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Sample records for alginate impression material

  1. Dimensional Changes of Alginate Dental Impression Materials-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thombare, Ram U

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentists are always looking ahead for more dimensionally stable material for accurate and successful fabrication of prosthesis in this competitive world. Arrival of newer materials and increased material market puts dentists in dilemma for selection of material. Aim The study evaluated the effect of variations in time of pour and temperature on dimensional stability of three brands of commercially available alginates. Materials and Methods Velplast, Marieflex & Zelgan alginate impression materials were evaluated by measuring dimensional accuracy of the master cast. A die was prepared and mounted on the apparatus for the ease of impression making. The prepared casts were categorized into five groups and made up of three brands of alginate impression material with variation in time of pour viz: immediate, 20&40 minutes interval and with varying temperature of 250C, 300C & 400C. Results Impressions showed least distortion at varying degrees of temperature for 20 minutes, but the values obtained by storing of alginate impressions for 20 minutes at 300C were found to be nearly accurate than the values obtained by storing of impression at 400C. However, storing showed shrinkage of impressions. Conclusion Marieflex showed better accuracy in comparison with other two materials. Maintenance of temperature and humidity play key role during storage & transport to prevent distortion. But the study suggests immediate pouring which will minimize the distortion. The manipulation instructions, temperature of mixing water, environment & water powder ratio also plays key role in minimizing the distortion. PMID:26436059

  2. The Effect of Three Different Disinfection Materials on Alginate Impression by Spray Method

    PubMed Central

    Badrian, Hamid; Ghasemi, Ehsan; Khalighinejad, Navid; Hosseini, Nafiseh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of three different types of disinfectant agents on alginate impression material after 5 and 10 minutes. Method and Materials. In this in vitro experimental study, 66 circular samples of alginate impression material were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans fungus. Except for control samples, all of them were disinfected with sodium hypochlorite 0.525, Deconex, and Epimax by way of spraying. Afterwards, they were kept in plastic bags with humid rolled cotton for 5 and 10 minutes. The number of colonies was counted after 24 and 48 hours for bacteria and after 72 hours for fungus. Statistical Mann-Whitney test was used for data analysis (α = 0.05). Results. After 5 minutes, Epimax showed the highest disinfection action on Staphylococcus aureus as it completely eradicated the bacteria. The disinfection capacity of different agents can be increased as time elapses except for Pseudomonas aeruginosa which was eradicated completely in both 5 and 10 minutes. Conclusion. This study revealed that alginate can be effectively disinfected by three types of disinfecting agents by spraying method, although Epimax showed the highest disinfection action after 10 minutes compared to other agents. PMID:22900196

  3. Investigation of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Piccione, Neil; Zhao, Tianqi; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Hanlin, Suzanne; Jermy, Mark; Waddell, J Neil

    2016-06-01

    Routine forensic research into in vitro skin/skull/brain ballistic blood backspatter behavior has traditionally used gelatin at a 1:10 Water:Powder (W:P) ratio by volume as a brain simulant. A limitation of gelatin is its high elasticity compared to brain tissue. Therefore this study investigated the use of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing. Fresh deer brain, alginate (W:P ratio 91.5:8.5) and agar (W:P ratio 81:19) specimens (n=10) (11×22×33mm) were placed in transparent Perspex boxes of the same internal dimensions prior to shooting with a 0.22inch caliber high velocity air gun. Quantitative analysis to establish kinetic energy loss, vertical displacement elastic behavior and qualitative analysis to establish elasticity behavior was done via high-speed camera footage (SA5, Photron, Japan) using Photron Fastcam Viewer software (Version 3.5.1, Photron, Japan) and visual observation. Damage mechanisms and behavior were qualitatively established by observation of the materials during and after shooting. The qualitative analysis found that of the two simulant materials tested, agar behaved more like brain in terms of damage and showed similar mechanical response to brain during the passage of the projectile, in terms of energy absorption and vertical velocity displacement. In conclusion agar showed a mechanical and subsequent damage response that was similar to brain compared to alginate. PMID:27131216

  4. Effect of Different Disinfectants on Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans Transferred to Alginate and Polyvinylsiloxane Impression Materials

    PubMed Central

    Parnia, Fereydun; Hafezeqoran, Ali; Moslehifard, Elnaz; Mahboub, Farhang; Nahaei, Mohammadreza; Akbari Dibavar, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims Several products have been marketed for disinfecting impression materials. The present study evaluated the effect of Deconex, Micro 10, Alprocid and Unisepta Plus sprays on Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans transferred to alginate and polyvinylsiloxane impression materials. Materials and methods A total of 180 impressions of a maxillary model (90 alginate and 90 polyvinylsiloxane im-pressions) were taken for the purpose of this in vitro study. Half of the impressions were infected with Staphylococcus au-reus and the other half were infected with Candida albicans. Then the microorganisms were cultured and their counts were determined. Subsequently, the impressions were divided into groups of 15 impressions each. Each group was disinfected with Deconex, Micro10, Alprocid and Unisepta Plus according to manufacturers' instructions except for the control group. The culturing procedure was repeated after disinfection and microbial counts were determined again. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and paired-sample t-test. Results There were statistically significant differences in the means of S. aureus and C. albicans counts before and after the use of disinfectants (P < 0.05). The use of the four disinfectants reduced S. aureus counts to zero in 80% of the cases. There were no statistically significant differences in S. aureus count reductions between the four disinfectants evaluated (P = 0.31). Micro 10 was more effective on alginate; Deconex was more efficient for polyvinylsiloxane and Alprocid had a better efficacy in both impression materials in eliminating C. albicans (P < 0.05). Conclusion All the disinfectants evaluated have high disinfecting postentials. PMID:23230499

  5. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood deposited on fabric--evaluating the use of alginate casting materials followed by chemical enhancement.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; NicDaéid, Niamh; Savage, Kathleen A; Bandey, Helen

    2010-12-01

    Most footwear marks made in blood on a surface such as fabric tend to be enhanced in situ rather than physically recovered using a lifting technique prior to enhancement. This work reports on the use of an alginate material to recover the impressed footwear marks made in blood and deposited on a range of fabric types and colours. The lifted marks were then enhanced using acid black 1 and leuco crystal violet with excellent results. This presents a new method for the lifting and recovery of blood impressions in situ from crime scene followed by subsequent mark enhancement of the lifted impression. PMID:21075299

  6. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  9. Using double-poured alginate impressions to fabricate bleaching trays.

    PubMed

    Haywood, V B; Powe, A

    1998-01-01

    Esthetic and diagnostic treatment often requires two casts of one arch, one for baseline and one for alterations (diagnostic wax-up, bleaching tray, occlusal analysis). The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts generated from a second pour of a properly handled alginate impression with first-poured casts. A maxillary dentoform was indexed with six reference spaces (#8-15, 9-2, 2-15, and incisal-to-gingival of #3, 9, 14). Irreversible hydrocolloid (Jeltrate) impressions were made in perforated steel trays by a single investigator. Impression material was spatulated for 1 minute. The seated impression and dentoform were wrapped in a damp paper towel to simulate intraoral conditions, and allowed to set for 2 minutes. Upon separation, the impression was stored in a damp towel for 5 minutes. The impression was poured in cast stone (Microstone) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The stone-filled impression was immediately rewrapped in a damp paper towel and allowed to set for 45 minutes at room temperature. Upon removal of the stone, the impression was rinsed with cold water, shaken dry, and repoured in the same manner. Ten impressions were made: the first five impressions were poured to make casts for Group A, then repoured as described above for casts for Group B. The remaining five impressions were poured once to make casts for Group C. The six spaces of each cast were measured three times in random order using a dial caliper and the space average calculated for the cast. At each space, analysis of variance showed no significant difference among Groups A, B, or C (P < 0.05). When alginate impressions that have been poured with cast stone are kept moist during stone setting and repoured within 45 minutes, two casts can be generated from one impression with the same degree of accuracy as two casts made from taking two separate impressions, providing the alginate does not tear during first cast removal. PMID:9656923

  10. Evaluation of digital dental models obtained from dental cone-beam computed tomography scan of alginate impressions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tingting; Lee, Sang-Mi; Hou, Yanan; Chang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models obtained from the dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of alginate impressions according to the time elapse when the impressions are stored under ambient conditions. Methods Alginate impressions were obtained from 20 adults using 3 different alginate materials, 2 traditional alginate materials (Alginoplast and Cavex Impressional) and 1 extended-pour alginate material (Cavex ColorChange). The impressions were stored under ambient conditions, and scanned by CBCT immediately after the impressions were taken, and then at 1 hour intervals for 6 hours. After reconstructing three-dimensional digital dental models, the models were measured and the data were analyzed to determine dimensional changes according to the elapsed time. The changes within the measurement error were regarded as clinically acceptable in this study. Results All measurements showed a decreasing tendency with an increase in the elapsed time after the impressions. Although the extended-pour alginate exhibited a less decreasing tendency than the other 2 materials, there were no statistically significant differences between the materials. Changes above the measurement error occurred between the time points of 3 and 4 hours after the impressions. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that digital dental models can be obtained simply from a CBCT scan of alginate impressions without sending them to a remote laboratory. However, when the impressions are not stored under special conditions, they should be scanned immediately, or at least within 2 to 3 hours after the impressions are taken. PMID:27226958

  11. [Elastomeric impression materials].

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, T; Tsokas, K

    1990-01-01

    A review of the literature on elastomeric impression materials, is presented in this paper. The article mentions the composition and the most important properties of the elastomeric impression materials used in dental practice. The clinical significance of these materials, physical and mechanical properties are also emphasized. In addition some new elastomeric impression materials with improved properties and a new (experimental) light-cured impression material, are mentioned. Another part of this article is the biocompatibility of these materials. In the end the great significance of handling is outlined. PMID:2130039

  12. [Elastomeric impression materials].

    PubMed

    Levartovsky, S; Folkman, M; Alter, E; Pilo, R

    2011-04-01

    Elastomeric impression materials are in common use. The impression taken should be highly precise, thus, requiring specific care when manipulatingthese materials. There are 4 groups of elastomers; polysulfide, condensation silicone, addition silicone and polyether; each differ in their setting mechanism and their physical and chemical properties. This review elaborates the major properties of elastomers and its implications on their use. The impression material is inserted into the patient's mouth in a viscous state and transforms into viscoelastic state, upon withdrawal, influencing the residual deformation. The requirements are minimal residual deformation or maximal elastic recovery. As the mouth is a wet environment a major consideration is hydrophilicity. The wettability which is estimated by measuring either the contact angle of a droplet of water and the substrate post setting or the contact angle of a droplet of impression material and the wet tooth pre setting, determines the interaction of the material with both mouth fluids and gypsum. As the primary end target is to obtain a model depicting accurately the oral details, an attention to the impressions' compatibility with gypsum should also be given. Many studies were conducted to get a thorough understanding of the hydrophilic properties of each material, and the mechanism utilized, such as surfactants in hydrophilic PVS. Polyether is the only material that is truly hydrophilic; it exhibits the lowest contact angle, during and after setting. Recent studies show that during setting the Polyether hydrophilicity is increased compared to the condition after setting. Dimensional stability, a crucial property of the impression, is affected by the physical and chemical attributes of the material, such as its tear strength. Polysulfide has the highest tear strength. Tear Strength is affected by two major parameters, viscosity, a built-in property, and how fast the impression is pulled out of the mouth, the

  13. Lifting bloody footwear impressions using alginate casts followed by chemical enhancement.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Sarena; Izraeli, Elad; Shor, Yaron; Domb, Avi

    2013-05-01

    A method for lifting bloody footwear impressions using alginate casts and enhancing the lifted impressions with amido black is presented. On rough or dark substrates, background interferences may conceal significant details of footwear impressions. Illumination with alternative light sources and chemically enhancing the bloody footwear impressions may reveal additional details, but sometimes, lifting footwear impressions prior to enhancing is the only way to expose hidden details (by using blood reagents not adequate on the original). Several cast formulations were tested for lifting the footwear impressions. The best results were achieved using Aroma fine®. Enhancement of the footwear impressions was attempted with several reagents prior to lifting, during the casting process, and on the lifted footwear impressions. Applying amido black to footwear impressions lifted with alginate produced the sharpest and most detailed footwear impressions. Alginate castings followed by chemical enhancement with amido black may produce high-quality footwear impressions for comparison. PMID:23488772

  14. Dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that many impression materials are available to the veterinary dentist. They each have different inherent properties, handling characteristics, and indications for use. A thorough understanding of these concepts is essential if the veterinarian and laboratory technician are to produce meaningful and accurate reproductions of oral structures. New products are constantly being introduced to the dental market, with fantastic claims for ease of use and reproduction of detail. The reader is urged to seek independent research findings when assessing such claims, and make decisions founded in the highest possible levels of evidence. PMID:24006720

  15. Effects of immersion disinfection of agar-alginate combined impressions on the surface properties of stone casts.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yukiko; Hiraguchi, Hisako; Iwasaki, Eriko; Yoneyama, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of disinfection of agar-alginate combined impressions on the surface properties of the resulting stone casts. Two brands of cartridge-form agar impression material and one alginate impression material were used. Agar-alginate combined impressions of smooth glass plates were prepared. The impressions were immersed in 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde solution or 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution for 1, 3, 5 and 10 min. A stone cast made with an impression that had not been immersed was prepared as a control. The surface roughness (Ra) of the stone casts was measured, and the cast surfaces were observed by SEM. Immersion of agar-alginate combined impressions in 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution for up to 10 min had no serious adverse effects on the surface properties of the stone casts. In contrast, even 1 min of immersion in 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde solution caused deterioration of the cast surface properties. PMID:26843442

  16. Effect of Storage Time of Extended-Pour and Conventional Alginate Impressions on Dimensional Accuracy of Casts

    PubMed Central

    Rohanian, Ahmad; Ommati Shabestari, Ghasem; Zeighami, Somayeh; Samadi, Mohammad Javad; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Some manufacturers claim to have produced new irreversible hydro-colloids that are able to maintain their dimensional stability during storage. The present study evaluated the effect of storage time on dimensional stability of three alginates: Hydrogum 5, Tropicalgin and Alginoplast. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in-vitro trial, a total of 90 alginate impressions were made from a Dentoform model using Hydrogum 5, Tropicalgin and Alginoplast alginates. The impressions were stored in a sealed plastic bag without a damp paper towel for 0, 24, 48, 72 and 120 hours and then poured with type III dental stone. Cross-arch (facial of 6 to facial of 6 on the opposite side) and antero-posterior (distal of right first molar to the ipsilateral central incisor) measurements were made with a digital caliper on the casts. Data were analyzed by two-way and one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test (P<0.05). Results: Alginate type and the pouring time significantly affected the dimensional stability of alginate impressions (both Ps<0.001). Pouring of Hydrogum 5 impressions can be delayed for up to 120 hours without significant dimensional changes. Alginoplast impressions may be poured after 72 hours, but Tropicalgin should be poured immediately and the storage time should not be more than 24 hours. Conclusion: Immediate pouring of alginate impressions provides the highest accuracy in reproducing the teeth and adjacent tissues; however, this study demonstrated that pouring may be delayed for up to five days using extended-pour (Hydrogum 5) alginates. PMID:25628695

  17. Digitization of dental alginate impression: Three-dimensional evaluation of point cloud.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Ri; Lee, Wan-Sun; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Hea-Young; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the digitization of alginate impressions by analyzing differences between the scan data of two types of impressions (alginate and rubber) taken from the master die and the scan data for the master die. The master die and impressions were digitized using a dental laser scanner (7 series, Dental Wings, Montreal, Canada). The crown portion of the abutment teeth in the digital data of 20 impressions was divided into three regions: cervical surface, middle surface, and occlusal surface. An independent t-test showed a significant difference (p<0.05) in the mean difference for each experimental group (alginate and rubber). One-way ANOVA and Tukey's honest significant difference test revealed a significant difference (p<0.05) among the three regions in the rubber impression. The results of this study also carefully suggest the possibility of digitization of alginate impressions in the future. PMID:26632232

  18. A historical review of hydrocolloids and an investigation of the dimensional accuracy of the new alginates for crown and bridge impressions when using stock trays.

    PubMed

    Hansson, O; Eklund, J

    1984-01-01

    Reversible hydrocolloids have been used since 1937 and irreversible hydrocolloids since 1947 for the making of impressions for fixed prostheses; the impression techniques were similar to today's. The dimensional accuracy of reproduction of the irreversible hydrocolloids has been proved since 1947. In this paper the dimensional accuracy of three new alginates, Algi -X ( Algiflex Super, Howmedica Alginate), Ardent Alginate, Ultrafine and a combination material, Colloid 80/ Algiace ( Dentloid / Algiace ) were compared to two agar hydrocolloids and an addition silicone, when different stock trays were used as in the dental clinic. In most clinical situations the new alginates used in metal stock trays are as accurate as the "old" impression materials. The combination material is less accurate when many abutment preparations are to be reproduced. Whether perforated or nonperforated metal stock trays are used with the alginates is of no consequence to the accuracy. Alginates used in disposable plastic trays may cause severe inaccuracy. In narrow spaces with severe unblocked undercuts some of the alginates may be inferior to the other impression materials in this study. PMID:6377548

  19. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p < 0.05). Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  20. The effect of a range of disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of some impression materials.

    PubMed

    Jagger, D C; Al Jabra, O; Harrison, A; Vowles, R W; McNally, L

    2004-12-01

    In this study the dimensional accuracy of two model materials; dental stone and plaster of Paris, reproduced from three commonly used impression materials; alginate, polyether and addition-cured silicone, retained by their adhesives in acrylic resin trays and exposed to four disinfectant solutions was evaluated. Ninety casts were used to investigate the effect of the four disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of alginate, polyether and addition-cured silicone impression material. For each impression material 30 impressions were taken, half were poured in dental stone and half in plaster of Paris. The disinfectants used were Dimenol, Perform-ID, MD-520, and Haz-tabs. Measurements were carried out using a High Precision Reflex Microscope. For the alginate impressions only those disinfected by 5-minute immersion in Haz-tabs solution and in full-strength MD 520 were not adversely affected by the disinfection treatment. All polyether impressions subjected to immersion disinfection exhibited a clinically acceptable expansion. Disinfected addition-cured silicone impressions produced very accurate stone casts. Those disinfected by spraying with fill-strength Dimenol produced casts that were very similar to those left as controls, but those treated by immersion disinfection exhibited negligible and clinically acceptable expansion. The results of the studied demonstrated that the various disinfection treatments had different effects on the impression materials. It is important that an appropriate disinfectant is used for each type of impression material. PMID:15691188

  1. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification... device is intended to provide models for study and for production of restorative prosthetic devices,...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification... device is intended to provide models for study and for production of restorative prosthetic devices,...

  3. A Comparative Evaluation of the Linear Dimensional Accuracy of Four Impression Techniques using Polyether Impression Material.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Smita Sara; Cherian, K P; Chitre, Vidya; Aras, Meena

    2013-12-01

    There is much discussion in the dental literature regarding the superiority of one impression technique over the other using addition silicone impression material. However, there is inadequate information available on the accuracy of different impression techniques using polyether. The purpose of this study was to assess the linear dimensional accuracy of four impression techniques using polyether on a laboratory model that simulates clinical practice. The impression material used was Impregum Soft™, 3 M ESPE and the four impression techniques used were (1) Monophase impression technique using medium body impression material. (2) One step double mix impression technique using heavy body and light body impression materials simultaneously. (3) Two step double mix impression technique using a cellophane spacer (heavy body material used as a preliminary impression to create a wash space with a cellophane spacer, followed by the use of light body material). (4) Matrix impression using a matrix of polyether occlusal registration material. The matrix is loaded with heavy body material followed by a pick-up impression in medium body material. For each technique, thirty impressions were made of a stainless steel master model that contained three complete crown abutment preparations, which were used as the positive control. Accuracy was assessed by measuring eight dimensions (mesiodistal, faciolingual and inter-abutment) on stone dies poured from impressions of the master model. A two-tailed t test was carried out to test the significance in difference of the distances between the master model and the stone models. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for multiple group comparison followed by the Bonferroni's test for pair wise comparison. The accuracy was tested at α = 0.05. In general, polyether impression material produced stone dies that were smaller except for the dies produced from the one step double mix impression technique. The ANOVA revealed a highly

  4. Wettability of nonaqueous elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Chai, J Y; Yeung, T C

    1991-01-01

    The wettability of eight nonaqueous elastomeric impression materials was studied by comparing their contact angles. The materials included three polyethers (one of which was light activated), three hydrophilic poly(vinyl siloxanes), one conventional poly(vinyl siloxane), and one poly(vinyl siloxane) putty. Extracted teeth were prepared to approximate the roughness of a tooth preparation. Contact angles were measured at different time intervals after the start of mixing but were not shown to be significant. The nonhydrophilic poly(vinyl siloxane) materials and the poly(vinyl siloxane) putty were found to be significantly less wettable. PMID:1817528

  5. Otologic complications caused by hearing aid mold impression material.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Cho, Hyong-Ho

    2012-08-01

    We report two extremely rare cases of otologic complications caused by hearing aid mold impression material. The symptoms of patients with retained impression material are characteristic of the length of time the impression material is retained. In case 1 had a chronic discharge and granulation tissue of the middle ear, while case 2 presented with acute pain and dizziness. The management for retained impression material may require surgical interventions, which can be safely accomplished by standard otologic techniques. PMID:21862255

  6. Biometric Denture Space- Concept of Neutral Zone Revisited Using A Hydrocolloid Impression Material

    PubMed Central

    Umamaheswaran, Aruna; Nayar, Sanjna

    2015-01-01

    Though the concept of neutral zone in making complete denture and its significance are well known, the material of choice has always been experimented to achieve better results. Recording of neutral zone using irreversible hydrocolloid (Alginate) as a material of choice would make the way of recording the neutral zone easier, as well as comfortable for the patient, when compared with other materials used for the purpose. This article describes the method of recording the biometric denture space (neutral zone) using hydrocolloid impression material which is most commonly used in everyday dental practice. PMID:26673250

  7. Dimensional Accuracy of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic VPS Impression Materials Using Different Impression Techniques - An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pilla, Ajai; Pathipaka, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The dimensional stability of the impression material could have an influence on the accuracy of the final restoration. Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression materials (VPS) are most frequently used as the impression material in fixed prosthodontics. As VPS is hydrophobic when it is poured with gypsum products, manufacturers added intrinsic surfactants and marketed as hydrophilic VPS. These hydrophilic VPS have shown increased wettability with gypsum slurries. VPS are available in different viscosities ranging from very low to very high for usage under different impression techniques. Aim To compare the dimensional accuracy of hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS using monophase, one step and two step putty wash impression techniques. Materials and Methods To test the dimensional accuracy of the impression materials a stainless steel die was fabricated as prescribed by ADA specification no. 19 for elastomeric impression materials. A total of 60 impressions were made. The materials were divided into two groups, Group1 hydrophilic VPS (Aquasil) and Group 2 hydrophobic VPS (Variotime). These were further divided into three subgroups A, B, C for monophase, one-step and two-step putty wash technique with 10 samples in each subgroup. The dimensional accuracy of the impressions was evaluated after 24 hours using vertical profile projector with lens magnification range of 20X-125X illumination. The study was analyzed through one-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey HSD test and unpaired t-test for mean comparison between groups. Results Results showed that the three different impression techniques (monophase, 1-step, 2-step putty wash techniques) did cause significant change in dimensional accuracy between hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS impression materials. One-way ANOVA disclosed, mean dimensional change and SD for hydrophilic VPS varied between 0.56% and 0.16%, which were low, suggesting hydrophilic VPS was satisfactory with all three impression techniques. However, mean

  8. Comparative study of dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques using addition silicone impression material.

    PubMed

    Penaflor, C F; Semacio, R C; De Las Alas, L T; Uy, H G

    1998-01-01

    This study compared dimensional accuracy of the single, double with spacer, double with cut-out and double mix impression technique using addition silicone impression material. A typhodont containing Ivorine teeth model with six (6) full-crown tooth preparations were used as the positive control. Two stone replication models for each impression technique were made as test materials. Accuracy of the techniques were assessed by measuring four dimensions on the stone dies poured from the impression of the Ivorine teeth model. Results indicated that most of the measurements for the height, width and diameter slightly decreased and a few increased compared with the Ivorine teeth model. The double with cut-out and double mix technique presents the least difference from the master model as compared to the two latter impression techniques. PMID:10202524

  9. The fungicidal effect of ultraviolet light on impression materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Nahara, Y.; Tamamoto, M.; Hamada, T. )

    1991-04-01

    The effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on fungi and impression materials were tested. UV light (250 microW/cm2) killed most Candida organisms (10(3) cells/ml) within 5 minutes. UV light (8000 microW/cm2) killed most C. albicans (10(7) cells/ml) within 2 minutes of exposure. The effect of UV light on dimensional change and surface roughness of impression materials (irreversible hydrocolloid, agar, and silicone rubber) was tested. The results showed that neither dimensional change nor surface roughness of the impression materials were affected. The results of this study indicate that UV light disinfects impression materials that are contaminated with Candida organisms.

  10. [EVALUATION OF CHANGES OF GEOMETRICAL PARAMETERS OF ALGINATE DENTAL IMPRESSIONS DUE TO THE INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL AND MICROWAVE DISINFECTION METHOD USING 3D TECHNOLOGIES].

    PubMed

    Nespraydko, V P; Shevchuk, V A; Michaylov, A A; Lyseyko, N V

    2015-01-01

    This clinical and laboratory study evaluated the effect of two methods of disinfection in different modes at the volume changes of alginate dental impressions and plaster models poured from them, as compared to the same parameters of plastic master models (PMM), using three-dimensional non-contact laser scanner and software. Immersion chemical disinfection for 15 min, microwave disinfection at 354 W for 10 minutes and combined disinfection with the power of 319 W for 4 minutes did not significantly affect the volumetric dimensional accuracy of the alginate impressions (P > 0.05). PMID:27491163

  11. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  12. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  13. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  14. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material....

  15. Replication techniques with new dental impression materials in combination with different negative impression materials.

    PubMed

    Pameijer, C H

    1979-01-01

    New materials and new techniques have enabled the fabrication of more reliable and more accurate replicas. Not only is the reproduction of detail of importance, but the expertise required from the operator and the time involved to produce a replica are considered key factors. For various reasons a reliable and reproducible replication technique for scanning electron microscopy offers many advantages. Recently a new dental precision impression material has been introduced, which in combination with low viscosity resins has produced superior results over other techniques. This combination processed by means of a centrifugal casting machine has produced replicas which could easily be compared to a standard test die at magnifications up to 3000 X. More in depth testing will have to be performed to establish whether these materials can be universally applied to a broad spectrum of replication problems. The combination Reprosil/Spurr low viscosity imbedding medium yielded replicas of high quality which can be made with simple equipment and without possessing special skills. Centrifugation of the positive replication material into the negative impression virtually eliminated the entrapment of airbubbles. PMID:392716

  16. Evaluation of dimensional stability of autoclavable elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Surendra, G P; Anjum, Ayesha; Satish Babu, C L; Shetty, Shilpa

    2011-03-01

    Impressions are important sources of cross contamination between patients and dental laboratories. As a part of infection control impressions contaminated with variety of micro-organisms via blood and oral secretions should be cleaned and disinfected or sterilized before being handled in dental laboratory. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on dimensional stability of elastomeric impression material (polyvinyl siloxane-Affinis). In this in vitro study standardized stainless steel die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. Polyvinyl siloxane (Affinis) light body and putty viscosity elastomeric impression materials were used. A total of 40 impressions of the stainless steel die were made and numeric coding system was used to identify the samples. Measurements were made using a measuring microscope. Distance between the cross lines CD and C'D' reproduced in the impression were measured before autoclaving, immediately after autoclaving and 24 hours after autoclaving and dimensional change was calculated. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. The mean difference in dimensional change between the three groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). However the results revealed that there was higher mean dimensional change immediately after autoclaving when compared to the other 2 time intervals. It is desirable to delay the casting of an autoclavable elastomeric impression material by about 24 hours. Though disinfection of impression is routinely followed autoclaving of impression is an effective method of sterilization. PMID:22379308

  17. Hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Frank; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jurgen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the initial hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials. Initial water contact angles were studied on thin unset and set films of one polyether and six polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials using high-resolution drop shape analysis at drop ages of 1 and 3 seconds. All unset PVS materials were very hydrophobic initially but showed different kinetics of hydrophilization. In contrast, the unset polyether was more hydrophilic initially but lacked distinct hydrophilization. All impression materials showed statistically significant contact angle differences between unset and set surfaces (P < .05). Dependent on the drop age, two PVS materials reached or exceeded the hydrophilicity of the polyether (P < .05). It can be concluded that studies on the wetting behavior of elastomeric impression materials should consider both the experimental drop age and set and unset material surfaces. PMID:21209992

  18. An Investigation into the Accuracy of Two Currently Available Dental Impression Materials in the Construction of Cobalt-Chromium Frameworks for Removable Partial Dentures.

    PubMed

    Dubal, Rajesh Kumar; Friel, Tim; Taylor, Philip D

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the suitability of irreversible hydrocolloid as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction. Scans of casts derived from (1) alginate and (2) addition-cured polyvinylsiloxane impressions were superposed on to a control. The differences within and between groups were compared at fixed landmarks. The investigation revealed a high degree of scan coincidence within and between groups. However, certain features, such as undercuts, resulted in a lower degree of scan coincidence. Irreversible hydrocolloid appears to be a viable alternative to addition-cured polyvinyl-siloxane as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction. PMID:26415334

  19. The dimensional accuracy of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials using two different impression techniques: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Nirmala; Nandeeshwar, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study: To evaluate and compare the linear dimensional changes of the three representative polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials and to compare the accuracy of single mix with double mix impression technique. Methodology: A study mold was prepared according to revised American Dental Association specification number 19 for nonaqueous elastic dental impression materials. Three PVS impression materials selected were Elite-HD, Imprint™ II Garant, Aquasil Ultra Heavy. Two impression techniques used were single mix and double mix impression technique. A total of 60 specimens were made and after 24 h the specimens were measured using profile projector. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance analysis and significant differences were separated using Student's Newman–Keul's test. Results: When all the three study group impression materials were compared for double mix technique, the statistically significant difference was found only between Imprint™ II Garantand Elite-HD (P < 0.05). Similarly, using single mix technique, statistically significant difference were found between Elite-HD and Imprint™ II Garant (P < 0.05) and also between Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD (P < 0.05). When the linear dimensional accuracy of all three impression material in double mix impression technique and single mix impression technique were compared with the control group, Imprint™ II Garant showed the values more nearing to the values of master die, followed by Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD respectively. Conclusion: Among the impression materials Imprint™ II Garant showed least dimensional change. Among the impression techniques, double mix impression technique showed the better results. PMID:26929515

  20. Does immediate dentin sealing influence the polymerization of impression materials?

    PubMed Central

    Ghiggi, Paula Cristine; Steiger, Arno Kieling; Marcondes, Maurem Leitão; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the following study is to evaluate the interaction between the resin materials used in immediate dentin sealing (IDS) techniques and impression materials with two different techniques to eliminate the oxygen-inhibition layer. Materials and Methods: The occlusal dentin surface of 35 human molars was exposed. The teeth were used in two Groups: Group 1 – Impression with Express XT; Group 2 – Impression with Impregum. Groups 1 and 2 were divided into 14 subgroups: Groups 1a and 2a – Control groups; 1b and 2b – IDS with Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); 1c and 2c – IDS with CSE + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; 1d and 2d – IDS with CSE + alcohol; 1e and 2e – IDS with CSE and Protect Liner F (PLF); 1f and 2f – IDS with CSE and PLF + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; and 1g and 2g – IDS with CSE and PLF + alcohol. Five teeth were used in each experimental group, and the tooth surface was photographed using a digital camera. Results: Small quantity of unpolymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF in Groups 1b and 1e. Groups 1c and 1d prevented the interaction. Small quantity of polymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF for Groups 2b and 2e. The same interaction was observed for Groups 2c and 2d. For Groups 2c and 2f, no interactions were observed. Conclusion: Resin materials interacted with impression materials. The application of glycerin jelly and alcohol prevented the interaction of CSE with Express XT and PLF with Impregum; however, these treatments were not completely effective in preventing the interaction of CSE with Impregum and PLF with Express XT. PMID:25202218

  1. [Consistency of zinc oxide-eugenol impression materials].

    PubMed

    Gomes, W L; Santos, J F; Muench, A

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this work was investigate the consistency of three zinc oxide-eugenol impression pastes, considering its flow. Flow tests were performed based on the AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION-Specification no 16. Setting time was based at that one when should be applied the load to get considered disc diameter; the values were obtained graphically. Considering the results it was possible to conclude: a) the first two materials (Equalizing and Horus) present high initial flow, which however drops down earlier on the second one; b) both materials may be used with non compressive impression technic but the second one has shorter working time; c) the third material (Lysanda) as it presents lower flow and faster setting time, may be used with compressive impression technic. PMID:2135423

  2. Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Comparison

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Francesco; Caputi, Sergio; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although new elastomeric impression materials have been introduced into the market, there are still insufficient data about their mechanical features. The tensile properties of 17 hydrophilic impression materials with different consistencies were compared. Materials and Methods. 12 vinylpolysiloxane, 2 polyether, and 3 hybrid vinylpolyether silicone-based impression materials were tested. For each material, 10 dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated (n = 10), according to the ISO 37:2005 specifications, and loaded in tension until failure. Mean values for tensile strength, yield strength, strain at break, and strain at yield point were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Results. Vinylpolysiloxanes consistently showed higher tensile strength values than polyethers. Heavy-body materials showed higher tensile strength than the light bodies from the same manufacturer. Among the light bodies, the highest yield strength was achieved by the hybrid vinylpolyether silicone (2.70 MPa). Polyethers showed the lowest tensile (1.44 MPa) and yield (0.94 MPa) strengths, regardless of the viscosity. Conclusion. The choice of an impression material should be based on the specific physical behavior of the elastomer. The light-body vinylpolyether silicone showed high tensile strength, yield strength, and adequate strain at yield/brake; those features might help to reduce tearing phenomena in the thin interproximal and crevicular areas. PMID:26693227

  3. Accuracy of different impression materials in parallel and nonparallel implants

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ansarifard, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background: A precise impression is mandatory to obtain passive fit in implant-supported prostheses. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of three impression materials in both parallel and nonparallel implant positions. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two partial dentate maxillary acrylic models with four implant analogues in canines and lateral incisors areas were used. One model was simulating the parallel condition and the other nonparallel one, in which implants were tilted 30° bucally and 20° in either mesial or distal directions. Thirty stone casts were made from each model using polyether (Impregum), additional silicone (Monopren) and vinyl siloxanether (Identium), with open tray technique. The distortion values in three-dimensions (X, Y and Z-axis) were measured by coordinate measuring machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for data analysis (α = 0.05). Results: Under parallel condition, all the materials showed comparable, accurate casts (P = 0.74). In the presence of angulated implants, while Monopren showed more accurate results compared to Impregum (P = 0.01), Identium yielded almost similar results to those produced by Impregum (P = 0.27) and Monopren (P = 0.26). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, in parallel conditions, the type of impression material cannot affect the accuracy of the implant impressions; however, in nonparallel conditions, polyvinyl siloxane is shown to be a better choice, followed by vinyl siloxanether and polyether respectively. PMID:26288620

  4. Fabrication of cationic chitin nanofiber/alginate composite materials.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koki; Tanaka, Kohei; Takata, Yusei; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kadokawa, Jun-Ichi

    2016-10-01

    We have already found that an amidinated chitin, which was prepared by the reaction of a partially deacetylated chitin with N,N-dimethylacetamide dimethyl acetal, was converted into an amidinium chitin bicarbonate with nanofiber morphology by CO2 gas bubbling and ultrasonic treatments in water. In this study, we performed the fabrication of composite materials of such cationic chitin nanofibers with an anionic polysaccharide, sodium alginate, by ion exchange. When the amidinium chitin bicarbonate nanofiber aqueous dispersion was added to an aqueous solution of sodium alginate, the composite material was agglomerated, which was isolated by centrifugation, filtration, and lyophilization, to form a manipulatable sheet. The morphology of the resulting sheet at nano-scale was evaluated by SEM measurement. PMID:27288700

  5. Wettability changes in polyether impression materials subjected to immersion disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Shweta; Kamat, Giridhar; Shetty, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Disinfection of impression materials prevents cross-contamination; however, the disinfectants may alter the wettability property. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the wettability changes of polyether impression material after immersing in four different chemical disinfectant solutions for a period of 10 min and 30 min, respectively. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 samples of polyether dental impression material (Impregum soft, 3MESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were randomly divided into nine groups with five specimens each. Each specimen was disc shaped, flat of 32 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness. The samples were immersed in four disinfectant solutions: 2% Glutaraldehyde, 5% sodium hypochlorite, 0.05% iodophor, and 5.25% phenol for 10 min and 30 min, respectively. The control was without disinfection. Wettability of the samples was assessed by measuring the contact angle by using the Telescopic Goniometer. Data were subjected to analysis of variance (Fisher's test) and Tukey's post hoc test for multiple comparisons at 5% level of significance. Results: The contact angle of 20.21° ± 0.22° were recorded in the control samples. After 10 min, the samples that were immersed in 5% sodium hypochlorite and 5.25% phenol showed significant statistical increase in the contact angle as compared to the control (P < 0.001). After 30 min of disinfection, only the samples immersed in 0.05% iodophor showed there were no significant changes in the contact angle, whereas the other disinfectants significantly increased the contact angle and decreased the wettability of the polyether material. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, 2% glutaraldehyde proved safe for 10 min of immersion disinfection while 0.05% iodophor holds promise as an effective disinfectant without affecting the wettability of the material. PMID:24130593

  6. Biocomposite cellulose-alginate films: promising packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Sirviö, Juho Antti; Kolehmainen, Aleksi; Liimatainen, Henrikki; Niinimäki, Jouko; Hormi, Osmo E O

    2014-05-15

    Biocomposite films based on cellulose and alginate were produced using unmodified birch pulp, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and birch pulp derivate, nanofibrillated anionic dicarboxylic acid cellulose (DCC), having widths of fibres ranging from 19.0 μm to 25 nm as cellulose fibre materials. Ionically cross-linked biocomposites were produced using Ca(2+) cross-linking. Addition of micro- and nanocelluloses as a reinforcement increased the mechanical properties of the alginate films remarkably, e.g. addition of 15% of NFC increased a tensile strength of the film from 70.02 to 97.97 MPa. After ionic cross-linking, the tensile strength of the film containing 10% of DCC was increased from 69.63 to 125.31 MPa. The biocomposite films showed excellent grease barrier properties and reduced water vapour permeability (WVP) after the addition of cellulose fibres, except when unmodified birch pulp was used. PMID:24423542

  7. Effect of disinfection of custom tray materials on adhesive properties of several impression material systems.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G A; Vermilyea, S G; Agar, J R

    1994-12-01

    The effects of impression tray disinfection procedures on the bond strength of impression-material adhesives to two types of resin trays were evaluated with a tensile test. Autopolymerizing acrylic resin and a visible light-curing resin were formed into one-half inch cubes. A screw eye was attached to each cube before polymerization. Perforated trays were fabricated with stops to maintain an even one-eighth inch of impression material over the resin block. Hooks on the opposite side permitted attachment of the metal plate to a mechanical testing machine. Before adhesive was applied, one third of the resin specimens were immersed in a 1:213 iodophor solution; one third in a 10% sodium hypochlorite solution, and one third were kept in the "as fabricated" condition. Polysulfide, polyether, and polyvinyl siloxane impression material-adhesive systems were evaluated. The resin-impression material-metal plate couples were attached to a mechanical testing machine and tensile forces were applied at a separation rate of 5 inches per minute. Mean values for adhesive strength ranged from 3.49 kg/cm2 for the autopolymerizing acrylic resin/iodophor/polyether combination to 10.55 kg/cm2 for the autopolymerizing acrylic resin/untreated/polyvinyl siloxane combination. Differences were detected among materials and disinfecting procedure. Clinically, disinfection of resin trays may adversely affect retention of the impression material to the tray. PMID:7853264

  8. A comparison of dimensional accuracy between three different addition cured silicone impression materials.

    PubMed

    Forrester-Baker, L; Seymour, K G; Samarawickrama, D; Zou, L; Cherukara, G; Patel, M

    2005-06-01

    Ten impressions of a metal implant abutment were made with each of three addition-cured silicone impression materials. Using the technique of co-ordinate metrology, the shoulder region of the abutment and corresponding regions of both impressions and dies made from these impressions were scanned and measured. Comparison of these measurements indicated that the mean dimension measured from the shoulder region for each group of impression materials was significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. However, when these impressions were cast in a gypsum based die material, none of the measured dimensions taken from the casts were significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. Thus, any change in measured dimensions occurring during impression making, was compensated for in some way by the casting process. PMID:16011234

  9. Performance of dental impression materials: Benchmarking of materials and techniques by three-dimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Heike; Graf, Michael R S; Kuhn, Katharina; Rupf-Köhler, Stephanie; Eirich, Alfred; Edelmann, Cornelia; Quaas, Sebastian; Luthardt, Ralph G

    2015-01-01

    Among other factors, the precision of dental impressions is an important and determining factor for the fit of dental restorations. The aim of this study was to examine the three-dimensional (3D) precision of gypsum dies made using a range of impression techniques and materials. Ten impressions of a steel canine were fabricated for each of the 24 material-method-combinations and poured with type 4 die stone. The dies were optically digitized, aligned to the CAD model of the steel canine, and 3D differences were calculated. The results were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Depending on material and impression technique, the mean values had a range between +10.9/-10.0 µm (SD 2.8/2.3) and +16.5/-23.5 µm (SD 11.8/18.8). Qualitative analysis using colorcoded graphs showed a characteristic location of deviations for different impression techniques. Three-dimensional analysis provided a comprehensive picture of the achievable precision. Processing aspects and impression technique were of significant influence. PMID:25948142

  10. Properties of a new polyether urethane dimethacrylate photoinitiated elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Craig, R G; Hare, P H

    1990-01-01

    The photoinitiated impression material is supplied premixed as a light-bodied material in a light-tight plastic syringe and as a heavy-bodied material in a tube. The impression material has excellent physical, mechanical, and clinical qualities with noteworthy long working times, short setting times, dimensional stability, accuracy, high tear strength, good wettability, biocompatibility, and ease of cold disinfection without loss of quality. The impression material is also compatible with gypsum and silver or copper metallizing baths. Accurate casts can be obtained by means of either a double-impression technique or a double-mix technique. PMID:2295985

  11. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracies Using Two Elastomeric Impression Materials in Casting Three-dimensional Tool Marks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two types of impression materials which were frequently used for casting three-dimensional tool marks in China, namely (i) dental impression material and (ii) special elastomeric impression material for tool mark casting. The two different elastomeric impression materials were compared under equal conditions. The parameters measured were dimensional accuracies, the number of air bubbles, the ease of use, and the sharpness and quality of the individual characteristics present on casts. The results showed that dental impression material had the advantage of special elastomeric impression material in casting tool marks in crime scenes; hence, it combined ease of use, dimensional accuracy, sharpness and high quality. PMID:27122422

  12. The effect of tray selection on the accuracy of elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Gordon, G E; Johnson, G H; Drennon, D G

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of reproduction of stone casts made from impressions using different tray and impression materials. The tray materials used were an acrylic resin, a thermoplastic, and a plastic. The impression materials used were an additional silicone, a polyether, and a polysulfide. Impressions were made of a stainless steel master die that simulated crown preparations for a fixed partial denture and an acrylic resin model with cross-arch and anteroposterior landmarks in stainless steel that typify clinical intra-arch distances. Impressions of the fixed partial denture simulation were made with all three impression materials and all three tray types. Impressions of the cross-arch and anteroposterior landmarks were made by using all three tray types with only the addition reaction silicone impression material. Impressions were poured at 1 hour with a type IV dental stone. Data were analyzed by using ANOVA with a sample size of five. Results indicated that custom-made trays of acrylic resin and the thermoplastic material performed similarly regarding die accuracy and produced clinically acceptable casts. The stock plastic tray consistently produced casts with greater dimensional change than the two custom trays. PMID:2404101

  13. Effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts

    PubMed Central

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Rismanchian, Mansor; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Bajoghli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different factors such as impression techniques and materials can affect the passive fit between the superstructure and implant. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts. Materials and Methods: Four internal hex implants (Biohorizons Ø4 mm) were placed on a metal maxillary model perpendicular to the horizontal plane in maxillary lateral incisors, right canine and left first premolar areas. Three impression techniques including open tray, closed tray using ball top screw abutments and closed tray using short impression copings and two impression materials (polyether and polyvinyl siloxane) were evaluated (n = 60). The changes in distances between implant analogues in mediolateral (x) and anteroposterior (y) directions and analogue angles in x/z and y/z directions in the horizontal plane on the definitive casts were measured by coordinate measuring machine. The data were analyzed by multivariate two-way analysis of variance and one sample t-test (α = 0.05). Results: No statistical significant differences were observed between different impression techniques and materials. However, deviation and distortion of definitive casts had a significant difference with the master model when short impression copings and polyvinyl siloxane impression material were used (P < 0.05). In open tray technique, there was a significant difference in the rotation of analogs compared with the master model with both impression materials (P < 0.05). Conclusion: There was no difference between open and closed tray impression techniques; however, less distortion and deviation were observed in the open tray technique. In the closed tray impression technique, ball top screw was more accurate than short impression copings. PMID:25878678

  14. Smart designing of new hybrid materials based on brushite-alginate and monetite-alginate microspheres: bio-inspired for sequential nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    Amer, Walid; Abdelouahdi, Karima; Ramananarivo, Hugo Ronald; Fihri, Aziz; El Achaby, Mounir; Zahouily, Mohamed; Barakat, Abdellatif; Djessas, Kamal; Clark, James; Solhy, Abderrahim

    2014-02-01

    In this report new hybrid materials based on brushite-alginate and monetite-alginate were prepared by self-assembling alginate chains and phosphate source ions via a gelation process with calcium ions. The alginate served as nanoreactor for nucleation and growth of brushite or/and monetite due to its gelling and swelling properties. The alginate gel framework, the crystalline phase and morphology of formed hybrid biomaterials were shown to be strongly dependent upon the concentration of the phosphate precursors. These materials were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX). PMID:24411386

  15. A Single Step Impression Technique of Flabby Ridges Using Monophase Polyvinylsiloxane Material: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Umesh Y.; Reddy, Vikram Simha; Hosi, Rushad Nariman

    2014-01-01

    Complete denture fabrication in clinically compromised situations such as flabby ridges is a challenging task for the clinician. Accurate impressioning of these tissues plays a major role in ensuring a well-fitting prosthesis. In this paper, the authors have proposed a newer technique of impression making of the flabby tissues using a combination of readily available newer and older materials to ensure an accurate and easy impression of these tissues. PMID:24872897

  16. Evaluation of properties of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials mixed with disinfectant liquids

    PubMed Central

    Amalan, Arul; Ginjupalli, Kishore; Upadhya, Nagaraja

    2013-01-01

    Background: Addition of disinfectant to irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials can eliminate the disinfection step to avoid dimensional changes associated with it. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of various disinfectant mixing liquids on the properties of commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials. Materials and Methods: Four commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials (Zelgan, Vignette, Tropicalgin, and Algitex) were mixed with disinfectant liquid containing chlorhexidine (0.1 and 0.2%) and sodium hypochlorite (0.1 and 0.5%). After mixing with disinfectant liquids, materials were evaluated for pH changes during gelation, gelation time, flow, gel strength, permanent deformation and detail reproduction. Results: Significant changes in gelation time were observed in irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials upon mixing with disinfectant liquids. In general, chlorhexidine increased the gelation time, whereas sodium hypochlorite reduced it. However, no significant changes in the flow were observed both with chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite. Gel strength was found to decrease when mixed with chlorhexidine, whereas an increase in gel strength was observed upon mixing with sodium hypochlorite. Permanent deformation of the most irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials was below the specification limit even after mixing with disinfectant liquids. Sodium hypochlorite significantly reduced the surface detail reproduction, whereas no change in detail reproduction was observed with chlorhexidine. Conclusion: Chlorhexidine solution can be used to mix irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials in regular dental practice as it did not significantly alter the properties. This may ensure effective disinfection of impressions. PMID:23878566

  17. Effect of mixing techniques on bacterial attachment and disinfection time of polyether impression material

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Umut; Budak, Yasemin; Ruh, Emrah; Ocal, Yesim; Canay, Senay; Akyon, Yakut

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was 2-fold. The first aim was to evaluate the effects of mixing technique (hand-mixing or auto-mixing) on bacterial attachment to polyether impression materials. The second aim was to determine whether bacterial attachment to these materials was affected by length of exposure to disinfection solutions. Materials and Methods: Polyether impression material samples (n = 144) were prepared by hand-mixing or auto-mixing. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used in testing. After incubation, the bacterial colonies were counted and then disinfectant solution was applied. The effect of disinfection solution was evaluated just after the polymerization of impression material and 30 min after polymerization. Differences in adherence of bacteria to the samples prepared by hand-mixing and to those prepared by auto-mixing were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. For evaluating the efficiency of the disinfectant, Kruskal-Wallis multiple comparisons test was used. Results: E. coli counts were higher in hand-mixed materials (P < 0.05); no other statistically significant differences were found between hand- and auto-mixed materials. According to the Kruskal-Wallis test, significant differences were found between the disinfection procedures (Z > 2.394). Conclusion: The methods used for mixing polyether impression material did not affect bacterial attachment to impression surfaces. In contrast, the disinfection procedure greatly affects decontamination of the impression surface. PMID:24966729

  18. Impression materials in fixed prosthodontics: influence of choice on clinical procedure.

    PubMed

    Hamalian, Techkouhie A; Nasr, Elie; Chidiac, José J

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to review impression materials used for fabricating fixed restorations in dentistry. Their compositions, properties, advantages, and disadvantages are presented and compared. How these properties influence clinical decisions is also described. This review helps the clinician choose which material is more suitable for a specific case. A broad search of the published literature was performed using Medline to identify pertinent current articles. Textbooks, the Internet, and manufacturers' literature were also used to supplement this information. It is limited to impression materials used in fixed prosthodontics. The review gives basic knowledge of ideal impression material properties and discusses traditional and, primarily, more recently developed products, such as polyethers, poly(vinyl siloxane), polysulfides, and condensation silicone materials. Clear advantages and disadvantages for these impression materials are provided along with the role that compositional variations have on the outcome of the impression. This should enable clinicians and technicians to easily identify the important physical properties of each type of impression material and their primary clinical indications. PMID:21284760

  19. Use of Clinical UV Chamber to Disinfect Dental Impressions: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sakshi; Kumar, Varun; Gupta, Neelu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental impressions are potential source of infection in a prosthodontic practice. Risk of transmission of infection through saliva, blood etc is considered as hazard for both dentist as well as dental auxiliary staff. A number of methods are currently employed for disinfecting the impressions which are technique sensitive and time consuming. This study focuses on disinfecting impression using dental UV chamber which is commonly employed for storing sterilized instruments. Aim The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the use of clinical UV chamber to disinfect various impression materials at different time intervals and its comparison with 2% glutaraldehyde using standard immersion technique. Materials and Methods Total sample size of 180 specimens was taken from three different impression materials. The impressions were made from 30 dentulous subjects. A total of ten impressions were made for each impression material i.e. alginate, addition silicone and polyether impression material. Six punch samples were taken from each impression. Out of 6 punch sample, one was kept as control, second was disinfected by immersing in freshly prepared 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 10 minutes and remaining four were exposed to UV rays for 3 minutes, 6 minutes, 10 minutes and 15 minutes using dental UV chamber. Amount of disinfection achieved was evaluated by counting the colonies over the culture plates with the help of digital colony. Results The results showed that the mean CFUs for alginate were found to be i.e. 11797.40 ± 5989.73 (mean ± SD). The mean CFUs for addition silicone impression material was found 7095.40 with a standard deviation of 4268.83 and the mean CFUs for polyether impression material was found to be 2168.92 ± 1676 (mean ± SD). Conclusion For alginate and addition silicone impression material, disinfection was achieved on exposure to UV rays for a period of 10 minutes. However, for polyether impression material 3 minutes of exposure to

  20. Silicone impression material foreign body in the middle ear: Two case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuyoshi; Okamura, Koji; Yano, Takuya; Moteki, Hideaki; Kitoh, Ryosuke; Takumi, Yutaka; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2015-10-01

    We report two cases of impression material foreign body in the middle ear. The first case had been affected with chronic otitis media. The silicone flowed into the middle ear through a tympanic membrane perforation during the process of making an ear mold. About 4 years and 8 months after, the patient had severe vertigo and deafness. We found bone erosion of the prominence of the lateral semicircular canal and diagnosed labyrinthitis caused by silicone impression material. In the second case silicone flowed into the canal wall down mastoid cavity. Both cases required surgery to remove the foreign body. The clinical courses in such cases are variable and timing of surgery is sometimes difficult. In addition to reporting these two cases, we present here a review of the literature regarding impression material foreign bodies. PMID:25956272

  1. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alikhasi, Marzieh; Siadat, Hakimeh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials. Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE) and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray techniques were made for each group. Impressions were poured with type IV stone, and linear and angular displacements of the replica heads were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Also, accurate reproduction of the grooves was evaluated by a video measuring machine (VMM). These measurements were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference model that served as control, and the data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at P= 0.05. Results: There was less linear displacement for PVS and less angular displacement for PE in closed-tray technique, and less linear displacement for PE in open tray technique (P<0.001). Also, the open tray technique showed less angular displacement with the use of PVS impression material. Detail reproduction accuracy was the same in all the groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate using PE, and also both closed tray and open tray techniques had acceptable results with the use of PVS. The choice of impression material and technique made no significant difference in surface detail reproduction. PMID:27252761

  2. Method and apparatus for non-destructive evaluation of composite materials with cloth surface impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madras, Eric I. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and related apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of composite materials by determination of the quantity known as Integrated Polar Backscatter, which avoids errors caused by surface texture left by cloth impressions by identifying frequency ranges associated with peaks in a power spectrum for the backscattered signal, and removing such frequency ranges from the calculation of Integrated Polar Backscatter for all scan sites on the composite material is presented.

