view provides a concise way of describing transducer algorithms and their compositions, opens the possibility of transferring fast linear algebra libraries (for example, based on GPUs), as well as low rank matrix approximation methods, to string-valued inference problems. PMID:24135792

  14. A note on probabilistic models over strings: the linear algebra approach.

    PubMed

    Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre

    2013-12-01

    Probabilistic models over strings have played a key role in developing methods that take into consideration indels as phylogenetically informative events. There is an extensive literature on using automata and transducers on phylogenies to do inference on these probabilistic models, in which an important theoretical question is the complexity of computing the normalization of a class of string-valued graphical models. This question has been investigated using tools from combinatorics, dynamic programming, and graph theory, and has practical applications in Bayesian phylogenetics. In this work, we revisit this theoretical question from a different point of view, based on linear algebra. The main contribution is a set of results based on this linear algebra view that facilitate the analysis and design of inference algorithms on string-valued graphical models. As an illustration, we use this method to give a new elementary proof of a known result on the complexity of inference on the "TKF91" model, a well-known probabilistic model over strings. Compared to previous work, our proving method is easier to extend to other models, since it relies on a novel weak condition, triangular transducers, which is easy to establish in practice. The linear algebra view provides a concise way of describing transducer algorithms and their compositions, opens the possibility of transferring fast linear algebra libraries (for example, based on GPUs), as well as low rank matrix approximation methods, to string-valued inference problems.

  15. Graded Poisson-sigma models and dilaton-deformed 2D supergravity algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamin, Luzi; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2003-05-01

    Supergravity extensions of generic 2d gravity theories obtained from the graded Poisson-Sigma model (gPSM) approach show a large degree of ambiguity. On the other hand, obstructions may reduce the allowed range of fields as given by the bosonic theory, or even prohibit any extension in certain cases. In our present work we relate the finite W-algebras inherent in the gPSM algebra of constraints to supergravity algebras (Neuveu-Schwarz or Ramond algebras resp.), deformed by the presence of the dilaton field. With very straightforward and natural assumptions on them - like the one linking the anti-commutator of certain fermionic charges to the Hamiltonian constraint without deformation - we are able not only to remove the ambiguities but, at the same time, the singularities referred to above. Thus all especially interesting bosonic models (spherically reduced gravity, the Jackiw-Teitelboim model etc.) under these conditions possess a unique fermionic extension and are free from new singularities. The superspace supergravity model of Howe is found as a special case of this supergravity action. For this class of models the relation between bosonic potential and prepotential does not introduce obstructions as well.

  16. Using computer algebra and SMT-solvers to analyze a mathematical model of cholera propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo Arredondo, Mariana

    2014-06-01

    We analyze a mathematical model for the transmission of cholera. The model is already defined and involves variables such as the pathogen agent, which in this case is the bacterium Vibrio cholera, and the human population. The human population is divided into three classes: susceptible, infectious and removed. Using Computer Algebra, specifically Maple we obtain two equilibrium states: the disease free state and the endemic state. Using Maple it is possible to prove that the disease free state is locally asymptotically stable if and only if R0 < 1. Using Maple it is possible to prove that the endemic equilibrium state is locally stable when it exists, it is to say when R0 > 1. Using the package Red-Log of the Computer algebra system Reduce and the SMT-Solver Z3Py it is possible to obtain numerical conditions for the model. The formula for the basic reproductive number makes a synthesis with all epidemic parameters in the model. Also it is possible to make numerical simulations which are very illustrative about the epidemic patters that are expected to be observed in real situations. We claim that these kinds of software are very useful in the analysis of epidemic models given that the symbolic computation provides algebraic formulas for the basic reproductive number and such algebraic formulas are very useful to derive control measures. For other side, computer algebra software is a powerful tool to make the stability analysis for epidemic models given that the all steps in the stability analysis can be made automatically: finding the equilibrium points, computing the jacobian, computing the characteristic polynomial for the jacobian, and applying the Routh-Hurwitz theorem to the characteristic polynomial. Finally, using SMT-Solvers is possible to make automatically checks of satisfiability, validity and quantifiers elimination being these computations very useful to analyse complicated epidemic models.

  17. Existence of standard models of conic fibrations over non-algebraically-closed fields

    SciTech Connect

    Avilov, A A

    2014-12-31

    We prove an analogue of Sarkisov's theorem on the existence of a standard model of a conic fibration over an algebraically closed field of characteristic different from two for three-dimensional conic fibrations over an arbitrary field of characteristic zero with an action of a finite group. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  18. Mathematical Modelling in Engineering: An Alternative Way to Teach Linear Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domínguez-García, S.; García-Planas, M. I.; Taberna, J.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances require that basic science courses for engineering, including Linear Algebra, emphasize the development of mathematical strengths associated with modelling and interpretation of results, which are not limited only to calculus abilities. Based on this consideration, we have proposed a project-based learning, giving a dynamic…

  19. Gup-Based and Snyder Noncommutative Algebras, Relativistic Particle Models, Deformed Symmetries and Interaction: a Unified Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Souvik; Ghosh, Subir

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a unified scheme for studying noncommutative algebras based on generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) and Snyder form in a relativistically covariant point particle Lagrangian (or symplectic) framework. Even though the GUP-based algebra and Snyder algebra are very distinct, the more involved latter algebra emerges from an approximation of the Lagrangian model of the former algebra. Deformed Poincaré generators for the systems that keep space-time symmetries of the relativistic particle models have been studied thoroughly. From a purely constrained dynamical analysis perspective the models studied here are very rich and provide insights on how to consistently construct approximate models from the exact ones when nonlinear constraints are present in the system. We also study dynamics of the GUP particle in presence of external electromagnetic field.

  20. Gup-Based and Snyder Noncommutative Algebras, Relativistic Particle Models, Deformed Symmetries and Interaction: a Unified Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Souvik; Ghosh, Subir

    2013-10-01

    We have developed a unified scheme for studying noncommutative algebras based on generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) and Snyder form in a relativistically covariant point particle Lagrangian (or symplectic) framework. Even though the GUP-based algebra and Snyder algebra are very distinct, the more involved latter algebra emerges from an approximation of the Lagrangian model of the former algebra. Deformed Poincaré generators for the systems that keep space-time symmetries of the relativistic particle models have been studied thoroughly. From a purely constrained dynamical analysis perspective the models studied here are very rich and provide insights on how to consistently construct approximate models from the exact ones when nonlinear constraints are present in the system. We also study dynamics of the GUP particle in presence of external electromagnetic field.

  1. CSOS models descending from chiral Potts models: degeneracy of the eigenspace and loop algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au-Yang, Helen; Perk, Jacques H. H.

    2016-04-01

    Monodromy matrices of the {{\\boldsymbol{τ }}}2\\phantom{^{\\prime }} model are known to satisfy a Yang-Baxter equation with a six-vertex R-matrix as the intertwiner. The commutation relations of the elements of the monodromy matrices are completely determined by this R-matrix. We show the reason why in the superintegrable case the eigenspace is degenerate, but not in the general case. We then show that the eigenspaces of special CSOS models descending from the chiral Potts model are also degenerate. The existence of an L({{sl}}2) quantum loop algebra (or subalgebra) in these models is established by showing that the Serre relations hold for the generators. The highest weight polynomial (or the Drinfeld polynomial) of the representation is obtained by using the method of Baxter for the superintegrable case. As a byproduct, the eigenvalues of all such CSOS models are given explicitly.

  2. Teaching Algebra without Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Algebra is, among other things, a shorthand way to express quantitative reasoning. This article illustrates ways for the classroom teacher to convert algebraic solutions to verbal problems into conversational solutions that can be understood by students in the lower grades. Three reasonably typical verbal problems that either appeared as or…

  3. Stress inoculation modeled in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brockhurst, J; Cheleuitte-Nieves, C; Buckmaster, C L; Schatzberg, A F; Lyons, D M

    2015-01-01

    Stress inoculation entails intermittent exposure to mildly stressful situations that present opportunities to learn, practice and improve coping in the context of exposure psychotherapies and resiliency training. Here we investigate behavioral and hormonal aspects of stress inoculation modeled in mice. Mice randomized to stress inoculation or a control treatment condition were assessed for corticosterone stress hormone responses and behavior during open-field, object-exploration and tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation training sessions that acutely increased plasma levels of corticosterone diminished subsequent immobility as a measure of behavioral despair on tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation also decreased subsequent freezing in the open field despite comparable levels of thigmotaxis in mice from both treatment conditions. Stress inoculation subsequently decreased novel-object exploration latencies and reduced corticosterone responses to repeated restraint. These results demonstrate that stress inoculation acutely stimulates glucocorticoid signaling and then enhances subsequent indications of active coping behavior in mice. Unlike mouse models that screen for the absence of vulnerability to stress or presence of traits that occur in resilient individuals, stress inoculation training reflects an experience-dependent learning-like process that resembles interventions designed to build resilience in humans. Mouse models of stress inoculation may provide novel insights for new preventive strategies or therapeutic treatments of human psychiatric disorders that are triggered and exacerbated by stressful life events. PMID:25826112

  4. Petri nets modeling and analysis using extended bag-theoretic relational algebra.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y C; Kim, T G

    1996-01-01

    Petri nets are a powerful modeling tool for studying reactive, concurrent systems. Analysis of the nets can reveal important information concerning the behavior of a modeled system. While various means for the analysis of the nets has been developed, a major limitation in the analysis, is explosion of large states space in simulation. An efficient method to manage large states space would overcome such a limitation. This paper proposes a framework for the modeling and analysis of Petri nets using relational database technologies. Formalism of the framework is based on a bag-theoretic relational algebra extended from the conventional, Within the framework, Petri nets are formalized by bag relations, and analysis algorithms are developed based on such formal relations. Properties associated with the nets are formalized by queries described in terms of the bag-theoretic relational algebra. The framework has been realized in a commercial relational database system using a standard SQL.

  5. Entanglement in a model for Hawking radiation: An application of quadratic algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Bambah, Bindu A.; Mukku, C.; Shreecharan, T.; Siva Prasad, K.

    2013-03-15

    Quadratic polynomially deformed su(1,1) and su(2) algebras are utilized in model Hamiltonians to show how the gravitational system consisting of a black hole, infalling radiation and outgoing (Hawking) radiation can be solved exactly. The models allow us to study the long-time behaviour of the black hole and its outgoing modes. In particular, we calculate the bipartite entanglement entropies of subsystems consisting of (a) infalling plus outgoing modes and (b) black hole modes plus the infalling modes, using the Janus-faced nature of the model. The long-time behaviour also gives us glimpses of modifications in the character of Hawking radiation. Finally, we study the phenomenon of superradiance in our model in analogy with atomic Dicke superradiance. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine a toy model for Hawking radiation with quantized black hole modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use quadratic polynomially deformed su(1,1) algebras to study its entanglement properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the 'Dicke Superradiance' in black hole radiation using quadratically deformed su(2) algebras. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the modification of the thermal character of Hawking radiation due to quantized black hole modes.

  6. Integrating programming features with an algebraic modeling language for optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fourer, R.; Gay, D.

    1994-12-31

    In describing optimization models to a computer, programming is best avoided. In using models as part of a larger scheme, however, programs must be written to specify how information is passed between models. We describe a programming environment for this purpose that has been integrated with the AMPL modeling language.

  7. Intelligently deciphering unintelligible designs: algorithmic algebraic model checking in systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Bud

    2009-01-01

    Systems biology, as a subject, has captured the imagination of both biologists and systems scientists alike. But what is it? This review provides one researcher's somewhat idiosyncratic view of the subject, but also aims to persuade young scientists to examine the possible evolution of this subject in a rich historical context. In particular, one may wish to read this review to envision a subject built out of a consilience of many interesting concepts from systems sciences, logic and model theory, and algebra, culminating in novel tools, techniques and theories that can reveal deep principles in biology—seen beyond mere observations. A particular focus in this review is on approaches embedded in an embryonic program, dubbed ‘algorithmic algebraic model checking’, and its powers and limitations. PMID:19364723

  8. Construction of linear models: A framework based on commutative Jordan algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covas, R.; Carvalho, F.

    2016-06-01

    We show how to obtain the necessary structures for statistical analysis of the folllowing orthogonal models Y˜(1 μ +∑i Xiβi ,∑j σj2Mj+σ2I ) . These structures rely on the existence of Jordan algebras, in the sequence of [24], [8], [12], [9], [5] and [10].

  9. On the Gaudin model associated to Lie algebras of classical types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kang; Mukhin, E.; Varchenko, A.

    2016-10-01

    We derive explicit formulas for solutions of the Bethe ansatz equations of the Gaudin model associated to the tensor product of one arbitrary finite-dimensional irreducible module and one vector representation for all simple Lie algebras of classical type. We use this result to show that the Bethe ansatz is complete in any tensor product where all but one factor are vector representations and the evaluation parameters are generic.

  10. ADAM: Analysis of Discrete Models of Biological Systems Using Computer Algebra

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many biological systems are modeled qualitatively with discrete models, such as probabilistic Boolean networks, logical models, Petri nets, and agent-based models, to gain a better understanding of them. The computational complexity to analyze the complete dynamics of these models grows exponentially in the number of variables, which impedes working with complex models. There exist software tools to analyze discrete models, but they either lack the algorithmic functionality to analyze complex models deterministically or they are inaccessible to many users as they require understanding the underlying algorithm and implementation, do not have a graphical user interface, or are hard to install. Efficient analysis methods that are accessible to modelers and easy to use are needed. Results We propose a method for efficiently identifying attractors and introduce the web-based tool Analysis of Dynamic Algebraic Models (ADAM), which provides this and other analysis methods for discrete models. ADAM converts several discrete model types automatically into polynomial dynamical systems and analyzes their dynamics using tools from computer algebra. Specifically, we propose a method to identify attractors of a discrete model that is equivalent to solving a system of polynomial equations, a long-studied problem in computer algebra. Based on extensive experimentation with both discrete models arising in systems biology and randomly generated networks, we found that the algebraic algorithms presented in this manuscript are fast for systems with the structure maintained by most biological systems, namely sparseness and robustness. For a large set of published complex discrete models, ADAM identified the attractors in less than one second. Conclusions Discrete modeling techniques are a useful tool for analyzing complex biological systems and there is a need in the biological community for accessible efficient analysis tools. ADAM provides analysis methods based on

  11. Closure of the algebra of constraints for a nonprojectable Horava model

    SciTech Connect

    Bellorin, Jorge; Restuccia, Alvaro

    2011-02-15

    We perform the Hamiltonian analysis for a nonprojectable Horava model whose potential is composed of R and R{sup 2} terms. We show that Dirac's algorithm for the preservation of the constraints can be done in a closed way, hence the algebra of constraints for this model is consistent. The model has an extra, odd, scalar mode whose decoupling limit can be seen in a linear-order perturbative analysis on weakly varying backgrounds. Although our results for this model point in favor of the consistency of the Horava theory, the validity of the full nonprojectable theory still remains unanswered.

  12. A deformation of quantum affine algebra in squashed Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten models

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Io; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2014-06-01

    We proceed to study infinite-dimensional symmetries in two-dimensional squashed Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten models at the classical level. The target space is given by squashed S³ and the isometry is SU(2){sub L}×U(1){sub R}. It is known that SU(2){sub L} is enhanced to a couple of Yangians. We reveal here that an infinite-dimensional extension of U(1){sub R} is a deformation of quantum affine algebra, where a new deformation parameter is provided with the coefficient of the Wess-Zumino term. Then we consider the relation between the deformed quantum affine algebra and the pair of Yangians from the viewpoint of the left-right duality of monodromy matrices. The integrable structure is also discussed by computing the r/s-matrices that satisfy the extended classical Yang-Baxter equation. Finally, two degenerate limits are discussed.

  13. Teaching Algebra and Geometry Concepts by Modeling Telescope Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Lauren M.; Dickinson, Gail; Hooper, Eric J.; Daniels, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This article describes preparation and delivery of high school mathematics lessons that integrate mathematics and astronomy through The Geometer's Sketchpad models, traditional proof, and inquiry-based activities. The lessons were created by a University of Texas UTeach preservice teacher as part of a project-based field experience in which high…

  14. The addition of algebraic turbulence modeling to program LAURA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheatwood, F. Mcneil; Thompson, R. A.

    1993-04-01

    The Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) is modified to allow the calculation of turbulent flows. This is accomplished using the Cebeci-Smith and Baldwin-Lomax eddy-viscosity models in conjunction with the thin-layer Navier-Stokes options of the program. Turbulent calculations can be performed for both perfect-gas and equilibrium flows. However, a requirement of the models is that the flow be attached. It is seen that for slender bodies, adequate resolution of the boundary-layer gradients may require more cells in the normal direction than a laminar solution, even when grid stretching is employed. Results for axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows are presented. Comparison with experimental data and other numerical results reveal generally good agreement, except in the regions of detached flow.

  15. Algebraic approach to the projected deformed oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asherova, R. M.; Smirnov, Yu. F.; Tolstoy, V. N.; Shustov, A. P.

    1981-03-01

    A new method of calculation in terms of the projected deformed oscillator model is proposed. The method involves expansion of its wave functions in terms of the wave functions of an isotropic oscillator potential. Only overlap integrals between projected wave functions and reduced probabilities B(E2) of E2 transitions are examined. B(E2) values are expressed as a series containing the corresponding values of the Elliott SU(3) scheme. The convergence of these expansions is shown to be fairly good. The expectation values of operators ( QQ) and ( QQQ), which characterize the effective internal non-sphericity and non-axiality of the nucleus, are also calculated and discussed.

  16. A Model of Teacher Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyriacou, Chris; Sutcliffe, John

    1978-01-01

    A definition and model of teacher stress is presented which conceptualizes teacher stress as a response syndrome (anger or depression) mediated by (1) an appraisal of threat to the teacher's self-esteem or well-being and (2) coping mechanisms activated to reduce the perceived threat. (Author)

  17. Sensitivity analysis and model reduction of nonlinear differential-algebraic systems. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, L.R.; Rosen, J.B.

    1997-12-30

    Differential-algebraic equations arise in a wide variety of engineering and scientific problems. Relatively little work has been done regarding sensitivity analysis and model reduction for this class of problems. Efficient methods for sensitivity analysis are required in model development and as an intermediate step in design optimization of engineering processes. Reduced order models are needed for modelling complex physical phenomena like turbulent reacting flows, where it is not feasible to use a fully-detailed model. The objective of this work has been to develop numerical methods and software for sensitivity analysis and model reduction of nonlinear differential-algebraic systems, including large-scale systems. In collaboration with Peter Brown and Alan Hindmarsh of LLNL, the authors developed an algorithm for finding consistent initial conditions for several widely occurring classes of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs). The new algorithm is much more robust than the previous algorithm. It is also very easy to use, having been designed to require almost no information about the differential equation, Jacobian matrix, etc. in addition to what is already needed to take the subsequent time steps. The new algorithm has been implemented in a version of the software for solution of large-scale DAEs, DASPK, which has been made available on the internet. The new methods and software have been used to solve a Tokamak edge plasma problem at LLNL which could not be solved with the previous methods and software because of difficulties in finding consistent initial conditions. The capability of finding consistent initial values is also needed for the sensitivity and optimization efforts described in this paper.

  18. Steady state analysis of Boolean molecular network models via model reduction and computational algebra

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A key problem in the analysis of mathematical models of molecular networks is the determination of their steady states. The present paper addresses this problem for Boolean network models, an increasingly popular modeling paradigm for networks lacking detailed kinetic information. For small models, the problem can be solved by exhaustive enumeration of all state transitions. But for larger models this is not feasible, since the size of the phase space grows exponentially with the dimension of the network. The dimension of published models is growing to over 100, so that efficient methods for steady state determination are essential. Several methods have been proposed for large networks, some of them heuristic. While these methods represent a substantial improvement in scalability over exhaustive enumeration, the problem for large networks is still unsolved in general. Results This paper presents an algorithm that consists of two main parts. The first is a graph theoretic reduction of the wiring diagram of the network, while preserving all information about steady states. The second part formulates the determination of all steady states of a Boolean network as a problem of finding all solutions to a system of polynomial equations over the finite number system with two elements. This problem can be solved with existing computer algebra software. This algorithm compares favorably with several existing algorithms for steady state determination. One advantage is that it is not heuristic or reliant on sampling, but rather determines algorithmically and exactly all steady states of a Boolean network. The code for the algorithm, as well as the test suite of benchmark networks, is available upon request from the corresponding author. Conclusions The algorithm presented in this paper reliably determines all steady states of sparse Boolean networks with up to 1000 nodes. The algorithm is effective at analyzing virtually all published models even those of moderate

  19. Generalized model of double random phase encoding based on linear algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Kazuya; Takeda, Masafumi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    We propose a generalized model for double random phase encoding (DRPE) based on linear algebra. We defined the DRPE procedure in six steps. The first three steps form an encryption procedure, while the later three steps make up a decryption procedure. We noted that the first (mapping) and second (transform) steps can be generalized. As an example of this generalization, we used 3D mapping and a transform matrix, which is a combination of a discrete cosine transform and two permutation matrices. Finally, we investigated the sensitivity of the proposed model to errors in the decryption key.

  20. Using process algebra to develop predator-prey models of within-host parasite dynamics.

    PubMed

    McCaig, Chris; Fenton, Andy; Graham, Andrea; Shankland, Carron; Norman, Rachel

    2013-07-21

    As a first approximation of immune-mediated within-host parasite dynamics we can consider the immune response as a predator, with the parasite as its prey. In the ecological literature of predator-prey interactions there are a number of different functional responses used to describe how a predator reproduces in response to consuming prey. Until recently most of the models of the immune system that have taken a predator-prey approach have used simple mass action dynamics to capture the interaction between the immune response and the parasite. More recently Fenton and Perkins (2010) employed three of the most commonly used prey-dependent functional response terms from the ecological literature. In this paper we make use of a technique from computing science, process algebra, to develop mathematical models. The novelty of the process algebra approach is to allow stochastic models of the population (parasite and immune cells) to be developed from rules of individual cell behaviour. By using this approach in which individual cellular behaviour is captured we have derived a ratio-dependent response similar to that seen in the previous models of immune-mediated parasite dynamics, confirming that, whilst this type of term is controversial in ecological predator-prey models, it is appropriate for models of the immune system.

  1. A computer code for calculations in the algebraic collective model of the atomic nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, T. A.; Rowe, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    A Maple code is presented for algebraic collective model (ACM) calculations. The ACM is an algebraic version of the Bohr model of the atomic nucleus, in which all required matrix elements are derived by exploiting the model's SU(1 , 1) × SO(5) dynamical group. This paper reviews the mathematical formulation of the ACM, and serves as a manual for the code. The code enables a wide range of model Hamiltonians to be analysed. This range includes essentially all Hamiltonians that are rational functions of the model's quadrupole moments qˆM and are at most quadratic in the corresponding conjugate momenta πˆN (- 2 ≤ M , N ≤ 2). The code makes use of expressions for matrix elements derived elsewhere and newly derived matrix elements of the operators [ π ˆ ⊗ q ˆ ⊗ π ˆ ] 0 and [ π ˆ ⊗ π ˆ ] LM. The code is made efficient by use of an analytical expression for the needed SO(5)-reduced matrix elements, and use of SO(5) ⊃ SO(3)  Clebsch-Gordan coefficients obtained from precomputed data files provided with the code.

  2. A computer code for calculations in the algebraic collective model of the atomic nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, T. A.; Rowe, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    A Maple code is presented for algebraic collective model (ACM) calculations. The ACM is an algebraic version of the Bohr model of the atomic nucleus, in which all required matrix elements are derived by exploiting the model's SU(1 , 1) × SO(5) dynamical group. This paper reviews the mathematical formulation of the ACM, and serves as a manual for the code. The code enables a wide range of model Hamiltonians to be analysed. This range includes essentially all Hamiltonians that are rational functions of the model's quadrupole moments qˆM and are at most quadratic in the corresponding conjugate momenta πˆN (- 2 ≤ M , N ≤ 2). The code makes use of expressions for matrix elements derived elsewhere and newly derived matrix elements of the operators [ π ˆ ⊗ q ˆ ⊗ π ˆ ] 0 and [ π ˆ ⊗ π ˆ ] LM. The code is made efficient by use of an analytical expression for the needed SO(5)-reduced matrix elements, and use of SO(5) ⊃ SO(3) Clebsch-Gordan coefficients obtained from precomputed data files provided with the code.

  3. Algebraic Bethe ansatz for the XXX chain with triangular boundaries and Gaudin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirilo António, N.; Manojlović, N.; Salom, I.

    2014-12-01

    We implement fully the algebraic Bethe ansatz for the XXX Heisenberg spin chain in the case when both boundary matrices can be brought to the upper-triangular form. We define the Bethe vectors which yield the strikingly simple expression for the off shell action of the transfer matrix, deriving the spectrum and the relevant Bethe equations. We explore further these results by obtaining the off shell action of the generating function of the Gaudin Hamiltonians on the corresponding Bethe vectors through the so-called quasi-classical limit. Moreover, this action is as simple as it could possibly be, yielding the spectrum and the Bethe equations of the Gaudin model.

  4. Fast and accurate computation of system matrix for area integral model-based algebraic reconstruction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shunli; Zhang, Dinghua; Gong, Hao; Ghasemalizadeh, Omid; Wang, Ge; Cao, Guohua

    2014-11-01

    Iterative algorithms, such as the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART), are popular for image reconstruction. For iterative reconstruction, the area integral model (AIM) is more accurate for better reconstruction quality than the line integral model (LIM). However, the computation of the system matrix for AIM is more complex and time-consuming than that for LIM. Here, we propose a fast and accurate method to compute the system matrix for AIM. First, we calculate the intersection of each boundary line of a narrow fan-beam with pixels in a recursive and efficient manner. Then, by grouping the beam-pixel intersection area into six types according to the slopes of the two boundary lines, we analytically compute the intersection area of the narrow fan-beam with the pixels in a simple algebraic fashion. Overall, experimental results show that our method is about three times faster than the Siddon algorithm and about two times faster than the distance-driven model (DDM) in computation of the system matrix. The reconstruction speed of our AIM-based ART is also faster than the LIM-based ART that uses the Siddon algorithm and DDM-based ART, for one iteration. The fast reconstruction speed of our method was accomplished without compromising the image quality.

  5. Algebraic turbulence models for the computation of two-dimensional high-speed flows using unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostand, Philippe

    1989-01-01

    The incorporation of algebraic turbulence models in a solver for the 2-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations using triangular grids is described. A practial way to use the Cebeci Smith model, and to modify it in separated regions is proposed. The ability of the model to predict high speed, perfect gas boundary layers is investigated from a numerical point of view.

  6. Computer Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavelle, Richard; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the nature and use of computer algebra and its applications to various physical sciences. Includes diagrams illustrating, among others, a computer algebra system and flow chart of operation of the Euclidean algorithm. (SK)

  7. Improvement of the second- and third-moment modeling of turbulence: A study of Reynolds-stress closure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.; Goel, P.

    1986-01-01

    Four parts of the Reynolds-stress closure modeling are reported: (1) improvement of the k and epsilon equaitons; (2) development of the third-moment transport equation; (3) formulation of the diffusion coefficient of the momentum equation by using the algebraic-stress model of turbulence; and (4) the application of the Reynolds-stress model to a heat exchanger problem. It was demonstrated that the third-moment transport model improved the prediction of the triple-velocity products in the recirculating and reattaching flow regions in comparison with the existing algebraic models for the triple-velocity products. Optimum values for empirical coefficients are obtained for the prediction of the backward-facing step flows. A functional expression is derived for the coefficient of the momentum diffusion by employing the algebraic-stress model. The second-moment closure is applied to a heat transfer problem. The computations for the flow in a corrugated-wall channel show that the second-moment closure improves the prediction of the heat transfer rates by 30% over the k - epsilon model.

  8. Differential algebraic methods for space charge modeling and applications to the University of Maryland Electron Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, Edward W.

    2011-12-01

    The future of particle accelerators is moving towards the intensity frontier; the need to place more particles into a smaller space is a common requirement of nearly all applications of particle accelerators. Putting large numbers of particles in a small space means that the mutual repulsion of these charged particles becomes a significant factor, this effect is called space charge. In this work we develop a series of differential algebra based methods to simulate the effects of space charge in particle accelerators. These methods were used to model the University of Maryland Electron Ring, a small 3.8 meter diameter 10 KeV electron storage ring designed to observe the effects of space charge in a safe, cost effective manner. The methods developed here are designed to not only simulate the effects of space charge on the motions of the test particles in the system but to add their effects to the transfer map of the system. Once they have been added useful information about the beam, such as tune shifts and chromaticities, can be extracted directly from the map. In order to make the simulation self consistent, the statistical moments of the distribution are used to create a self consistent Taylor series representing the distribution function, which is combined with pre-stored integrals solved using a Duffy transformation to find the potential. This method can not only find the map of the system, but also advance the particles under most conditions. For conditions where it cannot be used to accurately advance the particles a differential algebra based fast multipole method is implemented. By using differential algebras to create local expansions, noticeable time savings are found.

  9. ηc elastic and transition form factors: Contact interaction and algebraic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedolla, Marco A.; Raya, Khépani; Cobos-Martínez, J. J.; Bashir, Adnan

    2016-05-01

    For the flavor-singlet heavy-quark system of charmonia in the pseudoscalar [ηc(1 S ) ] channel, we calculate the elastic (EFF) and transition form factors (TFFs) [ηc(1 S )→γ γ* ] for a wide range of photon momentum transfer squared (Q2). The framework for this analysis is provided by a symmetry-preserving Schwinger-Dyson equation and Bethe-Salpeter equation treatment of a vector×vector contact interaction. We also employ an algebraic model, developed earlier to describe the light-quark systems. It correctly correlates infrared and ultraviolet dynamics of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The contact interaction results agree with the lattice data for low Q2. For Q2≥Q02 , the results start deviating from the lattice results by more than 20%. Q02≈2.5 GeV2 for the EFF, and ≈25 GeV2 for the TFF. We also present the results for the EFF, TFF, and ηc(1 S ) parton distribution amplitude for the algebraic model. Wherever the comparison is possible, these results are in excellent agreement with the lattice, perturbative QCD, results obtained through a Schwinger-Dyson equation-Bethe-Salpeter equation study, employing refined truncations, and the experimental findings of the BABAR experiment.

  10. Multiobjective algebraic synthesis of neural control systems by implicit model following.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia

    2009-03-01

    The advantages brought about by using classical linear control theory in conjunction with neural approximators have long been recognized in the literature. In particular, using linear controllers to obtain the starting neural control design has been shown to be a key step for the successful development and implementation of adaptive-critic neural controllers. Despite their adaptive capabilities, neural controllers are often criticized for not providing the same performance and stability guarantees as classical linear designs. Therefore, this paper develops an algebraic synthesis procedure for designing dynamic output-feedback neural controllers that are closed-loop stable and meet the same performance objectives as any classical linear design. The performance synthesis problem is addressed by deriving implicit model-following algebraic relationships between model matrices, obtained from the classical design, and the neural control parameters. Additional linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) conditions for closed-loop exponential stability of the neural controller are derived using existing integral quadratic constraints (IQCs) for operators with repeated slope-restricted nonlinearities. The approach is demonstrated by designing a recurrent neural network controller for a highly maneuverable tailfin-controlled missile that meets multiple design objectives, including pole placement for transient tuning, H(infinity) and H(2) performance in the presence of parameter uncertainty, and command-input tracking. PMID:19203887

  11. Algebraic solutions for two-level pairing model in IBM-2 and IVBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalili-Majarshin, A.; Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Fouladi, N.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper the affine SU(1,1) approach is applied to numerically solve two pairing problems. A dynamical symmetry limit of the two-fluid interacting boson model-2 (IBM-2) and of the interacting vector boson model (IVBM) defined through the chains U_{π}(6) ⊗ U_{ν}(6) supset SO_{π}(5)⊗ SO_{ν}(5) supset SO_{π}(3) ⊗ SO_{ν}(3) supset SO(3) and U(6) supset U_{π}(3) ⊗ U_{ν}(3) supset SO_{π}(3) ⊗ SO_{ν}(3) supset SO(3) are introduced, respectively. The quantum phase transition between spherical and γ-soft shapes in medium-mass nuclei is analyzed using U(5) leftrightarrow SO(6) transitional nuclei in IBM-2 and one case U_{π}(3) ⊗ U_{ν}(3) leftrightarrow SO(6) transitional nuclei in IVBM found by using an infinite dimensional algebraic method based on affine SU(1,1) Lie algebra. The calculated energy spectra, energy ratio and energy staggering of Mo isotopes are compared with experimental results. The interplay between phase transitions and configuration mixing of intruder excitations between spherical vibrations and the γ-soft shapes in Mo isotopes is succinctly addressed and displays fingerprints of the transitional dynamical symmetry E(5).

  12. A rigorous approach to investigating common assumptions about disease transmission: Process algebra as an emerging modelling methodology for epidemiology.

    PubMed

    McCaig, Chris; Begon, Mike; Norman, Rachel; Shankland, Carron

    2011-03-01

    Changing scale, for example, the ability to move seamlessly from an individual-based model to a population-based model, is an important problem in many fields. In this paper, we introduce process algebra as a novel solution to this problem in the context of models of infectious disease spread. Process algebra allows us to describe a system in terms of the stochastic behaviour of individuals, and is a technique from computer science. We review the use of process algebra in biological systems, and the variety of quantitative and qualitative analysis techniques available. The analysis illustrated here solves the changing scale problem: from the individual behaviour we can rigorously derive equations to describe the mean behaviour of the system at the level of the population. The biological problem investigated is the transmission of infection, and how this relates to individual interactions.

  13. Modeling waves and wind stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donelan, M. A.; Curcic, M.; Chen, S. S.; Magnusson, A. K.

    2012-11-01

    A model for wave and wind stress prediction is constructed. The source functions that drive the space-time evolution of the energy spectra are developed in form based on theory and laboratory and field experiments. The calibration factors (proportionality constants of the source functions) are determined from a comparison of modeled and observed significant height and mean period. The observations are for the month of January 2005 and are derived from an array of laser range finders mounted on a bridge between two platforms in the Ekofisk oil field in the North Sea. The model calculates the form stress on the waves and adds it vectorially to the sheltering-modified skin stress. The resulting drag coefficient versus wind speed is shown to have the observed structure: low in light winds, increasing in moderate winds, and increasing more slowly in very strong winds. Modeled spectral shapes in the four quadrants of Hurricane Bonnie (1998) match the Scanning Radar Altimeter measurements. Modeled spectral properties in Hurricane Ike (2008) are compared against NDBC buoy estimates with good results. Drag coefficients in the mixed seas produced by hurricanes show dependence on wave age of the wind sea, swell propagation direction, and water depth. The need for wave and stress modeling for atmosphere-ocean coupling is emphasized. The new wave model has all the necessary attributes to be the basis for such a coupler.

  14. Algebraic surface design and finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the techniques are summarized which are used in constructing C sup 0 and C sup 1 continuous meshes of low degree, implicitly defined, algebraic surface patches in three dimensional space. These meshes of low degree algebraic surface patches are used to construct accurate computer models of physical objects. These meshes are also used in the finite element simulation of physical phenomena (e.g., heat dissipation, stress/strain distributions, fluid flow characteristics) required in the computer prototyping of both the manufacturability and functionality of the geometric design.

  15. A possible framework of the Lipkin model obeying the SU(n) algebra in arbitrary fermion number. I: The SU(2) algebras extended from the conventional fermion pair and determination of the minimum weight states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; Providência, Constança; Providência, João da; Yamamura, Masatoshi

    2016-08-01

    The minimum weight states of the Lipkin model consisting of n single-particle levels and obeying the SU(n) algebra are investigated systematically. The basic idea is to use the SU(2) algebra, which is independent of the SU(n) algebra. This idea has already been presented by the present authors in the case of the conventional Lipkin model consisting of two single-particle levels and obeying the SU(2) algebra. If this idea is followed, the minimum weight states are determined for any fermion number appropriately occupying n single-particle levels. Naturally, the conventional minimum weight state is included: all fermions occupy energetically the lowest single-particle level in the absence of interaction. The cases n=2, 3, 4, and 5 are discussed in some detail.

  16. "We Want a Statement That Is Always True": Criteria for Good Algebraic Representations and the Development of Modeling Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izsak, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Presents a case study in which two 8th grade students developed knowledge for modeling a physical device called a winch. Demonstrates that students have and can use criteria for evaluating algebraic representations. Explains how students can develop modeling knowledge by coordinating criteria with knowledge for generating and using algebraic…

  17. Comparing Cognitive Models of Domain Mastery and Task Performance in Algebra: Validity Evidence for a State Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Zachary B.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared an expert-based cognitive model of domain mastery with student-based cognitive models of task performance for Integrated Algebra. Interpretations of student test results are limited by experts' hypotheses of how students interact with the items. In reality, the cognitive processes that students use to solve each item may be…

  18. Thermoregulatory modeling for cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Tikuisis, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Modeling for cold stress has generated a rich history of innovation, has exerted a catalytic influence on cold physiology research, and continues to impact human activity in cold environments. This overview begins with a brief summation of cold thermoregulatory model development followed by key principles that will continue to guide current and future model development. Different representations of the human body are discussed relative to the level of detail and prediction accuracy required. In addition to predictions of shivering and vasomotor responses to cold exposure, algorithms are presented for thermoregulatory mechanisms. Various avenues of heat exchange between the human body and a cold environment are reviewed. Applications of cold thermoregulatory modeling range from investigative interpretation of physiological observations to forecasting skin freezing times and hypothermia survival times. While these advances have been remarkable, the future of cold stress modeling is still faced with significant challenges that are summarized at the end of this overview. PMID:24944030

  19. Thermoregulatory modeling for cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Tikuisis, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Modeling for cold stress has generated a rich history of innovation, has exerted a catalytic influence on cold physiology research, and continues to impact human activity in cold environments. This overview begins with a brief summation of cold thermoregulatory model development followed by key principles that will continue to guide current and future model development. Different representations of the human body are discussed relative to the level of detail and prediction accuracy required. In addition to predictions of shivering and vasomotor responses to cold exposure, algorithms are presented for thermoregulatory mechanisms. Various avenues of heat exchange between the human body and a cold environment are reviewed. Applications of cold thermoregulatory modeling range from investigative interpretation of physiological observations to forecasting skin freezing times and hypothermia survival times. While these advances have been remarkable, the future of cold stress modeling is still faced with significant challenges that are summarized at the end of this overview.

  20. Constructing a coherent problem model to facilitate algebra problem solving in a chemistry context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiong Ngu, Bing; Seeshing Yeung, Alexander; Phan, Huy P.

    2015-04-01

    An experiment using a sample of 11th graders compared text editing and worked examples approaches in learning to solve dilution and molarity algebra word problems in a chemistry context. Text editing requires students to assess the structure of a word problem by specifying whether the problem text contains sufficient, missing, or irrelevant information for reaching a solution. Worked examples direct students to follow steps toward the solution, and its emphasis is on computation instead of the formation of a coherent problem model. Text editing yielded higher scores in a transfer test (which shared the same solution procedure as in the acquisition problems but differed in contexts), but not a similar test (which resembled acquisition problems in terms of both solution procedure and context). Results provide some theoretical support and practical implications for using text editing to develop a coherent problem model to facilitate problem-solving skills in chemistry.

  1. Conceptual explanation for the algebra in the noncommutative approach to the standard model.

    PubMed

    Chamseddine, Ali H; Connes, Alain

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this Letter is to remove the arbitrariness of the ad hoc choice of the algebra and its representation in the noncommutative approach to the standard model, which was begging for a conceptual explanation. We assume as before that space-time is the product of a four-dimensional manifold by a finite noncommmutative space F. The spectral action is the pure gravitational action for the product space. To remove the above arbitrariness, we classify the irreducible geometries F consistent with imposing reality and chiral conditions on spinors, to avoid the fermion doubling problem, which amounts to have total dimension 10 (in the K-theoretic sense). It gives, almost uniquely, the standard model with all its details, predicting the number of fermions per generation to be 16, their representations and the Higgs breaking mechanism, with very little input.

  2. Structure of 23Al from a multi-channel algebraic scattering model based on mirror symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, P. R.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Massen-Hane, K.; Amos, K.; Canton, L.; Karataglidis, S.; van der Knijff, D.; Bray, I.

    2016-09-01

    The proton-rich nucleus 23Al has a ground state just 123 keV below the one-proton emission threshold, and as a result comparatively little is known experimentally about its properties, as with many such nuclei. Theoretical investigations have tended to model exclusively the ground and first one to three excited states known. In this paper, we theoretically model most of the known spectrum, and predict what states may as yet be unobserved. We use the multichannel algebraic scattering method to describe states as resonances of a valence proton coupled to a 22Mg rotor core. Six states with low-excitation energies and defined {J}π are matched, and we make the first prediction of the properties of four others and propound the possible existence of several more.

  3. Unifying Algebraic and Large-Scale Shell-Model Approaches in Nuclear Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draayer, Jerry P.

    1997-04-01

    The shell model is the most robust theory for addressing nuclear structure questions. Unfortunately, it is only as good as the input hamiltonian and the appropriateness of the selected model space, and both of these elements usually prove to be a significant challenge. There are three basic theories: 1) algebraic models, boson and fermion, which focus on symmetries, exact and approximate, of a hamiltonian and usually use model spaces that are severely truncated; 2) numerically oriented schemes that accommodate larger spaces but rely on special techniques and algorithms for producing convergent results; and 3) models that employ statistical concepts, like statistical spectroscopy of the 70s and 80s and Monte Carlo methods of the 90s, schemes that are not limited by the usual dimensionality considerations. These three approaches and their various realizations and extensions, with their pluses and minuses, will be considered. In addition, opportunities that exist for defining a scheme that employs the best of all three approaches to yield a symmetry adapted theory that is not limited to simplified spaces and hamiltonians and yet remains tractable even for large-scale calculations of the type that are required for testing a theory against experimental data and for predicting new physical phenomena will be explored. Special attention will be focused on unifying themes linking the shell-model with the simpler and yet highly successful mean-field and collective-model theories. As a example of the latter, some recent results using the symplectic shell model will be presented.

  4. Extension of the algebraic transition model for the wall roughness effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír

    2016-03-01

    The contribution deals with the simulation of the laminar/turbulent transition taking into account the effect of wall roughness. The correlation for the transition onset proposed by Straka and Příhoda [1] was modified for the effect of the wall roughness using the correlation according to Boyle and Stripf [2]. This correlation derived for the wall roughness formed by regularly distributed truncated cones was modified for flows over the distributed wall roughness. The algebraic transition model proposed by Straka and Příhoda [1] with the modified relation for the transition onset was verified by means of the incompressible flat-plate boundary-layer and the compressible flow through the turbine blade cascade with rough blades.

  5. Algebraic geometry methods associated to the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study the covering vertex model of the one-dimensional Hubbard Hamiltonian constructed by Shastry in the realm of algebraic geometry. We show that the Lax operator sits in a genus one curve which is not isomorphic but only isogenous to the curve suitable for the AdS/CFT context. We provide an uniformization of the Lax operator in terms of ratios of theta functions allowing us to establish relativistic like properties such as crossing and unitarity. We show that the respective R-matrix weights lie on an Abelian surface being birational to the product of two elliptic curves with distinct J-invariants. One of the curves is isomorphic to that of the Lax operator but the other is solely fourfold isogenous. These results clarify the reason the R-matrix can not be written using only difference of spectral parameters of the Lax operator.