  3. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; van Uchelen, Judith; Witter, Dick J; Mulder, Jan; Creugers, Nico H J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression procedure, tray type (stock/custom), impression material (elastomer/alginate), use of border-molding material (yes/no); and (2) RPD type requested (distal-extension/tooth-bounded/combination). Of the 132 total RPD impressions, 111 (84%) involved custom trays, of which 73 (55%) were combined with an elastomer. Impression border-molding material was used in 4% of the cases. Associations between impression procedure and RPD type or dentists' year/university of graduation were not found. PMID:26929957

  4. A new generation of sterile and radiopaque impression materials: an in vitro cytotoxicity study.

    PubMed

    Coppi, Chiara; Paolinelli Devincenzi, Chiara; Bortolini, Sergio; Consolo, Ugo; Tiozzo, Roberta

    2007-07-01

    Impression materials are largely used to record the geometry of dental tissue. Hence, the assessment of their possible cytotoxicity is a necessary step in the evaluation of their biocompatibility. The present study is carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of a new elastomeric sterile and radiopaque impression material. Human gingival fibroblasts, cultured in vitro are exposed directly to Elite Implant in three different viscosities, heavy, medium, and light. At 3, 9, 24, 48, and 72 h, the cellular proliferation is evaluated. In parallel, human gingival fibroblasts are exposed indirectly by means of fluid extracts of Elite Implant. The cellular viability is evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, (MTT) assay (Sigma, St Louis, Mo). The gingival fibroblasts proliferation and viability are unaffected by the presence of Elite Implant. This new impression material may represent a safe medical device for clinical and surgical applications. In addition, this material is radiopaque and, thus, can be identified radiographically. PMID:17065163

  5. Comparing the Accuracy of Three Different Impression Materials in Making Duplicate Dies

    PubMed Central

    Bajoghli, Farshad; Sabouhi, Mahmoud; Nosouhian, Saeid; Davoudi, Amin; Behnamnia, Zeynab

    2015-01-01

    Background: Marginal adaptation is very important in cast restorations. Maladaptation leads to plaque retention, reduction of mechanical and esthetic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision of three different impression materials (including: Additional silicone [AS] and condensational silicone [CS] and polyether [PE]) for duplicating master dies. Materials and Methods: Three master dies from an acrylic tooth model-with supragingival and shoulder finishing line was made by using PE: Impergum, CS: Speedex, and AS: Panasil separately. The Ni-Cr copings were prepared from master dies separately. They were placed on the acrylic model and the mean marginal difference was recorded by using a stereomicroscope. Then 30 duplicate test dies were made by using the same impression materials and the marginal gaps were recorded. The comparison was done by one-way ANOVA and SPSS software (Version 13) at a significant level of 0.05. Results: The mean marginal difference of four walls from Impergum (38.56 um) was the lowest than Speedex (38.92 um) and Panasil (38.24 um). The Impergum had the highest capability in making duplicate dies (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The Impergum impression material manifested the highest capability in making a better marginal adaptation of duplicate dies but further studies are needed to make a precise decision. PMID:26229364

  6. The Effect of Disinfectants and a Surface Wetting Agent on the Wettability of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Lad, Pritam P; Gurjar, Minal; Gunda, Sachin; Gurjar, Vivek; Rao, Nandan K

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of two commercially available chemical disinfectants namely sodium hypochlorite and glutaraldehyde and a surface wetting agent on the wettability of three high precision elastomeric impression materials, addition silicone, condensation silicone and polyether. Materials and Methods: Three different types of elastomeric impression materials commonly used in prosthodontic practice were selected. The glutaraldehyde and sodium hypochloride solutions were employed to disinfect the impressions made with the above-mentioned elastomeric impression materials. True Blue surface wetting agent was selected. GBX contact angle analyzer was used to measure advancing and receding contact angle. Results: The results of this study have demonstrated that the polyether impression material was the most hydrophilic of all the materials, followed by hydrophilic addition silicone. Condensation silicone was least hydrophilic. All materials showed improvement in the wettability when a topical surfactant was used. Conclusion: The short term disinfection of the three elastomeric impression materials does not affect the wettability of these impression materials. PMID:26124605

  7. Influence of Custom Trays, Dual-Arch Passive, Flexed Trays and Viscosities of Elastomeric Impression Materials on Working Dies

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Shivani; Kalsi, Rupali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dual arch impression technique signifies an essential improvement in fixed prosthodontics and has numerous benefits over conventional impression techniques. The accuracy of working dies fabricated from dual arch impression technique remains in question because there is little information available in the literature. Aim This study was conducted to compare the accuracy of working dies fabricated from impressions made from two different viscosities of impression materials using metal, plastic dual arch trays and custom made acrylic trays. Materials and Methods The study samples were grouped into two groups based on the viscosity of impression material used i.e. Group I (monophase), whereas Group II consisted of Dual Mix technique using a combination of light and heavy body material. These were further divided into three subgroups A, B and C depending on the type of impression tray used (metal dual arch tray, plastic dual arch tray and custom made tray). Measurements of the master cast were made using profile projector. Descriptive statistics like mean, Standard Deviation (SD) were calculated for all the groups. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for multiple group comparisons. A p-value of 0.05 or less was considered statistically significant. Results The gypsum dies obtained with the three types of impression trays using two groups of impression materials were smaller than the master models in dimensions. Conclusion The plastic dual arch trays produced dies which were the least accurate of the three groups. There was no significant difference in the die dimensions obtained using the two viscosities of impression materials. PMID:27437342

  8. A Comparative Evaluation of the Dimensional Stability of Three Different Elastomeric Impression Materials after Autoclaving – An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thota, Kiran Kumar; Ravuri, Rajyalakshmi; Tella, Suchita

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the Study: The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on the dimensional stability of three different elastomeric impression materials at three different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Standardized stainless steel master die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. The impression materials used for the study were condensation silicone (GP1), addition silicone (GP2) and polyether (GP3). A total of 45 samples of the stainless steel die were made (n = 45), that is 15 samples for each group. Impression materials were mixed according to the manufacturer’s instructions and were loaded into the mold to make an impression of the die. Impressions were identified with the help of numerical coding system and measurements were made using stereomicroscope (MAGNUS MSZ-Bi) of 0.65x magnification with the help of image analysis software (IMACE PRO-INSIGHT VERSION.The results were subjected to statistical analysis using one way analysis of variance and student t-test for comparison between the groups. Results: Within the limitations of the study statistically significant dimensional changes were observed for all the three impression materials at three different time intervals but this change was not clinically significant. Conclusion: It is well-known fact that all impressions should be disinfected to avoid possible transmission of infectious diseases either by direct contact or cross contamination. Immersion and spray disinfection as well as various disinfection solutions have been tested and proven to be effective for this purpose. But for elastomeric impression materials these methods have proven to be ineffective as they do not prevent cross contamination among the dental team. So autoclaving was one of the most effective sterilization procedure for condensation silicone and addition silicone. Since polyether is hydrophilic it is better to disinfect the impressions as recommended by the manufacturer or by immersion or spray

  9. New composite materials based on alginate and hydroxyapatite as potential carriers for ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Andreia; Ghiţulică, Cristina; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Cucuruz, Andrei; Ficai, Anton

    2016-08-30

    The purpose of this article was to obtain prolonged drug release systems in which the drug (ascorbic acid) to reach intact the target area in an environment that is able to control the administration of the active component by chemical or physiological pathways. As support for drug, it was used a material based on calcium phosphate - hydroxyapatite and a natural polymer - alginate, since it is one of the most investigated composite materials for medical applications due to its positive response to biological testing: bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Three composites with different ratios between alginate and hydroxyapatite were obtained: (a) Alg/HA/AA 1:1 (the mass ratio between Alg and HA being of 1:1), (b) Alg/HA/AA 1:3 (Alg:HA mass ratio of 1:3) and (c) Alg/HA/AA 3:1 (Alg:HA mass ratio of 3:1). The synthesized materials were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and to observe the drug release process, UV-vis spectroscopy. PMID:26784979

  10. Thiol-Ene functionalized siloxanes for use as elastomeric dental impression materials

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Megan A.; Jankousky, Katherine C.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Thiol- and allyl-functionalized siloxane oligomers are synthesized and evaluated for use as a radical-mediated, rapid set elastomeric dental impression material. Thiol-ene siloxane formulations are crosslinked using a redox-initiated polymerization scheme, and the mechanical properties of the thiol-ene network are manipulated through the incorporation of varying degrees of plasticizer and kaolin filler. Formulations with medium and light body consistencies are further evaluated for their ability to accurately replicate features on both the gross and microscopic levels. We hypothesize that thiol-ene functionalized siloxane systems will exhibit faster setting times and greater detail reproduction than commercially available polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) materials of comparable consistencies. Methods Thiol-ene functionalized siloxane mixtures formulated with varying levels of redox initiators, plasticizer, and kaolin filler are made and evaluated for their polymerization speed (FTIR), consistency (ISO4823.9.2), and surface energy (goniometer). Feature replication is evaluated quantitatively by SEM. The Tg, storage modulus, and creep behavior are determined by DMA. Results Increasing redox initiation rate increases the polymerization rate but at high levels also limits working time. Combining 0.86 wt% oxidizing agent with up to 5 wt% plasticizer gave a working time of 3 min and a setting time of 2 min. The selected medium and light body thiol-ene formulations also achieved greater qualitative detail reproduction than the commercial material and reproduced micrometer patterns with 98% accuracy. Significance Improving detail reproduction and setting speed is a primary focus of dental impression material design and synthesis. Radical-mediated polymerizations, particularly thiol-ene reactions, are recognized for their speed, reduced shrinkage, and ‘click’ nature. PMID:24553250

  11. Evaluation of accuracy of casts of multiple internal connection implant prosthesis obtained from different impression materials and techniques: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Malesh; Garg, Pooja; Prithviraj, D R

    2014-04-01

    Movement of impression copings inside the impression material using a direct (open tray) impression technique during clinical and laboratory phases may cause inaccuracy in transferring the 3-dimensional spatial orientation of implants intraorally to the cast. Consequently, the prosthesis may require corrective procedures. This in vitro study evaluated the accuracy of 3 different impression techniques using polyether and vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material to obtain a precise cast for multiple internal connection implants. A reference acrylic resin model with 4 internal connection implants was fabricated. Impressions of the reference model were made using 3 different techniques and 2 different impression materials. The study consisted of 24 specimens divided into 6 groups of 4 each. Impressions were poured with ADA type IV stone (Kalrock, Kalabhai Karson Pvt Ltd, Mumbai, India). All casts were evaluated for the positional accuracy (mm) of the implant replica heads using a profile projector. These measurements were compared to the measurements calculated on the reference resin model, which served as a control. Data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Bonferroni multiple comparison procedures to evaluate group means. The results revealed significant difference for anterior implant distance between the 2 impression materials (P < .01) and also among the 3 different techniques (P < .05). The lowest mean variation was found with the polyether impression material and the splinted technique. For posterior implants, the results suggested no significant difference between the 2 impression materials (P ≥ .05). Although results were not statistically significant, the polyether impression material showed the lowest mean variation as compared to the VPS impression material. However, there was a significant difference among the 3 different techniques (P < .05). Among the 3 different techniques, the lowest mean variation between 2 posterior

  12. Microbial alginate production, modification and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Iain D; Rehman, Zahid Ur; Moradali, M Fata; Wang, Yajie; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2013-01-01

    Alginate is an important polysaccharide used widely in the food, textile, printing and pharmaceutical industries for its viscosifying, and gelling properties. All commercially produced alginates are isolated from farmed brown seaweeds. These algal alginates suffer from heterogeneity in composition and material properties. Here, we will discuss alginates produced by bacteria; the molecular mechanisms involved in their biosynthesis; and the potential to utilize these bacterially produced or modified alginates for high-value applications where defined material properties are required. PMID:24034361

  13. Jellyfish collagen and alginate: Combined marine materials for superior chondrogenesis of hMSC.

    PubMed

    Pustlauk, W; Paul, B; Gelinsky, M; Bernhardt, A

    2016-07-01

    Marine, hybrid constructs of porous scaffolds from fibrillized jellyfish collagen and alginate hydrogel are mimicking both of the main tissue components of cartilage, thus being a promising approach for chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Investigating their potential for articular cartilage repair, the present study examined scaffolds being either infiltrated with an alginate-cell-suspension (ACS) or seeded with hMSC and embedded in alginate after cell adhesion (EAS). Hybrid constructs with 2×10(5) and 4.5×10(5)hMSC/scaffold were compared to hMSC encapsulated in pure alginate discs, both chondrogenically stimulated for 21days. Typical round, chondrocyte-like morphology was observed in pure alginate gels and ACS scaffolds, while cells in EAS were elongated and tightly attached to the collagen pores. Col 2 gene expression was comparable in all scaffold types examined. However, the Col 2/Col 1 ratio was higher for pure alginate discs and ACS scaffolds compared to EAS. In contrast, cells in EAS scaffolds displayed higher gene expression of Sox 9, Col 11 and ACAN compared to ACS and pure alginate. Secretion of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) was comparable for ACS and EAS scaffolds. In conclusion hybrid constructs of jellyfish collagen and alginate support hMSC chondrogenic differentiation and provide more stable and constructs compared to pure hydrogels. PMID:27127044

  14. Protein extraction from Ca-alginate encapsulated plant material for comparative proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Domżalska, Lucyna; Mikuła, Anna; Rybczyński, Jan J

    2016-10-01

    The extensive use of encapsulation material in biotechnology drove the need to develop analytical techniques for this type of material. This study focuses on the specific problems of protein extraction from Ca-alginate encapsulated plant material. Proteomics is one of the fast-developing analysis categories, specifically for stress resistance and developmental changes in plant material. Sample preparation is a critical step in a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis proteome approach and is essential for good results. The aim was to avoid preliminary manipulations and get good quality material for comparative proteome analysis technique 2DE. The phenol extraction method and the complex method with preliminary TCA precipitation, SDS buffer and phenol phase were compared with respect to the efficiency and quality of the resulting 2DE gel. The most appropriate method turned out to be the TCA/phenol method with the phenol fractioning technique adapted to the gentian cell suspension. It resulted in a high protein concentration and good quality sample that could be analyzed using the standard separation procedures of 2DE and spectrometric identification with high efficiency. The work presented here confirms the possibility of obtaining a sufficient protein sample for effective proteomic analysis from a small number of capsules. PMID:27235574

  15. Hydrogen bonds of sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijun; Guo, Jing; Yu, Yue; An, Qingda; Wang, Liyan; Li, Shenglin; Huang, Xuelin; Mu, Siyang; Qi, Shanwei

    2016-05-20

    Sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material (SA/AKP) was successfully obtained by blending method. The hydrogen bonds of SA/AKP composite material were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Nuclear magnetic resonance hydrogen spectrum (HNMR). Experiment manifested the existence of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds in SA/AKP system; strength of intermolecular hydrogen bond enhanced with the increase of AKP in the composite material and the interaction strength of hydrogen bonding followed the order: OH…Ether O>OH…π>OH…N. The percentage of intermolecular hydrogen bond decreased with increase of pH. At the same time, the effect of hydrogen bonds on properties of the composite material was discussed. The increase of intermolecular hydrogen bonding led to the decrease of crystallinity, increase of apparent viscosity and surface tension, as well as obvious decrease of heat resistance of SA/AKP composite material. SA/AKP fiber SEM images and energy spectrum showed that crystallized salt was separated from the fiber, which possibly led to the fibrillation of the composite fibers. PMID:26917400

  16. To study the flow property of seven commercially available zinc oxide eugenol impression material at various time intervals after mixing.

    PubMed

    Katna, Vishal; Suresh, S; Vivek, Sharma; Meenakshi, Khandelwal; Ankita, Gaur

    2014-12-01

    Aims and objective of the study was to evaluate the flow property of seven commercially available zinc oxide eugenol impression materials at various time intervals, after mixing 49 samples (seven groups) were fabricated for flow property of the material. The sample were fabricated as equal length of base and accelerator paste of the test materials was taken on the glass slab and mixed with a rigid stainless steel spatula as per manufacturers recommendation till the homogenous mix was obtained. The mix material was loaded in glass syringe and 0.5 ml material was injected on a cellophane sheet placed on marked glass plate. A cellophane sheet and glass plate 70 and 500 g weight was carefully placed on freshly dispensed zinc oxide eugenol impression paste sequentially. The diameter of the mix was noted after 30 s and 1 min of load application and also after the final set of material. The diameter gives the flow of material. The samples were stored at the room temperature. The data of the flow property was analyzed with analysis of variance, Post hoc test and t test. The flow of the zinc oxide eugenol impression paste after 30 s, 1 min and final set of load application for Group A to Group G was noted. Maximum flow was seen for Group G zinc oxide eugenol impression material followed by Group F, D, E, B, C and A in descending order respectively after 30 s, where as the flow property changed after 1 min in the sequence of maximum for Group G followed by Group E, D, B, A, C, and F. Lastly after final set of the impression material the flow maximum for Group G followed by Group E, D, C, F, A and B in descending order. Based on statistical analysis of the results and within in the limitations of this in-vitro study, the following conclusions were drawn that; the flow of zinc oxide eugenol impression material after 30 s, 1 min and that after the final set was maximum for P.S.P. (Group G) and the flow for PYREX (Group A) was minimum. PMID:25489163

  17. Photochromic Solid Materials Based on Poly(decylviologen) Complexed with Alginate and Poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate).

    PubMed

    Sanhueza, Luis; Castro, Joaquín; Urzúa, Esteban; Barrientos, Lorena; Oyarzun-Ampuero, Felipe; Pesenti, Héctor; Shibue, Toshimichi; Sugimura, Natsuhiko; Tomita, Wataru; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Moreno-Villoslada, Ignacio

    2015-10-15

    Photochromic solid materials based on the cationic polymer poly(decylviologen) are reported. The solids were obtained by freeze-drying colloidal suspensions of nanocomplexes obtained by mixing aqueous solutions of the polycation with different solutions of polyanions such as poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) or sodium alginate, at a cationic/anionic polymeric charge ratio of 0.7. The photochromic responses of the solid materials fabricated with alginate as complementary charged polyelectrolyte of the cationic polyviologen are faster than those of the solid materials fabricated with poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate), achieving coloration kinetics in the order of minutes, and discoloration kinetics in the order of hours for the former. Aromatic-aromatic interactions between the latter polyanion and the polyviologen may stabilize the dicationic form of the viologen derivative, increasing the necessary energy to undergo photoreduction, thus decreasing the reduction kinetics. PMID:26398329

  18. Dodecenyl succinylated alginate as a novel material for encapsulation and hyperactivation of lipases.

    PubMed

    Falkeborg, Mia; Paitaid, Pattarapon; Shu, Allen Ndonwi; Pérez, Bianca; Guo, Zheng

    2015-11-20

    Alginate was modified with dodecenyl succinic anhydride (SAC12) in an aqueous reaction medium at neutral pH. The highest degree of succinylation (33.9±3.5%) was obtained after 4h at 30°C, using four mole SAC12 per mol alginate monomer. Alginate was modified with succinic anhydride (SAC0) for comparison, and the structures and thermal properties of alg-SAC0 and alg-SAC12 were evaluated using FTIR, (1)H NMR, and DSC. Calcium-hydrogel beads were formed from native and modified alginates, in which lipases were encapsulated with a load of averagely 76μg lipase per mg alginate, irrespective of the type of alginate. Lipases with a "lid", which usually are dependent on interfacial activation, showed a 3-fold increase in specific activity toward water-soluble substrates when encapsulated in alg-SAC12, compared to the free lipase. Such hyperactivation was not observed for lipases independent of interfacial activation, or for lipases encapsulated in native alginate or alg-SAC0 hydrogels. PMID:26344272

  19. Comparative evaluation of pressure generated on a simulated maxillary oral analog by impression materials in custom trays of different spacer designs: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Sakshi; Gupta, Narendra Kumar; Tandan, Amrit; Dwivedi, Ravi; Gupta, Swati; Agarwal, Garima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Literature reveals that masticatory load on denture bearing tissues through complete dentures should be maximum on primary stress bearing areas and least on relief area in accordance with the histology of underlying tissues. A study to validate the existing beliefs was planned to compare the pressure on mucosa using selective pressure technique and minimal pressure technique, with the incorporation of two different impression materials utilizing the pressure sensors during secondary impression procedure. Materials and Methods: The study was performed using a maxillary analog. Three pressure sensors were imbedded in the oral analog, one in the mid palatine area and the other two in the right and left ridge crest. Custom trays of two different configurations were fabricated. The two impression materials tested were light body and zinc oxide eugenol. A total of 40 impressions were made. A constant weight of 1 kg was placed, and the pressure was recorded as initial and end pressures. Results: A significant difference in the pressure produced using different impression materials was found (P < 0.001). Light body vinyl polysiloxane produced significantly lesser pressure than zinc oxide eugenol impression materials. The presence of relief did affect the magnitude of pressure at various locations. Conclusion: All impression materials produced pressure during maxillary edentulous impression making. Tray modification is an important factor in changing the amount of pressure produced. The impression materials used also had a significant role to play on the pressures acting on the tissues during impression procedure. Clinical Implication: Light body VPS impression material may be recommended to achieve minimal pressure on the denture bearing tissues in both selective as well as minimal pressure techniques. PMID:27041902

  20. Multilayered Short Peptide-Alginate Blends as New Materials for Potential Applications in Cartilage Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Grant A; Romanelli, Steven M; Brown, Alexandra M; Sortino, Rachel M; Banerjee, Ipsita A

    2016-03-01

    Peptide based nanomaterials have been gaining increased prominence due to their ability to form permeable scaffolds that promote growth and regeneration of new tissue. In this work for the first time a short hexapeptide motif VQIVYK, derived from the Tau protein family was conjugated with an organic polyamine linker, putrescine and utilized as a template for developing new materials for cartilage tissue regeneration. Our results showed that the conjugate formed extensive nanofibrous assemblies upon self-assembly under aqueous conditions. We then employed the layer-by-layer (LBL) approach to design the scaffold by first incorporating a short segment of the dentin sialophosphoprotein motif GDASYNSDESK followed by integration with the peptide sequence GSGAGAGSGAGAGSGAGA. This sequence mimics Ala, Gly, Ser repeats seen in the spider silk protein. We then incorporated the polysaccharide alginate which served as a hydrogel. To further enhance binding interactions with chondrocytes, and promote the formation of cartilage in vitro, the bionanocomposites were then attached to the chondrocyte binding peptide sequence HDSQLEALIKFM. The thermal properties as well as biodegradability of the scaffold was examined. To confirm biocompatibility, we examined cell viability, attachment and morphology in the presence of bovine chondrocytes. The cells were found to efficiently adhere to the scaffolds which formed an intricate mesh mimicking the extracellular matrix of cartilage tissue. To evaluate if differentiation occurred in the presence of the scaffolds, we examined in vitro deposition of proteoglycans. Thus, we have developed a new family of nanoscale scaffolds that may be utilized for cartilage tissue regeneration. PMID:27455656

  1. Inadvertent insertion of hearing aid impression material into the middle ear: Case report and implications for future community hearing services☆

    PubMed Central

    Algudkar, Ashwin; Maden, Belma; Singh, Arvind; Tatla, Taran

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The creation of ear moulds for hearing aids is generally considered a safe and routine procedure for trained professionals. In the literature there are reports of otological complications caused by hearing aid mould impression material in the middle ear cavity but such complications are considered rare. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a patient in whom impression material entered the middle ear through a perforation of the tympanic membrane during the process of making a hearing aid mould and review how this was managed. DISCUSSION We discuss how many aspects of the British Society of Audiology guidelines were not followed during this procedure and make recommendations as to how independent community practitioners need to be closely supervised with regular review to minimise the risks of such complications. CONCLUSION Our report demonstrates how a serious otological complication from the creation of a hearing aid impression in a community based private hearing clinic was managed. The reporting of such complications is rare but the incidence is likely to be much higher than the literature would suggest. We recommend and advise how these adverse incidents may be minimised and managed through competency reviews and formal referral links from community centres to hospital otolaryngology/audiology departments. PMID:24262374

  2. [Studies on the cytotoxic action of various silicone rubber impression materials by means of cell culture (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H

    1977-07-01

    Biological test of the silicone rubber impression materials was done by utilizing tissue cultures of L strain cells. Criteria for cytotoxicity were based upon response index in agar diffusion method which was determined by zone index and lysis index, and morphological observations of the cells. The materials used were chosen among those which were commercially available. Base material, catalyst, unset and set mixes of both materials were tested respectively. X-ray fluorescence analysis of the material was also performed. Following results were obtained. 1) Base material of all the materials showed zone index of a range between 11.8 mm and 18.6 mm. On the otherhand, lysis index was relatively small and minimum response index was 11.8 mm/8.6 mm. The cells appeared normal after cultivation with the base materials, though tissue culture medium became opaque due to dissolution of the base materials. It is revealed that the above results mean little cytotoxicity to the cells. 2) Catalyst, on the otherhand, yielded intense cytotoxicity. Minimum response index for the catalyst was 13.4 mm/14.8 mm. Morphological observation was parallel to the results of agar diffusion method. 3) Unset mixes also yielded intense to moderate cytotoxicity. 4) Set mixes showed a similar in level of cytotoxicity to the unset mixes. 5) X-ray fluorescence analysis of the materials revealed existence of such elements as Si, Sr, Sn, S, Cu and Fe. Moreover, Zn was found in materials A, B, C, D and E; P in materials A and B, and Pb in materials E and F. However, it was unable to show what compound was formed by these elements. It is expected that the present results could give a clue on animal experiments or clinical use from the view point of biocompatibility of silicone rubber impression materials. PMID:282367

  3. Good Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Geraldine; Pulsifer, Mary

    1986-01-01

    An art activity featuring ballerinas in classic poses and costumes was extended by a visit to an exhibit on Edgar Degas. Hearing impaired students shared their impressions of another traveling exhibit with French students via computers. (CL)

  4. A survey of the methods of disinfection of dental impressions used in dental hospitals in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Blair, F M; Wassell, R W

    1996-05-25

    The potential for cross-infection from microbial contaminated dental impressions has long been recognised. This study set out to investigate impression decontamination procedures currently used in UK dental hospitals (1995) and to see how these may have changed since a previous survey, carried out in 1988. A variety of disinfection solutions and regimes were highlighted both within and between dental hospitals. Several of the disinfecting solutions currently being used have not been specifically tested for efficacy with impression materials. The laboratories were asked to highlight any adverse reactions. Five laboratories reported that some alginates resulted in casts with poor surface properties when immersed in hypochlorite (0.1 and 1%), sodium dichloroisocyanurate, and 2% glutaraldehyde solutions. This paper highlights that there is no universally recognised impression disinfection/sterilisation protocol. It is recommended that all impressions should at least undergo a disinfecting procedure by immersion in 1% sodium hypochlorite for a minimum of 10 minutes. PMID:8652299

  5. Alginate based hybrid copolymer hydrogels--influence of pore morphology on cell-material interaction.

    PubMed

    Gnanaprakasam Thankam, Finosh; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2014-11-01

    Alginate based hybrid copolymer hydrogels with unidirectional pore morphology were prepared to achieve synergistic biological performance for cardiac tissue engineering applications. Alginate based hybrid copolymer (ALGP) were prepared using alginate and poly(propylene fumarate) (HT-PPF) units. Different hybrid bimodal hydrogels were prepared by covalent crosslinking using poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate) and vinyl monomer viz acrylic acid, methyl methacrylate, butyl methacrylate and N-N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide and ionic crosslinking with calcium. The morphologically modified hydrogels (MM-hydrogels) with unidirectional elongated pores and high aspect ratio were prepared. MM-hydrogels favour better mechanical properties; it also enhances cell viability and infiltration due to unidirectional pores. However, the crosslinkers influence the fibroblast infiltration of these hydrogels. Synthesis of collagen and fibroblast infiltration was greater for alginate copolymer crosslinked with poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate-acrylic acid (ALGP-PA) even after one month (288%). This hybrid MM-hydrogel promoted cardiomyoblast growth on to their interstices signifying its potent applications in cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:25129740

  6. First Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coen, Frank

    1969-01-01

    The unreliability of first impressions and subjective judgments is the subject of both Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Lionel Trilling's "Of This Time, Of That Place"; consequently, the works are worthwhile parallel studies for high school students. Austen, by means of irony and subtle characterization, dramatizes the need for constant…

  7. Removal of Cd (II) from synthetic wastewater by alginate-Ayous wood sawdust (Triplochiton scleroxylon) composite material.

    PubMed

    Njimou, Jacques Romain; Măicăneanu, Andrada; Indolean, Cerasella; Nanseu-Njiki, Charles Péguy; Ngameni, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    The biosorption characteristics of Cd (II) ions from synthetic wastewater using raw Ayous wood sawdust (Triplochiton scleroxylon), r-AS, immobilized by sodium alginate were investigated with respect to pH, biomass quantity, contact time, initial concentration of heavy metal, temperature and stirring rate. The experimental data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm, suggesting that monolayer adsorption of the cadmium ions onto alginate-Ayous sawdust composite (a-ASC). The obtained monolayer adsorption capacity of a-ASC for Cd (II) was 6.21 mg/g. From the Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm model, a 5.39 kJ/mol value for the mean free energy was calculated, indicating that Cd (II) biosorption could include an important physisorption stage. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the Cd (II) biosorption process was feasible, endothermic and spontaneous in nature under examined conditions. The results indicated that a-ASC could be an alternative material replacing more costly adsorbents used for the removal of heavy metals. PMID:26698559

  8. Ghana. Part One-Class Materials. Development Studies No. 1, Third Impression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Paula; Bourne, Fay

    Background readings and classroom materials dealing with Ghana for use with secondary and college students are provided in this publication. The major historical, social, geographical, and political aspects which have contributed to the present day development of Ghana are examined. The background readings for teachers which comprise section one…

  9. Dinosaur Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Philippe

    1998-09-01

    Perhaps you are a paleontologist or have always wondered what it is like to be one. Or you are fascinated by fossils and like to read about the origins and natural history of dinosaurs. Or maybe you are an avid traveler and reader of travelogues. If you are any of these things, then this book is for you. Originally published in 1994 in French, Dinosaur Impressions is the engaging account of thirty years of travel and paleontological exploration by Philippe Taquet, one of the world's most noted paleontologists. Dr. Taquet takes the reader on a surprisingly far-flung tour ranging from the Provence countryside to the Niger desert, from the Brazilian bush to the Mongolian Steppes, and from the Laos jungle to the Moroccan mountains in search of dinosaur bones and what they have to tell us about a vanished world. With wry humor and lively anecdotes, Dr. Taquet retraces the history of paleontological research, along the way discussing the latest theories of dinosaur existence and extinction. Elegantly translated by Kevin Padian, Dinosaur Impressions provides a unique, thoughtful perspective not often encountered in American- and English-language works. This insightful, first-hand account of an exceptional career is also a travelogue par excellence that will enthrall enthusiasts and general readers alike. Philippe Taquet is the Director of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris and is a member of the French Academy of Sciences. Kevin Padian is a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology and Curator of the Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the editor of The Beginning of the Age of Dinosaurs (Cambridge, 1986) and The Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs (1997).

  10. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  11. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  12. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  13. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  14. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single tooth... material, such as wax, the remaining end is slipped over the tooth to make the impression....

  15. Dual Ionic and Photo-Crosslinked Alginate Hydrogels for Micropatterned Spatial Control of Material Properties and Cell Behavior.

    PubMed

    Samorezov, Julia E; Morlock, Colin M; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-07-15

    Biomaterial properties such as mechanics, degradation rate, and cell adhesivity affect cell behaviors including spreading, proliferation, and differentiation. To engineer complex tissues, it is often desirable to achieve precise spatial control over these properties. Here, methacrylated alginate (MA-ALG) was used to create hydrogels comprising a single base material with regions of different types and levels of crosslinking and subsequently different material properties. Ionic and ultraviolet light crosslinking mechanisms were combined to create dual-crosslinked hydrogels with significantly increased stiffness and decreased swelling compared to calcium-crosslinked or UV-crosslinked hydrogels. MC3T3 cells showed significantly enhanced proliferation on the surface of dual-crosslinked hydrogels compared with calcium-crosslinked hydrogels. Photomasks were then used to create patterned hydrogels with precise spatial control over regions that were only calcium-crosslinked versus dual-crosslinked. This spatial variation in crosslinking mechanism permitted local regulation of the hydrogel physical properties and alignment of cells seeded on their surface. Photomasks were also used to create hydrogels with patterned presentation of cell adhesion ligands, leading to spatial control over cell attachment and proliferation. This biomaterial system can be useful for providing patterned, instructive cues to guide cell behavior for engineering complex tissues. PMID:25799217

  16. Engineering alginate as bioink for bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia; Richards, Dylan J; Pollard, Samuel; Tan, Yu; Rodriguez, Joshua; Visconti, Richard P; Trusk, Thomas C; Yost, Michael J; Yao, Hai; Markwald, Roger R; Mei, Ying

    2014-10-01

    Recent advances in three-dimensional (3-D) printing offer an excellent opportunity to address critical challenges faced by current tissue engineering approaches. Alginate hydrogels have been used extensively as bioinks for 3-D bioprinting. However, most previous research has focused on native alginates with limited degradation. The application of oxidized alginates with controlled degradation in bioprinting has not been explored. Here, a collection of 30 different alginate hydrogels with varied oxidation percentages and concentrations was prepared to develop a bioink platform that can be applied to a multitude of tissue engineering applications. The authors systematically investigated the effects of two key material properties (i.e. viscosity and density) of alginate solutions on their printabilities to identify a suitable range of material properties of alginates to be applied to bioprinting. Further, four alginate solutions with varied biodegradability were printed with human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) into lattice-structured, cell-laden hydrogels with high accuracy. Notably, these alginate-based bioinks were shown to be capable of modulating proliferation and spreading of hADSCs without affecting the structure integrity of the lattice structures (except the highly degradable one) after 8days in culture. This research lays a foundation for the development of alginate-based bioink for tissue-specific tissue engineering applications. PMID:24998183

  17. Engineering alginate as bioink for bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Richards, Dylan J.; Pollard, Samuel; Tan, Yu; Rodriguez, Joshua; Visconti, Richard P.; Trusk, Thomas C.; Yost, Michael J.; Yao, Hai; Markwald, Roger R.; Mei, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in 3D printing offer an excellent opportunity to address critical challenges faced by current tissue engineering approaches. Alginate hydrogels have been extensively utilized as bioinks for 3D bioprinting. However, most previous research has focused on native alginates with limited degradation. The application of oxidized alginates with controlled degradation in bioprinting has not been explored. Here, we prepared a collection of 30 different alginate hydrogels with varied oxidation percentages and concentrations to develop a bioink platform that can be applied to a multitude of tissue engineering applications. We systematically investigated the effects of two key material properties (i.e. viscosity and density) of alginate solutions on their printabilities to identify a suitable range of material properties of alginates to be applied to bioprinting. Further, four alginate solutions with varied biodegradability were printed with human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) into lattice-structured, cell-laden hydrogels with high accuracy. Notably, these alginate-based bioinks were shown to be capable of modulating proliferation and spreading of hADSCs without affecting structure integrity of the lattice structures (except the highly degradable one) after 8 days in culture. This research lays a foundation for the development of alginate-based bioink for tissue-specific tissue engineering applications. PMID:24998183

  18. Lasting Impression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Many schools and universities thought they were getting a good deal when they were building education facilities in the 1950s and 1960s. However, the K-12 and higher-education spaces constructed to accommodate the millions of baby-boomer students no longer look like the quick-fix bargain they did years ago. Low-quality materials and construction,…

  19. Nonlinear elasticity of alginate gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemnejad, Seyed Meysam; Kundu, Santanu

    Alginate is a naturally occurring anionic polysaccharide extracted from brown algae. Because of biocompatibility, low toxicity, and simple gelation process, alginate gels are used in biomedical and food applications. Here, we report the rheological behavior of ionically crosslinked alginate gels, which are obtained by in situ gelation of alginates with calcium salts, in between two parallel plates of a rheometer. Strain stiffening behavior was captured using large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) experiments. In addition, negative normal stress was observed for these gels, which has not been reported earlier for any polysaccharide networks. The magnitude of negative normal stress increases with applied strain and can exceed that of the shear stress at large strain. Rheological results fitted with a constitutive model that considers both stretching and bending of chains indicate that nonlinearity is likely related to the stretching of the chains between the crosslink junctions. The results provide an improved understanding of the deformation mechanism of ionically crosslinked alginate gel and the results will be important in developing synthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) from these materials.

  20. Effects of sulfur-based hemostatic agents and gingival retraction cords handled with latex gloves on the polymerization of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Carlos Eduardo Palhares; GUEDES, Carlos Gramani

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated the possible interactions between three addition silicone materials (Express®, Aquasil Ultra® and Adsil®), three hemostatic agents (ferric sulfate, StatGel FS®; aluminum sulfate, GelCord®; and aluminum chloride, Hemostop®) and gingival retraction cords previously handled with latex gloves to determine whether direct contact with medicaments or indirect contamination by latex in conditions similar to those found in clinical practice inhibit or affect the setting of the impression materials. Material and Methods A portable device for the simultaneous test of several specimens was specifically developed for this study. Polymerization inhibition was analyzed by examination of the impressions and the molded surface. Ten trials were performed for each addition silicone material used in the study, at a total of 240 study samples. Results All the samples tested (N=240) were nonreactive regardless of the type of combination used. Conclusions Aluminum sulfate, ferric sulfate and aluminum chloride hemostatic solutions did not show any inhibitory potential on the addition silicone samples under study, and there were no changes in polymerization as a result of contact between addition silicone and retraction cords handled with latex gloves. PMID:22230998

  1. Development of ultra-hydrophilic and non-cytotoxic dental vinyl polysiloxane impression materials using a non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2013-05-01

    Dental vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials are widely used for the replication of intraoral tissue where hydrophilicity is important as the oral tissues are surrounded by wet saliva. Recent attempts to improve the wettability of VPS using a ‘surfactant’, however, have resulted in a high level of cytotoxicity. Hence, in this study, application of a non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ) on VPS and its effects in terms of both hydrophilicity and cytotoxicity were investigated. The results showed that the application of the plasma jet resulted in significant improvement of hydrophilicity of VPS that had no surfactant, whereby the results were similar to commercially available products with the surfactant. The surface chemical analysis results indicated that this was due to the oxidation and decreased amount of hydrocarbon on the surface following NTAPPJ exposure. Meanwhile, an NTAPPJ-treated sample was shown to be non-cytotoxic. Therefore, the use of dental VPS impression materials without any surfactant, in conjunction with an NTAPPJ treatment, is a promising method for ultra-hydrophilic but yet non-cytotoxic materials.

  2. Electrically responsive materials based on polycarbazole/sodium alginate hydrogel blend for soft and flexible actuator application.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Watchara; Petcharoen, Karat; Paradee, Nophawan; Lerdwijitjarud, Wanchai; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2016-10-20

    The electromechanical properties, namely the storage modulus sensitivity and bending, of sodium alginate (SA) hydrogels and polycarbazole/sodium alginate (PCB/SA) hydrogel blends under applied electric field was investigated. The electromechanical properties of the pristine SA were studied under effects of crosslinking types and SA molecular weights, whereas the PCB/SA hydrogel blends were studied under the effect of PCB concentrations. The storage modulus sensitivity and bending of the pristine SA as crosslinked by the ionic crosslinking agent were found to be higher than those of the covalent crosslinking. The storage modulus sensitivity and deflection of the SA increased monotonically with increasing molecular weight. The highest electromechanical response of the PCB/SA hydrogel blends was obtained from the blend with 0.10% v/v PCB as it provided surprisingly the highest ever storage modulus sensitivity, (G'-G'0)/G'0 where G'0 and G' are the storage modulus without and with applied electric field, respectively, at 18.5 under applied electric field strength of 800V/mm. PMID:27474560

  3. A Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Detail Reproduction of Four Hydrophilic Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression Materials Tested Under Dry, Moist, and Wet Conditions-An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Nagrath, Rahul; Lahori, Manesh; Agrawal, Manjari

    2014-12-01

    Vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials have application in a wide variety of situations in both fixed and removable prosthodontics. A major limitation of VPS impression materials is their hydrophobicity. There are two aspects of this problem, the wettability of the polymerized impression by dental gypsum materials and the ability of the unpolymerized material to wet intraoral tissues. To address this problem, manufacturers have added surfactants and labelled these new products as "hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane." The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare dimensional accuracy and surface detail reproduction of four hydrophilic VPS impression materials, when used under dry, moist, and wet conditions. A total of 180 samples were made of stainless steel die similar to as described in ADA sp. no. 19. The die was scored with three horizontal and two vertical lines. Impressions were made under dry, moist and wet conditions. Dimensional accuracy was measured by comparing the length of the middle horizontal line in each impression to the same line on the metal die, by using Universal Length Measuring machine. A 2-way ANOVA was performed on the percentage change data for measured lengths of the 4 impression materials under the 3 conditions to evaluate dimensional accuracy. Surface detail was evaluated in two ways: (1) by use of criteria similar to ADA sp. no. 19 for detail reproduction, and (2) by use of a method that categorized the impressions as satisfactory or unsatisfactory based on their surface characteristics: presence of pits, voids, or roughness. Pearson X2 (α = 0.05) was used to compare surface detail reproduction results. Conditions (dry, moist, and wet) did not cause significant adverse effects on the dimensional accuracy of all the four material. With both surface detail analyses, dry, moist, and wet conditions had a significant effect on the detail reproduction of all the four materials (P < 0.05). The study concluded that the

  4. Alginate composites for bone tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Bhatnagar, Ira; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Kang, Kyong-Hwa; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a complex and hierarchical tissue consisting of nano hydroxyapatite and collagen as major portion. Several attempts have been made to prepare the artificial bone so as to replace the autograft and allograft treatment. Tissue engineering is a promising approach to solve the several issues and is also useful in the construction of artificial bone with materials including polymer, ceramics, metals, cells and growth factors. Composites consisting of polymer-ceramics, best mimic the natural functions of bone. Alginate, an anionic polymer owing enormous biomedical applications, is gaining importance particularly in bone tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility and gel forming properties. Several composites such as alginate-polymer (PLGA, PEG and chitosan), alginate-protein (collagen and gelatin), alginate-ceramic, alginate-bioglass, alginate-biosilica, alginate-bone morphogenetic protein-2 and RGD peptides composite have been investigated till date. These alginate composites show enhanced biochemical significance in terms of porosity, mechanical strength, cell adhesion, biocompatibility, cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase increase, excellent mineralization and osteogenic differentiation. Hence, alginate based composite biomaterials will be promising for bone tissue regeneration. This review will provide a broad overview of alginate preparation and its applications towards bone tissue engineering. PMID:25020082

  5. ETI: Our first impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Albert A.; Johnson, Joel T.

    2000-06-01

    Despite scant or ambiguous information, people are capable of developing comprehensive and detailed impressions. Consequently, if the detection of an electromagnetically-active civilization is announced, many people will rapidly form impressions of what the extraterrestrials and their civilization are "like". First impressions are crucial, not only because of their immediate psychological, social, and political consequences on Earth, but because they can influence the future of interstellar communication. Initial impressions will rest less on hard data than on the nature and tone of the "evidence" that is gleaned from the transmission; the interpretation and dissemination of this evidence; and the hard wiring, psychological programming, cultural conditioning, and social influence processes that shape human perception. We consider how dispositional inferences, implicit theories of personality, negatively toned or adverse information, physical appearance, prior expectations, the confirmation bias, and thinking and unthinking approaches to attitude formation are likely to affect human impressions of ETI.

  6. Impression block with orientator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilin, V. I.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2015-02-01

    Tool review, namely the impression block, applied to check the shape and size of the top of fish as well as to determine the appropriate tool for fishing operation was realized. For multiple application and obtaining of the impress depth of 3 cm and more, the standard volumetric impression blocks with fix rods are used. However, the registered impress of fish is not oriented in space and the rods during fishing are in the extended position. This leads to rods deformation and sinking due to accidental impacts of impression block over the borehole irregularity and finally results in faulty detection of the top end of fishing object in hole. The impression blocks with copy rods and fixed magnetic needle allow estimating the object configuration and fix the position of magnetic needle determining the position of the top end of object in hole. However, the magnetic needle fixation is realized in staged and the rods are in extended position during fishing operations as well as it is in standard design. The most efficient tool is the impression block with copy rods which directs the examined object in the borehole during readings of magnetic needles data from azimuth plate and averaging of readings. This significantly increases the accuracy of fishing toll direction. The rods during fishing are located in the body and extended only when they reach the top of fishing object.

  7. Stability of alginate microbead properties in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Monica L.; Morley, Michael; Khanna, Omaditya; Opara, Emmanuel C.

    2013-01-01

    Alginate microbeads have been investigated clinically for a number of therapeutic interventions, including drug delivery for treatment of ischemic tissues, cell delivery for tissue regeneration, and islet encapsulation as a therapy for type I diabetes. The physical properties of the microbeads play an important role in regulating cell behavior, protein release, and biological response following implantation. In this research alginate microbeads were synthesized, varying composition (mannuronic acid to guluronic acid ratio), concentration of alginate and needle gauge size. Following synthesis, the size, volume fraction, and morphometry of the beads were quantified. In addition, these properties were monitored over time in vitro in the presence of varying calcium levels in the microenvironment. The initial volume available for solute diffusion increased with alginate concentration and mannuronic (M) acid content, and bead diameter decreased with M content but increased with needle diameter. Interestingly, microbeads eroded completely in saline in less than 3 weeks regardless of synthesis conditions much faster than what has been observed in vivo. However, microbead stability was increased by the addition of calcium in the culture medium. Beads synthesized with low alginate concentration and high G content exhibited a more rapid change in physical properties even in the presence of calcium. These data suggest that temporal variations in the physical characteristics of alginate microbeads can occur in vitro depending on synthesis conditions and microbead environment. The results presented here will assist in optimizing the design of the materials for clinical application in drug delivery and cell therapy. PMID:22350778

  8. Magneto-responsive alginate capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degen, Patrick; Zwar, Elena; Schulz, Imke; Rehage, Heinz

    2015-05-01

    Upon incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) into gels, composite materials called ferrogels are obtained. These magneto-responsive systems have a wide range of potential applications including switches and sensors as well as drug delivery systems. In this article, we focus on the properties of calcium alginate capsules, which are widely used as carrier systems in medicine and technology. We studied the incorporation of different kinds of mNPs in matrix capsules and in the core and the shell of hollow particles. We found out that not all particle-alginate or particle-CaCl2 solution combinations were suitable for a successful capsule preparation on grounds of a destabilization of the nanoparticles or the polymer. For those systems allowing the preparation of switchable beads or capsules, we systematically studied the size and microscopic structure of the capsules, their magnetic behavior and mechanical resistance.

  9. Lactic acid fermentation by cells immobilised on various porous cellulosic materials and their alginate/poly-lactic acid composites.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mrinal Nishant; Gialleli, Angelika-Ioanna; Masson, Jean Bernard; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Bekatorou, Argyro; Koutinas, Athanasios A; Kanellaki, Maria

    2014-08-01

    Porous delignified cellulose (or tubular cellulose, abbr. TC) from Indian Mango (Mangifera indica) and Sal (Shorea robusta) wood and Rice husk, and TC/Ca-alginate/polylactic acid composites, were used as Lactobacillus bulgaricus immobilisation carriers leading to improvements in lactic acid fermentation of cheese whey and synthetic lactose media, compared to free cells. Specifically, shorter fermentation rates, higher lactic acid yields (g/g sugar utilised) and productivities (g/Ld), and higher amounts of volatile by-products were achieved, while no significant differences were observed on the performance of the different immobilised biocatalysts. The proposed biocatalysts are of food grade purity, cheap and easy to prepare, and they are attractive for bioprocess development based on immobilised cells. Such composite biocatalysts may be used for the co-immobilisation of different microorganisms or enzymes (in separate layers of the biocatalyst), to efficiently conduct different types of fermentations in the same bioreactor, avoiding inhibition problems of chemical or biological (competition) nature. PMID:24690466

  10. Bioactive apatite incorporated alginate microspheres with sustained drug-delivery for bone regeneration application.

    PubMed

    Li, Haibin; Jiang, Fei; Ye, Song; Wu, Yingying; Zhu, Kaiping; Wang, Deping

    2016-05-01

    The strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite microspheres (SrHA) incorporated alginate composite microspheres (SrHA/Alginate) were prepared via adding SrHA/alginate suspension dropwise into calcium chloride solution, in which the gel beads were formed by means of crosslinking reaction. The structure, morphology and in vitro bioactivity of the composite microspheres were studied by using XRD, SEM and EDS methods. The biological behaviors were characterized and analyzed through inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), CCK-8, confocal laser microscope and ALP activity evaluations. The experimental results indicated that the synthetic SrHA/Alginate showed similar morphology to the well-known alginate microspheres (Alginate) and both of them possessed a great in vitro bioactivity. Compared with the control Alginate, the SrHA/Alginate enhanced MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and ALP activity by releasing osteoinductive and osteogenic Sr ions. Furthermore, vancomycin was used as a model drug to investigate the drug release behaviors of the SrHA/Alginate, Alginate and SrHA. The results suggested that the SrHA/Alginate had a highest drug-loading efficiency and best controlled drug release properties. Additionally, the SrHA/Alginate was demonstrated to be pH-sensitive as well. The increase of the pH value in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) accelerated the vancomycin release. Accordingly, the multifunctional SrHA/Alginate can be applied in the field of bioactive drug carriers and bone filling materials. PMID:26952484

  11. Clinicians reaping benefits of new concepts in impressioning.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    While conventional elastomeric impression materials are still being used to generate excellent impressions, the future of impression-taking is undoubtedly with digital intraoral scanners. Advances in scanning systems are making this technology easier to use and more practical for dentists. PMID:25822643

  12. Chondrocyte Culture in Three Dimensional Alginate Sulfate Hydrogels Promotes Proliferation While Maintaining Expression of Chondrogenic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Mhanna, Rami; Kashyap, Aditya; Palazzolo, Gemma; Vallmajo-Martin, Queralt; Becher, Jana; Möller, Stephanie; Schnabelrauch, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The loss of expression of chondrogenic markers during monolayer expansion remains a stumbling block for cell-based treatment of cartilage lesions. Here, we introduce sulfated alginate hydrogels as a cartilage biomimetic biomaterial that induces cell proliferation while maintaining the chondrogenic phenotype of encapsulated chondrocytes. Hydroxyl groups of alginate were converted to sulfates by incubation with sulfur trioxide–pyridine complex (SO3/pyridine), yielding a sulfated material cross-linkable with calcium chloride. Passage 3 bovine chondrocytes were encapsulated in alginate and alginate sulfate hydrogels for up to 35 days. Cell proliferation was five-fold higher in alginate sulfate compared with alginate (p=0.038). Blocking beta1 integrins in chondrocytes within alginate sulfate hydrogels significantly inhibited proliferation (p=0.002). Sulfated alginate increased the RhoA activity of chondrocytes compared with unmodified alginate, an increase that was blocked by β1 blocking antibodies (p=0.017). Expression and synthesis of type II collagen, type I collagen, and proteoglycan was not significantly affected by the encapsulation material evidenced by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Alginate sulfate constructs showed an opaque appearance in culture, whereas the unmodified alginate samples remained translucent. In conclusion, alginate sulfate provides a three dimensional microenvironment that promotes both chondrocyte proliferation and maintenance of the chondrogenic phenotype and represents an important advance for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair therapies providing a material in which cell expansion can be done in situ. PMID:24320935

  13. Comparison of two impression techniques for auricular prosthesis: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Kasim; Mani, U M; Seenivasan, M K; Vaidhyanathan, A K; Veeravalli, P T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the accuracy of a new impression technique, the triple-layer impression technique (TLIT), with the conventional impression technique (CIT) to fabricate an auricular prosthesis. Fifteen male subjects (aged 22-45 yr) were selected. Ten markings were made on the subject's ear (super aurale [sa], sub aurale [sba], pre aurale [pra], post aurale [poa], A, A1, B, B1, C, and C1) and five measurements (sa-sba, pra-poa, A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1) were made. Custom-made trays were used to record impression in CIT and TLIT. Impressions were made using alginate, and models were cast with type IV gypsum product. Markings were transferred on the cast. Measurements were rechecked on the models. Distribution analysis of difference in measurements between the two impression techniques and the subject's actual values was evaluated. Sign test was used to analyze the statistical significance. Statistically significant differences were found in measurements A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1 between the two techniques when compared with the subject's actual dimensions (p < 0.01). TLIT was found to produce accurate models when compared with CIT. The TLIT used in the study was cost effective, less technique sensitive, and tailor made to reduce chairside orientation time during wax try-in appointments for rehabilitating patients, especially those with unilateral auricular defects. PMID:24458893

  14. Imaging contrast effects in alginate microbeads containing trapped emulsion droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester-Reilly, Holly J.; Shapley, Nina C.

    2007-09-01

    This study focuses on spherical microparticles made of cross-linked alginate gel and microcapsules composed of an oil-in-water emulsion where the continuous aqueous phase is cross-linked into an alginate gel matrix. We have investigated the use of these easily manufactured microbeads as contrast agents for the study of the flow properties of fluids using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Results demonstrate that combined spin-spin ( T2) relaxation and diffusion contrast in proton NMR imaging can be used to distinguish among rigid polymer particles, plain alginate beads, and alginate emulsion beads. Multi-echo CPMG spin-echo imaging indicates that the average spin-lattice ( T1) and spin-spin ( T2) relaxation times of the plain alginate and alginate emulsion beads are comparable. Meanwhile, diffusion-weighted imaging produces sharp contrast between the two types of alginate beads, due to restricted diffusion inside the embedded oil droplets of the alginate emulsion beads. While the signal obtained from most materials is severely attenuated under applied diffusion gradients, the alginate emulsion beads maintain signal strength. The alginate emulsion beads were added to a suspension and imaged in an abrupt, annular expansion flow. The emulsion beads could be clearly distinguished from the surrounding suspending fluid and rigid polystyrene particles, through either T2 relaxation or diffusion contrast. Such a capability allows future use of the alginate emulsion beads as tracer particles and as one particle type among many in a multimodal suspension where detailed concentration profiles or particle size separation must be quantified during flow.

  15. Imaging contrast effects in alginate microbeads containing trapped emulsion droplets.

    PubMed

    Hester-Reilly, Holly J; Shapley, Nina C

    2007-09-01

    This study focuses on spherical microparticles made of cross-linked alginate gel and microcapsules composed of an oil-in-water emulsion where the continuous aqueous phase is cross-linked into an alginate gel matrix. We have investigated the use of these easily manufactured microbeads as contrast agents for the study of the flow properties of fluids using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Results demonstrate that combined spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation and diffusion contrast in proton NMR imaging can be used to distinguish among rigid polymer particles, plain alginate beads, and alginate emulsion beads. Multi-echo CPMG spin-echo imaging indicates that the average spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation times of the plain alginate and alginate emulsion beads are comparable. Meanwhile, diffusion-weighted imaging produces sharp contrast between the two types of alginate beads, due to restricted diffusion inside the embedded oil droplets of the alginate emulsion beads. While the signal obtained from most materials is severely attenuated under applied diffusion gradients, the alginate emulsion beads maintain signal strength. The alginate emulsion beads were added to a suspension and imaged in an abrupt, annular expansion flow. The emulsion beads could be clearly distinguished from the surrounding suspending fluid and rigid polystyrene particles, through either T(2) relaxation or diffusion contrast. Such a capability allows future use of the alginate emulsion beads as tracer particles and as one particle type among many in a multimodal suspension where detailed concentration profiles or particle size separation must be quantified during flow. PMID:17600742

  16. Neurological Impress Method plus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, James; Lapp, Diane; Fisher, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of these two studies was to redirect interest to the Neurological Impress Method, a multisensory approach to reading instruction that occurs between a teacher and a student, which has been largely forgotten in mainstream and special education circles over the past decades. In addition to its emphasis on oral reading, we included a…

  17. Alginate gel-coated oil-entrapped alginate-tamarind gum-magnesium stearate buoyant beads of risperidone.

    PubMed

    Bera, Hriday; Boddupalli, Shashank; Nandikonda, Sridhar; Kumar, Sanoj; Nayak, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A novel alginate gel-coated oil-entrapped calcium-alginate-tamarind gum (TG)-magnesium stearate (MS) composite floating beads was developed for intragastric risperidone delivery with a view to improving its oral bioavailability. The TG-blended alginate core beads containing olive oil and MS as low-density materials were accomplished by ionotropic gelation technique. Effects of polymer-blend ratio (sodium alginate:TG) and crosslinker (CaCl2) concentration on drug entrapment efficiency (DEE, %) and cumulative drug release after 8 h (Q8h, %) were studied to optimize the core beads by a 3(2) factorial design. The optimized beads (F-O) exhibited DEE of 75.19±0.75% and Q8h of 78.04±0.38% with minimum errors in prediction. The alginate gel-coated optimized beads displayed superior buoyancy and sustained drug release property. The drug release profiles of the drug-loaded uncoated and coated beads were best fitted in Higuchi kinetic model with Fickian and anomalous diffusion driven mechanisms, respectively. The optimized beads yielded a notable sustained drug release profile as compared to marketed immediate release preparation. The uncoated and coated Ca-alginate-TG-MS beads were also characterized by SEM, FTIR and P-XRD analyses. Thus, the newly developed alginate-gel coated oil-entrapped alginate-TG-MS composite beads are suitable for intragastric delivery of risperidone over a prolonged period of time. PMID:25861741

  18. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  19. Substance Use as Impression Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Mark J.; Getz, J. Greg

    1996-01-01

    Examines the function of substance use as an impression management tactic. Introductory psychology students (n=377) responded to a survey instrument measuring self-monitoring, perceived success in impression management, interaction anxiety, and self-esteem. Results suggest that alcohol use may serve an impression management function. (JPS)

  20. Impression Testing of Self-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Huber, Amy

    2005-01-01

    As part of the BIOSANT program (biologically-inspired smart nanotechnology), scientists at NASA-Langley have identified a "self-healing" plastic that spontaneously closes the hole left by the passage of a bullet. To understand and generalize the phenomenon in question, the mechanical properties responsible for this ability are being explored. Low-rate impression testing was chosen to characterize post-yield material properties, and it turned out that materials that heal following ballistic puncture also show up to 80% healing of the low-rate impression. Preliminary results on the effects of temperature and rate of puncture are presented.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Calcium alginate is prepared...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food... GRAS § 184.1610 Potassium alginate. (a) Potassium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-36-1) is the potassium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Potassium alginate...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Sodium alginate...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food... GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Sodium alginate is prepared by...

  5. Alginic Acid Accelerates Calcite Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, T. D.; Duckworth, O. W.; McNamara, C. J.; Martin, S. T.; Mitchell, R.

    2003-12-01

    Accelerated carbonate weathering through biological activity affects both geochemical cycling and the local pH and alkalinity of terrestrial and marine waters. Microbes affect carbonate dissolution through metabolic activity, production of acidic or chelating exudates, and cation binding by cell walls. Dissolution occurs within microbial biofilms - communities of microorganisms attached to stone in an exopolymer matrix. We investigated the effect of alginic acid, a common biological polymer produced by bacteria and algae, on calcite dissolution using a paired atomic force microscopy/flow-through reactor apparatus. The alginic acid caused up to an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate at 3 < pH < 12. Additionally, the polymer preferentially binds to the obtuse pit steps and increases step velocity. We propose that the polymer is actively chelating surficial cations reducing the activation energy and increasing dissolution rate. The role of biologically produced polymers in mineral weathering is important in the protection of cultural heritage materials and understanding of marine and terrestrial systems.

  6. Alginate and alginate/gelatin microspheres for human adipose-derived stem cell encapsulation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rui; Zhang, Renji; Luan, Jie; Lin, Feng

    2012-06-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSC) encapsulated in alginate and alginate/gelatin microspheres with adjustable properties were fabricated via an improved microsphere generating device. The mechanism of the device, porous property, swelling behavior of the microspheres and hADSC proliferation as well as adipogenic differentiation were studied extensively. Microspheres with high-ratio evenly distributed adipocytes could be obtained by utilizing the proper matrix material and manufacturing parameters. The adipocyte/hADSC microspheres were a sound in vitro mimicking of a natural fat lobule and therefore a good candidate for adipose tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:22556122

  7. [Digital implant impression taking - an overview].

    PubMed

    Mahl, Dominik; Glenz, Fabienne; Marinello, Carlo P

    2014-01-01

    In dentist's daily practice, intraoral scanning systems are increased. Besides scanning of prepared teeth, also implants could be scanned intraorally. This clinical report describes the step-by-step techniques to scan digitally intraoral implants with two intraoral scanners (Lava™ C.O.S., 3M Espe and the CEREC AC connected with inLab MC XL, Sirona) for generating implant suprastructures without the use of impression materials, dental stone or implant impression copings. Different workflows, possibilities and limits by scanning dental implants are demonstrated. PMID:24585419

  8. Covalent layer-by-layer assembly of hyperbranched polymers on alginate microcapsulesto impart stability and permselectivity.

    PubMed

    Gattás-Asfura, Km; Valdes, M; Celik, E; Stabler, Cl

    2014-12-14

    The microencapsulation of cells has shown promise as a therapeutic vehicle for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. While alginate microcapsules provide an ideal cell encapsulation material, polycations coatings are commonly employed to enhance stability and impart permselectivity. In this study, functionalized hyperbranched alginate and dendrimer polymers were used to generate discreet nanoscale coatings onto alginate microbeads via covalent layer-by-layer assembly. The bioorthogonal Staudinger ligation scheme was used to chemoselectively crosslink azide functionalized hyperbranched alginate (alginate-hN3) to methyl-2-diphenylphosphino-terephthalate (MDT) linked PAMAM dendrimer (PAMAM-MDT). Covalent layer-by-layer deposition of PAMAM-MDT/alginate-hN3 coatings onto alginate microbeads resulted in highly stable coatings, even after the inner alginate gel was liquefied to form microcapsules. The permselectivity of the coated microcapsules could be manipulated via the charge density of the PAMAM, the number of layers deposited, and the length of the functional arms. The cytocompatibility of the resulting PAMAM-MDT/alginate-hN3 coating was evaluated using a beta cell line, with no significant detrimental response observed. The biocompatibility of the coatings in vivo was also found comparable to uncoated alginate beads. The remarkable stability and versatile nature of these coatings provides an appealing option for bioencapsulation and the release of therapeutic agents. PMID:25478165

  9. Fabrication of freestanding alginate microfibers and microstructures for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, John M; Feinberg, Adam W

    2014-06-01

    Natural biopolymers such as alginate have become important materials for a variety of biotechnology applications including drug delivery, cell encapsulation and tissue engineering. This expanding use has spurred the development of new approaches to engineer these materials at the nano- and microscales to better control cell interactions. Here we describe a method to fabricate freestanding alginate-based microfibers and microstructures with tunable geometries down to approximately 3 µm. To do this, a polydimethylsiloxane stamp is used to micromold alginate or alginate-fibrin blends onto a sacrificial layer of thermally-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm). A warm calcium chloride solution is then used to crosslink the alginate and, upon cooling below the lower critical solution temperature (~32 °C), the PIPAAm layer dissolves and releases the alginate or alginate-fibrin as freestanding microfibers and microstructures. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that C2C12 myoblasts seeded onto the alginate-fibrin microfibers polarize along the fiber length forming interconnected cell strands. Thus, we have developed the ability to engineer alginate-based microstructured materials that can selectively bind cells and direct cellular assembly. PMID:24695323

  10. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1610 Potassium alginate. (a) Potassium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-36-1) is the potassium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1610 Potassium alginate. (a) Potassium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-36-1) is the potassium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1610 Potassium alginate. (a) Potassium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-36-1) is the potassium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1610 Potassium alginate. (a) Potassium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-36-1) is the potassium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  18. Alginate Hydrogel: A Shapeable and Versatile Platform for in Situ Preparation of Metal-Organic Framework-Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, He; Zhang, Qi; Zhu, Shiping

    2016-07-13

    This work reports a novel in situ growth approach for incorporating metal-organic framework (MOF) materials into an alginate substrate, which overcomes the challenges of processing MOF particles into specially shaped structures for real industrial applications. The MOF-alginate composites are prepared through the post-treatment of a metal ion cross-linked alginate hydrogel with a MOF ligand solution. MOF particles are well distributed and embedded in and on the surface of the composites. The macroscopic shape of the composite can be designed by controlling the shape of the corresponding hydrogel; thus MOF-alginate beads, fibers, and membranes are obtained. In addition, four different MOF-alginate composites, including HKUST-1-, ZIF-8-, MIL-100(Fe)-, and ZIF-67-alginate, were successfully prepared using different metal ion cross-linked alginate hydrogels. The mechanism of formation is revealed, and the composite is demonstrated to be an effective absorbent for water purification. PMID:27315047

  19. Effect of the impression margin thickness on the linear accuracy of impression and stone dies: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Naveen, Y G; Patil, Raghunath

    2013-03-01

    The space available for impression material in gingival sulcus immediately after the removal of retraction cord has been found to be 0.3-0.4 mm. However after 40 s only 0.2 mm of the retracted space is available. This is of concern when impression of multiple abutments is to be made. Hence a study was planned to determine the minimum width of the retracted sulcus necessary to obtain a good impression. Five metal dies were machined to accurately fit a stainless steel block with a square cavity in the center with spaces, 1 mm deep and of varying widths (0.11-0.3 mm) away from the block. Polyvinyl siloxane impressions were made and poured using a high strength stone. Using traveling microscope, length and widths of abutment, impression and die were measured and compared for linear accuracy and completeness of impression. Results showed 1.5-3 times greater mean distortion and larger coefficient of variance in the 0.11 mm group than in the wider sulcular groups. ANOVA test for distortion also showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). 75 % of impressions in 0.11 mm group were defective compared to less than 25 % of impressions in other width groups. It is not always possible to predictably obtain accurate impressions in sulcus width of 0.11 mm or lesser. Dimensionally accurate and defect free impressions were obtained in sulcus width of 0.15 mm and wider. Hence clinicians must choose retraction methods to obtain a width greater than 0.35 mm. Further immediate loading of the impression material after cord removal may improve accuracy. PMID:24431701

  20. Human neutrophil elastase inhibition with a novel cotton alginate wound dressing formulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Occlusion and elasticity were combined in a novel cotton-based alginate dressing containing a non-toxic elastase inhibitor. Cotton gauzes were modified with a textile finishing process for incorporating alginate to yield a dressing material that retains elasticity while enhancing absorption. The ...

  1. Mechanical properties, biological behaviour and drug release capability of nano TiO2-HAp-Alginate composite scaffolds for potential application as bone implant material.

    PubMed

    Naik, Kshipra; Chandran, V Girish; Rajashekaran, Raghavan; Waigaonkar, Sachin; Kowshik, Meenal

    2016-09-01

    Nanocomposite scaffolds of TiO2 and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with alginate as the binding agent were fabricated using the freeze drying technique. TiO2, hydroxyapatite and alginate were used in the ratio of 1:1:4. The scaffolds were characterized using X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was evaluated using cell adhesion and MTT assay on osteosarcoma (MG-63) cells. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that cells adhered to the surface of the scaffolds with good spreading. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were investigated using dynamic mechanical analysis. The swelling ability, porosity, in vitro degradation, and biomineralization of the scaffolds were also evaluated. The results indicated controlled swelling, limited degradation, and enhanced biomineralization. Further, drug delivery studies of the scaffolds using the chemotherapeutic drug methotrexate exhibited an ideal drug release profile. These scaffolds are proposed as potential candidates for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. PMID:27485954

  2. A Paradigm shift in the concept for making dental impressions.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Sanjna; Mahadevan, R

    2015-04-01

    Digital dental impression is a revolutionary technological advancement that so surpasses the accuracy and efficiency of former techniques for obtaining replicas of prepared teeth for the purpose of fabricating restorations that its adoption by dentists is rapidly eclipsing the use of elastomeric impression materials. The ultimate goals of dentists dedicated to quality restorative dentistry are to make their treatment of patients as accurate, stressless, and efficient as possible. By elimination of the everyday problems described above, there is no question that the significant advantages of digital impressions will make intraoral digital scanning standard procedure in most dental offices within the next several years. Furthermore, digital impressions have proven to reduce remakes and returns, as well as increase overall efficiency. The patient also benefits by being provided a far more positive experience. Finally, through the use of digital impression making, it has been determined that laboratory products become more consistent and require less chair time at insertion. PMID:26015714

  3. Alginate: properties and biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Mooney, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Alginate is a biomaterial that has found numerous applications in biomedical science and engineering due to its favorable properties, including biocompatibility and ease of gelation. Alginate hydrogels have been particularly attractive in wound healing, drug delivery, and tissue engineering applications to date, as these gels retain structural similarity to the extracellular matrices in tissues and can be manipulated to play several critical roles. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of general properties of alginate and its hydrogels, their biomedical applications, and suggest new perspectives for future studies with these polymers. PMID:22125349

  4. Zinc cross-linked hydroxamated alginates for pulsed drug release

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Neha S; Deshmukh, Prasad R; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Alginates can be tailored chemically to improve solubility, physicochemical, and biological properties and its complexation with metal ion is useful for controlling the drug release. Materials And Methods: Synthesized N,O-dimethyl, N-methyl, or N-Benzyl hydroxylamine derivatives of sodium alginate were subsequently complexed with zinc to form beads. Hydroxamation of sodium alginate was confirmed by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results: The synthesized polymeric material exhibited reduced aqueous, HCl and NaOH solubility. The hydroxamated derivatives demonstrated pulsed release where change in pH of the dissolution medium stimulated the atenolol release. Conclusion: Atenolol loaded Zn cross-linked polymeric beads demonstrated the sustained the plasma drug levels with increased half-life. Although the synthesized derivatives greatly altered the aqueous solubility of sodium alginate, no significant differences in in vitro and in vivo atenolol release behavior amongst the N,O-dimethyl, N-methyl, or N-Benzyl hydroxylamine derivatives of sodium alginate were observed. PMID:24350039

  5. Alginate Polymerization and Modification Are Linked in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Fata Moradali, M.; Donati, Ivan; Sims, Ian M.; Ghods, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular mechanisms of alginate polymerization/modification/secretion by a proposed envelope-spanning multiprotein complex are unknown. Here, bacterial two-hybrid assays and pulldown experiments showed that the catalytic subunit Alg8 directly interacts with the proposed copolymerase Alg44 while embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane. Alg44 additionally interacts with the lipoprotein AlgK bridging the periplasmic space. Site-specific mutagenesis of Alg44 showed that protein-protein interactions and stability were independent of conserved amino acid residues R17 and R21, which are involved in c-di-GMP binding, the N-terminal PilZ domain, and the C-terminal 26 amino acids. Site-specific mutagenesis was employed to investigate the c-di-GMP-mediated activation of alginate polymerization by the PilZAlg44 domain and Alg8. Activation was found to be different from the proposed activation mechanism for cellulose synthesis. The interactive role of Alg8, Alg44, AlgG (epimerase), and AlgX (acetyltransferase) on alginate polymerization and modification was studied by using site-specific deletion mutants, inactive variants, and overproduction of subunits. The compositions, molecular masses, and material properties of resulting novel alginates were analyzed. The molecular mass was reduced by epimerization, while it was increased by acetylation. Interestingly, when overproduced, Alg44, AlgG, and the nonepimerizing variant AlgG(D324A) increased the degree of acetylation, while epimerization was enhanced by AlgX and its nonacetylating variant AlgX(S269A). Biofilm architecture analysis showed that acetyl groups promoted cell aggregation while nonacetylated polymannuronate alginate promoted stigmergy. Overall, this study sheds new light on the arrangement of the multiprotein complex involved in alginate production. Furthermore, the activation mechanism and the interplay between polymerization and modification of alginate were elucidated. PMID:25968647

  6. Statistical analysis of barefoot impressions.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Robert B; Pressman, Irwin S; Chen, Sanping; Petersen, Peter H; Pressman, Ari E

    2003-01-01

    Comparison of the shapes of barefoot impressions from an individual with footprints or shoes linked to a crime may be useful as a means of including or excluding that individual as possibly being at the scene of a crime. The question of the distinguishability of a person's barefoot print arises frequently. This study indicates that measurements taken from the outlines of inked footprint impressions show a great degree of variability between donors and a great degree of similarity for multiple impressions taken from the same donor. The normality of the set of measurements on footprint outlines that we have selected for this study is confirmed. A statistical justification for the use of the product rule on individual statistical precisions is developed. PMID:12570199

  7. Oxidized alginate hydrogels as niche environments for corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Bernice; De Bank, Paul A; Luetchford, Kim A; Acosta, Fernando R; Connon, Che J

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and biochemical modification of hydrogels is one strategy to create physiological constructs that maintain cell function. The aim of this study was to apply oxidised alginate hydrogels as a basis for development of a biomimetic niche for limbal epithelial stem cells that may be applied to treating corneal dysfunction. The stem phenotype of bovine limbal epithelial cells (LEC) and the viability of corneal epithelial cells (CEC) were examined in oxidised alginate gels containing collagen IV over a 3-day culture period. Oxidation increased cell viability (P ≤ 0.05) and this improved further with addition of collagen IV (P ≤ 0.01). Oxidised gels presented larger internal pores (diameter: 0.2–0.8 µm) than unmodified gels (pore diameter: 0.05–0.1 µm) and were significantly less stiff (P ≤ 0.001), indicating that an increase in pore size and a decrease in stiffness contributed to improved cell viability. The diffusion of collagen IV from oxidised alginate gels was similar to that of unmodified gels suggesting that oxidation may not affect the retention of extracellular matrix proteins in alginate gels. These data demonstrate that oxidised alginate gels containing corneal extracellular matrix proteins can influence corneal epithelial cell function in a manner that may impact beneficially on corneal wound healing therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published byWiley Periodicals, Inc. Part A: 102A: 3393–3400, 2014. PMID:24142706

  8. Alginate-polymethacrylate hybrid hydrogels with double ionic and covalent network for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schizzi, I.; Utzeri, R.; Castellano, M.; Stagnaro, P.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogels based on alginates are very promising candidates to realize scaffolds for tissue engineering. Indeed, alginate hydrogels are able to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) thus promoting in vitro and/or in vivo cell growth; moreover, their capability of giving rise to highly porous structures can specifically favor the osteochondral tissue regeneration. However, mechanical properties of polymeric hydrogels are often inadequate to endow the final constructs with the required characteristics of elasticity and toughness. Here alginate/polymethacrylate hybrid hydrogels, with a suitable porous structure and characterized by a double network, ionic (from alginate) and covalent (from polymethacrylate) were designed and realized. The mechanical performance of these hybrid materials resulted, as expected, improved due to the double interconnected network, where the alginate portion provides the appropriate micro-environment mimicking the ECM, whereas the polymethacrylate portion acts as a reinforce.

  9. A doxorubicin delivery system: Samarium/mesoporous bioactive glass/alginate composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xiang; Su, Yanli; Chen, Dongya; Zhong, Wenxing

    2016-10-01

    Samarium (Sm) incorporated mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBG) microspheres have been prepared using the method of alginate cross-linking with Ca(2+) ions. The in vitro bioactivities of Sm/MBG/alginate microspheres were studied by immersing in simulated body fluid (SBF) for various periods. The results indicated that the Sm/MBG/alginate microspheres have a faster apatite formation rate on the surface. To investigate their delivery properties further, doxorubicin (DOX) was selected as a model drug. The results showed that the Sm/MBG/alginate microspheres exhibit sustained DOX delivery, and their release mechanism is controlled by Fickian diffusion according the Higuchi model. In addition, the delivery of DOX from Sm/MBG/alginate microspheres can be dominated by changing the doping concentration of Sm and the values of pH microenvironment. These all revealed that this material is a promising candidate for the therapy of bone cancer. PMID:27287115

  10. Cultivable alginate lyase-excreting bacteria associated with the Arctic brown alga Laminaria.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sheng; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Shi, Mei; Song, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    Although some alginate lyases have been isolated from marine bacteria, alginate lyases-excreting bacteria from the Arctic alga have not yet been investigated. Here, the diversity of the bacteria associated with the brown alga Laminaria from the Arctic Ocean was investigated for the first time. Sixty five strains belonging to nine genera were recovered from six Laminaria samples, in which Psychrobacter (33/65), Psychromonas (10/65) and Polaribacter (8/65) were the predominant groups. Moreover, 21 alginate lyase-excreting strains were further screened from these Laminaria-associated bacteria. These alginate lyase-excreting strains belong to five genera. Psychromonas (8/21), Psedoalteromonas (6/21) and Polaribacter (4/21) are the predominant genera, and Psychrobacter, Winogradskyella, Psychromonas and Polaribacter were first found to produce alginate lyases. The optimal temperatures for the growth and algiante lyase production of many strains were as low as 10–20 °C, indicating that they are psychrophilic bacteria. The alginate lyases produced by 11 strains showed the highest activity at 20–30 °C, indicating that these enzymes are cold-adapted enzymes. Some strians showed high levels of extracellular alginate lyase activity around 200 U/mL. These results suggest that these algiante lyase-excreting bacteria from the Arctic alga are good materials for studying bacterial cold-adapted alginate lyases. PMID:23203272

  11. Four alginate dressings in the treatment of partial thickness wounds: a comparative experimental study.

    PubMed

    Agren, M S

    1996-03-01

    Alginate-based absorption materials for wound treatment are meeting with increasing clinical acceptance. The purpose of this study was to compare four different calcium alginate dressings (Algosteril, Comfeel Alginate, Kaltostat and Sorbsan) with respect to wound fluid retaining ability, adherence, dressing residues, epithelialisation and inflammatory cell infiltration using a standardised partial-thickness wound model in domestic pigs. Wound fluid spread laterally onto surrounding normal skin by about 40% more with Sorbsan than with the other alginate dressings after 24 h of treatment (P = 0.026). The corresponding figure after 66 h of treatment was 20% (P = 0.030). Algosteril (mean 1.7 [sem 0.3]) adhered significantly (P = 0.014) more to the wounds than Comfeel Alginate (mean 0.2 [0.2]). Kaltostat (mean 1.8 [0.3]) left significantly (P = 0.038) more dressing residues on the wound surface at dressing removal than the Comfeel Alginate dressing (mean 0.8 [0.2]). In the effect on epithelialisation or dermal inflammation there was no statistically significant difference at significance level 5% among the four alginate dressings, as assessed by light microscopy. In summary, the four alginate dressings showed significant differences in important handling characteristics and did not differ significantly in their effect on epithelialisation. PMID:8733355

  12. Coatless alginate pellets as sustained-release drug carrier for inflammatory bowel disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Md Ramli, Siti Hajar; Wong, Tin Wui; Naharudin, Idanawati; Bose, Anirbandeep

    2016-11-01

    Conventional alginate pellets underwent rapid drug dissolution and failed to exert colon targeting unless subjected to complex coating. This study designed coatless delayed-release oral colon-specific alginate pellets for ulcerative colitis treatment. Alginate pellets, formulated with water-insoluble ethylcellulose and various calcium salts, were prepared using solvent-free melt pelletization technique which prevented reaction between processing materials during agglomeration and allowed reaction to initiate only in dissolution. Combination of acid-soluble calcium carbonate and highly water-soluble calcium acetate did not impart colon-specific characteristics to pellets due to pore formation in fragmented matrices. Combination of moderately water-soluble calcium phosphate and calcium acetate delayed drug release due to rapid alginate crosslinking by soluble calcium from acetate salt followed by sustaining alginate crosslinking by calcium phosphate. The use of 1:3 ethylcellulose-to-alginate enhanced the sustained drug release attribute. The ethylcellulose was able to maintain the pellet integrity without calcium acetate. Using hydrophobic prednisolone as therapeutic, hydrophilic alginate pellets formulated with hydrophobic ethylcellulose and moderately polar calcium phosphate exhibited colon-specific in vitro drug release and in vivo anti-inflammatory action. Coatless oral colon-specific alginate pellets can be designed through optimal formulation with melt pelletization as the processing technology. PMID:27516284

  13. Social Relevance Enhances Memory for Impressions in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Brittany S.; Gutchess, Angela H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that older adults have difficulty retrieving contextual material over items alone. Recent research suggests this deficit can be reduced by adding emotional context, allowing for the possibility that memory for social impressions may show less age-related decline than memory for other types of contextual information. Two studies investigated how orienting to social or self-relevant aspects of information contributed to the learning and retrieval of impressions in young and older adults. Participants encoded impressions of others in conditions varying in the use of self-reference (Experiment 1) and interpersonal meaningfulness (Experiment 2), and completed memory tasks requiring the retrieval of specific traits. For both experiments, age groups remembered similar numbers of impressions. In Experiment 1, using more self-relevant encoding contexts increased memory for impressions over orienting to stimuli in a non-social way, regardless of age. In Experiment 2, older adults had enhanced memory for impressions presented in an interpersonally meaningful relative to a personally irrelevant way, whereas young adults were unaffected by this manipulation. The results provide evidence that increasing social relevance ameliorates age differences in memory for impressions, and enhances older adults’ ability to successfully retrieve contextual information. PMID:22364168

  14. [Complications Resulting from Taking Ear Impressions].

    PubMed

    Sugiuchi, Tomoko; Kodera, Kazuoki; Zusho, Hiroyuki; Asano, Yoshikazu; Kanesada, Keiko; Hayashida, Mitsuhiro; Kanaya, Koichiro; Tokumaru, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    In 2012, we carried out a study in a large sample to understand the secondary injuries caused during the taking ear impressions for hearing aids. This study is a follow-up of previous research conducted in 1986 (285 medical institutions) and 1999 (98 medical institutions). We posted a questionnaire survey to the otolaryngology departments of 3,257 medical institutions. The response rate to the questionnaire was 62.9% (2,050 of the 3,257 institutions), and the results indicated that 301 of the 2050 institutions (14.7%) had experience with secondary injuries, with a total of 460 cases reported. In 342 of the 460 cases (74.3%), the secondary injuries occurred at hearing-aid dealerships, followed by 67 cases (14.6%) at affiliated medical institutions, and 51 cases (11.1%) in other locations, including other medical institutions, rehabilitation counseling centers, and educational institutions. The most common type of secondary injury (298 cases, 64.8%) was caused by the presence of foreign bodies in the ear, which in turn was a result of complications occurring during the removal of residual ear impression material. Of these 298 cases, 32 required excision of the foreign bodies and surgical intervention under general anesthesia. The remaining 10 cases exhibited isolated tympanic membrane perforation without foreign body-related complications. Furthermore, 146 cases (31.7%) developed bleeding and otitis externa following removal of the ear impression, and there were reports of cases with bleeding that required long-term outpatient care and treatment. Therefore, since retention of a foreign body in the ear and tympanic membrane perforation can occur even in patients without a history of surgery or prior otologic history, adjustment of hearing aids requires prior otorhinolaryngological examination. Furthermore, because of the risk of secondary injury when taking ear impressions, this procedure must be performed with caution under the guidance of an otolaryngologist. PMID

  15. Structural Characterization of Sodium Alginate and Calcium Alginate.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Hadas; Srebnik, Simcha

    2016-06-13

    Alginate readily aggregates and forms a physical gel in the presence of cations. The association of the chains, and ultimately gel structure and mechanics, depends not only on ion type, but also on the sequence and composition of the alginate chain that ultimately determines its stiffness. Chain flexibility is generally believed to decrease with guluronic residue content, but it is also known that both polymannuronate and polyguluronate blocks are stiffer than heteropolymeric blocks. In this work, we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulation to primarily explore the association and aggregate structure of different alginate chains under various Ca(2+) concentrations and for different alginate chain composition. We show that Ca(2+) ions in general facilitate chain aggregation and gelation. However, aggregation is predominantly affected by alginate monomer composition, which is found to correlate with chain stiffness under certain solution conditions. In general, greater fractions of mannuronic monomers are found to increase chain flexibility of heteropolymer chains. Furthermore, differences in chain guluronic acid content are shown to lead to different interchain association mechanisms, such as lateral association, zipper mechanism, and entanglement, where the mannuronic residues are shown to operate as an elasticity moderator and therefore promote chain association. PMID:27177209

  16. Alginate Encapsulation Parameters Influence the Differentiation of Microencapsulated Embryonic Stem Cell Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jenna L.; Najia, Mohamad Ali; Saeed, Rabbia; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have tremendous potential as tools for regenerative medicine and drug discovery, yet the lack of processes to manufacture viable and homogenous cell populations of sufficient numbers limits the clinical translation of current and future cell therapies. Microencapsulation of ESCs within microbeads can shield cells from hydrodynamic shear forces found in bioreactor environments while allowing for sufficient diffusion of nutrients and oxygen through the encapsulation material. Despite initial studies examining alginate microbeads as a platform for stem cell expansion and directed differentiation, the impact of alginate encapsulation parameters on stem cell phenotype has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to systematically examine the effects of varying alginate compositions on microencapsulated ESC expansion and phenotype. Pre-formed aggregates of murine ESCs were encapsulated in alginate microbeads composed of a high or low ratio of guluronic to mannuronic acid residues (High G and High M, respectively), with and without a poly-l-lysine (PLL) coating, thereby providing four distinct alginate bead compositions for analysis. Encapsulation in all alginate compositions was found to delay differentiation, with encapsulation within High G alginate yielding the least differentiated cell population. The addition of a PLL coating to the High G alginate prevented cell escape from beads for up to 14 days. Furthermore, encapsulation within High M alginate promoted differentiation toward a primitive endoderm phenotype. Taken together, the findings of this study suggest that distinct ESC expansion capacities and differentiation trajectories emerge depending on the alginate composition employed, indicating that encapsulation material physical properties can be used to control stem cell fate. PMID:24166004

  17. Evaluation of surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability and gypsum compatibility of monophase polyvinyl-siloxane and polyether elastomeric impression materials under dry and moist conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Atluri, Kaleswararao; Putcha, Madhu Sudhan; Kondreddi, Sirisha; Kumar, N. Suman; Tadi, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study was designed to compare polyvinyl-siloxane (PVS) monophase and polyether (PE) monophase materials under dry and moist conditions for properties such as surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability, and gypsum compatibility. Materials and Methods: Surface detail reproduction was evaluated using two criteria. Dimensional stability was evaluated according to American Dental Association (ADA) specification no. 19. Gypsum compatibility was assessed by two criteria. All the samples were evaluated, and the data obtained were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Pearson's Chi-square tests. Results: When surface detail reproduction was evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19, both the groups under the two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. When evaluated macroscopically both the groups showed statistically significant difference. Results for dimensional stability showed that the deviation from standard was significant among the two groups, where Aquasil group showed significantly more deviation compared to Impregum group (P < 0.001). Two conditions also showed significant difference, with moist conditions showing significantly more deviation compared to dry condition (P < 0.001). The results of gypsum compatibility when evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19 and by giving grades to the casts for both the groups and under two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. Conclusion: Regarding dimensional stability, both impregum and aquasil performed better in dry condition than in moist; impregum performed better than aquasil in both the conditions. When tested for surface detail reproduction according to ADA specification, under dry and moist conditions both of them performed almost equally. When tested according to macroscopic evaluation, impregum and aquasil performed significantly better in dry condition compared to moist condition. In dry

  18. 21 CFR 582.7187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 582.7187 Section 582.7187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium alginate. (a) Product. Calcium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  19. 21 CFR 582.7610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 582.7610 Section 582.7610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium alginate. (a) Product. Potassium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 582.7610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 582.7610 Section 582.7610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium alginate. (a) Product. Potassium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 582.7610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 582.7610 Section 582.7610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium alginate. (a) Product. Potassium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 21 CFR 582.7610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 582.7610 Section 582.7610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium alginate. (a) Product. Potassium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  3. 21 CFR 582.7610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 582.7610 Section 582.7610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium alginate. (a) Product. Potassium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1011 - Alginic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Alginic acid. 184.1011 Section 184.1011 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1011 Alginic acid. (a) Alginic acid is a colloidal,...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1011 - Alginic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alginic acid. 184.1011 Section 184.1011 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1011 Alginic acid. (a) Alginic acid is a colloidal, hydrophilic polysaccharide obtained from...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1011 - Alginic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alginic acid. 184.1011 Section 184.1011 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1011 Alginic acid. (a) Alginic acid is a colloidal,...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1011 - Alginic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alginic acid. 184.1011 Section 184.1011 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1011 Alginic acid. (a) Alginic acid is a colloidal,...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1011 - Alginic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alginic acid. 184.1011 Section 184.1011 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1011 Alginic acid. (a) Alginic acid is a colloidal,...

  9. 21 CFR 582.7724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 582.7724 Section 582.7724 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7724 Sodium alginate. (a) Product. Sodium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  10. 21 CFR 582.7724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 582.7724 Section 582.7724 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7724 Sodium alginate. (a) Product. Sodium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  11. 21 CFR 582.7724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 582.7724 Section 582.7724 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7724 Sodium alginate. (a) Product. Sodium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  12. 21 CFR 582.7724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 582.7724 Section 582.7724 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7724 Sodium alginate. (a) Product. Sodium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  13. 21 CFR 582.7724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 582.7724 Section 582.7724 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7724 Sodium alginate. (a) Product. Sodium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  14. Reliability of the impression replica technique.

    PubMed

    Falk, Anders; Vult von Steyern, Per; Fransson, Håkan; Thorén, Margareta Molin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the impression replica technique with a four-unit zirconia fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Marginal and internal fit were measured by repeatedly placing the FDP on an epoxy cast using light-body silicone material corresponding to cement. All measured marginal and internal fit points showed varying values. The greatest variations were seen at the most distal margin (33 μm) and at the distal abutment of the FDP (77 μm). The results showed that the technique gives moderate variations and is a useful method to evaluate marginal and internal fit. PMID:25822305

  15. Ionically cross-linked alginate hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Catherine Kyleen

    incorporated into the system induce enzymatically controlled alginate degradation. This alginate hydrogel system is novel in that cells are directly and uniformly incorporated into a hydrogel with controlled gelation rate and material properties. The injectable alginate hydrogels can be molded into complex shapes or injected into the body to avoid invasive surgery. Further, the ability to tailor their gelation rate, material properties and degradation enable these alginate hydrogels to be used for a variety of biomedical applications including drug or biofactor delivery.

  16. Eyeblinks in formation of impressions.

    PubMed

    Omori, Y; Miyata, Y

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of frequency of one's eyeblinks on creating a personal impression. The subjects, 102 males and 127 females, ages 15 to 60 years, rated on a 7-point semantic differential scale a rarely blinking person or a frequently blinking person described on a question-sheet. A factor analysis of the ratings yielded three factors, interpreted as Nervousness, Unfriendliness, and Lack of intelligence. The frequently blinking person was rated as more nervous and less intelligent than the rarely blinking person. Present results provided evidence that frequency of eyeblinks may play an important role on the formation of impressions. Further implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:8902035

  17. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue. PMID:27600217

  18. Intraoral Digital Impression Technique: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ting-Shu, Su; Jian, Sun

    2015-06-01

    With the techniques of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) being applied in the field of prosthodontics, a concept of intraoral digital impressions was put forward in the early 1980s. It has drawn comprehensive attention from dentists and has been used for dental prosthesis fabrication in a number of cases. This new digital impression technique is expected to bring about absolute digitization to the mode of prosthodontics. A few published articles have indicated that dental prostheses fabricated from intraoral digital impressions have exhibited remarkable advantages over those from conventional impressions in several respects. The present review discusses intraoral digital impression techniques in terms of the following aspects: (1) categories and principles of intraoral digital impression devices currently available; (2) operating characteristics of the devices; and (3) comparison of the manipulation, accuracy, and repeatability between intraoral digital impression and conventional impression. PMID:25220390

  19. A Technique to Transfer the Emergence Profile Contours of a Provisional Implant Crown to the Definitive Impression.

    PubMed

    Shah, Karnik; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-01-01

    This clinical report describes a method to create a proper emergence profile and accurately transfer it to the definitive impression, using an indirectly fabricated modified impression post. A provisional screwretained crown was indexed with a polyvinyl siloxane material. An autopolymerizing acrylic resin was used to modify an impression post on the polyvinyl siloxane index, which was then screwed onto the implant for the definitive impression after proper soft tissue healing. The indirectly fabricated modified impression post helped to transfer the contours to the definitive impression with minimal soft tissue irritation. PMID:27004296

  20. Performance evaluation of bipolar and tripolar excitations during nozzle-jetting-based alginate microsphere fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herran, C. Leigh; Huang, Yong; Chai, Wenxuan

    2012-08-01

    Microspheres, small spherical (polymeric) particles with or without second phase materials embedded or encapsulated, are important for many biomedical applications such as drug delivery and organ printing. Scale-up fabrication with the ability to precisely control the microsphere size and morphology has always been of great manufacturing interest. The objective of this work is to experimentally study the performance differences of bipolar and tripolar excitation waveforms in using drop-on-demand (DOD)-based single nozzle jetting for alginate microsphere fabrication. The fabrication performance has been evaluated based on the formability of alginate microspheres as a function of materials properties (sodium alginate and calcium chloride concentrations) and operating conditions. The operating conditions for each excitation include voltage rise/fall times, dwell times and excitation voltage amplitudes. Overall, the bipolar excitation is more robust in making spherical, monodispersed alginate microspheres as good microspheres for its wide working range of material properties and operating conditions, especially during the fabrication of highly viscous materials such as the 2% sodium alginate solution. For both bipolar and tripolar excitations, the sodium alginate concentration and the voltage dwell times should be carefully selected to achieve good microsphere formability.

  1. Influence of hydrophobic modification in alginate-based hydrogels for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Soumitra

    Alginate has been exploited commercially for decades in foods, textiles, paper, pharmaceutical industries, and also as a detoxifier for removing heavy metals. Alginate is also popular in cell encapsulation because of its relatively mild gelation protocol and simple chemistry with which biological active entities can be immobilized. Surface modification of alginate gels has been explored to induce desired cell interactions with the gel matrix. These modifications alter the bulk properties, which strongly determine on how cells feel and response to the three-dimensional microenvironment. However, there is a need to develop strategies to engineer functionalities into bulk alginate hydrogels that not only preserve their inherent qualities but are also less toxic. In this thesis, our main focus was to optimize the mechanical properties of alginate-based hydrogels, and by doing so control the performance of the biomaterials. In the first scheme, we used alginate and hydrophobically modified ethyl hydroxy ethyl cellulose as components in interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) gels. The second network was used to control gelation time and rheological properties. We believe these experiments also may provide insight into the mechanical and structural properties of more complex biopolymer gels and naturally-occurring IPNs. Next, we worked on incorporating a hydrophobic moiety directly into the alginate chain, resulting in materials for extended release of hydrophobic drugs. We successfully synthesized hydrophobically modified alginate (HMA) by attaching octylamine groups onto the alginate backbone by standard carbodiimide based amide coupling reaction. Solubility of several model hydrophobic drugs in dilute HMA solutions was found to be increased by more than an order of magnitude. HMA hydrogels, prepared by crosslinking the alginate chains with calcium ions, were found to exhibit excellent mechanical properties (modulus ˜100 kPa) with release extended upto 5 days. Ability

  2. Imaging Contrast Effects in Alginate Microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapley, Nina; Hester-Reilly, Holly

    2007-03-01

    We have investigated the use of alginate gel microbeads as contrast agents for the study of suspension flows in complex geometries using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. These deformable particles can provide imaging contrast to rigid polymer particles in a bimodal suspension (two particle sizes). Microbeads were formed of crosslinked alginate gel, with or without trapped oil droplets. Crosslinking of the aqueous sodium alginate solution or the continuous phase of an oil-in-water emulsion occurred rapidly at gentle processing conditions. The alginate microbeads exhibit both spin-spin relaxation time (T2) contrast and diffusion contrast relative to both the suspending fluid and rigid polystyrene particles. Large alginate emulsion microbeads flowing in the abrupt, axisymmetric expansion geometry can be clearly distinguished from the suspending fluid and from rigid polymer particles in both spin-echo and diffusion weighted imaging. The alginate microbeads, particularly those containing trapped emulsion droplets, offer potential as a positive contrast agent in multiple NMR imaging applications.

  3. [Alginates in therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Avdeev, V G

    2015-01-01

    This article presents evidence of the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and highlights its main treatment options. Among its medications, particular emphasis is laid on alginates and their main mechanisms of action are described. There is information on the efficacy of alginates, including the alginate-antacid Gaviscon Double Action, in treating GERD. Recommendations for how to administer these drugs are given. PMID:26155630

  4. Physicochemical characterization and biocompatibility of alginate-polycation microcapsules designed for islet transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Susan Kimberly

    Microencapsulation represents a method for immunoprotecting transplanted therapeutic cells or tissues from graft rejection using a physical barrier. This approach is advantageous in that it eliminates the need to induce long-term immunosuppression and allows the option of transplanting non-cadaveric cell sources, such as animal cells and stem cell-derived tissues. The microcapsules that we have investigated are designed to immunoprotect islets of Langerhans (i.e. clusters of insulin-secreting cells), with the goal of treating insulin-dependent diabetes. With the aid of techniques for physicochemical analysis, this research focused on understanding which properties of the microcapsule are the most important for determining its biocompatibility. The objective of this work was to elucidate correlations between the chemical make-up, physicochemical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility of alginate-based microcapsules. Our approach was based on the hypothesis that the immune response to the microcapsules is governed by, and can therefore be controlled by, specific physicochemical properties of the microcapsule and its material components. The experimental work was divided into five phases, each associated with a specific aim : (1) To prove that immunoglobulins adsorb to the surface of alginate-polycation microcapsules, and to correlate this adsorption with the microcapsule chemistry. (2) To test interlaboratory reproducibility in making biocompatible microcapsules, and evaluate the suitability of our materials and fabrication protocols for subsequent studies. (3) To determine which physicochemical properties of alginates affect the in vivo biocompatibility of their gels. (4) To determine which physiochemical properties of alginate-polycation microcapsules are most important for determining their in vivo biocompatibility (5) To determine whether a modestly immunogenic membrane hinders or helps the ability of the microcapsule to immunoprotect islet xenografts in

  5. Alginate cryogel based glucose biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatoni, Amin; Windy Dwiasi, Dian; Hermawan, Dadan

    2016-02-01

    Cryogel is macroporous structure provides a large surface area for biomolecule immobilization. In this work, an alginate cryogel based biosensor was developed to detect glucose. The cryogel was prepared using alginate cross-linked by calcium chloride under sub-zero temperature. This porous structure was growth in a 100 μL micropipette tip with a glucose oxidase enzyme entrapped inside the cryogel. The glucose detection was based on the colour change of redox indicator, potassium permanganate, by the hydrogen peroxide resulted from the conversion of glucose. The result showed a porous structure of alginate cryogel with pores diameter of 20-50 μm. The developed glucose biosensor was showed a linear response in the glucose detection from 1.0 to 5.0 mM with a regression of y = 0.01x+0.02 and R2 of 0.994. Furthermore, the glucose biosensor was showed a high operational stability up to 10 times of uninterrupted glucose detections.

  6. Granular gel support-enabled extrusion of three-dimensional alginate and cellular structures.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yifei; Compaan, Ashley; Bhattacharjee, Tapomoy; Huang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Freeform fabrication of soft structures has been of great interest in recent years. In particular, it is viewed as a critical step toward the grand vision of organ printing--the on-demand design and fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) human organ constructs for implantation and regenerative medicine. The objective of this study is to develop a novel granular gel support material-enabled, two-step gelation-based 'printing-then-gelation' approach to fabricate 3D alginate structures using filament extrusion. Specifically, a granular Carbopol microgel bath holds the ungelled alginate structure being extruded, avoiding the instantaneous gelation of each printed layer as well as resultant surface tension-induced nozzle clogging. Since Carbopol microgels react with multivalent cations, which are needed for alginate crosslinking, gelatin is introduced as a sacrificial material to make an alginate and gelatin bioink for extrusion, which gels thermally (step-one gelation) to initially stabilize the printed structure for removal from Carbopol. Then gelatin is melted and diffused away while alginate is ionically crosslinked in a 37 °C calcium chloride bath (step-two gelation), resulting in an alginate structure. The proposed 'printing-then-gelation' approach works for alginate structure fabrication, and it is also applicable for the printing of cellular constructs and other similar homogeneous soft structures using a two-step or even multi-step approach. The main conclusions are: (1) 0.8% (w/v) Carbopol bath with a neutral pH value may be most suitable for soft structure printing; (2) it is most effective to use a 0.9% (w/v) NaCl solution to facilitate the removal of residual Carbopol; and (3) alginate structures fabricated using the proposed approach demonstrate better mechanical properties than those fabricated using the conventional 'gelation-while-printing' approach. PMID:27257095

  7. Evaluation of oral scanning in comparison to impression using three-dimensional registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogle-Kim, Yur-Chung; Deyhle, Hans; Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Bormann, Therese; Beckmann, Felix; Jäger, Kurt

    2012-10-01

    Crown and bridge restorations are one of the main treatment methods in fixed prosthodontics. The fabrication requires data on the patient's denture shape. This information is generally obtained as a hard copy from an impression mold. Alternatively, one can acquire the data electronically using oral optical three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques, which determine the surface of the denture. The aim of the study was to quantitatively compare the accuracy of three dimensional scanning with that of conventional impressions and give a statement how far the scanner provides a clinical alternative with equal or better precision. Data from 10 teeth were acquired in the dental office with a polyether impression material and an oral scanner. Data from the impressions were digitalized by means of micro computed tomography. The data were then 3D registered to identify the potential differences between impression and optical scan. We could demonstrate that the oral scanner's data and the conventional impressions are comparable.

  8. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Ravikiran, P; Nirupama, N

    2015-01-01

    Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis. PMID:26265651

  9. Swelling/deswelling mechanism of calcium alginate gel in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, S; Araki, Y; Kon, R; Katsura, H; Taira, M

    2000-12-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of dimensional changes in alginate impression in solutions, the relationship between the ion concentrations in three types of solutions (nonelectrolyte and monovalent and divalent metallic salts) and change in gel volume was examined. The gel in the monovalent metallic salt solution expanded and a decrease in monovalent cation and an increase in Ca2+ were observed. This suggests that the crosslinking density of the gel reduced due to dissociation of Ca2+ from the calcium alginate gel. In divalent metallic salt solutions, the shrinkage occurred according to crosslinking of unreacted residue. In the nonelectrolytic solution, gel, neither ethylene glycol nor acetonitrile showed any volume changes, while that in glutaraldehyde contracted. It is speculated that the former two solutions were affected by the fact that the gel has no semipermeability, and that the latter result was due to chemical interaction between the gel and solution. PMID:11816370

  10. Characterization of alginate lyase activity on liquid, gelled, and complexed states of alginate.

    PubMed

    Breguet, Véronique; von Stockar, Urs; Marison, Ian W

    2007-01-01

    A study of alginate lyase was carried out to determine if this enzyme could be used to remove alginate present in the core of alginate/poly-L-lysine (AG/PLL) microcapsules in order to maximize cell growth and colonization. A complete kinetic study was undertaken, which indicated an optimal activity of the enzyme at pH 7-8, 50 degrees C, in the presence of Ca2+. The buffer, not the ionic strength, influenced the alginate degradation rate. Alginate lyase was also shown to be active on gelled forms of alginate, as well as on the AG/PLL complex constituting the membrane of microcapsules. Batch cultures of CHO cells in the presence of alginate showed a decrease of the growth rate by a factor of 2, although the main metabolic flux rates were not modified. The addition of alginate lyase to cell culture medium increased the doubling time 5-7-fold and decreased the protein production rate, although cell viability was not affected. The addition of enzyme to medium containing alginate did not improve growth conditions. This suggests that alginate lyase is probably not suitable for hydrolysis of microcapsules in the presence of cells, in order to achieve high cell density and high productivity. However, the high activity may be useful for releasing cells from alginate beads or AG/PLL microcapsules. PMID:17691813

  11. Alginate Biosynthesis Factories in Pseudomonas fluorescens: Localization and Correlation with Alginate Production Level.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Susan; Almaas, Eivind; Zotchev, Sergey; Valla, Svein; Ertesvåg, Helga

    2016-02-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is able to produce the medically and industrially important exopolysaccharide alginate. The proteins involved in alginate biosynthesis and secretion form a multiprotein complex spanning the inner and outer membranes. In the present study, we developed a method by which the porin AlgE was detected by immunogold labeling and transmission electron microscopy. Localization of the AlgE protein was found to depend on the presence of other proteins in the multiprotein complex. No correlation was found between the number of alginate factories and the alginate production level, nor were the numbers of these factories affected in an algC mutant that is unable to produce the precursor needed for alginate biosynthesis. Precursor availability and growth phase thus seem to be the main determinants for the alginate production rate in our strain. Clustering analysis demonstrated that the alginate multiprotein complexes were not distributed randomly over the entire outer cell membrane surface. PMID:26655760

  12. Alginate Biosynthesis Factories in Pseudomonas fluorescens: Localization and Correlation with Alginate Production Level

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Susan; Almaas, Eivind; Zotchev, Sergey; Valla, Svein

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is able to produce the medically and industrially important exopolysaccharide alginate. The proteins involved in alginate biosynthesis and secretion form a multiprotein complex spanning the inner and outer membranes. In the present study, we developed a method by which the porin AlgE was detected by immunogold labeling and transmission electron microscopy. Localization of the AlgE protein was found to depend on the presence of other proteins in the multiprotein complex. No correlation was found between the number of alginate factories and the alginate production level, nor were the numbers of these factories affected in an algC mutant that is unable to produce the precursor needed for alginate biosynthesis. Precursor availability and growth phase thus seem to be the main determinants for the alginate production rate in our strain. Clustering analysis demonstrated that the alginate multiprotein complexes were not distributed randomly over the entire outer cell membrane surface. PMID:26655760

  13. Physicochemical characterization and biocompatibility of alginate-polycation microcapsules designed for islet transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Susan Kimberly

    Microencapsulation represents a method for immunoprotecting transplanted therapeutic cells or tissues from graft rejection using a physical barrier. This approach is advantageous in that it eliminates the need to induce long-term immunosuppression and allows the option of transplanting non-cadaveric cell sources, such as animal cells and stem cell-derived tissues. The microcapsules that we have investigated are designed to immunoprotect islets of Langerhans (i.e. clusters of insulin-secreting cells), with the goal of treating insulin-dependent diabetes. With the aid of techniques for physicochemical analysis, this research focused on understanding which properties of the microcapsule are the most important for determining its biocompatibility. The objective of this work was to elucidate correlations between the chemical make-up, physicochemical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility of alginate-based microcapsules. Our approach was based on the hypothesis that the immune response to the microcapsules is governed by, and can therefore be controlled by, specific physicochemical properties of the microcapsule and its material components. The experimental work was divided into five phases, each associated with a specific aim : (1) To prove that immunoglobulins adsorb to the surface of alginate-polycation microcapsules, and to correlate this adsorption with the microcapsule chemistry. (2) To test interlaboratory reproducibility in making biocompatible microcapsules, and evaluate the suitability of our materials and fabrication protocols for subsequent studies. (3) To determine which physicochemical properties of alginates affect the in vivo biocompatibility of their gels. (4) To determine which physiochemical properties of alginate-polycation microcapsules are most important for determining their in vivo biocompatibility (5) To determine whether a modestly immunogenic membrane hinders or helps the ability of the microcapsule to immunoprotect islet xenografts in

  14. Controlled delivery of VEGF via modulation of alginate microparticle ionic crosslinking

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Steven M.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Clinical application of therapeutic angiogenesis is hampered by a lack of viable systems that demonstrate controlled, sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Alginate has emerged as a popular material for VEGF delivery; however most alginate-based systems offer limited means to control the rate of VEGF release beyond reducing the VEGF:alginate ratio to suboptimal efficiency. This study describes methods to control the release of VEGF from small (<10 μm mean diameter) alginate microparticles via the use of different ionic crosslinkers. Crosslinking with Zn2+ versus Ca2+ reduced VEGF diffusional release and the combination of discrete populations of either Zn2+- or Ca2+-crosslinked particles allowed for control over the sustained release profiles for VEGF. The particle preparations were non-toxic and VEGF was bioactive after release. These results demonstrate that ionic modulation of alginate crosslinking is a viable strategy for controlling release of VEGF while retaining the high protein:polymer ratio that makes alginate an attractive carrier for delivery of protein therapeutics. PMID:19027807

  15. An additive manufacturing-based PCL-alginate-chondrocyte bioprinted scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Joydip; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Regenerative medicine is targeted to improve, restore or replace damaged tissues or organs using a combination of cells, materials and growth factors. Both tissue engineering and developmental biology currently deal with the process of tissue self-assembly and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. In this investigation, additive manufacturing (AM) with a multihead deposition system (MHDS) was used to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) cell-printed scaffolds using layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of polycaprolactone (PCL) and chondrocyte cell-encapsulated alginate hydrogel. Appropriate cell dispensing conditions and optimum alginate concentrations for maintaining cell viability were determined. In vitro cell-based biochemical assays were performed to determine glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), DNA and total collagen contents from different PCL-alginate gel constructs. PCL-alginate gels containing transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) showed higher ECM formation. The 3D cell-printed scaffolds of PCL-alginate gel were implanted in the dorsal subcutaneous spaces of female nude mice. Histochemical [Alcian blue and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining] and immunohistochemical (type II collagen) analyses of the retrieved implants after 4 weeks revealed enhanced cartilage tissue and type II collagen fibril formation in the PCL-alginate gel (+TGFβ) hybrid scaffold. In conclusion, we present an innovative cell-printed scaffold for cartilage regeneration fabricated by an advanced bioprinting technology. PMID:23349081

  16. Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Mineralized Alginate Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Westhrin, Marita; Xie, Minli; Olderøy, Magnus Ø.; Sikorski, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Mineralized biomaterials are promising for use in bone tissue engineering. Culturing osteogenic cells in such materials will potentially generate biological bone grafts that may even further augment bone healing. Here, we studied osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in an alginate hydrogel system where the cells were co-immobilized with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) for gradual mineralization of the microenvironment. MSC were embedded in unmodified alginate beads and alginate beads mineralized with ALP to generate a polymer/hydroxyapatite scaffold mimicking the composition of bone. The initial scaffold mineralization induced further mineralization of the beads with nanosized particles, and scanning electron micrographs demonstrated presence of collagen in the mineralized and unmineralized alginate beads cultured in osteogenic medium. Cells in both types of beads sustained high viability and metabolic activity for the duration of the study (21 days) as evaluated by live/dead staining and alamar blue assay. MSC in beads induced to differentiate in osteogenic direction expressed higher mRNA levels of osteoblast-specific genes (RUNX2, COL1AI, SP7, BGLAP) than MSC in traditional cell cultures. Furthermore, cells differentiated in beads expressed both sclerostin (SOST) and dental matrix protein-1 (DMP1), markers for late osteoblasts/osteocytes. In conclusion, Both ALP-modified and unmodified alginate beads provide an environment that enhance osteogenic differentiation compared with traditional 2D culture. Also, the ALP-modified alginate beads showed profound mineralization and thus have the potential to serve as a bone substitute in tissue engineering. PMID:25769043

  17. Influence of amino acids, buffers, and ph on the γ-irradiation-induced degradation of alginates.

    PubMed

    Ulset, Ann-Sissel T; Mori, Hideki; Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Hara, Masayuki; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2014-12-01

    Alginate-based biomaterials and medical devices are commonly subjected to γ-irradiation as a means of sterilization, either in the dry state or the gel (hydrated) state. In this process the alginate chains degrade randomly in a dose-dependent manner, altering alginates' material properties. The addition of free radical scavenging amino acids such as histidine and phenylalanine protects the alginate significantly against degradation, as shown by monitoring changes in the molecular weight distributions using SEC-MALLS and determining the pseudo first order rate constants of degradation. Tris buffer (0.5 M), but not acetate, citrate, or phosphate buffers had a similar effect on the degradation rate. Changes in pH itself had only marginal effects on the rate of alginate degradation and on the protective effect of amino acids. Contrary to previous reports, the chemical composition (M/G profile) of the alginates, including homopolymeric mannuronan, was unaltered following irradiation up to 10 kGy. PMID:25412478

  18. Mechanically reinforced cell-laden scaffolds formed using alginate-based bioink printed onto the surface of a PCL/alginate mesh structure for regeneration of hard tissue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Bok; Lee, Hyeongjin; Yang, Gi-Hoon; Choi, Chang Hyun; Lee, DaeWeon; Hwang, Heon; Jung, Won-Kyo; Yoon, Hyeon; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Cell-printing technology has provided a new paradigm for biofabrication, with potential to overcome several shortcomings of conventional scaffold-based tissue regeneration strategies via controlled delivery of various cell types in well-defined target regions. Here we describe a cell-printing method to obtain mechanically reinforced multi-layered cell-embedded scaffolds, formed of micron-scale poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)/alginate struts coated with alginate-based bioink. To compare the physical and cellular activities, we used a scaffold composed of pure alginate (without cells) coated PCL/alginate struts as a control. We systematically varied the ratio of alginate cross-linking agent, and determined the optimal cell-coating conditions to form the PCL/alginate struts. Following fabrication of the cell (MG63)-laden PCL/alginate scaffold, the bioactivity was evaluated in vitro. The laden cells exhibited a substantially more developed cytoskeleton compared with those on a control scaffold consisting of the same material composition. Based on these results, the printed cells exhibited a significantly more homogenous distribution within the scaffold compared with the control. Cell proliferation was determined via MTT assays at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days of culture, and the proliferation of the cell-printed scaffold was substantially in excess (∼2.4-fold) of that on the control. Furthermore, the osteogenic activity such as ALP was measured, and the cell-laden scaffold exhibited significantly greater activity (∼3.2-fold) compared with the control scaffold. PMID:26409783

  19. Effect of splinting in accuracy of two implant impression techniques.

    PubMed

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; de Matos Moraes, Fernanda; Castanharo, Sabrina Maria; Del'Acqua, Marcelo Antonialli; de Assis Mollo, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    Because there is no consensus in the literature about the need for a splint between copings, the aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the accuracy of 2 impression techniques for implant-supported prostheses. A master cast was fabricated with four parallel implant abutment analogs and a passive framework. Two groups with 5 casts each were formed: Group 1 (squared impression copings with no splint: S) and Group 2 (splinted squared impression copings, using metal drill burs and Pattern resin: SS). The impression material used was polyvinyl siloxane with open trays for standard preparation of the casts. For each cast, the framework was positioned, and a titanium screw was tightened with 10 N·cm torque in analog A, after which measurements of the abutment-framework interface gaps were performed at analogs C and D. This process was repeated for analog D. These measurements were analyzed using software. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a confidence interval of 95% was used to analyze the data. Significant differences were detected between S and SS in relation to the master cast (P ≤ 0.05). The median values of the abutment-framework interface gaps were as follows: master cast: 39.64 μm; squared impression copings with no splint: 205.86 μm; splinted squared impression copings: 99.19 μm. Under the limitations of this study, the technique presented for Group 2 produces better results compared with the technique used for Group 1. PMID:25506658

  20. Influence of mechanical properties of alginate-based substrates on the performance of Schwann cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Ning, Liqun; Xu, Yitong; Chen, Xiongbiao; Schreyer, David J

    2016-06-01

    In tissue engineering, artificial tissue scaffolds containing living cells have been studied for tissue repair and regeneration. Notably, the performance of these encapsulated-in-scaffolds cells in terms of cell viability, proliferation, and expression of function during and after the scaffold fabrication process, has not been well documented because of the influence of mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of the scaffold substrate materials. This paper presents our study on the influence of mechanical properties of alginate-based substrates on the performance of Schwann cells, which are the major glial cells of peripheral nervous system. Given the fact that alginate polysaccharide hydrogel has poor cell adhesion properties, in this study, we examined several types of cell-adhesion supplements and found that alginate covalently modified with RGD peptide provided improved cell proliferation and adhesion. We prepared alginate-based substrates for cell culture using varying alginate concentrations for altering their mechanical properties, which were confirmed by compression testing. Then, we examined the viability, proliferation, morphology, and expression of the extracellular matrix protein laminin of Schwann cells that were seeded on the surface of alginate-based substrates (or 2D culture) or encapsulated within alginate-based substrates (3D cultures), and correlated the examined cell performance to the alginate concentration (or mechanical properties) of hydrogel substrates. Our findings suggest that covalent attachment of RGD peptide can improve the success of Schwann cell encapsulation within alginate-based scaffolds, and provide guidance for regulating the mechanical properties of alginate-based scaffolds containing Schwann cells for applications in peripheral nervous system regeneration and repair. PMID:27012482

  1. Influence of both cation and alginate nature on the rheological behavior of transition metal alginate gels.

    PubMed

    Agulhon, Pierre; Robitzer, Mike; Habas, Jean-Pierre; Quignard, Françoise

    2014-11-01

    The rheological properties of several ionotropic alginate hydrogels were investigated according to the nature of the divalent cation (Mn(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+)) and the guluronic fraction of the alginate (HG and LG for "high G-content" and "low G-content"). Six hydrogels (Mn-LG, Mn-HG, Co-LG, Co-HG, Cu-LG and Cu-HG) were synthesized and studied by spectromechanical analyses. On one hand, Cu-HG, Cu-LG and Co-HG behaved as viscoelastic solids: the elastic contribution was higher than the dissipative component in all the frequency range studied (G'>G"). No flow zone (G">G') was detected even at very low values of the shearing frequency. On the other, Mn-HG, Mn-LG and Co-LG presented a spectromechanical behavior that resembled that observed classically for entangled polymers. Indeed, at high frequency, these latter materials could be compared to a viscoelastic solid but at low frequency, the flow zone was described and the viscous character became prevalent with finite relaxation time. Very good correlations with the microscopic structurations of the network were evidenced (rubbery vs. flow zone and fibrillar vs. complex morphology respectively). PMID:25129777

  2. A Teacher's Impressions of the Soviet Union.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Anne

    1987-01-01

    Reports the impressions of an 11th-grade world cultures teacher who visited European Russia and Uzbekistan in August, 1985. Ten major impressions are detailed, among them are (1) the poverty, (2) the sloppiness, (3) the pervasive presence of Lenin, and (4) the cultural importance of the Babushka, the Russian word for grandmother. (JDH)

  3. Laser-assisted fabrication of highly viscous alginate microsphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yafu; Huang, Yong

    2011-04-01

    Encapsulated microspheres have been widely used in various biomedical applications. However, fabrication of encapsulated microspheres from highly viscous materials has always been a manufacturing challenge. The objective of this study is to explore a novel metallic foil-assisted laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), a laser-assisted fabrication technique, to make encapsulated microspheres using high sodium alginate concentration solutions. The proposed four-layer approach includes a quartz disk, a sacrificial and adhesive layer, a metallic foil, and a transferred suspension layer. It is found that the proposed four-layer modified LIFT approach provides a promising fabrication technology for making of bead-encapsulated microspheres from highly viscous solutions. During the process, the microsphere only can be formed if the direct-writing height is larger than the critical direct-writing height; otherwise, tail structured droplets are formed; and the encapsulated microsphere diameter linearly increases with the laser fluence and decreases with the sodium alginate concentration.