  6. Modelling and temporal performances evaluation of networked control systems using (max, +) algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammour, R.; Amari, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of temporal performances evaluation of producer/consumer networked control systems. The aim is to develop a formal method for evaluating the response time of this type of control systems. Our approach consists on modelling, using Petri nets classes, the behaviour of the whole architecture including the switches that support multicast communications used by this protocol. (max, +) algebra formalism is then exploited to obtain analytical formulas of the response time and the maximal and minimal bounds. The main novelty is that our approach takes into account all delays experienced at the different stages of networked automation systems. Finally, we show how to apply the obtained results through an example of networked control system.

  7. Validating Cognitive Models of Task Performance in Algebra on the SAT®. Research Report No. 2009-3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Wang, Changjiang; Zhou, Jiawen; Gokiert, Rebecca; Tan, Adele

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to present research focused on validating the four algebra cognitive models in Gierl, Wang, et al., using student response data collected with protocol analysis methods to evaluate the knowledge structures and processing skills used by a sample of SAT test takers.

  8. The algebra of the general Markov model on phylogenetic trees and networks.

    PubMed

    Sumner, J G; Holland, B R; Jarvis, P D

    2012-04-01

    It is known that the Kimura 3ST model of sequence evolution on phylogenetic trees can be extended quite naturally to arbitrary split systems. However, this extension relies heavily on mathematical peculiarities of the associated Hadamard transformation, and providing an analogous augmentation of the general Markov model has thus far been elusive. In this paper, we rectify this shortcoming by showing how to extend the general Markov model on trees to include incompatible edges; and even further to more general network models. This is achieved by exploring the algebra of the generators of the continuous-time Markov chain together with the “splitting” operator that generates the branching process on phylogenetic trees. For simplicity, we proceed by discussing the two state case and then show that our results are easily extended to more states with little complication. Intriguingly, upon restriction of the two state general Markov model to the parameter space of the binary symmetric model, our extension is indistinguishable from the Hadamard approach only on trees; as soon as any incompatible splits are introduced the two approaches give rise to differing probability distributions with disparate structure. Through exploration of a simple example, we give an argument that our extension to more general networks has desirable properties that the previous approaches do not share. In particular, our construction allows for convergent evolution of previously divergent lineages; a property that is of significant interest for biological applications.

  9. A Model for Explaining Adolescent Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.

    1985-01-01

    This article introduces a model for studying stress in adolescents and reviews some of the research that relates to the model. It also suggests areas in which further research is needed in studying the effects of stress on adolescents. (MT)

  10. Generalized algebraic relation for predicting developing curved channel flow with a k-epsilon model of turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, J.A.C.; Pourahmadi, F.

    1981-06-01

    Using algebraic approximations for the Reynolds stress equations a general expression has been derived for C/sub ..mu../ in ..nu../sub t/ = C/sub ..mu../ k/sup 2//epsilon which accounts simultaneously for the effects of streamline curvature and pressure-strain in the flow, including wall-induced influences on the velocity fluctuations. The expression derived can be shown to encompass similar but more specific formulations proposed by Bradshaw, Rodi, and Leschziner and Rodi. The present formulation has been used in conjunction with k-epsilon model of turbulence to predict developing, two-dimensional, curved channel flows where both curvature and pressure-strain effects can be large. Minor modifications to include the influence of curvature on the length scale of the flow near the walls produces a significant improvement in the calculations. While, in general, predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements of mildly and strongly curved flows, the model tends to overpredict the kinetic energy of turbulence in the inner-radius (convex) wall region. This is attributed to a breakdown of the assumption that u/sub i/u/sub j/k is a constant in the derivation of the general expression for C/sub ..mu../. Most of the experimental results suggest the presence of a weak cross-stream motion due to Taylor-Goertler vortices which cannot be resolved by the calculation scheme. Despite its limitations the present formulation provides a degree of generality not previously available in two-equation modeling of turbulent flows.

  11. Generalized algebraic relation for predicting developing curved channel flow with a k-epsilon model of turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, J.A.C.; Pourahmadi, F.

    1981-06-01

    Using algebraic approximations for the Reynolds stress equations a general expression has been derived for C/sub ..mu../ in ..nu../sub t/ = C/sub ..mu../ k/sup 2//epsilon which accounts simultaneously for the effects of streamline curvature and pressure-strain in the flow, including wall-induced influences on the velocity fluctuations. The expression derived can be shown to encompass smilar but more specific formulations proposed by Bradshaw, Rodi, and Leschziner and Rodi. The present formulation has been used in conjunction with a k-epsilon model of turbulence to predict developing, two-dimensional, curved channel flows where both curvature and pressure-strain effects can be large. Minor modifications to include the influence of curvature on the length scale of the flow near the walls produce a significant improvement in the calculations. While, in general, predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements of mildly and strongly curved flows, the model tends to overpredict the kinetic energy of turbulence in the inner-radius (convex) wall region. This is attributed to a breakdown of the assumption that u/sub i/u/sub j//k is a constant in the derivation of the general expression for C/sub ..mu../. Most of the experimental results suggest the presence of a weak cross-stream motion due to Taylor-Goertler vortices which cannot be resolved by the calculation scheme. Despite its limitations the present formulation provides a degree of generality not previously available in two-equation modeling of turbulent flows.

  12. Earth Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufele, Christopher; Zumoff, Nancy

    Earth Algebra is an entry level college algebra course that incorporates the spirit of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics at the college level. The context of the course places mathematics at the center of one of the major current concerns of the world. Through…

  13. Kiddie Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2009-01-01

    As educators and policymakers search for ways to prepare students for the rigors of algebra, teachers in the Helena, Montana, school system are starting early by attempting to nurture students' algebraic-reasoning ability, as well as their basic number skills, in early elementary school, rather than waiting until middle or early high school.…

  14. Critical RSOS and minimal models: fermionic paths, Virasoro algebra and fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feverati, Giovanni; Pearce, Paul A.

    2003-07-01

    A framework is presented to extend the finitized characters and recursion methods of (off-critical) corner transfer matrices (CTMs), in a self-consistent fashion, to the calculation of CFT characters and conformal partition functions. More specifically, in this paper we consider sℓ(2) minimal conformal field theories on a cylinder from a lattice perspective. We argue that a general energy-preserving bijection exists between the one-dimensional configuration paths of the AL restricted solid-on-solid (RSOS) lattice models and the eigenstates of their double row transfer matrices and exhibit this bijection for the critical and tricritical Ising models in the vacuum sector. To each allowed one-dimensional configuration path we associate a physical state and a monomial in a finite fermionic algebra. The orthonormal states produced by the action of these monomials on the primary states | h> generate finite Virasoro modules with dimensions given by the finitized Virasoro characters χ( N) h( q). These finitized characters are the generating functions for the double row transfer matrix spectra of the critical RSOS models. We also propose a general level-by-level algorithm to build matrix representations of the Virasoro generators and chiral vertex operators (CVOs). The algorithm employs a distinguished basis which we call the L1-basis. Our results extend to ZL-1 parafermion models by duality.

  15. A computational neural model of orientation detection based on multiple guesses: comparison of geometrical and algebraic models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hui; Ren, Yuan; Wang, Zi Yan

    2013-10-01

    The implementation of Hubel-Wiesel hypothesis that orientation selectivity of a simple cell is based on ordered arrangement of its afferent cells has some difficulties. It requires the receptive fields (RFs) of those ganglion cells (GCs) and LGN cells to be similar in size and sub-structure and highly arranged in a perfect order. It also requires an adequate number of regularly distributed simple cells to match ubiquitous edges. However, the anatomical and electrophysiological evidence is not strong enough to support this geometry-based model. These strict regularities also make the model very uneconomical in both evolution and neural computation. We propose a new neural model based on an algebraic method to estimate orientations. This approach synthesizes the guesses made by multiple GCs or LGN cells and calculates local orientation information subject to a group of constraints. This algebraic model need not obey the constraints of Hubel-Wiesel hypothesis, and is easily implemented with a neural network. By using the idea of a satisfiability problem with constraints, we also prove that the precision and efficiency of this model are mathematically practicable. The proposed model makes clear several major questions which Hubel-Wiesel model does not account for. Image-rebuilding experiments are conducted to check whether this model misses any important boundary in the visual field because of the estimation strategy. This study is significant in terms of explaining the neural mechanism of orientation detection, and finding the circuit structure and computational route in neural networks. For engineering applications, our model can be used in orientation detection and as a simulation platform for cell-to-cell communications to develop bio-inspired eye chips. PMID:24427212

  16. G/G gauged WZW-matter model, Bethe Ansatz for q-boson model and Commutative Frobenius algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Satoshi; Yoshida, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the correspondence between two dimensional topological gauge theories and quantum integrable systems discovered by Moore, Nekrasov, Shatashvili. This correspondence means that the hidden quantum integrable structure exists in the topological gauge theories. We showed the correspondence between the G/G gauged WZW model and the phase model in JHEP 11 (2012) 146 (arXiv:1209.3800). In this paper, we study a one-parameter deformation for this correspondence and show that the G/G gauged WZW model coupled to additional matters corresponds to the q-boson model. Furthermore, we investigate this correspondence from the viewpoint of the commutative Frobenius algebra, the axiom of the two dimensional topological quantum field theory.

  17. Calculus domains modelled using an original bool algebra based on polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oanta, E.; Panait, C.; Raicu, A.; Barhalescu, M.; Axinte, T.

    2016-08-01

    Analytical and numerical computer based models require analytical definitions of the calculus domains. The paper presents a method to model a calculus domain based on a bool algebra which uses solid and hollow polygons. The general calculus relations of the geometrical characteristics that are widely used in mechanical engineering are tested using several shapes of the calculus domain in order to draw conclusions regarding the most effective methods to discretize the domain. The paper also tests the results of several CAD commercial software applications which are able to compute the geometrical characteristics, being drawn interesting conclusions. The tests were also targeting the accuracy of the results vs. the number of nodes on the curved boundary of the cross section. The study required the development of an original software consisting of more than 1700 computer code lines. In comparison with other calculus methods, the discretization using convex polygons is a simpler approach. Moreover, this method doesn't lead to large numbers as the spline approximation did, in that case being required special software packages in order to offer multiple, arbitrary precision. The knowledge resulted from this study may be used to develop complex computer based models in engineering.

  18. Mathematical Model for Dengue Epidemics with Differential Susceptibility and Asymptomatic Patients Using Computer Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldarriaga Vargas, Clarita

    When there are diseases affecting large populations where the social, economic and cultural diversity is significant within the same region, the biological parameters that determine the behavior of the dispersion disease analysis are affected by the selection of different individuals. Therefore and because of the variety and magnitude of the communities at risk of contracting dengue disease around all over the world, suggest defining differentiated populations with individual contributions in the results of the dispersion dengue disease analysis. In this paper those conditions were taken in account when several epidemiologic models were analyzed. Initially a stability analysis was done for a SEIR mathematical model of Dengue disease without differential susceptibility. Both free disease and endemic equilibrium states were found in terms of the basic reproduction number and were defined in the Theorem (3.1). Then a DSEIR model was solved when a new susceptible group was introduced to consider the effects of important biological parameters of non-homogeneous populations in the spreading analysis. The results were compiled in the Theorem (3.2). Finally Theorems (3.3) and (3.4) resumed the basic reproduction numbers for three and n different susceptible groups respectively, giving an idea of how differential susceptibility affects the equilibrium states. The computations were done using an algorithmic method implemented in Maple 11, a general-purpose computer algebra system.

  19. Dynamical analysis of a differential algebraic bio-economic model with stage-structured and stochastic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Qingling; Li, Aihua

    2016-11-01

    This study considers a class of differential algebraic stage-structured bio-economic models with stochastic fluctuations. The stochastic bio-economic model is simplified to an Itô equation using the stochastic averaging method. The stochastic stability, Hopf bifurcation, and P-bifurcation are discussed based on the singular boundary theory of the diffusion process for the system and the invariant measure theory of dynamic systems. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate our main results.

  20. Theory of equivalence systems for describing algebraic closures of a generalized estimation model. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Yakonov, A. G.

    2011-03-01

    Characteristic matrices and metrics of equivalence systems are studied that help give an efficient description of conjunctions of equivalence systems. Using these results, families of correct polynomials in the algebraic approach to classification are described.

  1. Modifications of the law of the wall and algebraic turbulence modelling for separated boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, B. S.; Maccormack, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Various modifications of the conventional algebraic eddy viscosity turbulence model are investigated for application to separated flows. Friction velocity is defined in a way that avoids singular behavior at separation and reattachment but reverts to the conventional definition for flows with small pressure gradients. This leads to a modified law of the wall for separated flows. The effect on the calculated flow field of changes in the model that affect the eddy viscosity at various distances from the wall are determined by (1) switching from Prandtl's form to an inner layer formula due to Clauser at various distances from the wall, (2) varying the constant in the Van Driest damping factor, (3) using Clauser's inner layer formula all the way to the wall, and (4) applying a relaxation procedure in the evaluation of the constant in Clauser's inner layer formula. Numerical solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are used to determine the effects of the modifications. Experimental results from shock-induced separated flows at Mach numbers 2.93 and 8.45 are used for comparison. For these cases improved predictions of wall pressure distribution and positions of separation and reattachment are obtained from the relaxation version of the Clauser inner layer eddy viscosity formula.

  2. Stress induced obesity: lessons from rodent models of stress

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Zachary R.; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Stress was once defined as the non-specific result of the body to any demand or challenge to homeostasis. A more current view of stress is the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc.), these endogenous stress systems are stimulated in order to generate a fight-or-flight response, and manage the stressful situation. As such, an organism is forced to liberate energy resources in attempt to meet the energetic demands posed by the stressor. A change in the energy homeostatic balance is thus required to exploit an appropriate resource and deliver useable energy to the target muscles and tissues involved in the stress response. Acutely, this change in energy homeostasis and the liberation of energy is considered advantageous, as it is required for the survival of the organism. However, when an organism is subjected to a prolonged stressor, as is the case during chronic stress, a continuous irregularity in energy homeostasis is considered detrimental and may lead to the development of metabolic disturbances such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. This concept has been studied extensively using animal models, and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress induced metabolic disorders are beginning to surface. However, different animal models of stress continue to produce divergent metabolic phenotypes wherein some animals become anorexic and lose body mass while others increase food intake and body mass and become vulnerable to the development of metabolic disturbances. It remains unclear exactly what factors associated with stress models can be used to predict the metabolic outcome of the organism. This review will explore a variety of rodent stress models and discuss the

  3. Stylolite compaction and stress models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, D.; Ebner, M.; Renard, F.; Toussaint, R.

    2009-04-01

    Stylolites are rough dissolution seams that develop during pressure solution in the Earth's crust. Especially in limestone quarries they exhibit a spectacular roughness with spikes and large columns. They are visible as dark lines of residual clays and other non-dissolvable components in the white limestone. The roughening phenomena seems to be universal since stylolites can also be found in quarzites, mylonites and all kinds of rocks that undergo pressure solution. The genesis of stylolites is not well understood even though they have been used to estimate compaction and to determine the direction of the main compressive stress. We have developed a numerical model to study the dynamic development of the roughness and its dependence on stress. Based on the model we present estimates of finite strain and depth of burial. The numerical stylolites are studied in two ways: the temporal evolution of the roughness on one hand and the fractal characteristics of the roughness on the other hand. In addition we vary the noise in the model and illustrate the importance of the grain size on the roughening process. Surface energies are dominant for small wavelengths and the initial stylolite growth is non-linear and as slow as a diffusive process. However, once a critical wavelength is reached the elastic regime becomes dominant and the growth is still non-linear but not as strong as in the surface energy dominated case. The growth of the roughness speeds up and teeth structures develop. Depending on the system size the growth will reach a third regime where saturation is reached and the roughness stays constant. We will present a scaling law based on these findings that can be used to estimate finite strain from natural stylolites. The roughness of the stylolite itself is self-affine with two different roughness exponents. The switch from one exponent to the other is dependent on stress. We show how stylolites can thus be used as palaeo-stress-gauges. A variation of the

  4. Super-Lie n-algebra extensions, higher WZW models and super-p-branes with tensor multiplet fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorenza, Domenico; Sati, Hisham; Schreiber, Urs

    2015-12-01

    We formalize higher-dimensional and higher gauge WZW-type sigma-model local prequantum field theory, and discuss its rationalized/perturbative description in (super-)Lie n-algebra homotopy theory (the true home of the "FDA"-language used in the supergravity literature). We show generally how the intersection laws for such higher WZW-type σ-model branes (open brane ending on background brane) are encoded precisely in (super-)L∞-extension theory and how the resulting "extended (super-)space-times" formalize spacetimes containing σ-model brane condensates. As an application we prove in Lie n-algebra homotopy theory that the complete super-p-brane spectrum of superstring/M-theory is realized this way, including the pure σ-model branes (the "old brane scan") but also the branes with tensor multiplet worldvolume fields, notably the D-branes and the M5-brane. For instance the degree-0 piece of the higher symmetry algebra of 11-dimensional (11D) spacetime with an M2-brane condensate turns out to be the "M-theory super-Lie algebra". We also observe that in this formulation there is a simple formal proof of the fact that type IIA spacetime with a D0-brane condensate is the 11D sugra/M-theory spacetime, and of (prequantum) S-duality for type IIB string theory. Finally we give the non-perturbative description of all this by higher WZW-type σ-models on higher super-orbispaces with higher WZW terms in stacky differential cohomology.

  5. Second-Order Algebraic Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Marcelo; Mahmoud, Ola

    Fiore and Hur [10] recently introduced a conservative extension of universal algebra and equational logic from first to second order. Second-order universal algebra and second-order equational logic respectively provide a model theory and a formal deductive system for languages with variable binding and parameterised metavariables. This work completes the foundations of the subject from the viewpoint of categorical algebra. Specifically, the paper introduces the notion of second-order algebraic theory and develops its basic theory. Two categorical equivalences are established: at the syntactic level, that of second-order equational presentations and second-order algebraic theories; at the semantic level, that of second-order algebras and second-order functorial models. Our development includes a mathematical definition of syntactic translation between second-order equational presentations. This gives the first formalisation of notions such as encodings and transforms in the context of languages with variable binding.

  6. On some spurious mode issues in shallow-water models using a linear algebra approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, D. Y.; Sène, A.; Rostand, V.; Hanert, E.

    Numerical methods that are usually employed in ocean modelling are typically finite-difference, finite and spectral-element techniques. For most of these methods the coupling between the momentum and continuity equations is a delicate problem and it usually leads to spurious solutions in the representation of inertia-gravity waves. The spurious modes have a wide range of characteristics and may take the form of pressure (surface-elevation), velocity and/or Coriolis modes. The modes usually cause aliasing and an accumulation of energy in the smallest-resolvable scale, leading to noisy solutions. The Fourier analysis has proven practical and beneficial to describe the spurious solutions of several classical schemes. However it is restricted to uniform meshes on which the variables are regularly distributed. In this paper, a linear algebra approach is proposed to study the existence and the behaviour of stationary spurious modes associated with zero frequency, for some popular finite-difference and finite-element grids. The present approach is performed on uniform meshes but it applies equally well to regular as well as unstructured meshes with irregular geometry for the finite-element schemes.

  7. Topological phase entanglements of membrane solitons in division algebra sigma models with a Hopf term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tze, Chia-Hsiung; Nam, Soonkeon

    1989-08-01

    Exploiting the unique connection between the division algebras of the complex numbers ( C), quaternions ( H), octonions ( Ω) and the essential Hopf maps S2 n - 1 → Sn with n = 2, 4, 8, we study Sn - 2 -membrane solitons in three D-dimensional KP(1) σ-models with a Hopf term, (D, K) = (3, C), (7, H), and (15, Ω). We present a comprehensive analysis of their topological phase entanglements. Extending Polyakov's approach to Fermi-Bose transmutations to higher dimensions, we detail a geometric regularization of Gauss' linking coefficient, its connections to the self-linking, twisting, writhing numbers of the Feynman paths of the solitons in their thin membrane limit. Alternative forms of the Hopf invariant show the latter as an Aharonov-Bohm-Berry phase of topologically massive, rank ( n - 1) antisymmetric tensor U(1) gauge fields coupled to the Sn - 2 -membranes. Via a K-bundle formulation of the dynamics of electrically and magnetically charged extended objects these phases are shown to induce a dyon-like structure on these membranes. We briefly discuss the connections to harmonic mappings, higher dimensional monopoles and instantons. We point out the relevance of the Gauss-Bonnet-Chern theorem on the connection between spin and statistics. By way of the topology of the infinite groups of sphere mappings Sn → Sn, n = 2, 4, 8, we also analyze the implications of the Hopf phases on the fractional spin and statistics of the membranes.

  8. Modelling and performance analysis of clinical pathways using the stochastic process algebra PEPA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospitals nowadays have to serve numerous patients with limited medical staff and equipment while maintaining healthcare quality. Clinical pathway informatics is regarded as an efficient way to solve a series of hospital challenges. To date, conventional research lacks a mathematical model to describe clinical pathways. Existing vague descriptions cannot fully capture the complexities accurately in clinical pathways and hinders the effective management and further optimization of clinical pathways. Method Given this motivation, this paper presents a clinical pathway management platform, the Imperial Clinical Pathway Analyzer (ICPA). By extending the stochastic model performance evaluation process algebra (PEPA), ICPA introduces a clinical-pathway-specific model: clinical pathway PEPA (CPP). ICPA can simulate stochastic behaviours of a clinical pathway by extracting information from public clinical databases and other related documents using CPP. Thus, the performance of this clinical pathway, including its throughput, resource utilisation and passage time can be quantitatively analysed. Results A typical clinical pathway on stroke extracted from a UK hospital is used to illustrate the effectiveness of ICPA. Three application scenarios are tested using ICPA: 1) redundant resources are identified and removed, thus the number of patients being served is maintained with less cost; 2) the patient passage time is estimated, providing the likelihood that patients can leave hospital within a specific period; 3) the maximum number of input patients are found, helping hospitals to decide whether they can serve more patients with the existing resource allocation. Conclusions ICPA is an effective platform for clinical pathway management: 1) ICPA can describe a variety of components (state, activity, resource and constraints) in a clinical pathway, thus facilitating the proper understanding of complexities involved in it; 2) ICPA supports the performance analysis of

  9. A new model for algebraic Rossby solitary waves in rotation fluid and its solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao-Deng; Yang, Hong-Wei; Gao, Yu-Fang; Yin, Bao-Shu; Feng, Xing-Ru

    2015-09-01

    A generalized Boussinesq equation that includes the dissipation effect is derived to describe a kind of algebraic Rossby solitary waves in a rotating fluid by employing perturbation expansions and stretching transformations of time and space. Using this equation, the conservation laws of algebraic Rossby solitary waves are discussed. It is found that the mass, the momentum, the energy, and the velocity of center of gravity of the algebraic solitary waves are conserved in the propagation process. Finally, the analytical solution of the equation is generated. Based on the analytical solution, the properties of the algebraic solitary waves and the dissipation effect are discussed. The results point out that, similar to classic solitary waves, the dissipation can cause the amplitude and the speed of solitary waves to decrease; however, unlike classic solitary waves, the algebraic solitary waves can split during propagation and the decrease of the detuning parameter can accelerate the occurrence of the solitary waves fission phenomenon. Project supported by the Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Ecology and Environment and Disaster Prevention and Mitigation Project, China (Grant No. 2012010), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41205082 and 41476019), the Special Funds for Theoretical Physics of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11447205), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), China.

  10. NPN fuzzy sets and NPN qualitative algebra: a computational framework for bipolar cognitive modeling and multiagent decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W R

    1996-01-01

    An NPN (Negative-Positive-Neutral) fuzzy set theory and an NPN qualitative algebra (Q-algebra) are proposed which form a computational framework for bipolar cognitive modeling and multiagent decision analysis. First a 6-valued NPN logic is introduced which extends the usual 4-valued Q-algebra (S, approximately , plus sign in circle,multiply sign in circle) and S={+,-,0,?} by adding one more level of specification; and then a real-valued NPN fuzzy logic is introduced which extends the 6-valued model to the real space { for all(x,y)|(x,y)in[-1,0]x[0,1]} and adds infinite levels of specifications, As a generalization, a fuzzy set theory is presented that allows beta-level fuzzy number-based NPN variables (x,y) to be substituted into (S, approximately , plus sign in circle,multiply sign in circle) where multiply sign in circle stands for any NPN T-norm; plus sign in circle stands for disjunction (V) or union ( union or logical sum), and beta is the number of alpha-cuts.

  11. Transient thermal stress recovery for structural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, William

    1992-01-01

    A method for computing transient thermal stress vectors from temperature vectors is described. The three step procedure involves the use of NASTRAN to generate an influence coefficient matrix which relates temperatures to stresses in the structural model. The transient thermal stresses are then recovered and sorted for maximum and minimum values. Verification data for the procedure is also provided.

  12. Solving multi-customer FPR model with quality assurance and discontinuous deliveries using a two-phase algebraic approach.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yuan-Shyi Peter; Chou, Chung-Li; Chang, Huei-Hsin; Chiu, Singa Wang

    2016-01-01

    A multi-customer finite production rate (FPR) model with quality assurance and discontinuous delivery policy was investigated in a recent paper (Chiu et al. in J Appl Res Technol 12(1):5-13, 2014) using differential calculus approach. This study employs mathematical modeling along with a two-phase algebraic method to resolve such a specific multi-customer FPR model. As a result, the optimal replenishment lot size and number of shipments can be derived without using the differential calculus. Such a straightforward method may assist practitioners who with insufficient knowledge of calculus in learning and managing the real multi-customer FPR systems more effectively. PMID:27186457

  13. ALGEBRA v.1.27

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Gilkey, A.; Smith, M.; Forsythe, C.

    2005-04-11

    The ALGEBRA program allows the user to manipulate data from a finite element analysis before it is plotted. The finite element output data is in the form of variable values (e.g., stress, strain, and velocity components) in an EXODUS II database. The ALGEBRA program evaluates user-supplied functions of the data and writes the results to an output EXODUS II database that can be read by plot programs.

  14. Magnetic resonance Spectroscopy with Linear Algebraic Modeling (SLAM) for higher speed and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Schär, Michael; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2012-05-01

    Speed and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are critical for localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of low-concentration metabolites. Matching voxels to anatomical compartments a priori yields better SNR than the spectra created by summing signals from constituent chemical-shift-imaging (CSI) voxels post-acquisition. Here, a new method of localized Spectroscopy using Linear Algebraic Modeling (SLAM) is presented, that can realize this additional SNR gain. Unlike prior methods, SLAM generates spectra from C signal-generating anatomic compartments utilizing a CSI sequence wherein essentially only the C central k-space phase-encoding gradient steps with highest SNR are retained. After MRI-based compartment segmentation, the spectra are reconstructed by solving a sub-set of linear simultaneous equations from the standard CSI algorithm. SLAM is demonstrated with one-dimensional CSI surface coil phosphorus MRS in phantoms, the human leg and the heart on a 3T clinical scanner. Its SNR performance, accuracy, sensitivity to registration errors and inhomogeneity, are evaluated. Compared to one-dimensional CSI, SLAM yielded quantitatively the same results 4-times faster in 24 cardiac patients and healthy subjects. SLAM is further extended with fractional phase-encoding gradients that optimize SNR and/or minimize both inter- and intra-compartmental contamination. In proactive cardiac phosphorus MRS of six healthy subjects, both SLAM and fractional-SLAM (fSLAM) produced results indistinguishable from CSI while preserving SNR gains of 36-45% in the same scan-time. Both SLAM and fSLAM are simple to implement and reduce the minimum scan-time for CSI, which otherwise limits the translation of higher SNR achievable at higher field strengths to faster scanning.

  15. The connection-set algebra--a novel formalism for the representation of connectivity structure in neuronal network models.

    PubMed

    Djurfeldt, Mikael

    2012-07-01

    The connection-set algebra (CSA) is a novel and general formalism for the description of connectivity in neuronal network models, from small-scale to large-scale structure. The algebra provides operators to form more complex sets of connections from simpler ones and also provides parameterization of such sets. CSA is expressive enough to describe a wide range of connection patterns, including multiple types of random and/or geometrically dependent connectivity, and can serve as a concise notation for network structure in scientific writing. CSA implementations allow for scalable and efficient representation of connectivity in parallel neuronal network simulators and could even allow for avoiding explicit representation of connections in computer memory. The expressiveness of CSA makes prototyping of network structure easy. A C+ + version of the algebra has been implemented and used in a large-scale neuronal network simulation (Djurfeldt et al., IBM J Res Dev 52(1/2):31-42, 2008b) and an implementation in Python has been publicly released.

  16. Constructing a Coherent Problem Model to Facilitate Algebra Problem Solving in a Chemistry Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Phan, Huy P.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment using a sample of 11th graders compared text editing and worked examples approaches in learning to solve dilution and molarity algebra word problems in a chemistry context. Text editing requires students to assess the structure of a word problem by specifying whether the problem text contains sufficient, missing, or irrelevant…

  17. Flipping an Algebra Classroom: Analyzing, Modeling, and Solving Systems of Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirvan, Rebecca; Rakes, Christopher R.; Zamora, Regie

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated whether flipping an algebra classroom led to a stronger focus on conceptual understanding and improved learning of systems of linear equations for 54 seventh- and eighth-grade students using teacher journal data and district-mandated unit exam items. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to compare scores on…

  18. Proposing and Testing a Model to Explain Traits of Algebra Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venenciano, Linda; Heck, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Early experiences with theoretical thinking and generalization in measurement are hypothesized to develop constructs we name here as logical reasoning and preparedness for algebra. Based on work of V. V. Davydov (1975), the Measure Up (MU) elementary grades experimental mathematics curriculum uses quantities of area, length, volume, and mass to…

  19. Prospective Mathematics Teachers' Sense Making of Polynomial Multiplication and Factorization Modeled with Algebra Tiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caglayan, Günhan

    2013-01-01

    This study is about prospective secondary mathematics teachers' understanding and sense making of representational quantities generated by algebra tiles, the quantitative units (linear vs. areal) inherent in the nature of these quantities, and the quantitative addition and multiplication operations--referent preserving versus referent…

  20. Developing Pre-Algebraic Thinking in Generalizing Repeating Pattern Using SOLO Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lian, Lim Hooi; Yew, Wun Thiam

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, researchers discussed the application of the generalization perspective in helping the primary school pupils to develop their pre-algebraic thinking in generalizing repeating pattern. There are two main stages of the generalization perspective had been adapted, namely investigating and generalizing the pattern. Since the Biggs and…

  1. Algebraic grid adaptation method using non-uniform rational B-spline surface modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann-Cherng; Soni, B. K.

    1992-01-01

    An algebraic adaptive grid system based on equidistribution law and utilized by the Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) surface for redistribution is presented. A weight function, utilizing a properly weighted boolean sum of various flow field characteristics is developed. Computational examples are presented to demonstrate the success of this technique.

  2. A meteorologically driven maize stress indicator model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. W.; Ravet, F. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A maize soil moisture and temperature stress model is described which was developed to serve as a meteorological data filter to alert commodity analysts to potential stress conditions in the major maize-producing areas of the world. The model also identifies optimum climatic conditions and planting/harvest problems associated with poor tractability.

  3. Spatial-Operator Algebra For Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo; Kreutz, Kenneth K.; Milman, Mark H.

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses spatial-operator algebra developed in recent studies of mathematical modeling, control, and design of trajectories of robotic manipulators. Provides succinct representation of mathematically complicated interactions among multiple joints and links of manipulator, thereby relieving analyst of most of tedium of detailed algebraic manipulations. Presents analytical formulation of spatial-operator algebra, describes some specific applications, summarizes current research, and discusses implementation of spatial-operator algebra in the Ada programming language.

  4. Modeling Residual Stresses in Ceramic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantavella, V.; Moreno, A.; Mezquita, A.; Reig, Y.

    2008-02-01

    The generation of residual stresses during cooling of layered ceramic plates has been modeled. Each plate comprises a body and two thin layers (engobe and glaze). The model takes into account two types of stresses: thermal stresses, resulting from temperature gradients inside the plate during cooling, and the stresses produced by the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the layers. The body has been simulated using a linear viscoelastic constitutive equation. The engobe and the glaze layer have been considered as elastic solids below a certain temperature (setting temperature: Ta). Above Ta these two layers have no mechanical influence on the body.

  5. Modeling Residual Stresses in Ceramic Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Cantavella, V.; Moreno, A.; Mezquita, A.; Reig, Y.

    2008-02-15

    The generation of residual stresses during cooling of layered ceramic plates has been modeled. Each plate comprises a body and two thin layers (engobe and glaze). The model takes into account two types of stresses: thermal stresses, resulting from temperature gradients inside the plate during cooling, and the stresses produced by the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the layers. The body has been simulated using a linear viscoelastic constitutive equation. The engobe and the glaze layer have been considered as elastic solids below a certain temperature (setting temperature: T{sub a}). Above T{sub a} these two layers have no mechanical influence on the body.

  6. A differential algebraic approach for the modeling of polycrystalline ferromagnetic hysteresis with minor loops and frequency dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Linxiang; Melnik, Roderick

    2016-07-01

    In the current paper, a nonlinear differential algebraic approach is proposed for the modeling of hysteretic dynamics of polycrystalline ferromagnetic materials. The model is constructed by employing a phenomenological theory to the magnetization orientation switching. For the modeling of hysteresis in polycrystalline ferromagnetic materials, the single crystal model is applied to each magnetic domain along its own principal axis. The overall dynamics of the polycrystalline materials is obtained by taking a weighted combination of the dynamics of all magnetic domains. The weight function for the combination is taken as the distribution function of the principal axes. Numerical simulations are performed and comparisons with its experimental counterparts are presented. The hysteretic dynamics caused by orientation switching processes is accurately captured by the proposed model. Minor hysteresis loops associated with partial-amplitude loadings are also captured. Rate dependence of the hysteresis loops are inherently incorporated into the model due to its differential nature.

  7. Thinking Visually about Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroudi, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Many introductions to algebra in high school begin with teaching students to generalise linear numerical patterns. This article argues that this approach needs to be changed so that students encounter variables in the context of modelling visual patterns so that the variables have a meaning. The article presents sample classroom activities,…

  8. The Effect of Scheduling Models for Introductory Algebra on 9th-Grade Students, Test Scores and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Angela L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of pacing and scheduling of algebra coursework on assigned 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for pre-algebra instruction and same course 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for standard algebra instruction. Students were selected based on completion of first-year…

  9. Genetic hotels for the standard genetic code: evolutionary analysis based upon novel three-dimensional algebraic models.

    PubMed

    José, Marco V; Morgado, Eberto R; Govezensky, Tzipe

    2011-07-01

    Herein, we rigorously develop novel 3-dimensional algebraic models called Genetic Hotels of the Standard Genetic Code (SGC). We start by considering the primeval RNA genetic code which consists of the 16 codons of type RNY (purine-any base-pyrimidine). Using simple algebraic operations, we show how the RNA code could have evolved toward the current SGC via two different intermediate evolutionary stages called Extended RNA code type I and II. By rotations or translations of the subset RNY, we arrive at the SGC via the former (type I) or via the latter (type II), respectively. Biologically, the Extended RNA code type I, consists of all codons of the type RNY plus codons obtained by considering the RNA code but in the second (NYR type) and third (YRN type) reading frames. The Extended RNA code type II, comprises all codons of the type RNY plus codons that arise from transversions of the RNA code in the first (YNY type) and third (RNR) nucleotide bases. Since the dimensions of remarkable subsets of the Genetic Hotels are not necessarily integer numbers, we also introduce the concept of algebraic fractal dimension. A general decoding function which maps each codon to its corresponding amino acid or the stop signals is also derived. The Phenotypic Hotel of amino acids is also illustrated. The proposed evolutionary paths are discussed in terms of the existing theories of the evolution of the SGC. The adoption of 3-dimensional models of the Genetic and Phenotypic Hotels will facilitate the understanding of the biological properties of the SGC.

  10. Algebraic multigrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruge, J. W.; Stueben, K.

    1987-01-01

    The state of the art in algebraic multgrid (AMG) methods is discussed. The interaction between the relaxation process and the coarse grid correction necessary for proper behavior of the solution probes is discussed in detail. Sufficient conditions on relaxation and interpolation for the convergence of the V-cycle are given. The relaxation used in AMG, what smoothing means in an algebraic setting, and how it relates to the existing theory are considered. Some properties of the coarse grid operator are discussed, and results on the convergence of two-level and multilevel convergence are given. Details of an algorithm particularly studied for problems obtained by discretizing a single elliptic, second order partial differential equation are given. Results of experiments with such problems using both finite difference and finite element discretizations are presented.

  11. Animal models of anxiety disorders and stress.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alline C; Fogaça, Manoela V; Aguiar, Daniele C; Guimarães, Francisco S

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety and stress-related disorders are severe psychiatric conditions that affect performance in daily tasks and represent a high cost to public health. The initial observation of Charles Darwin that animals and human beings share similar characteristics in the expression of emotion raise the possibility of studying the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders in other mammals (mainly rodents). The development of animal models of anxiety and stress has helped to identify the pharmacological mechanisms and potential clinical effects of several drugs. Animal models of anxiety are based on conflict situations that can generate opposite motivational states induced by approach-avoidance situations. The present review revisited the main rodent models of anxiety and stress responses used worldwide. Here we defined as "ethological" the tests that assess unlearned/unpunished responses (such as the elevated plus maze, light-dark box, and open field), whereas models that involve learned/punished responses are referred to as "conditioned operant conflict tests" (such as the Vogel conflict test). We also discussed models that involve mainly classical conditioning tests (fear conditioning). Finally, we addressed the main protocols used to induce stress responses in rodents, including psychosocial (social defeat and neonatal isolation stress), physical (restraint stress), and chronic unpredictable stress.

  12. Three-Dimensional Algebraic Models of the tRNA Code and 12 Graphs for Representing the Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    José, Marco V; Morgado, Eberto R; Guimarães, Romeu Cardoso; Zamudio, Gabriel S; de Farías, Sávio Torres; Bobadilla, Juan R; Sosa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional algebraic models, also called Genetic Hotels, are developed to represent the Standard Genetic Code, the Standard tRNA Code (S-tRNA-C), and the Human tRNA code (H-tRNA-C). New algebraic concepts are introduced to be able to describe these models, to wit, the generalization of the 2n-Klein Group and the concept of a subgroup coset with a tail. We found that the H-tRNA-C displayed broken symmetries in regard to the S-tRNA-C, which is highly symmetric. We also show that there are only 12 ways to represent each of the corresponding phenotypic graphs of amino acids. The averages of statistical centrality measures of the 12 graphs for each of the three codes are carried out and they are statistically compared. The phenotypic graphs of the S-tRNA-C display a common triangular prism of amino acids in 10 out of the 12 graphs, whilst the corresponding graphs for the H-tRNA-C display only two triangular prisms. The graphs exhibit disjoint clusters of amino acids when their polar requirement values are used. We contend that the S-tRNA-C is in a frozen-like state, whereas the H-tRNA-C may be in an evolving state. PMID:25370377

  13. Three-Dimensional Algebraic Models of the tRNA Code and 12 Graphs for Representing the Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    José, Marco V.; Morgado, Eberto R.; Guimarães, Romeu Cardoso; Zamudio, Gabriel S.; de Farías, Sávio Torres; Bobadilla, Juan R.; Sosa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional algebraic models, also called Genetic Hotels, are developed to represent the Standard Genetic Code, the Standard tRNA Code (S-tRNA-C), and the Human tRNA code (H-tRNA-C). New algebraic concepts are introduced to be able to describe these models, to wit, the generalization of the 2n-Klein Group and the concept of a subgroup coset with a tail. We found that the H-tRNA-C displayed broken symmetries in regard to the S-tRNA-C, which is highly symmetric. We also show that there are only 12 ways to represent each of the corresponding phenotypic graphs of amino acids. The averages of statistical centrality measures of the 12 graphs for each of the three codes are carried out and they are statistically compared. The phenotypic graphs of the S-tRNA-C display a common triangular prism of amino acids in 10 out of the 12 graphs, whilst the corresponding graphs for the H-tRNA-C display only two triangular prisms. The graphs exhibit disjoint clusters of amino acids when their polar requirement values are used. We contend that the S-tRNA-C is in a frozen-like state, whereas the H-tRNA-C may be in an evolving state. PMID:25370377

  14. Analyzing the nonlinear vibrational wave differential equation for the simplified model of Tower Cranes by Algebraic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, M. R.; Ganji, D. D.; Ahmadi, A. R.; Kachapi, Sayyid H. Hashemi

    2014-03-01

    In the current paper, a simplified model of Tower Cranes has been presented in order to investigate and analyze the nonlinear differential equation governing on the presented system in three different cases by Algebraic Method (AGM). Comparisons have been made between AGM and Numerical Solution, and these results have been indicated that this approach is very efficient and easy so it can be applied for other nonlinear equations. It is citable that there are some valuable advantages in this way of solving differential equations and also the answer of various sets of complicated differential equations can be achieved in this manner which in the other methods, so far, they have not had acceptable solutions. The simplification of the solution procedure in Algebraic Method and its application for solving a wide variety of differential equations not only in Vibrations but also in different fields of study such as fluid mechanics, chemical engineering, etc. make AGM be a powerful and useful role model for researchers in order to solve complicated nonlinear differential equations.

  15. Three-Dimensional Algebraic Models of the tRNA Code and 12 Graphs for Representing the Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    José, Marco V; Morgado, Eberto R; Guimarães, Romeu Cardoso; Zamudio, Gabriel S; de Farías, Sávio Torres; Bobadilla, Juan R; Sosa, Daniela

    2014-08-11

    Three-dimensional algebraic models, also called Genetic Hotels, are developed to represent the Standard Genetic Code, the Standard tRNA Code (S-tRNA-C), and the Human tRNA code (H-tRNA-C). New algebraic concepts are introduced to be able to describe these models, to wit, the generalization of the 2n-Klein Group and the concept of a subgroup coset with a tail. We found that the H-tRNA-C displayed broken symmetries in regard to the S-tRNA-C, which is highly symmetric. We also show that there are only 12 ways to represent each of the corresponding phenotypic graphs of amino acids. The averages of statistical centrality measures of the 12 graphs for each of the three codes are carried out and they are statistically compared. The phenotypic graphs of the S-tRNA-C display a common triangular prism of amino acids in 10 out of the 12 graphs, whilst the corresponding graphs for the H-tRNA-C display only two triangular prisms. The graphs exhibit disjoint clusters of amino acids when their polar requirement values are used. We contend that the S-tRNA-C is in a frozen-like state, whereas the H-tRNA-C may be in an evolving state.

  16. Modelling of stylolite geometries and stress scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, D.; Ebner, M.; Renard, F.; Toussaint, R.; Passchier, C. W.