  4. Comparison of intraoral scanning and conventional impression techniques using 3-dimensional superimposition

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Ye-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study is to evaluate the appropriate impression technique by analyzing the superimposition of 3D digital model for evaluating accuracy of conventional impression technique and digital impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-four patients who had no periodontitis or temporomandibular joint disease were selected for analysis. As a reference model, digital impressions with a digital impression system were performed. As a test models, for conventional impression dual-arch and full-arch, impression techniques utilizing addition type polyvinylsiloxane for fabrication of cast were applied. 3D laser scanner is used for scanning the cast. Each 3 pairs for 25 STL datasets were imported into the inspection software. The three-dimensional differences were illustrated in a color-coded map. For three-dimensional quantitative analysis, 4 specified contact locations(buccal and lingual cusps of second premolar and molar) were established. For twodimensional quantitative analysis, the sectioning from buccal cusp to lingual cusp of second premolar and molar were acquired depending on the tooth axis. RESULTS In color-coded map, the biggest difference between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression was seen (P<.05). In three-dimensional analysis, the biggest difference was seen between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression and the smallest difference was seen between dual-arch and full-arch impression. CONCLUSION The two- and three-dimensional deviations between intraoral scanner and dual-arch impression was bigger than full-arch and dual-arch impression (P<.05). The second premolar showed significantly bigger three-dimensional deviations than the second molar in the three-dimensional deviations (P>.05). PMID:26816576

  5. Alginate-modifying enzymes: biological roles and biotechnological uses

    PubMed Central

    Ertesvåg, Helga

    2015-01-01

    Alginate denotes a group of industrially important 1-4-linked biopolymers composed of the C-5-epimers β-D-mannuronic acid (M) and α-L-guluronic acid (G). The polysaccharide is manufactured from brown algae where it constitutes the main structural cell wall polymer. The physical properties of a given alginate molecule, e.g., gel-strength, water-binding capacity, viscosity and biocompatibility, are determined by polymer length, the relative amount and distribution of G residues and the acetyl content, all of which are controlled by alginate modifying enzymes. Alginate has also been isolated from some bacteria belonging to the genera Pseudomonas and Azotobacter, and bacterially synthesized alginate may be O-acetylated at O-2 and/or O-3. Initially, alginate is synthesized as polymannuronic acid, and some M residues are subsequently epimerized to G residues. In bacteria a mannuronan C-5-epimerase (AlgG) and an alginate acetylase (AlgX) are integral parts of the protein complex necessary for alginate polymerization and export. All alginate-producing bacteria use periplasmic alginate lyases to remove alginate molecules aberrantly released to the periplasm. Alginate lyases are also produced by organisms that utilize alginate as carbon source. Most alginate-producing organisms encode more than one mannuronan C-5 epimerase, each introducing its specific pattern of G residues. Acetylation protects against further epimerization and from most alginate lyases. An enzyme from Pseudomonas syringae with alginate deacetylase activity has been reported. Functional and structural studies reveal that alginate lyases and epimerases have related enzyme mechanisms and catalytic sites. Alginate lyases are now utilized as tools for alginate characterization. Secreted epimerases have been shown to function well in vitro, and have been engineered further in order to obtain enzymes that can provide alginates with new and desired properties for use in medical and pharmaceutical applications

  6. Clinical Evaluation of Different Pre-impression Preparation Procedures of Dental Arch

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika; Gupta, Naveen; Agarwal, Manisha; Verma, Rohit; Rathod, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bubbles and voids on the occlusal surface impede the actual intercuspation and pre-impression preparation aims to reduce the incidence of air bubbles and voids as well as influences the quality of occlusal reproduction and actual clinical intercuspation in the articulator. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of different pre-impression preparation procedures of antagonistic dental arch on the quality of the occlusal reproduction of the teeth in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and to determine most reliable pre-impression preparation method to reduce the incidence of air bubbles. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects were selected having full complement of mandibular teeth from second molar to second molar with well demarcated cusp height. 200 impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid material. The impressions were divided into five groups of 40 impressions each and each group had one specific type of pre-impression preparation. All the impressions were poured in die stone. A stereomicroscope with graduated eyepiece was used to count the number of bubbles on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars. The mean and standard deviations were calculated for each group. Mann–Whitney U-test was applied to find the significant difference between different groups. Results: Least bubbles were found in the group in which oral cavity was dried by saliva ejector and fluid hydrocolloid was finger painted onto the occlusal surfaces immediately before the placement of impression tray in the mouth. Conclusion: It was found that finger painting the tooth surfaces with fluid hydrocolloid immediately before the placement of loaded impression tray in the mouth was the most reliable method. The oral cavity can be cleared more easily of excess saliva by vacuum suction rather than by use of an astringent solution. PMID:26229376

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Plastic Deformation During Impression Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveena; Ganesh Kumar, J.; Mathew, M. D.

    2015-04-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis of plastic deformation associated with impression creep deformation of 316LN stainless steel was carried out. An axisymmetric FE model of 10 × 10 × 10 mm specimen with 1-mm-diameter rigid cylindrical flat punch was developed. FE simulation of impression creep deformation was performed by assuming elastic-plastic-power-law creep deformation behavior. Evolution of the stress with time under the punch during elastic, plastic, and creep processes was analyzed. The onset of plastic deformation was found to occur at a nominal stress about 1.12 times the yield stress of the material. The size of the developed plastic zone was predicted to be about three times the radius of the punch. The material flow behavior and the pile-up on specimen surface have been modeled.

  8. The elastomers for complete denture impression: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Elie E.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the current trends in materials used for complete denture impression. Peer-reviewed articles, published in English and in French between 1954 and 2007, were identified through a MEDLINE search (Pubmed and Elsevier) and a hand search of relevant textbooks and annual publications. Emphasis was made on the characteristics of the elastomers, their manipulation, the different techniques used, and the quality of the impression obtained. The combination of excellent physical properties, handling characteristics, and unlimited dimensional stability assures the popularity of these impression materials. PMID:24151408

  9. Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum immobilization in alginate coated with chitosan and gelatin on antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Imen; Ayadi, Dorra; Bejar, Wacim; Bejar, Samir; Chouayekh, Hichem; Ben Salah, Riadh

    2014-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate and evaluate the efficiency of immobilizing the Lactobacillus plantarum TN9 strain in alginate using chitosan and gelatin as coating materials, in terms of viability and antibacterial activity. The results indicate that maximum concentrations of L. plantarum TN9 strain were produced with 2% sodium alginate, 10(8)UFC/ml, and 1M calcium chloride. The viability and antibacterial activity of the L. plantarum TN9 cultures before and after immobilization in alginate, chitosan-coated alginate, and gelatin-coated alginate, were studied. The findings revealed that the viability of encapsulated L. plantarum could be preserved more than 5.8 log CFU/ml after 35 day of incubation at 4 °C, and no effects were observed when gelatin was used. The antibacterial activity of encapsulated L. plantarum TN9 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria was enhanced in the presence of chitosan coating materials, and no activity was observed in the presence of gelatin. The effects of catalase and proteolytic enzymes on the culture supernatant of L. plantarum TN9 were also investigated, and the results suggested that the antibacterial activity observed was due to the production of organic acids. Taken together, the findings indicated that immobilization in chitosan enhanced the antibacterial activity of L. plantarum TN9 against several pathogenic bacteria. This encapsulated strain could be considered as a potential strong candidate for future application as an additive in the food and animal feed industries. PMID:24315948

  10. Time-Resolved Imaging Study of Jetting Dynamics during Laser Printing of Viscoelastic Alginate Solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyi; Xiong, Ruitong; Mei, Renwei; Huang, Yong; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2015-06-16

    Matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct-write (MAPLE DW) has been successfully implemented as a promising laser printing technology for various fabrication applications, in particular, three-dimensional bioprinting. Since most bioinks used in bioprinting are viscoelastic, it is of importance to understand the jetting dynamics during the laser printing of viscoelastic fluids in order to control and optimize the laser printing performance. In this study, MAPLE DW was implemented to study the jetting dynamics during the laser printing of representative viscoelastic alginate bioinks and evaluate the effects of operating conditions (e.g., laser fluence) and material properties (e.g., alginate concentration) on the jet formation performance. Through a time-resolved imaging approach, it is found that when the laser fluence increases or the alginate concentration decreases, the jetting behavior changes from no material transferring to well-defined jetting to well-defined jetting with an initial bulgy shape to jetting with a bulgy shape to pluming/splashing. For the desirable well-defined jetting regimes, as the laser fluence increases, the jet velocity and breakup length increase while the breakup time and primary droplet size decrease. As the alginate concentration increases, the jet velocity and breakup length decrease while the breakup time and primary droplet size increase. In addition, Ohnesorge, elasto-capillary, and Weber number based phase diagrams are presented to better appreciate the dependence of jetting regimes on the laser fluence and alginate concentration. PMID:26011320

  11. Single Stage Silicone Border Molded Closed Mouth Impression Technique-Part II.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E G R

    2011-09-01

    Functioning of a complete denture depends to a great extent on the impression technique. Several impression techniques have been described in the literature since the turn of this century when Greene [Clinical courses in dental prothesis, 1916] brothers introduced the first scientific system of recording dental impression. Advocates of each technique have their own claim of superiority over the other. The introduction of elastomeric impression materials [Skinner and Cooper, J Am Dent Assoc 51:523-536, 1955] has made possible new techniques of recording impression for complete denture construction. These rubber like materials are of two types; one has a polysulfide base and is popularily known as polysulfide rubber (Thiokol and Mercaptan). The other variety has a silicone base known as silicone rubber or silicone elastomer. Silicone elastomers are available in four different consistencies; a thin easy flowing light bodied material,a creamy medium bodied material, a highly viscous heavy bodied material and a kneadable putty material. This paper describes an active closed mouth impression technique with one stage border molding using putty silicone material as a substitute for low fusing compound. PMID:22942578

  12. Environmental effects and desorption characteristics on heavy metal removal using carboxylated alginic acid.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Choong; Je Yoo, Young; Hoell, Wolfgang H

    2005-01-01

    Effects of ionic strength and organic materials on copper ion uptake capacity using carboxylated alginic acid which showed very high metal ion uptake capacity were investigated. The ionic strength only had a slight effect on the decrease of copper ion uptake capacity regardless of NaCl concentration. And, the effect of organic materials such as NTA (nitrilotriaceticacid) and sodium hypophosphite on the copper ion uptake capacity was negligible. When the lead ion adsorbed on carboxylated alginic acid was desorbed by NTA, which showed high desorption efficiency, the best optimum concentration of NTA was about 0.01 M. Also desorption efficiency decreased, however, concentration factor increased as S/L ratio which is defined as the ratio of adding amount of adsorbed and volume of desorbing agent increased. In sequential adsorption and desorption cycles, the lead uptake capacity on carboxylated alginic acid was relatively maintained through cycles 1-5. PMID:15364075

  13. Stability of alginate-immobilized algal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dainty, A.L.; Goulding, K.H.; Robinson, P.K.; Simpkins, I; Trevan, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were carried out using immobilized Chlorella cells to determine the diameter, compressibility, tolerance to phosphate chelation, and ability to retain algal cells during incubation of various alginate beads. These physical bead-characteristics were affected by a variety of interactive factors, including multivalent cation type (hardening agent) and cell, cation, and alginate concentration, the latter exhibiting a predominant influence. The susceptibility of alginate beads to phosphate chelation involved a complex interaction of cation type, concentration, and pH of phosphate solution. A scale of response ranging from gel swelling to gel shrinking was observed for a range of conditions. However, stable Ca alginate beads were maintained in incubation media with a pH of 5.5 and a phosphate concentration of 5 micro M. A preliminary investigation into cell leakage from the beads illustrated the importance of maintaining a stable gel structure and limiting cell growth to reduce leakage.

  14. Characterization and impression creep testing of silicon aluminum oxynitride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Kevin M.

    2005-11-01

    Three Yb-containing SiAlON materials were studied for potential use as hot section components in advanced microturbine engines. Two of the materials consisted of equiaxed alpha-SiAlON grains, elongated beta-SiAlON grains, and an amorphous intergranular phase containing a relatively large amount of Yb. The third material consisted of alpha- and beta-SiAlON grains with equiaxed morphologies and virtually no intergranular phase. An instrument was designed and constructed for impression creep testing of the YbSiAlON materials. Uniaxial compression creep experiments were also performed for comparison. In compression creep, the SiAlON materials exhibited activation energies that were similar to those of other SiAlONs reports in the literature, and stress exponents that were approximately 1. In impression creep, the SiAlONs tested exhibited activation energies similar to those reported in the literature for SiAlONs tested in uniaxial compression and tension. However, the SiAlON composition with equiaxed beta-SiAlON grains showed an exaggerated activation energy due to a change in creep mechanism above 1340°C. The measured stress exponents in impression creep were approximately 2. The stress state present below the punch in impression creep caused dilation to occur in the grain structure. The dilation results in an increase in the volume of the multi-grain junctions, and an increased dependence of strain rate on stress. The enlarged multi-grain junctions can become filled with the intergranular glassy phase. These large pockets of the glassy phase can enable an additional creep mechanism whereby the equiaxed grains slide past each other viscously. All of the SiAlONs developed an additional volume of the intergranular glassy phase during creep testing. A microstructure containing elongated beta-SiAlON grains is most effective in enhancing creep performance of the Yb-SiAlON materials tested. The impression creep data for the Yb-SiAlON materials can be related to the

  15. Correlation between nitrogen fixation rate and alginate productivity of an indigenous Azotobacter vinelandii from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, R; Owlia, P; Saderi, H; Olamaee, M; Rasooli, I; Akhavian, Tehrani A

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Azotobacter vinelandii, a gamma-proteobacterium, is an obligate aerobic free-living gram-negative soil bacterium capable of fixing nitrogen. Oxygen transfer rate into the cell is reduced by the increase of alginate concentrations during the course of A. vinelandii cultivation. This phenomenon provides a low intracellular oxygen concentration needed for nitrogenase activity. The aim of this study was to design a simple strategy to explain the alginate production, cell growth and nitrogenase activity correlation in A. vinelandii under aerobic conditions. Material and Methods Thirty-five different soil samples were taken from the rhizosphere of agricultural crops of Iran. Enrichment and isolation strategies were employed for microbial isolation. Physiological and biochemical characteristics were determined. Molecular identification was performed using selective nifH-g1 primers. Alginate production and nitrogenase activity assay by each isolate of Azotobacter were carried out. Bacterial growth, alginate production and Nitrogenase activity were conducted by time-coursed quantitative measurements. Results Total of 26 isolates were selected after enrichment, isolation, and screening. The isolate was identified by molecular tests as A. vinelandii. The highest alginate productions of 1.02 g/l and 0.91g/l were noted after 4 days in 8 isolates, cell biomass of which were estimated 4.88-5.26 g/l. Six of 8 isolates were able to fix atmospheric N2 on nitrogen-free medium. Rates obtained in isolates were in the range of 12.1 to 326.4 nmol C2H4 h-1 vial-1. Conclusions Nitrogen fixation and alginate production yielded significant and positive Pearson's correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.760, p ∼ 0.02. Finally association between bacterial growth, alginate production and nitrogenase activity almost noticeable yielded significant and positive Pearson's correlation coefficient R2= 0.723, p ∼ 0.04. PMID:23066492

  16. Preliminary impression techniques for microstomia patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Aswini; Bhat, Vinaya; Nair, K Chandrasekheran; Suresh, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    The Prosthetic rehabilitation of microstomia patients presents difficulties at all the stages. The difficulty starts with the preliminary impression making. This is due to the tongue rigidity and the decreased oral opening. A maximum oral opening which is smaller than the size of the tray can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Due to the restricted mouth opening, insertion and removal of the impression trays is extremely cumbersome and various modifications of the trays have been used in the past. Among these are the flexible trays and the sectional trays used with different modes of reassembling the segments extra orally after the impression is made. This article reviews the literature published from 1971 to 2015 concerning preliminary impression techniques used in making impressions for patients with microstomia based on various tray designs. An electronic search was performed across three databases (PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scolar) for relevant citations. The keywords/combinations used for the search were microstomia, limited/constricted/restricted mouth opening/oral access, trismus, sectional trays, impressions and prosthetic/prosthodontic rehabilitation. The search was limited to papers written in English which resulted in a total of 45 related articles of which 17 articles were included for discussion of this review. PMID:27621540

  17. Freeze-thaw induced gelation of alginates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Shen, Wei; Chen, Zhigang; Wu, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Adding divalent ions or lowering pH below the pKa values of alginate monomers are common ways in preparing alginate gels. Herein a new way of preparing alginate gels using freeze-thaw technique is described. Solvent crystallization during freezing drove the polymers to associate into certain structures that became the junction zones of hydrogels after thawing. It enabled the preparation of alginate gels at pH 4.0 and 3.5, two pH at which the gel could not be formed previously. At pH 3.0 where alginate gel could be formed initially, applying freeze-thaw treatment increased the gel storage modulus almost 100 times. The formation of hydrogels and the resulting gel properties, such as dynamic moduli and gel syneresis were influenced by the pH values, number of freeze-thaw cycles, alginate concentrations, and ionic strengths. The obtained hydrogels were soft and demonstrated a melting behavior upon storage, which may find novel applications in the biomedical industry. PMID:27185114

  18. Lactococcus lactis release from calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, C P; Gaudy, C; Poncelet, D; Neufeld, R J

    1992-01-01

    Cell release during milk fermentation by Lactococcus lactis immobilized in calcium alginate beads was examined. Numbers of free cells in the milk gradually increased from 1 x 10(6) to 3 x 10(7) CFU/ml upon successive reutilization of the beads. Rinsing the beads between fermentations did not influence the numbers of free cells in the milk. Cell release was not affected by initial cell density within the beads or by alginate concentration, although higher acidification rates were achieved with increased cell loading. Coating alginate beads with poly-L-lysine (PLL) did not significantly reduce the release of cells during five consecutive fermentations. A double coating of PLL and alginate reduced cell release by a factor of approximately 50. However, acidification of milk with beads having the PLL-alginate coating was slower than that with uncoated beads. Immersing the beads in ethanol to kill cells on the periphery reduced cell release, but acidification activity was maintained. Dipping the beads in aluminum nitrate or a hot CaCl2 solution was not as effective as dipping them in ethanol. Ethanol treatment or heating of the beads appears to be a promising method for maintaining acidification activity while minimizing viable cell release due to loosely entrapped cells near the surface of the alginate beads. PMID:1622208

  19. The Effect of Disinfection by Spray Atomization on Dimensional Accuracy of Condensation Silicone Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Saleh Saber, Fariba; Abolfazli, Nader; Kohsoltani, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims The condensation silicone impression materials are available, but there is little knowledge of their accuracy after disinfection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the disinfection by spray atomization on dimensional accuracy of condensation silicone impressions. Materials and methods Impressions were made on a stainless steel master model containing a simulated two complete crown preparation with an edentulous space interposed using Spidex® and Rapid® impression materials. 44 impressions were made with each material, of which 16 were disinfected with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 16 were disinfected with 10% iodophor and 12 were not disinfected. Three dimensional measurements of working casts, including interpreparation distance, height, and diameter, were calculated using a measuring microscope graduated at 0.001 mm. Dimensional changes (mm) between the disinfected and non-disinfected working casts were compared. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to analyze the data (α=0.05). Results Disinfection of each condensation silicone material by spraying atomization with two different disinfectant material resulted in significant change in interpreparation distance (p<0.05). Changes in height and diameter were only significant in Spidex® impressions (p<0.05). Conclusion Significant changes in the mean dimensions were seen as a result of disinfection by spraying; however, the dimensional changes do not seem great enough to cause critical positional distortion of teeth when fixed partial denture restorations are made. PMID:23346339

  20. Control of Alginate Core Size in Alginate-Poly (Lactic-Co-Glycolic) Acid Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Lio, Daniel; Yeo, David; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-12-01

    Core-shell alginate-poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microparticles are potential candidates to improve hydrophilic drug loading while facilitating controlled release. This report studies the influence of the alginate core size on the drug release profile of alginate-PLGA microparticles and its size. Microparticles are synthesized through double-emulsion fabrication via a concurrent ionotropic gelation and solvent extraction. The size of alginate core ranges from approximately 10, 50, to 100 μm when the emulsification method at the first step is homogenization, vortexing, or magnetic stirring, respectively. The second step emulsification for all three conditions is performed with magnetic stirring. Interestingly, although the alginate core has different sizes, alginate-PLGA microparticle diameter does not change. However, drug release profiles are dramatically different for microparticles comprising different-sized alginate cores. Specifically, taking calcein as a model drug, microparticles containing the smallest alginate core (10 μm) show the slowest release over a period of 26 days with burst release less than 1 %. PMID:26745977

  1. Control of Alginate Core Size in Alginate-Poly (Lactic-Co-Glycolic) Acid Microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lio, Daniel; Yeo, David; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell alginate-poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microparticles are potential candidates to improve hydrophilic drug loading while facilitating controlled release. This report studies the influence of the alginate core size on the drug release profile of alginate-PLGA microparticles and its size. Microparticles are synthesized through double-emulsion fabrication via a concurrent ionotropic gelation and solvent extraction. The size of alginate core ranges from approximately 10, 50, to 100 μm when the emulsification method at the first step is homogenization, vortexing, or magnetic stirring, respectively. The second step emulsification for all three conditions is performed with magnetic stirring. Interestingly, although the alginate core has different sizes, alginate-PLGA microparticle diameter does not change. However, drug release profiles are dramatically different for microparticles comprising different-sized alginate cores. Specifically, taking calcein as a model drug, microparticles containing the smallest alginate core (10 μm) show the slowest release over a period of 26 days with burst release less than 1 %.

  2. Mechanisms and factors affecting the adsorption of sodium alginate onto modified clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yongxin; Cao, Xihua; Song, Xiuxian; Wang, Nan; Yu, Zhiming

    2013-07-01

    Algal organic materials (AOMs) are one critical factor affecting the efficiency of modified clays used for the mitigation of harmful algal blooms (HABs). This study was conducted to develop a deeper understanding of the mechanisms and factors affecting the adsorption of AOMs onto modified clays. Sodium alginate (polysaccharide) and kaolinite modified with polyaluminium chloride (PACl) were used as AOMs and modified clay model substances, respectively, and the effects of modifier dosage, contact time, solution pH and ionic strength were investigated through batch adsorption experiments. Kinetics revealed that the alginate adsorption rate was described well by a pseudo-second order model. PACl effectively enhanced the adsorption capacity of kaolinite and increased the adsorption rate, and the optimum additive amount of PACl was 5%. The experimental data fitted both the Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption equations well. The adsorption thermodynamics for alginate onto modified clays suggests that alginate adsorption is a spontaneous process. The adsorption of alginate onto modified clays was highly dependent on pH, with a decrease in adsorption observed with increased pH to 9.48, but the opposite was true above pH 9.48. Finally, adsorption increased with increasing ionic strength.

  3. Laboratory assessment of impression accuracy by clinical simulation.

    PubMed

    Wassell, R W; Abuasi, H A

    1992-04-01

    Some laboratory tests of impression material accuracy mimic the clinical situation (simulatory) while others attempt to quantify a material's individual properties. This review concentrates on simulatory testing and aims to give a classification of the numerous tests available. Measurements can be made of the impression itself or the resulting cast. Cast measurements are divided into those made of individual dies and those made of interdie relations. Contact measurement techniques have the advantage of simplicity but are potentially inaccurate because of die abrasion. Non-contact techniques can overcome the abrasion problem but the measurements, especially those made in three dimensions, may be difficult to interpret. Nevertheless, providing that care is taken to avoid parallax error non-contact methods are preferable as experimental variables are easier to control. Where measurements are made of individual dies these should include the die width across the finishing line, as occlusal width measurements provide only limited information. A new concept of 'differential die distortion' (dimensional difference from the master model in one plane minus the dimensional difference in the perpendicular plane) provides a clinically relevant method of interpreting dimensional changes. Where measurements are made between dies movement of the individual dies within the master model must be prevented. Many of the test methods can be criticized as providing clinically unrealistic master models/dies or impression trays. Phantom head typodonts form a useful basis for the morphology of master models providing that undercuts are standardized and the master model temperature adequately controlled. PMID:1564180

  4. As(III) and As(V) removal from the aqueous phase via adsorption onto acid mine drainage sludge (AMDS) alginate beads and goethite alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongkyun; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Jongsik; Ji, Min-Kyu; Han, Young-Soo; Park, Young-Tae; Yun, Hyun-Shik; Choi, Jaeyoung

    2015-07-15

    Acid mine drainage sludge (AMDS) is a solid waste generated following the neutralization of acid mine drainage (AMD). This material entrapped in calcium alginate was investigated for the sorption of As(III) and As(V). Three different adsorbent materials were prepared: AMDS alginate beads (AABs), goethite alginate beads (GABs), and pure alginate beads. The effects of pH and the adsorption kinetics were investigated, and the adsorption isotherms were also evaluated. The optimum pH range using the AABs was determined to be within 2-10 for As(III) and 2-9 for As(V). Adsorption equilibrium data were evaluated using the Langmuir isotherm model, and the maximum adsorption capacity qmax was 18.25 and 4.97 mg g(-1) for As(III) on AAB and GAB, respectively, and 21.79 and 10.92 mg g(-1) for As(V) on AAB and GAB, respectively. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) was observed to follow pseudo-second order kinetics. The As K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) revealed that the adsorbed As(III) on the AABs was oxidized to As(V) via manganese oxide in the AMDS. PMID:25804789

  5. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    PubMed

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching. PMID:23313600

  6. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  7. Comparison of Different Final Impression Techniques for Management of Resorbed Mandibular Ridge: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhupender; Jayna, Manisha; Yadav, Harish; Suri, Shrey; Phogat, Shefali; Madan, Reshu

    2014-01-01

    The history of complete denture impression procedures has been influenced largely by the development of impression materials from which new techniques and ideas arose. The purpose of this study was to compare the retention of complete dentures made by using different impression techniques like conventional, admixed, all green, and functional techniques. The results showed that there was significant difference in retention between the six techniques where functional technique showed the highest mean value of retention followed by elastomeric, all green, and admixed, while cocktail and green stick compound showed the lowest mean value. However, on clinical examination, the retention produced by the six techniques was satisfactory. PMID:25180105

  8. Crystal growth of calcium carbonate in silk fibroin/sodium alginate hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Jinfa; Zuo, Baoqi

    2014-01-01

    As known, silk fibroin-like protein plays a pivotal role during the formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals in the nacre sheets. Here, we have prepared silk fibroin/sodium alginate nanofiber hydrogels to serve as templates for calcium carbonate mineralization. In this experiment, we report an interesting finding of calcium carbonate crystal growth in the silk fibroin/sodium alginate nanofiber hydrogels by the vapor diffusion method. The experimental results indicate calcium carbonate crystals obtained from nanofiber hydrogels with different proportions of silk fibroin/sodium alginate are mixture of calcite and vaterite with unusual morphologies. Time-dependent growth study was carried out to investigate the crystallization process. It is believed that nanofiber hydrogels play an important role in the process of crystallization. This study would help in understanding the function of organic polymers in natural mineralization, and provide a novel pathway in the design and synthesis of new materials related unique morphology and structure.

  9. Release of yerba mate antioxidants from corn starch-alginate capsules as affected by structure.

    PubMed

    López-Córdoba, Alex; Deladino, Lorena; Martino, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulation of yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis) extract in a proper matrix enhances the possible applications of this natural antioxidant in food systems. To start, calcium alginate capsules were used as carriers of yerba mate extract and a filler material (corn starch at 2%) was added to the alginate matrix to improve the structural properties and to modulate the release of the active compounds. Next, kinetics and swelling mechanisms involved in the release of yerba mate polyphenols in simulated digestive fluids were analyzed. A lower rate of release was obtained with calcium alginate-starch capsules as compared to control ones, which was attributed to the lower porosity of filled capsules. The release profiles of both systems were satisfactorily fitted with semi-empirical models, which indicated that a combined mechanism of polymer-chain relaxation and diffusion was taking place. PMID:24274491

  10. Alginate as a displacer for protein displacement chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Scouten, W H

    1996-01-01

    Alginate use in displacement chromatography as a displacer has been studied. The experiments showed that untreated alginate is the basis of potential displacer for displacement chromatography, but needs to be cleaved into smaller chains. Alginate treated with ultrasound, which cleaves alginate into shorter polysaccharide chains, gave better displacement than untreated alginate, while alginate subjected to limited acid hydrolysis gave the best results in displacement chromatography. It was found that the mixture of ovalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin separated well, and several components of ovalbumin were also separated and purified when alginate hydrolysate was used as a displacer. beta-Lactoglobulins A and B, which have the same molecular weight and differ in isoelectric point by only 0.1 pH units, were displaced from Q-Sepharose by alginate hydrolysate. PMID:9174919

  11. Giving the wrong impression: food and beverage brand impressions delivered to youth through popular movies

    PubMed Central

    Skatrud-Mickelson, Monica; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Sutherland, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Marketing on television showcases less-healthful options, with emerging research suggesting movies promote similar products. Given the obesity epidemic, understanding advertising to youth should be a public health imperative. The objective of this study was to estimate youth impressions to food and beverages delivered through movies. Methods Impressions were calculated by dividing US receipts annually into average movie ticket prices, then multiplying this by the number of brand appearances. Examination by ratings, product types and ages were conducted by Spearman rank correlation coefficient tests. Results Youth in the USA saw over 3 billion food, beverage or food–retail establishment (FRE) impressions on average, annually from 1996 to 2005. Those aged 12–18 viewed over half of all impressions, with PG-13-rated movies containing 61.5% of impressions. There were no significant trends in brand appearances by food, beverage or FRE impressions over the decade, although there was a decreasing trend in R-rated impressions for both foods (P< 0.01) and beverages (P< 0.01), but not FREs (P= 0.08). Conclusions Movies promote billions of food and beverage impressions annually to youth. Given the public health crisis of obesity, future research should further investigate these trends, as well as the potential association of these unhealthy exposures in youth. PMID:22076600

  12. Facial feedback effects on impression formation.

    PubMed

    Ohira, H; Kurono, K

    1993-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine effects of facial expressions upon social cognitive processes in which the impression of another person is formed. In each experiment, 30 female college students were induced to display or conceal their facial reactions to a hypothetical target person whose behaviors were mildly hostile (Exp. 1) or mildly friendly (Exp. 2), or their facial expressions were not manipulated. Displaying the facial expressions shifted the impression into the congruent directions with hedonic values corresponding to the facial expressions. Concealing the facial expressions, however, did not influence impression formation. Also, the positive-negative asymmetry was observed in the facial feedback effects, that is, the negative facial expression had a stronger effect on social cognition than the positive one. PMID:8170774

  13. Pressures involved in making upper edentulous impressions.

    PubMed

    Rihani, A

    1981-12-01

    A study was made of the pressures exerted on the upper denture-bearing area in three patients each with a different type of palatal vault. A method of measuring the relative pressures in different regions of the upper denture bearing area was devised. These pressures were registered with the use of manometers while making an impression in close fitting acrylic resin special trays. The results indicated that the main pressure regions during impression making were near the center of the palate and these pressures diminished toward the buccal borders. PMID:7028974

  14. 21 CFR 172.858 - Propylene glycol alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Propylene glycol alginate. 172.858 Section 172.858... Propylene glycol alginate. The food additive propylene glycol alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-37-2) may be used... the act: (1) The name of the additive, “propylene glycol alginate” or “propylene glycol ester...

  15. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Alginate to Produce Oligosaccharides by a New Purified Endo-Type Alginate Lyase

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Benwei; Chen, Meijuan; Yin, Heng; Du, Yuguang; Ning, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of sodium alginate to produce alginate oligosaccharides has drawn increasing attention due to its advantages of containing a wild reaction condition, excellent gel properties and specific products easy for purification. However, the efficient commercial enzyme tools are rarely available. A new alginate lyase with high activity (24,038 U/mg) has been purified from a newly isolated marine strain, Cellulophaga sp. NJ-1. The enzyme was most active at 50 °C and pH 8.0 and maintained stability at a broad pH range (6.0–10.0) and temperature below 40 °C. It had broad substrate specificity toward sodium alginate, heteropolymeric MG blocks (polyMG), homopolymeric M blocks (polyM) and homopolymeric G blocks (polyG), and possessed higher affinity toward polyG (15.63 mM) as well as polyMG (23.90 mM) than polyM (53.61 mM) and sodium alginate (27.21 mM). The TLC and MS spectroscopy analysis of degradation products suggested that it completely hydrolyzed sodium alginate into oligosaccharides of low degrees of polymerization (DPs). The excellent properties would make it a promising tool for full use of sodium alginate to produce oligosaccharides. PMID:27275826

  16. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Alginate to Produce Oligosaccharides by a New Purified Endo-Type Alginate Lyase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Benwei; Chen, Meijuan; Yin, Heng; Du, Yuguang; Ning, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of sodium alginate to produce alginate oligosaccharides has drawn increasing attention due to its advantages of containing a wild reaction condition, excellent gel properties and specific products easy for purification. However, the efficient commercial enzyme tools are rarely available. A new alginate lyase with high activity (24,038 U/mg) has been purified from a newly isolated marine strain, Cellulophaga sp. NJ-1. The enzyme was most active at 50 °C and pH 8.0 and maintained stability at a broad pH range (6.0-10.0) and temperature below 40 °C. It had broad substrate specificity toward sodium alginate, heteropolymeric MG blocks (polyMG), homopolymeric M blocks (polyM) and homopolymeric G blocks (polyG), and possessed higher affinity toward polyG (15.63 mM) as well as polyMG (23.90 mM) than polyM (53.61 mM) and sodium alginate (27.21 mM). The TLC and MS spectroscopy analysis of degradation products suggested that it completely hydrolyzed sodium alginate into oligosaccharides of low degrees of polymerization (DPs). The excellent properties would make it a promising tool for full use of sodium alginate to produce oligosaccharides. PMID:27275826

  17. Accuracy of Different Putty-Wash Impression Techniques with Various Spacer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Aman; Singh, Vijay Pratap

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the most important steps is accurate impression making for fabrication of fixed partial denture. The two different putty-wash techniques that are commonly used are: (1) Putty-wash one-step technique, (2) putty-wash two-step technique. A uniform wash space is needed for an accurate impression. Nissan et al recommended the use of two-step technique for accurate impression making as there is uniform wash space for the light body material to polymerize. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts obtained from different putty-wash impression techniques using various spacer thickness. The critical factor that influences the accuracy of putty-wash impression techniques is the controlled wash bulk which is absent in one-step putty-wash impression technique and with polyethylene spacer was used. How to cite this article: Chugh A, Arora A, Singh VP. Accuracy of Different Putty-Wash Impression Techniques with Various Spacer Thickness. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1):33-38. PMID:25206132

  18. Alginate Lyases from Alginate-Degrading Vibrio splendidus 12B01 Are Endolytic

    PubMed Central

    Badur, Ahmet H.; Jagtap, Sujit Sadashiv; Yalamanchili, Geethika; Lee, Jung-Kul; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Alginate lyases are enzymes that degrade alginate through β-elimination of the glycosidic bond into smaller oligomers. We investigated the alginate lyases from Vibrio splendidus 12B01, a marine bacterioplankton species that can grow on alginate as its sole carbon source. We identified, purified, and characterized four polysaccharide lyase family 7 alginates lyases, AlyA, AlyB, AlyD, and AlyE, from V. splendidus 12B01. The four lyases were found to have optimal activity between pH 7.5 and 8.5 and at 20 to 25°C, consistent with their use in a marine environment. AlyA, AlyB, AlyD, and AlyE were found to exhibit a turnover number (kcat) for alginate of 0.60 ± 0.02 s−1, 3.7 ± 0.3 s−1, 4.5 ± 0.5 s−1, and 7.1 ± 0.2 s−1, respectively. The Km values of AlyA, AlyB, AlyD, and AlyE toward alginate were 36 ± 7 μM, 22 ± 5 μM, 60 ± 2 μM, and 123 ± 6 μM, respectively. AlyA and AlyB were found principally to cleave the β-1,4 bonds between β-d-mannuronate and α-l-guluronate and subunits; AlyD and AlyE were found to principally cleave the α-1,4 bonds involving α-l-guluronate subunits. The four alginate lyases degrade alginate into longer chains of oligomers. PMID:25556193

  19. FLX Pyrosequencing Analysis of the Effects of the Brown-Algal Fermentable Polysaccharides Alginate and Laminaran on Rat Cecal Microbiotas

    PubMed Central

    An, Choa; Yazaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hajime; Kimura, Bon

    2013-01-01

    Edible brown algae are used as major food material in Far East Asian countries, particularly in South Korea and Japan. They contain fermentable dietary fibers, alginic acid (uronic acid polymer) and laminaran (β-1,3-glucan), that are fermented into organic acids by intestinal bacteria. To clarify the effect of edible algae on the intestinal environment, the cecal microbiotas of rats fed diets containing no dietary fiber (control) or 2% (wt/wt) sodium alginate or laminaran for 2 weeks were analyzed using FLX amplicon pyrosequencing with bar-coded primers targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The most abundant phylum in all groups was Firmicutes. Specifically, Allobaculum was dominant in all diet groups. In addition, Bacteroides capillosus (37.1%) was abundant in the alginate group, while Clostridium ramosum (3.14%) and Parabacteroides distasonis (1.36%) were only detected in the laminaran group. Furthermore, rats fed alginate showed simplified microbiota phylotypes compared with others. With respect to cecal chemical compounds, laminaran increased cecal organic acid levels, particularly propionic acid. Alginate increased total cecal organic acids. Cecal putrefactive compounds, such as indole, H2S, and phenol, were decreased by both alginate and laminaran. These results indicate that edible brown algae can alter the intestinal environment, with fermentation by intestinal microbiota. PMID:23183985

  20. The Trouble with Applicant Impression Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, Steven M.; Kirkwood, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that applicant impression management (AIM) is more harmful to employment interviewing than is currently suspected. Offers a conceptual model of AIM that is consistent with employment interviewing practice. Presents and critiques three arguments used to defend AIM. Examines a model for helping employers conduct interviews that minimize the…

  1. Personality Impressions Elicited by Accented English Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallois, Cynthia; Callan, Victor J.

    1981-01-01

    Australian born male and female students listened to tapes of accented English speech and were asked to relate their impressions and judgments of the speakers' personalities. Results indicated that the nationality and sex of the speakers were factors which influenced the judgments made about them by the Australian students. (Author/APM)

  2. Additivity of Clothing Cues in First Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Sharron J.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of information integration was used to predict that in first impression situations, clothing/physical appearance cues have differential importance depending upon the type of judgment elicited. Female college students (N=104) viewed and responded to slides of colored line drawings of female stimulus persons. Multiple regression of data…

  3. Patterns of Vocalization and Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Donald P.; Bouma, Gary D.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the interactive behavior that accompanies verbal exchange. It specifically describes a set of experiments designed to isolate an important subset of interactive behavior, the vocal (as opposed to the verbal) and to relate this information to a wide range of social impressions resulting from verbal exchange. (Available from…

  4. Impressive Subcutaneous Calcifications in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    DIMA, Alina; BERZEA, Ioana; BAICUS, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophic calcinosis cutis was commonly described in long-term dermatomyositis or systemic sclerosis, being rarely reported in other connective tissue diseases. We report the case of a 65-years old woman with an only 5-years history of systemic lupus erythematosus, who presents with multiple, impressive subcutaneous calcified masses and biological normal serum calcium and phosphate levels. PMID:26225152

  5. A Modified Impress Method for Beginning Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Russell W., Jr.

    A modified impress approach to teaching reading has been successfully used in a program involving first grade students. The program was multisensory and included aural, oral, visual, and kinesthetic learning experiences gained through listening, group discussions, dramatic play, art activities, audience reading, and recorded oral reading. These…

  6. Immunological and Technical Considerations in Application of Alginate-Based Microencapsulation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Paredes Juárez, Genaro Alberto; Spasojevic, Milica; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Islets encapsulated in immunoprotective microcapsules are being proposed as an alternative for insulin therapy for treatment of type 1 diabetes. Many materials for producing microcapsules have been proposed but only alginate does currently qualify as ready for clinical application. However, many different alginate-based capsule systems do exist. A pitfall in the field is that these systems are applied without a targeted strategy with varying degrees of success as a consequence. In the current review, the different properties of alginate-based systems are reviewed in view of future application in humans. The use of allogeneic and xenogeneic islet sources are discussed with acknowledging the different degrees of immune protection the encapsulation system should supply. Also issues such as oxygen supply and the role of danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPS) in immune activation are being reviewed. A common property of the encapsulation systems is that alginates for medical application should have an extreme high degree of purity and lack pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) to avoid activation of the recipient’s immune system. Up to now, non-inflammatory alginates are only produced on a lab-scale and are not yet commercially available. This is a major pitfall on the route to human application. Also the lack of predictive pre-clinical models is a burden. The principle differences between relevant innate and adaptive immune responses in humans and other species are reviewed. Especially, the extreme differences between the immune system of non-human primates and humans are cumbersome as non-human primates may not be predictive of the immune responses in humans, as opposed to the popular belief of regulatory agencies. Current insight is that although the technology is versatile major research efforts are required for identifying the mechanical, immunological, and physico-chemical requirements that alginate-based capsules should meet for successful human

  7. Consumer impressions of Tender Select beef.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Meade, M K; Reagan, J O; Byrnes, B L; Koohmaraie, M

    2001-10-01

    With the recent development of technology to classify beef for tenderness, it is now possible for packers and retailers to market brands of beef known to be consistently tender. The present experiment was conducted to determine consumer impressions of Tender Select, a model beef brand comprised of cuts from tender U.S. Select carcasses. A telephone survey was conducted in metropolitan Denver, CO, to recruit consumers (n = 1,036) for this study. Consumers who met minimal limits for household income, age, and beef consumption were invited to participate in a beef shopping and usage study in a local supermarket. Point-of-purchase material was developed that described Tender Select as "the only steak guaranteed tender and lean." When shown a copy of the Tender Select concept card, 89% of participating consumers (n = 759) indicated that they would definitely or probably buy that product. Of those consumers that said they would buy the product, 35% indicated that their purchases of Tender Select would be in addition to their current fresh meat purchases. Most consumers (54.1%) indicated that if Tender Select was available at their grocery store, 1 or 2 of their next 10 purchases of beef cuts would be Tender Select. Sixty-five percent of consumers indicated that if a grocery store carried a line of beef cuts guaranteed to be tender, they would buy all of their beef at that store. Both strip loins from 104 U.S. Select beef carcasses, representing a broad range (8.7 to 43.4 kg; CV = 42%) in slice shear force (SSF) at 14 d postmortem, were used to determine the effect of SSF classification on consumer satisfaction and the correlation among trained sensory panel descriptive attribute ratings and in-home consumer ratings of beef longissimus steaks. Both trained sensory panelists and consumers rated low-SSF steaks higher than the high-SSF steaks for all traits (P < 0.001). All consumer traits (like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, flavor amount, and overall satisfaction

  8. Chitosan and alginate types of bio-membrane in fuel cell application: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaari, N.; Kamarudin, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    The major problems of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell technology that need to be highlighted are fuel crossovers (e.g., methanol or hydrogen leaking across fuel cell membranes), CO poisoning, low durability, and high cost. Chitosan and alginate-based biopolymer membranes have recently been used to solve these problems with promising results. Current research in biopolymer membrane materials and systems has focused on the following: 1) the development of novel and efficient biopolymer materials; and 2) increasing the processing capacity of membrane operations. Consequently, chitosan and alginate-based biopolymers seek to enhance fuel cell performance by improving proton conductivity, membrane durability, and reducing fuel crossover and electro-osmotic drag. There are four groups of chitosan-based membranes (categorized according to their reaction and preparation): self-cross-linked and salt-complexed chitosans, chitosan-based polymer blends, chitosan/inorganic filler composites, and chitosan/polymer composites. There are only three alginate-based membranes that have been synthesized for fuel cell application. This work aims to review the state-of-the-art in the growth of chitosan and alginate-based biopolymer membranes for fuel cell applications.

  9. Alginate hydrogel-mediated crystallization of calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yufei; Feng, Qingling

    2011-05-15

    We documented a specific method for combining calcium ions and alginate molecules slowly and continuously in the mineralization system for the purpose of understanding the mediating function of alginate on the crystallization of calcium carbonate. The alginate was involved in the nucleation and the growth process of CaCO{sub 3}. The crystal size, morphology and roughness of crystal surface were significantly influenced by the type of the alginate, which could be accounted for by the length of the G blocks in alginate. A combination of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis showed that there were the chemical interactions between the alginate and the mineral phase. This strategic approach revealed the biologically controlled CaCO{sub 3} mineralization within calcium alginate hydrogels via the selective nucleation and the confined crystallization of CaCO{sub 3}. The results presented here could contribute to the understanding of the mineralization process in hydrogel systems. -- Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the growth of calcite aggregates with different morphologies obtained from (a) Low G alginate gels and (b) High G alginate gels. Display Omitted highlights: > We use a specific method for combining calcium ions and alginate molecules slowly and continuously in the mineralization system to understand the mediating function of alginate on the crystallization of CaCO{sub 3} crystals. > The crystal size, morphology and crystal surface roughness are influenced by the length of G blocks in alginate. There are chemical interactions between the alginate and the mineral phase. > We propose a potential mechanism of CaCO{sub 3} crystallization within High G and Low G calcium alginate hydrogel.

  10. Comparative evaluation of dimensional accuracy of different polyvinyl siloxane putty-wash impression techniques-in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Ramandeep; Railkar, Bhargavi; Musani, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dimensional accuracy when making impressions is crucial to the quality of fixed prosthodontic treatment, and the impression technique is a critical factor affecting this accuracy. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of the casts obtained from one step double mix, two step double mix polyvinyl siloxane putty- wash impression techniques using three different spacer thicknesses (0.5mm, 1mm and 1.5mm), in order to determine the impression technique that displays the maximum linear dimensional accuracy. Materials & Methods: A Mild steel model with 2 abutment preparations was fabricated, and impressions were made 15 times with each technique. All impressions were made with an addition-reaction silicone impression material (Express, 3M ESPE) and customarily made perforated metal trays. The 1-step putty/light-body impressions were made with simultaneous use of putty and light-body materials. The 2-step putty/light-body impressions were made with 0.5-mm, 1mm and 1.5mm-thick metal-prefabricated spacer caps. The accuracy of the 4 different impression techniques was assessed by measuring 7 dimensions (intra- and inter abutment) (20-μm accuracy) on stone casts poured from the impressions of the mild steel model. The data were analyzed by one sample‘t’ test. Results: The stone dies obtained with all the techniques had significantly larger or smaller dimensions as compared to those of the mild steel model (P<0.05). The order for highest to lowest deviation from the mild steel model was: single step putty/light body, 2-step putty/light body with 0.5mm spacer thickness, 2-step putty/light body1.5mm spacer thickness, and 2-step putty/light body with 1mm spacer thickness. Significant differences among all of the groups for both absolute dimensions of the stone dies, and their standard deviations from the master model (P<0.05), were noted. Conclusions: The 2-step putty/light-body impression technique with 1mm spacer thickness was

  11. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: Category of food Maximum level of use in food (as served) (percent) Functional use Confections, frostings... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium alginate. 184.1133 Section 184.1133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium alginate. 184.1133 Section 184.1133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  16. ANIMAL ANALOGIES IN FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF FACES

    PubMed Central

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A.; Wadlinger, Heather A.; Luevano, Victor X.; White, Benjamin M.; Xing, Cai; Zhang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Analogies between humans and animals based on facial resemblance have a long history. We report evidence for reverse anthropomorphism and the extension of facial stereotypes to lions, foxes, and dogs. In the stereotype extension, more positive traits were attributed to animals judged more attractive than con-specifics; more childlike traits were attributed to those judged more babyfaced. In the reverse anthropomorphism, human faces with more resemblance to lions, ascertained by connectionist modeling of facial metrics, were judged more dominant, cold, and shrewd, controlling attractiveness, babyfaceness, and sex. Faces with more resemblance to Labradors were judged warmer and less shrewd. Resemblance to foxes did not predict impressions. Results for lions and dogs were consistent with trait impressions of these animals and support the species overgeneralization hypothesis that evolutionarily adaptive reactions to particular animals are overgeneralized, with people perceived to have traits associated with animals their faces resemble. Other possible explanations are discussed. PMID:25339791

  17. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  18. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yuji; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  19. The Importance of Subtextual Impression Management and Business Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Lillian H.; Lyden, Julie A.

    1998-01-01

    College students (n=265) reported their impressions of business faculty's personal appearance, body language, behavior, and office appearance. Findings indicate that impression management is useful for professors who want to convey credibility, authority, and interest in students. (JOW)

  20. Preparation of microfibrillated cellulose/chitosan-benzalkonium chloride biocomposite for enhancing antibacterium and strength of sodium alginate films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Lin, Xinxing; Chen, Lihui; Huang, Liulian; Cao, Shilin; Wang, Huangwei

    2013-07-01

    The nonantibacterial and low strength properties of sodium alginate films negatively impact their application for food packaging. In order to improve these properties, a novel chitosan-benzalkonium chloride (C-BC) complex was prepared by ionic gelation using tripolyphosphate (TPP) as a coagulant, and a biocomposite obtained through the adsorption of C-BC complex on microfibrillated cellulose, MFC/C-BC, was then incorporated into a sodium alginate film. The TEM image showed that the C-BC nanoparticles were spherical in shape with a diameter of about 30 nm, and the adsorption equilibrium time of these nanoparticles on the surface of MFC was estimated to be 6 min under the driving forces of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. According to the disc diffusion method, the MFC/C-BC biocomposite-incorporated sodium alginate film exhibited remarkable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and certain antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli . The strength tests indicated that the tensile strength of the composite sodium alginate film increased about 225% when the loading of MFC/C-BC biocomposite was 10 wt %. These results suggested that the MFC/C-BC biocomposite-incorporated sodium alginate film with excellent antibacterial and strength properties would be a promising material for food packaging, and the MFC/C-BC may also be a potential multifunctional biocomposite for other biodegradable materials. PMID:23750871

  1. Alginate/Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) Base Biocompatible Gel for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wing P.; Kung, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Yu-Lin; Yang, Ming-Chen; Lai, Wen-Fu Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A technique for synthesizing biocompatible hydrogels by cross-linking calcium-form poly(γ-glutamic acid), alginate sodium, and Pluronic F-127 was created, in which alginate can be cross-linked by Ca2+ from Ca–γ-PGA directly and γ-PGA molecules introduced into the alginate matrix to provide pH sensitivity and hemostasis. Mechanical properties, swelling behavior, and blood compatibility were investigated for each hydrogel compared with alginate and for γ-PGA hydrogel with the sodium form only. Adding F-127 improves mechanical properties efficiently and influences the temperature-sensitive swelling of the hydrogels but also has a minor effect on pH-sensitive swelling and promotes anticoagulation. MG-63 cells were used to test biocompatibility. Gelation occurred gradually through change in the elastic modulus as the release of calcium ions increased over time and caused ionic cross-linking, which promotes the elasticity of gel. In addition, the growth of MG-63 cells in the gel reflected nontoxicity. These results showed that this biocompatible scaffold has potential for application in bone materials. PMID:26504784

  2. Preparation and characterization of hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate biocomposites for bone implant application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanasan, Nanthini; Adzila, Sharifah; Suid, Mohd Syafiq; Gurubaran, P.

    2016-07-01

    In biomedical fields, synthetic scaffolds are being improved by using the ceramics, polymers and composites materials to avoid the limitations of allograft. Ceramic-polymer composites are appearing to be the most successful bone graft substitute in human body. The natural bones itself are well-known as composite of collagen and hydroxyapatite. In this research, precipitation method was used to synthesis hydroxyapatite (HA)/sodium alginate (SA) in various parameters. This paper describes the hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate biocomposite which suitable for use in bone defects or regeneration of bone through the characterizations which include FTIR, FESEM, EDS and DTA. In FTIR, the characteristi peaks of PO4-3 and OH- groups which corresponding to hydroxyapatite are existed in the mixing powders. The needle-size particle of hydroxyapatite/ alginate (HA/SA) are observed in FESEM in the range of 15.8nm-38.2nm.EDS confirmed the existence of HA/SA composition in the mixing powders. There is an endothermic peak which corresponds to the dehydration and the loss of physically adsorbed water molecules of the hydroxyapatite (HA)/sodium alginate (SA) powder which are described in DTA.

  3. [Incidence of alginate-coding gene in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains].

    PubMed

    Bogiel, Tomasz; Kwiecińska-Piróg, Joanna; Kozuszko, Sylwia; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa rods are one of the most common isolated opportunistic nosocomial pathogens. Strains usually are capable to secret a capsule-like polysaccharide called alginate important for evasion of host defenses, especially during chronic pulmonary disease of patients with cystic fibrosis. Most genes for alginate biosynthesis and lysis are encoded by the operon. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence of algD sequence, generally use for alginate-coding gene detection, in 120 P. aeruginosa strains resistant to carbapenems. All isolates were obtained in the Department of Clinical Microbiology University Hospital no. 1 of dr A. Jurasz Collegium Medicum of L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń. Examined strains demonstrated resistance to carbenicillin (90,0%), ticarcillin (89,2%) and ticarcillin clavulanate (86,7%). All strains were susceptible to colistin. The majority of examined strains was susceptible to ceftazidime and cefepime (40,8% each) and norfloxacin (37,5%). Presence of algD gene - noted in 112 (93,3%) strains proves that not every strain is capable to produce alginate. It was also found out that differences in algD genes incidence in case of different clinical material that strains were isolated from were not statistically important. PMID:22184909

  4. Alginate/Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) Base Biocompatible Gel for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing P; Kung, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Yu-Lin; Yang, Ming-Chen; Lai, Wen-Fu Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A technique for synthesizing biocompatible hydrogels by cross-linking calcium-form poly(γ-glutamic acid), alginate sodium, and Pluronic F-127 was created, in which alginate can be cross-linked by Ca(2+) from Ca-γ-PGA directly and γ-PGA molecules introduced into the alginate matrix to provide pH sensitivity and hemostasis. Mechanical properties, swelling behavior, and blood compatibility were investigated for each hydrogel compared with alginate and for γ-PGA hydrogel with the sodium form only. Adding F-127 improves mechanical properties efficiently and influences the temperature-sensitive swelling of the hydrogels but also has a minor effect on pH-sensitive swelling and promotes anticoagulation. MG-63 cells were used to test biocompatibility. Gelation occurred gradually through change in the elastic modulus as the release of calcium ions increased over time and caused ionic cross-linking, which promotes the elasticity of gel. In addition, the growth of MG-63 cells in the gel reflected nontoxicity. These results showed that this biocompatible scaffold has potential for application in bone materials. PMID:26504784

  5. Impression Management Training: Conceptualization and Application to Personal Selling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathers, Dale G.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the importance of impression management, an individual's conscious attempt to exercise control over selected communicative behaviors and cues for purposes of making a desired impression. Provides a comprehensive conceptualization of the impression-management process, and demonstrates how this process can facilitate effective training of…

  6. Falsirhodobacter sp. alg1 Harbors Single Homologs of Endo and Exo-Type Alginate Lyases Efficient for Alginate Depolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Mami; Tanaka, Reiji; Miyake, Hideo; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Chow, Seinen; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Takeyama, Haruko

    2016-01-01

    Alginate-degrading bacteria play an important role in alginate degradation by harboring highly efficient and unique alginolytic genes. Although the general mechanism for alginate degradation by these bacteria is fairly understood, much is still required to fully exploit them. Here, we report the isolation of a novel strain, Falsirhodobacter sp. alg1, the first report for an alginate-degrading bacterium from the family Rhodobacteraceae. Genome sequencing reveals that strain alg1 harbors a primary alginate degradation pathway with only single homologs of an endo- and exo-type alginate lyase, AlyFRA and AlyFRB, which is uncommon among such bacteria. Subsequent functional analysis showed that both enzymes were extremely efficient to depolymerize alginate suggesting evolutionary interests in the acquirement of these enzymes. The exo-type alginate lyase, AlyFRB in particular could depolymerize alginate without producing intermediate products making it a highly efficient enzyme for the production of 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH). Based on our findings, we believe that the discovery of Falsirhodobacter sp. alg1 and its alginolytic genes hints at the potentiality of a more diverse and unique population of alginate-degrading bacteria. PMID:27176711

  7. Composite ECM-alginate microfibers produced by microfluidics as scaffolds with biomineralization potential.

    PubMed

    Angelozzi, Marco; Miotto, Martina; Penolazzi, Letizia; Mazzitelli, Stefania; Keane, Timothy; Badylak, Stephen F; Piva, Roberta; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    A novel approach to produce artificial bone composites (microfibers) with distinctive features mimicking natural tissue was investigated. Currently proposed inorganic materials (e.g. apatite matrixes) lack self-assembly and thereby limit interactions between cells and the material. The present work investigates the feasibility of creating "bio-inspired materials" specifically designed to overcome certain limitations inherent to current biomaterials. We examined the dimensions, morphology, and constitutive features of a composite hydrogel which combined an alginate based microfiber with a gelatin solution or a particulate form of urinary bladder matrix (UBM). The effectiveness of the composite microfibers to induce and modulate osteoblastic differentiation in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds without altering the viability and morphological characteristics of the cells was investigated. The present study describes a novel alginate microfiber production method with the use of microfluidics. The microfluidic procedure allowed for precise tuning of microfibers which resulted in enhanced viability and function of embedded cells. PMID:26249575

  8. Antibacterial Performance of Alginic Acid Coating on Polyethylene Film

    PubMed Central

    Karbassi, Elika; Asadinezhad, Ahmad; Lehocký, Marian; Humpolíček, Petr; Vesel, Alenka; Novák, Igor; Sáha, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Alginic acid coated polyethylene films were examined in terms of surface properties and bacteriostatic performance against two most representative bacterial strains, that is, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Microwave plasma treatment followed by brush formation in vapor state from three distinguished precursors (allylalcohol, allylamine, hydroxyethyl methacrylate) was carried out to deposit alginic acid on the substrate. Surface analyses via various techniques established that alginic acid was immobilized onto the surface where grafting (brush) chemistry influenced the amount of alginic acid coated. Moreover, alginic acid was found to be capable of bacterial growth inhibition which itself was significantly affected by the brush type. The polyanionic character of alginic acid as a carbohydrate polymer was assumed to play the pivotal role in antibacterial activity. The cell wall composition of two bacterial strains along with the substrates physicochemical properties accounted for different levels of bacteriostatic performance. PMID:25196604

  9. The Bidimensional Impression Management Index (BIMI): measuring agentic and communal forms of impression management.

    PubMed

    Blasberg, Sabrina A; Rogers, Katherine H; Paulhus, Delroy L

    2014-01-01

    Measures of impression management have yet to incorporate two-factor models of person perception. The 2 primary factors are often labeled agency and communion. In Study 1, we assembled a new measure of impression management—the Bidimensional Impression Management Index (BIMI): It comprises 2 subscales designed specifically to tap agentic and communal content. Both subscales showed adequate alpha reliabilities under both honest and faking conditions. In Study 2, the BIMI was cross-validated in a new sample: The subscales remained relatively independent, and their reliabilities remained solid. A coherent pattern of personality correlates also supported the validities of both subscales. In Study 3, the differential sensitivity of the 2 subscales was demonstrated by manipulating the job type in simulated job applications. Implications and applications of the BIMI are discussed. PMID:24328818

  10. Marginal and Internal Fit of Cobalt-Chromium Fixed Dental Prostheses Generated from Digital and Conventional Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Skjerven, Henrik; Carlsson, Pablo; Karlsson, Stig; Örtorp, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Digital impressions are increasingly used and have the potential to avoid the problem of inaccurate impressions. Only a few studies to verify the accuracy of digital impressions have been performed. The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal and internal fit of 3-unit tooth supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) fabricated from digital and conventional impressions. Methods. Ten FDPs were produced from digital impressions using the iTero system and 10 FDPs were produced using vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material. A triple-scan protocol and CAD software were used for measuring and calculating discrepancies of the FDPs at 3 standard areas: mean internal discrepancy, absolute marginal gap, and cervical area discrepancy. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for analyzing the results. Results. For conventional and digital impressions, respectively, FDPs had an absolute marginal gap of 147 μm and 142 μm, cervical area discrepancy of 69 μm and 44 μm, and mean internal discrepancy of 117 μm and 93 μm. The differences were statistically significant in the cervical and internal areas (P < 0.001). Significance. The results indicated that the digital impression technique is more exact and can generate 3-unit FDPs with a significantly closer fit compared to the VPS technique. PMID:24723954

  11. Diffusivity of Cu2+ in calcium alginate gel beads: recalculation.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Z; Roe, F

    1994-01-20

    Calculations of the diffusivity of Cu(2+) in calcium alginate gel beads using the shrinking core model were checked by us. Corrected results are reported here. Diffusivity was still found to increase with increasing alginate concentration, but at a lower rate than reported in the cited paper. The diffusivity increased by a factor of 2 over the range of alginate concentrations studied rather than 10. The original data is included with sample calculations. PMID:18615614

  12. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in urine on fabric.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Bandey, Helen; Bleay, Steve; NicDaéid, Niamh

    2012-01-10

    A range of chemical techniques were utilised for the enhancement of footwear impressions deposited on a variety of fabric types of different colours with urine as a contaminant. A semi-automated stamping device was used to deliver test impressions at a set force to minimise the variability between impressions; multiple impressions were produced and enhanced by each reagent to determine the repeatability of the enhancement. Urine samples from different donors were analysed using a spectrofluorophotometer revealing differences between individuals. Results indicated that the enhancement of footwear impressions in urine was possible using amino acid staining techniques whereas protein stains failed to achieve successful enhancement. PMID:21813253

  13. Phoenix Makes an Impression on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view from the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the first impression dubbed Yeti and looking like a wide footprint -- made on the Martian soil by the Robotic Arm scoop on Sol 6, the sixth Martian day of the mission, (May 31, 2008).

    Touching the ground is the first step toward scooping up soil and ice and delivering the samples to the lander's experiments.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Comparative characterization of three bacterial exo-type alginate lyases.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Makoto; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2016-05-01

    Alginate, a major acidic polysaccharide in brown macroalgae, has attracted attention as a carbon source for production of ethanol and other chemical compounds. Alginate is monomerized by exo-type alginate lyase into an unsaturated uronate; thus, this enzyme is critical for the saccharification and utilization of alginate. Although several exo-type alginate lyases have been characterized independently, their activities were not assayed under the same conditions or using the same unit definition, making it difficult to compare enzymatic properties or to select the most suitable enzyme for saccharification of alginate. In this study, we characterized the three bacterial exo-type alginate lyases under the same conditions: A1-IV of Sphingomonas sp. strain A1, Atu3025 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Alg17c of Saccharophagus degradans. A1-IV had the highest specific activity as well as the highest productivity of uronate, whereas Alg17c had the lowest activity and productivity. Only dialyzed Atu3025 and Alg17c were tolerant to freezing. Alg17c exhibited a remarkable halotolerance, which may be advantageous for monomerization of alginate from marine brown algae. Thus, each enzyme exhibited particular desirable and undesirable properties. Our results should facilitate further utilization of the promising polysaccharide alginate. PMID:26827758

  15. PLGA/alginate composite microspheres for hydrophilic protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng; Chen, X B; Schreyer, David J

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres were prepared by a novel double emulsion and solvent evaporation technique and loaded with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or rabbit anti-laminin antibody protein. The addition of alginate and the use of a surfactant during microsphere preparation increased the encapsulation efficiency and reduced the initial burst release of hydrophilic BSA. Confocal laser scanning microcopy (CLSM) of BSA-loaded PLGA/alginate composite microspheres showed that PLGA, alginate, and BSA were distributed throughout the depths of microspheres; no core/shell structure was observed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that PLGA microspheres erode and degrade more quickly than PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. When loaded with anti-laminin antibody, the function of released antibody was well preserved in both PLGA and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. The biocompatibility of PLGA and PLGA/alginate microspheres were examined using four types of cultured cell lines, representing different tissue types. Cell survival was variably affected by the inclusion of alginate in composite microspheres, possibly due to the sensitivity of different cell types to excess calcium that may be released from the calcium cross-linked alginate. PMID:26249587

  16. The comparative bioavailability of cimetidine-alginate treatments.

    PubMed

    Britton, A M; Nichols, J D; Draper, P R

    1991-02-01

    The comparative bioavailability of cimetidine in cimetidine-alginate combinations has been investigated in twelve healthy volunteers in an open crossover study. Each volunteer received a single oral dose of a commercially available alginate-cimetidine combination tablet (Algitec) or cimetidine tablets (Tagamet), co-administered with a commercially available alginate reflux suppressant liquid or tablet (Gaviscon). No significant differences were observed between treatments for Cmax, tmax, AUC0-12 or AUC0- infinity. The study demonstrated equivalent bioavailability of cimetidine when administered separately with alginate products and as a fixed dose combination product. PMID:1672897

  17. A three-dimensional culture system using alginate hydrogel prolongs hatched cattle embryo development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuan; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Gao, Hui; Wu, Yi; Fang, Yuan; Wu, Shuai-Shuai; Li, Ming-Jie; Bai, Jia-Hua; Liu, Yan; Evans, Alexander; Zeng, Shen-Ming

    2015-07-15

    No successful method exists to maintain the three-dimensional architecture of hatched embryos in vitro. Alginate, a linear polysaccharide derived from brown algae, has characteristics that make it an ideal material as a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix for in vitro cell, tissue, or embryo culture. In this study, alginate hydrogel was used for IVC of posthatched bovine embryos to observe their development under the 3D system. In vitro-fertilized and parthenogenetically activated posthatched bovine blastocysts were cultured in an alginate encapsulation culture system (AECS), an alginate overlay culture system (AOCS), or control culture system. After 18 days of culture, the survival rate of embryos cultured in AECS was higher than that in the control group (P < 0.05), and the embryos were expanded and elongated in AECS with the maximal length of 1.125 mm. When the AECS shrinking embryos were taken out of the alginate beads on Day 18 and cultured in the normal culture system, 9.09% of them attached to the bottoms of the plastic wells and grew rapidly, with the largest area of an attached embryo being 66.00 mm(2) on Day 32. The embryos cultured in AOCS developed monovesicular or multivesicular morphologies. Total cell number of the embryos cultured in AECS on Day 19 was significantly higher than that of embryos on Day 8. Additionally, AECS and AOCS supported differentiation of the embryonic cells. Binuclear cells were visible in Day-26 adherent embryos, and the messenger RNA expression patterns of Cdx2 and Oct4 in AOCS-cultured embryos were similar to those in vivo embryos, whereas IFNT and ISG15 messenger RNA were still expressed in Day-26 and Day-32 prolong-cultured embryos. In conclusion, AECS and AOCS did support cell proliferation, elongation, and differentiation of hatched bovine embryos during prolonged IVC. The culture system will be useful to further investigate the molecular mechanisms controlling ruminant embryo elongation and implantation. PMID

  18. Effect of jet stretch and particle load on cellulose nanocrystal-alginate nanocomposite fibers.

    PubMed

    Ureña-Benavides, Esteban E; Brown, Philip J; Kitchens, Christopher L

    2010-09-01

    Alginate fibers have found many applications such as the preparation of dressings to treat exuding wounds, drug delivery, enzyme immobilization, etc.; however, their use is limited due to poor mechanical properties. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were isolated from cotton and introduced into calcium alginate fibers with the goal of improving their strength and modulus. The isolated CNCs are elongated nanoparticles of crystalline cellulose with an average length of 130 nm with a standard deviation (s) of 63 nm, an average width of 20.4 nm (s = 7.8 nm), and an average height of 6.8 nm (s = 3.3 nm). The CNCs were mixed with an aqueous sodium alginate dope solution and wet spun into a CaCl(2) bath to form fibers. It was found that if the apparent jet stretch (ratio of the fiber draw velocity to extrusion velocity) is kept constant, addition of the nanocrystals reduces the tensile strength and modulus of the material; however, a small concentration of CNCs in the dope solution increases the tensile energy to break and enables an increase in the fiber spinning apparent jet stretch ratio by nearly 2-fold at up to 25% CNCs load; the maximum ratio of 4.6 is observed at 25 wt % CNC loading as compared to a maximum of 2.4 for the native alginate. Mechanical testing showed a 38% increase in tenacity and a 123% increase in tensile modulus with 10 wt % CNCs loading and an apparent jet stretch of 4.2. The data suggest that alignment of the nanocrystals in the composites is a key factor influencing the mechanical properties. CNCs have potential to become a biocompatible, renewable, and cost-effective solution to reinforce alginate fibers. PMID:20712357

  19. Impression creep behavior of SiC particle-MoSi{sub 2} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, D.P.; Korzekwa, D.A.; Maloy, S.A.; Kung, H.; Petrovic, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    Using a cylindrical indenter (or punch), the impression creep behavior of MoSi{sub 2}-SiC composites containing 0{endash}40{percent} SiC by volume, was characterized at 1000{endash}1200{degree}C, 258{endash}362 MPa punch pressure. Through finite element modeling, an equation that depends on the material stress exponent was derived that converts the stress distribution beneath the punch to an effective compressive stress. Using this relationship, direct comparisons were made between impression and compressive creep studies. Under certain conditions, compressive creep and impression creep measurements yield comparable results after correcting for effective stresses and strain rates beneath the punch. However, rate-controlling mechanisms may be quite different under the two stressing conditions, in which case impression creep data should not be used to predict compressive creep behavior. The addition of SiC affects the impression creep behavior of MoSi{sub 2} in a complex manner by pinning grain boundaries during pressing, thus leading to smaller MoSi{sub 2} grains and by obstructing or altering both dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  20. Valence-based age differences in medial prefrontal activity during impression formation.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Brittany S; Leshikar, Eric D; Shih, Joanne Y; Aizenman, Avigael; Gutchess, Angela H

    2013-01-01

    Reports of age-related changes to medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) activity during socio-cognitive tasks have shown both age-equivalence and under recruitment. Emotion work illustrates selective mPFC response dependent on valence, such that negative emotional images evoke increased ventral mPFC activity for younger adults, while older adults recruit vmPFC more for positive material. By testing whether this differential age-related response toward valenced material is also present for the social task of forming impressions, we may begin to understand inconsistencies regarding when age differences are present vs. absent in the literature. Using fMRI, participants intentionally formed impressions of positive and negative face-behavior pairs in anticipation of a memory task. Extending previous findings to a social task, valence-based reversals were present in dorsal and ventral mPFC, and posterior cingulate cortex. Younger adults elicited increased activity when forming negative impressions, while older adults had more recruitment when forming positive impressions. This suggests an age-related shift toward emphasizing positive social information may be reflected in the recruitment of regions supporting forming impressions. Overall, the results indicate an age-related shift in neural response to socio-cognitive stimuli that is valence dependent rather than a general age-related reduction in activity, in part informing prior inconsistencies within the literature. PMID:23998453

  1. Redox-responsive alginate microsphere containing cystamine.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kyeongnan; Kim, Jin-Chul

    2016-10-01

    Redox-responsive microspheres were prepared by solidifying the alginate- and cystamine-containing water droplets of O/W emulsion using calcium ion. Emulsions were prepared using alginate/cystamine mixture solution whose the carboxylic group/the amino group molar ratio was 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3, and whose the total concentration was kept to 2% (w/v). The microspheres on Scanning electron microscopy photographs were almost spherical and they were less than 1 μm in diameter. According to the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the sulfur content of the microspheres was found to be 6.1, 11.4, and 14.8% (w/w), respectively, not markedly different from the calculated content. The release degree of blue dextran loaded in the microspheres was higher as the cystamine content was higher. Microspheres released almost the same amount of dye regardless of dithiothreitol (DTT, a reducing agent) concentration when the cystamine content was relatively low (e.g. 14.5% (w/w)), whereas they released dye in DTT concentration-dependent manner when the cystamine content was relatively high (e.g. 27.0 and 35.1% (w/w)). The light scattering intensity of alginate/cystamine mixture solution was stronger at a larger amount of cystamine, indicating that cystamine could cross-link alginate chains. The light scattering intensity decreased with increasing DTT concentration, possibly because of the breakdown of the disulfide bond of cystamine. The breakdown of the disulfide bond could account for why the DTT concentration-dependent release of dye loaded in the microspheres was observed. PMID:27484719

  2. Antibacterial efficacy and effect of Morinda citrifolia L. mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid for dental impressions: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A. Shafath; Charles, P. David; Cholan, R.; Russia, M.; Surya, R.; Jailance, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to evaluate whether the extract of Morinda citrifolia L. mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid powder decreases microbial contamination during impression making without affecting the resulting casts. Materials and Methods: Twenty volunteers were randomly divided into two groups (n = 10). Group A 30 ml extract of M. citrifolia L diluted in 30 ml of water was mixed to make the impression with irreversible hydrocolloid material. Group B 30 ml deionized water was mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid material to make the impressions following which the surface roughness and dimensional stability of casts were evaluated. Results: Extract of M. citrifolia L. mixed with irreversible hydrocolloid decreased the percentage of microorganisms when compared with water (P < 0.001) but did not affect the surface quality or dimensional stability of the casts. Conclusion: Mixing the extract of M. citrifolia L. with irreversible hydrocolloid powder is an alternative method to prevent contamination without sacrificing impression quality. PMID:26538926

  3. Malleability of social impressions of hyperactive children.

    PubMed

    Granger, D A; Whalen, C K; Henker, B

    1993-12-01

    The role of adults' social cognitions in mediating judgments of hyperactive children's medication-related behavior change was explored. Two hundred eight-eight undergraduates observed two videotaped excerpts of a hyperactive "target" boy playing a group game with two peers. Each target was taking either methylphenidate (0.6 mg/kg) during both excerpts, placebo during both excerpts, methylphenidate first followed by placebo, or placebo first followed by methylphenidate. Adults' cumulative social evaluations of the child were assessed after they viewed both video segments. Results indicated that observers combined their perceptions of the two behavior samples into composite impressions using an equal-weight averaging algorithm. Even for children whose behavior improved, adults' ratings of undercontrolled behaviors continued to meet or, in some cases exceed, research cutoff scores used to identify hyperactive children. The findings suggest that the actual behaviors of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) play a more influential role in shaping interpersonal impressions than do perceiver social-cognitive processes such as primacy, recency, or integration biases. PMID:8126317

  4. Controlled nucleation of hydroxyapatite on alginate scaffolds for stem cell-based bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-González, Darilis; Barnhart, Kara; Saito, Eiji; Vanderby, Ray; Hollister, Scott; Murphy, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Current bone tissue engineering strategies aim to grow a tissue similar to native bone by combining cells and biologically active molecules with a scaffold material. In this study, a macroporous scaffold made from the seaweed-derived polymer alginate was synthesized and mineralized for cell-based bone tissue engineering applications. Nucleation of a bone-like hydroxyapatite mineral was achieved by incubating the scaffold in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF) for four weeks. Analysis using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral primarily composed of calcium and phosphorous. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite, the major inorganic constituent of human bone tissue. In addition to the mineral characterization, the ability to control nucleation on the surface, into the bulk of the material, or on the inner pore surfaces of scaffolds was demonstrated. Finally, human MSCs attached and proliferated on the mineralized scaffolds and cell attachment improved when seeding cells on mineral coated alginate scaffolds. This novel alginate- HAP composite material could be used in bone tissue engineering as a scaffold material to deliver cells, and perhaps also biologically active molecules. PMID:20574984

  5. Heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of ofloxacin drug by iron alginate support.

    PubMed

    Titouhi, Hana; Belgaied, Jamel-Eddine

    2016-08-01

    A new catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of ofloxacin antibiotic is presented in this work. The removal was achieved using a biodegradable sodium alginate-iron material. Several parameters were studied such as iron content, drying duration of the catalytic support, temperature, solid amount and initial drug concentration. The process showed a strong oxidative ability; at optimum conditions, a nearly complete removal of the drug (around 98%) has been reached after three h of treatment. A relatively low decrease of support activity (around 10%) has been observed after three successive oxidation runs and a low iron leaching has been detected (1.2% of the incorporated quantity). The removal of the substrate has been also examined in the absence of hydrogen peroxide in order to discriminate between the contributions of simple adsorption and oxidation processes in the drug disappearance. We also discussed the influence of the studied experimental parameters on the removal kinetic. PMID:26752017

  6. NMR microscopy of heavy metal absorption in calcium alginate beads

    SciTech Connect

    Nestle, N.; Kimmich, R.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, heavy metal uptake by biopolymer gels, such as Cal-Alginate or chitosan, has been studied by various methods. This is of interest because such materials might be an alternative to synthetical ion-exchange resins in the treatment of industrial waste waters. Most of the work done in this field consisted of studies of equilibrium absorption of different heavy metal ions with dependence on various experimental parameters. In some publications, the kinetics of absorption were studied, too. However, no experiments on the spatial distribution of heavy metals during the absorption process are known to us. Using Cu as an example, it is demonstrated in this article that NMR microscopy is an appropriate tool for such studies. By the method presented here, it is possible to monitor the spatial distribution of heavy metal ions with a time resolution of about 5 min and a spatial resolution of 100 {mu}m or even better. 14 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Novel Model-Based Inquiry of Ionic Bonding in Alginate Hydrogels Used in Tissue Engineering for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Robby D.; Saroka, James M.; Archer, Shivaun D.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Because of cost and time, it is difficult to relate to students how fundamental chemical principles are involved in cutting edge biomedical breakthroughs being reported in the national media. The laboratory exercise presented here is aimed at high school chemistry students and uses alginate hydrogels, a common material used in tissue engineering,…

  8. Characterization of morphology and composition of inorganic fillers in dental alginates.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Consani, Simonides; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Meneghel, Luciana Lira; da Silva, Fabiane Borges; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Archimedes' Principle were used to determine the characteristics of inorganic filler particles in five dental alginates, including Cavex ColorChange (C), Hydrogum 5 (H5), Hydrogum (H), Orthoprint (O), and Jeltrate Plus (JP). The different alginate powders (0.5 mg) were fixed on plastic stubs (n = 5) and sputter coated with carbon for EDX analysis, then coated with gold, and observed using SEM. Volume fractions were determined by weighing a sample of each material in water before and after calcining at 450(°)C for 3 h. The alginate materials were mainly composed of silicon (Si) by weight (C-81.59%, H-79.89%, O-78.87%, H5-77.95%, JP-66.88%, wt). The filler fractions in volume (vt) were as follows: H5-84.85%, JP-74.76%, H-70.03%, O-68.31%, and C-56.10%. The tested materials demonstrated important differences in the inorganic elemental composition, filler fraction, and particle morphology. PMID:25165690

  9. Characterization of Morphology and Composition of Inorganic Fillers in Dental Alginates

    PubMed Central

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Consani, Simonides; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Meneghel, Luciana Lira; da Silva, Fabiane Borges; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Archimedes' Principle were used to determine the characteristics of inorganic filler particles in five dental alginates, including Cavex ColorChange (C), Hydrogum 5 (H5), Hydrogum (H), Orthoprint (O), and Jeltrate Plus (JP). The different alginate powders (0.5 mg) were fixed on plastic stubs (n = 5) and sputter coated with carbon for EDX analysis, then coated with gold, and observed using SEM. Volume fractions were determined by weighing a sample of each material in water before and after calcining at 450°C for 3 h. The alginate materials were mainly composed of silicon (Si) by weight (C—81.59%, H—79.89%, O—78.87%, H5—77.95%, JP—66.88%, wt). The filler fractions in volume (vt) were as follows: H5—84.85%, JP—74.76%, H—70.03%, O—68.31%, and C—56.10%. The tested materials demonstrated important differences in the inorganic elemental composition, filler fraction, and particle morphology. PMID:25165690

  10. Accuracy of a proposed implant impression technique using abutments and metal framework

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeok-Jae; Lim, Young-Jun; Kim, Chang-Whe; Choi, Jung-Han

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE This study compared the accuracy of an abutment-framework (A-F) taken with open tray impression technique combining cementon crown abutments, a metal framework and resin cement to closed tray and resin-splinted open tray impression techniques for the 3-implant definitive casts. The effect of angulation on the accuracy of these 3 techniques was also evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS Three definitive casts, each with 3 linearly positioned implant analogs at relative angulations 0, 30, and 40 degrees, were fabricated with passively fitted corresponding reference frameworks. Ten impressions were made and poured, using each of the 3 techniques on each of the 3 definitive casts. To record the vertical gap between reference frameworks and analogs in duplicate casts, a light microscope with image processing was used. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test. RESULTS The open tray techniques showed significantly smaller vertical gaps compare to closed tray technique (P < .05). The closed tray and the resin-splinted open tray technique showed significantly different vertical gaps according to the angulation of implant (P < .05), but the A-F impression technique did not (P > .05). CONCLUSION The accuracy of the A-F impression technique was superior to that of conventional techniques, and was not affected by the angulation of the implants. PMID:21165184

  11. Optical impression systems for CAD-CAM restorations.

    PubMed

    Galhano, Graziela Ávila Prado; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Mazaro, José Vitor Quinelli

    2012-11-01

    Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing images can be taken through either direct or indirect imaging. For the indirect systems, the digitalization is obtained from the impression material or cast, and for the direct ones the image is taken directly from the mouth using intraoral scanners.The direct acquisition systems have been constantly improved because these are less invasive, quicker, and more precise than the conventional method. Besides, the digital images can be easily stored for a long time. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to describe and discuss based on the literature the main direct image acquisition systems available on the market: CEREC Bluecam (Sirona), Lava C.O.S. System (3M ESPE), iTero System (Cadent/Straumann), and E4D System (D4D Technologies). PMID:23172483

  12. A Controlled Drug-Delivery Experiment Using Alginate Beads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Stephanie; Vernengo, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, cost-effective experiment which introduces students to drug delivery and modeling using alginate beads. Students produce calcium alginate beads loaded with drug and measure the rate of release from the beads for systems having different stir rates, geometries, extents of cross-linking, and drug molecular weight.…

  13. 21 CFR 172.858 - Propylene glycol alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Propylene glycol alginate. 172.858 Section 172.858... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.858 Propylene glycol alginate. The food additive propylene glycol... information required by the act: (1) The name of the additive, “propylene glycol alginate” or...

  14. 21 CFR 172.858 - Propylene glycol alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Propylene glycol alginate. 172.858 Section 172.858... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.858 Propylene glycol alginate. The food additive propylene glycol... information required by the act: (1) The name of the additive, “propylene glycol alginate” or...

  15. 21 CFR 172.858 - Propylene glycol alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Propylene glycol alginate. 172.858 Section 172.858... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.858 Propylene glycol alginate. The food additive propylene glycol... information required by the act: (1) The name of the additive, “propylene glycol alginate” or...

  16. Impression Management in Survey Responding: Easier for Collectivists or Individualists?

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Hila; Shavitt, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments indicate that when individualists and collectivists engage in impression management on self-reports, they do so through different psychological mechanism s. Collectivists do so through a relatively automatic process. Thus, they can impression manage even when cognitively busy. Individualists impression manage through a more effortful process. Therefore, they can do so only when the situation permits effortful processing. These findings highlight distinct conditions under which social norms may influence consumer self-reports across cultures. PMID:23175618

  17. Comparison of some biochemical properties of artichoke polyphenol oxidase entrapped in alginate-carrageenan and alginate gels.

    PubMed

    Yagar, Hulya; Kocaturk, Selin

    2014-08-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC.1.14.18.1) isolated from artichoke (Cynara scolymus) was entrapped within alginate and alginate+ carrageenan beads, and the catecholase and cresolase activities of both entrapped enzymes were determined. Some properties of these immobilized enzymes such as optimum pH and temperature, kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax), thermal, and storage stability were determined and compared to each other. The highest catecholase activity was observed in alginate gel (370 U/g bead) while the highest cresolase activity was in alginate+ carrageenan gel (90 U/g bead). For catecholase and cresolase activities, optimum pHs of alginate and alginate+ carrageenan beads were determined to be 7.0 and 4.0, respectively. Optimum temperatures for catecholase activity were determined to be 40°C for both entrapped enzymes. These values for cresolase activity were 30°C and 20°C, respectively. Immobilized artichoke PPOs greatly preserved their thermal stability which exists anyway. The catalytic efficiency value (Vmax/Km) of the alginate beads is approximately high as two-and-a-half folds of that of alginate+κ-carrageenan beads for cresolase activity. These values were very close for catecholase activity. Immobilized beads saved their both activities after 30 days of storage at 4°C. PMID:23795723

  18. Recovery of zinc, cadmium, and lanthanum by biopolymer gel particles of alginic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Konishi, Yasuhiro; Asai, Satoru; Midoh, Yuji; Oku, Muneharu )

    1993-07-01

    Biopolymer gel particles of alginic acid were found to be a useful material for recovering zinc, cadmium, and lanthanum from aqueous solutions. The metals sorbed by the gel particles could be completely eluted by using dilute HCl solution of 0.1 kmol/m[sup 3]. The distribution ratios of the individual metals between the gel and liquid phases were measured by using a batch method. The equilibrium data were consistent with predictions made assuming that sorption takes place with the ion-exchange reaction between metal ions and alginic acid. The maximum sorption capacity of the gel particles and the distribution equilibrium constants for the metals were determined by comparing the experimental data with the theoretical predictions. The observed effect of temperature on the distribution equilibrium was insignificant in the range from 15 to 35[degrees]C. 17 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Glutathione and S-nitrosoglutathione in alginate/chitosan nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcato, P. D.; Adami, L. F.; Melo, P. S.; de Paula, L. B.; Durán, N.; Seabra, A. B.

    2011-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in several physiological processes, such as the control of vascular tone, the immune response and the wound healing process. Thus, there is a great interest in the development of NO-releasing drugs and in matrices which are able to stabilize and release NO locally in different tissues. Thiols, such as glutathione (GSH), are ready nitrosated to form the NO donors S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs). In this work, GSH, a precursor of the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), was encapsulated into a mucoadhesive combination of alginate/chitosan nanoparticles. The encapsulated GSH was nitrosated in the alginate/chitosan nanoparticles by adding sodium nitrite, leading to the formation of encapsulated GSNO. The cytotoxicity characterization of the nanoparticles containing either GSH or GSNO showed that these materials were completely non cytotoxic to cellular viability. These results show that this novel nanostructure biomaterial has a great potential to be use in biomedical applications where NO has a therapeutical effect.

  20. TEMPO-oxidized nanocellulose participating as crosslinking aid for alginate-based sponges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ning; Bruzzese, Cécile; Dufresne, Alain

    2012-09-26

    Crosslinked polysaccharide sponges have been prepared by freeze-drying of amorphous alginate-oxidized nanocellulose in the presence of a Ca(2+) ionic crosslinking agent. The new carboxyl groups on the surface of nanocellulose induced by the chemical oxidization provided the possibility of participating in the construction of an alginate-based sponge's structure and played a fundamental role in the structural and mechanical stability of ensuing sponges. Furthermore, enhanced mechanical strength induced by oxidized cellulose nanocrystals and the formation of a semi-interpenetrating polymer network from oxidized microfibrillated cellulose were reported. Together with the facile and ionic crosslinking process, the ultrahigh porosity, promising water absorption and retention, as well as the improved compression strength of the crosslinked sponges should significantly extend the use of this soft material in diverse practical applications. PMID:22950801

  1. Development of a new antibacterial biomaterial by tetracycline immobilization on calcium-alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Ozseker, Emine Erdogan; Akkaya, Alper

    2016-10-20

    In recent years, increasing risk of infection, caused by resistant microorganism to antibiotics, has become the limelight discovery of new and natural antibacterial materials. Heavy metals, such as silver, copper, mercury and titanium, have antibacterial activity. Products, which improved these metals, do not have stable antibacterial property. Therefore, use of these products is restricted. The aim of this study was to immobilize tetracycline to alginate and improve an antibacterial biomaterial. For this purpose, calcium-alginate beads were formed by dropping to calcium-chloride solution and tetracycline was immobilized to beads using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide at optimum conditions. After immobilization, actualization of immobilization was investigated by analyzing ATR-FTIR spectrum and SEM images. Also, antibacterial property of obtained product was tested. Improved product demonstrated antibacterial property. It has potential for open wound, surgical drapes, bed and pillow sheath in hospitals and it may also be used for increasing human comfort in daily life. PMID:27474587

  2. Interpenetrating Fibrin-Alginate Matrices for in vitro Ovarian Follicle Development

    PubMed Central

    Shikanov, Ariella; Xu, Min; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we investigate the fibrin-alginate inter penetrating network (FA-IPN) to provide dynamic cell-responsive mechanical properties, which we apply to the in vitro growth of ovarian follicles. The mechanical properties and polymerization rate of the gels were investigated by rheology, and the fiber structure was imaged by electron microscopy. Using a mouse model, two-layered secondary follicles were encapsulated in FA-IPNs, and growth, morphology, hormone production, fibrin degradation rate and the numbers of competent eggs were assessed. The initial mechanics of the FA-IPN are determined by the composite material, and subsequent degradation of fibrin by the encapsulated cells would produce a material with mechanical properties due to the alginate alone. The rate of meotically competent oocytes produced by culture in FA-IPN was 82%, which was significantly greater than in alginate alone. This increase in oocyte quality is an important step in identifying 3D culture systems that can provide a fundamental tool to investigate follicle maturation, and may be applied to promote the growth of human follicles, which can be used to provide reproductive options for women facing a cancer diagnosis PMID:19616843

  3. Prevention of Polyglycolic Acid-Induced Peritoneal Adhesions Using Alginate in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Mari; Hashimoto, Ayumi; Tanzawa, Ayumi; Orikasa, Taichi; Ikeda, Junki; Iwame, Yoshizumi; Ozamoto, Yuki; Miyamoto, Hiroe; Yoshida, Chiko; Hashimoto, Toru; Torii, Hiroko; Takamori, Hideki; Morita, Shinichiro; Tsujimoto, Hiroyuki; Hagiwara, Akeo

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative intra-abdominal or intrathoracic adhesions sometimes cause significant morbidity. We have designed three types of alginate-based treatments using strongly cross-linked (SL), weakly cross-linked (WL), and non-cross-linked (NL) alginate with calcium gluconate. In rat experiments, we compared the antiadhesive effects of the three types of alginate-based treatments, fibrin glue treatment (a standard treatment), and no treatment against adhesions caused by polyglycolic acid (PGA) mesh (PGA-induced adhesions). The antiadhesive materials were set on the PGA sheet fixed on the parietal peritoneum of the abdomen. Fifty-six days later, the adhesions were evaluated macroscopically by the adhesion scores and microscopically by hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunostaining. We also tested the fibroblast growth on the surface of the antiadhesive materials in vitro. The antiadhesive effects of WL and NL were superior to the no treatment and fibrin glue treatment. A microscopic evaluation confirmed that the PGA sheet was covered by a peritoneal layer constructed of well-differentiated mesothelial cells, and the inflammation was most improved in the NL and WL. The fibroblast growth was inhibited most on the surfaces of the NL and WL. These results suggest that either the WL or NL treatments are suitable for preventing PGA-induced adhesions compared to SL or the conventional treatment. PMID:26078949

  4. Alginate Particles as Platform for Drug Delivery by the Oral Route: State-of-the-Art

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical research and development aims to design products with ensured safety, quality, and efficacy to treat disease. To make the process more rational, coherent, efficient, and cost-effective, the field of Pharmaceutical Materials Science has emerged as the systematic study of the physicochemical properties and behavior of materials of pharmaceutical interest in relation to product performance. The oral route is the most patient preferred for drug administration. The presence of a mucus layer that covers the entire gastrointestinal tract has been exploited to expand the use of the oral route by developing a mucoadhesive drug delivery system that showed a prolonged residence time. Alginic acid and sodium and potassium alginates have emerged as one of the most extensively explored mucoadhesive biomaterials owing to very good cytocompatibility and biocompatibility, biodegradation, sol-gel transition properties, and chemical versatility that make possible further modifications to tailor their properties. The present review overviews the most relevant applications of alginate microparticles and nanoparticles for drug administration by the oral route and discusses the perspectives of this biomaterial in the future. PMID:25101184

  5. Effects of Music on Image Impression and Relationship between Impression and Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Keiko; Mitsukura, Yasue

    Auditory information plays an integral role in AV media because even identical images are perceived differently when they are matched with different music. However, we now present a few studies in which the changes in subjective perceptions were analyzed on the basis of the physical properties of the perceived items. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of music on image impression in terms of the physical properties of images. In this paper, we first elucidate the changes in subjective impressions when the image is presented by itself and when it is presented with music. Secondly, to clarify the relation between the impression of an image or music and physical properties, we compare the different image or music perceptions with each other and also compare their respective physical properties, which include color information, structural information, and frequency characteristics. As a result, the color information of an image containing green or saturation colors and the power of the music were strongly correlated with adjectives expressing activity. Moreover, the entropy of saturation correlated with words expressing spatial extent.

  6. Downplaying Positive Impressions: Compensation Between Warmth and Competence in Impression Management

    PubMed Central

    Holoien, Deborah Son; Fiske, Susan T.

    2014-01-01

    The compensation effect demonstrates a negative relationship between the dimensions of warmth and competence in impression formation in comparative contexts. However, does compensation between warmth and competence extend to impression management? Two studies examined whether people actively downplay their warmth in order to appear competent and downplay their competence in order to appear warm. In Studies 1a and 1b, participants selected words pretested to be high or low in warmth and competence to include in an e-mail message to people they wanted to impress. As predicted, participants downplayed their competence when they wanted to appear warm (Study 1a) and downplayed their warmth when they wanted to appear competent (Study 1b). In Studies 2a and 2b, compensation also occurred when participants introduced themselves to another person, as evidenced by the questions they selected to answer about themselves, their self-reported goals, and their open-ended introductions. Compensation occurred uniquely between warmth and competence and not for other dimensions, such as healthiness (Study 2a) and political interest (Study 2b), which suggests that the compensation effect extends beyond a mere zero-sum exchange between dimensions. PMID:24550571

  7. Cetylpyridinium chloride/magnetic alginate beads: an efficient system to remove p-nitrophenol from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeid, Layaly; Bee, Agnes; Talbot, Delphine; Abramson, Sebastien; Welschbillig, Mathias

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption process is one of the most efficient methods to remove pollutants from wastewater provided that suitable adsorbents are used. In order to produce environmentally safe adsorbents, natural polymers have received increasing attention in recent years. Thus, alginate, a polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweeds, is extensively used as inexpensive, non-toxic and efficient biosorbent. Furthermore, it has been shown that the encapsulation of magnetic materials in alginate beads facilitates their recovery from wastewater after the adsorption step, by the use of an external magnetic field gradient, obtained with a magnet or an electromagnet [1, 2]. In the present work, we have studied the adsorption affinity of magnetic alginate beads (called magsorbents)for p-nitrophenol (PNP), used as a hydrophobic pollutant, in presence of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cationic surfactant. First, the effect of different parameters (pH solution, contact time, surfactant initial concentration…) on the adsorption of CPC on the alginate beads was investigated. Adsorption of the surfactant occurs due to electrostatic attractions between its cationic head groups and negative carboxylate functions of the alginate beads. At larger surfactant concentrations, adsorption is also due to the interaction between the hydrocarbon chains of CPC forming aggregated structures capable of solubilizing hydrophobic solutes. In a second step, we showed that PNP can reach up to 95% of adsorption in the beads in presence of CPC, although the pollutant is poorly adsorbed by alginate in absence of the surfactant. At highest CPC concentrations, desorption occurs as micellar solubilization is preferred over coadsorption. Our magsorbents appear to efficiently remove both cationic surfactant and hydrophobic pollutants and we hope that this fundamental research will be helpful for the future development of magnetically assisted processes in water treatment plants. 1. A.Bee, D.Talbot, S.Abramson, V

  8. Effects of added oligoguluronate on mechanical properties of Ca - alginate - oligoguluronate hydrogels depend on chain length of the alginate.

    PubMed

    Padoł, Anna Maria; Draget, Kurt Ingar; Stokke, Bjørn Torger

    2016-08-20

    The effect of adding shorter alginate fragments highly enriched in α-l-guluronic acid (oligoG) on the Young's modulus of the Ca-induced alginate hydrogels were determined using nanoindentation. Ca-alginate gels using two low and one high molecular weight alginate, with increasing amount of added oligoG, were prepared at constant 20mM total Ca(2+) by in situ release of the cation. Differences in the effect on the mechanical properties of increasing amount of oligoG to the various alginate samples were attributed to their different capability to support network connectivity by junction zone formation. Upon decreasing the fractional Ca-saturation of all the α-l-guluronic acid residues (G) present, Fsat, by increasing the oligoG concentration, the lower molecular weight alginates displayed the largest reduction in Young's modulus. This was suggested to be due to the few sequences of α-l-guluronic acid residues making up potential zones engaging in network connectivity of this alginate. Similar trends were observed for a low molecular weight alginate with larger fraction of G. The higher molecular weight sample displayed less reduction of Young's modulus associated with increasing concentration of oligoG. The consequences of reduction in effective, mean junction zone functionality and associated increase in sol fraction with added oligoG on the elastic properties thus depend on the chain length of the alginates. These finding suggest that effects of added oligoG on Ca-induced alginate gelation should connect the effect on junction zone formation to those mediating network connectivity. PMID:27178929

  9. Impression Creep Behavior of a Cast AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabirian, F.; Mahmudi, R.

    2009-01-01

    The creep behavior of the cast AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated by impression testing. The tests were carried out under constant punching stress in the range 100 to 650 MPa, corresponding to 0.007 ≤ σ imp/ G ≤ 0.044, at temperatures in the range 425 to 570 K. Assuming a power-law relationship between the impression velocity and stress, depending on the testing temperature, stress exponents of 4.2 to 6.0 were obtained. When the experimental creep rates were normalized to the grain size and effective diffusion coefficient, a stress exponent of approximately 5 was obtained, which is in complete agreement with stress exponents determined by the conventional creep testing of the same material reported in the literature. Calculation of the activation energy showed a slight decrease in the activation energy with increasing stress such that the creep-activation energy of 122.9 kJ/mol at σ imp/ G = 0.020 decreases to 94.0 kJ/mol at σ imp/ G = 0.040. Based on the obtained stress exponents and activation energy data, it is proposed that dislocation climb is the controlling creep mechanism. However, due to the decreasing trend of creep-activation energy with stress, it is suggested that two parallel mechanisms of lattice and pipe-diffusion-controlled dislocation climb are competing. To elucidate the contribution of each mechanism to the overall creep deformation, the creep rates were calculated based on the effective activation energy. This yielded a criterion that showed that, in the high-stress regimes, the experimental activation energies fall in the range in which the operative creep mechanism is dislocation climb controlled by dislocation pipe diffusion. In the low-stress regime, however, the lattice-diffusion dislocation climb is dominant.

  10. Impression Cytology of the Lid Wiper Area.

    PubMed

    Muntz, Alex; van Doorn, Kevin; Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Jones, Lyndon W

    2016-01-01

    Few reports on the cellular anatomy of the lid wiper (LW) area of the inner eyelid exist and only one report makes use of cytological methods. The optimization of a method of collecting, staining and imaging cells from the LW region using impression cytology (IC) is described in this study. Cells are collected from the inner surface of the upper eyelid of human subjects using hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes, and stained with cytological dyes to reveal the presence of goblet cells, mucins, cell nuclei and various degrees of pre- and para-keratinization. Immunocytochemical dyes show cell esterase activity and compromised cell membranes by the use of a confocal scanning laser microscope. Up to 100 microscopic digital images are captured for each sample and stitched into a high-resolution, large scale image of the entire IC span. We demonstrate a higher sensitivity of IC than reported before, appropriate for identifying cellular morphologies and metabolic activity in the LW area. To our knowledge, this is the first time this selection of fluorescent dyes was used to image LW IC membranes. This protocol will be effective in future studies to reveal undocumented details of the LW area, such as assessing cellular particularities of contact lens wearers or patients with dry eye or lid wiper epitheliopathy. PMID:27584693

  11. Controlled mineralisation and recrystallisation of brushite within alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bjørnøy, Sindre H; Bassett, David C; Ucar, Seniz; Andreassen, Jens-Petter; Sikorski, Pawel

    2016-02-01

    Due to high solubility and fast resorption behaviour under physiological conditions, brushite (CaHPO4⋅2H2O, calcium monohydrogen phosphate dihydrate, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate) has great potential in bone regeneration applications, both in combination with scaffolds or as a component of calcium phosphate cements. The use of brushite in combination with hydrogels opens up possibilities for new cell-based tissue engineering applications of this promising material. However, published preparation methods of brushite composites, in which the mineral phase is precipitated within the hydrogel network, fail to offer the necessary degree of control over the mineral phase, content and distribution within the hydrogel matrix. The main focus of this study is to address these shortcomings by determining the precise fabrication parameters needed to prepare composites with controlled composition and properties. Composite alginate microbeads were prepared using a counter-diffusion technique, which allows for the simultaneous crosslinking of the hydrogel and precipitation of an inorganic mineral phase. Reliable nucleation of a desired mineral phase within the alginate network proved more challenging than simple aqueous precipitation. This was largely due to ion transport within the hydrogel producing concentration gradients that modified levels of supersaturation and favoured the nucleation of other phases such as hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate, which would otherwise not form. To overcome this, the incorporation of brushite seed crystals resulted in good control during the mineral phase, and by adjusting the number of seeds and amount of precursor concentration, the amount of mineral could be tuned. The material was characterised with a range of physical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, in order to assess the mineral

  12. Evaluation of sodium alginate as drug release modifier in matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Liew, Celine Valeria; Chan, Lai Wah; Ching, Ai Ling; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2006-02-17

    Alginates are useful natural polymers suitable for use in the design of pharmaceutical dosage forms. However, the effects of particle size, viscosity and chemical composition of alginates on drug release from alginate matrix tablets are not clearly understood. Hence, 17 grades of sodium alginate with different particle size distributions, viscosities and chemical compositions were used to prepare matrix tablets at various concentrations to screen the factors influencing drug release from such matrices. Particle size was found to have an influence on drug release from these matrices. Sodium alginate was subsequently classified into several size fractions and also cryogenically milled to produce smaller particle size samples. Cryogenic milling could be successfully applied to pulverize coarse alginate particles without changing the quality through degradation or segregation. This study showed the significance of each alginate property in modulating drug release: particle size is important in initial alginic acid gel barrier formation as it affected the extent of burst release; higher alginate viscosity slowed down drug release rate in the buffer phase but enhanced release rate in the acid phase; high M-alginate might be more advantageous than high-G-alginate in sustaining drug release; and, the effect of increasing alginate concentration was greater with larger alginate particles. This can serve as a framework for formulators working with alginates. Furthermore, the results showed that sodium alginate matrices can sustain drug release for at least 8 h, even for a highly water-soluble drug in the presence of a water-soluble excipient. PMID:16364576

  13. Reducing Distortion of Implant- or Abutment-Level Impressions for Implant-Supported Prosthetic Rehabilitation: A Technique Report.

    PubMed

    Lanis, Alejandro; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Selman, Andrea; Alvarez Del Canto, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    Passive fit between prosthesis and implants or abutments is a significant factor in preventing mechanical and biologic failures of implant-supported prostheses. Therefore, impression techniques must transfer the 3D implant position as accurately as possible for a correct superstructure fabrication. A novel impression protocol that uses an individualized open tray design is proposed. It allows the clinician to splint the transfers between the copings, outside the impression area, and to the tray itself to create a rigid monoblock. Thus, distortions produced by the tear of impression material or by transfer abutments' micromovements during tray retrieval are limited and superstructure misfits are minimized. This technique is specifically recommended for long spanning or completely edentulous patients. PMID:26509993

  14. A sectional-splinting technique for impressing multiple implant units by eliminating the use of an open tray

    PubMed Central

    Deogade, Suryakant C.; Dube, Gunjan

    2014-01-01

    Since the inception of root form implant dentistry by P-I Branemark in the early 1980's, so many technical advances have been put forward by several authors. However, the open tray impression technique is still performed for impressing multiple implant fixtures as it was first described in the original Branemark procedure manual. The most critical aspect for a successful implant-supported restoration is the passive and an accurate fit of superstructures to avoid preload and loading stresses. Splinting impression technique in multiple implants has gained popularity. Auto-polymerizing acrylic resin is among the most routinely practiced splinting material for multiple implant units. However, unfortunately, it exhibits shrinkage, which makes an impression quite inaccurate. This case report presents the solution to minimize the shrinkage of resin by utilizing sectional-splinting technique as advocated in the previous implant literature. PMID:24963251

  15. Molecular engineering of manipulated alginate-based polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Daemi, Hamed; Barikani, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    The novel soluble alginate-based polyurethanes in organic solvents were synthesized by the reaction of NCO-terminated prepolymers and tributylammonium alginate (TBA-Alg) for the first time. The chemical structures of synthesized polyurethanes were characterized using FTIR, (1)H NMR and TGA. The reaction completion was confirmed by disappearing of NCO band in FTIR spectra. Furthermore, a peak at 4.71 ppm and some small peaks at a range of 4.12-4.37 ppm in the (1)H NMR of alginate-based polyurethanes were assigned to the backbone of alginate. The results of both FTIR and (1)H NMR were remarkably confirmed by TGA data. The ionic nature of polyurethane backbone not only affects on thermal properties of samples, but it also changes the chemically-bonded alginate morphology. Both polyether and polyester based non-ionic polyurethanes extended by TBA-Alg illustrated the distinct alginate, whereas those ionomers extended by alginate were appeared as the continuous systems at nanoscale. PMID:25129793

  16. Impression Management by Association: Construction and Validation of a Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Martha C.; Kacmar, K. Michele

    2001-01-01

    Impression management (managing associations with others to create a favorable impression) using such tactics as boasting, blurring, blaring, and burying was examined using factor and validity analyses of data from the Image Management by Association Scale. The scale satisfactorily represented the four tactics, although burying and blaring needed…

  17. Impression Management and the Control of Social Anxieties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rowland S.