    2012-08-01

    In this contribution we present numerical simulations of stylolite growth to decipher the effects of initial rock heterogeneity and stress on their morphology. We show that stylolite growth in a rock with a uniform grain size produces different patterns than stylolite growth in a rock with a bimodal grain size distribution. Strong pinning of large heterogeneities produce stylolite structures that are dominated by pronounced teeth, whereas a uniform grain size leads to spikes and a roughness that shows variable wavelengths. We compare the simulated stylolites with natural examples and show that the model can reproduce the real structures. In addition we show that strong pinning in the bimodal case can lead to a linear stylolite roughness growth in contrast to the non-linear growth of stylolites that develop from a uniform noise. In a set of 24 simulations we vary the main principle stress on the stylolite in order to test if our model can reproduce the analytically derived stress-scaling proposed by Schmittbuhl et al. (2004). We compare the calculated stresses with the applied stresses and show that the numerical model and the analytical solution are in good agreement. Our results strengthen the hypothesis that stylolites can be used as strain and stress gauges to estimate not only the orientation of paleo-stresses, but also their absolute values of formation stresses and amounts of compaction.

  17. An Ada Linear-Algebra Software Package Modeled After HAL/S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, Allan R.; Lawson, Charles L.

    1990-01-01

    New avionics software written more easily. Software package extends Ada programming language to include linear-algebra capabilities similar to those of HAL/S programming language. Designed for such avionics applications as Space Station flight software. In addition to built-in functions of HAL/S, package incorporates quaternion functions used in Space Shuttle and Galileo projects and routines from LINPAK solving systems of equations involving general square matrices. Contains two generic programs: one for floating-point computations and one for integer computations. Written on IBM/AT personal computer running under PC DOS, v.3.1.

  18. Algebraic Bethe ansatz for the sℓ (2) Gaudin model with boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirilo António, N.; Manojlović, N.; Ragoucy, E.; Salom, I.

    2015-04-01

    Following Sklyanin's proposal in the periodic case, we derive the generating function of the Gaudin Hamiltonians with boundary terms. Our derivation is based on the quasi-classical expansion of the linear combination of the transfer matrix of the XXX Heisenberg spin chain and the central element, the so-called Sklyanin determinant. The corresponding Gaudin Hamiltonians with boundary terms are obtained as the residues of the generating function. By defining the appropriate Bethe vectors which yield strikingly simple off shell action of the generating function, we fully implement the algebraic Bethe ansatz, obtaining the spectrum of the generating function and the corresponding Bethe equations.

  19. Heisenberg XXX Model with General Boundaries: Eigenvectors from Algebraic Bethe Ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belliard, Samuel; Crampé, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    We propose a generalization of the algebraic Bethe ansatz to obtain the eigenvectors of the Heisenberg spin chain with general boundaries associated to the eigenvalues and the Bethe equations found recently by Cao et al. The ansatz takes the usual form of a product of operators acting on a particular vector except that the number of operators is equal to the length of the chain. We prove this result for the chains with small length. We obtain also an off-shell equation (i.e. satisfied without the Bethe equations) formally similar to the ones obtained in the periodic case or with diagonal boundaries.

  20. A Deterministic Interfacial Cyclic Oxidation Spalling Model. Part 2; Algebraic Approximation, Descriptive Parameters, and Normalized Universal Curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2002-01-01

    A cyclic oxidation interfacial spalling model has been developed in Part 1. The governing equations have been simplified here by substituting a new algebraic expression for the series (Good-Smialek approximation). This produced a direct relationship between cyclic oxidation weight change and model input parameters. It also allowed for the mathematical derivation of various descriptive parameters as a function of the inputs. It is shown that the maximum in weight change varies directly with the parabolic rate constant and cycle duration and inversely with the spall fraction, all to the 1/2 power. The number of cycles to reach maximum and zero weight change vary inversely with the spall fraction, and the ratio of these cycles is exactly 1:3 for most oxides. By suitably normalizing the weight change and cycle number, it is shown that all cyclic oxidation weight change model curves can be represented by one universal expression for a given oxide scale.

  1. Twisted C⋆-algebra formulation of quantum cosmology with application to the Bianchi I model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, Marcos; Vergara, J. David; Juárez, Román; Minzoni, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    A twisted C⋆-algebra of the extended (noncommutative) Heisenberg-Weyl group has been constructed which takes into account the uncertainty principle for coordinates in the Planck-length regime. This general construction is then used to generate an appropriate Hilbert space and observables for the noncommutative theory which, when applied to the Bianchi I cosmology, leads to a new set of equations that describe the quantum evolution of the Universe. We find that this formulation matches theories based on a reticular Heisenberg-Weyl algebra in the bouncing and expanding regions of a collapsing Bianchi universe. There is, however, an additional effect introduced by the dynamics generated by the noncommutativity. This is an oscillation in the spectrum of the volume operator of the Universe, within the bouncing region of the commutative theories. We show that this effect is generic and produced by the noncommutative momentum exchange between the degrees of freedom in the cosmology. We give asymptotic and numerical solutions which show the above mentioned effects of the noncommutativity.

  2. Coverings of topological semi-abelian algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucuk, Osman; Demir, Serap

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we study on a category of topological semi-abelian algebras which are topological models of given an algebraic theory T whose category of models is semi-abelian; and investigate some results on the coverings of topological models of such theories yielding semi-abelian categories. We also consider the internal groupoid structure in the semi-abelian category of T-algebras, and give a criteria for the lifting of internal groupoid structure to the covering groupoids.

  3. Algebraic trigonometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaninsky, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    This article introduces a trigonometric field (TF) that extends the field of real numbers by adding two new elements: sin and cos - satisfying an axiom sin2 + cos2 = 1. It is shown that by assigning meaningful names to particular elements of the field, all known trigonometric identities may be introduced and proved. Two different interpretations of the TF are discussed with many others potentially possible. The main objective of this article is to introduce a broader view of trigonometry that can serve as motivation for mathematics students and teachers to study and teach abstract algebraic structures.

  4. Filiform Lie algebras of order 3

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, R. M.

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this work is to generalize a very important type of Lie algebras and superalgebras, i.e., filiform Lie (super)algebras, into the theory of Lie algebras of order F. Thus, the concept of filiform Lie algebras of order F is obtained. In particular, for F = 3 it has been proved that by using infinitesimal deformations of the associated model elementary Lie algebra it can be obtained families of filiform elementary lie algebras of order 3, analogously as that occurs into the theory of Lie algebras [M. Vergne, “Cohomologie des algèbres de Lie nilpotentes. Application à l’étude de la variété des algèbres de Lie nilpotentes,” Bull. Soc. Math. France 98, 81–116 (1970)]. Also we give the dimension, using an adaptation of the sl(2,C)-module Method, and a basis of such infinitesimal deformations in some generic cases.

  5. Hopf algebras of rooted forests, cocyles, and free Rota-Baxter algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianjie; Gao, Xing; Guo, Li

    2016-10-01

    The Hopf algebra and the Rota-Baxter algebra are the two algebraic structures underlying the algebraic approach of Connes and Kreimer to renormalization of perturbative quantum field theory. In particular, the Hopf algebra of rooted trees serves as the "baby model" of Feynman graphs in their approach and can be characterized by certain universal properties involving a Hochschild 1-cocycle. Decorated rooted trees have also been applied to study Feynman graphs. We will continue the study of universal properties of various spaces of decorated rooted trees with such a 1-cocycle, leading to the concept of a cocycle Hopf algebra. We further apply the universal properties to equip a free Rota-Baxter algebra with the structure of a cocycle Hopf algebra.

  6. Modular properties of doubly extended N = 4 superconformal algebras and their connection to rational torus models (I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Jens Lyng; Taormina, Anne

    1991-05-01

    The doubly extended N = 4 superconformal algebra, which contains all conventional extended superconformal algebras, is analyzed when one of the central extensions is set to 1. The modular transformations of the characters are derived, the relation between the characters and those of the N = 2 minimal is clarified, and in the process it is shown how rather simple extensions of the algebra based on rational torus theories, give rise to finite dimensional representations of the modular group.

  7. ANSYS Modeling of Hydrostatic Stress Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.

    1999-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic pressure has no effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Plasticity textbooks, from the earliest to the most modem, infer that there is no hydrostatic effect on the yielding of metals, and even modem finite element programs direct the user to assume the same. The object of this study is to use the von Mises and Drucker-Prager failure theory constitutive models in the finite element program ANSYS to see how well they model conditions of varying hydrostatic pressure. Data is presented for notched round bar (NRB) and "L" shaped tensile specimens. Similar results from finite element models in ABAQUS are shown for comparison. It is shown that when dealing with geometries having a high hydrostatic stress influence, constitutive models that have a functional dependence on hydrostatic stress are more accurate in predicting material behavior than those that are independent of hydrostatic stress.

  8. Hopf algebras and topological recursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, João N.

    2015-11-01

    We consider a model for topological recursion based on the Hopf algebra of planar binary trees defined by Loday and Ronco (1998 Adv. Math. 139 293-309 We show that extending this Hopf algebra by identifying pairs of nearest neighbor leaves, and thus producing graphs with loops, we obtain the full recursion formula discovered by Eynard and Orantin (2007 Commun. Number Theory Phys. 1 347-452).

  9. Priority in Process Algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleaveland, Rance; Luettgen, Gerald; Natarajan, V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper surveys the semantic ramifications of extending traditional process algebras with notions of priority that allow for some transitions to be given precedence over others. These enriched formalisms allow one to model system features such as interrupts, prioritized choice, or real-time behavior. Approaches to priority in process algebras can be classified according to whether the induced notion of preemption on transitions is global or local and whether priorities are static or dynamic. Early work in the area concentrated on global pre-emption and static priorities and led to formalisms for modeling interrupts and aspects of real-time, such as maximal progress, in centralized computing environments. More recent research has investigated localized notions of pre-emption in which the distribution of systems is taken into account, as well as dynamic priority approaches, i.e., those where priority values may change as systems evolve. The latter allows one to model behavioral phenomena such as scheduling algorithms and also enables the efficient encoding of real-time semantics. Technically, this paper studies the different models of priorities by presenting extensions of Milner's Calculus of Communicating Systems (CCS) with static and dynamic priority as well as with notions of global and local pre- emption. In each case the operational semantics of CCS is modified appropriately, behavioral theories based on strong and weak bisimulation are given, and related approaches for different process-algebraic settings are discussed.

  10. A two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid produced by an atomic simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model

    PubMed Central

    Po, Hoi Chun; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Bosons have a natural instinct to condense at zero temperature. It is a long-standing challenge to create a high-dimensional quantum liquid that does not exhibit long-range order at the ground state, as either extreme experimental parameters or sophisticated designs of microscopic Hamiltonians are required for suppressing the condensation. Here we show that synthetic gauge fields for ultracold atoms, using either the Raman scheme or shaken lattices, provide physicists a simple and practical scheme to produce a two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid at the ground state. This quantum liquid arises at a critical Lifshitz point, where a two-dimensional quartic dispersion emerges in the momentum space, and many fundamental properties of two-dimensional bosons are changed in its proximity. Such an ideal simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model allows experimentalists to directly visualize and explore the deconfinement transition of topological excitations, an intriguing phenomenon that is difficult to access in other systems. PMID:26268154

  11. A two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid produced by an atomic simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model.

    PubMed

    Po, Hoi Chun; Zhou, Qi

    2015-08-13

    Bosons have a natural instinct to condense at zero temperature. It is a long-standing challenge to create a high-dimensional quantum liquid that does not exhibit long-range order at the ground state, as either extreme experimental parameters or sophisticated designs of microscopic Hamiltonians are required for suppressing the condensation. Here we show that synthetic gauge fields for ultracold atoms, using either the Raman scheme or shaken lattices, provide physicists a simple and practical scheme to produce a two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid at the ground state. This quantum liquid arises at a critical Lifshitz point, where a two-dimensional quartic dispersion emerges in the momentum space, and many fundamental properties of two-dimensional bosons are changed in its proximity. Such an ideal simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model allows experimentalists to directly visualize and explore the deconfinement transition of topological excitations, an intriguing phenomenon that is difficult to access in other systems.

  12. A two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid produced by an atomic simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po, Hoi Chun; Zhou, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Bosons have a natural instinct to condense at zero temperature. It is a long-standing challenge to create a high-dimensional quantum liquid that does not exhibit long-range order at the ground state, as either extreme experimental parameters or sophisticated designs of microscopic Hamiltonians are required for suppressing the condensation. Here we show that synthetic gauge fields for ultracold atoms, using either the Raman scheme or shaken lattices, provide physicists a simple and practical scheme to produce a two-dimensional algebraic quantum liquid at the ground state. This quantum liquid arises at a critical Lifshitz point, where a two-dimensional quartic dispersion emerges in the momentum space, and many fundamental properties of two-dimensional bosons are changed in its proximity. Such an ideal simulator of the quantum Lifshitz model allows experimentalists to directly visualize and explore the deconfinement transition of topological excitations, an intriguing phenomenon that is difficult to access in other systems.

  13. A Non-Econometric Analysis with Algebraic Models to Forecast the Numbers of Newly Hired and Retirement of Public Primary School Teachers in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lung-Hsing, Kuo; Hung-Jen, Yang; Ying-Wen, Lin; Shang-Ming, Su

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the "street teachers" issue has caused social concern in Taiwan. This study estimates the retirement of and needs for newly hired and public primary school teachers in 2010 using an algebraic model from the paper by Husssar (1999). This recursive methodology predicts the number of newly hired public primary school teachers due to…

  14. A stress-free model for residual stress assessment using thermoelastic stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Geoffrey; Dulieu-Barton, Janice M.; Achintha, Mithila; Robinson, Andrew F.

    2015-03-01

    Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) has been proposed as a method of obtaining residual stresses. The results of a preliminary study demonstrated that when Al-2024 plate containing holes that were plastically deformed by cold expansion process to 2% and 4% strain the thermoelastic response in the material around the hole was different to that obtained from a plate that had not experienced any plastic cold expansion (i.e. a reference specimen). This observation provides an opportunity for obtaining residual stresses based on TSA data. In many applications a reference specimen (i.e. residual stress free specimen) may not be available for comparison, so a synthetic, digital bitmap has been proposed as an alternative. An elastic finite element model is created using commercially available software Abaqus/Standard and the resultant stress field is extracted. The simulated stress field from the model is mapped onto a grid that matches the TSA pixel data from a physical reference specimen. This stress field is then converted to a ΔT/T field that can be compared to the full-field TSA data. When the reference experimental data is subtracted from the, bitmap dataset the resultant ΔT/T field is approximately zero. Further work proposes replacing the experimental reference data with that from specimens that have undergone cold expansion with the aim of revealing the regions affected by residual stress through a departure from zero in the resultant stress field. The paper demonstrates the first steps necessary for deriving the residual stresses from a general specimen using TSA.

  15. Flow stress model in metal cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    A model for the plastic deformation that occurs in metal cutting, based on dislocation mechanics, is presented. The model explains the fundamental deformation structure that develops during machining and is based on the well known Cottrell-Stokes Law, wherein the flow stress is partitioned into two parts; an athermal part which occurs in the shear fronts (or shear bands); and a thermal part which occurs in the lamella regions. The deformation envokes the presence of a cellular dislocation distribution which always exists in the material ahead of the shear process. This 'alien' dislocation distribution either exists in the metal prior to cutting or is produced by the compressive stress field which operates in front of the shear process. The magnitude of the flow stress and direction of the shear are shown to be correlated to the stacking fault energy of the metal being cut. The model is tested with respect to energy consumption rates and found to be consistent with observed values.

  16. The roles of prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex in algebra problem solving: a case of using cognitive modeling to inform neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Danker, Jared F; Anderson, John R

    2007-04-15

    In naturalistic algebra problem solving, the cognitive processes of representation and retrieval are typically confounded, in that transformations of the equations typically require retrieval of mathematical facts. Previous work using cognitive modeling has associated activity in the prefrontal cortex with the retrieval demands of algebra problems and activity in the posterior parietal cortex with the transformational demands of algebra problems, but these regions tend to behave similarly in response to task manipulations (Anderson, J.R., Qin, Y., Sohn, M.-H., Stenger, V.A., Carter, C.S., 2003. An information-processing model of the BOLD response in symbol manipulation tasks. Psychon. Bull. Rev. 10, 241-261; Qin, Y., Carter, C.S., Silk, E.M., Stenger, A., Fissell, K., Goode, A., Anderson, J.R., 2004. The change of brain activation patterns as children learn algebra equation solving. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 101, 5686-5691). With this study we attempt to isolate activity in these two regions by using a multi-step algebra task in which transformation (parietal) is manipulated in the first step and retrieval (prefrontal) is manipulated in the second step. Counter to our initial predictions, both brain regions were differentially active during both steps. We designed two cognitive models, one encompassing our initial assumptions and one in which both processes were engaged during both steps. The first model provided a poor fit to the behavioral and neural data, while the second model fit both well. This simultaneously emphasizes the strong relationship between retrieval and representation in mathematical reasoning and demonstrates that cognitive modeling can serve as a useful tool for understanding task manipulations in neuroimaging experiments. PMID:17355908

  17. The roles of prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex in algebra problem solving: a case of using cognitive modeling to inform neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Danker, Jared F; Anderson, John R

    2007-04-15

    In naturalistic algebra problem solving, the cognitive processes of representation and retrieval are typically confounded, in that transformations of the equations typically require retrieval of mathematical facts. Previous work using cognitive modeling has associated activity in the prefrontal cortex with the retrieval demands of algebra problems and activity in the posterior parietal cortex with the transformational demands of algebra problems, but these regions tend to behave similarly in response to task manipulations (Anderson, J.R., Qin, Y., Sohn, M.-H., Stenger, V.A., Carter, C.S., 2003. An information-processing model of the BOLD response in symbol manipulation tasks. Psychon. Bull. Rev. 10, 241-261; Qin, Y., Carter, C.S., Silk, E.M., Stenger, A., Fissell, K., Goode, A., Anderson, J.R., 2004. The change of brain activation patterns as children learn algebra equation solving. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 101, 5686-5691). With this study we attempt to isolate activity in these two regions by using a multi-step algebra task in which transformation (parietal) is manipulated in the first step and retrieval (prefrontal) is manipulated in the second step. Counter to our initial predictions, both brain regions were differentially active during both steps. We designed two cognitive models, one encompassing our initial assumptions and one in which both processes were engaged during both steps. The first model provided a poor fit to the behavioral and neural data, while the second model fit both well. This simultaneously emphasizes the strong relationship between retrieval and representation in mathematical reasoning and demonstrates that cognitive modeling can serve as a useful tool for understanding task manipulations in neuroimaging experiments.

  18. New directions in algebraic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Klaus; Verbitskiy, Evgeny

    2011-02-01

    The logarithmic Mahler measure of certain multivariate polynomials occurs frequently as the entropy or the free energy of solvable lattice models (especially dimer models). It is also known that the entropy of an algebraic dynamical system is the logarithmic Mahler measure of the defining polynomial. The connection between the lattice models and the algebraic dynamical systems is still rather mysterious.

  19. Comparing the Impact of Traditional and Modeling College Algebra Courses on Student Performance in Survey of Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Jerry G.

    2013-01-01

    Students in higher education deserve opportunities to succeed and learning environments which maximize success. Mathematics courses can create a barrier for success for some students. College algebra is a course that serves as a gateway to required courses in many bachelor's degree programs. The content in college algebra should serve to…

  20. Investigation and Modeling of Cranberry Weather Stress.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Paul Joseph

    Cranberry bog weather conditions and weather-related stress were investigated for development of crop yield prediction models and models to predict daily weather conditions in the bog. Field investigations and data gathering were completed at the Rutgers University Blueberry/Cranberry Research Center experimental bogs in Chatsworth, New Jersey. Study indicated that although cranberries generally exhibit little or no stomatal response to changing atmospheric conditions, the evaluation of weather-related stress could be accomplished via use of micrometeorological data. Definition of weather -related stress was made by establishing critical thresholds of the frequencies of occurrence, and magnitudes of, temperature and precipitation in the bog based on values determined by a review of the literature and a grower questionnaire. Stress frequencies were correlated with cranberry yield to develop predictive models based on the previous season's yield, prior season data, prior and current season data, current season data; and prior and current season data through July 31 of the current season. The predictive ability of the prior season models was best and could be used in crop planning and production. Further examination of bog micrometeorological data permitted the isolation of those weather conditions conducive to cranberry scald and allowed for the institution of a pilot scald advisory program during the 1991 season. The micrometeorological data from the bog was also used to develop models to predict daily canopy temperature and precipitation, based on upper air data, for grower use. Models were developed for each month for maximum and minimum temperatures and for precipitation and generally performed well. The modeling of bog weather conditions is an important first step toward daily prediction of cranberry weather-related stress.

  1. Algebraic Mean Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dankova, T. S.; Rosensteel, G.

    1998-10-01

    Mean field theory has an unexpected group theoretic mathematical foundation. Instead of representation theory which applies to most group theoretic quantum models, Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov have been formulated in terms of coadjoint orbits for the groups U(n) and O(2n). The general theory of mean fields is formulated for an arbitrary Lie algebra L of fermion operators. The moment map provides the correspondence between the Hilbert space of microscopic wave functions and the dual space L^* of densities. The coadjoint orbits of the group in the dual space are phase spaces on which time-dependent mean field theory is equivalent to a classical Hamiltonian dynamical system. Indeed it forms a finite-dimensional Lax system. The mean field theories for the Elliott SU(3) and symplectic Sp(3,R) algebras are constructed explicitly in the coadjoint orbit framework.

  2. A Stage Model of Stress and Disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sheldon; Gianaros, Peter J; Manuck, Stephen B

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we argued that the term stress has served as a valuable heuristic, helping researchers to integrate traditions that illuminate different stages of the process linking stressful life events to disease. We provided a short history of three traditions in the study of stress: the epidemiological, psychological, and biological. The epidemiological tradition focuses on defining which circumstances and experiences are deemed stressful on the basis of consensual agreement that they constitute threats to social or physical well-being. The psychological tradition focuses on individuals' perceptions of the stress presented by life events on the basis of their appraisals of the threats posed and the availability of effective coping resources. The biological tradition focuses on brain-based perturbations of physiological systems that are otherwise essential for normal homeostatic regulation and metabolic control. The foci of these three traditions have informed elements of a stage model of disease, wherein events appraised as stressful are viewed as triggering affective states that in turn engender behavioral and biological responses having possible downstream implications for disease. PMID:27474134

  3. The algebras of large N matrix mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B.; Schwartz, C.

    1999-09-16

    Extending early work, we formulate the large N matrix mechanics of general bosonic, fermionic and supersymmetric matrix models, including Matrix theory: The Hamiltonian framework of large N matrix mechanics provides a natural setting in which to study the algebras of the large N limit, including (reduced) Lie algebras, (reduced) supersymmetry algebras and free algebras. We find in particular a broad array of new free algebras which we call symmetric Cuntz algebras, interacting symmetric Cuntz algebras, symmetric Bose/Fermi/Cuntz algebras and symmetric Cuntz superalgebras, and we discuss the role of these algebras in solving the large N theory. Most important, the interacting Cuntz algebras are associated to a set of new (hidden!) local quantities which are generically conserved only at large N. A number of other new large N phenomena are also observed, including the intrinsic nonlocality of the (reduced) trace class operators of the theory and a closely related large N field identification phenomenon which is associated to another set (this time nonlocal) of new conserved quantities at large N.

  4. Development of unified Reynolds stress models for non-equilibrium turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang-Hua

    Turbulence modeling has played a major role in the calculation of turbulent flows of engineering importance. To solve the flow problems that arise in both nature and engineering, a variety of Reynolds stress models--including simple eddy viscosity models based on the Prandtl mixing length hypothesis, one-equation and two-equation models, nonlinear two-equation and explicit algebraic stress models, as well as full second-order closures--have been proposed during the past few decades. These models, which are typically based on benchmark near-equilibrium turbulence experimental data, perform fairly well in a variety of turbulent flows that are not far from equilibrium. However, it is now well recognized that these models cannot correctly predict turbulent flows that are far from equilibrium. In this dissertation, it is shown that they cannot even properly predict homogeneous turbulent flows that are in strongly strained non-equilibrium states. Two benchmark flows--homogeneous turbulent shear flow and homogeneous plane strain turbulence--are chosen to evaluate the performance of existing turbulence models since these two benchmark flows constitute idealizations of real engineering turbulent flows. It is found that none of the existing Reynolds stress models (including a recent version of a non-equilibrium, near-wall model) can predict results that compare favorably with Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) in strongly distorted turbulent flows that are far from equilibrium. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the standard linear and nonlinear two-equation models can predict enormous negative values of the normal Reynolds stresses in non-equilibrium homogeneous turbulence that strongly violate basic realizability constraints. In light of the poor performance of existing Reynolds stress models in non-equilibrium homogeneous turbulence, two new Reynolds stress models are developed herein--an explicit algebraic stress model and a full second-order closure--that can correctly

  5. Central charge and quasihole scaling dimensions from model wavefunctions: toward relating Jack wavefunctions to {\\cal W} -algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernevig, B. Andrei; Gurarie, Victor; Simon, Steven H.

    2009-06-01

    We present a general method for obtaining the central charge and the quasihole scaling dimension directly from ground-state and quasihole wavefunctions. Our method applies to wavefunctions satisfying specific clustering properties. We then use our method to examine the relation between Jack symmetric functions and certain {\\cal W} -algebras. We add substantially to the evidence that the (k, r) admissible Jack functions correspond to correlators of the conformal field theory {\\cal W}_k(k+1,k+r) by calculating the central charge and scaling dimensions of some of the fields in both cases and showing that they match. For the Jacks described by unitary {\\cal W} -models, the central charge and quasihole exponents match those previously obtained from analyzing the physics of the edge excitations. For the Jacks described by non-unitary {\\cal W} -models the central charge and quasihole scaling dimensions obtained from the wavefunctions differ from those obtained from the edge physics, which instead agree with the 'effective' central charge of the corresponding {\\cal W} -model.

  6. Matrix-algebra-based calculations of the time evolution of the binary spin-bath model for magnetization transfer.

    PubMed

    Müller, Dirk K; Pampel, André; Möller, Harald E

    2013-05-01

    Quantification of magnetization-transfer (MT) experiments are typically based on the assumption of the binary spin-bath model. This model allows for the extraction of up to six parameters (relative pool sizes, relaxation times, and exchange rate constants) for the characterization of macromolecules, which are coupled via exchange processes to the water in tissues. Here, an approach is presented for estimating MT parameters acquired with arbitrary saturation schemes and imaging pulse sequences. It uses matrix algebra to solve the Bloch-McConnell equations without unwarranted simplifications, such as assuming steady-state conditions for pulsed saturation schemes or neglecting imaging pulses. The algorithm achieves sufficient efficiency for voxel-by-voxel MT parameter estimations by using a polynomial interpolation technique. Simulations, as well as experiments in agar gels with continuous-wave and pulsed MT preparation, were performed for validation and for assessing approximations in previous modeling approaches. In vivo experiments in the normal human brain yielded results that were consistent with published data.

  7. Numerical algebraic geometry and algebraic kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wampler, Charles W.; Sommese, Andrew J.

    In this article, the basic constructs of algebraic kinematics (links, joints, and mechanism spaces) are introduced. This provides a common schema for many kinds of problems that are of interest in kinematic studies. Once the problems are cast in this algebraic framework, they can be attacked by tools from algebraic geometry. In particular, we review the techniques of numerical algebraic geometry, which are primarily based on homotopy methods. We include a review of the main developments of recent years and outline some of the frontiers where further research is occurring. While numerical algebraic geometry applies broadly to any system of polynomial equations, algebraic kinematics provides a body of interesting examples for testing algorithms and for inspiring new avenues of work.

  8. Investigation of quantum phase transitions in the spdf interacting boson model based on dual algebraic structures for the four-level pairing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Jalili Majarshin, A.; Fouladi, N.; Ghapanvari, M.

    2016-09-01

    The building blocks of the interacting boson model (IBM) are associated with both s and d bosons for positive parity states. An extension of sd-IBM along these models to spdf-IBM can provide the appropriate framework to describe negative parity states. In this paper, a solvable extended transitional Hamiltonian based on the affine \\widehat{{SU}(1,1)} Lie algebra is proposed to describe low lying positive and negative parity states between the spherical and deformed gamma-unstable shape. Quantum phase transitions (QPTs) are investigated based on dual algebraic structures for the four-level pairing model. Numerical extraction to low-lying energy levels and transition rates within the control parameters of this evaluated Hamiltonian are presented for various N values. By reproducing the experimental results, the method based on the signatures of the phase transition, such as the expectation value of the boson number operators in the lowest excited states, are used to provide a better description of Ru isotopes in this transitional region.

  9. Residual Stresses Modeled in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freborg, A. M.; Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications continue to increase as the need for greater engine efficiency in aircraft and land-based gas turbines increases. However, durability and reliability issues limit the benefits that can be derived from TBC's. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms that cause TBC failure is a key to increasing, as well as predicting, TBC durability. Oxidation of the bond coat has been repeatedly identified as one of the major factors affecting the durability of the ceramic top coat during service. However, the mechanisms by which oxidation facilitates TBC failure are poorly understood and require further characterization. In addition, researchers have suspected that other bond coat and top coat factors might influence TBC thermal fatigue life, both separately and through interactions with the mechanism of oxidation. These other factors include the bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, the bond coat roughness, and the creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers. Although it is difficult to design an experiment to examine these factors unambiguously, it is possible to design a computer modeling "experiment" to examine the action and interaction of these factors, as well as to determine failure drivers for TBC's. Previous computer models have examined some of these factors separately to determine their effect on coating residual stresses, but none have examined all the factors concurrently. The purpose of this research, which was performed at DCT, Inc., in contract with the NASA Lewis Research Center, was to develop an inclusive finite element model to characterize the effects of oxidation on the residual stresses within the TBC system during thermal cycling as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with the other factors affecting TBC life. The plasma sprayed, two-layer thermal barrier coating that was modeled incorporated a superalloy substrate, a NiCrAlY bond coat, and a ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic top coat. We

  10. An algebraic model on the performance of a direct methanol fuel cell with consideration of methanol crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ken-Ming

    An algebraic one-dimensional model on the membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is proposed. Non-linear regression procedure was imposed on the model to retrieve important parameters: solid polymer electrolyte conductivity κ m, exchange current density of methanol electro-oxidation at anode catalyst surface i oM,ref, and mass diffusivity of methanol in aqueous phase within the porous electrode D a that correspond to the experimentally measured polarization curves. Although numerical iteration is required for a complete solution, the explicit relationships of methanol concentration, methanol crossover rate, oxygen concentration and cell discharge current density do provide a clear picture of the mass transport and electrochemical kinetics within the various porous media in the MEA. It is shown the cathode mixed potential induced by the parallel reactions of oxygen reduction and oxidation of crossover methanol elucidates the potential drop of the cathode and the decrease of the cell open circuit voltage (OCV). Methanol transport in the membrane is described by the diffusion, electro-osmosis, and pressure induced convection. Detailed accounts of the effects of anode methanol and cathode oxygen feed concentrations on the cell discharge performance are given with correlation to the physical structure and chemical compositions of the catalyst layers (CLs).

  11. A priori direct numerical simulation assessment of algebraic flame surface density models for turbulent premixed flames in the context of large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus

    2008-08-01

    Flame surface density (FSD) based reaction rate closure is one of the most important approaches in turbulent premixed flame modeling. The algebraic models for FSD based on power laws often require information about the fractal dimension D and the inner cut-off scale ηi. In the present study, two three-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) databases for freely propagating statistically planar turbulent premixed flames are analyzed among which the flame in one case belongs to the corrugated flamelet (CF) regime, whereas the other falls well within the thin reaction zone (TRZ) regime. It is found that D for the flame in the TRZ regime is greater than the value obtained for the flame in the CF regime. For the flame within the TRZ regime, the fractal dimension is found to be 7/3, which is the same as D for a material surface in a turbulent environment. For the flame in the CF regime, ηi is found to scale with the Gibson scale, whereas ηi is found to scale with the Kolmogorov length scale for the flame in the TRZ regime. Based on these observations a new algebraic model for FSD is proposed, where D and ηi are expressed as functions of Karlovitz number. The performances of the new and existing algebraic models for FSD are compared with the corresponding values obtained from DNS databases.

  12. Quantization of Algebraic Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sniatycki, Jeodrzej

    2007-11-14

    For a Poisson algebra obtained by algebraic reduction of symmetries of a quantizable system we develop an analogue of geometric quantization based on the quantization structure of the original system.

  13. Learning Algebra in a Computer Algebra Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drijvers, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This article summarises a doctoral thesis entitled "Learning algebra in a computer algebra environment, design research on the understanding of the concept of parameter" (Drijvers, 2003). It describes the research questions, the theoretical framework, the methodology and the results of the study. The focus of the study is on the understanding of…

  14. The Adaptive Calibration Model of stress responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Adaptive Calibration Model (ACM), an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in the functioning of the stress response system. The stress response system has three main biological functions: (1) to coordinate the organism’s allostatic response to physical and psychosocial challenges; (2) to encode and filter information about the organism’s social and physical environment, mediating the organism’s openness to environmental inputs; and (3) to regulate the organism’s physiology and behavior in a broad range of fitness-relevant areas including defensive behaviors, competitive risk-taking, learning, attachment, affiliation and reproductive functioning. The information encoded by the system during development feeds back on the long-term calibration of the system itself, resulting in adaptive patterns of responsivity and individual differences in behavior. Drawing on evolutionary life history theory, we build a model of the development of stress responsivity across life stages, describe four prototypical responsivity patterns, and discuss the emergence and meaning of sex differences. The ACM extends the theory of biological sensitivity to context (BSC) and provides an integrative framework for future research in the field. PMID:21145350

  15. Algebraic theory of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iachello, Franco

    1995-01-01

    An algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics is presented. In this formulation, operators of interest are expanded onto elements of an algebra, G. For bound state problems in nu dimensions the algebra G is taken to be U(nu + 1). Applications to the structure of molecules are presented.

  16. Profiles of Algebraic Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humberstone, J.; Reeve, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The algebraic competence of 72 12-year-old female students was examined to identify profiles of understanding reflecting different algebraic knowledge states. Beginning algebraic competence (mapping abilities: word-to-symbol and vice versa, classifying, and solving equations) was assessed. One week later, the nature of assistance required to map…

  17. Orientation in operator algebras

    PubMed Central

    Alfsen, Erik M.; Shultz, Frederic W.

    1998-01-01

    A concept of orientation is relevant for the passage from Jordan structure to associative structure in operator algebras. The research reported in this paper bridges the approach of Connes for von Neumann algebras and ourselves for C*-algebras in a general theory of orientation that is of geometric nature and is related to dynamics. PMID:9618457

  18. Developing Thinking in Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, John; Graham, Alan; Johnson-Wilder, Sue

    2005-01-01

    This book is for people with an interest in algebra whether as a learner, or as a teacher, or perhaps as both. It is concerned with the "big ideas" of algebra and what it is to understand the process of thinking algebraically. The book has been structured according to a number of pedagogic principles that are exposed and discussed along the way,…

  19. Connecting Arithmetic to Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darley, Joy W.; Leapard, Barbara B.

    2010-01-01

    Algebraic thinking is a top priority in mathematics classrooms today. Because elementary school teachers lay the groundwork to develop students' capacity to think algebraically, it is crucial for teachers to have a conceptual understanding of the connections between arithmetic and algebra and be confident in communicating these connections. Many…

  20. Comparison of an algebraic multigrid algorithm to two iterative solvers used for modeling ground water flow and transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detwiler, R.L.; Mehl, S.; Rajaram, H.; Cheung, W.W.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical solution of large-scale ground water flow and transport problems is often constrained by the convergence behavior of the iterative solvers used to solve the resulting systems of equations. We demonstrate the ability of an algebraic multigrid algorithm (AMG) to efficiently solve the large, sparse systems of equations that result from computational models of ground water flow and transport in large and complex domains. Unlike geometric multigrid methods, this algorithm is applicable to problems in complex flow geometries, such as those encountered in pore-scale modeling of two-phase flow and transport. We integrated AMG into MODFLOW 2000 to compare two- and three-dimensional flow simulations using AMG to simulations using PCG2, a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver that uses the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioner and is included with MODFLOW 2000. CPU times required for convergence with AMG were up to 140 times faster than those for PCG2. The cost of this increased speed was up to a nine-fold increase in required random access memory (RAM) for the three-dimensional problems and up to a four-fold increase in required RAM for the two-dimensional problems. We also compared two-dimensional numerical simulations of steady-state transport using AMG and the generalized minimum residual method with an incomplete LU-decomposition preconditioner. For these transport simulations, AMG yielded increased speeds of up to 17 times with only a 20% increase in required RAM. The ability of AMG to solve flow and transport problems in large, complex flow systems and its ready availability make it an ideal solver for use in both field-scale and pore-scale modeling.

  1. Algebraic multigrid preconditioning within parallel finite-element solvers for 3-D electromagnetic modelling problems in geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldan, Jelena; Puzyrev, Vladimir; de la Puente, Josep; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Cela, José María

    2014-06-01

    We present an elaborate preconditioning scheme for Krylov subspace methods which has been developed to improve the performance and reduce the execution time of parallel node-based finite-element (FE) solvers for 3-D electromagnetic (EM) numerical modelling in exploration geophysics. This new preconditioner is based on algebraic multigrid (AMG) that uses different basic relaxation methods, such as Jacobi, symmetric successive over-relaxation (SSOR) and Gauss-Seidel, as smoothers and the wave front algorithm to create groups, which are used for a coarse-level generation. We have implemented and tested this new preconditioner within our parallel nodal FE solver for 3-D forward problems in EM induction geophysics. We have performed series of experiments for several models with different conductivity structures and characteristics to test the performance of our AMG preconditioning technique when combined with biconjugate gradient stabilized method. The results have shown that, the more challenging the problem is in terms of conductivity contrasts, ratio between the sizes of grid elements and/or frequency, the more benefit is obtained by using this preconditioner. Compared to other preconditioning schemes, such as diagonal, SSOR and truncated approximate inverse, the AMG preconditioner greatly improves the convergence of the iterative solver for all tested models. Also, when it comes to cases in which other preconditioners succeed to converge to a desired precision, AMG is able to considerably reduce the total execution time of the forward-problem code-up to an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the tests have confirmed that our AMG scheme ensures grid-independent rate of convergence, as well as improvement in convergence regardless of how big local mesh refinements are. In addition, AMG is designed to be a black-box preconditioner, which makes it easy to use and combine with different iterative methods. Finally, it has proved to be very practical and efficient in the

  2. A Theoretical Framework for Research in Algebra: Modification of Janvier's "Star" Model of Function Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Anita H.

    A pentagonal model, based on the star model of function understanding of C. Janvier (1987), is presented as a framework for the design and interpretation of research in the area of learning the concept of mathematical function. The five vertices of the pentagon correspond to five common representations of mathematical function: (1) graph; (2)…

  3. A non-linear algebraic model for the turbulent scalar fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Younis, B.A.; Speziale, C.G.; Clark, T.T.

    1995-09-01

    The need for a new approach to modelling the scalar fluxes stems from the lack of realism in the performance of the simple gradient-transport models and the inadequacy of many of the assumptions underlying the more complicated scalar-flux transport closures. The problems with the simple gradient-transport closures are well known. In models of this type, the scalar fluxes are related to the mean scalar field via a scalar turbulent diffusivity. The purpose of this paper is to report on a novel approach to the modelling of the turbulent scalar fluxes (u{sub i}{theta}) which arise as a consequence of time averaging the transport equation for a mean scalar ({Theta}). The focus of this paper will be on the case where {Theta} is a `passive` scalar; the extension of this approach to cases involving buoyancy and compressibility will be briefly discussed. Models of this type fail badly in complex and strongly-buoyant flows.

  4. Conceptualizing Family Stress: A Systemic Revision of Hill's ABCX Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Alberta Y.

    This report offers a theoretical approach to the study of family adaptation to stress. Major works pertaining to family theory, research, and stress, published since 1979, are explored as a theoretical framework, and three conclusions are drawn from these sources: (1) Hill's ABCX model of family stress still influences family stress research; (2)…

  5. The BCS-Bogoliubov and the su(2)-Algebraic Approach to the Pairing Model in Many-Fermion System --- The Quasiparticle in the Conservation of the Fermion Number ---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsue, Y.; Providência, C.; Providência, J. d.; Yamamura, M.

    2012-10-01

    The relation between two approaches to the su(2)-algebraic many-fermion model is discussed: (1) the BCS-Bogoliubov approach in terms of the use of the quasiparticles representing all the degrees of freedom except those related to the Cooper-pairs and (2) the conventional algebraic approach in terms of the use of the minimum weight states, from which the Cooper-pairs are excluded. In order to arrive at the goal, the idea of the quasiparticles is brought up in the conservation of the fermion number. Under the c-number replacement for the three su(2)-generators, the quasiparticles suggested in this paper are reduced to those in the BCS-Bogoliubov approach. It is also shown that the two approaches are equivalent through the c-number replacement. Further, a certain modification of the BCS-Bogoliubov approach is discussed.

  6. Computer algebra and operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fateman, Richard; Grossman, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The symbolic computation of operator expansions is discussed. Some of the capabilities that prove useful when performing computer algebra computations involving operators are considered. These capabilities may be broadly divided into three areas: the algebraic manipulation of expressions from the algebra generated by operators; the algebraic manipulation of the actions of the operators upon other mathematical objects; and the development of appropriate normal forms and simplification algorithms for operators and their actions. Brief descriptions are given of the computer algebra computations that arise when working with various operators and their actions.

  7. A Metric Conceptual Space Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Benjamin; Raubal, Martin

    The modeling of concepts from a cognitive perspective is important for designing spatial information systems that interoperate with human users. Concept representations that are built using geometric and topological conceptual space structures are well suited for semantic similarity and concept combination operations. In addition, concepts that are more closely grounded in the physical world, such as many spatial concepts, have a natural fit with the geometric structure of conceptual spaces. Despite these apparent advantages, conceptual spaces are underutilized because existing formalizations of conceptual space theory have focused on individual aspects of the theory rather than the creation of a comprehensive algebra. In this paper we present a metric conceptual space algebra that is designed to facilitate the creation of conceptual space knowledge bases and inferencing systems. Conceptual regions are represented as convex polytopes and context is built in as a fundamental element. We demonstrate the applicability of the algebra to spatial information systems with a proof-of-concept application.

  8. Algebraic Lattices in QFT Renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinsky, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The structure of overlapping subdivergences, which appear in the perturbative expansions of quantum field theory, is analyzed using algebraic lattice theory. It is shown that for specific QFTs the sets of subdivergences of Feynman diagrams form algebraic lattices. This class of QFTs includes the standard model. In kinematic renormalization schemes, in which tadpole diagrams vanish, these lattices are semimodular. This implies that the Hopf algebra of Feynman diagrams is graded by the coradical degree or equivalently that every maximal forest has the same length in the scope of BPHZ renormalization. As an application of this framework, a formula for the counter terms in zero-dimensional QFT is given together with some examples of the enumeration of primitive or skeleton diagrams.