    Impression management refers to the concept that people engaged in interaction will attempt to control the image of themselves that others form. This provides a foundation for social interaction, giving others information about who we are and what to expect from us. A central concern of impression management is the manner in which we are evaluated…

  18. Observing and Understanding Children's Social Interactions. An Impression Management Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, J. Amos

    1994-01-01

    Describes ways of observing and interpreting children's peer social behavior based on the impression management perspective, which focuses on the social construction of a child's individual self-concept. Suggests that teachers and caregivers can use impression management strategies to observe and promote prosocial development in young children.…

  19. Impressions of College Intructors: Stability and Change in Student Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    Although the topic of stability and change in classroom impressions research is not new, there remain unanswered questions about what impressions are stable, when they are likely to change, and for whom they are likely to change over the course of a semester. My research will begin to answer those questions. My research took place in four college…

  20. Impression Creep Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, M. D.; Naveena; Vijayanand, D.

    2013-02-01

    Impression creep tests have been carried out at 923 K on 316LN SS containing 0.07, 0.14, and 0.22 wt.% nitrogen, under different applied stress levels. It was observed that the impression creep depth versus time curves were similar to the creep curves obtained from conventional uniaxial creep tests. The impression creep curves were characterized by a loading strain and primary and secondary creep stages similar to uniaxial creep curves. The tertiary stage observed in uniaxial creep curves was absent. The steady-state impression velocity was found to increase with increasing applied stress. The equivalent steady-state creep rates calculated from impression velocities were found to be in good agreement with the steady-state creep rates obtained from conventional uniaxial creep tests. Equivalence between applied stress and steady-state impression velocity with uniaxial creep stress and steady-state creep rate, respectively, has been established based on the laws of mechanics for time-dependent plasticity. It was found that impression velocity was sensitive to the variation in nitrogen content in the steel; impression velocity decreased with increasing nitrogen content, and the results obtained in this study were in agreement with those obtained from uniaxial creep tests.

  1. Impression Management: The Web Presence of College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Joanne Cardin

    2013-01-01

    Leadership profile pages on organizational websites have become staged opportunities for impression management. This research uses content analysis to examine the strategies of assertive impression management used to construct the leadership Web presence of the 70 presidents of national public universities, as identified in the "US News and…

  2. Read Two Impress: An Intervention for Disfluent Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Chase; Rasinski, Timothy; Mohr, Kathleen A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a research-based method to increase students' reading fluency. The method is called Read Two Impress, which is derived from the Neurological Impress Method and the method of repeated readings. The authors provide step-by-step procedures to effectively implement the reading fluency intervention. Previous research indicates that…

  3. A Study of Peer Tutors Using the Neurological Impress Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.

    A study investigated the efficacy of using the neurological impress method in peer tutoring during reading instruction. The neurological impress reading method is a unison reading procedure in which the student and teacher or tutor read aloud simultaneously and quickly, with the student placed slightly in front of the teacher so that the teacher's…

  4. Comparison of dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced from scanned impressions and scanned stone casts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subeihi, Haitham

    Introduction: Digital models of dental arches play a more and more important role in dentistry. A digital dental model can be generated by directly scanning intraoral structures, by scanning a conventional impression of oral structures or by scanning a stone cast poured from the conventional impression. An accurate digital scan model is a fundamental part for the fabrication of dental restorations. Aims: 1. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions versus scanning of stone casts. 2. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions made of three different materials (polyvinyl siloxane, polyether or vinyl polyether silicone). Methods and Materials: This laboratory study included taking addition silicone, polyether and vinyl polyether silicone impressions from an epoxy reference model that was created from an original typodont. Teeth number 28 and 30 on the typodont with a missing tooth number 29 were prepared for a metal-ceramic three-unit fixed dental prosthesis with tooth #29 being a pontic. After tooth preparation, an epoxy resin reference model was fabricated by duplicating the typodont quadrant that included the tooth preparations. From this reference model 12 polyvinyl siloxane impressions, 12 polyether impressions and 12 vinyl polyether silicone impressions were made. All 36 impressions were scanned before pouring them with dental stone. The 36 dental stone casts were, in turn, scanned to produce digital models. A reference digital model was made by scanning the reference model. Six groups of digital models were produced. Three groups were made by scanning of the impressions obtained with the three different materials, the other three groups involved the scanning of the dental casts that resulted from pouring the impressions made with the three different materials. Groups of digital models were compared using Root Mean

  5. Growth-promotion of plants with depolymerized alginates by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, Nguyen Quoc; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Tham, Le Xuan; Yoshii, Fumio; Dang, Vo Huy; Mitomo, Hiroshi; Makuuchi, Keizo; Kume, Tamikazu

    2000-07-01

    Alginate has been degraded by gamma-ray irradiation from a Co-60 source in liquid state (aqueous solution) and in solid state (powder form). The irradiated alginate with a molecular weight less than 10 4 shows a strong effect on the growth-promotion of rice and peanut. Low concentration of degraded alginate from 4% solution irradiated at 100 kGy is effective for the growth-promotion of plants and the suitable concentrations are ca 50 ppm for rice and ca 100 ppm for peanut.

  6. Neural correlates of self-deception and impression-management.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Tom F D; Burgess, Jenny; Wilkinson, Iain D; Hunter, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Self-deception and impression-management comprise two types of deceptive, but generally socially acceptable behaviours, which are common in everyday life as well as being present in a number of psychiatric disorders. We sought to establish and dissociate the 'normal' brain substrates of self-deception and impression-management. Twenty healthy participants underwent fMRI scanning at 3T whilst completing the 'Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding' test under two conditions: 'fake good', giving the most desirable impression possible and 'fake bad' giving an undesirable impression. Impression-management scores were more malleable to manipulation via 'faking' than self-deception scores. Response times to self-deception questions and 'fake bad' instructions were significantly longer than to impression-management questions and 'fake good' instructions respectively. Self-deception and impression-management manipulation and 'faking bad' were associated with activation of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC). Impression-management manipulation was additionally associated with activation of left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left posterior middle temporal gyrus. 'Faking bad' was additionally associated with activation of right vlPFC, left temporo-parietal junction and right cerebellum. There were no supra-threshold activations associated with 'faking good'. Our neuroimaging data suggest that manipulating self-deception and impression-management and more specifically 'faking bad' engages a common network comprising mPFC and left vlPFC. Shorter response times and lack of dissociable neural activations suggests that 'faking good', particularly when it comes to impression-management, may be our most practiced 'default' mode. PMID:25527112

  7. Rheological characterization of a gel produced using human blood plasma and alginate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Malagón-Romero, Dionisio; Hernández, Nicolás; Cardozo, Carmen; Godoy-Silva, Rubén D

    2014-06-01

    Human blood plasma is a material used to generate tissue equivalents due to presence of fibrinogen. However, gels formed using human blood plasma has weak mechanical properties. In this study, different mixtures of sodium alginate and blood plasma were performed and evaluated. By determining ζ potential can be established the stability of the plasma-alginate mixture and by dynamic rheology can determine the most suitable parameters for the gelation of the above mixtures, when calcium chloride is used as a crosslinker. Experimental results evidence an increment in ζ potential at alginate concentrations of 0.8% and 1.6% with a resulting pseudoplastic behavior of evaluated mixtures, which described the homogenization of the mixture. On the other hand, mixtures were gelled by using aspersion of calcium chloride and characterized by dynamic rheology. Solid behavior is dominant in all range of frequency sweep test between 0.1Hz and 100Hz. Finally, the ultimate tensile strength of a gel reach 6.36938±0.24320kPa, which is enough for manual handling of the gel. Between the tasks of the gel would be used for cell entrapment, for controlled release of drugs or in the manufacture of wound dressings. PMID:24603213

  8. Studies of magnetic alginate-based electrospun matrices crosslinked with different methods for potential hyperthermia treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Hsuan; Cheng, Chi-Hui; Chang, Wan-Ju; Lin, Yi-Ching; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lin, Jui-Che

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic electrospun mats were lately established as an innovative biomaterial for hyperthermic cancer treatment. Unlike those surface-modified magnetic nanoparticles that may not firmly adhere onto the tumor for long-term duration, the magnetic mats with nanofibrous structure can promote cell adhesion and kill the tumor directly within an alternating magnetic field. However, most magnetic electrospun mats were fabricated using non-biodegradable polymers and organic solvents, causing the problems of removal after therapy and the suspected biotoxicity associated with residual solvent. Alginate (SA) was utilized in this investigation as the main material for electrospinning because of being biodegradable and water-soluble. The alginate-based electrospun mats were then treated by an ionic or a covalent crosslinking method, and then followed by chelation with Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) for chemical coprecipitation of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles. Significant less cytotoxicity was noted on both liquid extracts from the ionic-crosslinked (Fe3O4-SA/PEO) and covalent-crosslinked (Fe3O4-SA/PVA) magnetic electrospun mats as well as the surface of Fe3O4-SA/PVA. In vitro hyperthermia assay indicated that the covalent-crosslinked magnetic alginate-based mats reduced tumor cell viability greater than Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Such magnetic electrospun mats are of potential for hyperthermia treatment by endoscopic/surgical delivery as well as serving as a supplementary debridement treatment after surgical tumor removal. PMID:26952432

  9. Alginate/quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan/clay nanocomposite microspheres: preparation and drug-controlled release behavior.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Luo, Jiwen; Wang, Xiaoying; Lu, Junxiang; Deng, Hongbing; Sun, Runcang

    2013-01-01

    Drug-delivery systems, using natural drug carriers, have become increasingly important because of their nontoxicity and biodegradability. In this study, firstly, quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan (QCMC) was intercalated into the interlayer of organic montmorillonite (OMMT) to obtain the QCMC/OMMT nanocomposites, their structure, morphology, and thermal stability were investigated. Next, crosslinked alginate/QCMC/OMMT (AQCOM) microsphere was obtained by crosslinking with CaCl2, and the drug-controlled release behavior was evaluated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model drug. The results suggested that, carboxyl groups in alginate and QCMC crosslinked with Ca(2+), quaternary ammonium groups in QCMC or OMMT electrostatically interacted with carboxyl groups in alginate, and there was stable three-dimensional network in AQCOM microsphere. The swelling ratio of AQCOM microspheres decreased with the increase of OMMT content, the lowest one was only about 45% compared to the microsphere without OMMT of 197%. Besides, the in vitro release results for BSA indicated that the AQCOM microsphere displayed more excellent encapsulation and controlled release capacities than the microsphere without OMMT. The in vitro active cutaneous anaphylaxis test was carried out on Guinea pigs, which revealed that AQCOM microsphere did not cause anaphylaxis. Therefore, QCMC/OMMT nanocomposites from natural materials are considerably suitable to apply as drug-controlled release carriers. PMID:23565870

  10. Time-Dependent Effect of Encapsulating Alginate Hydrogel on Neurogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Khosravizadeh, Zahra; Bahramian, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective Due to the restricted potential of neural stem cells for regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) after injury, providing an alternative source for neural stem cells is essential. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent cells with properties suitable for tissue engineering. In addition, alginate hydrogel is a biocompatible polysaccharide polymer that has been used to encapsulate many types of cells. The aim of this study was to assess the proliferation rate and level of expression of neural markers; NESTIN, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in encapsulated human ADSCs (hADSCs) 10 and14 days after neural induction. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, ADSCs isolated from human were cultured in neural induction media and seeded into alginate hydrogel. The rate of proliferation and differentiation of encapsulated cells were evaluated by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, immunocytoflourescent and realtime reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyzes 10 and 14 days after induction. Results The rate of proliferation of encapsulated cells was not significantly changed with time passage. The expression of NESTIN and GFAP significantly decreased on day 14 relative to day 10 (P<0.001) but MAP2 expression was increased. Conclusion Alginate hydrogel can promote the neural differentiation of encapsulated hADSCs with time passage. PMID:26199909

  11. The reinforcement and healing of asphalt mastic mixtures by rejuvenator encapsulation in alginate compartmented fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabaković, A.; Post, W.; Cantero, D.; Copuroglu, O.; Garcia, S. J.; Schlangen, E.

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores the potential use of compartmented alginate fibres as a new method of incorporating rejuvenators into asphalt pavement mixtures. The compartmented fibres are employed to locally distribute the rejuvenator and to overcome the problems associated with spherical capsules and hollow fibres. The work presents proof of concept of the encapsulation process which involved embedding the fibres into the asphalt mastic mixture and the survival rate of fibres in the asphalt mixture. To prove the effectiveness of the alginate as a rejuvenator encapsulating material and to demonstrate its ability survive asphalt production process, the fibres containing the rejuvenator were prepared and subjected to thermogravimetric analysis and uniaxial tensile test. The test results demonstrated that fibres have suitable thermal and mechanical strength to survive the asphalt mixing and compaction process. The CT scan of an asphalt mortar mix containing fibres demonstrated that fibres are present in the mix in their full length, undamaged, providing confirmation that the fibres survived the asphalt production process. In order to investigate the fibres physiological properties and ability to release the rejuvenator into cracks in the asphalt mastic, the environmental scanning electron microscope and optical microscope analysis were employed. To prove its success as an asphalt healing system, compartmented alginate fibres containing rejuvenator were embedded in asphalt mastic mix. The three point bend tests were performed on the asphalt mastic test samples and the degree to which the samples began to self-heal in response was measured and quantified. The research findings indicate that alginate fibres present a promising new approach for the development of self-healing asphalt pavement systems.

  12. Improvement of Biodesulfurization Rate of Alginate Immobilized Rhodococcus erythropolis R1

    PubMed Central

    Derikvand, Peyman; Etemadifar, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sulfur oxides released from the burning of oil causes severe environmental pollution. The sulfur can be removed via the 4S pathway in biodesulfurization (BDS). Immobilization approaches have been developed to prevent cell contamination of oil during the BDS process. Objectives: The encapsulation of Rhodococcus erythropolis R1 in calcium alginate beads was studied in order to enhance conversion of dibenzothiophene (DBT) to 2-hydroxy biphenyl (2-HBP) as the final product. Also the effect of different factors on the BDS process was investigated. Materials and Methods: Calcium alginate capsules were prepared using peristaltic pumps with different needle sizes to control the beads sizes. Scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry methods were used to study the distribution and viability of encapsulated cells, respectively. Two non-ionic surfactants and also nano Ƴ-Al2O3were used with the ratio of 0.5% (v/v) and 1:5 (v/v) respectively to investigate their BDS efficiency. In addition, the effect of different bead sizes and different concentrations of sodium alginate in BDS activity was studied. Results: The 2% (w/v) sodium alginate beads with 1.5mm size were found to be the optimum for beads stability and efficient 2-HBP production. The viability of encapsulated cells decreased by 12% after 20 h of desulfurization, compared to free cells. Adding the non-ionic surfactants markedly enhanced the rate of BDS, because of increasing mass transfer of DBT to the gel matrix. In addition, Span 80 was more effective than Tween 80. The nanoƳ-Al2O3 particles could increase BDS rate by up to two-folds greater than that of the control beads. Conclusions: The nano Ƴ-Al2O3 can improve the immobilized biocatalyst for excellent efficiency of DBT desulfurization. Also the BDS activity can be enhanced by setting the other explained factors at optimum levels. PMID:25147685

  13. Effect of alginate and alginate-cimetidine combination therapy on stimulated postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Washington, N; Denton, G

    1995-11-01

    This randomized, single-blind cross-over study compared the effectiveness of a conventional alginate reflux barrier formulation (20 mL single dose of Liquid Gaviscon; sodium alginate, sodium bicarbonate, calcium carbonate) with a 20 mL single dose of an alginate-cimetidine combination formulation (Algitec Suspension; sodium alginate, cimetidine) in the suppression of food and acid reflux into the oesophagus after a test meal in 12 healthy volunteers. Subjects were fasted overnight before the study. A pH electrode and gamma detector were accurately positioned 5 cm above the cardia. The volunteers received a 99mTc-labelled meal designed to provoke reflux and then either remained untreated, or 30 min later were given either Algitec Suspension or Liquid Gaviscon. Reflux of both food and acid into the oesophagus was measured for 3 h. There was a seven day wash-out period between each treatment. Food reflux in the control group was 22,878 +/- 14,385 counts x 10(3) and this was significantly suppressed by both Liquid Gaviscon (174 +/- 128 (s.e.) counts x 10(3); P = 0.003); however, although the reduction of food reflux to 3812 +/- 2322 counts x 10(3) observed after Algitec treatment was considerable, this did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05) due to the large intersubject variation. Liquid Gaviscon was significantly better at reducing food reflux than Algitec (P = 0.001). Gaviscon also significantly reduced acid reflux when compared with the control group (1.08 +/- 0.73 vs 5.87 +/- 3.27% recording time oesophageal pH < 4, respectively) (P = 0.03). The slight reduction in acid reflux after Algitec treatment (3.25 +/- 1.82% recording time oesophageal pH < 4) also did not reach statistical significance. The difference between Algitec and Gaviscon treatment was also not significant. PMID:8708979

  14. An animal model study for bone repair with encapsulated differentiated osteoblasts from adipose-derived stem cells in alginate

    PubMed Central

    Hashemibeni, Batool; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Sadeghi, Farzaneh; Heidary, Fariba; Roshankhah, Shiva; Mardani, Mohammad; Goharian, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) can be engineered to express bone specific markers. The aim of this study is to evaluate repairing tibia in animal model with differentiated osteoblasts from autologous ADSCs in alginate scaffold. Materials and Methods: In this study, 6 canine's ADSCs were encapsulated in alginate and differentiated into osteoblasts. Alkaline phosphatase assay (ALP) and RT-PCR method were applied to confirm the osteogenic induction. Then, encapsulated differentiated cells (group 1) and cell-free alginate (group 2) implanted in defected part of dog's tibia for 4 and 8 weeks. Regenerated tissues and compressive strength of samples were evaluated by histological and Immunohistochemical (IHC) methods and Tensometer Universal Machine. Results: Our results showed that ADSCs were differentiated into osteoblasts in vitro, and type I collagen and osteocalcin genes expression in differentiated osteoblasts was proved by RT-PCR. In group 2, ossification and thickness of trabecula were low compared to group 1, and in both groups woven bone was observed instead of control group's compact bone. Considering time, we found bone trabeculae regression and ossification reduction after 8 weeks compared with 4 weeks in group 2, but in group 1 bone formation was increased in 8 weeks. Presence of differentiated cells caused significantly more compressive strength in comparison with group 2 (P-value ≤0.05). Conclusion: This research showed that engineering bone from differentiated adipose-derived stem cells, encapsulated in alginate can repair tibia defects. PMID:25691926

  15. Alginate and Algal-Based Beads for the Sorption of Metal Cations: Cu(II) and Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengye; Vincent, Thierry; Faur, Catherine; Guibal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Alginate and algal-biomass (Laminaria digitata) beads were prepared by homogeneous Ca ionotropic gelation. In addition, glutaraldehyde-crosslinked poly (ethyleneimine) (PEI) was incorporated into algal beads. The three sorbents were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX): the sorption occurs in the whole mass of the sorbents. Sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of pH, sorption isotherms, and uptake kinetics. A special attention was paid to the effect of drying (air-drying vs. freeze-drying) on the mass transfer properties. For alginate, freeze drying is required for maintaining the porosity of the hydrogel, while for algal-based sorbents the swelling of the material minimizes the impact of the drying procedure. The maximum sorption capacities observed from experiments were 415, 296 and 218 mg Pb g(-1) and 112, 77 and 67 mg Cu g(-1) for alginate, algal and algal/PEI beads respectively. Though the sorption capacities of algal-beads decreased slightly (compared to alginate beads), the greener and cheaper one-pot synthesis of algal beads makes this sorbent more competitive for environmental applications. PEI in algal beads decreases the sorption properties in the case of the sorption of metal cations under selected experimental conditions. PMID:27598128

  16. Development of functionalized multi-walled carbon-nanotube-based alginate hydrogels for enabling biomimetic technologies

    PubMed Central

    Joddar, Binata; Garcia, Eduardo; Casas, Atzimba; Stewart, Calvin M.

    2016-01-01

    Alginate is a hydrogel commonly used for cell culture by ionically crosslinking in the presence of divalent Ca2+ ions. However these alginate gels are mechanically unstable, not permitting their use as scaffolds to engineer robust biological bone, breast, cardiac or tumor tissues. This issue can be addressed via encapsulation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) serving as a reinforcing phase while being dispersed in a continuous phase of alginate. We hypothesized that adding functionalized MWCNT to alginate, would yield composite gels with distinctively different mechanical, physical and biological characteristics in comparison to alginate alone. Resultant MWCNT-alginate gels were porous, and showed significantly less degradation after 14 days compared to alginate alone. In vitro cell-studies showed enhanced HeLa cell adhesion and proliferation on the MWCNT-alginate compared to alginate. The extent of cell proliferation was greater when cultured atop 1 and 3 mg/ml MWCNT-alginate; although all MWCNT-alginates lead to enhanced cell cluster formation compared to alginate alone. Among all the MWCNT-alginates, the 1 mg/ml gels showed significantly greater stiffness compared to all other cases. These results provide an important basis for the development of the MWCNT-alginates as novel substrates for cell culture applications, cell therapy and tissue engineering. PMID:27578567

  17. Mechanical and microstructural properties of "wet" alginate and composite films containing various carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Harper, B Allison; Barbut, Shai; Smith, Alexandra; Marcone, Massimo F

    2015-01-01

    Composite "wet" alginate films were manufactured from alginate-carbohydrate solutions containing 5% alginate and 0.25% pectin, carrageenan (kappa or iota), potato starch (modified or unmodified), gellan gum, or cellulose (extracted or commercial). The "wet" alginate films were used as a model to understand co-extruded alginate sausage casings that are currently being used by several sausage manufacturers. The mechanical, optical, and microstructural properties of the calcium cross-linked composite films were explored. In addition, the water holding capacity and textural profile analysis properties of the alginate-carbohydrate gels were studied. The results indicate that the mechanical properties of "wet" alginate films/casings can be modified by adding various carbohydrates to them. Alginate films with pectin, carrageenan, and modified potato starch had significantly (P < 0.05) greater elongation values than pure alginate films. The alginate-pectin films also had greater (P < 0.05) tensile strengths than the pure alginate films. Alginate films with extracted cellulose, commercial cellulose, and modified potato starch had lower (P < 0.05) puncture force, distance, and work values than the alginate control films. Transmission electron microscopy images showed a very uniform alginate network in the control films. Several large cellulose fibers were visible in the films with extracted cellulose, while the cellulose fibers in the films with commercial cellulose were difficult to distinguish. Despite these apparent differences in cellulose fiber length, the 2 cellulose films had similar puncture and tensile properties. PMID:25471730

  18. Development of functionalized multi-walled carbon-nanotube-based alginate hydrogels for enabling biomimetic technologies.

    PubMed

    Joddar, Binata; Garcia, Eduardo; Casas, Atzimba; Stewart, Calvin M

    2016-01-01

    Alginate is a hydrogel commonly used for cell culture by ionically crosslinking in the presence of divalent Ca(2+) ions. However these alginate gels are mechanically unstable, not permitting their use as scaffolds to engineer robust biological bone, breast, cardiac or tumor tissues. This issue can be addressed via encapsulation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) serving as a reinforcing phase while being dispersed in a continuous phase of alginate. We hypothesized that adding functionalized MWCNT to alginate, would yield composite gels with distinctively different mechanical, physical and biological characteristics in comparison to alginate alone. Resultant MWCNT-alginate gels were porous, and showed significantly less degradation after 14 days compared to alginate alone. In vitro cell-studies showed enhanced HeLa cell adhesion and proliferation on the MWCNT-alginate compared to alginate. The extent of cell proliferation was greater when cultured atop 1 and 3 mg/ml MWCNT-alginate; although all MWCNT-alginates lead to enhanced cell cluster formation compared to alginate alone. Among all the MWCNT-alginates, the 1 mg/ml gels showed significantly greater stiffness compared to all other cases. These results provide an important basis for the development of the MWCNT-alginates as novel substrates for cell culture applications, cell therapy and tissue engineering. PMID:27578567

  19. Application of self-assembled ultra-thin film coatings to stabilize macromolecule encapsulation in alginate microspheres.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, R; McShane, M J

    2005-06-01

    Alginate-based hydrogels have several unique properties that have enabled them to be used as a matrix for the entrapment of a variety of enzymes, proteins and cells for applications in bioprocessing, drug delivery and chemical sensing. However, control over release rates or, in some cases, stable encapsulation remains a difficult goal, especially for small particles with high surface-area-to-volume ratios. In this work, the potential to limit diffusion of macromolecules embedded in alginate spheres with nanofilm coatings was assessed. Alginate microspheres were fabricated using an emulsification process with high surfactant concentration to form beads in the size range of 2-10 microm. Using calcium chloride for ionotropic gelation, dextran was encapsulated in the gel phase by mixing with the alginate in solution. The exterior surface was then modified with polyelectrolyte coatings using the layer-by-layer self assembly technique. Leaching studies to assess retention of dextran with varying molecular weights confirmed that the application of multi-layer thin films to the alginate microspheres was effective in reducing leaching rate and total loss of the encapsulated material from the microspheres. For the best case, the rate of release for dextran of 2,000,000 Dalton molecular weight decreased from 1% h(-1) in bare microspheres to 0.1% h(-1) in polyelectrolyte-coated microspheres. The effectiveness of nanofilms reducing loss of the encapsulated macromolecules was found to vary between different polycation materials used. These studies support the feasibility of using these microsystems for development of long-term stable encapsulated systems, such as implantable biosensors. PMID:16214787

  20. Repeatability and reproducibility of individual abutment impression, assessed with a blue light scanner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Jae-Jun; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We assessed the repeatability and reproducibility of abutment teeth dental impressions, digitized with a blue light scanner, by comparing the discrepancies in repeatability and reproducibility values for different types of abutment teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS To evaluate repeatability, impressions of the canine, first premolar, and first molar, prepared for ceramic crowns, were repeatedly scanned to acquire 5 sets of 3-dimensional data via stereolithography (STL) files. Point clouds were compared and the error sizes were measured (n=10, per type). To evaluate reproducibility, the impressions were rotated by 10-20° on the table and scanned. These data were compared to the first STL data and the error sizes were measured (n=5, per type). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the repeatability and reproducibility of the 3 types of teeth, and Tukey honest significant differences (HSD) multiple comparison test was used for post hoc comparisons (α=.05). RESULTS The differences with regard to repeatability were 4.5, 2.7, and 3.1 µm for the canine, premolar, and molar, indicating the poorest repeatability for the canine (P<.001). For reproducibility, the differences were 6.6, 5.8, and 11.0 µm indicating the poorest reproducibility for the molar (P=.007). CONCLUSION Our results indicated that impressions of individual abutment teeth, digitized with a blue light scanner, had good repeatability and reproducibility. PMID:27350856

  1. Enzyme-entrapping behaviors in alginate fibers and their papers

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Matsuo, R.; Ohya, T.; Yokoi, N.

    1987-01-01

    Enzyme immobilization in the form of fiber and paper was easily achieved by wet spinning of aqueous admixture of sodium alginate and enzymes into divalent metallic ion solution as a coagulating bath, followed by paper making of resultant shortly cut fibers. Entrapment yields of enzymes used, e.g., glucoamylase, cyclodextrin glucanotransferase, endo-polygalacturonase, and protease, were always higher in calcium alginate fibers and their papers than those in corresponding beads. It was found that the yields increased with an increase of the discharge rate through the spinning nozzle because the higher discharge rate could provide more highly oriented metal-chelate linear polymer molecules along the fiber axis for preventing leakage of entrapped enzymes. Divalent metallic ions affected greatly the entrapment of glucoamylase in alginate fibers, the order of which followed rougly the ionotropic series of Thiele. Entrapment of glucoamylase in bicomponent systems comprising alginate and other water-soluble polymers was also investigated. (Refs. 41).

  2. The Alginate Demonstration: Polymers, Food Science, and Ion Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, Amy Sue; Schechinger, Linda; Govindarajoo, Geeta; Nowick, James S.; Pignolet, Louis H.

    1998-11-01

    We have recently devised a polymer demonstration involving the crosslinking and decrosslinking of alginate, a polysaccharide isolated from seaweed. The polymer is composed of D-mannuronic acid and L-guluronic acid subunits and is a component of cell walls. It is commonly used as a thickener in foods such as ice cream and fruit-filled snacks. For the demonstration, a 2% solution of sodium alginate is poured into a 1% solution of calcium chloride. Nontoxic calcium alginate "worms" form due to crosslinking of the polymer. Alternatively, the commercially available antacid Gaviscon can be used as a source of sodium alginate. The crosslinks can then be broken by shaking the worms in brine. The demonstration is a fine addition to any chemical educator's repertoire of polymer experiments.

  3. Understanding Alginate Gel Development for Bioclogging and Biogeophysical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, I.; Atekwana, E. A.; Abdel Aal, G. Z.; Atekwana, E. A.; Sarkisova, S.; Patrauchan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Bioremediation strategies to mitigate the transport of heavy metals and radionuclides in subsurface sediments have largely targeted to increase the mobility and/or solubility of these compounds by the stimulation of biogeochemical activity of the metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. The latter secrete and/or release out diverse biochemical molecule including, first of all, organic acids and biopolymers such as alginic acid, proteins and DNA. Alginate gel is one of the major components determining the structure of biofilm which causes clogging in porous media. Biopolymers composing biofilm having, at least, two main functions: to be a scaffold for a microbial biofilm, and to regulate the exchange of metabolites and ions between an environment and bacterial cells. Additionally, the accumulation of biopolymers and a matured biofilm within porous media was shown to contribute to a detectable biogeophysical signal, spectral induced polarization (SIP), in particular. Our objective is to understand the role of different biofilm components on the SIP response as the latter has been proposed as a non-invasive tool to monitor biofilm development and rate of clogging in the subsurface. Understanding the process of alginate gel development may aid in the understanding of the fate and transport of mineralized heavy metals and radionuclides in contaminated soils. Here we describe the reciprocal relationship between environmental chemistry and alginate gel development. Commercial (Sigma) alginic acid (AA) was used as a substratum for the preparation of a model gel. AA was solubilized by adjusting solutions with pH up to 4 with 0.1 NaOH. Both Ca(OH)2 or CaCl2 were used to initiate the gelation of alginate. pH, fluid conductivity, soluble Ca2+ concentration, and a yield of gelated alginate were monitored in both liquid and porous media after the interaction of calcium compounds with alginate. This study confirms the critical role of Ca2+ for alginate gelation, biofilm development

  4. Alginate oligosaccharides: enzymatic preparation and antioxidant property evaluation.

    PubMed

    Falkeborg, Mia; Cheong, Ling-Zhi; Gianfico, Carlo; Sztukiel, Katarzyna Magdalena; Kristensen, Kasper; Glasius, Marianne; Xu, Xuebing; Guo, Zheng

    2014-12-01

    Alginate oligosaccharides (AOs) prepared from alginate, by alginate lyase-mediated depolymerization, were structurally characterized by mass spectrometry, infrared spectrometry and thin layer chromatography. Studies of their antioxidant activities revealed that AOs were able to completely (100%) inhibit lipid oxidation in emulsions, superiorly to ascorbic acid (89% inhibition). AOs showed radical scavenging activity towards ABTṠ, hydroxyl, and superoxide radicals, which might explain their excellent antioxidant activity. The radical scavenging activity is suggested to originate mainly from the presence of the conjugated alkene acid structure formed during enzymatic depolymerization. According to the resonance hybrid theory, the parent radicals of AOs are delocalized through allylic rearrangement, and as a consequence, the reactive intermediates are stabilized. AOs were weak ferrous ion chelators. This work demonstrated that AOs obtained from a facile enzymatic treatment of abundant alginate is an excellent natural antioxidant, which may find applications in the food industry. PMID:24996323

  5. Boost for Alginate Encapsulation in Beta Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pipeleers, Daniel; Keymeulen, Bart

    2016-05-01

    A recent study reported that encapsulation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived beta cells by a novel alginate formula protects against foreign body reactivity in immune-competent mice. Intraperitoneal implants corrected a diabetic state for at least 6 months. These observations will stimulate the development of alginate encapsulation towards novel cell therapy protocols for treating type 1 diabetes (T1DM). PMID:27037212

  6. Nanocellulose-alginate hydrogel for cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Minsung; Lee, Dajung; Hyun, Jinho

    2015-02-13

    TEMPO-oxidized bacterial cellulose (TOBC)-sodium alginate (SA) composites were prepared to improve the properties of hydrogel for cell encapsulation. TOBC fibers were obtained using a TEMPO/NaBr/NaClO system at pH 10 and room temperature. The fibrillated TOBCs mixed with SA were cross-linked in the presence of Ca(2+) solution to form hydrogel composites. The compression strength and chemical stability of the TOBC/SA composites were increased compared with the SA hydrogel, which indicated that TOBC performed an important function in enhancing the structural, mechanical and chemical stability of the composites. Cells were successfully encapsulated in the TOBC/SA composites, and the viability of cells was investigated. TOBC/SA composites can be a potential candidate for cell encapsulation engineering. PMID:25458293

  7. Strategies for managing impressions of racial identity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Laura Morgan; Cha, Sandra E; Kim, Sung Soo

    2014-10-01

    This article deepens understanding of the workplace experiences of racial minorities by investigating racial identity-based impression management (RIM) by Asian American journalists. Racial centrality, directly or indirectly, predicted the use of 4 RIM strategies (avoidance, enhancement, affiliation, and racial humor). Professional centrality also predicted strategy use, which was related to life satisfaction and perceived career success. By shedding light on proactive strategies that individuals use to influence colleagues' impressions of their racial identity, we contribute to research on diversity in organizations, impression management, and racial identity. PMID:25090148

  8. Microfluidic generation of hollow Ca-alginate microfibers.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Wei; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhuang; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2016-07-01

    This work reports on an efficient microfluidic approach for continuous production of hollow Ca-alginate microfibers with controllable structures and functions. A coaxial microcapillary microfluidic device combined with a rotator is constructed to produce a cylindrical flow jet with four aqueous solutions as templates for continuous fabrication and collection of microfibers. A four-aqueous-phase flow jet with an intermediate buffer flow between the Ca(2+)-containing and alginate-containing flows is used as the template for microfiber fabrication. The buffer flow efficiently controls the diffusion of Ca(2+) into the alginate-containing flow as well as the crosslinking reaction, thus ensuring the continuous fabrication of hollow Ca-alginate microfibers under relatively low flow rates without clogging of the microchannel. The structure of the hollow microfibers can be flexibly adjusted by changing the flow rates and device dimensions. Meanwhile, the continuous fabrication process of the microfibers allows flexible incorporation of a functional component into the sheath flow for functionalization and addition of active substances in the core flow for encapsulation. This is demonstrated by fabricating hollow Ca-alginate microfibers with a wall containing magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic functionalization and with hollow internals containing Chlorella pyrenoidosa cells for confined growth. This work provides an efficient strategy for continuous fabrication of functional hollow Ca-alginate microfibers with controllable structures and functions. PMID:27302737

  9. Sodium alginate decreases the permeability of intestinal mucus

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Alan R.; Macierzanka, Adam; Aarak, Kristi; Rigby, Neil M.; Parker, Roger; Channell, Guy A.; Harding, Stephen E.; Bajka, Balazs H.

    2016-01-01

    In the small intestine the nature of the environment leads to a highly heterogeneous mucus layer primarily composed of the MUC2 mucin. We set out to investigate whether the soluble dietary fibre sodium alginate could alter the permeability of the mucus layer. The alginate was shown to freely diffuse into the mucus and to have minimal effect on the bulk rheology when added at concentrations below 0.1%. Despite this lack of interaction between the mucin and alginate, the addition of alginate had a marked effect on the diffusion of 500 nm probe particles, which decreased as a function of increasing alginate concentration. Finally, we passed a protein stabilised emulsion through a simulation of oral, gastric and small intestinal digestion. We subsequently showed that the addition of 0.1% alginate to porcine intestinal mucus decreased the diffusion of fluorescently labelled lipid present in the emulsion digesta. This reduction may be sufficient to reduce problems associated with high rates of lipid absorption such as hyperlipidaemia. PMID:26726279

  10. Polymeric alginate nanoparticles containing the local anesthetic bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Renato; de Melo, Nathalie F S; de Araújo, Daniele Ribeiro; de Paula, Eneida; Rosa, André Henrique; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2010-11-01

    Bupivacaine (BVC; S75–R25, NovaBupi® is an amide-type local anesthetic. Sodium alginate is a water-soluble linear polysaccharide. The present study reports the development of alginate/bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) and alginate/chitosan nanoparticle formulations containing BVC (0.5%). The amounts of BVC associated in the alginate/AOT and alginate/chitosan nanoparticles were 87 ± 1.5 and 76 ± 0.9%, respectively. The average diameters and zeta potentials of the nanoparticles were measured for 30 days, and the results demonstrated the good stability of these particles in solution. The in vitro release kinetics showed a different behavior for the release profile of BVC in solution, compared with BVC-loaded alginate nanoparticles. In vitro and in vivo assays showed that alginate–chitosan BVC (BVC(ALG–CHIT)) and alginate–AOT BVC (BVC(ALG–AOT)) presented low cytotoxicity in 3T3-fibroblasts, enhanced the intensity, and prolonged the duration of motor and sensory blockades in a sciatic nerve blockade model. PMID:20196632

  11. Novel alginate based nanocomposite hydrogels with incorporated silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Bojana; Stojkovska, Jasmina; Jovanovic, Zeljka; Miskovic-Stankovic, Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Alginate colloid solution containing electrochemically synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was investigated regarding the nanoparticle stabilization and possibilities for production of alginate based nanocomposite hydrogels in different forms. AgNPs were shown to continue to grow in alginate solutions for additional 3 days after the synthesis by aggregative mechanism and Ostwald ripening. Thereafter, the colloid solution remains stable for 30 days and could be used alone or in mixtures with aqueous solutions of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) while preserving AgNPs as verified by UV-Vis spectroscopy studies. We have optimized techniques for production of Ag/alginate microbeads and Ag/alginate/PVA beads, which were shown to efficiently release AgNPs decreasing the Escherichia coli concentration in suspensions for 99.9% over 24 h. Furthermore, Ag/hydrogel discs based on alginate, PVA and PVP were produced by freezing-thawing technique allowing adjustments of hydrogel composition and mechanical properties as demonstrated in compression studies performed in a biomimetic bioreactor. PMID:22203513

  12. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate-exotoxin A conjugate that elicits anti-alginate and exotoxin A-neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Coin, D; Vacheron, M J; Guinand, M; Michel, G

    1991-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate was covalently coupled to exotoxin A by reductive amination using adipic acid dihydrazide as spacer. The conjugate was composed of 25% alginate and 75% exotoxin A and possessed an average molecular mass higher than 700 kDa as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The conjugate had virtually no ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and a reduced cytotoxicity for TSA8 murine cells, derived from Friend erythroleukemia cells, as indicated by a greater than 50-fold increased LD50. Anti-conjugate antibodies recognized exotoxin A and alginate. A booster injection resulted in markedly increased antibody ELISA titers to both exotoxin A and alginate. The antibodies neutralized the exotoxin A toxicity. PMID:1931130

  13. “Evaluation of the Effect of Ultraviolet Disinfection on Dimensional Stability of the Polyvinyl Silioxane Impressions.” an in-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Godbole, Surekha R; Dahane, Trupti M; Nimonkar, Sharayu V

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Infection control is an important concept in the present day practice of dentistry. The prosthodontists are at an added risk of transmission because of the infection spreading through the contaminated lab equipments while working in the lab. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of UV light disinfection on dimensional stability of polyvinyl siloxane impressions. Materials and Methods : Impressions were made in perforated custom tray. After polymerization of impression, half the samples were disinfected in UV light and remaining samples were not subjected to disinfection and poured in die stone which served as control group. Linear dimensions were measured on the cast with travelling microscope of 0.001accuracy. Result : The result showed that UV light disinfectant showed no significant dimensional changes on impressions. Conclusion: Hence, it can be safely used to disinfect impressions in clinical prosthodontic procedures. PMID:25386528

  14. Managing Impression Formation in Computer-Mediated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuliang; Ginther, Dean

    2001-01-01

    Offers suggestions for online instructors regarding verbal and nonverbal impression management. The recommendations should facilitate computer mediated teacher-student or manager-client interactions and help develop constructive relationships that promote learning and productivity. (EV)

  15. Persons who most impress gifted youth: a replication.

    PubMed

    Karnes, F A; McGinnis, J C

    1994-06-01

    A replication of a study of the persons who most impressed gifted youth was conducted with 95 students enrolled in a summer residential program for the gifted. Students were asked to indicate the person who most impressed them and to include the reason(s) for choosing that person. The most frequently chosen category of individuals was family members (61.1%), then a tie between persons in the world of arts and culture and persons doing a specific job (8.4%), another tie between comrades and sports stars (6.3%), followed by political or historical figures (4.2%), themselves (3.2%), and moral and religious personalities (2.1%). Consistent with the 1982 study by Karnes and Lee, most impressive to these students were family members and least impressive moral and religious personalities. PMID:8058865

  16. Electronic evaluation for video commercials by impression index.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhao, Xinxin; Hu, Sanqing; Vecchiato, Giovanni; Babiloni, Fabio

    2013-12-01

    How to evaluate the effect of commercials is significantly important in neuromarketing. In this paper, we proposed an electronic way to evaluate the influence of video commercials on consumers by impression index. The impression index combines both the memorization and attention index during consumers observing video commercials by tracking the EEG activity. It extracts features from scalp EEG to evaluate the effectiveness of video commercials in terms of time-frequency-space domain. And, the general global field power was used as an impression index for evaluation of video commercial scenes as time series. Results of experiment demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to track variations of the cerebral activity related to cognitive task such as observing video commercials, and help to judge whether the scene in video commercials is impressive or not by EEG signals. PMID:24427225

  17. A Comparison of Accuracy of Matrix Impression System with Putty Reline Technique and Multiple Mix Technique: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M Praveen; Patil, Suneel G; Dheeraj, Bhandari; Reddy, Keshav; Goel, Dinker; Krishna, Gopi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The difficulty in obtaining an acceptable impression increases exponentially as the number of abutments increases. Accuracy of the impression material and the use of a suitable impression technique are of utmost importance in the fabrication of a fixed partial denture. This study compared the accuracy of the matrix impression system with conventional putty reline and multiple mix technique for individual dies by comparing the inter-abutment distance in the casts obtained from the impressions. Materials and Methods: Three groups, 10 impressions each with three impression techniques (matrix impression system, putty reline technique and multiple mix technique) were made of a master die. Typodont teeth were embedded in a maxillary frasaco model base. The left first premolar was removed to create a three-unit fixed partial denture situation and the left canine and second premolar were prepared conservatively, and hatch marks were made on the abutment teeth. The final casts obtained from the impressions were examined under a profile projector and the inter-abutment distance was calculated for all the casts and compared. Results: The results from this study showed that in the mesiodistal dimensions the percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.1 and 0.2, in Group II was 0.9 and 0.3, and Group III was 1.6 and 1.5, respectively. In the labio-palatal dimensions the percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.01 and 0.4, Group II was 1.9 and 1.3, and Group III was 2.2 and 2.0, respectively. In the cervico-incisal dimensions the percentage deviation from the master model in Group I was 1.1 and 0.2, Group II was 3.9 and 1.7, and Group III was 1.9 and 3.0, respectively. In the inter-abutment dimension of dies, percentage deviation from master model in Group I was 0.1, Group II was 0.6, and Group III was 1.0. Conclusion: The matrix impression system showed more accuracy of reproduction for individual dies when compared with putty reline

  18. Simplified custom impression post for implant-supported restorations.

    PubMed

    Patras, Michael; Martin, William

    2016-05-01

    The esthetic outcome of an implant-supported restoration is greatly influenced by the relationship between the contours of the definitive prosthesis and the periimplant tissues. In this clinical technique, an implant analog holder and autopolymerizing acrylic resin were used to accurately register the soft-tissue transition zone created by the interim restoration and transfer it to the impression post during the definitive impression. PMID:26774317

  19. The kinetics of the swelling process and the release mechanisms of Coriandrum sativum L. essential oil from chitosan/alginate/inulin microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Dima, Cristian; Pătraşcu, Livia; Cantaragiu, Alina; Alexe, Petru; Dima, Ştefan

    2016-03-15

    The encapsulation by spray drying method of coriander essential oil (CEO) in various materials (chitosan, alginate, chitosan/alginate, chitosan/inulin) was studied. The viscoelastic properties of the oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions and the characteristics of CEO-loaded microcapsules like morphology, moisture, wettability, solubility, flowability properties, swelling and release mechanisms were investigated. The chitosan microcapsules had a brain-like structure while the alginate and chitosan/alginate microcapsules are spherical with a smooth surface. The Compressibility Index (CI=29.09-32.25%) and Hausner Ratio (HR=1.38-1.44) values showed that all the microcapsules prepared correspond to the "poor" flowability powders group. The chitosan microcapsules exhibited the maximum release rate at pH 2.5 while the alginate microcapsules exhibited the maximum release rate at pH 6.5. Kinetics and mechanism of CEO release were studied using various mathematical models such as, zero order, first order, Higuchi model and Peppas model. The diffusional exponent (n) values of Peppas equation explains a non Fickian transport mechanism and diffusion or diffusion-swelling controlled process. PMID:26575710

  20. In Silico Analysis of the Potential of the Active Compounds Fucoidan and Alginate Derived from Sargassum Sp. as Inhibitors of COX-1 and COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Lestari

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX) is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of one of the mediators of inflammation, the prostaglandins. Inhibition of COX allegedly can improve inflammation-induced pathological conditions. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential of Sargassum sp. components, Fucoidan and alginate, as COX inhibitors. Material and methods: The study was conducted by means of a computational (in silico) method. It was performed in two main stages, the docking between COX-1 and COX-2 with Fucoidan, alginate and aspirin (for comparison) and the analysis of the amount of interactions formed and the residues directly involved in the process of interaction. Results: Our results showed that both Fucoidan and alginate had an excellent potential as inhibitors of COX-1 and COX-2. Fucoidan had a better potential as an inhibitor of COX than alginate. COX inhibition was expected to provide a more favorable effect on inflammation-related pathological conditions. Conclusion: The active compounds Fucoidan and alginate derived from Sargassum sp. were suspected to possess a good potential as inhibitors of COX-1 and COX-2. PMID:27594740

  1. Auditory and visual spatial impression: Recent studies of three auditoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Andy; Cabrera, Densil

    2004-10-01

    Auditory spatial impression is widely studied for its contribution to auditorium acoustical quality. By contrast, visual spatial impression in auditoria has received relatively little attention in formal studies. This paper reports results from a series of experiments investigating the auditory and visual spatial impression of concert auditoria. For auditory stimuli, a fragment of an anechoic recording of orchestral music was convolved with calibrated binaural impulse responses, which had been made with the dummy head microphone at a wide range of positions in three auditoria and the sound source on the stage. For visual stimuli, greyscale photographs were used, taken at the same positions in the three auditoria, with a visual target on the stage. Subjective experiments were conducted with auditory stimuli alone, visual stimuli alone, and visual and auditory stimuli combined. In these experiments, subjects rated apparent source width, listener envelopment, intimacy and source distance (auditory stimuli), and spaciousness, envelopment, stage dominance, intimacy and target distance (visual stimuli). Results show target distance to be of primary importance in auditory and visual spatial impression-thereby providing a basis for covariance between some attributes of auditory and visual spatial impression. Nevertheless, some attributes of spatial impression diverge between the senses.

  2. Development of edible films and coatings from alginates and carrageenans.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli-Kafrani, Elham; Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Masoudpour-Behabadi, Mahdieh

    2016-02-10

    The use of renewable resources, which can reduce waste disposal problems, is being explored to produce biopolymer films and coatings. Renewability, degradability, and edibility make such films particularly suitable for food and nonfood packaging applications. Edible films and coatings play an important role in the quality, safety, transportation, storage, and display of a wide range of fresh and processed foods. They can diminish main alteration by avoiding moisture losses and decreasing adverse chemical reaction rates. Also, they can prevent spoilage and microbial contamination of foods. Additionally, nanomaterials and food additives, such as flavors, antimicrobials, antioxidants, and colors, can be incorporated into edible films and coatings in order to extend their applications. Water-soluble hydrocolloids like polysaccharides usually impart better mechanical properties to edible films and coatings than do hydrophobic substances. They also are excellent barriers to oxygen and carbon dioxide. Recently, there has been much attention on carrageenan and alginate as sources of film-forming materials. Thus, this review highlights production and characteristics of these films. PMID:26686140

  3. Composite alginate gels for tunable cellular microenvironment mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavari, Adele; Nydén, Magnus; Weitz, David A.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.

    2016-08-01

    The mechanics of the cellular microenvironment can be as critical as biochemistry in directing cell behavior. Many commonly utilized materials derived from extra-cellular-matrix create excellent scaffolds for cell growth, however, evaluating the relative mechanical and biochemical effects independently in 3D environments has been difficult in frequently used biopolymer matrices. Here we present 3D sodium alginate hydrogel microenvironments over a physiological range of stiffness (E = 1.85 to 5.29 kPa), with and without RGD binding sites or collagen fibers. We use confocal microscopy to measure the growth of multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), of increasing metastatic potential in different elastic moduli of hydrogels, with and without binding factors. We find that the hydrogel stiffness regulates the growth and morphology of these cell clusters; MCAs grow larger and faster in the more rigid environments similar to cancerous breast tissue (E = 4–12 kPa) as compared to healthy tissue (E = 0.4–2 kpa). Adding binding factors from collagen and RGD peptides increases growth rates, and change maximum MCA sizes. These findings demonstrate the utility of these independently tunable mechanical/biochemistry gels, and that mechanical confinement in stiffer microenvironments may increase cell proliferation.

  4. Composite alginate gels for tunable cellular microenvironment mechanics.

    PubMed

    Khavari, Adele; Nydén, Magnus; Weitz, David A; Ehrlicher, Allen J

    2016-01-01

    The mechanics of the cellular microenvironment can be as critical as biochemistry in directing cell behavior. Many commonly utilized materials derived from extra-cellular-matrix create excellent scaffolds for cell growth, however, evaluating the relative mechanical and biochemical effects independently in 3D environments has been difficult in frequently used biopolymer matrices. Here we present 3D sodium alginate hydrogel microenvironments over a physiological range of stiffness (E = 1.85 to 5.29 kPa), with and without RGD binding sites or collagen fibers. We use confocal microscopy to measure the growth of multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), of increasing metastatic potential in different elastic moduli of hydrogels, with and without binding factors. We find that the hydrogel stiffness regulates the growth and morphology of these cell clusters; MCAs grow larger and faster in the more rigid environments similar to cancerous breast tissue (E = 4-12 kPa) as compared to healthy tissue (E = 0.4-2 kpa). Adding binding factors from collagen and RGD peptides increases growth rates, and change maximum MCA sizes. These findings demonstrate the utility of these independently tunable mechanical/biochemistry gels, and that mechanical confinement in stiffer microenvironments may increase cell proliferation. PMID:27484403

  5. Composite alginate gels for tunable cellular microenvironment mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Khavari, Adele; Nydén, Magnus; Weitz, David A.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanics of the cellular microenvironment can be as critical as biochemistry in directing cell behavior. Many commonly utilized materials derived from extra-cellular-matrix create excellent scaffolds for cell growth, however, evaluating the relative mechanical and biochemical effects independently in 3D environments has been difficult in frequently used biopolymer matrices. Here we present 3D sodium alginate hydrogel microenvironments over a physiological range of stiffness (E = 1.85 to 5.29 kPa), with and without RGD binding sites or collagen fibers. We use confocal microscopy to measure the growth of multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), of increasing metastatic potential in different elastic moduli of hydrogels, with and without binding factors. We find that the hydrogel stiffness regulates the growth and morphology of these cell clusters; MCAs grow larger and faster in the more rigid environments similar to cancerous breast tissue (E = 4–12 kPa) as compared to healthy tissue (E = 0.4–2 kpa). Adding binding factors from collagen and RGD peptides increases growth rates, and change maximum MCA sizes. These findings demonstrate the utility of these independently tunable mechanical/biochemistry gels, and that mechanical confinement in stiffer microenvironments may increase cell proliferation. PMID:27484403

  6. Microwave assisted step-by-step process for the production of fucoidan, alginate sodium, sugars and biochar from Ascophyllum nodosum through a biorefinery concept.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Macquarrie, Duncan J

    2015-12-01

    The biorefinery is an important concept for the development of alternative routes to a range of interesting and important materials from renewable resources. It ensures that the resources are used fully and that all parts of them are valorized. This paper develops this concept, using brown macroalgae Ascophyllum nodosum as an example, by assistance of microwave technology. A step-by-step process was designed to obtain fucoidan, alginates, sugars and biochar (alga residue) consecutively. The yields of fucoidan, alginates, sugars and biochar were 14.09%, 18.24%, 10.87% and 21.44%, respectively. To make an evaluation of the biorefinery process, seaweed sample was also treated for fucoidan extraction only, alginate extraction only and hydrothermal treatment for sugars and biochar only. The chemical composition and properties of each product were also analyzed. The results indicated that A. nodosum could be potentially used as feedstock for a biorefinery process to produce valuable chemicals and fuels. PMID:26454369

  7. Comparative equilibrium studies of sorption of Pb(II) ions by sodium and calcium alginate.

    PubMed

    Khotimchenko, Maxim; Kovalev, Valeri; Khotimchenko, Yuri

    2008-01-01

    The absorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by different alginate compounds was studied in a batch sorption system. Water soluble sodium alginate and insoluble calcium alginate beads were investigated. The lead-binding capacity of both alginate compounds was highest within the pH range 6-8. The binding capacities and rates of Pb(II) ions by alginate compounds were evaluated. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and Bruneaur, Emmet and Teller (BET) sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and isotherm constants. Sorption isothermal data could be well interpreted by the Langmuir model. The results obtained through the study suggest that alginate compounds are favorable sorbents. The largest amount of Pb(II) ions were bound by sodium alginate although the difference between two compounds was slight. Therefore, alginate substances may be considered as an alternative for sorption and removal of Pb(II) ions from wastewaters. PMID:18814578

  8. NMR imaging of heavy metal absorption in alginate, immobilized cells, and kombu algal biosorbents.

    PubMed

    Nestle, N F; Kimmich, R

    1996-09-01

    In this contribution, an NMR imaging study of heavy metal absorption in alginate, immobilized-cell biosorbents, and kombu (Laminaria japonica) algal biomass is presented. This method provides the good possibility of directly monitoring the time evolution of the spatial distribution of the ions in the materials. From these results, we demonstrate that rare earth ions are absorbed with a steep reaction front that can be described very well with a modified shrinking core model, while copper ions are absorbed with a more diffuse front. PMID:18629817

  9. Growth and by-product profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cells immobilized in foamed alginate.

    PubMed

    Wilkowska, Agnieszka; Kregiel, Dorota; Guneser, Onur; Karagul Yuceer, Yonca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study how the yeast cell immobilization technique influences the growth and fermentation profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cultivated on apple/chokeberry and apple/cranberry pomaces. Encapsulation of the cells was performed by droplet formation from a foamed alginate solution. The growth and metabolic profiles were evaluated for both free and immobilized cells. Culture media with fruit waste produced good growth of free as well as immobilized yeast cells. The fermentation profiles of K. marxianus were different with each waste material. The most varied aroma profiles were noted for immobilized yeast cultivated on apple/chokeberry pomace. PMID:25277269

  10. Inorganic particle analysis of dental impression elastomers.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Hugo Lemes; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Soares, Carlos José; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine quantitatively and qualitatively the inorganic particle fraction of commercially available dental elastomers. The inorganic volumetric fraction of two addition silicones (Reprosil Putty/Fluid and Flexitime Easy Putty/Fluid), three condensation silicones (Clonage Putty/Fluid, Optosil Confort/Xantopren VL and Silon APS Putty/Fluid), one polyether (Impregum Soft Light Body) and one polysulfide (Permlastic Light Body) was accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 600 ºC, during 3 h. Unsettled material samples were soaked in acetone and chloroform for removal of the organic portion. The remaining filler particles were sputter-coated with gold evaluation of their morphology and size, under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexitime Easy Putty was the material with the highest results for volumetric particle fraction, while Impregum Soft had the lowest values. Silon 2 APS Fluid presented the lowest mean filler size values, while Clonage Putty had the highest values. SEM micrographs of the inorganic particles showed several morphologies - lathe-cut, spherical, spherical-like, sticks, and sticks mixed to lathe-cut powder. The results of this study revealed differences in particle characteristics among the elastometic materials that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties. PMID:21271042

  11. Morphogenetically active scaffold for osteochondral repair (polyphosphate/alginate/N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan).

    PubMed

    Müller, W E; Neufurth, M; Wang, S; Tolba, E; Schröder, H C; Wang, X

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a novel bioinspired hydrogel material that can be hardened with calcium ions to yield a scaffold material with viscoelastic properties matching those of cartilage. This material consists of a negatively charged biopolymer triplet, composed of morphogenetically active natural inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), along with the likewise biocompatible natural polymers N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan (N,O-CMC) and alginate. The porosity of the hardened scaffold material obtained after calcium exposure can be adjusted by varying the pre-processing conditions. Various compression tests were applied to determine the local (nanoindentation) and bulk mechanical properties (tensile/compression test system for force measurements) of the N,O-CMC-polyP-alginate material. Determinations of the Young's modulus revealed that the stiffness of this comparably water rich (and mouldable) material increases during successive compression cycles to values measured for native cartilage. The material not only comprises viscoelastic properties suitable for a cartilage substitute material, but also displays morphogenetic activity. It upregulates the expression of genes encoding for collagen type II and aggrecan, the major proteoglycan within the articular cartilage, in human chondrocytes, and the expression of alkaline phosphatase in human bone-like SaOS-2 cells, as revealed in RT qPCR experiments. Further, we demonstrate that the new polyP-based material can be applied for manufacturing 3D solid models of cartilage bone such as of the tibial epiphyseal plate and the superior articular cartilage surface. Since the material is resorbable and enhances the activity of cells involved in regeneration of cartilage tissue, this material has the potential to be used for artificial articular cartilage implants. PMID:26898843

  12. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracy between Open-Tray and Closed-Tray Implant Impression Technique in 15° Angled Implants

    PubMed Central

    Balouch, F; Jalalian, E; Nikkheslat, M; Ghavamian, R; Toopchi, Sh; Jallalian, F; Jalalian, S

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Various impression techniques have different effects on the accuracy of final cast dimensions. Meanwhile; there are some controversies about the best technique. Purpose: This study was performed to compare two kinds of implant impression methods (open tray and closed tray) on 15 degree angled implants. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, a steel model with 8 cm in diameter and 3 cm in height were produced with 3 holes devised inside to stabilize 3 implants. The central implant was straight and the other two implants were 15° angled. The two angled implants had 5 cm distance from each other and 3.5 cm from the central implant. Dental stone, high strength (type IV) was used for the main casts. Impression trays were filled with poly ether, and then the two impression techniques (open tray and closed tray) were compared. To evaluate positions of the implants, each cast was analyzed by CMM device in 3 dimensions (x,y,z). Differences in the measurements obtained from final casts and laboratory model were analyzed using t-Test. Results: The obtained results indicated that closed tray impression technique was significantly different in dimensional accuracy when compared with open tray method. Dimensional changes were 129 ± 37μ and 143.5 ± 43.67μ in closed tray and open tray, while coefficient of variation in closed- tray and open tray were reported to be 27.2% and 30.4%, respectively. Conclusion: Closed impression technique had less dimensional changes in comparison with open tray method, so this study suggests that closed tray impression technique is more accurate. PMID:24724130

  13. Preparation of alginate beads containing a prodrug of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Tsai; Di Pasqua, Anthony J.; He, Weiling; Tsai, Tsuimin; Sueda, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Yong; Jay, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A penta-ethyl ester prodrug of the radionuclide decorporation agent diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), which exists as an oily liquid, was encapsulated in alginate beads by the ionotropic gelation method. An optimal formulation was found by varying initial concentrations of DTPA pentaethyl ester, alginate polymer, Tween 80 surfactant and calcium chloride. All prepared alginate beads were ~1.6 mm in diameter, and the optimal formulation had loading and encapsulation efficiencies of 91.0 ± 1.1 and 72.6 ± 2.2%, respectively, and only 3.2 ± 0.8% water absorption after storage at room temperature in ~80% relative humidity. Moreover, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that DTPA penta-ethyl ester did not react with excipients during formation of the DTPA penta-ethyl ester-containing alginate beads. Release of prodrug from alginate beads was via anomalous transport, and its stability enhanced by encapsulation. Collectively, these data suggest that this solid dosage form may be suitable for oral administration after radionuclide contamination. PMID:23399237

  14. Towards antimicrobial yet bioactive Cu-alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Madzovska-Malagurski, I; Vukasinovic-Sekulic, M; Kostic, D; Levic, S

    2016-01-01

    The simplest approach to enhance alginate hydrogel characteristics and functional properties is to replace the calcium in the process of alginate gelation with other metallic ions which are essential for living systems. Gelling of alginate with other ions and using modern encapsulation techniques can provide new delivery systems with required properties. Hence, in this study Cu-alginate hydrogels in the form of microbeads were produced by electrostatic extrusion using gelling solutions with Cu(II) concentrations in the range 13.5-270 mM and comprehensively characterized in vitro. The variation of gelling solution concentration influenced the microbead Cu(II) content, size, biomechanical properties, Cu(II) release and subsequently potential biomedical application. The formulations chosen for biomedical evaluation showed potential for antimicrobial and tissue engineering applications. Microbeads with higher Cu(II) loading (~100 μmol g(-1)) induced immediate bactericidal effects against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Conversely, Cu(II) release from microbeads with the Cu(II) content of ~60 μmol g(-1) was slower and they were suitable for promoting and maintaining chondrogenic phenotype of bovine calf chondrocytes in 3D culture. Results of this study have shown possibilities for tuning Cu-alginate properties for potential biomedical applications such as antimicrobial wound dressings, tissue engineering scaffolds or articular cartilage implants. PMID:27305176

  15. In vivo Study of the Accuracy of Dual-arch Impressions

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Luciana Martinelli Santayana; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Junior, Luiz Henrique Burnett; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated in vivo the accuracy of metal (Smart®) and plastic (Triple Tray®) dual-arch trays used with vinyl polysiloxane (Flexitime®), in the putty/wash viscosity, as well as polyether (Impregum Soft®) in the regular viscosity. Materials and Methods: In one patient, an implant-level transfer was screwed on an implant in the mandibular right first molar, serving as a pattern. Ten impressions were made with each tray and impression material. The impressions were poured with Type IV gypsum. The width and height of the pattern and casts were measured in a profile projector (Nikon). The results were submitted to Student’s t-test for one sample (α = 0.05). Results: For the width distance, the plastic dual-arch trays with vinyl polysiloxane (4.513 mm) and with polyether (4.531 mm) were statistically wider than the pattern (4.489 mm). The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane (4.504 mm) and with polyether (4.500 mm) did not differ statistically from the pattern. For the height distance, only the metal dual-arch tray with polyether (2.253 mm) differed statistically from the pattern (2.310 mm). Conclusion: The metal dual-arch tray with vinyl polysiloxane, in the putty/wash viscosities, reproduced casts with less distortion in comparison with the same technique with the plastic dual-arch tray. The plastic or metal dual-arch trays with polyether reproduced cast with greater distortion. How to cite the article: Santayana de Lima LM, Borges GA, Burnett LH Jr, Spohr AM. In vivo study of the accuracy of dual-arch impressions. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):50-5. PMID:25083032

  16. Prefabricated stock trays for impression of auricular region.

    PubMed

    Vibha, Shetty; Anandkrishna, G N; Anupam, Purwar; Namratha, N

    2010-06-01

    The conventional methods of impression making for maxillofacial defects are cumbersome and time consuming for both patient and operator. This study focuses upon standardizing and simplifying the impression making methodology for auricular prosthesis with the help of prefabricated stock trays for auricular region. The stock trays were designed on positive replicas of anatomical structures, broadly divided into long and narrow, short and broad and long and broad ear. For each stock tray, impressions of auricle, of patients of different morphology were made with plastic funnels of different shape and size ensuring at least 6 mm of space between the anatomical part and inner surface of funnel and master cast was obtained. Subsequent adaptation of wax was done and fabrications of stock stainless steel trays were done. A standardized stock tray for making of auricular impressions was developed. From this innovative technical procedure it is possible to get an accurate impression of auricular defects now by the use of prefabricated stock trays rather than the cumbersome conventional method. PMID:21629455

  17. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation.

    PubMed

    Ames, Daniel L; Fiske, Susan T

    2013-12-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent, and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  18. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  19. Enhancing the authenticity of assessments through grounding in first impressions.

    PubMed

    Humă, Bogdana

    2015-09-01

    This article examines first impressions through a discursive and interactional lens. Until now, social psychologists have studied first impressions in laboratory conditions, in isolation from their natural environment, thus overseeing their discursive roles as devices for managing situated interactional concerns. I examine fragments of text and talk in which individuals spontaneously invoke first impressions of other persons as part of assessment activities in settings where the authenticity of speakers' stances might be threatened: (1) in activities with inbuilt evaluative components and (2) in sequential contexts where recipients have been withholding affiliation to speakers' actions. I discuss the relationship between authenticity, as a type of credibility issue related to intersubjective trouble, and the characteristics of first impression assessments, which render them useful for dealing with this specific credibility concern. I identify four features of first impression assessments which make them effective in enhancing authenticity: witness positioning (Potter, 1996, Representing reality: Discourse, rhetoric and social construction, Sage, London), (dis)location in time and space, automaticity, and extreme formulations (Edwards, 2003, Analyzing race talk: Multidisciplinary perspectives on the research interview, Cambridge University Press, New York). PMID:25346466

  20. Similarity to the self influences cortical recruitment during impression formation.

    PubMed

    Leshikar, Eric D; Cassidy, Brittany S; Gutchess, Angela H

    2016-04-01

    Prior work has shown that whether or not someone is similar to the self influences person memory--a type of self-reference effect for others. In this study, we were interested in understanding the neural regions supporting the generation of impressions and subsequent memory for targets who vary in similarity to the self. Participants underwent fMRI scanning while forming positive or negative impressions of face-behavior pairs. We tested participants' memory for their generated impressions and then back-sorted the impression trials (encoding) into different levels of self-similarity (high, medium, low) using a self-similarity posttest that came after recognition. Extending prior behavioral work, our data confirmed our hypothesis that memory would be highest for self-similar others and lowest for self-dissimilar others. Dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activity increased with self-similarity (high > medium > low) to targets, regardless of later memory for them. An analysis of regions supporting impression memory revealed a double dissociation within medial temporal lobe regions: for similar others, amygdala recruitment supported memory, whereas for dissimilar others, hippocampal activation supported memory. These results suggest that self-similarity influences evaluation and memory for targets but also affects the underlying neural resources engaged when thinking about others who vary in self-similarity. PMID:26558615

  1. The First Impression of Data Sent by Two Martian Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    ``Spirit'' at the Gusev crater near the dichotomy boundary sent a panoramic view, an image of the near ground and a very close view of a small spot analyzed by X-ray. The first impression of chaotic disposition of big and small rocks and sandy fragments is wrong. All scales images display striations in 4 directions probably due to intersecting undulations, besides, rock fragments are rather evenly distributed. This is not of surprise because many MOLA images show very regular patterns described earlier for intersecting wave processes on planetary surfaces [1]. The middle scale image shows angular rock fragments of various sizes protruding soil. There is an impression that the protruding blocks represent uplifted parts of a wave-woven surface of volcanic infilling , subsided parts being covered with sandy soil mainly of eolian origin. Such an interpretation is supported by the THEMIS image (released 23 Sept., 2003 in Internet) of a 22 km-diameter crater on Sirenum Fossae where wave structurized (volcanic?) material is gradually covered by eolian sediments leaving protruding high standing blocks (antinodes). The soil X-ray analysis shows high Si an Fe, some Al, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Cl, S, minor Cu, Ni, Zn that should be expected for a mixed material at low/highland contact contaminated by an eolian stuff. ``Opportunity'' is the first highland landing and in this is its highest importance. It seems that long awaited light (in color and density) rock type without Fe [2, 3 & others] is in front of us. The leveled out white outcrops probably represent this kind of rocks (albitites, syenites). Eleveted K, Na, CL, S, Si and H20 (!) detected by gamma and neutron spectra can be explained by sodalite (hydrosodalite) and cancrinite group minerals present in nepheline syenites -- albitites and always accompanied by zeolites containing water. The high chemical dichotomy (and mantle fractionation) between lowlands and highlands is an important part of the wave planetology (Theorem 4 [3

  2. Impression Cytology in Different Types of Contact Lens Users

    PubMed Central

    ISKELELI, Guzin; ARICI, Ceyhun; DEGER BILGEC, Mustafa; DEMIRKESEN, Cuyan; SERAP ARSLAN, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    This study compared tear function tests and cytologic changes on the conjunctival surface in asymptomatic patients wearing contact lens of different materials. Included in this study were 40 eyes wearing daily wear 4 week replacement hydrogel (H) lenses, 32 eyes wearing silicone hydrogel (SiH) lenses, 18 eyes wearing rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lenses, and 21 healthy eyes (no lenses) as the control group. Epithelial morphology of the conjunctival surface was evaluated, based on Nelson classification with conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), after the tear break-up time (TBUT) and Schirmer test were performed. The mean values of the Schirmer and TBUT tests were significantly higher in the control group than in the other lens groups (p < 0.001). Grade 0 was the most frequent CIC in the control group (66.7%) and least frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%); grade I was least frequent in the control and RGP groups (33.3%) and most frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%). Moreover, grade 2 was most frequent in the SiH lens group (18.8%). There was no statistically significant difference in goblet cell densities between the groups (p = 0.462). In addition to the different Schirmer and TBUT test results between contact lens wearers and healthy non-wearers, some cytologic changes may occur on the ocular surface with direct mechanical effects of contact lenses. This simple and noninvasive technique may be used to evaluate the ocular surface with regard to intolerance to contact lenses. PMID:27350951

  3. Impression Cytology in Different Types of Contact Lens Users.

    PubMed

    Iskeleli, Guzin; Arici, Ceyhun; Deger Bilgec, Mustafa; Demirkesen, Cuyan; Serap Arslan, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    This study compared tear function tests and cytologic changes on the conjunctival surface in asymptomatic patients wearing contact lens of different materials. Included in this study were 40 eyes wearing daily wear 4 week replacement hydrogel (H) lenses, 32 eyes wearing silicone hydrogel (SiH) lenses, 18 eyes wearing rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lenses, and 21 healthy eyes (no lenses) as the control group. Epithelial morphology of the conjunctival surface was evaluated, based on Nelson classification with conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), after the tear break-up time (TBUT) and Schirmer test were performed. The mean values of the Schirmer and TBUT tests were significantly higher in the control group than in the other lens groups (p < 0.001). Grade 0 was the most frequent CIC in the control group (66.7%) and least frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%); grade I was least frequent in the control and RGP groups (33.3%) and most frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%). Moreover, grade 2 was most frequent in the SiH lens group (18.8%). There was no statistically significant difference in goblet cell densities between the groups (p = 0.462). In addition to the different Schirmer and TBUT test results between contact lens wearers and healthy non-wearers, some cytologic changes may occur on the ocular surface with direct mechanical effects of contact lenses. This simple and noninvasive technique may be used to evaluate the ocular surface with regard to intolerance to contact lenses. PMID:27350951

  4. Postelectrospinning modifications for alginate nanofiber-based wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Leung, Victor; Hartwell, Ryan; Elizei, Sanam Salimi; Yang, Heejae; Ghahary, Aziz; Ko, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Alginate nanofibers have been attractive for potential tissue regeneration applications due to a combination of their moisture retention ability and large surface area available in a nonwoven nanofiber form. This study aims to address several challenges in alginate nanofiber application, including the lack of structural stability in aqueous environment and limited cell attachment as compared to commercial wound dressings, via examining crosslinking techniques. In addition to the commonly performed divalent ion crosslinking, a glutaraldehyde double-crosslinking step and polylysine addition were applied to an electrospun alginate nanofiber nonwoven mat. With optimization of the electrospinning solution, nanofiber morphology was maintained after the two-stage crosslinking process. Extensibility of the nanofiber mat reduced after the crosslinking process. However, both aqueous stability and cell attachment improved after the postspinning modifications, as shown through degradation tests in phosphate buffered saline solutions and fibroblast cell culture studies, respectively. PMID:24155096

  5. Optimization of alpha-amylase immobilization in calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Ertan, Figen; Yagar, Hulya; Balkan, Bilal

    2007-01-01

    alpha-Amylase enzyme was produced by Aspergillus sclerotiorum under SSF conditions, and immobilized in calcium alginate beads. Effects of immobilization conditions, such as alginate concentration, CaCl(2) concentration, amount of loading enzyme, bead size, and amount of beads, on enzymatic activity were investigated. Optimum alginate and CaCl(2) concentration were found to be 3% (w/v). Using a loading enzyme concentration of 140 U mL(-1), and bead (diameter 3 mm) amount of 0.5 g, maximum enzyme activity was observed. Beads prepared at optimum immobilization conditions were suitable for up to 7 repeated uses, losing only 35% of their initial activity. Among the various starches tested, the highest enzyme activity (96.2%) was determined in soluble potato starch hydrolysis for 120 min at 40 degrees C. PMID:17516249

  6. Alginate based polyurethanes: A review of recent advances and perspective.

    PubMed

    Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zia, Fatima; Zuber, Mohammad; Rehman, Saima; Ahmad, Mirza Nadeem

    2015-08-01

    The trend of using biopolymers in combination with synthetic polymers was increasing rapidly from last two or three decades. Polysaccharide based biopolymers especially starch, cellulose, chitin, chitosan, alginate, etc. found extensive applications for different industrial uses, as they are biocompatible, biodegradable, bio-renewable resources and chiefly environment friendly. Segment block copolymer character of polyurethanes that endows them a broad range of versatility in terms of tailoring their properties was employed in conjunction with various natural polymers resulted in modified biomaterials. Alginate is biodegradable, biocompatible, bioactive, less toxic and low cost anionic polysaccharide, as a part of structural component of bacteria and brown algae (sea weed) is quite abundant in nature. It is used in combination with polyurethanes to form elastomers, nano-composites, hydrogels, etc. that especially revolutionized the food and biomedical industries. The review summarized the development in alginate based polyurethanes with their potential applications. PMID:25964178

  7. Fundamental Characteristics of Bioprint on Calcium Alginate Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezu, Shinjiro; Hatta, Tatsuru; Ohmori, Hitoshi

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this study is to fabricate precision three-dimensional (3D) biodevices those are micro fluidics and artificial organs utilizing digital fabrication. Digital fabrication is fabrication method utilizing inkjet technologies. Electrostatic inkjet is one of the inkjet technologies. The electrostatic inkjet method has following two merits; those are high resolution to print and ability to eject highly viscous liquid. These characteristics are suitable to print biomaterials precisely. We are now applying for bioprint. In this paper, the electrostatic inkjet method is applied for fabrication of 3D biodevices that has cave like blood vessel. When aqueous solution of sodium alginate is printed to aqueous solution of calcium chloride, calcium alginate is produced. 3D biodevices are fabricated in case that calcium alginate is piled.

  8. Harmony between Colors and Fragrances: Effect on Dimensions of Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kumiko; Saito, Miho

    The objective of this study is to extract dimensions in impressions of colors and fragrances, and to examine their harmonious relationship. Experiment A: One hundred subjects were requested to describe their impressions of eight fragrances, and to select harmonious/disharmonious colors from color charts. Experiment B: One hundred subjects described their impression of 18 colors and each color's degree of harmonization with each of the eight fragrances. In addition, we combined the results of Experiment A and Experiment B, and conducted several analyses. The factor analysis revealed the MILD factor and CLEAR factor for the dimensions of each fragrance, color, and combination of color and fragrance. The multiple regression analysis revealed the following tendency: the smaller the distance between colors and fragrances on the dimensions, the greater is the rise in harmony; conversely, the greater the distance, the greater is the disharmony.

  9. A Sensitive Measurement for Estimating Impressions of Image-Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Mie; Matouge, Shingo; Mori, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Noboru; Kasuga, Masao

    We have investigated Kansei Content that appeals maker's intention to viewer's kansei. An SD method is a very good way to evaluate subjective impression of image-contents. However, because the SD method is performed after subjects view the image-contents, it is difficult to examine impression of detailed scenes of the image-contents in real time. To measure viewer's impression of the image-contents in real time, we have developed a Taikan sensor. With the Taikan sensor, we investigate relations among the image-contents, the grip strength and the body temperature. We also explore the interface of the Taikan sensor to use it easily. In our experiment, a horror movie is used that largely affects emotion of the subjects. Our results show that there is a possibility that the grip strength increases when the subjects view a strained scene and that it is easy to use the Taikan sensor without its circle base that is originally installed.

  10. Forming impressions: effects of facial expression and gender stereotypes.

    PubMed

    Hack, Tay

    2014-04-01

    The present study of 138 participants explored how facial expressions and gender stereotypes influence impressions. It was predicted that images of smiling women would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting warmth, and that images of non-smiling men would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting competence. As predicted, smiling female faces were rated as more warm; however, contrary to prediction, perceived competence of male faces was not affected by facial expression. Participants' female stereotype endorsement was a significant predictor for evaluations of female faces; those who ascribed more strongly to traditional female stereotypes reported the most positive impressions of female faces displaying a smiling expression. However, a similar effect was not found for images of men; endorsement of traditional male stereotypes did not predict participants' impressions of male faces. PMID:24897907

  11. Valuing Women in Management: An Impression Management Perspective of Gender Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, William L., III; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Applies a model of impression management to explore the process whereby women in organizations present themselves to others and the impressions they create. Devotes particular attention to how these impressions influence women's experiences in organizations. Suggests future research direction for clarifying the impact of gender impression and…

  12. Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cell (GMSC) Delivery System Based on RGD-Coupled Alginate Hydrogel with Antimicrobial Properties: A Novel Treatment Modality for Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Ivana M. A.; Chen, Chider; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H.; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Chee, Daniel; Marques, Márcia M.; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Peri-implantitis is one of the most common inflammatory complications in dental implantology. Similar to periodontitis, in peri-implantitis, destructive inflammatory changes take place in the tissues surrounding a dental implant. Bacterial flora at the failing implant sites resemble the pathogens in periodontal disease and consist of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of a silver lactate (SL)-containing RGD-coupled alginate hydrogel scaffold as a promising stem cell delivery vehicle with antimicrobial properties. Materials and Methods Gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) or human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) were encapsulated in SL-loaded alginate hydrogel microspheres. Stem cell viability, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation capacity were analyzed. Results Our results showed that SL exhibited antimicrobial properties against Aa in a dose-dependent manner, with 0.50 mg/ml showing the greatest antimicrobial properties while still maintaining cell viability. At this concentration, SL-containing alginate hydrogel was able to inhibit Aa on the surface of Ti discs and significantly reduce the bacterial load in Aa suspensions. Silver ions were effectively released from the SL-loaded alginate microspheres for up to 2 weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of GMSCs and hBMMSCs encapsulated in the SL-loaded alginate microspheres were confirmed by the intense mineral matrix deposition and high expression of osteogenesis-related genes. Conclusion Taken together, our findings confirm that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel containing SL show promise for bone tissue engineering with antimicrobial properties against Aa bacteria in vitro. PMID:26216081

  13. Ocular hypotensive efficacy and safety of once daily carteolol alginate

    PubMed Central

    Demailly, P.; Allaire, C.; Trinquand, C.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM—Carteolol is a β adrenoceptor antagonist used topically to reduce intraocular pressure, typically twice daily. In an effort to provide a once daily dosing regimen, carteolol was formulated with 1% alginic acid. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of carteolol alginate solution in comparison with standard carteolol solution.
METHODS—This was a double masked, parallel group, multicentre study. Patients with ocular hypertension or open angle glaucoma (n=235) were randomly assigned to receive either carteolol alginate four times daily or standard carteolol solution, twice daily. The masking was maintained through the use of a vehicle in the evening for the alginate group. Patients were evaluated at baseline, 15, 60, and 120 days.
RESULTS—At 0900 (presumed trough) on day 60, mean reductions in intraocular pressure (IOP) from baseline were 6.09 (SD 2.97) and 6.09 (3.18) mm Hg for the standard carteolol and alginate, respectively. At 1100 (presumed peak), mean reductions were 6.51 (2.53) and 6.47 (2.76) mm Hg, respectively. Results were similar at other times (day 15 and day 120). The most common side effect was transient stinging on instillation of drops, which did not differ significantly between groups. There were no differences of note in other ocular or systemic signs or symptoms.
CONCLUSION—The new alginate formulation of carteolol 2% given once daily was as effective as standard carteolol 2% given twice daily with no meaningful differences regarding safety.

 PMID:11466245

  14. BIODEGRADABLE PHOTO-CROSSLINKED ALGINATE NANOFIBRE SCAFFOLDS WITH TUNEABLE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, CELL ADHESIVITY AND GROWTH FACTOR RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sung In; Jeon, Oju; Krebs, Melissa D.; Hill, Michael C.; Alsberg, Eben

    2012-01-01

    Nanofibrous scaffolds are of interest in tissue engineering due to their high surface area to volume ratio, interconnected pores, and architectural similarity to the native extracellular matrix. Our laboratory recently developed a biodegradable, photo-crosslinkable alginate biopolymer. Here, we show the capacity of the material to be electrospun into a nanofibrous matrix, and the ability to enhance cell adhesion and proliferation on these matrices by covalent modification with cell adhesion peptides. Additionally, the potential of covalently incorporating heparin into the hydrogels during the photopolymerisation process to sustain the release of a heparin binding growth factor via affinity interactions was demonstrated. Electrospun photo-crosslinkable alginate nanofibrous scaffolds endowed with cell adhesion ligands and controlled delivery of growth factors may allow for improved regulation of cell behaviour for regenerative medicine. PMID:23070945

  15. All-natural composite wound dressing films of essential oils encapsulated in sodium alginate with antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis; Rizzello, Loris; Scurr, David J; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Bayer, Ilker S; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2014-03-25

    We present natural polymeric composite films made of essential oils (EOs) dispersed in sodium alginate (NaAlg) matrix, with remarkable anti-microbial and anti-fungal properties. Namely, elicriso italic, chamomile blue, cinnamon, lavender, tea tree, peppermint, eucalyptus, lemongrass and lemon oils were encapsulated in the films as potential active substances. Glycerol was used to induce plasticity and surfactants were added to improve the dispersion of EOs in the NaAlg matrix. The topography, chemical composition, mechanical properties, and humidity resistance of the films are presented analytically. Antimicrobial tests were conducted on films containing different percentages of EOs against Escherichia coli bacteria and Candida albicans fungi, and the films were characterized as effective or not. Such diverse types of essential oil-fortified alginate films can find many applications mainly as disposable wound dressings but also in food packaging, medical device protection and disinfection, and indoor air quality improvement materials, to name a few. PMID:24211443

  16. Montmorillonite-alginate nanocomposite as a drug delivery system--incorporation and in vitro release of irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Iliescu, Ruxandra Irina; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Ghitulica, Cristina Daniela; Voicu, Georgeta; Ficai, Anton; Hoteteu, Mihai

    2014-03-25

    The scope of the present study was the preparation and characterization of irinotecan nanocomposite beads based on montmorillonite (Mt) and sodium alginate (AL) as drug carriers. After irinotecan (I) incorporation into Mt, the resulting hybrid was compounded with alginate, and I-Mt-AL nanocomposite beads were obtained by ionotropic gelation technique. The structure and surface morphology of the hybrid and composite materials were established by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Irinotecan incorporation efficiency in Mt and in alginate beads was determined both by UV-vis spectroscopy and thermal analysis and was found to be high. The hybrid and composite materials were tested in vitro in simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.4, at 37 °C) in order to establish if upon administering the beads at the site of a resected colorectal tumor, the delivery of the drug is sustained and can represent an alternative to the existing systemic chemotherapy. The in vitro drug release test results clearly suggested that Mt, and Mt along with AL were able to control the release of irinotecan by making it sustained, without any burst effect, and by reducing the released amount and the release rate. The nanocomposite beads may be a promising drug delivery system in chemotherapy. PMID:23998956

  17. Alginate and Chitosan Gel Nanoparticles for Efficient Protein Entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalova, O.; Kulikouskaya, V.; Shutava, T.; Agabekov, V.

    Alginate and chitosan nanoparticles were synthesized by ionic gelation of the polymers in the presence of stabilizers (PEG 1500, PEG 6000, TWEEN 80). The stability of 210-240 nm Ca-alginate colloids is affected by nanoparticles ageing and by the presence of a stabilizer. The diameter of chitosan nanoparticles is in the range of 180 to 260 nm and depends on polymer concentration in the reaction mixture, its molecular weight, and stabilizer type. The nanoparticles efficiently entrap a model protein, bovine serum albumin, in the amount up to 0.24 mg per 1 mg of polysaccharide.

  18. Muscle Tissue Engineering Using Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells Encapsulated in Alginate Hydrogels Containing Multiple Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Sahar; Chen, Chider; Xu, Xingtian; Annabi, Nasim; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Wu, Benjamin M; Khademhosseini, Ali; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2016-06-01

    Repair and regeneration of muscle tissue following traumatic injuries or muscle diseases often presents a challenging clinical situation. If a significant amount of tissue is lost the native regenerative potential of skeletal muscle will not be able to grow to fill the defect site completely. Dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in combination with appropriate scaffold material, present an advantageous alternative therapeutic option for muscle tissue engineering in comparison to current treatment modalities available. To date, there has been no report on application of gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) in three-dimensional scaffolds for muscle tissue engineering. The objectives of the current study were to develop an injectable 3D RGD-coupled alginate scaffold with multiple growth factor delivery capacity for encapsulating GMSCs, and to evaluate the capacity of encapsulated GMSCs to differentiate into myogenic tissue in vitro and in vivo where encapsulated GMSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. The results demonstrate that after 4 weeks of differentiation in vitro, GMSCs as well as the positive control human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) exhibited muscle cell-like morphology with high levels of mRNA expression for gene markers related to muscle regeneration (MyoD, Myf5, and MyoG) via qPCR measurement. Our quantitative PCR analyzes revealed that the stiffness of the RGD-coupled alginate regulates the myogenic differentiation of encapsulated GMSCs. Histological and immunohistochemical/fluorescence staining for protein markers specific for myogenic tissue confirmed muscle regeneration in subcutaneous transplantation in our in vivo animal model. GMSCs showed significantly greater capacity for myogenic regeneration in comparison to hBMMSCs (p < 0.05). Altogether, our findings confirmed that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel with multiple growth factor delivery capacity is a promising

  19. Adsorption studies of cadmium ions on alginate-calcium carbonate composite beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Zahid; Amin, Athar; Zafar, Uzma; Raza, Muhammad Amir; Hafeez, Irfan; Akram, Adnan

    2015-07-01

    Alginate-calcium carbonate composite material was prepared in the form of beads and characterized using Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The adsorption of Cd2+ ions was studied through batch experiments. The adsorption parameters such as contact time (120 min), adsorbent dose (1.5 g), initial metal ion concentration(10 mg/L), pH (6) and agitation speed (150 rpm) were optimized at room temperature. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were applied to the data and it was noted that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions is better explained by Freundlich model. The kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions followed pseudo-first order kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters like ∆G 0, ∆H 0 and ∆S 0 were calculated and on the basis of these values it was established that the adsorption process is feasible and endothermic in nature. It was concluded from the study that the composite material of alginate and calcium carbonate can effectively be used to recover Cd2+ ions from wastewater.

  20. Accuracy of 3D white light scanning of abutment teeth impressions: evaluation of trueness and precision

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin-Hun; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of digitizing dental impressions of abutment teeth using a white light scanner and to compare the findings among teeth types. MATERIALS AND METHODS To assess precision, impressions of the canine, premolar, and molar prepared to receive all-ceramic crowns were repeatedly scanned to obtain five sets of 3-D data (STL files). Point clouds were compared and error sizes were measured (n=10 per type). Next, to evaluate trueness, impressions of teeth were rotated by 10°-20° and scanned. The obtained data were compared with the first set of data for precision assessment, and the error sizes were measured (n=5 per type). The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate precision and trueness among three teeth types, and post-hoc comparisons were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test with Bonferroni correction (α=.05). RESULTS Precision discrepancies for the canine, premolar, and molar were 3.7 µm, 3.2 µm, and 7.3 µm, respectively, indicating the poorest precision for the molar (P<.001). Trueness discrepancies for teeth types were 6.2 µm, 11.2 µm, and 21.8 µm, respectively, indicating the poorest trueness for the molar (P=.007). CONCLUSION In respect to accuracy the molar showed the largest discrepancies compared with the canine and premolar. Digitizing of dental impressions of abutment teeth using a white light scanner was assessed to be a highly accurate method and provided discrepancy values in a clinically acceptable range. Further study is needed to improve digitizing performance of white light scanning in axial wall. PMID:25551007

  1. Effects of composition and structure of alginates on adsorption of divalent metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nai-Yu, Zheng; Yan-Xia, Zhang; Xiao, Fan; Li-Jun, Han

    1994-03-01

    Results of a series of experiments (on the adsorption of divalent metal ions by dried alginic acid, Na and Ca alginates of different composition and block structure) conducted in this systematic study of the effects of the composition and structure of alginates on the static adsorption equilibrium of divalent metal ions indicate that the properties of alginate adsorption to divalent metal ions are highly different, depending not only on the cations used, but also on the form and structure of the alginates. There is close correlation between the adsorption properties and the structure of the alginates. The selectivity coefficient of Na alginate for Cd-Sr ion exchange tends to increase with the increase of the M/G ratio in alginate, whereas the adsorption capacity of Ca alginate for Cu2+ ion decrease with the increase of the G-block or the average length of the G-block(bar N_G ) and the total adsorption capacity of alginic acid is found to vary in the same order as the F MM(diad frequency) in alginate in the mixed solution of Sr2+, Ba2+ and Cd2+.

  2. Bio-based barium alginate film: Preparation, flame retardancy and thermal degradation behavior.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Chuan-Jie; Zhao, Jin-Chao; Guo, Yi; Zhu, Ping; Wang, De-Yi

    2016-03-30

    A bio-based barium alginate film was prepared via a facile ionic exchange and casting approach. Its flammability, thermal degradation and pyrolysis behaviors, thermal degradation mechanism were studied systemically by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning (UL-94), microscale combustion calorimetry (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). It showed that barium alginate film had much higher LOI value (52.0%) than that of sodium alginate film (24.5%). Moreover, barium alginate film passed the UL-94 V-0 rating, while the sodium alginate film showed no classification. Importantly, peak of heat release rate (PHRR) of barium alginate film in MCC test was much lower than that of sodium alginate film, suggested that introduction of barium ion into alginate film significantly decreased release of combustible gases. TG-FTIR and Py-GC-MS results indicated that barium alginate produced much less flammable products than that of sodium alginate in whole thermal degradation procedure. Finally, a possible degradation mechanism of barium alginate had been proposed. PMID:26794953

  3. Immobilization of a Plant Lipase from Pachira aquatica in Alginate and Alginate/PVA Beads

    PubMed Central

    Bonine, Bárbara M.; Polizelli, Patricia Peres; Bonilla-Rodriguez, Gustavo O.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the immobilization of a new lipase isolated from oleaginous seeds of Pachira aquatica, using beads of calcium alginate (Alg) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). We evaluated the morphology, number of cycles of reuse, optimum temperature, and temperature stability of both immobilization methods compared to the free enzyme. The immobilized enzymes were more stable than the free enzyme, keeping 60% of the original activity after 4 h at 50°C. The immobilized lipase was reused several times, with activity decreasing to approximately 50% after 5 cycles. Both the free and immobilized enzymes were found to be optimally active between 30 and 40°C. PMID:24818012

  4. Cross-Cultural Impression Management: A Cultural Knowledge Audit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spong, Abigail; Kamau, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many people moving into a new culture for work or study do so without prior cross-cultural training, yet successful cultural adaptation has important ramifications. The purpose of this paper is to focus on cross-cultural impression management as an element of cultural adaptation. Does cultural adaptation begin by paying strong attention…

  5. Method for creating stomatal impressions directly onto archivable microscope slides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stomatal density has been shown to be a primary determinant of water use efficiency, limitation to CO2 assimilation rate and yield. Widely used methods of stomatal impressioning sample small regions of the leaf, are labor intensive, or do not yield stable archivable samples for potentially revisitin...

  6. Making an Impression: YA Authors and Their Influential Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenbach, Brooke; Kaywell, Joan F.

    2013-01-01

    This article recounts significant moments from online interviews these authors conducted with Young Adult (YA) authors concerning the teachers who left a lasting impression on them and assisted them in finding their voice and unique writing abilities. S. E. Hinton, Walter Dean Myers, Erin Gruwell, Chris Crutcher, and other popular YA authors…

  7. Modeling first impressions from highly variable facial images

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Richard J. W.; Sutherland, Clare A. M.; Young, Andrew W.; Hartley, Tom

    2014-01-01

    First impressions of social traits, such as trustworthiness or dominance, are reliably perceived in faces, and despite their questionable validity they can have considerable real-world consequences. We sought to uncover the information driving such judgments, using an attribute-based approach. Attributes (physical facial features) were objectively measured from feature positions and colors in a database of highly variable “ambient” face photographs, and then used as input for a neural network to model factor dimensions (approachability, youthful-attractiveness, and dominance) thought to underlie social attributions. A linear model based on this approach was able to account for 58% of the variance in raters’ impressions of previously unseen faces, and factor-attribute correlations could be used to rank attributes by their importance to each factor. Reversing this process, neural networks were then used to predict facial attributes and corresponding image properties from specific combinations of factor scores. In this way, the factors driving social trait impressions could be visualized as a series of computer-generated cartoon face-like images, depicting how attributes change along each dimension. This study shows that despite enormous variation in ambient images of faces, a substantial proportion of the variance in first impressions can be accounted for through linear changes in objectively defined features. PMID:25071197

  8. First Impressions: Gait Cues Drive Reliable Trait Judgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoresen, John C.; Vuong, Quoc C.; Atkinson, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    Personality trait attribution can underpin important social decisions and yet requires little effort; even a brief exposure to a photograph can generate lasting impressions. Body movement is a channel readily available to observers and allows judgements to be made when facial and body appearances are less visible; e.g., from great distances.…

  9. Alkaptonuria Presenting with Impressive Osteoarticular Changes and Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Roca, Bernardino; Roca, Manuel; Monferrer, Raquel

    2016-03-01

    Alkaptonuria, or ochronosis, a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, causes an excess of homogentisic acid that results in dark pigmentation, calcification, and inflammation of cartilaginous and other tissues. Cardiovascular complications are also typical of the disease. We report the case of a 78-year-old male who presented with impressive osteoarticular changes and aortic stenosis associated with alkaptonuria. PMID:27169295

  10. Shared impression formation in the cognitively interdependent dyad.

    PubMed

    Ruscher, Janet B; Santuzzi, Alecia M; Hammer, Elizabeth Yost

    2003-09-01

    We examined the role of cognitive interdependence in determining how close friends form shared impressions of another person. Cognitive interdependence should provide a processing advantage, such that close friends are more efficient in forming shared impressions and are more successful at doing so. Under normal circumstances, the conversations of close friends should be marked by little necessity to make explicit requests for information, mutual recognition of who currently is controlling the flow of conversation, and willingness to express differences in opinion. Given these advantages, close friends also should be able to form complex shared impressions that go beyond mere one-sided stereotypic judgments and that instead resolve apparent discrepancies in the target's personality. However, if the cognitive interdependence system is disrupted by mutual distraction, these advantages should attenuate or even reverse. Dyads of varying degrees of closeness were mutually distracted or not while discussing their impressions of another female college student. Results supported predictions and are discussed with reference to how cognitive interdependence may help close dyads function within their mutual social networks. PMID:14567845

  11. Temporary Employment and Perceived Employability: Mediation by Impression Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Cuyper, Nele; De Witte, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Perceived employability (PE) has been advanced as the upcoming resource for career development, particularly for temporary workers. The question is how temporary workers become employable. Our hypothesis is that temporary workers more than permanent workers use impression management to become employable, both on the internal and the external labor…

  12. How Sexual Orientation and Physical Attractiveness Affect Impressions of Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elman, Donald; And Others

    Stereotyped impressions of male homosexuals and the underlying importance of sexuality in social attraction and perceptions were investigated. Male (N=80) and female (N=80) college students responded to either an attractive or an unattractive photo of a male stimulus person, who was identified to half of the subjects as a homosexual. Compared to…

  13. Modeling first impressions from highly variable facial images.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Richard J W; Sutherland, Clare A M; Young, Andrew W; Hartley, Tom

    2014-08-12

    First impressions of social traits, such as trustworthiness or dominance, are reliably perceived in faces, and despite their questionable validity they can have considerable real-world consequences. We sought to uncover the information driving such judgments, using an attribute-based approach. Attributes (physical facial features) were objectively measured from feature positions and colors in a database of highly variable "ambient" face photographs, and then used as input for a neural network to model factor dimensions (approachability, youthful-attractiveness, and dominance) thought to underlie social attributions. A linear model based on this approach was able to account for 58% of the variance in raters' impressions of previously unseen faces, and factor-attribute correlations could be used to rank attributes by their importance to each factor. Reversing this process, neural networks were then used to predict facial attributes and corresponding image properties from specific combinations of factor scores. In this way, the factors driving social trait impressions could be visualized as a series of computer-generated cartoon face-like images, depicting how attributes change along each dimension. This study shows that despite enormous variation in ambient images of faces, a substantial proportion of the variance in first impressions can be accounted for through linear changes in objectively defined features. PMID:25071197

  14. The impact of motivation on race-based impression formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyi; Cardenas-Iniguez, Carlos; Correll, Joshua; Cloutier, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Affective biases toward racial out-group members, characterized by White perceivers' negative evaluations of Black individuals, prevail in U.S. culture. Such affective associations have been found to guide race-based impression formation. Accordingly, individuals may strive to resolve inconsistencies when perceiving targets violating their expectations. The current study focuses on the impact of evaluative incongruence on the activity of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) - a brain region previously shown to support impression formation. When asking participants to form impressions of positively and negatively evaluated Black and White individuals, we found preferential dmPFC activity in response to individuals paired with information that violates race-based affective associations. Importantly, individual differences in internal motivation to respond without prejudice (IMS) were found to shape the extent to which dmPFC activity indexes the interactive effects of race and affective associations during impression formation. Specifically, preferential dmPFC activity in response to evaluatively incongruent targets (i.e., Black-positive & White-negative) was present among participants with lower, but not those with higher, levels of IMS. Implications and future directions are discussed in the context of dmPFC involvement in social cognition. PMID:26302673

  15. Using Teacher Impression Journals to Improve Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, SeonYeong; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Meyer, Lori E.; Favazza, Paddy C.; Mouzourou, Chryso; van Luling, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of "Teacher Impression Journals" during a larger study that examined the efficacy of an intervention program designed to promote kindergarteners' positive attitudes toward peers with disabilities (i.e., the "Special Friends" program). The journals were designed to gather information about…

  16. DETAIL OF THE IMPRESSION IN THE CONCRETE SLAB OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE IMPRESSION IN THE CONCRETE SLAB OF THE SOUTH END OF THE ABOVE-GROUND PORTION. NOTE STEP DOWN TO THE STEEL PLATE IN BACKGROUND. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Impressions of Counselors as a Function of Counselor Physical Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jean A.

    1978-01-01

    Research assessed the effects of counselor physical attractiveness and inter-actions between attractiveness and counselor subject sex. It is suggested that sex of counselor and client may play a more important role independently and in conjunction with attractiveness than does attractiveness alone in influencing impressions and expectations.…

  18. Impressions of a Middle Grades STEM Integration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohlmann, Micah; Moore, Tamara J.; McClelland, J.; Roehrig, Gillian H.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of one Minnesota middle school that implemented a year-long integrated STEM program with the cooperation of graduate student fellows from a local university. The authors, two of whom were among the graduate students involved in the project, describe their impressions of the program, share some lessons they…

  19. River Influences on Shelf Ecosystems: Initial Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, B. M.

    2004-12-01

    scales of minutes to days (i.e., internal waves) was important to fluorescence, nutrients and salinity within 10 km of the river mouth, prompting us to initiate multi-disciplinary anchor stations to examine higher frequencies in detail. Initial conclusions are that short spatial scales ( ˜100 m) and time scales ( ˜10-30 minutes) are likely critical to mixing and hence biological growth in the plume. Larger scales (shelf width) and longer periods (days) are also important; e.g., the baroclinic southward coastal jet over the outer shelf/slope over 100-200 km along the coast plays a critical role in plume direction and hence transport of plume material as well as providing nutrients to fuel plume productivity. We note that much of the water upwelled into the Columbia plume likely originates farther north where upwelling is enhanced by the estuarine/topographic processes near the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

  20. Alginate Hydrogels Coated with Chitosan for Wound Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Straccia, Maria Cristina; Gomez d’Ayala, Giovanna; Romano, Ida; Oliva, Adriana; Laurienzo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a coating of chitosan onto alginate hydrogels was realized using the water-soluble hydrochloride form of chitosan (CH-Cl), with the dual purpose of imparting antibacterial activity and delaying the release of hydrophilic molecules from the alginate matrix. Alginate hydrogels with different calcium contents were prepared by the internal setting method and coated by immersion in a CH-Cl solution. Structural analysis by cryo-scanning electron microscopy was carried out to highlight morphological alterations due to the coating layer. Tests in vitro with human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) were assessed to check the absence of toxicity of CH-Cl. Swelling, stability in physiological solution and release characteristics using rhodamine B as the hydrophilic model drug were compared to those of relative uncoated hydrogels. Finally, antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli was tested. Results show that alginate hydrogels coated with chitosan hydrochloride described here can be proposed as a novel medicated dressing by associating intrinsic antimicrobial activity with improved sustained release characteristics. PMID:25969981

  1. Insulin-loaded alginic acid nanoparticles for sublingual delivery.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilam H; Devarajan, Padma V

    2016-01-01

    Alginic acid nanoparticles (NPs) containing insulin, with nicotinamide as permeation enhancer were developed for sublingual delivery. The lower concentration of proteolytic enzymes, lower thickness and enhanced retention due to bioadhesive property, were relied on for enhanced insulin absorption. Insulin-loaded NPs were prepared by mild and aqueous based nanoprecipitation process. NPs were negatively charged and had a mean size of ∼200 nm with low dispersity index. Insulin loading capacities of >95% suggested a high association of insulin with alginic acid. Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra and DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) thermogram of insulin-loaded NPs revealed the association of insulin with alginic acid. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed conformational stability, while HPLC analysis confirmed chemical stability of insulin in the NPs. Sublingually delivered NPs with nicotinamide exhibited high pharmacological availability (>100%) and bioavailability (>80%) at a dose of 5 IU/kg. The high absolute pharmacological availability of 20.2% and bioavailability of 24.1% in comparison with subcutaneous injection at 1 IU/kg, in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model, suggest the insulin-loaded alginic acid NPs as a promising sublingual delivery system of insulin. PMID:24901208

  2. Reinforcement of porous alginate scaffolds by incorporating electrospun fibres.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Takagi, Yousuke; Yamada, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Tetsu; Kawakami, Koei

    2008-09-01

    The mechanical properties of scaffolds play a vital role in transmitting input mechanical signals to the cells within them. We aimed to modify mechanical properties of porous scaffolds by incorporating electrospun fibres into their frameworks. Porous constructs containing electrospun silicate fibres were prepared from Na-alginate aqueous solutions suspending the silicate fibres with (ASF) or without amino groups (NASF) via an all-aqueous method based on a freeze-drying technique. The repulsion forces of constructs containing ASF towards compression increased as the fibre content increased. In contrast, constructs containing NASF showed no such increases in repulsion forces. Cells seeded onto constructs containing ASF exhibited suppressed growth, similar to cells seeded onto alginate scaffolds without fibres. In contrast, cells seeded onto scaffolds containing NASF showed about two-fold faster growth than cells seeded onto scaffolds containing ASF. The differences in the mechanical properties and cell growth profiles between the scaffolds containing ASF and NASF can be explained by the formation and non-formation of electrostatic bonds between the fibres and alginate, respectively. The results obtained in the present study demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating electrospun fibres for reinforcement of alginate scaffolds and enhancement of cell growth. PMID:18689918

  3. Inhibition of tobramycin diffusion by binding to alginate.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, W W; Dorrington, S M; Slack, M P; Walmsley, H L

    1988-01-01

    [3H]tobramycin bound to sodium alginate and to exopolysaccharide prepared from two mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Binding to sodium alginate was similar to binding to exopolysaccharide, both in the dependence on tobramycin concentration and in the maximum binding observed at saturation. Incorporation of sodium alginate into agar plates reduced the zone sizes of growth inhibition caused by tobramycin. The reductions in zone sizes were quantitatively accounted for by the binding of tobramycin to sodium alginate during diffusion of the antibiotic away from the well in which it had been placed at the start of the experiment. However, the binding of tobramycin to the exopolysaccharide of P. aeruginosa, and the resulting inhibition of diffusion of the antibiotic, did not significantly increase the penetration time of a spherical microcolony with a radius of 125 micron, such as might be found in the respiratory tract of a patient with cystic fibrosis (from a 90% penetration time of 12 s in the absence of exopolysaccharide to one of 35 s with an exopolysaccharide concentration of 1.0% [wt/vol]). PMID:3132093

  4. 21 CFR 172.858 - Propylene glycol alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Propylene glycol alginate. 172.858 Section 172.858 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives §...

  5. Chitosan and alginate scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Olmez, S S; Korkusuz, P; Bilgili, H; Senel, S

    2007-06-01

    Polymeric scaffold for tissue regeneration was developed for veterinary applications. Oxytetracycline hydrochloride (OTC), which is a widely used antibiotic in veterinary medicine was chosen as the model compound. Gel formulations using chitosan and alginate were prepared in distilled water or in 1% (v/v) acetic acid solution. Sponges were also prepared by a freeze-drying process. Tripolyphosphate was used for cross-linking. Viscosity was decreased in the presence of OTC in chitosan gels whereas no difference was found with alginate gels. All gels showed pseudoplastic behaviour. Water absorption capacity was highest with chitosan/alginate sponges. The solvent used for preparation of the chitosan gels was found to affect the release of OTC. The release of OTC from the sponges was increased by cross-linking. Chitosan/alginate sponges showed the slowest and lowest drug release among the developed sponge formulations in this study. The formulations were found to be biocompatible, inducing no adverse reaction in vivo on surgically formed bone defects of radius of rabbits. The level of organization of the remodelled new bone in the treatment groups was better than that of control. Incorporation of OTC into formulations did not show any considerable enhancing effect. PMID:17663189

  6. Kefiran-alginate gel microspheres for oral delivery of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Blandón, Lina M; Islan, German A; Castro, Guillermo R; Noseda, Miguel D; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R

    2016-09-01

    Ciprofloxacin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic associated with gastric and intestinal side effects after extended oral administration. Alginate is a biopolymer commonly employed in gel synthesis by ionotropic gelation, but unstable in the presence of biological metal-chelating compounds and/or under dried conditions. Kefiran is a microbial biopolymer able to form gels with the advantage of displaying antimicrobial activity. In the present study, kefiran-alginate gel microspheres were developed to encapsulate ciprofloxacin for antimicrobial controlled release and enhanced bactericidal effect against common pathogens. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the hybrid gel microspheres showed a spherical structure with a smoother surface compared to alginate gel matrices. In vitro release of ciprofloxacin from kefiran-alginate microspheres was less than 3.0% and 5.0% at pH 1.2 (stomach), and 5.0% and 25.0% at pH 7.4 (intestine) in 3 and 21h, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of ciprofloxacin-kefiran showed the displacement of typical bands of ciprofloxacin and kefiran, suggesting a cooperative interaction by hydrogen bridges between both molecules. Additionally, the thermal analysis of ciprofloxacin-kefiran showed a protective effect of the biopolymer against ciprofloxacin degradation at high temperatures. Finally, antimicrobial assays of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhymurium, and Staphylococcus aureus demonstrated the synergic effect between ciprofloxacin and kefiran against the tested microorganisms. PMID:27289312

  7. Bioinspired preparation of alginate nanoparticles using microbubble bursting.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Mohamed; Huang, Jie; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are considered to be one of the most advanced tools for drug delivery applications. In this research, alginate (a model hydrophilic polymer) nanoparticles 80 to 200 nm in diameter were obtained using microbubble bursting. The natural process of bubble bursting occurs through a number of stages, which consequently produce nano- and microsized droplets via two main production mechanisms, bubble shell disintegration and a jetting process. In this study, nano-sized droplets/particles were obtained by promoting the disintegrating mechanism and suppressing (limiting) the formation of larger microparticles resulting from the jetting mechanism. A T-junction microfluidic device was used to prepare alginate microbubbles with different sizes in a well-controlled manner. The size of the bubbles was varied by controlling two processing parameters, the solution flow rate and the bubbling pressure. Crucially, the bubble size was found to be the determining factor for inducing (or limiting) the bubble shell disintegration mechanism and the size needed to promote this process was influenced by the properties of the solution used for preparing the bubbles, particularly the viscosity. The size of alginate nanoparticles produced via the disintegration mechanism was found to be directly proportional to the viscosity of the alginate solution. PMID:25491969

  8. Fabrication of novel core-shell hybrid alginate hydrogel beads.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Wang, Chaoyang; Gao, Quanxing; Liu, Xinxing; Tong, Zhen

    2008-03-01

    Novel hybrid alginate hydrogel beads with shells of porous CaCO3 microparticles were fabricated by templating water-in-oil emulsion and subsequent in situ gelation. Porous CaCO3 microparticles were self-assembled at interfaces of water-in-oil emulsion. Water droplets containing alginate in the emulsion were subsequently in situ gelated by Ca2+ released from CaCO3 through decreasing pH with slow hydrolysis of d-glucono-delta-lactone (GDL). The resulting hybrid beads with alginate gel cores and shells of porous CaCO3 microparticles were called colloidosomes. The packed density of CaCO3 microparticles in the shell increased with increasing the ratio of the CaCO3 microparticle weight to the water phase volume Mp/Vw and decreased with addition of NaCl into water. The size of the produced colloidosome beads was independent of Mp/Vw. Increasing the volume fraction of water Phi w to 0.5, some colloidosome beads deformed to nonspheral shape and even broken. Brilliant blue (BB) as a drug model was loaded into the colloidosome beads by being dissolved in the alginate aqueous solution before gelation. The BB release from the colloidosome beads was slowed down because of the formation of the shells of CaCO3 microparticles. The colloidosome beads may find applications as delivery vehicles for drugs, cosmetics, food supplements and living cell. PMID:17964745

  9. Structural Basis for Alginate Secretion Across the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    J Whitney; I Hay; C Li; P Eckford; H Robinson; M Amaya; L Wood; D Ohman; C Bear; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  10. Inhibition of tobramycin diffusion by binding to alginate

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, W.W.; Dorrington, S.M.; Slack, M.P.; Walmsley, H.L.