  9. Discrete Minimal Surface Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnlind, Joakim; Hoppe, Jens

    2010-05-01

    We consider discrete minimal surface algebras (DMSA) as generalized noncommutative analogues of minimal surfaces in higher dimensional spheres. These algebras appear naturally in membrane theory, where sequences of their representations are used as a regularization. After showing that the defining relations of the algebra are consistent, and that one can compute a basis of the enveloping algebra, we give several explicit examples of DMSAs in terms of subsets of sln (any semi-simple Lie algebra providing a trivial example by itself). A special class of DMSAs are Yang-Mills algebras. The representation graph is introduced to study representations of DMSAs of dimension d ≤ 4, and properties of representations are related to properties of graphs. The representation graph of a tensor product is (generically) the Cartesian product of the corresponding graphs. We provide explicit examples of irreducible representations and, for coinciding eigenvalues, classify all the unitary representations of the corresponding algebras.

  10. The Heisenberg-Weyl algebra on the circle and a related quantum mechanical model for hindered rotation.

    PubMed

    Kouri, Donald J; Markovich, Thomas; Maxwell, Nicholas; Bodmann, Bernhard G

    2009-07-01

    We discuss a periodic variant of the Heisenberg-Weyl algebra, associated with the group of translations and modulations on the circle. Our study of uncertainty minimizers leads to a periodic version of canonical coherent states. Unlike the canonical, Cartesian case, there are states for which the uncertainty product associated with the generators of the algebra vanishes. Next, we explore the supersymmetric (SUSY) quantum mechanical setting for the uncertainty-minimizing states and interpret them as leading to a family of "hindered rotors". Finally, we present a standard quantum mechanical treatment of one of these hindered rotor systems, including numerically generated eigenstates and energies.

  11. Computational algebraic geometry for statistical modeling FY09Q2 progress.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Rojas, Joseph Maurice; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2009-03-01

    This is a progress report on polynomial system solving for statistical modeling. This is a progress report on polynomial system solving for statistical modeling. This quarter we have developed our first model of shock response data and an algorithm for identifying the chamber cone containing a polynomial system in n variables with n+k terms within polynomial time - a significant improvement over previous algorithms, all having exponential worst-case complexity. We have implemented and verified the chamber cone algorithm for n+3 and are working to extend the implementation to handle arbitrary k. Later sections of this report explain chamber cones in more detail; the next section provides an overview of the project and how the current progress fits into it.

  12. SDG fermion-pair algebraic SO(12) and Sp(10) models and their boson realizations

    SciTech Connect

    Navatil, P.; Geyer, H.B.; Dobes, J.

    1995-11-01

    It is shown how the boson mapping formalism may be applied as a useful many-body tool to solve a fermion problem. This is done in the context of generalized Ginocchio models for which the authors introduce S-, D-, and G-pairs of fermions and subsequently construct the sdg-boson realizations of the generalized Dyson type. The constructed SO(12) and Sp(10) fermion models are solved beyond the explicit symmetry limits. Phase transitions to rotational structures are obtained also in situations where there is no underlying SU(3) symmetry. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Stress shield: a model of police resiliency.

    PubMed

    Paton, Douglas; Violanti, John M; Johnston, Peter; Burke, Karena J; Clarke, Joanna; Keenan, Denise

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a new model of police officer resiliency. Following Antonovsky's definition of resilience, the model is built on the view that the resilience of a person or group reflects the extent to which they can call upon their psychological and physical resources and competencies in ways that allow them to render challenging events coherent, manageable, and meaningful. The model posits that a police officer's capacity to render challenging experiences meaningful, coherent, and manageable reflects the interaction of person, team, and organizational factors. The paper argues that a model that encompasses these factors can be developed using theories drawn from the literatures of occupational health and empowerment. The development of the model is also informed by the need to ensure that it can accommodate the importance of learning from past experiences to build resilience in ways that increase officers' capacity to adapt to future risk and uncertainty. By building on recent empirical research, this paper outlines a new multi-level model of resilience and adaptive capacity. The Stress Shield model of resilience integrates person, team and organizational factors to provide a proactive framework for developing and sustaining police officer resilience.

  14. Stress shield: a model of police resiliency.

    PubMed

    Paton, Douglas; Violanti, John M; Johnston, Peter; Burke, Karena J; Clarke, Joanna; Keenan, Denise

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a new model of police officer resiliency. Following Antonovsky's definition of resilience, the model is built on the view that the resilience of a person or group reflects the extent to which they can call upon their psychological and physical resources and competencies in ways that allow them to render challenging events coherent, manageable, and meaningful. The model posits that a police officer's capacity to render challenging experiences meaningful, coherent, and manageable reflects the interaction of person, team, and organizational factors. The paper argues that a model that encompasses these factors can be developed using theories drawn from the literatures of occupational health and empowerment. The development of the model is also informed by the need to ensure that it can accommodate the importance of learning from past experiences to build resilience in ways that increase officers' capacity to adapt to future risk and uncertainty. By building on recent empirical research, this paper outlines a new multi-level model of resilience and adaptive capacity. The Stress Shield model of resilience integrates person, team and organizational factors to provide a proactive framework for developing and sustaining police officer resilience. PMID:18788345

  15. The biopsychosocial model of stress in adolescence: self-awareness of performance versus stress reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Rith-Najarian, Leslie R.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Sheridan, Margaret A.; Nock, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research among adults supports the biopsychosocial (BPS) model of challenge and threat, which describes relationships among stress appraisals, physiological stress reactivity, and performance; however, no previous studies have examined these relationships in adolescents. Perceptions of stressors as well as physiological reactivity to stress increase during adolescence, highlighting the importance of understanding the relationships among stress appraisals, physiological reactivity, and performance during this developmental period. In this study, 79 adolescent participants reported on stress appraisals before and after a Trier Social Stress Test in which they performed a speech task. Physiological stress reactivity was defined by changes in cardiac output and total peripheral resistance from a baseline rest period to the speech task, and performance on the speech was coded using an objective rating system. We observed in adolescents only two relationships found in past adult research on the BPS model variables: (1) pre-task stress appraisal predicted post-task stress appraisal and (2) performance predicted post-task stress appraisal. Physiological reactivity during the speech was unrelated to pre- and post-task stress appraisals and to performance. We conclude that the lack of association between post-task stress appraisal and physiological stress reactivity suggests that adolescents might have low self-awareness of physiological emotional arousal. Our findings further suggest that adolescent stress appraisals are based largely on their performance during stressful situations. Developmental implications of this potential lack of awareness of one’s physiological and emotional state during adolescence are discussed. PMID:24491123

  16. The biopsychosocial model of stress in adolescence: self-awareness of performance versus stress reactivity.

    PubMed

    Rith-Najarian, Leslie R; McLaughlin, Katie A; Sheridan, Margaret A; Nock, Matthew K

    2014-03-01

    Extensive research among adults supports the biopsychosocial (BPS) model of challenge and threat, which describes relationships among stress appraisals, physiological stress reactivity, and performance; however, no previous studies have examined these relationships in adolescents. Perceptions of stressors as well as physiological reactivity to stress increase during adolescence, highlighting the importance of understanding the relationships among stress appraisals, physiological reactivity, and performance during this developmental period. In this study, 79 adolescent participants reported on stress appraisals before and after a Trier Social Stress Test in which they performed a speech task. Physiological stress reactivity was defined by changes in cardiac output and total peripheral resistance from a baseline rest period to the speech task, and performance on the speech was coded using an objective rating system. We observed in adolescents only two relationships found in past adult research on the BPS model variables: (1) pre-task stress appraisal predicted post-task stress appraisal and (2) performance predicted post-task stress appraisal. Physiological reactivity during the speech was unrelated to pre- and post-task stress appraisals and to performance. We conclude that the lack of association between post-task stress appraisal and physiological stress reactivity suggests that adolescents might have low self-awareness of physiological emotional arousal. Our findings further suggest that adolescent stress appraisals are based largely on their performance during stressful situations. Developmental implications of this potential lack of awareness of one's physiological and emotional state during adolescence are discussed. PMID:24491123

  17. The biopsychosocial model of stress in adolescence: self-awareness of performance versus stress reactivity.

    PubMed

    Rith-Najarian, Leslie R; McLaughlin, Katie A; Sheridan, Margaret A; Nock, Matthew K

    2014-03-01

    Extensive research among adults supports the biopsychosocial (BPS) model of challenge and threat, which describes relationships among stress appraisals, physiological stress reactivity, and performance; however, no previous studies have examined these relationships in adolescents. Perceptions of stressors as well as physiological reactivity to stress increase during adolescence, highlighting the importance of understanding the relationships among stress appraisals, physiological reactivity, and performance during this developmental period. In this study, 79 adolescent participants reported on stress appraisals before and after a Trier Social Stress Test in which they performed a speech task. Physiological stress reactivity was defined by changes in cardiac output and total peripheral resistance from a baseline rest period to the speech task, and performance on the speech was coded using an objective rating system. We observed in adolescents only two relationships found in past adult research on the BPS model variables: (1) pre-task stress appraisal predicted post-task stress appraisal and (2) performance predicted post-task stress appraisal. Physiological reactivity during the speech was unrelated to pre- and post-task stress appraisals and to performance. We conclude that the lack of association between post-task stress appraisal and physiological stress reactivity suggests that adolescents might have low self-awareness of physiological emotional arousal. Our findings further suggest that adolescent stress appraisals are based largely on their performance during stressful situations. Developmental implications of this potential lack of awareness of one's physiological and emotional state during adolescence are discussed.

  18. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which are not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  19. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which is not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  20. Stress Management Model for the Elementary/Middle/High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    The Matthews Stress Management formula is a stress management model for use in schools. This effective, practical, and inexpensive model entails the awareness of the physiology of stress, perception of tangible bases of motivation for children, appropriate and simplified techniques, applicability to other areas, and full recognition of the…

  1. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results. PMID:24188921

  2. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-12-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results.

  3. Tests of Predictions of the Algebraic Cluster Model: the Triangular D 3h Symmetry of 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Moshe

    2016-07-01

    A new theoretical approach to clustering in the frame of the Algebraic Cluster Model (ACM) has been developed. It predicts rotation-vibration structure with rotational band of an oblate equilateral triangular symmetric spinning top with a D 3h symmetry characterized by the sequence of states: 0+, 2+, 3-, 4±, 5- with a degenerate 4+ and 4- (parity doublet) states. Our measured new 2+ 2 in 12C allows the first study of rotation-vibration structure in 12C. The newly measured 5- state and 4- states fit very well the predicted ground state rotational band structure with the predicted sequence of states: 0+, 2+, 3-, 4±, 5- with almost degenerate 4+ and 4- (parity doublet) states. Such a D 3h symmetry is characteristic of triatomic molecules, but it is observed in the ground state rotational band of 12C for the first time in a nucleus. We discuss predictions of the ACM of other rotation-vibration bands in 12 C such as the (0+) Hoyle band and the (1-) bending mode with prediction of (“missing 3- and 4-”) states that may shed new light on clustering in 12C and light nuclei. In particular, the observation (or non observation) of the predicted (“missing”) states in the Hoyle band will allow us to conclude the geometrical arrangement of the three alpha particles composing the Hoyle state at 7.6542 MeV in 12C. We discuss proposed research programs at the Darmstadt S-DALINAC and at the newly constructed ELI-NP facility near Bucharest to test the predictions of the ACM in isotopes of carbon.

  4. Unstressing intemperate models: how cold stress undermines mouse modeling.

    PubMed

    Karp, Christopher L

    2012-06-01

    Mus musculus enjoys pride of place at the center of contemporary biomedical research. Despite being the current model system of choice for in vivo mechanistic analysis, mice have clear limitations. The literature is littered with examples of therapeutic approaches that showed promise in mouse models but failed in clinical trials. More generally, mice often provide poor mimics of the human diseases being modeled. Available data suggest that the cold stress to which laboratory mice are ubiquitously subjected profoundly affects mouse physiology in ways that impair the modeling of human homeostasis and disease. Experimental attention to this key, albeit largely ignored, environmental variable is likely to have a broad transformative effect on biomedical research.

  5. The Effects of Female Mathematician Role Models on Eighth- and Ninth-Grade First-Year Algebra Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Judith A.; Tracy, Dyanne M.

    In the United States female and male students supposedly have the same educational opportunities. Females continue to score below male students on the mathematics portions of standardized tests and less frequently choose mathematics-oriented careers. In this experimental study (n=95), 47 first-year algebra students participated in a month-long…

  6. Effectiveness of the Mind Research Institute's Algebra Readiness Curriculum on Student Achievement Implemented in a Tiered Response to Intervention Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quick, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Algebra is typically the gatekeeper for higher-level math coursework. Low math performance on standardized assessments impedes access to these higher-level math classes. Limited math progress in high school affects future career opportunities and quality of life. High school students who have historically struggled with math need interventions…

  7. Linear algebra of the permutation invariant Crow-Kimura model of prebiotic evolution.

    PubMed

    Bratus, Alexander S; Novozhilov, Artem S; Semenov, Yuri S

    2014-10-01

    A particular case of the famous quasispecies model - the Crow-Kimura model with a permutation invariant fitness landscape - is investigated. Using the fact that the mutation matrix in the case of a permutation invariant fitness landscape has a special tridiagonal form, a change of the basis is suggested such that in the new coordinates a number of analytical results can be obtained. In particular, using the eigenvectors of the mutation matrix as the new basis, we show that the quasispecies distribution approaches a binomial one and give simple estimates for the speed of convergence. Another consequence of the suggested approach is a parametric solution to the system of equations determining the quasispecies. Using this parametric solution we show that our approach leads to exact asymptotic results in some cases, which are not covered by the existing methods. In particular, we are able to present not only the limit behavior of the leading eigenvalue (mean population fitness), but also the exact formulas for the limit quasispecies eigenvector for special cases. For instance, this eigenvector has a geometric distribution in the case of the classical single peaked fitness landscape. On the biological side, we propose a mathematical definition, based on the closeness of the quasispecies to the binomial distribution, which can be used as an operational definition of the notorious error threshold. Using this definition, we suggest two approximate formulas to estimate the critical mutation rate after which the quasispecies delocalization occurs. PMID:25149562

  8. Linear algebra of the permutation invariant Crow-Kimura model of prebiotic evolution.

    PubMed

    Bratus, Alexander S; Novozhilov, Artem S; Semenov, Yuri S

    2014-10-01

    A particular case of the famous quasispecies model - the Crow-Kimura model with a permutation invariant fitness landscape - is investigated. Using the fact that the mutation matrix in the case of a permutation invariant fitness landscape has a special tridiagonal form, a change of the basis is suggested such that in the new coordinates a number of analytical results can be obtained. In particular, using the eigenvectors of the mutation matrix as the new basis, we show that the quasispecies distribution approaches a binomial one and give simple estimates for the speed of convergence. Another consequence of the suggested approach is a parametric solution to the system of equations determining the quasispecies. Using this parametric solution we show that our approach leads to exact asymptotic results in some cases, which are not covered by the existing methods. In particular, we are able to present not only the limit behavior of the leading eigenvalue (mean population fitness), but also the exact formulas for the limit quasispecies eigenvector for special cases. For instance, this eigenvector has a geometric distribution in the case of the classical single peaked fitness landscape. On the biological side, we propose a mathematical definition, based on the closeness of the quasispecies to the binomial distribution, which can be used as an operational definition of the notorious error threshold. Using this definition, we suggest two approximate formulas to estimate the critical mutation rate after which the quasispecies delocalization occurs.

  9. Improved analytical model for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxu; Li, Bin; Xiong, Liangshan

    2014-09-01

    The analytical model of residual stress in orthogonal cutting proposed by Jiann is an important tool for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting. In application of the model, a problem of low precision of the surface residual stress prediction is found. By theoretical analysis, several shortages of Jiann's model are picked out, including: inappropriate boundary conditions, unreasonable calculation method of thermal stress, ignorance of stress constraint and cyclic loading algorithm. These shortages may directly lead to the low precision of the surface residual stress prediction. To eliminate these shortages and make the prediction more accurate, an improved model is proposed. In this model, a new contact boundary condition between tool and workpiece is used to make it in accord with the real cutting process; an improved calculation method of thermal stress is adopted; a stress constraint is added according to the volumeconstancy of plastic deformation; and the accumulative effect of the stresses during cyclic loading is considered. At last, an experiment for measuring residual stress in cutting AISI 1045 steel is conducted. Also, Jiann's model and the improved model are simulated under the same conditions with cutting experiment. The comparisons show that the surface residual stresses predicted by the improved model is closer to the experimental results than the results predicted by Jiann's model.

  10. ALGEBRA IIVer 1.22

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-03

    The ALGEBRA II program allows the user to manipulate data from a finite element analysis before it is plotted by evaluating algebraic expressions. The equation variables are dependent on the input database variable names. The finite element output data is in the form of variable values (e.g., stress, strain, and velocity components) in an EXODUS II database which can be read by plot programs. Code is written in a portable form as possible. Fortran code is written in ANSI Standard FORTRAN-77. Machine-specific routines are limited in number and are grouped together to minimize the time required to adapt them to a new system. SEACAS codes has been ported to several Unix systems.

  11. ALGEBRA IIVer 1.22

    2003-06-03

    The ALGEBRA II program allows the user to manipulate data from a finite element analysis before it is plotted by evaluating algebraic expressions. The equation variables are dependent on the input database variable names. The finite element output data is in the form of variable values (e.g., stress, strain, and velocity components) in an EXODUS II database which can be read by plot programs. Code is written in a portable form as possible. Fortran codemore » is written in ANSI Standard FORTRAN-77. Machine-specific routines are limited in number and are grouped together to minimize the time required to adapt them to a new system. SEACAS codes has been ported to several Unix systems.« less

  12. A modular approach to modeling an isolated power system on a finite voltage bus using a differential algebraic equation solving routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipps, Mark R.

    1994-03-01

    The modeling of power systems has been primarily driven by the commercial power utility industry. These models usually involve the assumption that system bus voltage and frequency are constant. However, in applications such as shipboard power systems this infinite bus assumption is not valid. This thesis investigates the modeling of a synchronous generator and various loads in a modular fashion on a finite bus. The simulation presented allows the interconnection of multiple state-space models via a bus voltage model. The major difficulty encountered in building a model which computes bus voltage at each time step is that bus voltage is a function of current and current derivative terms. Bus voltage is also an input to the state equations which produce the current and current derivatives. This creates an algebraic loop which is a form of implicit differential equation. A routine has been developed by Linda Petzold of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for solving these types of equations. The routine, called Differential Algebraic System Solver (DASSL), has been implemented in a pre-release version of the software Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) and has been made available to the Naval Postgraduate School on a trial basis. An isolated power system is modeled using this software and the DASSL routine. The system response to several dynamic situations is studied and the results are presented.

  13. ALGEBRA: A program that algebraically manipulates the output of a finite element analysis (EXODUS version)

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkey, A.P.

    1988-08-01

    The ALGEBRA program allows the user to manipulate data from a finite element analysis before it is plotted. The finite element output data is in the form of variable values (e.g., stress, strain, and velocity components) in an EXODUS database. The ALGEBRA program evaluates user-supplied functions of the data and writes the results to an output EXODUS database which can be read by plot programs. 8 refs.

  14. q-bosons and the Lie-deformed Heisenberg algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hui-yun; Zhao, Zu Sen

    1998-02-01

    It is shown that the non-Hermitian realization of a Lie-deformed Heisenberg algebra given by Jannussis et al. is closely related with the q-Heisenberg-Weyl algebra of Biedenharn and Macfarlane with q being a phase ( q = eiθ, with θ real). The physical implications of this result are stressed.

  15. Bifactor Item Response Theory Model of Acute Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Yuan; Tang, Jingjing; Zhu, Xia; Miao, Danmin

    2013-01-01

    Background Better understanding of acute stress responses is important for revision of DSM-5. However, the latent structure and relationship between different aspects of acute stress responses haven’t been clarified comprehensively. Bifactor item response model may help resolve this problem. Objective The purpose of this study is to develop a statistical model of acute stress responses, based on data from earthquake rescuers using Acute Stress Response Scale (ASRS). Through this model, we could better understand acute stress responses comprehensively, and provide preliminary information for computerized adaptive testing of stress responses. Methods Acute stress responses of earthquake rescuers were evaluated using ASRS, and state/trait anxiety were assessed using State-trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). A hierarchical item response model (bifactor model) was used to analyze the data. Additionally, we tested this hierarchical model with model fit comparisons with one-dimensional and five-dimensional models. The correlations among acute stress responses and state/trait anxiety were compared, based on both the five-dimensional and bifactor models. Results Model fit comparisons showed bifactor model fit the data best. Item loadings on general and specific factors varied greatly between different aspects of stress responses. Many symptoms (40%) of physiological responses had positive loadings on general factor, and negative loadings on specific factor of physiological responses, while other stress responses had positive loadings on both general and specific factors. After extracting general factor of stress responses using bifactor analysis, significant positive correlations between physiological responses and state/trait anxiety (r = 0.185/0.112, p<0.01) changed into negative ones (r = −0.177/−0.38, p<0.01). Conclusion Our results demonstrated bifactor structure of acute stress responses, and positive and negative correlations between physiological responses

  16. A Richer Understanding of Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Algebra is one of those hard-to-teach topics where pupils seem to struggle to see it as more than a set of rules to learn, but this author recently used the software "Grid Algebra" from ATM, which engaged her Year 7 pupils in exploring algebraic concepts for themselves. "Grid Algebra" allows pupils to experience number, pre-algebra, and algebra…

  17. Connecting Algebra and Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Sean

    2003-01-01

    Correlates high school chemistry curriculum with high school algebra curriculum and makes the case for an integrated approach to mathematics and science instruction. Focuses on process integration. (DDR)

  18. Micromagnetic model for biaxial stress effects on magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablik, M. J.; Riley, L. A.; Burkhardt, G. L.; Kwun, H.; Cannell, P. Y.; Watts, K. T.; Langman, R. A.

    1994-04-01

    A micromagnetic formulation has been developed for modeling the effect of biaxial stress on magnetoelastic processes in polycrystalline steels. The formulation uses a modified version of the Kashiwaya model for the effect of biaxial stress on magnetic properties and combines it with the Schneider-Cannell-Watts model for magnetoelastic processes in steels. In particular, the model involves use of an effective stress equal to one of the deviatoric (i.e. distortional) normal stress components, depending on whether the field is parallel to a tensile or compressive axis or to the third axis perpendicular to the plane of biaxial stress. Computer results are compared to experimental results on the effects of biaxial stress on magnetic properties in mild steel and in SAE-4130 steel. Good qualitative agreement is found in almost all cases, in that in going from one biaxial stress case to the next, the same kinds of changes are seen magnetically.

  19. Expanding stress generation theory: test of a transdiagnostic model.

    PubMed

    Conway, Christopher C; Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A

    2012-08-01

    Originally formulated to understand the recurrence of depressive disorders, the stress generation hypothesis has recently been applied in research on anxiety and externalizing disorders. Results from these investigations, in combination with findings of extensive comorbidity between depression and other mental disorders, suggest the need for an expansion of stress generation models to include the stress generating effects of transdiagnostic pathology as well as those of specific syndromes. Employing latent variable modeling techniques to parse the general and specific elements of commonly co-occurring Axis I syndromes, the current study examined the associations of transdiagnostic internalizing and externalizing dimensions with stressful life events over time. Analyses revealed that, after adjusting for the covariation between the dimensions, internalizing was a significant predictor of interpersonal dependent stress, whereas externalizing was a significant predictor of noninterpersonal dependent stress. Neither latent dimension was associated with the occurrence of independent, or fateful, stressful life events. At the syndrome level, once variance due to the internalizing factor was partialed out, unipolar depression contributed incrementally to the generation of interpersonal dependent stress. In contrast, the presence of panic disorder produced a "stress inhibition" effect, predicting reduced exposure to interpersonal dependent stress. Additionally, dysthymia was associated with an excess of noninterpersonal dependent stress. The latent variable modeling framework used here is discussed in terms of its potential as an integrative model for stress generation research.

  20. A dynamic model of stress and sustained attention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, Peter A.; Warm, Joel S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of stress on sustained attention. With recognition of the task itself as the major source of cognitive stress, a dynamic model is presented that addresses the effects of stress on vigilance and, potentially, a wide variety of attention performance tasks.

  1. The Culture-Work-Health Model and Work Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Michael; Wilson, John F.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the role of organizational culture in the etiology of workplace stress through the framework of the Culture-Work- Health model. A review of relevant business and health literature indicates that culture is an important component of work stress and may be a key to creating effective organizational stress interventions. (SM)

  2. Neotectonic stresses in Fennoscandia: field observations and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    The present-day stress state of Fennoscandia is traditionally viewed as the combination of far field sources and residual glacial loading stresses. Investigations were conducted in different regions of Norway with the purpose of detecting and measuring stress-relief features and to derive from them valuable information on the crustal stress state. Stress-relief features are induced by blasting and sudden rock unloading in road construction and quarrying operations and are common in Norway and very likely in other regions of Fennoscandia. Stress relief at the Earth's surface is diagnostic of anomalously high stress levels at shallow depths in the crust and appears to be a characteristic of the formerly glaciated Baltic and Canadian Precambrian shields. The studied stress-relief features are, in general, indicative of NW-SE compression, suggesting ridge-push as the main source of stress. Our derived stress directions are also in excellent agreement with the ones derived from other kinds of stress indicators, including focal mechanisms from deep earthquakes, demonstrating that stress-relief features are valuable for neotectonic research. As a second step we applied numerical modelling techniques to simulate the neotectonic stress field in Fennoscandia with particular emphasis to southern Norway. A numerical method was used to reconstruct the structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere. The numerical method involves classical steady-state heat equations to derive lithosphere thickness, geotherm and density distribution and, in addition, requires the studied lithosphere to be isostatically compensated at its base. The a priori crustal structure was derived from previous geophysical studies. Undulations of the geoid were used to calibrate the models. Once the density structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere is reconstructed it is straightforward to quantify its stress state and compare modelling results with existing stress indicators. The modelling suggests that

  3. Z 2-graded classical r-matrices and algebraic Bethe ansatz: applications to integrable models of quantum optics and nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrypnyk, T.

    2016-09-01

    We consider quantum integrable models based on the Lie algebra gl(n) and non-skew-symmetric classical r-matrices associated with Z 2-gradings of gl(n) of the following type: {gl}(n)={gl}{(n)}\\bar{0}+{gl}{(n)}\\bar{1}, where {gl}{(n)}\\bar{0}={gl}({n}1)\\oplus {gl}(n-{n}1). Among the considered models are Gaudin-type models with an external magnetic field, used in nuclear physics to produce proton–neutron Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieer-type models, n-level many-mode Jaynes–Cummings–Dicke-type models of quantum optics, matrix generalization of Bose–Hubbard dimers, etc. We diagonalize the constructed models by means of the ‘generalized’ nested Bethe ansatz.

  4. Z 2-graded classical r-matrices and algebraic Bethe ansatz: applications to integrable models of quantum optics and nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrypnyk, T.

    2016-09-01

    We consider quantum integrable models based on the Lie algebra gl(n) and non-skew-symmetric classical r-matrices associated with Z 2-gradings of gl(n) of the following type: {gl}(n)={gl}{(n)}\\bar{0}+{gl}{(n)}\\bar{1}, where {gl}{(n)}\\bar{0}={gl}({n}1)\\oplus {gl}(n-{n}1). Among the considered models are Gaudin-type models with an external magnetic field, used in nuclear physics to produce proton-neutron Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieer-type models, n-level many-mode Jaynes-Cummings-Dicke-type models of quantum optics, matrix generalization of Bose-Hubbard dimers, etc. We diagonalize the constructed models by means of the ‘generalized’ nested Bethe ansatz.

  5. Algebraic distance on graphs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Safro, I.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the connection strength between a pair of vertices in a graph is one of the most important concerns in many graph applications. Simple measures such as edge weights may not be sufficient for capturing the effects associated with short paths of lengths greater than one. In this paper, we consider an iterative process that smooths an associated value for nearby vertices, and we present a measure of the local connection strength (called the algebraic distance; see [D. Ron, I. Safro, and A. Brandt, Multiscale Model. Simul., 9 (2011), pp. 407-423]) based on this process. The proposed measure is attractive in that the process is simple, linear, and easily parallelized. An analysis of the convergence property of the process reveals that the local neighborhoods play an important role in determining the connectivity between vertices. We demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the proposed measure through several combinatorial optimization problems on graphs and hypergraphs.

  6. A dynamic model of stress and sustained attention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, P. A.; Warm, Joel S.

    1989-01-01

    Arguments are presented that an integrated view of stress and performance must consider the task demanding a sustained attention as a primary source of cognitive stress. A dynamic model is developed on the basis of the concept of adaptability in both physiological and psychological terms, that addresses the effects of stress on vigilance and, potentially, a wide variety of attention-demanding performance tasks. The model provides an insight into the failure of an operator under the driving influences of stress and opens a number of potential avenues through which solutions to the complex challenge of stress and performance might be posed.

  7. Effective Stress Management: A Model of Emotional Intelligence, Self-Leadership, and Student Stress Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Jeffery D.; Wu, Jinpei; Godwin, Jeffrey L.; Neck, Christopher P.; Manz, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    This article develops and presents a model of the relationships among emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and stress coping among management students. In short, the authors' model suggests that effective emotion regulation and self-leadership, as mediated through positive affect and self-efficacy, has the potential to facilitate stress coping…

  8. Modeling heat stress under different environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Carabaño, M J; Logar, B; Bormann, J; Minet, J; Vanrobays, M-L; Díaz, C; Tychon, B; Gengler, N; Hammami, H

    2016-05-01

    Renewed interest in heat stress effects on livestock productivity derives from climate change, which is expected to increase temperatures and the frequency of extreme weather events. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of temperature and humidity on milk production in highly selected dairy cattle populations across 3 European regions differing in climate and production systems to detect differences and similarities that can be used to optimize heat stress (HS) effect modeling. Milk, fat, and protein test day data from official milk recording for 1999 to 2010 in 4 Holstein populations located in the Walloon Region of Belgium (BEL), Luxembourg (LUX), Slovenia (SLO), and southern Spain (SPA) were merged with temperature and humidity data provided by the state meteorological agencies. After merging, the number of test day records/cows per trait ranged from 686,726/49,655 in SLO to 1,982,047/136,746 in BEL. Values for the daily average and maximum temperature-humidity index (THIavg and THImax) ranges for THIavg/THImax were largest in SLO (22-74/28-84) and shortest in SPA (39-76/46-83). Change point techniques were used to determine comfort thresholds, which differed across traits and climatic regions. Milk yield showed an inverted U-shaped pattern of response across the THI scale with a HS threshold around 73 THImax units. For fat and protein, thresholds were lower than for milk yield and were shifted around 6 THI units toward larger values in SPA compared with the other countries. Fat showed lower HS thresholds than protein traits in all countries. The traditional broken line model was compared with quadratic and cubic fits of the pattern of response in production to increasing heat loads. A cubic polynomial model allowing for individual variation in patterns of response and THIavg as heat load measure showed the best statistical features. Higher/lower producing animals showed less/more persistent production (quantity and quality) across the THI scale. The

  9. Modeling of stresses at grain boundaries with respect to occurrence of stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Sinharoy, A.; Ruud, C.O.; McIlree, A.R.

    1995-12-31

    The distributions of elastic stresses/strains in the grain boundary regions were studied by the analytical and the finite element models. The grain boundaries represent the sites where stress concentration occurs as a result of discontinuity of elastic properties across the grain boundary and the presence of second phase particles elastically different from the surrounding matrix grains. A quantitative analysis of those stresses for steels and nickel based alloys showed that the stress concentrations in the grain boundary regions are high enough to cause a local microplastic deformation even when the material is in the macroscopic elastic regime. The stress redistribution as a result of such a plastic deformation was discussed.

  10. Modeling the Effects of Stress: An Approach to Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuper, Taryn

    2010-01-01

    Stress is an integral element of the operational conditions experienced by combat medics. The effects of stress can compromise the performance of combat medics who must reach and treat their comrades under often threatening circumstances. Examples of these effects include tunnel vision, loss of motor control, and diminished hearing, which can result in an inability to perceive further danger, satisfactorily treat the casualty, and communicate with others. While many training programs strive to recreate this stress to aid in the experiential learning process, stress inducement may not always be feasible or desired. In addition, live simulations are not always a practical, convenient, and repeatable method of training. Instead, presenting situational training on a personal computer is proposed as an effective training platform in which the effects of stress can be addressed in a different way. We explore the cognitive and motor effects of stress, as well as the benefits of training for mitigating these effects in real life. While many training applications focus on inducing stress in order to "condition" the stress response, the author explores the possibilities of modeling stress to produce a similar effect. Can presenting modeled effects of stress help prepare or inoculate soldiers for stressful situations in which they must perform at a high level? This paper investigates feasibility of modeling stress and describes the preliminary design considerations of a combat medic training system that utilizes this method of battlefield preparation.

  11. Linear-Algebra Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, C. L.; Krogh, F. T.; Gold, S. S.; Kincaid, D. R.; Sullivan, J.; Williams, E.; Hanson, R. J.; Haskell, K.; Dongarra, J.; Moler, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS) library is a collection of 38 FORTRAN-callable routines for performing basic operations of numerical linear algebra. BLAS library is portable and efficient source of basic operations for designers of programs involving linear algebriac computations. BLAS library is supplied in portable FORTRAN and Assembler code versions for IBM 370, UNIVAC 1100 and CDC 6000 series computers.

  12. Ready, Set, Algebra?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Alissa Beth

    2012-01-01

    The California Department of Education (CDE) has long asserted that success Algebra I by Grade 8 is the goal for all California public school students. In fact, the state's accountability system penalizes schools that do not require all of their students to take the Algebra I end-of-course examination by Grade 8 (CDE, 2009). In this…

  13. Algebraic Reasoning through Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, F. D.; Becker, Joanne Rossi

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the results of a three-year study that explores students' performance on patterning tasks involving prealgebra and algebra. The findings, insights, and issues drawn from the study are intended to help teach prealgebra and algebra. In the remainder of the article, the authors take a more global view of the three-year study on…

  14. Teaching Structure in Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlin, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how the author has developed tasks for students that address the missed "essence of the matter" of algebraic transformations. Specifically, he has found that having students practice "perceiving" algebraic structure--by naming the "glue" in the expressions, drawing expressions using…

  15. RESEARCH: Conceptualizing Environmental Stress: A Stress-Response Model of Coastal Sandy Barriers.

    PubMed

    Gabriel; Kreutzwiser

    2000-01-01

    / The purpose of this paper is to develop and apply a conceptual framework of environmental stress-response for a geomorphic system. Constructs and methods generated from the literature were applied in the development of an integrative stress-response framework using existing environmental assessment techniques: interaction matrices and a systems diagram. Emphasis is on the interaction between environmental stress and the geomorphic environment of a sandy barrier system. The model illustrates a number of stress concepts pertinent to modeling environmental stress-response, including those related to stress-dependency, frequency-recovery relationships, environmental heterogeneity, spatial hierarchies and linkages, and temporal change. Sandy barrier stress-response and recovery are greatly impacted by fluctuating water levels, stress intensity and frequency, as well as environmental gradients such as differences in sediment storage and supply. Aspects of these stress-response variables are articulated in terms of three main challenges to management: dynamic stability, spatial integrity, and temporal variability. These in turn form the framework for evaluative principles that may be applied to assess how policies and management practices reflect key biophysical processes and human stresses identified by the model.

  16. A meteorologically driven grain sorghum stress indicator model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. W.; Ravet, F. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A grain sorghum soil moisture and temperature stress model is described. It was developed to serve as a meteorological data filter to alert commodity analysts to potential stress conditions and crop phenology in selected grain sorghum production areas. The model also identifies optimum conditions on a daily basis and planting/harvest problems associated with poor tractability.

  17. Oxidative Stress in Genetic Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Varçin, Mustafa; Bentea, Eduard; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence in Parkinson's disease of a link between oxidative stress and some of the monogenically inherited Parkinson's disease-associated genes. This paper focuses on the importance of this link and potential impact on neuronal function. Basic mechanisms of oxidative stress, the cellular antioxidant machinery, and the main sources of cellular oxidative stress are reviewed. Moreover, attention is given to the complex interaction between oxidative stress and other prominent pathogenic pathways in Parkinson's disease, such as mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, an overview of the existing genetic mouse models of Parkinson's disease is given and the evidence of oxidative stress in these models highlighted. Taken into consideration the importance of ageing and environmental factors as a risk for developing Parkinson's disease, gene-environment interactions in genetically engineered mouse models of Parkinson's disease are also discussed, highlighting the role of oxidative damage in the interplay between genetic makeup, environmental stress, and ageing in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22829959

  18. Stress associated with caregiving: an examination of the stress process model among Kenyan Luo elders.

    PubMed

    Ice, Gillian H; Sadruddin, Aalyia F A; Vagedes, Amy; Yogo, Jaja; Juma, Elizabeth

    2012-06-01

    Globally, a growing number of grandparents are caring for their grandchildren. The impact and burden associated with increases in custodial grandparenting, however, may differ by culture. In the United States, the caregiving role has been shown to be a significant source of stress for older adults. In cultures in which grandparents are more commonly involved in the care of young children, however, increasing caregiving roles may not be viewed as stressful. This study examines the impact of caregiving on perceived and physiological measures of stress among 640 Luo elders (60+) in western Kenya, where high HIV prevalence among younger-to-middle aged adults has led to a heavy burden of orphan care. Perceived stress levels were measured using the Luo Perceived Stress Scale (LPSS). Salivary cortisol and casual blood pressure were used as biomarkers of stress. Results were analyzed using random mixed effects models. Overall this study showed that caregivers have higher levels of perceived stress than non-caregivers. For women, household composition, including the number of orphans and adults in the homestead impacted perceived stress. Among men, those who perceived caregiving as burdensome had higher perceived stress. Despite the association between caregiving and perceived stress, there was a minimal relationship between caregiving and the two biomarkers of stress. This may be because caregiving is superimposed onto other stressors and therefore has a minimal physiological impact. These results highlight the importance of local context in determining the impact of the caregiving role on older adult well-being. PMID:22475406

  19. Lie algebra extensions of current algebras on S3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kori, Tosiaki; Imai, Yuto

    2015-06-01

    An affine Kac-Moody algebra is a central extension of the Lie algebra of smooth mappings from S1 to the complexification of a Lie algebra. In this paper, we shall introduce a central extension of the Lie algebra of smooth mappings from S3 to the quaternization of a Lie algebra and investigate its root space decomposition. We think this extension of current algebra might give a mathematical tool for four-dimensional conformal field theory as Kac-Moody algebras give it for two-dimensional conformal field theory.

  20. Setting up virgin stress conditions in discrete element models

    PubMed Central

    Rojek, J.; Karlis, G.F.; Malinowski, L.J.; Beer, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, a methodology for setting up virgin stress conditions in discrete element models is proposed. The developed algorithm is applicable to discrete or coupled discrete/continuum modeling of underground excavation employing the discrete element method (DEM). Since the DEM works with contact forces rather than stresses there is a need for the conversion of pre-excavation stresses to contact forces for the DEM model. Different possibilities of setting up virgin stress conditions in the DEM model are reviewed and critically assessed. Finally, a new method to obtain a discrete element model with contact forces equivalent to given macroscopic virgin stresses is proposed. The test examples presented show that good results may be obtained regardless of the shape of the DEM domain. PMID:27087731

  1. Leibniz algebras associated with representations of filiform Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayupov, Sh. A.; Camacho, L. M.; Khudoyberdiyev, A. Kh.; Omirov, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we investigate Leibniz algebras whose quotient Lie algebra is a naturally graded filiform Lie algebra nn,1. We introduce a Fock module for the algebra nn,1 and provide classification of Leibniz algebras L whose corresponding Lie algebra L / I is the algebra nn,1 with condition that the ideal I is a Fock nn,1-module, where I is the ideal generated by squares of elements from L. We also consider Leibniz algebras with corresponding Lie algebra nn,1 and such that the action I ×nn,1 → I gives rise to a minimal faithful representation of nn,1. The classification up to isomorphism of such Leibniz algebras is given for the case of n = 4.

  2. A model analysis of static stress in the vestibular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pender, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Background The scheme of the core vestibular membranes, consisting of serially connected utricle, ampulla and semicircular canal, first appeared hundreds of millions of years ago in primitive fish and has remained largely unchanged during the subsequent course of evolution. The labyrinths of higher organisms build on this core structure, with the addition of the phylogenetically newer membrane structures, namely, saccule, lagena and cochlea. An analysis of static stress in these core vestibular membranes may contribute to a better understanding of the role of stress in the evolution of derivative membrane structures over the long term as well as the short-term membrane distortions seen in Meniere's disease. Methods A model of these core vestibular membranes is proposed in order to analyze the distribution of stress in the walls of the component chambers. The model uses basic geometrical elements of hollow cylinders and spheres to emulate the actual structures. These model elements lend themselves to a mathematical analysis of static stress in their membranes. Results Hoop stress, akin to the stress in hoops used to reinforce barrel walls, is found to be the predominant stress in the model membranes. The level of hoop stress depends not only on pressure but as well on a geometric stress factor that incorporates membrane shape, thickness and curvature. This result implies that hoop stress may be unevenly distributed in the membranes of the several vestibular chambers due to variations in these dimensional parameters. These results provide a theoretical framework for appraising hoop stress levels in any vestibular labyrinth whose dimensions are known. Conclusion Static hoop stress disparities are likely to exist in the vestibular membranes given their complex physical configurations. Such stress disparities may contribute to the development of membrane pathologies as seen in Meniere's Disease. They may also factor in the evolutionary development of other derivative

  3. Degenerate Sklyanin algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Andrey

    2010-08-01

    New trigonometric and rational solutions of the quantum Yang-Baxter equation (QYBE) are obtained by applying some singular gauge transformations to the known Belavin-Drinfeld elliptic R-matrix for sl(2;?). These solutions are shown to be related to the standard ones by the quasi-Hopf twist. We demonstrate that the quantum algebras arising from these new R-matrices can be obtained as special limits of the Sklyanin algebra. A representation for these algebras by the difference operators is found. The sl( N;?)-case is discussed.

  4. Degenerate Sklyanin algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Andrey

    2010-08-01

    New trigonometric and rational solutions of the quantum Yang-Baxter equation (QYBE) are obtained by applying some singular gauge transformations to the known Belavin-Drinfeld elliptic R-matrix for sl(2;?). These solutions are shown to be related to the standard ones by the quasi-Hopf twist. We demonstrate that the quantum algebras arising from these new R-matrices can be obtained as special limits of the Sklyanin algebra. A representation for these algebras by the difference operators is found. The sl(N;?)-case is discussed.

  5. Severe Life Stress and Oxidative Stress in the Brain: From Animal Models to Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Jaquet, Vincent; Trabace, Luigia; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Severe life stress (SLS), as opposed to trivial everyday stress, is defined as a serious psychosocial event with the potential of causing an impacting psychological traumatism. Recent Advances: Numerous studies have attempted to understand how the central nervous system (CNS) responds to SLS. This response includes a variety of morphological and neurochemical modifications; among them, oxidative stress is almost invariably observed. Oxidative stress is defined as disequilibrium between oxidant generation and the antioxidant response. Critical Issues: In this review, we discuss how SLS leads to oxidative stress in the CNS, and how the latter impacts pathophysiological outcomes. We also critically discuss experimental methods that measure oxidative stress in the CNS. The review covers animal models and human observations. Animal models of SLS include sleep deprivation, maternal separation, and social isolation in rodents, and the establishment of hierarchy in non-human primates. In humans, SLS, which is caused by traumatic events such as child abuse, war, and divorce, is also accompanied by oxidative stress in the CNS. Future Directions: The outcome of SLS in humans ranges from resilience, over post-traumatic stress disorder, to development of chronic mental disorders. Defining the sources of oxidative stress in SLS might in the long run provide new therapeutic avenues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1475–1490. PMID:22746161

  6. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Kac Moody algebras and controlled chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, Daniel H.

    2007-02-01

    Compactification can control chaotic Mixmaster behaviour in gravitational systems with p-form matter: we consider this in light of the connection between supergravity models and Kac Moody algebras. We show that different compactifications define 'mutations' of the algebras associated with the noncompact theories. We list the algebras obtained in this way, and find novel examples of wall systems determined by Lorentzian (but not hyperbolic) algebras. Cosmological models with a smooth pre-big bang phase require that chaos is absent: we show that compactification alone cannot eliminate chaos in the simplest compactifications of the heterotic string on a Calabi Yau, or M theory on a manifold of G2 holonomy.

  7. Specifying initial stress for dynamic heterogeneous earthquake source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.; Barall, M.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic rupture calculations using heterogeneous stress drop that is random and self-similar with a power-law spatial spectrum have great promise of producing realistic ground-motion predictions. We present procedures to specify initial stress for random events with a target rupture length and target magnitude. The stress function is modified in the depth dimension to account for the brittle-ductile transition at the base of the seismogenic zone. Self-similar fluctuations in stress drop are tied in this work to the long-wavelength stress variation that determines rupture length. Heterogeneous stress is related to friction levels in order to relate the model to physical concepts. In a variant of the model, there are high-stress asperities with low background stress. This procedure has a number of advantages: (1) rupture stops naturally, not at artificial barriers; (2) the amplitude of short-wavelength fluctuations of stress drop is not arbitrary: the spectrum is fixed to the long-wavelength fluctuation that determines rupture length; and (3) large stress drop can be confined to asperities occupying a small fraction of the total rupture area, producing slip distributions with enhanced peaks.

  8. Algebraic integrability: a survey.

    PubMed

    Vanhaecke, Pol

    2008-03-28

    We give a concise introduction to the notion of algebraic integrability. Our exposition is based on examples and phenomena, rather than on detailed proofs of abstract theorems. We mainly focus on algebraic integrability in the sense of Adler-van Moerbeke, where the fibres of the momentum map are affine parts of Abelian varieties; as it turns out, most examples from classical mechanics are of this form. Two criteria are given for such systems (Kowalevski-Painlevé and Lyapunov) and each is illustrated in one example. We show in the case of a relatively simple example how one proves algebraic integrability, starting from the differential equations for the integrable vector field. For Hamiltonian systems that are algebraically integrable in the generalized sense, two examples are given, which illustrate the non-compact analogues of Abelian varieties which typically appear in such systems. PMID:17588863

  9. Algebraic Semantics for Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper uses discussion of Edmund Spenser's "The Faerie Queene" to present a theoretical framework for explaining the semantics of narrative discourse. The algebraic theory of finite automata is used. (CK)

  10. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  11. Aprepro - Algebraic Preprocessor

    2005-08-01

    Aprepro is an algebraic preprocessor that reads a file containing both general text and algebraic, string, or conditional expressions. It interprets the expressions and outputs them to the output file along witht the general text. Aprepro contains several mathematical functions, string functions, and flow control constructs. In addition, functions are included that, with some additional files, implement a units conversion system and a material database lookup system.

  12. Geometric Algebra for Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Chris; Lasenby, Anthony

    2007-11-01

    Preface; Notation; 1. Introduction; 2. Geometric algebra in two and three dimensions; 3. Classical mechanics; 4. Foundations of geometric algebra; 5. Relativity and spacetime; 6. Geometric calculus; 7. Classical electrodynamics; 8. Quantum theory and spinors; 9. Multiparticle states and quantum entanglement; 10. Geometry; 11. Further topics in calculus and group theory; 12. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian techniques; 13. Symmetry and gauge theory; 14. Gravitation; Bibliography; Index.

  13. Quantum walks, deformed relativity and Hopf algebra symmetries.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo

    2016-05-28

    We show how the Weyl quantum walk derived from principles in D'Ariano & Perinotti (D'Ariano & Perinotti 2014Phys. Rev. A90, 062106. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.90.062106)), enjoying a nonlinear Lorentz symmetry of dynamics, allows one to introduce Hopf algebras for position and momentum of the emerging particle. We focus on two special models of Hopf algebras-the usual Poincaré and theκ-Poincaré algebras.

  14. Quantum walks, deformed relativity and Hopf algebra symmetries.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo

    2016-05-28

    We show how the Weyl quantum walk derived from principles in D'Ariano & Perinotti (D'Ariano & Perinotti 2014Phys. Rev. A90, 062106. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.90.062106)), enjoying a nonlinear Lorentz symmetry of dynamics, allows one to introduce Hopf algebras for position and momentum of the emerging particle. We focus on two special models of Hopf algebras-the usual Poincaré and theκ-Poincaré algebras. PMID:27091171

  15. A finite element model for residual stress in repair welds

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Zacharia, T.

    1996-03-28

    This paper describes a three-dimensional finite element model for calculation of the residual stress distribution caused by repair welding. Special user subroutines were developed to simulate the continuous deposition of filler metal during welding. The model was then tested by simulating the residual stress/strain field of a FeAl weld overlay clad on a 2{1/4}Cr-1 Mo steel plate, for which neutron diffraction measurement data of the residual strain field were available. It is shown that the calculated residual stress distribution was consistent with that determined with neutron diffraction. High tensile residual stresses in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were observed around the weld toe at the end of the weld. The strong spatial dependency of the residual stresses in the region around the weld demonstrates that the common two-dimensional cross-section finite element models should not be used for repair welding analysis.

  16. The Algebraic Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiley, B. J.

    In this chapter, we examine in detail the non-commutative symplectic algebra underlying quantum dynamics. By using this algebra, we show that it contains both the Weyl-von Neumann and the Moyal quantum algebras. The latter contains the Wigner distribution as the kernel of the density matrix. The underlying non-commutative geometry can be projected into either of two Abelian spaces, so-called `shadow phase spaces'. One of these is the phase space of Bohmian mechanics, showing that it is a fragment of the basic underlying algebra. The algebraic approach is much richer, giving rise to two fundamental dynamical time development equations which reduce to the Liouville equation and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the classical limit. They also include the Schrödinger equation and its wave-function, showing that these features are a partial aspect of the more general non-commutative structure. We discuss briefly the properties of this more general mathematical background from which the non-commutative symplectic algebra emerges.

  17. Tectonic stressing in California modeled from GPS observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2006-01-01

    What happens in the crust as a result of geodetically observed secular motions? In this paper we find out by distorting a finite element model of California using GPS-derived displacements. A complex model was constructed using spatially varying crustal thickness, geothermal gradient, topography, and creeping faults. GPS velocity observations were interpolated and extrapolated across the model and boundary condition areas, and the model was loaded according to 5-year displacements. Results map highest differential stressing rates in a 200-km-wide band along the Pacific-North American plate boundary, coinciding with regions of greatest seismic energy release. Away from the plate boundary, GPS-derived crustal strain reduces modeled differential stress in some places, suggesting that some crustal motions are related to topographic collapse. Calculated stressing rates can be resolved onto fault planes: useful for addressing fault interactions and necessary for calculating earthquake advances or delays. As an example, I examine seismic quiescence on the Garlock fault despite a calculated minimum 0.1-0.4 MPa static stress increase from the 1857 M???7.8 Fort Tejon earthquake. Results from finite element modeling show very low to negative secular Coulomb stress growth on the Garlock fault, suggesting that the stress state may have been too low for large earthquake triggering. Thus the Garlock fault may only be stressed by San Andreas fault slip, a loading pattern that could explain its erratic rupture history.

  18. A Model of Teacher Stress and Its Implications for Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, David J.

    1984-01-01

    After summarizing research into the sources and correlates of teacher stress, this article defines and proposes a model of work-related stress in school, incorporating current concepts and research findings. Strategies for coping with the buildup of environmental stressors are developed for application at various administrative levels within the…

  19. A hydrostatic stress-dependent anisotropic model of viscoplasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Tao, Q.; Verrilli, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrostatic stress-dependent, anisotropic model of viscoplasticity is formulated as an extension of Bodner's model. This represents a further extension of the isotropic Bodner model over that made to anisotropy by Robinson and MitiKavuma. Account is made of the inelastic deformation that can occur in metallic composites under hydrostatic stress. A procedure for determining the material parameters is identified that is virtually identical to the established characterization procedure for the original Bodner model. Characterization can be achieved using longitudinal/transverse tensile and shear tests and hydrostatic stress tests; alternatively, four off-axis tensile tests can be used. Conditions for a yield stress minimum under off-axis tension are discussed. The model is applied to a W/Cu composite; characterization is made using off-axis tensile data generated at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC).

  20. Emotional Stress and Cardiovascular Complications in Animal Models: A Review of the Influence of Stress Type.

    PubMed

    Crestani, Carlos C

    2016-01-01

    Emotional stress has been recognized as a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The impact of stress on physiological and psychological processes is determined by characteristics of the stress stimulus. For example, distinct responses are induced by acute vs. chronic aversive stimuli. Additionally, the magnitude of stress responses has been reported to be inversely related to the degree of predictability of the aversive stimulus. Therefore, the purpose of the present review was to discuss experimental research in animal models describing the influence of stressor stimulus characteristics, such as chronicity and predictability, in cardiovascular dysfunctions induced by emotional stress. Regarding chronicity, the importance of cardiovascular and autonomic adjustments during acute stress sessions and cardiovascular consequences of frequent stress response activation during repeated exposure to aversive threats (i.e., chronic stress) is discussed. Evidence of the cardiovascular and autonomic changes induced by chronic stressors involving daily exposure to the same stressor (predictable) vs. different stressors (unpredictable) is reviewed and discussed in terms of the impact of predictability in cardiovascular dysfunctions induced by stress. PMID:27445843

  1. Emotional Stress and Cardiovascular Complications in Animal Models: A Review of the Influence of Stress Type

    PubMed Central

    Crestani, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    Emotional stress has been recognized as a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The impact of stress on physiological and psychological processes is determined by characteristics of the stress stimulus. For example, distinct responses are induced by acute vs. chronic aversive stimuli. Additionally, the magnitude of stress responses has been reported to be inversely related to the degree of predictability of the aversive stimulus. Therefore, the purpose of the present review was to discuss experimental research in animal models describing the influence of stressor stimulus characteristics, such as chronicity and predictability, in cardiovascular dysfunctions induced by emotional stress. Regarding chronicity, the importance of cardiovascular and autonomic adjustments during acute stress sessions and cardiovascular consequences of frequent stress response activation during repeated exposure to aversive threats (i.e., chronic stress) is discussed. Evidence of the cardiovascular and autonomic changes induced by chronic stressors involving daily exposure to the same stressor (predictable) vs. different stressors (unpredictable) is reviewed and discussed in terms of the impact of predictability in cardiovascular dysfunctions induced by stress. PMID:27445843

  2. Algebraic tools for dealing with the atomic shell model. I. Wavefunctions and integrals for hydrogen-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhykov, Andrey; Koval, Peter; Fritzsche, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    Today, the 'hydrogen atom model' is known to play its role not only in teaching the basic elements of quantum mechanics but also for building up effective theories in atomic and molecular physics, quantum optics, plasma physics, or even in the design of semiconductor devices. Therefore, the analytical as well as numerical solutions of the hydrogen-like ions are frequently required both, for analyzing experimental data and for carrying out quite advanced theoretical studies. In order to support a fast and consistent access to these (Coulomb-field) solutions, here we present the DIRAC program which has been developed originally for studying the properties and dynamical behavior of the (hydrogen-like) ions. In the present version, a set of MAPLE procedures is provided for the Coulomb wave and Green's functions by applying the (wave) equations from both, the nonrelativistic and relativistic theory. Apart from the interactive access to these functions, moreover, a number of radial integrals are also implemented in the DIRAC program which may help the user to construct transition amplitudes and cross sections as they occur frequently in the theory of ion-atom and ion-photon collisions. Program summaryTitle of program:DIRAC Catalogue number: ADUQ Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUQ Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Computer for which the program is designed and has been tested: All computers with a license of the computer algebra package MAPLE [1] Program language used: Maple 8 and 9 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:2186 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 162 591 Distribution format: tar gzip file CPC Program Library subprograms required: None Nature of the physical problem: Analytical solutions of the hydrogen atom are widely used in very different fields of physics [2,3]. Despite of the rather simple structure

  3. Custom impression trays. Part III: A stress distribution model.

    PubMed

    Moseley, J P; Dixon, D L; Breeding, L C

    1994-05-01

    All resins used to make custom impression trays exhibit plastic deformation at some force value; therefore it is important to compare the physical property values of such materials with the stresses to which impression trays are subjected during dental procedures. A simple mathematical model of a custom tray was developed to predict stress distributions in this final part of a three-part investigation. Experimental stress analysis of such a tray confirmed the accuracy of the model, which was then used to predict the maximum stress experienced by the tray during removal of a completed impression from the oral cavity. The results of this analysis indicated that these stresses would be significantly lower than the yield stress for a commonly used polymethyl methacrylate resin or a light-polymerized resin. The stresses were also sufficiently low for us to conclude that thermoplastic resins would not permanently deform; however, the stresses encountered in the experimental confirmation procedure were close to the yield stress values for these materials.

  4. Thermal Residual Stress in Environmental Barrier Coated Silicon Nitride - Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Abdul-Aziz; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2009-01-01

    When exposed to combustion environments containing moisture both un-reinforced and fiber reinforced silicon based ceramic materials tend to undergo surface recession. To avoid surface recession environmental barrier coating systems are required. However, due to differences in the elastic and thermal properties of the substrate and the environmental barrier coating, thermal residual stresses can be generated in the coated substrate. Depending on their magnitude and nature thermal residual stresses can have significant influence on the strength and fracture behavior of coated substrates. To determine the maximum residual stresses developed during deposition of the coatings, a finite element model (FEM) was developed. Using this model, the thermal residual stresses were predicted in silicon nitride substrates coated with three environmental coating systems namely barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS), rare earth mono silicate (REMS) and earth mono di-silicate (REDS). A parametric study was also conducted to determine the influence of coating layer thickness and material parameters on thermal residual stress. Results indicate that z-direction stresses in all three systems are small and negligible, but maximum in-plane stresses can be significant depending on the composition of the constituent layer and the distance from the substrate. The BSAS and REDS systems show much lower thermal residual stresses than REMS system. Parametric analysis indicates that in each system, the thermal residual stresses can be decreased with decreasing the modulus and thickness of the coating.

  5. Stress field modelling from digital geological map data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Gáspár; Barancsuk, Ádám; Szentpéteri, Krisztián

    2016-04-01

    To create a model for the lithospheric stress a functional geodatabase is required which contains spatial and geodynamic parameters. A digital structural-geological map is a geodatabase, which usually contains enough attributes to create a stress field model. Such a model is not accurate enough for engineering-geological purposes because simplifications are always present in a map, but in many cases maps are the only sources for a tectonic analysis. The here presented method is designed for field geologist, who are interested to see the possible realization of the stress field over the area, on which they are working. This study presents an application which can produce a map of 3D stress vectors from a kml-file. The core application logic is implemented on top of a spatially aware relational database management system. This allows rapid and geographically accurate analysis of the imported geological features, taking advantage of standardized spatial algorithms and indexing. After pre-processing the map features in a GIS, according to the Type-Property-Orientation naming system, which was described in a previous study (Albert et al. 2014), the first stage of the algorithm generates an irregularly spaced point cloud by emitting a pattern of points within a user-defined buffer zone around each feature. For each point generated, a component-wise approximation of the tensor field at the point's position is computed, derived from the original feature's geodynamic properties. In a second stage a weighted moving average method calculates the stress vectors in a regular grid. Results can be exported as geospatial data for further analysis or cartographic visualization. Computation of the tensor field's components is based on the implementation of the Mohr diagram of a compressional model, which uses a Coulomb fracture criterion. Using a general assumption that the main principal stress must be greater than the stress from the overburden, the differential stress is

  6. Characterization and modeling of in situ stress heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Lewis, Amy D. F.

    Through a series of related projects, the work described in this dissertation strives to better constrain, describe, and explain in situ stress heterogeneity. Although each project has specific goals, approaches, and outcomes, combined they represent important progress in the ongoing effort to understand stress heterogeneity at a variety of scales. In the first study we analyze multi-scale variations in the direction of maximum horizontal compressive stress as a function of depth in four scientific research boreholes located in a variety of tectonic environments. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms controlling in situ crustal stress heterogeneity over scales from centimeters to kilometers. We show that the orientation of the maximum, horizontal compressive stress determined from stress-induced wellbore failures displays scale-invariant, fractal distributions with spectral exponents between 1 and 2. The scaling of the stress variations is remarkably similar to the spatial scaling of earthquakes as a function of fault size in the individual study areas. Consequently, we suggest that wellbore stress heterogeneity is controlled by slip on a fractal distribution of active faults in the surrounding crust. The observed correlation between the amount of stress heterogeneity and local fault behavior may prove useful in models of dynamic earthquake rupture, where many of the key parameters including stress and fault strength appear to vary spatially. In the second study we develop two models---a two-dimensional, analytical model and a three-dimensional, numerical model---to explain the rotation of in situ stresses resulting from a pore pressure change on one side of an impermeable boundary (for example, near an impermeable fault in a depleted reservoir). Our models show clearly that near the boundary depletion will induce the maximum horizontal compressive stress to become more parallel to the boundary, whereas injection will have the opposite effect. We find a

  7. Third-moment closure of turbulence for predictions of separating and reattaching shear flows: A study of Reynolds-stress closure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.; Goel, P.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study of computations in backward-facing steps with flow separation and reattachment, using the Reynolds stress closure is presented. The highlight of this study is the improvement of the Reynold-stress model (RSM) by modifying the diffusive transport of the Reynolds stresses through the formulation, solution and subsequent incorporation of the transport equations of the third moments, bar-u(i)u(j)u(k), into the turbulence model. The diffusive transport of the Reynolds stresses, represented by the gradients of the third moments, attains greater significance in recirculating flows. The third moments evaluated by the development and solution of the complete transport equations are superior to those obtained by existing algebraic correlations. A low-Reynolds number model for the transport equations of the third moments is developed and considerable improvement in the near-wall profiles of the third moments is observed. The values of the empirical constants utilized in the development of the model are recommended. The Reynolds-stress closure is consolidated by incorporating the equations of k and e, containing the modified diffusion coefficients, and the transport equations of the third moments into the Reynolds stress equations. Computational results obtained by the original k-e model, the original RSM and the consolidated and modified RSM are compared with experimental data. Overall improvement in the predictions is seen by consolidation of the RMS and a marked improvement in the profiles of bar-u(i)u(j)u(k) is obtained around the reattachment region.

  8. Thermodynamic Modeling and Analysis of Human Stress Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boregowda, S. C.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    A novel approach based on the second law of thermodynamics is developed to investigate the psychophysiology and quantify human stress level. Two types of stresses (thermal and mental) are examined. A Unified Stress Response Theory (USRT) is developed under the new proposed field of study called Engineering Psychophysiology. The USRT is used to investigate both thermal and mental stresses from a holistic (human body as a whole) and thermodynamic viewpoint. The original concepts and definitions are established as postulates which form the basis for thermodynamic approach to quantify human stress level. An Objective Thermal Stress Index (OTSI) is developed by applying the second law of thermodynamics to the human thermal system to quantify thermal stress or dis- comfort in the human body. The human thermal model based on finite element method is implemented. It is utilized as a "Computational Environmental Chamber" to conduct series of simulations to examine the human thermal stress responses under different environmental conditions. An innovative hybrid technique is developed to analyze human thermal behavior based on series of human-environment interaction simulations. Continuous monitoring of thermal stress is demonstrated with the help of OTSI. It is well established that the human thermal system obeys the second law of thermodynamics. Further, the OTSI is validated against the experimental data. Regarding mental stress, an Objective Mental Stress Index (OMSI) is developed by applying the Maxwell relations of thermodynamics to the combined thermal and cardiovascular system in the human body. The OMSI is utilized to demonstrate the technique of monitoring mental stress continuously and is validated with the help of series of experimental studies. Although the OMSI indicates the level of mental stress, it provides a strong thermodynamic and mathematical relationship between activities of thermal and cardiovascular systems of the human body.

  9. Spatial-Operator Algebra For Flexible-Link Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Rodriguez, Guillermo

    1994-01-01

    Method of computing dynamics of multiple-flexible-link robotic manipulators based on spatial-operator algebra, which originally applied to rigid-link manipulators. Aspects of spatial-operator-algebra approach described in several previous articles in NASA Tech Briefs-most recently "Robot Control Based on Spatial-Operator Algebra" (NPO-17918). In extension of spatial-operator algebra to manipulators with flexible links, each link represented by finite-element model: mass of flexible link apportioned among smaller, lumped-mass rigid bodies, coupling of motions expressed in terms of vibrational modes. This leads to operator expression for modal-mass matrix of link.

  10. Stress and Sleep Reactivity: A Prospective Investigation of the Stress-Diathesis Model of Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Christopher L.; Pillai, Vivek; Roth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To prospectively assess sleep reactivity as a diathesis of insomnia, and to delineate the interaction between this diathesis and naturalistic stress in the development of insomnia among normal sleepers. Design: Longitudinal. Setting: Community-based. Participants: 2,316 adults from the Evolution of Pathways to Insomnia Cohort (EPIC) with no history of insomnia or depression (46.8 ± 13.2 y; 60% female). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Participants reported the number of stressful events they encountered at baseline (Time 1), as well as the level of cognitive intrusion they experienced in response to each stressor. Stressful events (OR = 1.13; P < 0.01) and stress-induced cognitive intrusion (OR = 1.61; P < 0.01) were significant predictors of risk for insomnia one year hence (Time 2). Intrusion mediated the effects of stressful events on risk for insomnia (P < 0.05). Trait sleep reactivity significantly increased risk for insomnia (OR = 1.78; P < 0.01). Further, sleep reactivity moderated the effects of stress-induced intrusion (P < 0.05), such that the risk for insomnia as a function of intrusion was significantly higher in individuals with high sleep reactivity. Trait sleep reactivity also constituted a significant risk for depression (OR = 1.67; P < 0.01) two years later (Time 3). Insomnia at Time 2 significantly mediated this effect (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study suggests that premorbid sleep reactivity is a significant risk factor for incident insomnia, and that it triggers insomnia by exacerbating the effects of stress-induced intrusion. Sleep reactivity is also a precipitant of depression, as mediated by insomnia. These findings support the stress-diathesis model of insomnia, while highlighting sleep reactivity as an important diathesis. Citation: Drake CL, Pillai V, Roth T. Stress and sleep reactivity: a prospective investigation of the stress-diathesis model of insomnia. SLEEP 2014;37(8):1295-1304. PMID:25083009

  11. An ambient agent model for analyzing managers' performance during stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ChePa, Noraziah; Aziz, Azizi Ab; Gratim, Haned

    2016-08-01

    Stress at work have been reported everywhere. Work related performance during stress is a pattern of reactions that occurs when managers are presented with work demands that are not matched with their knowledge, skills, or abilities, and which challenge their ability to cope. Although there are many prior findings pertaining to explain the development of manager performance during stress, less attention has been given to explain the same concept through computational models. In such, a descriptive nature in psychological theories about managers' performance during stress can be transformed into a causal-mechanistic stage that explains the relationship between a series of observed phenomena. This paper proposed an ambient agent model for analyzing managers' performance during stress. Set of properties and variables are identified through past literatures to construct the model. Differential equations have been used in formalizing the model. Set of equations reflecting relations involved in the proposed model are presented. The proposed model is essential and can be encapsulated within an intelligent agent or robots that can be used to support managers during stress.

  12. Modeling of grain boundary stresses in Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Sinharoy, A.; Ruud, C.O.; Mcllree, A.R.

    1995-04-01

    Corrosive environments combined with high stress levels and susceptible microstructures can cause intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 components on both primary and secondary sides of pressurized water reactors. One factor affecting the IGSCC is intergranular carbide precipitation controlled by heat treatment of Alloy 600. This study is concerned with analysis of elastic stress fields in vicinity of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated in the matrix and at a grain boundary triple point. The local stress concentration which can lead to IGSCC initiation was studied using a two-dimensional finite element model. The intergranular precipitates are more effective stress raisers than the intragranular precipitates. The combination of the elastic property mismatch and the precipitate shape can result in a local stress field substantially different than the macroscopic stress. The maximum local stresses in the vicinity of the intergranular precipitate were almost twice as high as the applied stress.

  13. Models and Methods to Investigate Acute Stress Responses in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Arsenault, Ryan; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation within the livestock industry and throughout society that animal stress is an important issue that must be addressed. With implications for animal health, well-being, and productivity, minimizing animal stress through improved animal management procedures and/or selective breeding is becoming a priority. Effective management of stress, however, depends on the ability to identify and quantify the effects of various stressors and determine if individual or combined stressors have distinct biological effects. Furthermore, it is critical to determine the duration of stress-induced biological effects if we are to understand how stress alters animal production and disease susceptibility. Common stress models used to evaluate both psychological and physical stressors in cattle are reviewed. We identify some of the major gaps in our knowledge regarding responses to specific stressors and propose more integrated methodologies and approaches to measuring these responses. These approaches are based on an increased knowledge of both the metabolic and immune effects of stress. Finally, we speculate on how these findings may impact animal agriculture, as well as the potential application of large animal models to understanding human stress. PMID:26633525

  14. Thermomechanical Modeling of Stress Relaxation in Shape Memory Alloy Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Fateme; Kadkhodaei, Mahmoud; Salafian, Iman

    2015-04-01

    When a shape memory alloy (SMA) is subjected to a mechanical load, especially at high strain rates, its temperature varies due to thermomechanical coupling in the response of these materials. Thus, if strain is kept constant during the transformation, temperature change will cause stress to decrease during loading and to increase during unloading. A decrease in stress under constant strain indicates stress relaxation, and an increase in stress indicates stress recovery, i.e., reverse stress relaxation. In this paper, a fully coupled thermomechanical model is developed in a continuum framework to study stress relaxation and stress recovery in SMA wires. Numerical simulations at different ambient temperatures, applied strain rates, wire radii, and relaxation intervals are done to show the abilities of the proposed model in predicting relaxation phenomena in various conditions where strain remains constant during loading or unloading. Relaxation experiments were also performed on NiTi wires, and the numerical and empirical results are shown to be in a good agreement.

  15. Models and Methods to Investigate Acute Stress Responses in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Arsenault, Ryan; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation within the livestock industry and throughout society that animal stress is an important issue that must be addressed. With implications for animal health, well-being, and productivity, minimizing animal stress through improved animal management procedures and/or selective breeding is becoming a priority. Effective management of stress, however, depends on the ability to identify and quantify the effects of various stressors and determine if individual or combined stressors have distinct biological effects. Furthermore, it is critical to determine the duration of stress-induced biological effects if we are to understand how stress alters animal production and disease susceptibility. Common stress models used to evaluate both psychological and physical stressors in cattle are reviewed. We identify some of the major gaps in our knowledge regarding responses to specific stressors and propose more integrated methodologies and approaches to measuring these responses. These approaches are based on an increased knowledge of both the metabolic and immune effects of stress. Finally, we speculate on how these findings may impact animal agriculture, as well as the potential application of large animal models to understanding human stress. PMID:26633525

  16. Evaluating the structural identifiability of the parameters of the EBPR sub-model in ASM2d by the differential algebra method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Zhang, Daijun; Li, Zhenliang; Cai, Qing

    2010-05-01

    The calibration of ASMs is a prerequisite for their application to simulation of a wastewater treatment plant. This work should be made based on the evaluation of structural identifiability of model parameters. An EBPR sub-model including denitrification phosphorus removal has been incorporated in ASM2d. Yet no report is presented on the structural identifiability of the parameters in the EBPR sub-model. In this paper, the differential algebra approach was used to address this issue. The results showed that the structural identifiability of parameters in the EBPR sub-model could be improved by increasing the measured variables. The reduction factor eta(NO)(3) was identifiable when combined data of aerobic process and anoxic process were assumed. For K(PP), X(PAO) and q(PHA) of the anaerobic process to be uniquely identifiable, one of them is needed to be determined by other ways. Likewise, if prior information on one of the parameters, K(PHA), X(PAO) and q(PP) of the aerobic process, is known, all the parameters are identifiable. The above results could be of interest to the parameter estimation of the EBPR sub-model. The algorithm proposed in the paper is also suitable for other sub-models of ASMs.

  17. Creep and stress relaxation modeling of polycrystalline ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of high performance polycrystalline ceramic fibers are currently being considered as reinforcement for high temperature ceramic matrix composites. However, under mechanical loading about 800 C, these fibers display creep related instabilities which can result in detrimental changes in composite dimensions, strength, and internal stress distributions. As a first step toward understanding these effects, this study examines the validity of a mechanism-based empirical model which describes primary stage tensile creep and stress relaxation of polycrystalline ceramic fibers as independent functions of time, temperature, and applied stress or strain. To verify these functional dependencies, a simple bend test is used to measure stress relaxation for four types of commercial ceramic fibers for which direct tensile creep data are available. These fibers include both nonoxide (SCS-6, Nicalon) and oxide (PRD-166, FP) compositions. The results of the Bend Stress Relaxation (BSR) test not only confirm the stress, time, and temperature dependencies predicted by the model, but also allow measurement of model empirical parameters for the four fiber types. In addition, comparison of model tensile creep predictions based on the BSR test results with the literature data show good agreement, supporting both the predictive capability of the model and the use of the BSR text as a simple method for parameter determination for other fibers.

  18. Modelling of the Global Geopotential Energy & Stress Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, C.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    Lateral density and topography variations yield in and important contribution to the lithospheric stress field. The leading quantity is the Geopotential Energy, the integrated lithostatic pressure in a rock column. The horizontal gradient of this quantity is related to horizontal stresses through the Equations of equilibrium of stresses. The Geopotential Energy furthermore can be linearly related to the Geoid under assumption of local isostasy. Satellite Geoid measurements contain, however, also non-isostatic deeper mantle responses of long wavelength. Unfortunately, high-pass filtering of the Geoid does not suppress only the deeper sources. The age-dependent signal of the oceanic lithosphere, for instance, is of long wave length and a prominent representative of in-plane stress, derived from the horizontal gradient of isostatic Geoid anomalies and responsible for the ridge push effect. Therefore a global lithospheric density model is required in order to isolate the shallow Geoid signal and calculate the stress pattern from isostatically compensated lithospheric sources. We use a linearized inverse method to fit a lithospheric reference model to observations such as topography and surface heat flow in the presence of local isostasy and a steady state geotherm. Subsequently we use a FEM code to solve the Equations of equilibrium of stresses for a three dimensional elastic shell. The modelled results are shown and compared with the global stress field and other publications.

  19. Simple reminiscence: a stress-adaptation model of the phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Puentes, William J

    2002-01-01

    The phenomenon of Simple Reminiscence may play an important role in the individual's ability to adapt to anxiety-provoking stressors across the life span. However, a clearly articulated model of the underlying psychodynamics of the phenomenon has not been developed. In this paper, a proposed model of the phenomenon of Simple Reminiscence is presented. The important components of the model-developmental issues, triggers, uses, processes, and outcomes-are interpreted within the context of Peplau's conceptualization of stress and stress adaptation. Implications of the model for future empirical investigations of Simple Reminiscence are discussed.

  20. Abstract Algebra for Algebra Teaching: Influencing School Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the potential for aspects of abstract algebra to be influential for the teaching of school algebra (and early algebra). Using national standards for analysis, four primary areas common in school mathematics--and their progression across elementary, middle, and secondary mathematics--where teaching may be transformed by…

  1. Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, M; Falgout, R; MacLachlan, S; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J

    2004-04-09

    Our ability to simulate physical processes numerically is constrained by our ability to solve the resulting linear systems, prompting substantial research into the development of multiscale iterative methods capable of solving these linear systems with an optimal amount of effort. Overcoming the limitations of geometric multigrid methods to simple geometries and differential equations, algebraic multigrid methods construct the multigrid hierarchy based only on the given matrix. While this allows for efficient black-box solution of the linear systems associated with discretizations of many elliptic differential equations, it also results in a lack of robustness due to assumptions made on the near-null spaces of these matrices. This paper introduces an extension to algebraic multigrid methods that removes the need to make such assumptions by utilizing an adaptive process. The principles which guide the adaptivity are highlighted, as well as their application to algebraic multigrid solution of certain symmetric positive-definite linear systems.

  2. Peer & Parent Encouragement of Early Algebra Enrollment & Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filer, Kimberly L.; Chang, Mido

    2008-01-01

    Using data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88), path analytic procedures were performed to test a model of the effects of parent and peer encouragement to take algebra on the mathematics achievement of eighth grade students. The effects of socio-economic status (SES) on middle school algebra course-taking and…

  3. Computer-Intensive Algebra and Students' Conceptual Knowledge of Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, Brian R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a research project that examined the effects of the Computer-Intensive Algebra (CIA) and traditional algebra curricula on students' (N=802) understanding of the function concept. Results indicate that CIA students achieved a better understanding of functions and were better at the components of modeling, interpreting, and translating.…

  4. Computer Program For Linear Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.; Hanson, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Collection of routines provided for basic vector operations. Basic Linear Algebra Subprogram (BLAS) library is collection from FORTRAN-callable routines for employing standard techniques to perform basic operations of numerical linear algebra.

  5. Algebra for Gifted Third Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borenson, Henry

    1987-01-01

    Elementary school children who are exposed to a concrete, hands-on experience in algebraic linear equations will more readily develop a positive mind-set and expectation for success in later formal, algebraic studies. (CB)

  6. A stress-coping model of mental illness stigma: I. Predictors of cognitive stress appraisal.

    PubMed

    Rüsch, Nicolas; Corrigan, Patrick W; Wassel, Abigail; Michaels, Patrick; Olschewski, Manfred; Wilkniss, Sandra; Batia, Karen

    2009-05-01

    Stigma can be a major stressor for individuals with schizophrenia and other mental illnesses. It is unclear, however, why some stigmatized individuals appraise stigma as more stressful, while others feel they can cope with the potential harm posed by public prejudice. We tested the hypothesis that the level of perceived public stigma and personal factors such as rejection sensitivity, perceived legitimacy of discrimination and ingroup perceptions (group value; group identification; entitativity, or the perception of the ingroup of people with mental illness as a coherent unit) predict the cognitive appraisal of stigma as a stressor. Stigma stress appraisal refers to perceived stigma-related harm exceeding perceived coping resources. Stress appraisal, stress predictors and social cue recognition were assessed in 85 people with schizophrenia, schizoaffective or affective disorders. Stress appraisal did not differ between diagnostic subgroups, but was positively correlated with rejection sensitivity. Higher levels of perceived societal stigma and holding the group of people with mental illness in low regard (low group value) independently predicted high stigma stress appraisal. These predictors remained significant after controlling for social cognitive deficits, depressive symptoms and diagnosis. Our findings support the model that public and personal factors predict stigma stress appraisal among people with mental illness, independent of diagnosis and clinical symptoms. Interventions that aim to reduce the impact of stigma on people with mental illness could focus on variables such as rejection sensitivity, a personal vulnerability factor, low group value and the cognitive appraisal of stigma as a stressor.

  7. Naturalistic Rodent Models of Chronic Early-Life Stress

    PubMed Central

    Molet, Jenny; Maras, Pamela M.; Avishai-Eliner, Sarit

    2016-01-01

    A close association between early-life experience and cognitive and emotional outcomes is found in humans. In experimental models, early-life experience can directly influence a number of brain functions long-term. Specifically, and often in concert with genetic background, experience regulates structural and functional maturation of brain circuits and alters individual neuronal function via large-scale changes in gene expression. Because adverse experience during sensitive developmental periods is often associated with neuropsychiatric disease, there is an impetus to create realistic models of distinct early-life experiences. These can then be used to study causality between early-life experiential factors and cognitive and emotional outcomes, and to probe the underlying mechanisms. Although chronic early-life stress has been linked to the emergence of emotional and cognitive disorders later in life, most commonly used rodent models of involve daily maternal separation and hence intermittent early-life stress. We describe here a naturalistic and robust chronic early-life stress model that potently influences cognitive and emotional outcomes. Mice and rats undergoing this stress develop structural and functional deficits in a number of limbic-cortical circuits. Whereas overt pathological memory impairments appear during adulthood, emotional and cognitive vulnerabilities emerge already during adolescence. This naturalistic paradigm, widely adopted around the world, significantly enriches the repertoire of experimental tools available for the study of normal brain maturation and of cognitive and stress-related disorders including depression, autism, post-traumatic stress disorder, and dementia. PMID:24910169

  8. Pseudo Algebraically Closed Extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bary-Soroker, Lior

    2009-07-01

    This PhD deals with the notion of pseudo algebraically closed (PAC) extensions of fields. It develops a group-theoretic machinery, based on a generalization of embedding problems, to study these extensions. Perhaps the main result is that although there are many PAC extensions, the Galois closure of a proper PAC extension is separably closed. The dissertation also contains the following subjects. The group theoretical counterpart of pseudo algebraically closed extensions, the so-called projective pairs. Applications to seemingly unrelated subjects, e.g., an analog of Dirichlet's theorem about primes in arithmetic progression for polynomial rings in one variable over infinite fields.

  9. Social-support moderated stress: a nonlinear dynamical model and the stress-buffering hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Field, Richard J; Schuldberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Health psychology has studied the cross-sectional, stationary relationships linking stress, social support, and health. Levels of stress-related illness are generally modeled by including a nonlinear multiplicative or 'buffering' effect, corresponding to the interaction of stressor levels with social support from family and friends. The motivation of the present research is to extend an iterative, dynamic model of this well-investigated psychological process using a dynamical systems model expressed as a set of continuous, nonlinear differential equations similar to those of the 'Oregonator,' a model of a nonlinear dynamic chemical system. This model of the behavior of an individual is amenable to numerical investigation of its stationary-state stability properties, temporal evolution, and cause-effect relationships. The continuous variables in this new approach refer to varying states of an individual; they are Perceived stress (X), Symptoms (Y), and Social support (Z). It is expected that poor health in this model, represented by Symptoms (Y), is directly related to Perceived stress, as well as being tied in more complicated ways to Social support. A number of such models may be envisioned, some including a multiplicative, 'buffering' (- X x Z) effect of social support dependent on stress levels. We explore the behavior of this model over ranges of parameter values and initial conditions and relate these results to how an individual reacts to environmental challenges at various levels of stressors and social-support recruitment. Data generated by the model are in turn analyzed with a traditional cross-sectional statistical technique. Similarities and differences between chemical and psychological systems are discussed.

  10. Time Evolution of Modeled Reynolds Stresses in Planar Homogeneous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongen, T.; Gatski, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    The analytic expression of the time evolution of the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor in all planar homogeneous flows is obtained by exact integration of the modeled differential Reynolds stress equations. The procedure is based on results of tensor representation theory, is applicable for general pressure-strain correlation tensors, and can account for any additional turbulence anisotropy effects included in the closure. An explicit solution of the resulting system of scalar ordinary differential equations is obtained for the case of a linear pressure-strain correlation tensor. The properties of this solution are discussed, and the dynamic behavior of the Reynolds stresses is studied, including limit cycles and sensitivity to initial anisotropies.

  11. Integrating Map Algebra and Statistical Modeling for Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Monthly Mean Daily Incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) over a Complex Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Evrendilek, Fatih

    2007-01-01

    This study aims at quantifying spatio-temporal dynamics of monthly mean daily incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) over a vast and complex terrain such as Turkey. The spatial interpolation method of universal kriging, and the combination of multiple linear regression (MLR) models and map algebra techniques were implemented to generate surface maps of PAR with a grid resolution of 500 × 500 m as a function of five geographical and 14 climatic variables. Performance of the geostatistical and MLR models was compared using mean prediction error (MPE), root-mean-square prediction error (RMSPE), average standard prediction error (ASE), mean standardized prediction error (MSPE), root-mean-square standardized prediction error (RMSSPE), and adjusted coefficient of determination (R2adj.). The best-fit MLR- and universal kriging-generated models of monthly mean daily PAR were validated against an independent 37-year observed dataset of 35 climate stations derived from 160 stations across Turkey by the Jackknifing method. The spatial variability patterns of monthly mean daily incident PAR were more accurately reflected in the surface maps created by the MLR-based models than in those created by the universal kriging method, in particular, for spring (May) and autumn (November). The MLR-based spatial interpolation algorithms of PAR described in this study indicated the significance of the multifactor approach to understanding and mapping spatio-temporal dynamics of PAR for a complex terrain over meso-scales.

  12. Assessing Elementary Algebra with STACK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangwin, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper concerns computer aided assessment (CAA) of mathematics in which a computer algebra system (CAS) is used to help assess students' responses to elementary algebra questions. Using a methodology of documentary analysis, we examine what is taught in elementary algebra. The STACK CAA system, http://www.stack.bham.ac.uk/, which uses the CAS…

  13. Modeling of Stress Triggered Faulting at Agenor Linea, Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahm, A. L.; Cameron, M. E.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2012-04-01

    To better understand the role of tidal stress sources and implications for faulting on Europa, we investigate the relationship between shear and normal stresses at Agenor Linea (AL), a ~1500 km long, E-W trending, 20-30 km wide zone of geologically young deformation located in the southern hemisphere of Europa which forks into two branches at its eastern end. The orientation of AL is consistent with tensile stresses resulting from long-term decoupled ice shell rotation (non-synchronous rotation [NSR]) as well as dextral shear stresses due to diurnal flexure of the ice shell. Its brightness and lack of cross-cutting features make AL a candidate for recent or current activity. Several observations indicate that right-lateral strike-slip faulting has occurred, such as left-stepping en echelon fractures in the northern portion of AL and the presence of an imbricate fan or horsetail complex at AL's western end. To calculate tidal stresses on Europa, we utilize SatStress, a numerical code that calculates tidal stresses at any point on the surface of a satellite for both diurnal and NSR stresses. We adopt SatStress model parameters appropriate to a spherically symmetric ice shell of thickness 20 km, underlain by a global subsurface ocean: shear modulus G = 3.5 GPa, Poisson ratio ν = 0.33, gravity g= 1.32 m/s2, ice density ρ = 920 kg/m3, satellite radius R= 1.56 x 103 km, satellite mass M= 4.8 x 1022 kg, semimajor axis a= 6.71 x 105 km, and eccentricity e= 0.0094. In this study we assume a coefficient of friction μ = 0.6 and consider a range of vertical fault depths zto 6 km. To assess shear failure at AL, we adopt a model based on the Coulomb failure criterion. This model balances stresses that promote and resist the motion of a fault, simultaneously accounting for both normal and shear tidal and NSR stresses, the coefficient of friction of ice, and additional stress at depth due to the overburden pressure. In this model, tidal shear stresses drive strike-slip motions

  14. Modelling of of hydraulic fractures trajectories in inhomogeneous stress field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. A.; Galybin, A.

    2013-05-01

    The paper examines an actual problem of oil and gas production -- modelling of the hydro-fracture trajectories depending on ihomogeneous distributions of pore pressure. The results could serve for improvement of the design of hydraulic fracturing in the oil/gas fields. The methods of the plane elasticity theory and fracture mechanics are employed. It is assumed, that in addition to the homogeneous field of natural stress the reservoir is also subjected to additional stresses caused by technological reasons, which makes the total stress field to be inhomogeneous. Therefore, the objective is to model a curvilinear crack path in an elastic inhomogeneous-loaded plane depending on the different mechanical parameters that control the stress state of the reservoir. For the simulation of the trajectory of a crack the method of boundary integral equation is used. The algorithms of step-by-step determination of the crack's trajectory development using the criterion of maximum tensile stresses at the end of the cracks have been developed. For the numerical realization of the solution we used a special modification of the method of mechanical quadratures providing effective and fast solution of the corresponding system of singular integral equation. The solution for the hydro-fracture path have been simulated for the case of inhomogeneous stress field due to presence of injection well for several physical models.

  15. Career Vitalization and Stress among Professors: An Attributional Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumpus, J. Frank

    A model that conceptualizes career stress for faculty members and that suggests options for enhancing career vitality is considered. The model draws upon attribution theory, the locus of control in work of Julian Rotter and the literature of depression by Martin E. P. Seligman. It suggests that perceived causes, or attributions, are directly…

  16. Simulating canopy temperature for modelling heat stress in cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop models must be improved to account for the large effects of heat stress effects on crop yields. To date, most approaches in crop models use air temperature despite evidence that crop canopy temperature better explains yield reductions associated with high temperature events. This study presents...

  17. A Multimodular Tensegrity Model of an Actin Stress Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yaozhi; Xu, Xian; Lele, Tanmay; Kumar, Sanjay; Ingber, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Stress fibers are contractile bundles in the cytoskeleton that stabilize cell structure by exerting traction forces on extracellular matrix. Individual stress fibers are molecular bundles composed of parallel actin and myosin filaments linked by various actin-binding proteins, which are organized end-on-end in a sarcomere-like pattern within an elongated three-dimensional network. While measurements of single stress fibers in living cells show that they behave like tensed viscoelastic fibers, precisely how this mechanical behavior arises from this complex supramolecular arrangement of protein components remains unclear. Here we show that computationally modeling a stress fiber as a multi-modular tensegrity network can predict several key behaviors of stress fibers measured in living cells, including viscoelastic retraction, fiber splaying after severing, non-uniform contraction, and elliptical strain of a puncture wound within the fiber. The tensegrity model also can explain how they simultaneously experience passive tension and generate active contraction forces; in contrast, a tensed cable net model predicts some, but not all, of these properties. Thus, tensegrity models may provide a useful link between molecular and cellular scale mechanical behaviors, and represent a new handle on multi-scale modeling of living materials. PMID:18632107

  18. Formal Formality of the Hypercommutative Algebras of Low Dimensional Calabi-Yau Varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond-Cole, Gabriel C.

    2014-04-01

    There is a homotopy hypercommutative algebra structure on the cohomology of a Calabi-Yau variety. The truncation of this homotopy hypercommutative algebra to a strict hypercommutative algebra is well-known as a mathematical realization of the genus zero B-model. It is shown that this truncation loses no information for some cases, including all Calabi-Yau 3-folds.

  19. Understanding lithospheric stresses in Arctic: constraints and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Sergei; Minakov, Alexander; Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Gaina, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    This pilot project aims to model stress patterns and analyze factors controlling lithospheric stresses in Arctic. The project aims to understand the modern stresses in Arctic as well as to define the ways to test recent hypotheses about Cenozoic evolution of the region. The regions around Lomonosov Ridge and Barents Sea are of particular interest driven by recent acquisition of high-resolution potential field and seismic data. Naturally, the major contributor to the lithospheric stress distribution is the gravitational potential energy (GPE). The study tries to incorporate available geological and geophysical data to build reliable GPE. In particular, we use the recently developed integrated gravity inversion for crustal thickness which incorporates up-to-date compilations of gravity anomalies, bathymetry, and sedimentary thickness. The modelled lithosphere thermal structure assumes a pure shear extension and the ocean age model constrained by global plate kinematics for the last ca. 120 Ma. The results of this approach are juxtaposed with estimates of the density variation inferred from the upper mantle S-wave velocity models based on previous surface wave tomography studies. Although new data and interpretations of the Arctic lithosphere structure become available now, there are areas of low accuracy or even lack of data. To compensate for this, we compare two approaches to constrain GPE: (1) one that directly integrates density of modelled lithosphere and (2) one that uses geoid anomalies which are filtered to account for density variations down to the base of the lithosphere only. The two versions of GPE compared to each other and the stresses calculated numerically are compared with observations. That allows us to optimize GPE and understand density structure, stress pattern, and factors controlling the stresses in Arctic.

  20. College Algebra II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Carl; And Others

    Presented are student performance objectives, a student progress chart, and assignment sheets with objective and diagnostic measures for the stated performance objectives in College Algebra II. Topics covered include: differencing and complements; real numbers; factoring; fractions; linear equations; exponents and radicals; complex numbers,…

  1. Computer Algebra versus Manipulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zand, Hossein; Crowe, David

    2004-01-01

    In the UK there is increasing concern about the lack of skill in algebraic manipulation that is evident in students entering mathematics courses at university level. In this note we discuss how the computer can be used to ameliorate some of the problems. We take as an example the calculations needed in three dimensional vector analysis in polar…

  2. Algebraic Artful Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, David

    1995-01-01

    Presents a technique that helps students concentrate more on the science and less on the mechanics of algebra while dealing with introductory physics formulas. Allows the teacher to do complex problems at a lower level and not be too concerned about the mathematical abilities of the students. (JRH)

  3. Computers in Abstract Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwabueze, Kenneth K.

    2004-01-01

    The current emphasis on flexible modes of mathematics delivery involving new information and communication technology (ICT) at the university level is perhaps a reaction to the recent change in the objectives of education. Abstract algebra seems to be one area of mathematics virtually crying out for computer instructional support because of the…

  4. ALGEBRA: a computer program that algebraically manipulates finite element output data. [In extended FORTRAN for CDC 7600 or CYBER 76 only

    SciTech Connect

    Richgels, M A; Biffle, J H

    1980-09-01

    ALGEBRA is a program that allows the user to process output data from finite-element analysis codes before they are sent to plotting routines. These data take the form of variable values (stress, strain, and velocity components, etc.) on a tape that is both the output tape from the analyses code and the input tape to ALGEBRA. The ALGEBRA code evaluates functions of these data and writes the function values on an output tape that can be used as input to plotting routines. Convenient input format and error detection capabilities aid the user in providing ALGEBRA with the functions to be evaluated. 1 figure.

  5. On vertex algebra representations of the Schrödinger-Virasoro Lie algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterberger, Jérémie

    2009-12-01

    The Schrödinger-Virasoro Lie algebra sv is an extension of the Virasoro Lie algebra by a nilpotent Lie algebra formed with a bosonic current of weight 3/2 and a bosonic current of weight 1. It is also a natural infinite-dimensional extension of the Schrödinger Lie algebra, which — leaving aside the invariance under time-translation — has been proved to be a symmetry algebra for many statistical physics models undergoing a dynamics with dynamical exponent z=2. We define in this article general Schrödinger-Virasoro primary fields by analogy with conformal field theory, characterized by a 'spin' index and a (non-relativistic) mass, and construct vertex algebra representations of sv out of a charged symplectic boson and a free boson and its associated vertex operators. We also compute two- and three-point functions of still conjectural massive fields that are defined by an analytic continuation with respect to a formal parameter.

  6. Optical systolic solutions of linear algebraic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, C. P.; Casasent, D.

    1984-01-01

    The philosophy and data encoding possible in systolic array optical processor (SAOP) were reviewed. The multitude of linear algebraic operations achievable on this architecture is examined. These operations include such linear algebraic algorithms as: matrix-decomposition, direct and indirect solutions, implicit and explicit methods for partial differential equations, eigenvalue and eigenvector calculations, and singular value decomposition. This architecture can be utilized to realize general techniques for solving matrix linear and nonlinear algebraic equations, least mean square error solutions, FIR filters, and nested-loop algorithms for control engineering applications. The data flow and pipelining of operations, design of parallel algorithms and flexible architectures, application of these architectures to computationally intensive physical problems, error source modeling of optical processors, and matching of the computational needs of practical engineering problems to the capabilities of optical processors are emphasized.

  7. An algebra of discrete event processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, Michael; Meyer, George

    1991-01-01

    This report deals with an algebraic framework for modeling and control of discrete event processes. The report consists of two parts. The first part is introductory, and consists of a tutorial survey of the theory of concurrency in the spirit of Hoare's CSP, and an examination of the suitability of such an algebraic framework for dealing with various aspects of discrete event control. To this end a new concurrency operator is introduced and it is shown how the resulting framework can be applied. It is further shown that a suitable theory that deals with the new concurrency operator must be developed. In the second part of the report the formal algebra of discrete event control is developed. At the present time the second part of the report is still an incomplete and occasionally tentative working paper.

  8. Stress Rupture Fracture Model and Microstructure Evolution for Waspaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhihao; Zhang, Maicang; Dong, Jianxin

    2013-07-01

    Stress rupture behavior and microstructure evolution of nickel-based superalloy Waspaloy specimens from tenon teeth of an as-received 60,000-hour service-exposed gas turbine disk were studied between 923 K and 1088 K (650 °C and 815 °C) under initial applied stresses varying from 150 to 840 MPa. Good microstructure stability and performance were verified for this turbine disk prior to stress rupture testing. Microstructure instability, such as the coarsening and dissolution of γ' precipitates at the varying test conditions, was observed to be increased with temperature and reduced stress. Little microstructure variation was observed at 923 K (650 °C). Only secondary γ' instability occurred at 973 K (700 °C). Four fracture mechanisms were obtained. Transgranular creep fracture was exhibited up to 923 K (650 °C) and at high stress. A mixed mode of transgranular and intergranular creep fracture occurred with reduced stress as a transition to intergranular creep fracture (ICF) at low stress. ICF was dominated by grain boundary sliding at low temperature and by the nucleation and growth of grain boundary cavities due to microstructure instability at high temperature. The fracture mechanism map and microstructure-related fracture model were constructed. Residual lifetime was also evaluated by the Larson-Miller parameter method.

  9. Unconditionally stable time marching scheme for Reynolds stress models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor-Yossef, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Progress toward a stable and efficient numerical treatment for the compressible Favre-Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a Reynolds-stress model (RSM) is presented. The mean-flow and the Reynolds stress model equations are discretized using finite differences on a curvilinear coordinates mesh. The convective flux is approximated by a third-order upwind biased MUSCL scheme. The diffusive flux is approximated using second-order central differencing, based on a full-viscous stencil. The novel time-marching approach relies on decoupled, implicit time integration, that is, the five mean-flow equations are solved separately from the seven Reynolds-stress closure equations. The key idea is the use of the unconditionally positive-convergent implicit scheme (UPC), originally developed for two-equation turbulence models. The extension of the UPC scheme for RSM guarantees the positivity of the normal Reynolds-stress components and the turbulence (specific) dissipation rate for any time step. Thanks to the UPC matrix-free structure and the decoupled approach, the resulting computational scheme is very efficient. Special care is dedicated to maintain the implicit operator compact, involving only nearest neighbor grid points, while fully supporting the larger discretized residual stencil. Results obtained from two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations demonstrate the significant progress achieved in this work toward optimally convergent solution of Reynolds stress models. Furthermore, the scheme is shown to be unconditionally stable and positive.

  10. Modelling of residually stressed materials with application to AAA.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, T; Dorfmann, L; Ogden, R W

    2016-08-01

    Residual stresses are generated in living tissues by processes of growth and adaptation and they significantly influence the mechanical behaviour of the tissues. Thus, to effectively model the elastic response of the tissues relative to a residually stressed configuration the residual stresses need to be incorporated into the constitutive equations. The purposes of this paper are (a) to summarise a general elastic constitutive formulation that includes residual stress, (b) to specify the tensors needed for the three-dimensional implementation of the theory in a nonlinear finite element code, and (c) to use the theory and its implementation to evaluate the wall stress distribution in an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) using patient specific geometry and material model parameters. The considered material is anisotropic with two preferred directions indicating the orientation of the collagen fibres in the aortic tissue. The method described in this paper is general and can be used, by specifying appropriate energy functions, to investigate other residually stressed biological systems. PMID:26874252

  11. A review of Reynolds stress models for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed review of recent developments in Reynolds stress modeling for incompressible turbulent shear flows is provided. The mathematical foundations of both two-equation models and full second-order closures are explored in depth. It is shown how these models can be systematically derived for two-dimensional mean turbulent flows that are close to equilibrium. A variety of examples are provided to demonstrate how well properly calibrated versions of these models perform for such flows. However, substantial problems remain for the description of more complex turbulent flows where there are large departures from equilibrium. Recent efforts to extend Reynolds stress models to nonequilibrium turbulent flows are discussed briefly along with the major modeling issues relevant to practical naval hydrodynamics applications.

  12. Algebraic connectivity and graph robustness.

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Abdallah, Chaouki T.

    2009-07-01

    Recent papers have used Fiedler's definition of algebraic connectivity to show that network robustness, as measured by node-connectivity and edge-connectivity, can be increased by increasing the algebraic connectivity of the network. By the definition of algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian is a lower bound on the node-connectivity. In this paper we show that for circular random lattice graphs and mesh graphs algebraic connectivity is a conservative lower bound, and that increases in algebraic connectivity actually correspond to a decrease in node-connectivity. This means that the networks are actually less robust with respect to node-connectivity as the algebraic connectivity increases. However, an increase in algebraic connectivity seems to correlate well with a decrease in the characteristic path length of these networks - which would result in quicker communication through the network. Applications of these results are then discussed for perimeter security.

  13. Trench migration and overriding plate stress in dynamic subduction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, A. F.; Becker, T. W.; Buffett, B. A.

    2015-04-01

    On Earth, oceanic plates subduct beneath a variety of overriding plate (OP) styles, from relatively thin and negatively buoyant oceanic OPs to thick and neutrally/positively buoyant continental OPs. The inclusion of an OP in numerical models of self-consistent subduction has been shown to reduce the rate that subducting slabs roll back relative to the equivalent single plate models. We use dynamic, 2-D subduction models to investigate how the mechanical properties, namely viscosity, thickness, and density, of the OP modify the slab rollback rate and the state of stress of the OP. In addition, we examine the role of the subducting plate (SP) viscosity. Because OP deformation accommodates the difference between the slab rollback rate and the far-field OP velocity, we find that the temporal variations in the rollback rate results in temporal variations in OP stress. The slabs in our models roll back rapidly until they reach the lower mantle viscosity increase, at which point the rollback velocity decreases. Concurrent with this reduction in rollback rate is a switch from an OP dominated by extensional stresses to a compressional OP. As in single plate models, the viscosity of the SP exerts a strong control on subducting slab kinematics; weaker slabs exhibit elevated sinking velocities and rollback rates. The SP viscosity also exerts a strong control on the OP stress regime. Weak slabs, either due to reduced bulk viscosity or stress-dependent weakening, have compressional OPs, while strong slabs have dominantly extensional OPs. While varying the viscosity of the OP alone does not substantially affect the OP stress state, we find that the OP thickness and buoyancy plays a substantial role in dictating the rate of slab rollback and OP stress state. Models with thick and/or negatively buoyant OPs have reduced rollback rates, and increased slab dip angles, relative to slabs with thin and/or positively buoyant OPs. Such elevated trench rollback for models with positively

  14. Using Technology to Balance Algebraic Explorations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.

    2013-01-01

    In 2000, the "National Council of Teachers of Mathematics" recommended that Algebra Standards, "instructional programs from prekindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to use mathematical models to represent and understand quantitative relationships." In this article, the authors suggest the "Balance"…

  15. Noise limitations in optical linear algebra processors.

    PubMed

    Batsell, S G; Jong, T L; Walkup, J F; Krile, T F

    1990-05-10

    A general statistical noise model is presented for optical linear algebra processors. A statistical analysis which includes device noise, the multiplication process, and the addition operation is undertaken. We focus on those processes which are architecturally independent. Finally, experimental results which verify the analytical predictions are also presented.

  16. A Microcomputer Lab for Algebra & Calculus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Chris; And Others

    An overview is provided of De Anza College's use of computerized instruction in its mathematics courses. After reviewing the ways in which computer technology is changing math instruction, the paper looks at the use of computers in several course sequences. The instructional model for the algebra sequence is based on a large group format of…

  17. A Linear Algebra Measure of Cluster Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mather, Laura A.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of models for information retrieval focuses on an application of linear algebra to text clustering, namely, a metric for measuring cluster quality based on the theory that cluster quality is proportional to the number of terms that are disjoint across the clusters. Explains term-document matrices and clustering algorithms. (Author/LRW)

  18. The geometric semantics of algebraic quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Cruz Morales, John Alexander; Zilber, Boris

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we will present an ongoing project that aims to use model theory as a suitable mathematical setting for studying the formalism of quantum mechanics. We argue that this approach provides a geometric semantics for such a formalism by means of establishing a (non-commutative) duality between certain algebraic and geometric objects.

  19. Digital Maps, Matrices and Computer Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    The way in which computer algebra systems, such as Maple, have made the study of complex problems accessible to undergraduate mathematicians with modest computational skills is illustrated by some large matrix calculations, which arise from representing the Earth's surface by digital elevation models. Such problems are often considered to lie in…

  20. A Visual Approach to Algebra Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morelli, Lynn

    1992-01-01

    Presents activities to visually explore the algebraic concepts of variable, constant, the distributive property, and combining like terms. Presents four transparencies that use visual models to understand exercises in students perform the same mental calculations on a number of their choice and obtain the same result. (MDH)

  1. Integrable generalized spin ladder models based on the SU(1|3) and SU(3|1) algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonel, Arlei Prestes; Foerster, Angela; Hibberd, Katrina; Links, Jon

    2003-12-01

    We present two integrable spin ladder models which possess a general free parameter besides the rung coupling J. The models are exactly solvable by means of the Bethe ansatz method and we present the Bethe ansatz equations. We analyze the elementary excitations of the models which reveal the existence of a gap for both models that depends on the free parameter.

  2. Effective stress model for partially and fully saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, T.N.

    1989-01-01

    An effective stress model which calculates the pressure-volume (P-V) and deviatoric stress response of partially and fully saturated rocks is described here. The model includes pore pressure effects on pore crushing and shear strength as well as effects of shear enhanced void collapse and shear caused dilatancy. The model can directly use tabular data for the P-V behavior of the rock solids and the water, and for the drained pore crushing behavior and shear strength, which simplifies model fitting. Phase transitions in the solids and vaporization of the water are also allowed. Use of the model is illustrated by an example of wave propagation in limestone. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Depression, Stress, and Anhedonia: Toward a Synthesis and Integrated Model

    PubMed Central

    Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a significant public health problem, but its etiology and pathophysiology remain poorly understood. Such incomplete understanding likely arises from the fact that depression encompasses a heterogeneous set of disorders. To overcome these limitations, renewed interest in intermediate phenotypes (endophenotypes) has resurfaced, and anhedonia has emerged as one of the most promising endophenotypes of depression. Here, a heuristic model is presented postulating that anhedonia arises from dysfunctional interactions between stress and brain reward systems. To this end, we review and integrate three bodies of independent literature investigating the role of (1) anhedonia, (2) dopamine, and (3) stress in depression. In a fourth section, we summarize animal data indicating that stress negatively affect mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic pathways critically implicated in incentive motivation and reinforcement learning. In the last section, we provide a synthesis of these four literatures, present initial evidence consistent with our model, and discuss directions for future research. PMID:24471371

  4. Scaling of earthquake models with inhomogeneous stress dissipation.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Rachele; Tiampo, Kristy; Serino, C A; Klein, W

    2013-02-01

    Natural earthquake fault systems are highly nonhomogeneous. The inhomogeneities occur because the earth is made of a variety of materials which hold and dissipate stress differently. In this work, we study scaling in earthquake fault models which are variations of the Olami-Feder-Christensen and Rundle-Jackson-Brown models. We use the scaling to explore the effect of spatial inhomogeneities due to damage and inhomogeneous stress dissipation in the earthquake-fault-like systems when the stress transfer range is long, but not necessarily longer than the length scale associated with the inhomogeneities of the system. We find that the scaling depends not only on the amount of damage, but also on the spatial distribution of that damage.

  5. Stressors, stress and stress consequences during long-duration manned space missions: a descriptive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geuna, Stefano; Brunelli, Francesco; Perino, Maria A.

    Keeping crew members in good health is a major factor in the success or failure of long-duration manned space missions. Among the many possible agents that can affect the crew's general well-being, stress is certainly one of the most critical because of its implications on human health and performance, both physical and mental. Nevertheless, very few studies have been performed on this fundamental issue and none of them has addressed it in its entirity, considering its diverse physical and psychological aspects. In this work, a descriptive model is proposed to expound the mechanism and sequence of events which mediate stress. A critical analysis of the information provided by past manned spaceflights and by dedicated research performed in analogous environments is presented, and an extrapolation of the available data on human stress in such extreme conditions is proposed. Both internal and external stressors have been identified, at physical and psychosocial levels, thus providing the basis for their early detection and preventive reduction. The possible negative consequences of stress that may lead to disease in crewmembers are described. Finally, the most effective instruments which may be of help in reducing space-related human stress and treating its negative consequences are suggested.

  6. Exact duality of the dissipative Hofstadter model on a triangular lattice: T-duality and noncommutative algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taejin

    2016-09-01

    We study the dissipative Hofstadter model on a triangular lattice, making use of the O(2, 2; R) T-dual transformation of string theory. The O(2, 2; R) dual transformation transcribes the model in a commutative basis into the model in a noncommutative basis. In the zero-temperature limit, the model exhibits an exact duality, which identifies equivalent points on the two-dimensional parameter space of the model. The exact duality also defines magic circles on the parameter space, where the model can be mapped onto the boundary sine-Gordon on a triangular lattice. The model describes the junction of three quantum wires in a uniform magnetic field background. An explicit expression of the equivalence relation, which identifies the points on the two-dimensional parameter space of the model by the exact duality, is obtained. It may help us to understand the structure of the phase diagram of the model.

  7. Martian sub-crustal stress from gravity and topographic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenzer, Robert; Eshagh, Mehdi; Jin, Shuanggen

    2015-09-01

    The latest Martian gravity and topographic models derived from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter and the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft tracking data are used to compute the sub-crustal stress field on Mars. For this purpose, we apply the method for a simultaneous determination of the horizontal sub-crustal stress component and the crustal thickness based on solving the Navier-Stokes problem and incorporating the Vening Meinesz-Moritz inverse problem of isostasy. Results reveal that most of the Martian sub-crustal stress is concentrated in the Tharsis region, with the most prominent signatures attributed to a formation of Tharsis major volcanoes followed by crustal loading. The stress distribution across the Valles Marineris rift valleys indicates extensional tectonism. This finding agrees with more recent theories of a tectonic origin of Valles Marineris caused, for instance, by a crustal loading of the Tharsis bulge that resulted in a regional trusting and folding. Aside from these features, the Martian stress field is relatively smooth with only a slightly enhanced pattern of major impact basins. The signatures of active global tectonics and polar ice load are absent. Whereas the signature of the hemispheric dichotomy is also missing, the long-wavelength spectrum of the stress field comprises the signature of additional dichotomy attributed to the isostatically uncompensated crustal load of Tharsis volcanic accumulations. These results suggest a different origin of the Earth's and Martian sub-crustal stress. Whereas the former is mainly related to active global tectonics, the latter is generated by a crustal loading and regional tectonism associated with a volcanic evolution on Mars. The additional sub-crustal stress around major impact basins is likely explained by a crustal extrusion after impact followed by a Moho uplift.

  8. Sex Differences in Adolescent Depression: Stress Exposure and Reactivity Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankin, Benjamin L.; Mermelstein, Robin; Roesch, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Stress exposure and reactivity models were examined as explanations for why girls exhibit greater levels of depressive symptoms than boys. In a multiwave, longitudinal design, adolescents' depressive symptoms, alcohol usage, and occurrence of stressors were assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months later (N=538; 54.5% female; ages 13-18, average…

  9. Uncertainties in obtaining high reliability from stress-strength models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Donald M.; Matthews, William T.; Vangel, Mark G.

    1992-01-01

    There has been a recent interest in determining high statistical reliability in risk assessment of aircraft components. The potential consequences are identified of incorrectly assuming a particular statistical distribution for stress or strength data used in obtaining the high reliability values. The computation of the reliability is defined as the probability of the strength being greater than the stress over the range of stress values. This method is often referred to as the stress-strength model. A sensitivity analysis was performed involving a comparison of reliability results in order to evaluate the effects of assuming specific statistical distributions. Both known population distributions, and those that differed slightly from the known, were considered. Results showed substantial differences in reliability estimates even for almost nondetectable differences in the assumed distributions. These differences represent a potential problem in using the stress-strength model for high reliability computations, since in practice it is impossible to ever know the exact (population) distribution. An alternative reliability computation procedure is examined involving determination of a lower bound on the reliability values using extreme value distributions. This procedure reduces the possibility of obtaining nonconservative reliability estimates. Results indicated the method can provide conservative bounds when computing high reliability. An alternative reliability computation procedure is examined involving determination of a lower bound on the reliability values using extreme value distributions. This procedure reduces the possibility of obtaining nonconservative reliability estimates. Results indicated the method can provide conservative bounds when computing high reliability.

  10. The Algebra Artist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beigie, Darin

    2014-01-01

    Most people who are attracted to STEM-related fields are drawn not by a desire to take mathematics tests but to create things. The opportunity to create an algebra drawing gives students a sense of ownership and adventure that taps into the same sort of energy that leads a young person to get lost in reading a good book, building with Legos®,…

  11. Algebra of Majorana doubling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehoon; Wilczek, Frank

    2013-11-27

    Motivated by the problem of identifying Majorana mode operators at junctions, we analyze a basic algebraic structure leading to a doubled spectrum. For general (nonlinear) interactions the emergent mode creation operator is highly nonlinear in the original effective mode operators, and therefore also in the underlying electron creation and destruction operators. This phenomenon could open up new possibilities for controlled dynamical manipulation of the modes. We briefly compare and contrast related issues in the Pfaffian quantum Hall state.

  12. Algebraic Multigrid Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    2013-05-06

    AMG2013 is a parallel algebraic multigrid solver for linear systems arising from problems on unstructured grids. It has been derived directly from the Boomer AMG solver in the hypre library, a large linear solvers library that is being developed in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) at LLNL. The driver provided in the benchmark can build various test problems. The default problem is a Laplace type problem on an unstructured domain with various jumps and an anisotropy in one part.

  13. Symmetric linear systems - An application of algebraic systems theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazewinkel, M.; Martin, C.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamical systems which contain several identical subsystems occur in a variety of applications ranging from command and control systems and discretization of partial differential equations, to the stability augmentation of pairs of helicopters lifting a large mass. Linear models for such systems display certain obvious symmetries. In this paper, we discuss how these symmetries can be incorporated into a mathematical model that utilizes the modern theory of algebraic systems. Such systems are inherently related to the representation theory of algebras over fields. We will show that any control scheme which respects the dynamical structure either implicitly or explicitly uses the underlying algebra.

  14. A quantum affine algebra for the deformed Hubbard chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisert, Niklas; Galleas, Wellington; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2012-09-01

    The integrable structure of the one-dimensional Hubbard model is based on Shastry's R-matrix and the Yangian of a centrally extended \\mathfrak {sl}(2|2) superalgebra. Alcaraz and Bariev have shown that the model admits an integrable deformation whose R-matrix has recently been found. This R-matrix is of trigonometric type and here we derive its underlying exceptional quantum affine algebra. We also show how the algebra reduces to the above-mentioned Yangian and to the conventional quantum affine \\mathfrak {sl}(2|2) algebra in two special limits.

  15. Survey of Turbulence Models for the Computation of Turbulent Jet Flow and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, N.

    1999-01-01

    The report presents an overview of jet noise computation utilizing the computational fluid dynamic solution of the turbulent jet flow field. The jet flow solution obtained with an appropriate turbulence model provides the turbulence characteristics needed for the computation of jet mixing noise. A brief account of turbulence models that are relevant for the jet noise computation is presented. The jet flow solutions that have been directly used to calculate jet noise are first reviewed. Then, the turbulent jet flow studies that compute the turbulence characteristics that may be used for noise calculations are summarized. In particular, flow solutions obtained with the k-e model, algebraic Reynolds stress model, and Reynolds stress transport equation model are reviewed. Since, the small scale jet mixing noise predictions can be improved by utilizing anisotropic turbulence characteristics, turbulence models that can provide the Reynolds stress components must now be considered for jet flow computations. In this regard, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are good candidates. Reynolds stress transport models involve more modeling and computational effort and time compared to algebraic stress models. Hence, it is recommended that an algebraic Reynolds stress model (ASM) be implemented in flow solvers to compute the Reynolds stress components.

  16. Modeling of residual stresses by HY-100 weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Taljat, B.; Radhakrishnan, B.

    1997-02-01

    Residual stress distribution in a HY-100 steel disk, induced by GTA spot welding, was analyzed by finite element (FE) formulations and measured by neutron diffraction (ND). Computations used temperature- dependent thermophysical and mechanical properties. FE model predictions are in good agreement with ND data in far heat affected zone (HAZ) and in base metal. Predicted residual stresses in fusion zone and near HAZ were higher than those measured by ND. This discrepancy was attributed to microstructural changes and associated material properties in the HAZ and fusion zone due to phase transformations during the weld thermal cycle.

  17. Modelling Of Residual Stresses Induced By High Speed Milling Process

    SciTech Connect

    Desmaison, Olivier; Mocellin, Katia; Jardin, Nicolas

    2011-05-04

    Maintenance processes used in heavy industries often include high speed milling operations. The reliability of the post-process material state has to be studied. Numerical simulation appears to be a very interesting way to supply an efficient residual stresses (RS) distribution prediction.Because the adiabatic shear band and the serrated chip shaping are features of the austenitic stainless steel high speed machining, a 2D high speed orthogonal cutting model is briefly presented. This finite element model, developed on Forge registered software, is based on data taken from Outeiro and al.'s paper [1]. A new behaviour law fully coupling Johnson-Cook's constitutive law and Latham and Cockcroft's damage model is detailed in this paper. It ensures results that fit those found in literature.Then, the numerical tools used on the 2D model are integrated to a 3D high speed milling model. Residual stresses distribution is analysed, on the surface and into the depth of the material. Various revolutions and passes of the two teeth hemispheric mill on the workpiece are simulated. Thus the sensitivity of the residual stresses generation to the cutting conditions can be discussed. In order to validate the 3D model, a comparison of the cutting forces measured by EDF R and D to those given by numerical simulations is achieved.

  18. Modelling Of Residual Stresses Induced By High Speed Milling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmaison, Olivier; Mocellin, Katia; Jardin, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    Maintenance processes used in heavy industries often include high speed milling operations. The reliability of the post-process material state has to be studied. Numerical simulation appears to be a very interesting way to supply an efficient residual stresses (RS) distribution prediction. Because the adiabatic shear band and the serrated chip shaping are features of the austenitic stainless steel high speed machining, a 2D high speed orthogonal cutting model is briefly presented. This finite element model, developed on Forge® software, is based on data taken from Outeiro & al.'s paper [1]. A new behaviour law fully coupling Johnson-Cook's constitutive law and Latham and Cockcroft's damage model is detailed in this paper. It ensures results that fit those found in literature. Then, the numerical tools used on the 2D model are integrated to a 3D high speed milling model. Residual stresses distribution is analysed, on the surface and into the depth of the material. Various revolutions and passes of the two teeth hemispheric mill on the workpiece are simulated. Thus the sensitivity of the residual stresses generation to the cutting conditions can be discussed. In order to validate the 3D model, a comparison of the cutting forces measured by EDF R&D to those given by numerical simulations is achieved.

  19. On the cohomology of Leibniz conformal algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiao

    2015-04-01

    We construct a new cohomology complex of Leibniz conformal algebras with coefficients in a representation instead of a module. The low-dimensional cohomology groups of this complex are computed. Meanwhile, we construct a Leibniz algebra from a Leibniz conformal algebra and prove that the category of Leibniz conformal algebras is equivalent to the category of equivalence classes of formal distribution Leibniz algebras.

  20. Assessing Algebraic Solving Ability: A Theoretical Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lian, Lim Hooi; Yew, Wun Thiam

    2012-01-01

    Algebraic solving ability had been discussed by many educators and researchers. There exists no definite definition for algebraic solving ability as it can be viewed from different perspectives. In this paper, the nature of algebraic solving ability in terms of algebraic processes that demonstrate the ability in solving algebraic problem is…

  1. Reconceptualizing native women's health: an "indigenist" stress-coping model.

    PubMed

    Walters, Karina L; Simoni, Jane M

    2002-04-01

    This commentary presents an "indigenist" model of Native women's health, a stress-coping paradigm that situates Native women's health within the larger context of their status as a colonized people. The model is grounded in empirical evidence that traumas such as the "soul wound" of historical and contemporary discrimination among Native women influence health and mental health outcomes. The preliminary model also incorporates cultural resilience, including as moderators identity, enculturation, spiritual coping, and traditional healing practices. Current epidemiological data on Native women's general health and mental health are reconsidered within the framework of this model.

  2. Duncan F. Gregory, William Walton and the development of British algebra: 'algebraical geometry', 'geometrical algebra', abstraction.

    PubMed

    Verburgt, Lukas M

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed account of the period of the complex history of British algebra and geometry between the publication of George Peacock's Treatise on Algebra in 1830 and William Rowan Hamilton's paper on quaternions of 1843. During these years, Duncan Farquharson Gregory and William Walton published several contributions on 'algebraical geometry' and 'geometrical algebra' in the Cambridge Mathematical Journal. These contributions enabled them not only to generalize Peacock's symbolical algebra on the basis of geometrical considerations, but also to initiate the attempts to question the status of Euclidean space as the arbiter of valid geometrical interpretations. At the same time, Gregory and Walton were bound by the limits of symbolical algebra that they themselves made explicit; their work was not and could not be the 'abstract algebra' and 'abstract geometry' of figures such as Hamilton and Cayley. The central argument of the paper is that an understanding of the contributions to 'algebraical geometry' and 'geometrical algebra' of the second generation of 'scientific' symbolical algebraists is essential for a satisfactory explanation of the radical transition from symbolical to abstract algebra that took place in British mathematics in the 1830s-1840s. PMID:26806075

  3. Duncan F. Gregory, William Walton and the development of British algebra: 'algebraical geometry', 'geometrical algebra', abstraction.

    PubMed

    Verburgt, Lukas M

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed account of the period of the complex history of British algebra and geometry between the publication of George Peacock's Treatise on Algebra in 1830 and William Rowan Hamilton's paper on quaternions of 1843. During these years, Duncan Farquharson Gregory and William Walton published several contributions on 'algebraical geometry' and 'geometrical algebra' in the Cambridge Mathematical Journal. These contributions enabled them not only to generalize Peacock's symbolical algebra on the basis of geometrical considerations, but also to initiate the attempts to question the status of Euclidean space as the arbiter of valid geometrical interpretations. At the same time, Gregory and Walton were bound by the limits of symbolical algebra that they themselves made explicit; their work was not and could not be the 'abstract algebra' and 'abstract geometry' of figures such as Hamilton and Cayley. The central argument of the paper is that an understanding of the contributions to 'algebraical geometry' and 'geometrical algebra' of the second generation of 'scientific' symbolical algebraists is essential for a satisfactory explanation of the radical transition from symbolical to abstract algebra that took place in British mathematics in the 1830s-1840s.

  4. Modeling of thermal stresses in elastic multilayer coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chunxue; Zhao, Zhiwei; Li, Xuehua

    2015-02-01

    The performance and reliability of multilayer coating systems are strongly influenced by thermal stresses. The present study develops an alternative analytical model to predict the thermal stresses in elastic multilayer coating systems. An exact closed-form solution is obtained which is independent of the number of coating layers. In addition, with the definition of the coordinate system, the closed-form solution is concisely formulated. Specific results are calculated for thermal stresses in HfO2/SiO2 multilayer optical coatings, and a finite element analysis is performed to confirm the analytical results. The two results agree fairly well with each other. Also, when the thicknesses of the coating layers are much less than the substrate thickness, the approximate solution is obtained based on the exact closed-form solution, and its accuracy is examined.

  5. How Structure Sense for Algebraic Expressions or Equations Is Related to Structure Sense for Abstract Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotna, Jarmila; Hoch, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Many students have difficulties with basic algebraic concepts at high school and at university. In this paper two levels of algebraic structure sense are defined: for high school algebra and for university algebra. We suggest that high school algebra structure sense components are sub-components of some university algebra structure sense…

  6. Risperidone ameliorates post-traumatic stress disorder-like symptoms in modified stress re-stress model.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Garabadu, Debapriya; Joy, Keerikkattil P

    2013-12-01

    The management for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves chronic administration of drugs. We have modified the stress re-stress (SRS) model to study the effect of chronic administration of risperidone (RIS) after induction of PTSD in rats. On day-1 (D-1) rats underwent training session for elevated-plus maze (EPM) test. On D-2, rats were subjected to stress protocol of 2 h restraint and 20 min forced-swim test (FST) followed by halothane anesthesia. The rats were exposed to re-stress (FST) on D-8 and at six day intervals on D-14, D-20, D-26 and D-32. The rats were treated with RIS (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg; p.o.) and standard drug, paroxetine (PAX; 10.0 mg/kg; p.o.) from D-8 to D-32. RIS (0.1 mg/kg) and PAX ameliorated SRS-induced immobility. RIS in median dose reversed SRS-induced hypocorticosteronemia both in urine and plasma. RIS in median dose improved SRS-induced behavioral perturbations such as memory impairment and anxiety-like behavior in EPM and Y-maze tests. RIS (0.1 mg/kg) reversed SRS-induced increase in amygdalar serotonin level. RIS (0.1 mg/kg) increased the expression of hippocampal MR thereby reversing the SRS-induced decrease in MR/GR ratio. Pearson's analysis of data on D-32 showed that there was significant correlation of plasma corticosterone, amygdalar serotonin and hippocampal ratio of mineralocorticoid (MR)/glucocorticoid receptor (GR) with SRS-induced behavioral abnormalities. Hence, median dose of RIS shows anti-PTSD-like effect in the modified SRS model. PAX had earlier onset of action in ameliorating behavioral effects of PTSD compared to RIS. However, RIS showed anti-PTSD like effect in sub-therapeutic dose. The mode of anti-PTSD action of RIS seems to involve the HPA-axis and serotonergic system, whereas PAX did not show any significant action on these pathways. The effect of repeated treatment of drugs for PTSD can be evaluated using the modified SRS model.

  7. A rabbit ear model for cold stress testing.

    PubMed

    Smith, T L; Gordon, S; Holden, M B; Smith, B P; Russell, G B; Koman, L A

    1994-01-01

    A rabbit ear model resembling the human digit was studied to determine the vascular response of the rabbit ear to a cold stress. Following moderate cooling (10 minutes at 5 degrees - 8 degrees C), auricular blood flow and cutaneous perfusion were reduced. This decrease was reversed by 30 minutes of warming. The response in the rabbit ear to cold stress is similar to that of normal human digits. The similarities between the control of the circulation in human digits and rabbit ears may result from the similarities in digital and auricular vascular receptors and receptor subtypes. Verification of the rabbit model provides an experimental method for obtaining important data regarding digital pathophysiology and the treatment of cold intolerance. Further study with this model will provide clinically relevant information regarding the pathophysiology of digital thermoregulatory abnormalities. PMID:7830538

  8. Modeling the Stress Strain Behavior of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2006-01-01

    Woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites represent one of the most mature composite systems to date. Future components fabricated out of these woven ceramic matrix composites are expected to vary in shape, curvature, architecture, and thickness. The design of future components using woven ceramic matrix composites necessitates a modeling approach that can account for these variations which are physically controlled by local constituent contents and architecture. Research over the years supported primarily by NASA Glenn Research Center has led to the development of simple mechanistic-based models that can describe the entire stress-strain curve for composite systems fabricated with chemical vapor infiltrated matrices and melt-infiltrated matrices for a wide range of constituent content and architecture. Several examples will be presented that demonstrate the approach to modeling which incorporates a thorough understanding of the stress-dependent matrix cracking properties of the composite system.

  9. Modeling diffusion-induced stress in nanowire electrode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Rutooj; Cheng, Yang-Tse; Verbrugge, Mark W.

    There is an intense, worldwide effort to develop durable lithium ion batteries with high energy and power densities for a wide range of applications, including electric and hybrid electric vehicles. One of the critical challenges in advancing lithium ion battery technologies is fracture and decrepitation of the electrodes as a result of lithium diffusion during charging and discharging operations. When lithium is inserted in either the positive or negative electrode, a large volume change on the order of a few to several hundred percent, can occur. Diffusion-induced stresses (DISs) can therefore cause the nucleation and growth of cracks, leading to mechanical degradation of the active electrode materials. Our work is aimed at developing a mathematical model relating surface energy with diffusion-induced stresses in nanowire electrodes. With decreasing size of the electrode, the ratio of surface area to volume increases. Thus, surface energy and surface stress can play an important role in mitigating DISs in nanostructured electrodes. In this work, we establish relationships between the surface energy, surface stress, and the magnitude of DISs in nanowires. We find that DISs, especially the tensile stresses, can decrease significantly due to the surface effects. Our model also establishes a relationship between stress and the nanowire radius. We show that, with decreasing size, the electrode material will be less prone to mechanical degradation, leading to an increase in the life of lithium ion batteries, provided other phenomena are unaffected by increased surface area (e.g., chemical degradation reactions). Also we show that, in the case of nanostructures, surface strain energy is significant in magnitude comparing with bulk strain energy. A mathematical tool to calculate total strain energy is developed that can be used to compare strain energy with the fracture energy of that material in electrode system.

  10. Stress, glucocorticoids and absences in a genetic epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Tolmacheva, Elena A; Oitzl, Melly S; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2012-05-01

    Although stress can alter the susceptibility of patients and animal models to convulsive epilepsy, little is known about the role of stress and glucocorticoid hormones in absence epilepsy. We measured the basal and acute stress-induced (foot-shocks: FS) concentrations of corticosterone in WAG/Rij rats, non-epileptic inbred ACI rats and outbred Wistar rats. The WAG/Rij strain is a genetic model for absence epilepsy and comorbidity for depression, which originates from the population of Wistar rats and, therefore, shares their genetic background. In a separate experiment, WAG/Rij rats were exposed to FS on three consecutive days. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded before and after FS, and the number of absence seizures (spike-wave-discharges, SWDs) was quantified. Both WAG/Rij rats and ACI rats exhibited elevated basal levels of corticosterone and a rapid corticosterone increase in response to acute stress. The WAG/Rij rats also displayed the most rapid normalization of corticosterone during the recovery phase compared to that of ACI and Wistar rats. FS had a biphasic effect on SWDs; an initial suppression was followed by an aggravation of the SWDs. By the third day, this aggravation of seizures was present in the hour preceding FS. This increase in SWDs may arise from anticipatory stress about the upcoming FS. Together, these results suggest that the distinct secretion profile of corticosterone found in WAG/Rij rats may contribute to the severity of the epileptic phenotype. Although the acute stressor results in an initial suppression of SWDs followed by an increase in SWDs, stress prior to a predictable negative event aggravates absences.

  11. Heisenberg Groups and their Automorphisms over Algebras with Central Involution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert W.

    2015-08-01

    Heisenberg groups over algebras with central involution and their automorphism groups are constructed. The complex quaternion group algebra over a prime field is used as an example. Its subspaces provide finite models for each of the real and complex quadratic spaces with dimension 4 or less. A model for the representations of these Heisenberg groups and automorphism groups is constructed. A pseudo-differential operator enables a parallel treatment of spaces defined over finite and real fields.

  12. 2-Local derivations on matrix algebras over semi-prime Banach algebras and on AW*-algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayupov, Shavkat; Kudaybergenov, Karimbergen

    2016-03-01

    The paper is devoted to 2-local derivations on matrix algebras over unital semi-prime Banach algebras. For a unital semi-prime Banach algebra A with the inner derivation property we prove that any 2-local derivation on the algebra M 2n (A), n ≥ 2, is a derivation. We apply this result to AW*-algebras and show that any 2-local derivation on an arbitrary AW*-algebra is a derivation.

  13. Neural models on temperature regulation for cold-stressed animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The present review evaluates several assumptions common to a variety of current models for thermoregulation in cold-stressed animals. Three areas covered by the models are discussed: signals to and from the central nervous system (CNS), portions of the CNS involved, and the arrangement of neurons within networks. Assumptions in each of these categories are considered. The evaluation of the models is based on the experimental foundations of the assumptions. Regions of the nervous system concerned here include the hypothalamus, the skin, the spinal cord, the hippocampus, and the septal area of the brain.

  14. Reynolds stress closure modeling in wall-bounded flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes two projects. Firstly, a Reynolds stress closure for near-wall turbulence is described. It was motivated by the simpler k-epsilon-(v-bar(exp 2)) model described in last year's annual research brief. Direct Numerical Simulation of three-dimensional channel flow shows a curious decrease of the turbulent kinetic energy. The second topic of this report is a model which reproduces this effect. That model is described and used to discuss the relevance of the three dimensional channel flow simulation to swept wing boundary layers.

  15. Animal models of post-traumatic stress disorder: face validity

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sonal; Rodríguez-Sierra, Olga; Cascardi, Michele; Paré, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating condition that develops in a proportion of individuals following a traumatic event. Despite recent advances, ethical limitations associated with human research impede progress in understanding PTSD. Fortunately, much effort has focused on developing animal models to help study the pathophysiology of PTSD. Here, we provide an overview of animal PTSD models where a variety of stressors (physical, psychosocial, or psychogenic) are used to examine the long-term effects of severe trauma. We emphasize models involving predator threat because they reproduce human individual differences in susceptibility to, and in the long-term consequences of, psychological trauma. PMID:23754973

  16. Plethystic algebras and vector symmetric functions.

    PubMed Central

    Rota, G C; Stein, J A

    1994-01-01

    An isomorphism is established between the plethystic Hopf algebra Pleth(Super[L]) and the algebra of vector symmetric functions. The Hall inner product of symmetric function theory is extended to the Hopf algebra Pleth(Super[L]). PMID:11607504

  17. Stress transmission through a model system of cohesionless elastic grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Miguel; Rajchenbach, Jean

    2000-08-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of granular materials is important for applications in civil and chemical engineering, geophysical sciences and the food industry, as well as for the control or prevention of avalanches and landslides. Unlike continuous media, granular materials lack cohesion, and cannot resist tensile stresses. Current descriptions of the mechanical properties of collections of cohesionless grains have relied either on elasto-plastic models classically used in civil engineering, or on a recent model involving hyperbolic equations. The former models suggest that collections of elastic grains submitted to a compressive load will behave elastically. Here we present the results of an experiment on a two-dimensional model system-made of discrete square cells submitted to a point load-in which the region in which the stress is confined is photoelastically visualized as a parabola. These results, which can be interpreted within a statistical framework, demonstrate that the collective response of the pile contradicts the standard elastic predictions and supports a diffusive description of stress transmission. We expect that these findings will be applicable to problems in soil mechanics, such as the behaviour of cohesionless soils or sand piles.

  18. Algebra and Algebraic Thinking in School Math: 70th YB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Algebra is no longer just for college-bound students. After a widespread push by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and teachers across the country, algebra is now a required part of most curricula. However, students' standardized test scores are not at the level they should be. NCTM's seventieth yearbook takes a look at the…

  19. Abstract Algebra to Secondary School Algebra: Building Bridges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Donna; Sparks, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The authors have experience with secondary mathematics teacher candidates struggling to make connections between the theoretical abstract algebra course they take as college students and the algebra they will be teaching in secondary schools. As a mathematician and a mathematics educator, the authors collaborated to create and implement a…

  20. Handheld Computer Algebra Systems in the Pre-Algebra Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantz, Linda Ann Galofaro

    2010-01-01

    This mixed method analysis sought to investigate several aspects of student learning in pre-algebra through the use of computer algebra systems (CAS) as opposed to non-CAS learning. This research was broken into two main parts, one which compared results from both the experimental group (instruction using CAS, N = 18) and the control group…

  1. Deformable target tracking method based on Lie algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunpeng; Shi, Zelin; Li, Guangwei

    2007-11-01

    Conventional approaches to object tracking use area correlation, but they are difficult to solve the problem of deformation of object region during tracking. A novel target tracking method based on Lie algebra is presented. We use Gabor feature as target token, model deformation using affine Lie group, and optimize parameters directly on manifold, which can be solved by exponential mapping between Lie Group and its Lie algebra. We analyze the essence of our method and test the algorithm using real image sequences. The experimental results demonstrate that Lie algebra method outperforms other traditional algorithms in efficiency, stabilization and accuracy.

  2. Computational modeling of cardiovascular response to orthostatic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldt, Thomas; Shim, Eun B.; Kamm, Roger D.; Mark, Roger G.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a model of the cardiovascular system capable of simulating the short-term (< or = 5 min) transient and steady-state hemodynamic responses to head-up tilt and lower body negative pressure. The model consists of a closed-loop lumped-parameter representation of the circulation connected to set-point models of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes. Model parameters are largely based on literature values. Model verification was performed by comparing the simulation output under baseline conditions and at different levels of orthostatic stress to sets of population-averaged hemodynamic data reported in the literature. On the basis of experimental evidence, we adjusted some model parameters to simulate experimental data. Orthostatic stress simulations are not statistically different from experimental data (two-sided test of significance with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons). Transient response characteristics of heart rate to tilt also compare well with reported data. A case study is presented on how the model is intended to be used in the future to investigate the effects of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance.

  3. Computational modeling of cardiovascular response to orthostatic stress.

    PubMed

    Heldt, Thomas; Shim, Eun B; Kamm, Roger D; Mark, Roger G

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a model of the cardiovascular system capable of simulating the short-term (< or = 5 min) transient and steady-state hemodynamic responses to head-up tilt and lower body negative pressure. The model consists of a closed-loop lumped-parameter representation of the circulation connected to set-point models of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes. Model parameters are largely based on literature values. Model verification was performed by comparing the simulation output under baseline conditions and at different levels of orthostatic stress to sets of population-averaged hemodynamic data reported in the literature. On the basis of experimental evidence, we adjusted some model parameters to simulate experimental data. Orthostatic stress simulations are not statistically different from experimental data (two-sided test of significance with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons). Transient response characteristics of heart rate to tilt also compare well with reported data. A case study is presented on how the model is intended to be used in the future to investigate the effects of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance. PMID:11842064

  4. Statecharts Via Process Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttgen, Gerald; vonderBeeck, Michael; Cleaveland, Rance

    1999-01-01

    Statecharts is a visual language for specifying the behavior of reactive systems. The Language extends finite-state machines with concepts of hierarchy, concurrency, and priority. Despite its popularity as a design notation for embedded system, precisely defining its semantics has proved extremely challenging. In this paper, a simple process algebra, called Statecharts Process Language (SPL), is presented, which is expressive enough for encoding Statecharts in a structure-preserving and semantic preserving manner. It is establish that the behavioral relation bisimulation, when applied to SPL, preserves Statecharts semantics

  5. Algebraic Multigrid Benchmark

    2013-05-06

    AMG2013 is a parallel algebraic multigrid solver for linear systems arising from problems on unstructured grids. It has been derived directly from the Boomer AMG solver in the hypre library, a large linear solvers library that is being developed in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) at LLNL. The driver provided in the benchmark can build various test problems. The default problem is a Laplace type problem on an unstructured domain with various jumpsmore » and an anisotropy in one part.« less

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress.

    PubMed

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S; Dudchenko, Olga A; Zlobina, Ksenia E; Guria, Georgy Th

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines.

  7. Dynamics of urban heat stress events in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, David

    2016-04-01

    Extreme heat stress events as measured by the wet-bulb temperature require extraordinarily high air temperatures coupled with high humidity. These conditions are rare, as relative humidity rapidly falls with rising air temperature, and this effect often results in decreasing heat stress as temperature rises. However, in certain coastal locations in the Middle East recent heat waves have resulted in wet-bulb temperatures of 33-35 degrees C, which approach the theoretical limits of human tolerance. These conditions result from the combination of extreme desert heat and humid winds off of the warm ocean waters. It is unclear if climate models properly simulate these dynamics. This study will analyse the ability of the CMIP5 model suite to replicate observed dynamics during extreme heat events in major urban areas.

  8. An Integrated Model of Posttraumatic Stress and Growth.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Steven L; Klein, Keith R; Nadia, Cyrus; Szabo, Lisa; Mogerman, Ben

    2015-01-01

    A number of recent models have examined cognitive predictors of posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth (S. Barton, A. Boals, & L. Knowles, 2013; J. Groleau, L. Calhoun, A. Cann, & G. Tedeschi, 2013; K. N. Triplett, R. G. Tedeschi, A. Cann, L. G. Calhoun, & C. L. Reeve, 2012). The current study examined an integrated model of predictors of distress and perceived growth in 194 college undergraduates. Domains covered included the roles of core belief challenge, event centrality, posttrauma cognitions, and event-related rumination. Negative cognitions about the self and the centrality of the event directly predicted both growth and distress, although intrusive rumination predicted only posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and deliberate rumination predicted only posttraumatic growth. Future research should continue to examine the shared and unique predictors of postevent growth and distress. PMID:26011515

  9. An Integrated Model of Posttraumatic Stress and Growth.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Steven L; Klein, Keith R; Nadia, Cyrus; Szabo, Lisa; Mogerman, Ben

    2015-01-01

    A number of recent models have examined cognitive predictors of posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth (S. Barton, A. Boals, & L. Knowles, 2013; J. Groleau, L. Calhoun, A. Cann, & G. Tedeschi, 2013; K. N. Triplett, R. G. Tedeschi, A. Cann, L. G. Calhoun, & C. L. Reeve, 2012). The current study examined an integrated model of predictors of distress and perceived growth in 194 college undergraduates. Domains covered included the roles of core belief challenge, event centrality, posttrauma cognitions, and event-related rumination. Negative cognitions about the self and the centrality of the event directly predicted both growth and distress, although intrusive rumination predicted only posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and deliberate rumination predicted only posttraumatic growth. Future research should continue to examine the shared and unique predictors of postevent growth and distress.

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  11. Prediction of Plate Motions and Stresses from Global Dynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Holt, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    Predicting plate motions correctly has been a challenge for global dynamic models. In addition to predicting plate motions, a successful model must also explain the following features: plate rigidity, plate boundary zone deformation, as well as intraplate stress patterns and deformation. In this study we show that, given constraints from shallow lithosphere structure, history of subduction, and first order features from whole mantle tomography, it is possible to achieve a high level of accuracy in predicting plate motions and lithosphere deformation within plate boundary zones. Best-fit dynamic models presently provide an RMS velocity misfit of global surface motions (compared at 63,000 spaced points in the GSRM NNR model [Kreemer et al., 2006]) of order 1 cm/yr. We explore the relative contribution of shallow lithosphere structure vs. whole mantle convection in affecting surface deformation as well as plate motions. We show that shallow lithosphere structure that includes topography and lateral density variations in the lithosphere is an integral part of global force balance. Its inclusion in geodynamic models is essential in order to match observations of surface motions and stresses, particularly within continental zones of deformation. We also argue that stiff slabs may not be as important as has been previously claimed in controlling plate motion and lithosphere deformation. An important result of this study is the calibration of absolute stress magnitudes in the lithosphere, verified through benchmarking using whole mantle convection models. Given additional constraints of the matching of surface motions, we also calibrate the absolute effective lithosphere viscosities. Best-fit models require plates with effective viscosities of order 1023 Pa-s, with plate boundary zones possessing effective viscosities 1-3 orders of magnitude weaker. Given deviatoric stress magnitudes within the lithosphere of order 10 - 60 MPa, our global models predict less than 2 mm

  12. Stress monitoring in a maxilla model and dentition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milczewski, Maura S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.; da Silva, Jean C. C.; Abe, Ilda; Simões, José A.; Saga, Armando

    2011-05-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings were used to measure stress caused by the orthodontic appliance in an experimental model reproducing the maxilla and dentition. This study brings light to the understanding of the way forces are dissipated on the dentition and propagate to the adjacent bone. Results show deformations on the order of 4 μɛ and a linear relationship between strain and the applied load in the incisor, canine and molar teeth.

  13. Micromechanical Modelling of Stress Waves in Rock and Rock Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resende, R.; Lamas, L. N.; Lemos, J. V.; Calçada, R.

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to simulate the interaction of stress waves and rock fractures in a particle micromechanical model. Stress waves travelling in fractured rock masses are slowed down and attenuated by natural heterogeneities, voids, microcracks and, above all, by faults and fractures. Considerable laboratory and theoretical investigation have uncovered the major aspects of this phenomenon, but models that cover the core mechanisms of the wave propagation in rock masses are necessary to investigate aspects of wave-fracture interaction, which are not completely clear, and in the future simulate full-scale real problems. The micromechanical model is based on the particle discrete element model that reproduces rock through a densely packed non-structured assembly of 2D disks with point contacts. The model of a hard rock core is developed and an irregular rock joint is generated at mid-height. A new contact constitutive model is applied to the particles in the joint walls. Numerical static joint compression tests are performed and a typical hyperbolic stress-displacement curve is obtained. Conditions for good quality wave transmission through non-jointed unorganized particulate media are determined, hybrid static-dynamic boundary conditions are established and plane waves are emitted into the compressed joint. The transmitted and reflected waves are extracted and analysed. Joint dynamic stiffness calculated according to the hypotheses of the Displacement Discontinuity Theory shows to increase with the static joint compression until the joint is completely closed. Still in its early stages of application, this rock micromechanical model enables the joint behaviour under static and dynamic loading to be analysed in detail. Its advantages are the reproduction of the real mechanics of contact creation, evolution and destruction and the possibility of visualizing in detail the joint geometry changes, which is hard to accomplish in the laboratory.

  14. A heuristic model for MRI turbulent stresses in Hall MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-07-01

    Although the Shakura-Sunyaev α viscosity prescription has been highly successful in characterizing myriad astrophysical environments, it has proven to be partly inadequate in modelling turbulent stresses driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Hence, we adopt the approach employed by Ogilvie, but in the context of Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), to study MRI turbulence. We utilize the exact evolution equations for the stresses, and the non-linear terms are closed through the invocation of dimensional analysis and physical considerations. We demonstrate that the inclusion of the Hall term leads to non-trivial results, including the modification of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, as well as the (asymptotic) non-equipartition between the kinetic and magnetic energies; the latter issue is also addressed via the analysis of non-linear waves. The asymptotic ratio of the kinetic to magnetic energies is shown to be independent of the choice of initial conditions, but it is governed by the Hall parameter. We contrast our model with an altered version of the Kazantsev prescription from small-scale dynamo theory, and the Hall term does not generally contribute in the latter approach, illustrating the limitations of this formalism. We indicate potential astrophysical applications of our model, including the solar wind where a lack of equipartition has been observed.

  15. Modeling Diffusion Induced Stresses for Lithium-Ion Battery Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu Huang, Cheng-Kai

    Advancing lithium-ion battery technology is of paramount importance for satisfying the energy storage needs in the U.S., especially for the application in the electric vehicle industry. To provide a better acceleration for electric vehicles, a fast and repeatable discharging rate is required. However, particle fractures and capacity loss have been reported under high current rate (C-rate) during charging/discharging and after a period of cycling. During charging and discharging, lithium ions extract from and intercalate into electrode materials accompanied with the volume change and phase transition between Li-rich phase and Li-poor phase. It is suggested that the diffusion-induced-stress is one of the main reasons causing capacity loss due to the mechanical degradation of electrode particles. Therefore, there is a fundamental need to provide a mechanistic understanding by considering the structure-mechanics-property interactions in lithium-ion battery materials. Among many cathode materials, the olivine-based lithium-iron-phosphate (LiFePO4) with an orthorhombic crystal structure is one of the promising cathode materials for the application in electric vehicles. In this research we first use a multiphysic approach to investigate the stress evolution, especially on the phase boundary during lithiation in single LiFePO4 particles. A diffusion-controlled finite element model accompanied with the experimentally observed phase boundary propagation is developed via a finite element package, ANSYS, in which lithium ion concentration-dependent anisotropic material properties and volume misfits are incorporated. The stress components on the phase boundary are used to explain the Mode I, Mode II, and Mode III fracture propensities in LiFePO4 particles. The elastic strain energy evolution is also discussed to explain why a layer-by-layer lithium insertion mechanism (i.e. first-order phase transformation) is energetically preferred. Another importation issue is how current

  16. Linear Algebra and Image Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allali, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    We use the computing technology digital image processing (DIP) to enhance the teaching of linear algebra so as to make the course more visual and interesting. Certainly, this visual approach by using technology to link linear algebra to DIP is interesting and unexpected to both students as well as many faculty. (Contains 2 tables and 11 figures.)

  17. Linear algebra and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allali, Mohamed

    2010-09-01

    We use the computing technology digital image processing (DIP) to enhance the teaching of linear algebra so as to make the course more visual and interesting. Certainly, this visual approach by using technology to link linear algebra to DIP is interesting and unexpected to both students as well as many faculty.

  18. A Programmed Course in Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mewborn, Ancel C.; Hively, Wells II

    This programed textbook consists of short sections of text interspersed with questions designed to aid the student in understanding the material. The course is designed to increase the student's understanding of some of the basic ideas of algebra. Some general experience and manipulative skill with respect to high school algebra is assumed.…

  19. Astro Algebra [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Astro Algebra is one of six titles in the Mighty Math Series from Edmark, a comprehensive line of math software for students from kindergarten through ninth grade. Many of the activities in Astro Algebra contain a unique technology that uses the computer to help students make the connection between concrete and abstract mathematics. This software…

  20. Gamow functionals on operator algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnino, M.; Gadella, M.; Betán, R. Id; Laura, R.

    2001-11-01

    We obtain the precise form of two Gamow functionals representing the exponentially decaying part of a quantum resonance and its mirror image that grows exponentially, as a linear, positive and continuous functional on an algebra containing observables. These functionals do not admit normalization and, with an appropriate choice of the algebra, are time reversal of each other.

  1. Online Algebraic Tools for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.

    2011-01-01

    Many free online tools exist to complement algebraic instruction at the middle school level. This article presents findings that analyzed the features of algebraic tools to support learning. The findings can help teachers select appropriate tools to facilitate specific topics. (Contains 1 table and 4 figures.)

  2. Patterns to Develop Algebraic Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Sheryl L.

    2011-01-01

    What is the role of patterns in developing algebraic reasoning? This important question deserves thoughtful attention. In response, this article examines some differing views of algebraic reasoning, discusses a controversy regarding patterns, and describes how three types of patterns--in contextual problems, in growing geometric figures, and in…

  3. Algebra: Grades 8-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    A complete set of behavioral objectives for first-year algebra taught in any of grades 8 through 12 is presented. Three to six sample test items and answers are provided for each objective. Objectives were determined by surveying the most used secondary school algebra textbooks. Fourteen major categories are included: (1) whole numbers--operations…

  4. Elementary maps on nest algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengtong

    2006-08-01

    Let , be algebras and let , be maps. An elementary map of is an ordered pair (M,M*) such that for all , . In this paper, the general form of surjective elementary maps on standard subalgebras of nest algebras is described. In particular, such maps are automatically additive.

  5. Condensing Algebra for Technical Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Donald R.

    Twenty Algebra-Packets (A-PAKS) were developed by the investigator for technical education students at the community college level. Each packet contained a statement of rationale, learning objectives, performance activities, performance test, and performance test answer key. The A-PAKS condensed the usual sixteen weeks of algebra into a six-week…

  6. The Algebra of the Arches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buerman, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Finding real-world examples for middle school algebra classes can be difficult but not impossible. As we strive to accomplish teaching our students how to solve and graph equations, we neglect to teach the big ideas of algebra. One of those big ideas is functions. This article gives three examples of functions that are found in Arches National…

  7. Deterministic Stress Modeling of Hot Gas Segregation in a Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busby, Judy; Sondak, Doug; Staubach, Brent; Davis, Roger

    1998-01-01

    Simulation of unsteady viscous turbomachinery flowfields is presently impractical as a design tool due to the long run times required. Designers rely predominantly on steady-state simulations, but these simulations do not account for some of the important unsteady flow physics. Unsteady flow effects can be modeled as source terms in the steady flow equations. These source terms, referred to as Lumped Deterministic Stresses (LDS), can be used to drive steady flow solution procedures to reproduce the time-average of an unsteady flow solution. The goal of this work is to investigate the feasibility of using inviscid lumped deterministic stresses to model unsteady combustion hot streak migration effects on the turbine blade tip and outer air seal heat loads using a steady computational approach. The LDS model is obtained from an unsteady inviscid calculation. The LDS model is then used with a steady viscous computation to simulate the time-averaged viscous solution. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional applications are examined. The inviscid LDS model produces good results for the two-dimensional case and requires less than 10% of the CPU time of the unsteady viscous run. For the three-dimensional case, the LDS model does a good job of reproducing the time-averaged viscous temperature migration and separation as well as heat load on the outer air seal at a CPU cost that is 25% of that of an unsteady viscous computation.

  8. An Algebraic Model for the mathfrak{su}(2|2) Light-Cone String Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, S.

    We first revisit the light-cone string field theory on the flat andpp-wave background. By our systematic analysis, we find that some unsatisfactions in the previous construction can be overcome. After that, we head for the construction of the LCSFT on the bubbling geometry with an isometry [mathfrak{psu}(2|2)]^2 ltimes {mathbb R}. We clarify the structure of expansion and propose toy models for it. This proceeding is based on the collaboration with Kishimoto [I. Kishimoto and S. Moriyama, J. High Energy Phys. textbf{08} (2010), 013, arXiv:1005.4719 (Ref. 1)].

  9. Thermodynamics. [algebraic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental structure of thermodynamics is purely algebraic, in the sense of atopological, and it is also independent of partitions, composite systems, the zeroth law, and entropy. The algebraic structure requires the notion of heat, but not the first law. It contains a precise definition of entropy and identifies it as a purely mathematical concept. It also permits the construction of an entropy function from heat measurements alone when appropriate conditions are satisfied. Topology is required only for a discussion of the continuity of thermodynamic properties, and then the weak topology is the relevant topology. The integrability of the differential form of the first law can be examined independently of Caratheodory's theorem and his inaccessibility axiom. Criteria are established by which one can determine when an integrating factor can be made intensive and the pseudopotential extensive and also an entropy. Finally, a realization of the first law is constructed which is suitable for all systems whether they are solids or fluids, whether they do or do not exhibit chemical reactions, and whether electromagnetic fields are or are not present.

  10. Open-closed homotopy algebra in mathematical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kajiura, Hiroshige; Stasheff, Jim

    2006-02-15

    In this paper we discuss various aspects of open-closed homotopy algebras (OCHAs) presented in our previous paper, inspired by Zwiebach's open-closed string field theory, but that first paper concentrated on the mathematical aspects. Here we show how an OCHA is obtained by extracting the tree part of Zwiebach's quantum open-closed string field theory. We clarify the explicit relation of an OCHA with Kontsevich's deformation quantization and with the B-models of homological mirror symmetry. An explicit form of the minimal model for an OCHA is given as well as its relation to the perturbative expansion of open-closed string field theory. We show that our open-closed homotopy algebra gives us a general scheme for deformation of open string structures (A{sub {infinity}} algebras) by closed strings (L{sub {infinity}} algebras)

  11. Application and improvement of Raupach's shear stress partitioning model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, B. A.; Lehning, M.; Gromke, C.

    2012-12-01

    Aeolian processes such as the entrainment, transport and redeposition of sand, soil or snow are able to significantly reshape the earth's surface. In times of increasing desertification and land degradation, often driven by wind erosion, investigations of aeolian processes become more and more important in environmental sciences. The reliable prediction of the sheltering effect of vegetation canopies against sediment erosion, for instance, is a clear practical application of such investigations to identify suitable and sustainable counteractive measures against wind erosion. This study presents an application and improvement of a theoretical model presented by Raupach (Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1992, Vol.60, 375-395 and Journal of Geophysical Research, 1993, Vol.98, 3023-3029) which allows for quantifying the sheltering effect of vegetation against sediment erosion. The model predicts the shear stress ratios τS'/τ and τS''/τ. Here, τS is the part of the total shear stress τ that acts on the ground beneath the plants. The spatial peak τS'' of the surface shear stress is responsible for the onset of particle entrainment whereas the spatial mean τS' can be used to quantify particle mass fluxes. The precise and accurate prediction of these quantities is essential when modeling wind erosion. Measurements of the surface shear stress distributions τS(x,y) on the ground beneath live vegetation canopies (plant species: lolium perenne) were performed in a controlled wind tunnel environment to determine the model parameters and to evaluate the model performance. Rigid, non-porous wooden blocks instead of the plants were additionally tested for the purpose of comparison, since previous wind tunnel studies used exclusively artificial plant imitations for their experiments on shear stress partitioning. The model constant c, which is needed to determine the total stress τ for a canopy of interest and which remained rather unspecified to date, was found to be c ≈ 0

  12. Comparison of the Effectiveness of a Traditional Intermediate Algebra Course With That of a Less Rigorous Intermediate Algebra Course in Preparing Students for Success in a Subsequent Mathematics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sworder, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    An experimental two-track intermediate algebra course was offered at Saddleback College, Mission Viejo, CA, between the Fall, 2002 and Fall, 2005 semesters. One track was modeled after the existing traditional California community college intermediate algebra course and the other track was a less rigorous intermediate algebra course in which the…

  13. Analytical Model for Thermal Elastoplastic Stresses of Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, P. C.; Chen, G.; Liu, L. S.; Fang, C.; Zhang, Q. J.

    2008-02-15

    A modification analytical model is presented for the thermal elastoplastic stresses of functionally graded materials subjected to thermal loading. The presented model follows the analytical scheme presented by Y. L. Shen and S. Suresh [6]. In the present model, the functionally graded materials are considered as multilayered materials. Each layer consists of metal and ceramic with different volume fraction. The ceramic layer and the FGM interlayers are considered as elastic brittle materials. The metal layer is considered as elastic-perfectly plastic ductile materials. Closed-form solutions for different characteristic temperature for thermal loading are presented as a function of the structure geometries and the thermomechanical properties of the materials. A main advance of the present model is that the possibility of the initial and spread of plasticity from the two sides of the ductile layers taken into account. Comparing the analytical results with the results from the finite element analysis, the thermal stresses and deformation from the present model are in good agreement with the numerical ones.

  14. Composite memory variable velocity-stress viscoelastic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hestholm, Stig

    2002-01-01

    The full 3-D viscoelastic wave equations have been reformulated,using the velocity-stress formulation for a curved grid, to include a set of memory variables for each particle velocity component. The earlier standard formulation includes a set of memory variables for each stress component. In 3-D this reduces the number of memory variables by three for each extra relaxation parameter above 1. This reformulation requires transforming the usual first order differential equation for velocity-stress modelling to a second order differential equation which again requires storage of two consecutive time step values of the particle velocities. No memory saving therefore is achieved using just one relaxation mechanism. However, the memory saved by the new formulation increases with increasing number of included relaxation mechanisms, and is around 30 per cent for 5-7 relaxation mechanisms, which is often required for accurate Q modelling. Incidentally, for media of heterogeneous Q , the new formulation is two to three times slower in simulations than the old formulation, so the new formulation should be used in memory critical applications and/or for heterogeneous media with layers/blocks of homogeneous Q , for which also CPU will be saved.

  15. An Algebra-Integrated Physics and Chemistry Workshop for Teachers as a Model for Increasing the Number of Minority Students in Science and Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obot, V.; Brown, B.; Wu, T.; Wunsch, G.; Miles, A.; Morris, P.; Lindstrom, M.; Allen, J.

    The need to increase minority representation in science and engineering disciplines is well documented. Many strategies for achieving this goal have evolved over the years; yet, minority representation is still minimal. It appears that while students are naturally curious about the universe, once mention is made of mathematics as a pre-requisite to the study of science and engineering, interest seems to wane. Perhaps a possible way to get around this phobia is to incorporate the mathematics into the science courses and the science into the mathematics courses at the secondary level. This will require mathematics and science teachers to work together, re-enforcing each other so that lessons can be truly interdisciplinary. For the past two summers, we have conducted workshops for secondary school mathematics and science teachers in a large urban school district. The workshops are called "Algebra-Integrated Physics and Chemistry". These workshops are designed to introduce the teachers to mathematical modeling of physical and chemical phenomenon. T chnology (graphic calculators) is used to dis covere functions that model a particular process. We have modeled linear functions by looking at the Celsius and Fahrenheit scales. A simple experiment is heating water, measuring the temperature in both Celsius and Fahrenheit scales, plotting Celsius versus Fahrenheit temperatures, and determining their mathematical relationship. At this point, the science teacher can also go into a discussion of the meaning of temperature. In some cases readily available data can be analyzed. The ellipse and Kepler's third law is ideal when studying conic sections. In this case, available data can be used, and by plotting appropriately, cubic functions can be studied and motions of planets in their orbits near and far from the sun can be discussed. This new approach to mathematics and science will take the student to a certain comfort level so that statements such as either " I like science

  16. A possible framework of the Lipkin model obeying the SU(n) algebra in arbitrary fermion number. II: Two subalgebras in the SU(n) Lipkin model and an approach to the construction of a linearly independent basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; Providência, Constança; Providência, João da; Yamamura, Masatoshi

    2016-08-01

    Based on the results for the minimum weight states obtained in the previous paper (I), an idea of how to construct the linearly independent basis is proposed for the SU(n) Lipkin model. This idea starts in setting up m independent SU(2) subalgebras in the cases with n=2m and n=2m+1 (m=2,3,4,…). The original representation is re-formed in terms of the spherical tensors for the SU(n) generators built under the SU(2) subalgebras. Through this re-formation, the SU(m) subalgebra can be found. For constructing the linearly independent basis, not only the SU(2) algebras but also the SU(m) subalgebra play a central role. Some concrete results in the cases with n=2, 3, 4, and 5 are presented.

  17. Latent sensitization: a model for stress-sensitive chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Marvizon, Juan Carlos; Walwyn, Wendy; Minasyan, Ani; Chen, Wenling; Taylor, Bradley K

    2015-01-01

    Latent sensitization is a rodent model of chronic pain that reproduces both its episodic nature and its sensitivity to stress. It is triggered by a wide variety of injuries ranging from injection of inflammatory agents to nerve damage. It follows a characteristic time course in which a hyperalgesic phase is followed by a phase of remission. The hyperalgesic phase lasts between a few days to several months, depending on the triggering injury. Injection of μ-opioid receptor inverse agonists (e.g., naloxone or naltrexone) during the remission phase induces reinstatement of hyperalgesia. This indicates that the remission phase does not represent a return to the normal state, but rather an altered state in which hyperalgesia is masked by constitutive activity of opioid receptors. Importantly, stress also triggers reinstatement. Here we describe in detail procedures for inducing and following latent sensitization in its different phases in rats and mice. PMID:25829356

  18. Thermal mechanical stress modeling of GCtM seals

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Steve Xunhu; Chambers, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Finite-element thermal stress modeling at the glass-ceramic to metal (GCtM) interface was conducted assuming heterogeneous glass-ceramic microstructure. The glass-ceramics were treated as composites consisting of high expansion silica crystalline phases dispersed in a uniform residual glass. Interfacial stresses were examined for two types of glass-ceramics. One was designated as SL16 glass -ceramic, owing to its step-like thermal strain curve with an overall coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at 16 ppm/ºC. Clustered Cristobalite is the dominant silica phase in SL16 glass-ceramic. The other, designated as NL16 glass-ceramic, exhibited clusters of mixed Cristobalite and Quartz and showed a near-linear thermal strain curve with a same CTE value.

  19. Latent Sensitization: a model for stress-sensitive chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Marvizon, Juan Carlos; Walwyn, Wendy; Minasyan, Ani; Chen, Wenling; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2015-01-01

    Latent sensitization is a rodent model of chronic pain that reproduces both its episodic nature and its sensitivity to stress. It is triggered by a wide variety of injuries ranging from injection of inflammatory agents to nerve damage. It follows a characteristic time course in which a hyperalgesic phase is followed by a phase of remission. The hyperalgesic phase lasts between a few days to several months, depending of the triggering injury. Injection of μ-opioid receptor inverse agonists (i.e., naloxone, naltrexone) during the remission phase induces reinstatement of hyperalgesia. This indicates that the remission phase does not represent a return to the normal state, but rather an altered state in which hyperalgesia is masked by constitutive activity of opioid receptors. Importantly, stress also triggers reinstatement. Here we describe in detail the procedures to induce and follow latent sensitization in its different phases in rats and mice. PMID:25829356

  20. A contact stress model for multifingered grasps of rough objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Pramath Raj; Abel, Jacob M.

    1990-01-01

    The model developed utilizes a contact-stress analysis of an arbitrarily shaped object in a multifingered grasp. The fingers and the object are all treated as elastic bodies, and the region of contact is modeled as a deformable surface patch. The relationship between the friction and normal forces is nonlocal and nonlinear in nature and departs from the Coulomb approximation. The nature of the constraints arising out of conditions for compatibility and static equilibrium motivated the formulation of the model as a nonlinear constrained minimization problem. The model is able to predict the magnitude of the inwardly directed normal forces and both the magnitude and direction of the tangential (friction) forces at each finger-object interface for grasped objects in static equilibrium.

  1. Using Linear Algebra to Introduce Computer Algebra, Numerical Analysis, Data Structures and Algorithms (and To Teach Linear Algebra, Too).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Vega, Laureano

    1999-01-01

    Using a Computer Algebra System (CAS) to help with the teaching of an elementary course in linear algebra can be one way to introduce computer algebra, numerical analysis, data structures, and algorithms. Highlights the advantages and disadvantages of this approach to the teaching of linear algebra. (Author/MM)

  2. Transformation of time dependence to linear algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menšík, Miroslav

    2005-10-01

    Reduced density matrix and memory function in the Nakajima-Zwanzig equation are expanded in properly chosen basis of special functions. This trick completely transforms time dependence to linear algebra. Then, the master equation for memory function is constructed and expanded in the same basis functions. For the model of a simple harmonic oscillator it is shown that this trick introduces infinite partial summation of the memory function in the system-bath interaction.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Stress-Induced Myocardial Injury in a Rat Model Simulating Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mi; Xu, Feifei; Tao, Tianqi; Song, Dandan; Li, Dong; Li, Yuzhen; Guo, Yucheng; Liu, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying myocardial injury induced by simulated PTSD. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group (n = 18) and PTSD group (n = 30). The PTSD model was replicated using the single prolonged stress (SPS) method. On the 14th day poststress, the apoptotic cells in myocardium were assessed using both TUNEL method and transmission electron microscopy; the protein levels of the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) molecules were measured by using Western blotting analysis. Results Exposure to SPS resulted in characteristic morphologic changes of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, TUNEL staining was also indicative of the elevated apoptosis rate of cardiomyocytes from the SPS rats (30.69% versus 7.26%, p < .001). Simulated PTSD also induced ERS in myocardium, demonstrated by up-regulation of protein levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (0.64 versus 0.26, p = .017), calreticulin (p = .040), and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (0.95 versus 0.43, p = .047), phosphorylation of protein kinase RNA–like ER kinase (p = .003), and caspase 12 activation (0.30 versus 0.06, p < .001) in myocardium from the SPS rats. The ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax decreased significantly in myocardium from the SPS rats (p = .005). Conclusions The ERS-related apoptosis mediated by the protein kinase RNA–like ER kinase/CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein and caspase 12 pathways may be associated with myocardial injury in a rat model simulating PTSD. This study may advance our understanding of how PTSD contributes to myocardial injury on a molecular level. PMID:27359173

  4. In vivo porcine left atrial wall stress: Computational model.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Elena S; Bellini, Chiara; Schwartzman, David S

    2011-10-13

    Most computational models of the heart have so far concentrated on the study of the left ventricle, mainly using simplified geometries. The same approach cannot be adopted to model the left atrium, whose irregular shape does not allow morphological simplifications. In addition, the deformation of the left atrium during the cardiac cycle strongly depends on the interaction with its surrounding structures. We present a procedure to generate a comprehensive computational model of the left atrium, including physiological loads (blood pressure), boundary conditions (pericardium, pulmonary veins and mitral valve annulus movement) and mechanical properties based on planar biaxial experiments. The model was able to accurately reproduce the in vivo dynamics of the left atrium during the passive portion of the cardiac cycle. A shift in time between the peak pressure and the maximum displacement of the mitral valve annulus allows the appendage to inflate and bend towards the ventricle before the pulling effect associated with the ventricle contraction takes place. The ventricular systole creates room for further expansion of the appendage, which gets in close contact with the pericardium. The temporal evolution of the volume in the atrial cavity as predicted by the finite element simulation matches the volume changes obtained from CT scans. The stress field computed at each time point shows remarkable spatial heterogeneity. In particular, high stress concentration occurs along the appendage rim and in the region surrounding the pulmonary veins. PMID:21907340

  5. Quantum algebra of N superspace

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, Nicolas; Restuccia, A.; Stephany, J.

    2007-08-15

    We identify the quantum algebra of position and momentum operators for a quantum system bearing an irreducible representation of the super Poincare algebra in the N>1 and D=4 superspace, both in the case where there are no central charges in the algebra, and when they are present. This algebra is noncommutative for the position operators. We use the properties of superprojectors acting on the superfields to construct explicit position and momentum operators satisfying the algebra. They act on the projected wave functions associated to the various supermultiplets with defined superspin present in the representation. We show that the quantum algebra associated to the massive superparticle appears in our construction and is described by a supermultiplet of superspin 0. This result generalizes the construction for D=4, N=1 reported recently. For the case N=2 with central charges, we present the equivalent results when the central charge and the mass are different. For the {kappa}-symmetric case when these quantities are equal, we discuss the reduction to the physical degrees of freedom of the corresponding superparticle and the construction of the associated quantum algebra.

  6. Constraint algebra in bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, V. O.

    2015-07-15

    The number of degrees of freedom in bigravity theory is found for a potential of general form and also for the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley (dRGT). This aim is pursued via constructing a Hamiltonian formalismand studying the Poisson algebra of constraints. A general potential leads to a theory featuring four first-class constraints generated by general covariance. The vanishing of the respective Hessian is a crucial property of the dRGT potential, and this leads to the appearance of two additional second-class constraints and, hence, to the exclusion of a superfluous degree of freedom—that is, the Boulware—Deser ghost. The use of a method that permits avoiding an explicit expression for the dRGT potential is a distinctive feature of the present study.

  7. Constraint algebra in bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, V. O.

    2015-07-01

    The number of degrees of freedom in bigravity theory is found for a potential of general form and also for the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze, and Tolley (dRGT). This aim is pursued via constructing a Hamiltonian formalismand studying the Poisson algebra of constraints. A general potential leads to a theory featuring four first-class constraints generated by general covariance. The vanishing of the respective Hessian is a crucial property of the dRGT potential, and this leads to the appearance of two additional second-class constraints and, hence, to the exclusion of a superfluous degree of freedom—that is, the Boulware—Deser ghost. The use of a method that permits avoiding an explicit expression for the dRGT potential is a distinctive feature of the present study.

  8. An Example of Competence-Based Learning: Use of Maxima in Linear Algebra for Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Ana; Garcia, Alfonsa; de la Villa, Agustin

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) in a model of learning based on competences. The proposal is an e-learning model Linear Algebra course for Engineering, which includes the use of a CAS (Maxima) and focuses on problem solving. A reference model has been taken from the Spanish Open University. The proper use of CAS is…

  9. Frequency analysis of stress relaxation dynamics in model asphalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoori, Mohammad; Greenfield, Michael L.

    2014-09-01

    Asphalt is an amorphous or semi-crystalline material whose mechanical performance relies on viscoelastic responses to applied strain or stress. Chemical composition and its effect on the viscoelastic properties of model asphalts have been investigated here by computing complex modulus from molecular dynamics simulation results for two different model asphalts whose compositions each resemble the Strategic Highway Research Program AAA-1 asphalt in different ways. For a model system that contains smaller molecules, simulation results for storage and loss modulus at 443 K reach both the low and high frequency scaling limits of the Maxwell model. Results for a model system composed of larger molecules (molecular weights 300-900 g/mol) with longer branches show a quantitatively higher complex modulus that decreases significantly as temperature increases over 400-533 K. Simulation results for its loss modulus approach the low frequency scaling limit of the Maxwell model at only the highest temperature simulated. A Black plot or van Gurp-Palman plot of complex modulus vs. phase angle for the system of larger molecules suggests some overlap among results at different temperatures for less high frequencies, with an interdependence consistent with the empirical Christensen-Anderson-Marasteanu model. Both model asphalts are thermorheologically complex at very high frequencies, where they show a loss peak that appears to be independent of temperature and density.

  10. Renormalization group flows and continual Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakas, Ioannis

    2003-08-01

    We study the renormalization group flows of two-dimensional metrics in sigma models using the one-loop beta functions, and demonstrate that they provide a continual analogue of the Toda field equations in conformally flat coordinates. In this algebraic setting, the logarithm of the world-sheet length scale, t, is interpreted as Dynkin parameter on the root system of a novel continual Lie algebra, denoted by Script G(d/dt;1), with anti-symmetric Cartan kernel K(t,t') = delta'(t-t'); as such, it coincides with the Cartan matrix of the superalgebra sl(N|N+1) in the large-N limit. The resulting Toda field equation is a non-linear generalization of the heat equation, which is integrable in target space and shares the same dissipative properties in time, t. We provide the general solution of the renormalization group flows in terms of free fields, via Bäcklund transformations, and present some simple examples that illustrate the validity of their formal power series expansion in terms of algebraic data. We study in detail the sausage model that arises as geometric deformation of the O(3) sigma model, and give a new interpretation to its ultra-violet limit by gluing together two copies of Witten's two-dimensional black hole in the asymptotic region. We also provide some new solutions that describe the renormalization group flow of negatively curved spaces in different patches, which look like a cane in the infra-red region. Finally, we revisit the transition of a flat cone C/Zn to the plane, as another special solution, and note that tachyon condensation in closed string theory exhibits a hidden relation to the infinite dimensional algebra Script G(d/dt;1) in the regime of gravity. Its exponential growth holds the key for the construction of conserved currents and their systematic interpretation in string theory, but they still remain unknown.

  11. Readiness and Preparation for Beginning Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotman, Jack W.

    Drawing from experience at Lansing Community College (LCC), this paper discusses how to best prepare students for success in a beginning algebra course. First, an overview is presented of LCC's developmental math sequence, which includes Basic Arithmetic (MTH 008), Pre-Algebra (MTH 009), Beginning Algebra (MTH 012), and Intermediate Algebra (MTH…

  12. Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper I discuss Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations. This paper starts with an introduction to Hopf algebras, followed by a review of the contribution and application of Hopf algebras to particle physics. The final part of the paper is devoted to the relation between Hopf algebras and Dyson-Schwinger equations.

  13. Two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Zhang, Honglian

    2016-09-01

    We establish Drinfeld realization for the two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras using a new method. The Hopf algebra structure for Drinfeld generators is given for both untwisted and twisted two-parameter quantum affine algebras, which include the quantum affine algebras as special cases.

  14. Antibiotic resistance and stress in the light of Fisher's model.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Sandra; Sousa, Ana; Gordo, Isabel

    2012-12-01

    The role of mutations in evolution depends upon the distribution of their effects on fitness. This distribution is likely to depend on the environment. Indeed genotype-by-environment interactions are key for the process of local adaptation and ecological specialization. An important trait in bacterial evolution is antibiotic resistance, which presents a clear case of change in the direction of selection between environments with and without antibiotics. Here, we study the distribution of fitness effects of mutations, conferring antibiotic resistance to Escherichia coli, in benign and stressful environments without drugs. We interpret the distributions in the light of a fitness landscape model that assumes a single fitness peak. We find that mutation effects (s) are well described by a shifted gamma distribution, with a shift parameter that reflects the distance to the fitness peak and varies across environments. Consistent with the theoretical predictions of Fisher's geometrical model, with a Gaussian relationship between phenotype and fitness, we find that the main effect of stress is to increase the variance in s. Our findings are in agreement with the results of a recent meta-analysis, which suggest that a simple fitness landscape model may capture the variation of mutation effects across species and environments.

  15. Modeling temperature and stress in rocks exposed to the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallet, B.; Mackenzie, P.; Shi, J.; Eppes, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    The potential contribution of solar-driven thermal cycling to the progressive breakdown of surface rocks on the Earth and other planets is recognized but under studied. To shed light on this contribution we have launched a collaborative study integrating modern instrumental and numerical approaches to define surface temperatures, stresses, strains, and microfracture activity in exposed boulders, and to shed light on the thermo-mechanical response of boulders to diurnal solar exposure. The instrumental portion of our study is conducted by M. Eppes and coworkers who have monitored the surface and environmental conditions of two ~30 cm dia. granite boulders (one in North Carolina, one in New Mexico) in the field for one and tow years, respectively. Each boulder is instrumented with 8 thermocouples, 8 strain gauges, a surface moisture sensor and 6 acoustic emission (AE) sensors to monitor microfracture activity continuously and to locate it within 2.5 cm. Herein, we focus on the numerical modeling. Using a commercially available finite element program, MSC.Marc®2008r1, we have developed an adaptable, realistic thermo-mechanical model to investigate quantitatively the temporal and spatial distributions of both temperature and stress throughout a boulder. The model accounts for the effects of latitude and season (length of day and the sun's path relative to the object), atmospheric damping (reduction of solar radiation when traveling through the Earth's atmosphere), radiative interaction between the boulder and its surrounding soil, secondary heat exchange of the rock with air, and transient heat conduction in both rock and soil. Using representative thermal and elastic rock properties, as well as realistic representations of the size, shape and orientation of a boulder instrumented in the field in North Carolina, the model is validated by comparison with direct measurements of temperature and strain on the surface of one boulder exposed to the sun. Using the validated

  16. Nematodynamics modelling under extreme mechanical and electric stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoddeo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Nematic liquid crystals confined in asymmetric π-cells and subjected to intense electrical and mechanical stresses undergo strong distortions which can be relaxed by means of the order reconstruction, a fast switching mechanism connecting topologically different textures, assuming bulk and/or surface characteristics depending on both amplitude of the applied electric fields and anchoring angles of the nematic molecules on the confining surfaces. In the frame of the Landau-de Gennes order tensor theory, we provide a numerical model implemented with a moving mesh finite element method appropriate to describe the nematic order dynamics, allowing to map the switching properties of the nematic texture.

  17. Modeling of stress distributions on the microstructural level in Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Petrovic, B.G.; Ruud, C.O.; Mcllree, A.R.

    1995-04-01

    Stress distribution in a random polycrystalline material (Alloy 600) was studied using a topologically correct microstructural model. Distributions of von Mises and hydrostatic stresses at the grain vertices, which could be important in intergranular stress corrosion cracking, were analyzed as functions of microstructure, grain orientations and loading conditions. Grain size, shape, and orientation had a more pronounced effect on stress distribution than loading conditions. At grain vertices the stress concentration factor was higher for hydrostatic stress (1.7) than for von Mises stress (1.5). The stress/strain distribution in the volume (grain interiors) is a normal distribution and does not depend on the location of the studied material volume i.e., surface vs/bulk. The analysis of stress distribution in the volume showed the von Mises stress concentration of 1.75 and stress concentration of 2.2 for the hydrostatic pressure. The observed stress concentration is high enough to cause localized plastic microdeformation, even when the polycrystalline aggregate is in the macroscopic elastic regime. Modeling of stresses and strains in polycrystalline materials can identify the microstructures (grain size distributions, texture) intrinsically susceptible to stress/strain concentrations and justify the correctness of applied stress state during the stress corrosion cracking tests. Also, it supplies the information necessary to formulate the local failure criteria and interpret of nondestructive stress measurements.

  18. CULA: hybrid GPU accelerated linear algebra routines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, John R.; Price, Daniel K.; Spagnoli, Kyle E.; Paolini, Aaron L.; Kelmelis, Eric J.

    2010-04-01

    The modern graphics processing unit (GPU) found in many standard personal computers is a highly parallel math processor capable of nearly 1 TFLOPS peak throughput at a cost similar to a high-end CPU and an excellent FLOPS/watt ratio. High-level linear algebra operations are computationally intense, often requiring O(N3) operations and would seem a natural fit for the processing power of the GPU. Our work is on CULA, a GPU accelerated implementation of linear algebra routines. We present results from factorizations such as LU decomposition, singular value decomposition and QR decomposition along with applications like system solution and least squares. The GPU execution model featured by NVIDIA GPUs based on CUDA demands very strong parallelism, requiring between hundreds and thousands of simultaneous operations to achieve high performance. Some constructs from linear algebra map extremely well to the GPU and others map poorly. CPUs, on the other hand, do well at smaller order parallelism and perform acceptably during low-parallelism code segments. Our work addresses this via hybrid a processing model, in which the CPU and GPU work simultaneously to produce results. In many cases, this is accomplished by allowing each platform to do the work it performs most naturally.

  19. Translating cosmological special relativity into geometric algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Martin Erik

    2012-11-01

    Geometric algebra and Clifford algebra are important tools to describe and analyze the physics of the world we live in. Although there is enormous empirical evidence that we are living in four dimensional spacetime, mathematical worlds of higher dimensions can be used to present the physical laws of our world in an aesthetical and didactical more appealing way. In physics and mathematics education we are therefore confronted with the question how these high dimensional spaces should be taught. But as an immediate confrontation of students with high dimensional compactified spacetimes would expect too much from them at the beginning of their university studies, it seems reasonable to approach the mathematics and physics of higher dimensions step by step. The first step naturally is the step from four dimensional spacetime of special relativity to a five dimensional spacetime world. As a toy model for this artificial world cosmological special relativity, invented by Moshe Carmeli, can be used. This five dimensional non-compactified approach describes a spacetime which consists not only of one time dimension and three space dimensions. In addition velocity is regarded as a fifth dimension. This model very probably will not represent physics correctly. But it can be used to discuss and analyze the consequences of an additional dimension in a clear and simple way. Unfortunately Carmeli has formulated cosmological special relativity in standard vector notation. Therefore a translation of cosmological special relativity into the mathematical language of Grassmann and Clifford (Geometric algebra) is given and the physics of cosmological special relativity is discussed.

  20. Cartooning in Algebra and Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, L. Jeneva

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses how teachers can create cartoons for undergraduate math classes, such as college algebra and basic calculus. The practice of cartooning for teaching can be helpful for communication with students and for students' conceptual understanding.

  1. Ada Linear-Algebra Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.; Lawson, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    Routines provided for common scalar, vector, matrix, and quaternion operations. Computer program extends Ada programming language to include linear-algebra capabilities similar to HAS/S programming language. Designed for such avionics applications as software for Space Station.

  2. GCD, LCM, and Boolean Algebra?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Martin P.; Juraschek, William A.

    1976-01-01

    This article investigates the algebraic structure formed when the process of finding the greatest common divisor and the least common multiple are considered as binary operations on selected subsets of positive integers. (DT)

  3. Computer Models of Stress, Allostasis, and Acute and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The past century has seen a profound shift in diseases of humankind. Acute, unifactorial diseases are being replaced increasingly by multifactorial disorders that arise from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities and treatments, and time. According to the concept of allostasis, there is no single, ideal set of steady-state conditions in life. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators “homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of a home temperature control system, the temperature can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states) by multiple means (effectors), regulated by a comparator thermostat (homeostat). Stress might exert adverse health consequences via allostatic load. This presentation describes models of homeostatic systems that incorporate negative feedback regulation, multiple effectors, effector sharing, environmental influences, intrinsic obsolescence, and destabilizing positive feedback loops. These models can be used to predict effects of environmental and genetic alterations on allostatic load and therefore on the development of multi-system disorders and failures. PMID:19120114

  4. Abnormal Fear Memory as a Model for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, Aline; Marighetto, Aline; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    For over a century, clinicians have consistently described the paradoxical co-existence in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) of sensory intrusive hypermnesia and declarative amnesia for the same traumatic event. Although this amnesia is considered as a critical etiological factor of the development and/or persistence of PTSD, most current animal models in basic neuroscience have focused exclusively on the hypermnesia, i.e., the persistence of a strong fear memory, neglecting the qualitative alteration of fear memory. The latest is characterized by an underrepresentation of the trauma in the context-based declarative memory system in favor of its overrepresentation in a cue-based sensory/emotional memory system. Combining psychological and neurobiological data as well as theoretical hypotheses, this review supports the idea that contextual amnesia is at the core of PTSD and its persistence and that altered hippocampal-amygdalar interaction may contribute to such pathologic memory. In a first attempt to unveil the neurobiological alterations underlying PTSD-related hypermnesia/amnesia, we describe a recent animal model mimicking in mice some critical aspects of such abnormal fear memory. Finally, this line of argument emphasizes the pressing need for a systematic comparison between normal/adaptive versus abnormal/maladaptive fear memory to identify biomarkers of PTSD while distinguishing them from general stress-related, potentially adaptive, neurobiological alterations.

  5. Abnormal Fear Memory as a Model for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, Aline; Marighetto, Aline; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    For over a century, clinicians have consistently described the paradoxical co-existence in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) of sensory intrusive hypermnesia and declarative amnesia for the same traumatic event. Although this amnesia is considered as a critical etiological factor of the development and/or persistence of PTSD, most current animal models in basic neuroscience have focused exclusively on the hypermnesia, i.e., the persistence of a strong fear memory, neglecting the qualitative alteration of fear memory. The latest is characterized by an underrepresentation of the trauma in the context-based declarative memory system in favor of its overrepresentation in a cue-based sensory/emotional memory system. Combining psychological and neurobiological data as well as theoretical hypotheses, this review supports the idea that contextual amnesia is at the core of PTSD and its persistence and that altered hippocampal-amygdalar interaction may contribute to such pathologic memory. In a first attempt to unveil the neurobiological alterations underlying PTSD-related hypermnesia/amnesia, we describe a recent animal model mimicking in mice some critical aspects of such abnormal fear memory. Finally, this line of argument emphasizes the pressing need for a systematic comparison between normal/adaptive versus abnormal/maladaptive fear memory to identify biomarkers of PTSD while distinguishing them from general stress-related, potentially adaptive, neurobiological alterations. PMID:26238378

  6. Algebraic isomorphism in two-dimensional anomalous gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalhaes, C.G.; Natividade, C.P.

    1997-08-01

    The operator solution of the anomalous chiral Schwinger model is discussed on the basis of the general principles of Wightman field theory. Some basic structural properties of the model are analyzed taking a careful control on the Hilbert space associated with the Wightman functions. The isomorphism between gauge noninvariant and gauge invariant descriptions of the anomalous theory is established in terms of the corresponding field algebras. We show that (i) the {Theta}-vacuum representation and (ii) the suggested equivalence of vector Schwinger model and chiral Schwinger model cannot be established in terms of the intrinsic field algebra. {copyright} 1997 Academic Press, Inc.

  7. Modeling conductive cooling for thermally stressed dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhin, Kifle G; Wu, Binxin; Perano, K

    2016-02-01

    Conductive cooling, which is based on direct contact between a cow lying down and a cooled surface (water mattress, or any other heat exchanger embedded under the bedding), allows heat transfer from the cow to the cooled surface, and thus alleviate heat stress of the cow. Conductive cooling is a novel technology that has the potential to reduce the consumption of energy and water in cooling dairy cows compared to some current practices. A three-dimensional conduction model that simulates cooling thermally-stressed dairy cows was developed. The model used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method to characterize the air-flow field surrounding the animal model. The flow field was obtained by solving the continuity and the momentum equations. The heat exchange between the animal and the cooled water mattress as well as between the animal and ambient air was determined by solving the energy equation. The relative humidity was characterized using the species transport equation. The conduction 3-D model was validated against experimental temperature data and the agreement was very good (average error is 4.4% and the range is 1.9-8.3%) for a mesh size of 1117202. Sensitivity analyses were conducted between heat losses (sensible and latent) with respect to air temperature, relative humidity, air velocity, and level of wetness of skin surface to determine which of the parameters affect heat flux more than others. Heat flux was more sensitive to air temperature and level of wetness of the skin surface and less sensitive to relative humidity.

  8. Modeling conductive cooling for thermally stressed dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhin, Kifle G; Wu, Binxin; Perano, K

    2016-02-01

    Conductive cooling, which is based on direct contact between a cow lying down and a cooled surface (water mattress, or any other heat exchanger embedded under the bedding), allows heat transfer from the cow to the cooled surface, and thus alleviate heat stress of the cow. Conductive cooling is a novel technology that has the potential to reduce the consumption of energy and water in cooling dairy cows compared to some current practices. A three-dimensional conduction model that simulates cooling thermally-stressed dairy cows was developed. The model used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method to characterize the air-flow field surrounding the animal model. The flow field was obtained by solving the continuity and the momentum equations. The heat exchange between the animal and the cooled water mattress as well as between the animal and ambient air was determined by solving the energy equation. The relative humidity was characterized using the species transport equation. The conduction 3-D model was validated against experimental temperature data and the agreement was very good (average error is 4.4% and the range is 1.9-8.3%) for a mesh size of 1117202. Sensitivity analyses were conducted between heat losses (sensible and latent) with respect to air temperature, relative humidity, air velocity, and level of wetness of skin surface to determine which of the parameters affect heat flux more than others. Heat flux was more sensitive to air temperature and level of wetness of the skin surface and less sensitive to relative humidity. PMID:26857982

  9. Chronic stress impacts the cardiovascular system: animal models and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Golbidi, Saeid; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Laher, Ismail

    2015-06-15

    Psychological stresses are associated with cardiovascular diseases to the extent that cardiovascular diseases are among the most important group of psychosomatic diseases. The longstanding association between stress and cardiovascular disease exists despite a large ambiguity about the underlying mechanisms. An array of possibilities have been proposed including overactivity of the autonomic nervous system and humoral changes, which then converge on endothelial dysfunction that initiates unwanted cardiovascular consequences. We review some of the features of the two most important stress-activated systems, i.e., the humoral and nervous systems, and focus on alterations in endothelial function that could ensue as a result of these changes. Cardiac and hematologic consequences of stress are also addressed briefly. It is likely that activation of the inflammatory cascade in association with oxidative imbalance represents key pathophysiological components of stress-induced cardiovascular changes. We also review some of the commonly used animal models of stress and discuss the cardiovascular outcomes reported in these models of stress. The unique ability of animals for adaptation under stressful conditions lessens the extrapolation of laboratory findings to conditions of human stress. An animal model of unpredictable chronic stress, which applies various stress modules in a random fashion, might be a useful solution to this predicament. The use of stress markers as indicators of stress intensity is also discussed in various models of animal stress and in clinical studies.

  10. Algebraic Systems and Pushdown Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Ion; Salomaa, Arto

    We concentrate in this chapter on the core aspects of algebraic series, pushdown automata, and their relation to formal languages. We choose to follow here a presentation of their theory based on the concept of properness. We introduce in Sect. 2 some auxiliary notions and results needed throughout the chapter, in particular the notions of discrete convergence in semirings and C-cycle free infinite matrices. In Sect. 3 we introduce the algebraic power series in terms of algebraic systems of equations. We focus on interconnections with context-free grammars and on normal forms. We then conclude the section with a presentation of the theorems of Shamir and Chomsky-Schützenberger. We discuss in Sect. 4 the algebraic and the regulated rational transductions, as well as some representation results related to them. Section 5 is dedicated to pushdown automata and focuses on the interconnections with classical (non-weighted) pushdown automata and on the interconnections with algebraic systems. We then conclude the chapter with a brief discussion of some of the other topics related to algebraic systems and pushdown automata.

  11. Advanced Numerical-Algebraic Thinking: Constructing the Concept of Covariation as a Prelude to the Concept of Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitt, Fernando; Morasse, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In this document we stress the importance of developing in children a structure for advanced numerical-algebraic thinking that can provide an element of control when solving mathematical situations. We analyze pupils' conceptions that induce errors in algebra due to a lack of control in connection with their numerical thinking. We…

  12. Multifractal vector fields and stochastic Clifford algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, Daniel; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia

    2015-12-01

    In the mid 1980s, the development of multifractal concepts and techniques was an important breakthrough for complex system analysis and simulation, in particular, in turbulence and hydrology. Multifractals indeed aimed to track and simulate the scaling singularities of the underlying equations instead of relying on numerical, scale truncated simulations or on simplified conceptual models. However, this development has been rather limited to deal with scalar fields, whereas most of the fields of interest are vector-valued or even manifold-valued. We show in this paper that the combination of stable Lévy processes with Clifford algebra is a good candidate to bridge up the present gap between theory and applications. We show that it indeed defines a convenient framework to generate multifractal vector fields, possibly multifractal manifold-valued fields, based on a few fundamental and complementary properties of Lévy processes and Clifford algebra. In particular, the vector structure of these algebra is much more tractable than the manifold structure of symmetry groups while the Lévy stability grants a given statistical universality.

  13. Multifractal vector fields and stochastic Clifford algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Schertzer, Daniel Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia

    2015-12-15

    In the mid 1980s, the development of multifractal concepts and techniques was an important breakthrough for complex system analysis and simulation, in particular, in turbulence and hydrology. Multifractals indeed aimed to track and simulate the scaling singularities of the underlying equations instead of relying on numerical, scale truncated simulations or on simplified conceptual models. However, this development has been rather limited to deal with scalar fields, whereas most of the fields of interest are vector-valued or even manifold-valued. We show in this paper that the combination of stable Lévy processes with Clifford algebra is a good candidate to bridge up the present gap between theory and applications. We show that it indeed defines a convenient framework to generate multifractal vector fields, possibly multifractal manifold-valued fields, based on a few fundamental and complementary properties of Lévy processes and Clifford algebra. In particular, the vector structure of these algebra is much more tractable than the manifold structure of symmetry groups while the Lévy stability grants a given statistical universality.

  14. Multifractal vector fields and stochastic Clifford algebra.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Daniel; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia

    2015-12-01

    In the mid 1980s, the development of multifractal concepts and techniques was an important breakthrough for complex system analysis and simulation, in particular, in turbulence and hydrology. Multifractals indeed aimed to track and simulate the scaling singularities of the underlying equations instead of relying on numerical, scale truncated simulations or on simplified conceptual models. However, this development has been rather limited to deal with scalar fields, whereas most of the fields of interest are vector-valued or even manifold-valued. We show in this paper that the combination of stable Lévy processes with Clifford algebra is a good candidate to bridge up the present gap between theory and applications. We show that it indeed defines a convenient framework to generate multifractal vector fields, possibly multifractal manifold-valued fields, based on a few fundamental and complementary properties of Lévy processes and Clifford algebra. In particular, the vector structure of these algebra is much more tractable than the manifold structure of symmetry groups while the Lévy stability grants a given statistical universality. PMID:26723166

  15. Multifractal vector fields and stochastic Clifford algebra.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Daniel; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia

    2015-12-01

    In the mid 1980s, the development of multifractal concepts and techniques was an important breakthrough for complex system analysis and simulation, in particular, in turbulence and hydrology. Multifractals indeed aimed to track and simulate the scaling singularities of the underlying equations instead of relying on numerical, scale truncated simulations or on simplified conceptual models. However, this development has been rather limited to deal with scalar fields, whereas most of the fields of interest are vector-valued or even manifold-valued. We show in this paper that the combination of stable Lévy processes with Clifford algebra is a good candidate to bridge up the present gap between theory and applications. We show that it indeed defines a convenient framework to generate multifractal vector fields, possibly multifractal manifold-valued fields, based on a few fundamental and complementary properties of Lévy processes and Clifford algebra. In particular, the vector structure of these algebra is much more tractable than the manifold structure of symmetry groups while the Lévy stability grants a given statistical universality.

  16. Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... hurt or killed. Examples include a major accident, war, assault, or a natural disaster. This type of ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  17. Reconstructing a network of stress-response regulators via dynamic system modeling of gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2008-02-10

    Unicellular organisms such as yeasts have evolved mechanisms to respond to environmental stresses by rapidly reorganizing the gene expression program. Although many stress-response genes in yeast have been discovered by DNA microarrays, the stress-response transcription factors (TFs) that regulate these stress-response genes remain to be investigated. In this study, we use a dynamic system model of gene regulation to describe the mechanism of how TFs may control a gene's expression. Then, based on the dynamic system model, we develop the Stress Regulator Identification Algorithm (SRIA) to identify stress-response TFs for six kinds of stresses. We identified some general stress-response TFs that respond to various stresses and some specific stress-response TFs that respond to one specific stress. The biological significance of our findings is validated by the literature. We found that a small number of TFs is probably sufficient to control a wide variety of expression patterns in yeast under different stresses. Two implications can be inferred from this observation. First, the response mechanisms to different stresses may have a bow-tie structure. Second, there may be regulatory cross-talks among different stress responses. In conclusion, this study proposes a network of stress-response regulators and the details of their actions.

  18. Invertible linear transformations and the Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Tam, Honwah; Guo, Fukui

    2008-07-01

    With the help of invertible linear transformations and the known Lie algebras, a way to generate new Lie algebras is given. These Lie algebras obtained have a common feature, i.e. integrable couplings of solitary hierarchies could be obtained by using them, specially, the Hamiltonian structures of them could be worked out. Some ways to construct the loop algebras of the Lie algebras are presented. It follows that some various loop algebras are given. In addition, a few new Lie algebras are explicitly constructed in terms of the classification of Lie algebras proposed by Ma Wen-Xiu, which are bases for obtaining new Lie algebras by using invertible linear transformations. Finally, some solutions of a (2 + 1)-dimensional partial-differential equation hierarchy are obtained, whose Hamiltonian form-expressions are manifested by using the quadratic-form identity.

  19. Application of a Reynolds stress model to separating boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Sung HO

    1993-01-01

    Separating turbulent boundary layers occur in many practical engineering applications. Nonetheless, the physics of separation/reattachment of flows is poorly understood. During the past decade, various turbulence models were proposed and their ability to successfully predict some types of flows was shown. However. prediction of separating/reattaching flows is still a formidable task for model developers. The present study is concerned with the process of separation from a smooth surface. Features of turbulent separating boundary layers that are relevant to modeling include the following: the occurrence of zero wall shear stress, which causes breakdown of the boundary layer approximation; the law of the wall not being satisfied in the mean back flow region; high turbulence levels in the separated region; a significant low-frequency motion in the separation bubble; and the turbulence structure of the separated shear layer being quite different from that of either the mixing layers or the boundary layers. These special characteristics of separating boundary layers make it difficult for simple turbulence models to correctly predict their behavior.

  20. Stress-induced hyperlocomotion as a confounding factor in anxiety and depression models in mice.

    PubMed

    Strekalova, T; Spanagel, R; Dolgov, O; Bartsch, D

    2005-05-01

    Chronic stress is broadly used to model anxiety and depression. However, in chronic stress models, anxiety- and depression-like behaviors might be masked by unspecific effects of stress. We tested whether chronic stress in mice can induce unspecific changes in locomotion, and whether these changes interfere with the measurement of anxiety and forced-swimming behaviors. Also, we studied these latter behaviors in relation to the duration of stress, the lighting conditions during testing, and after the injection of diazepam. We employed a 4-week chronic stress paradigm, adopted from a model of stress-induced anhedonia and a 1-week subchronic stress, both consisting of rat exposure, restraint stress and tail suspension. Chronically stressed mice, tested under bright and moderate illumination, exhibited 'anxiolytic-like' behavior along with prolonged swimming and hyperactivity. These behaviors were not detectable under weak illumination or after the injection of diazepam (0.25 mg/kg). Instead, normal locomotion, increased anxiety and inhibited swimming were revealed under these conditions. Thus, chronic stress can induce hyperlocomotion in mice, which is triggered by acute stressors such as light, and interferes with the evaluation of anxiety and forced swimming. One week of stress did not change locomotion and forced swimming, and increased anxiety irrespective of illumination applied during testing. Our data can possibly explain previously reported contradictions in the behavioral testing of mice with chronic stress models of anxiety and depression.

  1. Kinetic model for dependence of thin film stress on growth rate, temperature, and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chason, E.; Shin, J. W.; Hearne, S. J.; Freund, L. B.

    2012-04-01

    During deposition, many thin films go through a range of stress states, changing from compressive to tensile and back again. In addition, the stress depends strongly on the processing and material parameters. We have developed a simple analytical model to describe the stress evolution in terms of a kinetic competition between different mechanisms of stress generation and relaxation at the triple junction where the surface and grain boundary intersect. The model describes how the steady state stress scales with the dimensionless parameter D/LR where D is the diffusivity, R is the growth rate, and L is the grain size. It also explains the transition from tensile to compressive stress as the microstructure evolves from isolated islands to a continuous film. We compare calculations from the model with measurements of the stress dependence on grain size and growth rate in the steady state regime and of the evolution of stress with thickness for different temperatures.

  2. Visceral obesity and psychosocial stress: a generalised control theory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Rodrick

    2016-07-01

    The linking of control theory and information theory via the Data Rate Theorem and its generalisations allows for construction of necessary conditions statistical models of body mass regulation in the context of interaction with a complex dynamic environment. By focusing on the stress-related induction of central obesity via failure of HPA axis regulation, we explore implications for strategies of prevention and treatment. It rapidly becomes evident that individual-centred biomedical reductionism is an inadequate paradigm. Without mitigation of HPA axis or related dysfunctions arising from social pathologies of power imbalance, economic insecurity, and so on, it is unlikely that permanent changes in visceral obesity for individuals can be maintained without constant therapeutic effort, an expensive - and likely unsustainable - public policy.

  3. BRST charges for finite nonlinear algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, A. P.; Krivonos, S. O.; Ogievetsky, O. V.

    2010-07-01

    Some ingredients of the BRST construction for quantum Lie algebras are applied to a wider class of quadratic algebras of constraints. We build the BRST charge for a quantum Lie algebra with three generators and ghost-anti-ghosts commuting with constraints. We consider a one-parametric family of quadratic algebras with three generators and show that the BRST charge acquires the conventional form after a redefinition of ghosts. The modified ghosts form a quadratic algebra. The family possesses a nonlinear involution, which implies the existence of two independent BRST charges for each algebra in the family. These BRST charges anticommute and form a double BRST complex.

  4. Some Remarks on Kite Pseudo Effect Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvurečenskij, Anatolij; Holland, W. Charles

    2014-05-01

    Recently a new family of pseudo effect algebras, called kite pseudo effect algebras, was introduced. Such an algebra starts with a po-group G, a set I and with two bijections λ, ρ: I→ I. Using a clever construction on the ordinal sum of ( G +) I and ( G -) I , we can define a pseudo effect algebra which can be non-commutative even if G is an Abelian po-group. In the paper we give a characterization of subdirect product of subdirectly irreducible kite pseudo effect algebras, and we show that every kite pseudo effect algebra is an interval in a unital po-loop.

  5. Social Emotional Learning and Educational Stress: A Predictive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Serhat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between social emotional learning and educational stress. Participants were 321 elementary students. Social emotional learning and educational stress scale were used as measures. The relationships between social emotional learning and educational stress were examined using correlation…

  6. Stress, and pathogen response gene expression in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Immune suppression in microgravity has been well documented. With the advent of human exploration and long-term space travel, the immune system of the astronaut must be optimally maintained. It is important to investigate the expression patterns of cytokine genes, because they are directly related to immune response. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), also called stress proteins, are a group of proteins that are present in the cells of every life form. These proteins are induced when a cell responds to stressors such as heat, cold and oxygen deprivation. Microgravity is another stressor that may regulate HSPs. Heat shock proteins trigger immune response through activities that occur both inside the cell (intracellular) and outside the cell (extracellular). Knowledge about these two gene groups could lead to establishment of a blueprint of the immune response and adaptation-related genes in the microgravity environment. Methods: Human peripheral blood cells were cultured in 1g (T flask) and modeled microgravity (MMG, rotating-wall vessel) for 24 and 72 hours. Cell samples were collected and subjected to gene array analysis using the Affymetrix HG_U95 array. Data was collected and subjected to a two-way analysis of variance. The genes related to immune and stress responses were analyzed. Results and Conclusions: HSP70 was up-regulated by more than two fold in microgravity culture, while HSP90 was significantly down-regulated. HSP70 is not typically expressed in all kinds of cells, but it is expressed at high levels in stress conditions. HSP70 participates in translation, protein translocation, proteolysis and protein folding, suppressing aggregation and reactivating denatured proteins. Increased serum HSP70 levels correlate with a better outcome for heat-stroke or severe trauma patients. At the same time, elevated serum levels of HSP70 have been detected in patients with peripheral or renal vascular disease. HSP90 has been identified in the cytosol, nucleus and

  7. Operator product expansion algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Jan; Hollands, Stefan

    2013-07-15

    We establish conceptually important properties of the operator product expansion (OPE) in the context of perturbative, Euclidean φ{sup 4}-quantum field theory. First, we demonstrate, generalizing earlier results and techniques of hep-th/1105.3375, that the 3-point OPE, =Σ{sub C}C{sub A{sub 1A{sub 2A{sub 3}{sup C}}}}, usually interpreted only as an asymptotic short distance expansion, actually converges at finite, and even large, distances. We further show that the factorization identity C{sub A{sub 1A{sub 2A{sub 3}{sup B}}}}=Σ{sub C}C{sub A{sub 1A{sub 2}{sup C}}}C{sub CA{sub 3}{sup B}} is satisfied for suitable configurations of the spacetime arguments. Again, the infinite sum is shown to be convergent. Our proofs rely on explicit bounds on the remainders of these expansions, obtained using refined versions, mostly due to Kopper et al., of the renormalization group flow equation method. These bounds also establish that each OPE coefficient is a real analytic function in the spacetime arguments for non-coinciding points. Our results hold for arbitrary but finite loop orders. They lend support to proposals for a general axiomatic framework of quantum field theory, based on such “consistency conditions” and akin to vertex operator algebras, wherein the OPE is promoted to the defining structure of the theory.

  8. Model Determined for Predicting Fatigue Lives of Metal Matrix Composites Under Mean Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine components invariably are subjected to mean stresses over and above the cyclic loads. In monolithic materials, it has been observed that tensile mean stresses are detrimental and compressive mean stresses are beneficial to fatigue life in comparison to a base of zero mean stress. Several mean stress models exist for monolithic metals, but each differ quantitatively in the extent to which detrimental or beneficial effects are ascribed. There have been limited attempts to apply these models to metal matrix composites. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, several mean stress models--the Smith-Watson- Topper, Walker, Normalized Goodman, and Soderberg models--were examined for applicability to this class of composite materials. The Soderberg approach, which normalizes the mean stress to a 0.02-percent yield strength, was shown to best represent the effect of mean stresses over the range covered. The other models varied significantly in their predictability and often failed to predict the composite behavior at very high tensile mean stresses. This work is the first to systematically demonstrate the influence of mean stresses on metal matrix composites and model their effects. Attention also was given to fatigue-cracking mechanisms in the Ti-15-3 matrix and to micromechanics analyses of mean stress effects.

  9. Implementation and model to model intercomparison of 12 heat stress metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, Jonathan R.

    Earth system models simulate the dynamics of the most complex systems on our planet with some success. Despite the overwhelming sophistication of these models, which include dynamical interactions of ocean, atmosphere, vegetation, ice, and land-surface properties, they fail to include the most important element. People. Humans are also a complex physical-biological system and coupling of human physiology within an Earth Systems Modeling framework is challenging. This thesis presents results that tackle one particular component of human physiological climate interaction--a representation of heat stress on human physiology. Twelve different metrics were implemented and analyzed. These metrics represent a variety of philosophical approaches to characterizing heat stress: thermal comfort, physiological responses, and first principle physics. We implemented these 12 metrics into the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). All of the metrics implemented measure the covariance of near surface atmospheric variables: temperature, pressure, and humidity. Results show that heat stress may be broken into two regimes; arid and non-arid regions (i.e. the rest of the land surface). Additionally, results show that the highest heat stress zones are a robust feature with low variability. Temperatures vary by +/-3°C as compared to +/-1°C wet bulb temperatures, and is consistent over a vast area of Earth.

  10. Constructing a parasupersymmetric Virasoro algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, S.

    2011-03-01

    We construct a para SUSY Virasoro algebra by generalizing the ordinary fermion in SUSY Virasoro algebra (Ramond or Neveu-Schwarz algebra) to the parafermion. First, we obtain a polynomial relation (PR) between different-mode parafermion fi's by generalizing the corresponding single-mode PR to such that is invariant under the unitary transformation of fi (Green's condition). Differently from a usual context, where the Green's condition is imposed only on the defining relation of fi (degree three with respect to fi and fi†), we impose it on any degree of PR. For the case of order-two parafermion (the simplest case of para SUSY), we calculate a PR between the parasupercharge G0, the bosonic hamiltonian LB0 and parafermionic one LF0, although it is difficult to obtain a PR between G0 and the total hamiltonian L0 (= LB0 + LF0). Finally, we construct a para SUSY Virasoro algebra by generalizing L0 to the Ln's such that form a Virasoro algebra.

  11. Stress analysis of 27% scale model of AH-64 main rotor hub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    Stress analysis of an AH-64 27% scale model rotor hub was performed. Component loads and stresses were calculated based upon blade root loads and motions. The static and fatigue analysis indicates positive margins of safety in all components checked. Using the format developed here, the hub can be stress checked for future application.

  12. Depression amongst Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong: An Evaluation of a Stress Moderation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Catalina S. M.; Hurry, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Stress has an established association with depression. However, not all adolescents experiencing stressors become depressed and it is helpful to identify potential resilience factors. The current study tests a theoretical extension of a stress-diathesis model of depression in a Chinese context, with stress, coping, family relationships, and…

  13. Modelling Occupational Stress and Employee Health and Wellbeing in a Chinese Higher Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sang, Xiaoli; Teo, Stephen T. T.; Cooper, Cary L.; Bohle, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Extensive change is evident in higher education in the People's Republic of China but there have been few studies of the effect of work stress on wellbeing in the higher education sector. The main aim of this study is to test and refine the ASSET ("An Organizational Stress Screening Tool") model of occupational stress in a sample of 150 academic…

  14. Parent and Adolescent Responses to Poverty Related Stress: Tests of Mediated and Moderated Coping Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, Martha E.; Raviv, Tali; Compas, Bruce E.; Connor-Smith, Jennifer K.

    2005-01-01

    We tested several models of the associations among economic strain, life stress, coping, involuntary stress responses, and psychological symptoms in a sample of 57 parent-adolescent dyads from rural, lower-income families. Economic strain and life stress predicted symptoms for both parents and adolescents. Stressor-symptom specificity was found…

  15. Methamphetamine Use among Rural White and Native American Adolescents: An Application of the Stress Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eitle, David J.; Eitle, Tamela McNulty

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine use has been identified as having significant adverse health consequences, yet we know little about the correlates of its use. Additionally, research has found that Native Americans are at the highest risk for methamphetamine use. Our exploratory study, informed by the stress process model, examines stress and stress buffering…

  16. Psychosocial stress and prostate cancer: a theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Ellison, G L; Coker, A L; Hebert, J R; Sanderson, S M; Royal, C D; Weinrich, S P

    2001-01-01

    African-American men are more likely to develop and die from prostate cancer than are European-American men; yet, factors responsible for the racial disparity in incidence and mortality have not been elucidated. Socioeconomic disadvantage is more prevalent among African-American than among European-American men. Socioeconomic disadvantage can lead to psychosocial stress and may be linked to negative lifestyle behaviors. Regardless of socioeconomic position, African-American men routinely experience racism-induced stress. We propose a theoretical framework for an association between psychosocial stress and prostate cancer. Within the context of history and culture, we further propose that psychosocial stress may partially explain the variable incidence of prostate cancer between these diverse groups. Psychosocial stress may negatively impact the immune system leaving the individual susceptible to malignancies. Behavioral responses to psychosocial stress are amenable to change. If psychosocial stress is found to negatively impact prostate cancer risk, interventions may be designed to modify reactions to environmental demands.

  17. Plant physiological models of heat, water and photoinhibition stress for climate change modelling and agricultural prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, B.; Gilbert, M. E.; Paw U, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT) models are based upon well understood steady state photosynthetic physiology - the Farquhar-von Caemmerer-Berry model (FvCB). However, representations of physiological stress and damage have not been successfully integrated into SVAT models. Generally, it has been assumed that plants will strive to conserve water at higher temperatures by reducing stomatal conductance or adjusting osmotic balance, until potentially damaging temperatures and the need for evaporative cooling become more important than water conservation. A key point is that damage is the result of combined stresses: drought leads to stomatal closure, less evaporative cooling, high leaf temperature, less photosynthetic dissipation of absorbed energy, all coupled with high light (photosynthetic photon flux density; PPFD). This leads to excess absorbed energy by Photosystem II (PSII) and results in photoinhibition and damage, neither are included in SVAT models. Current representations of photoinhibition are treated as a function of PPFD, not as a function of constrained photosynthesis under heat or water. Thus, it seems unlikely that current models can predict responses of vegetation to climate variability and change. We propose a dynamic model of damage to Rubisco and RuBP-regeneration that accounts, mechanistically, for the interactions between high temperature, light, and constrained photosynthesis under drought. Further, these predictions are illustrated by key experiments allowing model validation. We also integrated this new framework within the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA). Preliminary results show that our approach can be used to predict reasonable photosynthetic dynamics. For instances, a leaf undergoing one day of drought stress will quickly decrease its maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm), but it won't recover to unstressed levels for several days. Consequently, cumulative effect of photoinhibition on photosynthesis can cause

  18. Stress distribution in a premolar 3D model with anisotropic and isotropic enamel.

    PubMed

    Munari, Laís S; Cornacchia, Tulimar P M; Moreira, Allyson N; Gonçalves, Jason B; De Las Casas, Estevam B; Magalhães, Cláudia S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the areas of stress concentration in a three-dimensional (3D) premolar tooth model with anisotropic or isotropic enamel using the finite element method. A computed tomography was imported to an image processing program to create the tooth model which was exported to a 3D modeling program. The mechanical properties and loading conditions were prescribed in Abaqus. In order to evaluate stresses, axial and oblique loads were applied simulating realistic conditions. Compression stress was observed on the side of load application, and tensile stress was observed on the opposite side. Tensile stress was concentrated mainly in the cervical region and in the alveolar insertion bone. Although stress concentration analyses of the isotropic 3D models produced similar stress distribution results when compared to the anisotropic models, tensile stress values shown by anisotropic models were smaller than the isotropic models. Oblique loads resulted in higher values of tensile stresses, which concentrate mainly in the cervical area of the tooth and in the alveolar bone insertion. Anisotropic properties must be utilized in enamel stress evaluation in non-carious cervical lesions. PMID:25850984

  19. METHAMPHETAMINE USE AMONG RURAL WHITE AND NATIVE AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS: AN APPLICATION OF THE STRESS PROCESS MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Eitle, David J.; McNulty Eitle, Tamela

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine use has been identified as having significant adverse health consequences, yet we know little about the correlates of its use. Additionally, research has found that Native Americans are at the highest risk for methamphetamine use. Our exploratory study, informed by the stress process model, examines stress and stress buffering factors associated with methamphetamine use among a cross-sectional sample of rural white and Native American adolescents (n=573). Results of logistic regression analyses revealed mixed support for the stress process model; while stress exposure and family methamphetamine use predicted past year methamphetamine use, the inclusion of these variables failed to attenuate the association between race and past year use. PMID:25445505

  20. A cortical folding model incorporating stress-dependent growth explains gyral wavelengths and stress patterns in the developing brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayly, P. V.; Okamoto, R. J.; Xu, G.; Shi, Y.; Taber, L. A.

    2013-02-01

    In humans and many other mammals, the cortex (the outer layer of the brain) folds during development. The mechanics of folding are not well understood; leading explanations are either incomplete or at odds with physical measurements. We propose a mathematical model in which (i) folding is driven by tangential expansion of the cortex and (ii) deeper layers grow in response to the resulting stress. In this model the wavelength of cortical folds depends predictably on the rate of cortical growth relative to the rate of stress-induced growth. We show analytically and in simulations that faster cortical expansion leads to shorter gyral wavelengths; slower cortical expansion leads to long wavelengths or even smooth (lissencephalic) surfaces. No inner or outer (skull) constraint is needed to produce folding, but initial shape and mechanical heterogeneity influence the final shape. The proposed model predicts patterns of stress in the tissue that are consistent with experimental observations.