    1988-04-01

    (/sup 3/H)tobramycin bound to sodium alginate and to exopolysaccharide prepared from two mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Binding to sodium alginate was similar to binding to exopolysaccharide, both in the dependence on tobramycin concentration and in the maximum binding observed at saturation. Incorporation of sodium alginate into agar plates reduced the zone sizes of growth inhibition caused by tobramycin. The reductions in zone sizes were quantitatively accounted for by the binding of tobramycin to sodium alginate during diffusion of the antibiotic away from the well in which it had been placed at the start of the experiment. However, the binding of tobramycin to the exopolysaccharide of P. aeruginosa, and the resulting inhibition of diffusion of the antibiotic, did not significantly increase the penetration time of a spherical microcolony with a radius of 125 micron, such as might be found in the respiratory tract of a patient with cystic fibrosis (from a 90% penetration time of 12 s in the absence of exopolysaccharide to one of 35 s with an exopolysaccharide concentration of 1.0% (wt/vol)).

  11. Structural basis for alginate secretion across the bacterial outer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, J.C.; Robinson, H.; Hay, I. D.; Li, C.; Eckford, P. D. W.; Amaya, M. F.; Wood, L. F.; Ohman, D. E.; Bear, C. E.; Rehm, B. H.; Howell, P. L.

    2011-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  12. Deterioration of polyamino acid-coated alginate microcapsules in vivo.

    PubMed

    van Raamsdonk, J M; Cornelius, R M; Brash, J L; Chang, P L

    2002-01-01

    The implantation of immuno-isolated recombinant cell lines secreting a therapeutic protein in alginate microcapsules presents an alternative approach to gene therapy. Its clinical efficacy has recently been demonstrated in treating several genetic diseases in murine models. However, its application to humans will depend on the long-term structural stability of the microcapsules. Based on previous implantations in canines, it appears that survival of alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate microcapsules in such large animals is short-lived. This article reports on the biological factors that may have contributed to the degradation of these microcapsules after implantation in dogs. Alginate microcapsules coated with poly-L-lysine or poly-L-arginine were implanted in subcutaneous or intraperitoneal sites. The retrieved microcapsules showed a loss of mechanical stability, as measured by resistance to osmotic stress. The polyamino acid coats were rendered fragile and easily lost, particularly when poly-L-lysine was used for coating and the intraperitoneal site was used for implantation. Various plasma proteins were associated with the retrieved microcapsules and identified with western blotting to include Factor XI, Factor XII, prekallikrein, HMWK, fibrinogen, plasminogen, ATIII, transferrin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, fibronectin, IgG, alpha-2-macroglobulin, vitronectin, prothrombin, apolipoprotein A1, and particularly albumin, a major Ca-transporting plasma protein. Complement proteins (C3, Factor B, Factor H, Factor I) and C3 activation fragments were detected. Release of the amino acids from the microcapsule polyamino acid coats was observed after incubation with plasma. indicating the occurrence of proteolytic degradation. Hence, the loss of long-term stability of the polyamino acid-coated alginate microcapsules is associated with activation of the complement system, degradation of the polyamino acid coating, and destabilization of the alginate core matrix, probably through loss

  13. Polymeric materials for neovascularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVolder, Ross John

    Revascularization therapies have emerged as a promising strategy to treat various acute and chronic wounds, cardiovascular diseases, and tissue defects. It is common to either administer proangiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or transplant cells that endogenously express multiple proangiogenic factors. Additionally, these strategies utilize a wide variety of polymeric systems, including hydrogels and biodegradable plastics, to deliver proangiogenic factors in a sophisticated manner to maintain a sustained proangiogenic environment. Despite some impressive results in rebuilding vascular networks, it is still a challenging task to engineer mature and functional neovessels in target tissues, because of the increasing complexities involved with neovascularization applications. To resolve these challenges, this work aims to design a wide variety of proangiogenic biomaterial systems with tunable properties used for neovascularization therapies. This thesis describes the design of several biomaterial systems used for the delivery of proangiogenic factors in neovascularization therapies, including: an electrospun/electrosprayed biodegradable plastic patch used for directional blood vessel growth (Chapter 2), an alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system that biochemically stimulates cellular endogenous proangiogenic factor expression (Chapter 3), an enzyme-catalyzed alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system for VEGF delivery (Chapter 4), an enzyme-activated alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system with systematically controllable electrical and mechanical properties (Chapter 5), and an alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel that enables the decoupled control of electrical conductivity and mechanical rigidity and is use to electrically stimulate cellular endogenous proangiogenic factor expression (Chapter 6). Overall, the biomaterial systems developed in this thesis will be broadly useful for improving the quality of a wide array of molecular and cellular based

  14. Drug release of pH/temperature-responsive calcium alginate/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) semi-IPN beads.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun; Alves, Natália M; Mano, João F

    2006-05-23

    A series of semi-interpenetrating, polymer network (semi-IPN), hydrogel beads, composed of calcium alginate (Ca-alginate) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAM), were prepared for a pH/temperature-sensitive drug delivery study. The equilibrium swelling showed the independent pH- and thermo- responsive nature of the developed materials. At pH=2.1, the release amount of indomethacin incorporated into these beads was about 10% within 400 min, while this value approached to 95% at pH=7.4. The release rate of the drug was higher at 37 degrees C than that at 25 degrees C and increased slightly with increasing PNIPAAM content. These results suggest that the Ca-alginate/PNIPAAM beads have the potential to be used as an effective pH/temperature sustainable delivery system of bioactive agents. [GRAPHS: SEE TEXT] A summary of the temperature- and pH-dependence on the release of the drug over a period of 450 min. The effect of the temperature on the swelling of the beads is shown in the inset. PMID:16671051

  15. Characterization of Raoultella planticola Rs-2 microcapsule prepared with a blend of alginate and starch and its release behavior.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhansheng; He, Yanhui; Chen, Lijun; Han, Yajie; Li, Chun

    2014-09-22

    To judiciously use Raoultella planticola Rs-2 and develop its biodegradable and controlled-release formulations, Rs-2 was encapsulated with various combinations of sodium alginate (NaAlg) and starch. Sodium alginate, soluble starch, and CaCl2 showed good biocompatibility with Rs-2 for preparing microcapsules. These microcapsules were spherical in shape and their particle size, embedding rate, swelling ratio of Rs-2 microcapsules and release numbers of viable Rs-2 cells increased with the increasing of starch and NaAlg concentrations. Meanwhile, the biodegradability of the microcapsules constantly increases when the wt% of starch increased, but decreased when the amount of NaAlg increased. In addition, the release mechanism of microcapsules was consistent with that of the Ritger-Peppas model, which involves the Case II diffusion mechanism. In summary, the desired properties of the microcapsules can be modulated by varying the starch and alginate amounts of capsule materials. This process has broad application prospects to meet the needs of agricultural production. PMID:24906754

  16. Interaction of metal ions with acid sites of biosorbents peat moss and Vaucheria and model substances alginic and humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, R.H.; Martin, J.R.; Crist, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    The interaction between added metal ions and acid sites of two biosorbents, peat moss and the alga Vaucheria, was studied. Results were interpreted in terms of two model substances, alginic acid, a copolymer of guluronic and mannuronic acids present in marine algae, and humic acid in peat moss. For peat moss and Vaucheria at pH 4--6, two protons were displaced per Cd sorbed, after correction for sorbed metals also displaced by the heavy metal. The frequent neglect of exchange of heavy metals for metals either sorbed on the native material or added for pH adjustment leads to erroneous conclusions about proton displacement stoichiometry. Proton displacement constants K{sub ex}{sup H} decreased logarithmically with pH and had similar slopes for alginic acid and biosorbents. This pH effect was interpreted as an electrostatic effect of increasing anionic charge making proton removal less favorable. The maximum number of exchangeable acid sites (capacity C{sub H}) decreased with pH for alginic acid but increased with pH for biosorbents. Consistent with titration behavior, this difference was explained in terms of more weak acid sites in the biosorbents.

  17. Peptide-incorporated 3D porous alginate scaffolds with enhanced osteogenesis for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zuyuan; Yang, Yue; Deng, Yi; Sun, Yuhua; Yang, Hongtao; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-07-01

    Good bioactivity and osteogenesis of three-dimensional porous alginate scaffolds (PAS) are critical for bone tissue engineering. In this work, alginate and bone-forming peptide-1 (BFP-1), derived from bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7), have been combined together (without carbodiimide chemistry treatment) to develop peptide-incorporated PAS (p-PAS) for promoting bone repairing ability. The mechanical properties and SEM images show no difference between pure PAS and p-PAS. The release kinetics of the labeled peptide with 6-carboxy tetramethyl rhodamine from the PAS matrix suggests that the peptide is released in a relatively sustained manner. In the cell experiment, p-PAS show higher cell adhesion, spreading, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity than the pristine PAS group, indicating that the BFP-1 released from p-PAS could significantly promote the aggregation and differentiation of osteoblasts, especially at 10μg/mL of trapped peptide concentration (p-PAS-10). Furthermore, p-PAS-10 was implanted into Beagle calvarial defects and bone regeneration was analyzed after 4 weeks. New bone formation was assessed by calcein and Masson's trichrome staining. The data reveal that p-PAS group exhibits significantly enhanced oseto-regenerative capability in vivo. The peptide-modified PAS with promoted bioactivity and osteogenic differentiation in vitro as well as bone formation ability in vivo could be promising tissue engineering materials for repairing and regeneration of bone defects. PMID:27022863

  18. Freeform drop-on-demand laser printing of 3D alginate and cellular constructs.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ruitong; Zhang, Zhengyi; Chai, Wenxuan; Huang, Yong; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2015-12-01

    Laser printing is an orifice-free printing approach and has been investigated for the printing of two-dimensional patterns and simple three-dimensional (3D) constructs. To demonstrate the potential of laser printing as an effective bioprinting technique, both straight and Y-shaped tubes have been freeform printed using two different bioinks: 8% alginate solution and 2% alginate-based mouse fibroblast suspension. It has been demonstrated that 3D cellular tubes, including constructs with bifurcated overhang structures, can be adequately fabricated under optimal printing conditions. The post-printing cell viabilities immediately after printing as well as after 24 h incubation are above 60% for printed straight and Y-shaped fibroblast tubes. During fabrication, overhang and spanning structures can be printed using a dual-purpose crosslinking solution, which also functions as a support material. The advancement distance of gelation reaction front after a cycle time of the receiving platform downward motion should be estimated for experimental planning. The optimal downward movement step size of receiving platform should be chosen to be equal to the height of ungelled portion of a previously printed layer. PMID:26693735

  19. Feasibility of using alginate to absorb dissolved copper from aqueous media

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, L.K.; Brand, W.; Resong, M.; Mainieri, W.; Geesey, G.G. )

    1990-11-01

    Alginate (a biopolymer from kelp and some bacterial strains) is known to absorb copper favorably in the presence of other cations. In this work, the feasibility of using a 2-liter batch three-phase (air/liquid/alginate gel) loop fluidized bed reactor to polish water containing 10-150 ppm dissolved copper was investigated. Three methods were tested: (1) calcium alginate spheres, prepared by dispensing sodium alginate (3.2 wt. % in water) into a 0.05 M calcium nitrate solution, were used as the absorbent, (2) the alginate spheres were formed in situ by dispensing the sodium alginate solution directly into the reactor fluid, and (3) same as (2) except that a trace amount of EDTA was added to the alginate solution. Batch absorption data showed that Method 3 yielded the best result; the concentration of dissolved copper was successfully reduced from 140 ppm to 10 ppm with 3.2 g sodium alginate and 0.2 g EDTA used. However, when the initial concentration was below 40 ppm, both Method 2 and Method 3 are not recommended because the concentration of dissolved copper was too low to allow in situ formation of alginate spheres. Method 1 was found to be useful for treating water containing 10 ppm dissolved copper. But the competition from calcium seriously affected the effective capacity of the alginate for copper. The application of the classical shell progressive model to describe the absorption kinetics was discussed.

  20. Preparation and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized by alginate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui-li; Qi, Xian-rong; Maitani, Yoshie; Nagai, Tsuneji

    2007-03-21

    SPION with appropriate surface chemistry have been widely used experimentally for numerous in vivo applications. In this study, SPION stabilized by alginate (SPION-alginate) were prepared by a modified coprecipitation method. The structure, size, morphology, magnetic property and relaxivity of the SPION-alginate were characterized systematically by means of XRD, TEM, ESEM, AFM, DLS, SQUID magnetometer and MRI, respectively, and the interaction between alginate and iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4)) was characterized by FT-IR and AFM. The results revealed that typical iron oxide nanoparticles were Fe(3)O(4) with a core diameter of 5-10 nm and SPION-alginate had a hydrodynamic diameter of 193.8-483.2 nm. From the magnetization curve, the Ms of a suspension of SPION-alginate was 40 emu/g, corresponding to 73% of that of solid SPION-alginate. This high Ms may be due to the binding of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles to alginate macromolecule strands as visually confirmed by AFM. SPION-alginate of several hundred nanometers was stable in size for 12 months at 4 degrees C. Moreover, T1 relaxivity and T2 relaxivity of SPION-alginate in saline (1.5 T, 20 degrees C) were 7.86+/-0.20 s(-1) mM(-1) and 281.2+/-26.4 s(-1) mM(-1), respectively. PMID:17074454

  1. Scaling up of ethanol production from sugar molasses using yeast immobilized with alginate-based MCM-41 mesoporous zeolite composite carrier.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunming; Sun, Xiaohong; Li, Landong; Guan, Naijia

    2012-07-01

    Microporous and mesoporous zeolites, including ZSM-5, H-β, H-Y, and MCM-41, were modified with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES), then inorganic fillers, such as abovementioned zeolites or mesoporous materials, (α-AlOOH or γ-Al(2)O(3)), were mixed with alginate embedded with yeast; and finally these carriers were cross-linked through the double oxirane. The alginate-based immobilized yeast with MCM-41 exhibited much shorter fermentation time and higher ethanol concentration than pure alginate and other composite carriers with the highest cell concentration of 4.8×10(9) cells/mL. The composite carrier maintains the highest ethanol productivity of 6.55 g/L/h for 60 days in continuous fermentation process, implying good operational durability for commercial applications. The reason for the higher bio-catalytical function of the immobilized yeast might lay in the uniformly yeast distribution in the bio-reactor and high yeast cell concentration, which contributed by the improved transmission of fermentation media and combined effects of yeast adsorption by MCM-41 and embedment by alginate. PMID:22154581

  2. This paper is a winner in the Undergraduate category for the SFB awards: Evaluation of the tissue response to alginate encapsulated islets in an omentum pouch model.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Veronica; Appel, Alyssa A; Anastasio, Mark A; Opara, Emmanuel C; Brey, Eric M

    2016-07-01

    Islet transplantation is currently in clinical use as a treatment for type I diabetes, but donor shortages and long-term immunosuppression limit broad application. Alginate microcapsules coated with poly-l-ornithine can be used to encapsulate islets in an environment that allows diffusion of glucose, insulin, nutrients, and waste products while inhibiting cells and antibodies. While clinical trials are ongoing using islets encapsulated in alginate microbeads, there are concerns in regards to long-term stability. Evaluation of the local tissue response following implantation provides insight into the underlying mechanisms contributing to biomaterial failure, which can be used to the design of new material strategies. Macrophages play an important role in driving the response. In this study, the stability of alginate microbeads coated with PLO containing islets transplanted in the omentum pouch model was investigated. Biomaterial structure and the inflammatory response were characterized by X-ray phase contrast (XPC) μCT imaging, histology, and immunostaining. XPC allowed evaluation of microbead 3D structure and identification of failed and stable microbeads. A robust inflammatory response characterized by high cell density and the presence of pro-inflammatory macrophages was found around the failed grafts. The results obtained provide insight into the local tissue response and possible failure mechanisms for alginate microbeads. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1581-1590, 2016. PMID:27144389

  3. Multi-featured macroporous agarose-alginate cryogel: synthesis and characterization for bioengineering applications.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anuj; Kumar, Ashok

    2011-01-10

    In this study agarose-alginate scaffolds are synthesized using cryogelation technology in different formats like monolith, sheet, discs, and beads, and show amiable mechanical strength like soft tissue properties and high interconnected macroporous degradable architecture. In cell-material interactions, fibroblast (NIH-3T3) cells showed good adherence and proliferation on these scaffolds presenting its potential application in soft tissue engineering. The application of cryogel beads and monoliths was also examined by the efficient immobilization of bacterial cells (BL21) on these matrices revealing their use for recovery of product from continuous fermentation systems without cell leakage. These scaffolds also showed potential as a filter for repeated recovery of heavy metal binding, such as copper and nickel from the waste water. The cryogels prepared herein do have a number of unique features that make them an important class of soft materials for developing multi-featured scaffolds as a novel carrier for bioengineering applications. PMID:21077225

  4. First impressions: gait cues drive reliable trait judgements.

    PubMed

    Thoresen, John C; Vuong, Quoc C; Atkinson, Anthony P

    2012-09-01

    Personality trait attribution can underpin important social decisions and yet requires little effort; even a brief exposure to a photograph can generate lasting impressions. Body movement is a channel readily available to observers and allows judgements to be made when facial and body appearances are less visible; e.g., from great distances. Across three studies, we assessed the reliability of trait judgements of point-light walkers and identified motion-related visual cues driving observers' judgements. The findings confirm that observers make reliable, albeit inaccurate, trait judgements, and these were linked to a small number of motion components derived from a Principal Component Analysis of the motion data. Parametric manipulation of the motion components linearly affected trait ratings, providing strong evidence that the visual cues captured by these components drive observers' trait judgements. Subsequent analyses suggest that reliability of trait ratings was driven by impressions of emotion, attractiveness and masculinity. PMID:22717166

  5. Antioxidant activity of low molecular weight alginate produced by thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Kelishomi, Zahra Habibi; Goliaei, Bahram; Mahdavi, Hossein; Nikoofar, Alireza; Rahimi, Mahmood; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Mamashli, Fatemeh; Bigdeli, Bahareh

    2016-04-01

    By definition, antioxidants are molecules that inhibit the oxidation of other molecules. Therefore, such compounds have very important clinical roles. In this study alginate polymer was depolymerized by heat treatment. The resulting low molecular weight alginates were investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy, Viscometry, Dynamic light scattering and FT-IR spectroscopy techniques. Antioxidant properties of these heat products were studied by ABTS and superoxide radical scavenging assays. Results showed that heating caused breaks in the polymer chain and so generation of low molecular weight alginates. Antioxidant measurements confirmed antioxidant activity of alginate increased upon a decrease in molecular weight. Therefore, low molecular weight alginate produced by heating could be considered as a stronger antioxidant than alginate polymer. These products could be useful for industrial and biomedical applications. PMID:26593570

  6. [Direct hearing aid provision by ENT specialists: Recommendations for prevention and treatment of complications after taking ear impressions].

    PubMed

    Caffier, Ph P; Sedlmaier, B; Hölzl, M

    2009-07-01

    In times of budgeting, rising costs and monetary losses, an increasing number of ENT specialists considers the hearing system sector due to the distinct undersupply and the expected demographic development to be a market of the future and appropriate to enlarge their field of competence. Exact prevalence of direct hearing aid provision by German otorhinolaryngologists as well as its complication rate are not well-known. Retrospectively, all patients were evaluated who presented at our department with complications in the context of outpatient direct hearing aid supply within the last 3 years. Inappropriate fitting contains the danger of malformed or displaced ear impressions with various injury patterns comprising the external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and ossicular chain. Practical advices for prevention of complications include the accurate modeling and placement of sufficient impression pads behind the second bend of the auditory canal, using an adequate type of impression material as well as performing the correct application procedures. Recommendations for diagnostic patterns and treatment of complications after taking ear impressions are presented, the differences between German "traditional" and "direct" hearing aid provision are critically discussed. PMID:19579285

  7. A comparative analysis of the accuracy of implant master casts fabricated from two different transfer impression techniques

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rupali; Kadam, Pankaj; Oswal, Chetan; Patil, Seema; Jajoo, Shweta; Gachake, Arati

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated and compared two impression techniques in terms of their dimensional accuracies to reproduce implant positions on working casts. Materials and Methods: A master model was designed to simulate a clinical situation. Impressions were made using four techniques: (1) Stock open tray (SOT) technique; (2) stock closed tray (SCT) technique; (3) custom open tray (COT) technique; and (3) custom closed tray (CCT) technique. Reference points on the hexagonal silhouette of the implant on master model and onto the analogs of the obtained master casts were compared after using the four impression techniques. Measurements were made using an optical microscope, capable of recording under 50x magnifications. The means and standard deviations of all the groups and subgroups were calculated and statically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test. Results: The open tray impressions showed significantly less variation from the master model and all the techniques studied were comparable. Conclusion: All the techniques studied shown some distortion. COT showed the most accurate results of all the techniques. PMID:27114954

  8. The Role of Profanity and Sex Variables in Interpersonal Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Marshall M.; Saine, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a study designed to identify areas of research which may increase under standing of the relationship between speaker profanity and impression formation. Provides an experimental test of the predicted interrelationships between profanity, sex variables, and impression formation. (MH)

  9. Water status and thermal analysis of alginate beads used in cryopreservation of plant germplasm.

    PubMed

    Block, William

    2003-08-01

    Encapsulation and dehydration techniques using alginate beads are used increasingly for the pre-treatment of various plant materials for cryopreservation to improve survival post-cryogenic storage. This study reports the effects of the water content of beads (formed with 3% (w/v) alginic acid in liquid S-RIB), polymerisation time (in 100 mM calcium chloride solution), osmotic dehydration (in 0.75 M sucrose solution), and evaporative air desiccation on the thermal properties of alginate beads used in cryopreservation protocols. Experimental beads were assayed using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with a cooling programme to -150 degrees C, followed by re-warming. Resultant thermograms were evaluated with particular reference to the onset temperature and enthalpy of the melt endotherm from which the quantities of frozen and unfrozen water were calculated. Treatments were applied sequentially to samples of beads and their thermal features evaluated at each stage of the protocol. Using 'standard' beads (40-55 mg fresh weight), formed using plastic disposable pipettes, the degree of polymerisation (>10 min) proportionally reduced their dry weight and increased their water content. Thermal characteristics of the beads were unaffected by polymerisation times >10 min, but the maximum level (23%) of unfrozen (osmotically inactive) water was achieved after 15 min polymerisation. Osmotic dehydration using 0.75 M sucrose significantly lowered bead water content and mean dry weight approximately doubled with 20-24 h immersion time. Bead desiccation in still air reduced their water content by 83% of fresh weight, whilst dry weight remained constant. After 8 h desiccation in air between 27 and 37% of the water in the bead was osmotically inactive (unfrozen) in DSC scans. Desiccation >18 h reduced this fraction to zero. The melt onset temperature and the enthalpy of melting were directly related to bead water content. The unfrozen water fraction increased substantially

  10. In vivo degradation of alginate in the presence and in the absence of resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Jonathan, Melliana; Souza da Silva, Carol; Bosch, Guido; Schols, Henk; Gruppen, Harry

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the intestinal degradability of alginate during 74 days intake in pigs as models for humans. Diets contained pregelatinized starch, retrograded starch, alginate, or a mix of retrograded starch and alginate. Faeces were collected on day 1, 3, 7, 14, 39 and 74. Clear trends in intestinal alginate degradation were observed. Up to day 39, the total tract digestibility of alginate was limited (0.52 ± 0.10), and was lower with the inclusion of retrograded starch in the diet (0.34 ± 0.02). More than 90% of the faecal alginate was insoluble in water, which may explain the low digestibility of the alginate. The digestibility of mannuronic acid (M) was 2-3 times higher than that of guluronic acid (G). The changes of G:M ratio and the relative amounts of alginate oligosaccharides between day 39 and 74 indicated that the microbiota needed more than 39 days to adapt to alginate. This study demonstrated that in-depth analyses of dietary fibres are valuable in understanding the fate of the dietary fibres in the large intestine as it was shown that degradation of a dietary fibre depends not only on the properties of the fibre itself, but also on the other dietary fibres present in the diet and the adaptation time. PMID:25442531

  11. Characterization of AlgMsp, an Alginate Lyase from Microbulbifer sp. 6532A

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Steven M.; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.; Heselpoth, Ryan D.; Bales, Patrick M.; Nelson, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Alginate is a polysaccharide produced by certain seaweeds and bacteria that consists of mannuronic acid and guluronic acid residues. Seaweed alginate is used in food and industrial chemical processes, while the biosynthesis of bacterial alginate is associated with pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Alginate lyases cleave this polysaccharide into short oligo-uronates and thus have the potential to be utilized for both industrial and medicinal applications. An alginate lyase gene, algMsp, from Microbulbifer sp. 6532A, was synthesized as an E.coli codon-optimized clone. The resulting 37 kDa recombinant protein, AlgMsp, was expressed, purified and characterized. The alginate lyase displayed highest activity at pH 8 and 0.2 M NaCl. Activity of the alginate lyase was greatest at 50°C; however the enzyme was not stable over time when incubated at 50°C. The alginate lyase was still highly active at 25°C and displayed little or no loss of activity after 24 hours at 25°C. The activity of AlgMsp was not dependent on the presence of divalent cations. Comparing activity of the lyase against polymannuronic acid and polyguluronic acid substrates showed a higher turnover rate for polymannuronic acid. However, AlgMSP exhibited greater catalytic efficiency with the polyguluronic acid substrate. Prolonged AlgMsp-mediated degradation of alginate produced dimer, trimer, tetramer, and pentamer oligo-uronates. PMID:25409178

  12. Synthesis and characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate-toxin A conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Cryz, S J; Fürer, E; Que, J U

    1991-01-01

    Alginate from Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3064 was depolymerized by controlled heating in dilute acid. The resulting depolymerized alginate (Mr less than 60,000) was covalently coupled to toxin A with adipic acid dihydrazide as a spacer molecule and carbodiimide as a linker. The resulting conjugate was composed of toxin A and depolymerized alginate at a ratio of 4:1 and possessed an Mr of 260,000. The conjugate was nontoxic and nonpyrogenic. While native alginate (Mr greater than 640,000) given in a range of doses was poorly immunogenic in mice and rabbits, the conjugate induced high levels of antibody which bound to native alginate. Rabbits, but not mice, also produced an antitoxin immunoglobulin antibody response. Alginate derived from three other strains of P. aeruginosa competed with the homologous 3064 alginate for binding to anticonjugate antibody. This indicates that the conjugate elicits an antibody response able to recognize heterologous alginates. The serum from rabbits immunized with the conjugate was effective at promoting the uptake and killing of mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. In contrast, immunization with native alginate did not engender an opsonic antibody response. Rabbit anticonjugate antibody also neutralized the cytotoxic potential of toxin A. PMID:1898901

  13. Preferential localization of Lactococcus lactis cells entrapped in a caseinate/alginate phase separated system.

    PubMed

    Léonard, Lucie; Gharsallaoui, Adem; Ouaali, Fahima; Degraeve, Pascal; Waché, Yves; Saurel, Rémi; Oulahal, Nadia

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to entrap bioprotective lactic acid bacteria in a sodium caseinate/sodium alginate aqueous two-phase system. Phase diagram at pH=7 showed that sodium alginate and sodium caseinate were not miscible when their concentrations exceeded 1% (w/w) and 6% (w/w), respectively. The stability of the caseinate/alginate two-phase system was also checked at pH values of 6.0 and 5.5. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LAB3 cells were added in a 4% (w/w) caseinate/1.5% (w/w) alginate two-phase system at pH=7. Fluorescence microscopy allowed to observe that the caseinate-rich phase formed droplets dispersed in a continuous alginate-rich phase. The distribution of bacteria in such a system was observed by epifluorescence microscopy: Lc. lactis LAB3 cells stained with Live/Dead(®) Baclight kit™ were located exclusively in the protein phase. Since zeta-potential measurements indicated that alginate, caseinate and bacterial cells all had an overall negative charge at pH 7, the preferential adhesion of LAB cells was assumed to be driven by hydrophobic effect or by depletion phenomena in such biopolymeric systems. Moreover, LAB cells viability was significantly higher in the ternary mixture obtained in the presence of both caseinate and alginate than in single alginate solution. Caseinate/alginate phase separated systems appeared thus well suited for Lc. lactis LAB3 cells entrapment. PMID:23665092

  14. Do first impressions count? Frailty judged by initial clinical impression predicts medium-term mortality in vascular surgical patients.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, B R; Batterham, A M; Hollingsworth, A C; Durrand, J W; Danjoux, G R

    2016-06-01

    Recognising frailty during pre-operative assessment is important. Frail patients experience higher mortality rates and are less likely to return to baseline functional status following the physiological insult of surgery. We evaluated the association between an initial clinical impression of frailty and all-cause mortality in 392 patients attending our vascular pre-operative assessment clinic. Prevalence of frailty assessed by the initial clinical impression was 30.6% (95% CI 26.0-35.2%). There were 133 deaths in 392 patients over a median follow-up period of 4 years. Using Cox regression, adjusted for age, sex, revised cardiac risk index and surgery (yes/no), the hazard ratio for mortality for frail vs. not-frail was 2.14 (95% CI 1.51-3.05). The time to 20% mortality was 16 months in the frail group and 33 months in the not-frail group. The initial clinical impression is a useful screening tool to identify frail patients in pre-operative assessment. PMID:27018374

  15. Photonic monitoring of chitosan nanostructured alginate microcapsules for drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajuria, Deepak Kumar; Konnur, Manish C.; Vasireddi, Ramakrishna; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2015-02-01

    By using a novel microfluidic set-up for drug screening applications, this study examines delivery of a novel risedronate based drug formulation for treatment of osteoporosis that was developed to overcome the usual shortcomings of risedronate, such as its low bioavailability and adverse gastric effects. Risedronate nanoparticles were prepared using muco-adhesive polymers such as chitosan as matrix for improving the intestinal cellular absorption of risedronate and also using a gastric-resistant polymer such as sodium alginate for reducing the gastric inflammation of risedronate. The in-vitro characteristics of the alginate encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles are investigated, including their stability, muco-adhesiveness, and Caco-2 cell permeability. Fluorescent markers are tagged with the polymers and their morphology within the microcapsules is imaged at various stages of drug release.

  16. Isolation of protoplasts from undaria pinnatifida by alginate lyase digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoke, Hu; Xiaolu, Jiang; Huashi, Guan

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study is to isolate protoplasts from Undaria pinnatifida. Protoplasts of the alga were isolated enzymatically by using alginate lyase, which was prepared by fermenting culture of a strain Vibrio sp. 510. Monofacterial method was applied for optimizing digestion condition. The optimum condition for protoplast preparation is enzymatic digestion at 28°C for 2h using alginate lyase at the concentration of 213.36 U (8 mL) every 0.5g fresh thalline with NaCl 50 and at the shaking speed of 150 r min-1 during digestion. The protoplast yield can reach 2.62±0.09 million per 0.5 g fresh leave under the optimum condition. The enzyme activity is inhibited by Ca2+ and slightly enhanced by Fe2+ and Mn2+ at concentrations of 0.05, 0.08 and 0.10 mol L-1.

  17. Computer-Mediated Impression Formation: A Test of the Sticky Cues Model Using Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Heide, Brandon Lee

    2009-01-01

    This research offers a model of online impression formation that explains how different impression-bearing cues may carry more or less informational value. This research considers the possibility that impression-bearing cues have greater informational value when those cues are distinctive and are task-relevant. This research refers to such cues as…

  18. Influence of scanning system and dentist's level of training in the accuracy of digital impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hategan, Simona; Gabor, Alin; Zaharia, Cristian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Jivanescu, Anca

    2016-03-01

    Background: The principal aim of our study was to evaluate digital impressions, taken with spray powder and powderfree scan systems, in order to determine the influence of the dentist's commitment to training as a critical factor regarding quality. Material and method: Two digital intraoral impression systems from the same manufacture (Sirona) : Apollo DI and CEREC Omnicam, were used to scan 16 crown preparations on teeth on a typodont maxillary model. Because an Apollo Di intraoral camera is a powder system, an adhesive was applied before using the powder spray. Three groups were used to scan the crown preparations in order to determine coating thickness homogeneity. One group consisted of senior year dental students, a second consisted of prosthodontics residents, and the third consisted of prosthodontics specialists. The same procedure was applied with a CEREC Omnicam intraoral camera, which is a powder-free system. By using the two systems software parameters we were able to determine the scanning precision. Results: Homogeneity scores for Apollo Di regarding the spray layer was significantly thinner for all dental surfaces in the first group, while the second group had thinner coatings for buccal and distal surfaces. For the third group, the crown preparations were coated more homogeneously than the first two groups. The powder-free system CEREC Omnicam can, to a degree, mask the lack of experience in direct optical impressions by avoiding the poor quality coating, which can lead to defective marginal adaptation of definitive restoration. Conclusions: The dentist's lack of experience can be mitigated, and partially avoided, by using powder-free systems. At the same time, the dentist can give more time towards learning how to integrate computerized fabricated restoration into the practice. The commitment to training is a critical factor in the successful integration of the technology. In

  19. Encapsulation of volatiles by homogenized partially-cross linked alginates.

    PubMed

    Inguva, Pavan K; Ooi, Shing Ming; Desai, Parind M; Heng, Paul W S

    2015-12-30

    Cross-linked calcium alginate gels are too viscous to be efficaciously incorporated into spray dried formulations. Thus, viscosity reduction is essential to ensure the processability of calcium alginate gels to be sprayed. Viscosity reduction by high pressure homogenization can open new formulation possibilities. Presently, testing of microcapsule integrity is also limited because either single particle tests neglect collective particle behaviours in bulk or bulk testing methods are often associated with single compressions which may not fully characterize individual particle strengths. The aim of this study was sub-divided into three objectives. First objective was to evaluate the impact of high pressure homogenization on gel viscosity. Second objective was to explore the use of the homogenized gels with modified starch for microencapsulation by spray drying. The final objective was to develop a stamping system as microcapsule strength tester that can assess microcapsules in bulk and evaluate the impact of multiple compressions. Collectively, this study would lead towards developing a pressure-activated patch of microcapsules with encapsulated volatiles and the method to assess the patch efficacy. The alginate gels largely experienced an exponential decay in viscosity when homogenized. Furthermore, the homogenized gels were successfully incorporated in spray drying formulations for microencapsulation. The custom-designed microcapsule strength tester was successfully used and shown to possess the required sensitivity to discern batches of microcapsules containing volatiles to have different release profiles. Addition of homogenized gels strengthened the microcapsules only at high wall to core ratios with low mass-load alginate gels. High mass-load gels weaken the microcapsules, exhibiting a higher release at low stamping pressures and wrinkling on the microcapsules surface. PMID:26581772

  20. Diffusivity of Cu2+ in calcium alginate gel beads.

    PubMed

    Jang, L K

    1994-01-20

    The diffusivity of Cu(2+) in calcium alginate beads calculated by the shrinking core model (SCM) was reevaluated in this work. The results obtained in this work were significantly different than those by the original authors. There were excellent agreements between the results obtained by the SCM in this work and those by the more rigorous linear absorption model (LAM) by the original authors. PMID:18615613

  1. Immobilization of enzymes on alginic acid-polyacrylamide copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaraswamy, M.D.K.; Panduranga R.K.; Thomas J.K.; Santappa, M.

    1981-08-01

    In this report, the authors present initial results and limitations of a polymeric system for the immobilization of enzymes. Enzymes attached to insoluble polymers of natural and synthetic origin are gaining importance in many industrial and biomedical applications. Graft copolymers are used as enzyme supports and in this study a novel polymeric system of alginic acid-polyacrylamide graft copolymer is described which was used for immobilizing enzymes. (Refs. 4).

  2. Transdermal delivery of selegiline from alginate-Pluronic composite thermogels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chieh; Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Jia-You

    2011-08-30

    The present work was carried out to design a practical, controlled-release transdermal system for selegiline using thermosensitive hydrogels. The copolymers of alginate and Pluronic F127 (PF127) were used to design thermogels by either physical blending (A+P) or chemical grafting (AP). The thermogels were characterized in terms of the sol-gel temperature, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degradation ratio, and skin permeation behavior. The chemical grafting of alginate to PF127 could delay the sol-gel temperature from 24.1 to 30.4°C, which is near the temperature of the skin surface. The gelling temperature of the physical mixture of alginate and PF127 (A+P) did not significantly differ. The porosity of the A+P structure was greater compared to that of the AP structure. AP thermogels were regularly degraded, with 60% of the gel matrix remaining after a 48-h incubation. PF127 and A+P hydrogels showed almost no degradation. The results of skin permeation across porcine skin and nude mouse skin suggested that the thermogels could produce sustained selegiline release, with AP showing the most-sustained permeation. AP hydrogels exhibited linear permeation properties for the transdermal delivery of selegiline. Inter-subject variations in skin permeation were reduced by incorporation of the thermogel. Such a thermosensitive hydrogel can be advantageous as a topical therapeutic formulation for selegiline. PMID:21645593

  3. Free-standing polyelectrolyte membranes made of chitosan and alginate

    PubMed Central

    Caridade, Sofia G.; Monge, Claire; Gilde, Flora; Boudou, Thomas; Mano, João F.; Picart, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Free-standing films have increasing applications in the biomedical field as drug delivery systems, for wound healing and tissue engineering. Here, we prepared free-standing membranes by the layer-by-layer assembly of chitosan and alginate, two widely used biomaterials. Our aim was to produce thick membrane, to study the permeation of model drugs and the adhesion of muscle cells. We first defined the optimal growth conditions in terms of pH and alginate concentration. The membranes could be easily detached from polystyrene or polypropylene substrate without any post-processing step. They dry thickness was varied over a large range from 4 to 35 μm. A two-fold swelling was observed by confocal microscopy when they were immersed in PBS. In addition, we quantified the permeation of model drugs (fluorescent dextrans) through the free standing membrane, which depended on the dextran molecular weight. Finally, we showed that myoblast cells exhibited a preferential adhesion on the alginate-ending membrane as compared to the chitosan-ending membrane or to the substrate side. PMID:23590116

  4. A honeycomb composite of mollusca shell matrix and calcium alginate.

    PubMed

    You, Hua-jian; Li, Jin; Zhou, Chan; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yao-guang

    2016-03-01

    A honeycomb composite is useful to carry cells for application in bone, cartilage, skin, and soft tissue regenerative therapies. To fabricate a composite, and expand the application of mollusca shells as well as improve preparing methods of calcium alginate in tissue engineering research, Anodonta woodiana shell powder was mixed with sodium alginate at varying mass ratios to obtain a gel mixture. The mixture was frozen and treated with dilute hydrochloric acid to generate a shell matrix/calcium alginate composite. Calcium carbonate served as the control. The composite was transplanted subcutaneously into rats. At 7, 14, 42, and 70 days after transplantation, frozen sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, followed by DAPI, β-actin, and collagen type-I immunofluorescence staining, and observed using laser confocal microscopy. The composite featured a honeycomb structure. The control and composite samples displayed significantly different mechanical properties. The water absorption rate of the composite and control group were respectively 205-496% and 417-586%. The composite (mass ratio of 5:5) showed good biological safety over a 70-day period; the subcutaneous structure of the samples was maintained and the degradation rate was lower than that of the control samples. Freezing the gel mixture afforded control over chemical reaction rates. Given these results, the composite is a promising honeycomb scaffold for tissue engineering. PMID:26700239

  5. Liquid phase coating to produce controlled-release alginate microspheres.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lai Wah; Liu, Xiaohua; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2005-12-01

    This study explored a liquid phase coating technique to produce polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-coated alginate microspheres. Alginate microspheres with a mean diameter of 85.6 microm were prepared using an emulsification method. The alginate microspheres, as cores, were then coated with different types of PMMA by a liquid phase coating technique. The release characteristics of these coated microspheres in simulated gastric (SGF) and intestinal (SIF) fluids and the influence of drug load on encapsulation efficiency were studied. The release of paracetamol, as a model hydrophilic drug, from the coated microspheres in SGF and SIF was greatly retarded. Release rates of Eudragit RS100-coated microspheres in SGF and SIF were similar as the rate-controlling polymer coat was insoluble in both media. Drug release from Eudragit S100-coated microspheres was more sustained in SGF than in SIF, due to the greater solubility of the coating polymer in media with pH greater than 7.0. The drug release rate was affected by the core:coat ratio. Drug release from the coated microspheres was best described by the Higuchi's square root model. The liquid phase coating technique developed offers an efficient method of coating small microspheres with markedly reduced drug loss and possible controlled drug release. PMID:16423760

  6. Vesicle-Templated Supramolecular Assembly of Alginate Nanogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jennifer; Vreeland, Wyatt; Raghavan, Srinivasa; Locascio, Laurie; Gaitan, Michael

    2006-03-01

    In this work, large uni- and multilamellar dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes (800-900 nm in diameter) were used as templates for the formation of alginate gels. DPPC liposomes encapsulating sodium alginate were prepared in a 15 mM NaCl buffer solution by the solvent injection method, followed by several freeze/thaw cycles to achieve higher encapsulation efficiency and larger vesicle size. Purified liposomes were placed in a 10 mM CaCl2 buffer solution and permeabilized by heating and cooling over the phase transition temperature (Tm) of DPPC. The increased membrane permeability at the Tm allowed calcium ions from the surrounding buffer solution to traverse the membrane to the interior region and subsequently crosslink the encapsulated alginate. Removal of the lipid by detergent resulted in nanogels that were similar in size (800-900 nm in diameter) to the template liposome, as characterized by multi-angle and dynamic light scattering techniques. In the future these nanogels may be useful for single-molecule encapsulation or controlled release applications.

  7. Magnetic alginate-layered double hydroxide composites for phosphate removal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Kim, Song-Bae

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate phosphate removal using magnetic alginate-layered double hydroxide (LDH) composites. The magnetic composites were prepared by entrapping synthetic magnetic iron oxide and calcined Mg-Al LDH in polymer matrix (alginate). Results showed that the magnetic composites (2% magnetic iron oxide and 6% calcined Mg-Al LDH) were effective in the removal of phosphate with the sorption capacity of 5.0 +/- 0.1 mgP/g under given experimental conditions (adsorbent dose = 0.05 g in 30 ml solution; initial phosphate concentration = 10 mgP/l; reaction time = 24 h). Both magnetic iron oxide and calcined Mg-Al LDH have the ability to adsorb phosphate, with the latter having much higher sorption capacity. In the magnetic composites, calcined Mg-Al LDH functions as a phosphate adsorbent while magnetic iron oxide provides both magnetic and sorption properties. Results also demonstrated that phosphate sorption to the magnetic composites reached equilibrium at 24 h. The maximum phosphate sorption capacity was determined to be 39.1 mgP/g. In addition, phosphate removal was not sensitive to initial solution pH between 4.1 and 10.2. Only 9% of the phosphate sorption capacity was reduced as the solution pH increased from 4.1 to 10.2. This study demonstrated that magnetic alginate-LDH composites could be used for phosphate removal in combination with magnetic separation. PMID:24527638

  8. Magnetite-Alginate-AOT nanoparticles based drug delivery platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, R.; Sudakar, C.; Dixit, A.; Naik, R.; Lawes, G.; Toti, U.; Panyam, J.; Vaishnava, P. P.

    2008-03-01

    Iron oxide having the magnetite structure is a widely used biomaterial, having applications ranging from cell separation and drug delivery to hyperthermia. In order to increase the efficacy of drug treatments, magnetite nanoparticles can be incorporated into a composite system with a surfactant-polymer nanoparticle, which can act as a platform for sustained and enhanced cellular delivery of water-soluble molecules. Here we report a composite formulation based on magnetite and Alginate-aerosol OT (AOT) nanoparticles formulated using an emulsion-cross-linking process loaded with Rhodamine 6G [1]. We prepared two set of nanoparticles by using Ca^2+ or Fe^2+ to cross-link the alginate polymer. Additionally, we added ˜8 nm diameter Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles prepared by a soft chemical method to these alginate-AOT nanoparticles. The resulting composites were superparamagnetic at room temperature, with a saturation magnetization of approximately 0.006 emu/g of solution. We will present detailed studies on the structural and magnetic properties of these samples. We will also discuss HPLC measurements on Rhodamine uploading in these composites. [1] M.D.Chavanpatil, Pharmaceutical Research, vol.24, (2007) 803.

  9. Nano zinc oxide-sodium alginate antibacterial cellulose fibres.

    PubMed

    Varaprasad, Kokkarachedu; Raghavendra, Gownolla Malegowd; Jayaramudu, Tippabattini; Seo, Jongchul

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, antibacterial cellulose fibres were successfully fabricated by a simple and cost-effective procedure by utilizing nano zinc oxide. The possible nano zinc oxide was successfully synthesized by precipitation technique and then impregnated effectively over cellulose fibres through sodium alginate matrix. XRD analysis revealed the 'rod-like' shape alignment of zinc oxide with an interplanar d-spacing of 0.246nm corresponding to the (101) planes of the hexagonal wurtzite structure. TEM analysis confirmed the nano dimension of the synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles. The presence of nano zinc oxide over cellulose fibres was evident from the SEM-EDS experiments. FTIR and TGA studies exhibited their effective bonding interaction. The tensile stress-strain curves data indicated the feasibility of the fabricated fibres for longer duration utility without any significant damage or breakage. The antibacterial studies against Escherichia coli revealed the excellent bacterial devastation property. Further, it was observed that when all the parameters remained constant, the variation of sodium alginate concentration showed impact in devastating the E. coli. In overall, the fabricated nano zinc oxide-sodium alginate cellulose fibres can be effectively utilized as antibacterial fibres for biomedical applications. PMID:26453887

  10. Optimization of polyphenol oxidase immobilization in copper alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Kocaturk, Selin; Yagar, Hulya

    2010-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1) was isolated from artichoke head (Cynara scolymus L.) by using 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.0), concentrated by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, and immobilized in copper-alginate beads. Immobilization yield was determined to be 70%. The cresolase and catecholase activities of enzyme immobilized at optimum immobilization conditions were found to be 13.3 and 670 U g beads min(-1), respectively. Effects of immobilization conditions such as alginate concentration, CaCl2 concentration, amount of loading enzyme, bead size, and amount of beads on enzymatic activity were investigated. Optimum alginate and CuCl2 concentration were found to be 2 % and 3 % (w/v), respectively. Using bead (diameter 3 mm) amount of 0.25 g maximum enzyme activities were observed for both polyphenol activities. The initial concentrations of loading free enzyme were 6.5 U mL(-1) and 5815 U mL(-1) for cresolase activity and catecholase activities, respectively. Beads prepared at optimum immobilization conditions were suitable for up to 8 repeated uses. PMID:20429683

  11. Chronic (89-week) feeding study with hydroxypropyl distarch phosphate, starch acetate, lactose and sodium alginate in mice.

    PubMed

    Til, H P; Feron, V J; Immel, H R; Vogel, W F

    1986-08-01

    A chronic feeding study was carried out in mice with two chemically modified potato starches, hydroxypropyl distarch phosphate (HP-starch) and starch acetate (AC-starch), and with lactose and sodium alginate. Each of the materials was fed to a group of 75 male and 75 female mice for 89 wk. The dietary level of the test products was gradually increased until the diets contained (by weight) 55% HP-starch, 55% AC-starch, 55% lactose or 25% alginate. The control diet contained 55% pregelatinized potato starch. Each of the four test materials caused increased water consumption, distinct caecal and colonic enlargement, a slightly increased incidence of intratubular nephrosis and, with the exception of AC-starch, also slightly lower body weights. An increased incidence of gastric trichobezoars was observed in mice fed either the modified starches or lactose. The occurrence of concrements in the renal pelvis along with slight urinary changes, such as increased amounts of amorphous material in the urine and increased urinary Ca content, in mice fed HP-starch, AC-starch or lactose was regarded as an effect of little, if any, toxicological significance. Alginate fed at 25% (w/w) of the diet was nephrotoxic to mice, as shown by extremely high water consumption, high urine production, urinary incontinence, high pH and low specific gravity of the urine, increased level of blood urea nitrogen, increased kidney weights, distension of the renal calyx and the high incidence of dilated distal tubules. Caecal and colonic enlargement and changes in urinalysis were found to be reversible and had completely or largely disappeared within 2-5 wk of the cessation of the treatment in wk 87. The incidence of intratubular calcinosis or of concrements in the pelvic space was not reduced during the recovery period. The study did not provide any evidence of carcinogenicity of the products tested. PMID:2430873

  12. Comparison of the properties of membranes produced with alginate and chitosan from mushroom and from shrimp.

    PubMed

    Bierhalz, Andréa C K; Westin, Cecília Buzatto; Moraes, Ângela Maria

    2016-10-01

    Dense and porous chitosan-alginate membranes (1:1 in mass) useful as coverages of skin wounds treated through cell therapy were produced using chitosan of different chain sizes from fungal (white mushrooms) and animal (shrimp shells) sources. Porous materials were obtained by adding the surfactant Poloxamer 188 to the formulations. The influence of chitosan type on membranes physicochemical properties and toxicity to fibroblasts was evaluated. Porosity was noticed to be more pronounced in membranes obtained with fungal chitosan and increased with its molecular mass. These formulations showed the highest values of thickness, roughness, opacity, liquid uptake and water vapor permeability. The membranes were not toxic to fibroblasts, but the lowest cytotoxicity values (0.16-0.21%) were observed for membranes prepared with fungal chitosan in the presence of surfactant. In conclusion, it is possible to replace chitosan from animal sources by chitosan of fungal origin to produce membranes with negligible cytotoxicity while maintaining appropriate physicochemical properties. PMID:27240752

  13. Constructing a novel zwitterionic surface of PVDF membrane through the assembled chitosan and sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiye; Zhao, Xinzhen; He, Chunju

    2016-06-01

    A novel zwitterionic surface of PVDF membrane with significantly improved antifouling properties was prepared though pressure-assisted layer by layer self-assembly method based on the electrostatic interactions of chitosan (CS), sodium alginate (SA) and polyfunctional lysine. For the modified C-S-C-S-L membrane, the contact angle decreased to 35°, the bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption mass of static fouling on the membrane surface decreased to 10μg/cm(2), and the secondary water flux recovery rate (FRR) of dynamic fouling of BSA and humic acid (HA) pollutants increased to 98% and 99%, respectively, exhibiting excellent antifouling performance. The results demonstrated that using charged bio-macromolecules and amino acids to build zwitterionic surface was effective and convenient to change the interface properties of the separation membrane through the pressure-assisted self-assembly modification method, and provided a new way for the industrial scale hydrophilic modification of hydrophobic porous membrane materials. PMID:26944663

  14. Full arch scans: conventional versus digital impressions--an in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ender, A; Mehl, A

    2011-01-01

    The digital intraoral impression has become a central part of the CAD/CAM technique. The objective of the present study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of digital impressions of the full arch with that of conventional impressions on the in-vitro model. For this purpose, a master model was acquired with a new reference scanning process, the measuring trueness of which was +/- 4.1 microm and the precision +/- 2.5 microm. On the one hand, conventional impressions and then plaster models (n = 5) were produced from this master model, and on the other hand, digital impressions were made with the Cerec AC Bluecam and the Lava COS system (each n = 5). The plaster models were also scanned with the reference scanner. The available data records were superimposed and the differences determined. The deviation from the master model defines the trueness of the impression method. The deviations of the models among one another demonstrate the precision of the method. The trueness of the impressions was 55 +/- 21.8 microm in the conventional impression group, for digital impressions with Cerec Bluecam it was 49 +/- 14.2 microm and for digital impressions with Lava COS 40.3 +/- 14.1 microm. The precision was 61.3 +/- 17.9 microm for conventional impression with Impregum, 30.9 +/- 7.1 microm for digital impression with the Cerec Bluecam and 60.1 +/- 31.3 microm for digital impression with Lava COS. These in-vitro results show that accuracy of the digital impression is similar to that of the conventional impression. These results will have to be confirmed in further clinical studies. PMID:21657122

  15. Preparation of aminated chitosan/alginate scaffold containing halloysite nanotubes with improved cell attachment.

    PubMed

    Amir Afshar, Hamideh; Ghaee, Azadeh

    2016-10-20

    The chemical nature of biomaterials play important role in cell attachment, proliferation and migration in tissue engineering. Chitosan and alginate are biodegradable and biocompatible polymers used as scaffolds for various medical and clinical applications. Amine groups of chitosan scaffolds play an important role in cell attachment and water adsorption but also associate with alginate carboxyl groups via electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding, consequently the activity of amine groups in the scaffold decreases. In this study, chitosan/alginate/halloysite nanotube (HNTs) composite scaffolds were prepared using a freeze-drying method. Amine treatment on the scaffold occurred through chemical methods, which in turn caused the hydroxyl groups to be replaced with carboxyl groups in chitosan and alginate, after which a reaction between ethylenediamine, 1-ethyl-3,(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and scaffold triggered the amine groups to connect to the carboxyl groups of chitosan and alginate. The chemical structure, morphology and mechanical properties of the composite scaffolds were investigated by FTIR, CHNS, SEM/EDS and compression tests. The electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding between chitosan, alginate and halloysite was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. Chitosan/alginate/halloysite scaffolds exhibit significant enhancement in compressive strength compared with chitosan/alginate scaffolds. CHNS and EDS perfectly illustrate that amine groups were effectively introduced in the aminated scaffold. The growth and cell attachment of L929 cells as well as the cytotoxicity of the scaffolds were investigated by SEM and Alamar Blue (AB). The results indicated that the aminated chitosan/alginate/halloysite scaffold has better cell growth and cell adherence in comparison to that of chitosan/alginate/halloysite samples. Aminated chitosan/alginate/halloysite composite scaffolds exhibit great potential for applications in tissue engineering, ideally in

  16. Digital impression-taking: Fundamentals and benefits in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Lecocq, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The digital era has burst into our offices in a big way. 3D camera technology has improved, enabling us to record our impressions and the occlusion in a digital format file. This file can then be used to make set-ups and manufacture orthodontic devices. Like any new technology, it needs to be studied and understood in order to grasp it fully and master the information and digital flow which can be generated between one's office and any external party involved in treatment, such as laboratories or other colleagues. PMID:27080602

  17. Sectional impression tray and sectional denture for a microstomia patient.

    PubMed

    Colvenkar, Shreya S

    2010-02-01

    Microstomia presents a unique challenge to the patient. Patients with microstomia who must wear removable dental prostheses often face the difficulty of being unable to insert or remove the prosthesis because of the constricted opening of the oral cavity. A completely edentulous patient, who developed microstomia along with Raynaud's phenomenon induced by scleroderma, is presented. This clinical report describes a quick and easy method for fabrication of a sectional custom impression tray connected by press button and a sectional complete denture retained by magnets. A sectional denture that provides ease in placement and removal can be successfully used in clinical practice for treatment of microstomia patients. PMID:19895427

  18. Basilar Invagination, Basilar Impression, and Platybasia: Clinical and Imaging Aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; McVige, Jennifer; Mechtler, Laszlo

    2016-08-01

    The congenital and acquired deformities of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ), such as basilar invagination, basilar impression, or platybasia, can present in the form of slowly progressive or acute neurologic deterioration. In many cases, an insidious headache is the only symptom and can be a diagnostic challenge for the neurologist. Proper imaging studies as well as recognizing often associated neurologic or systemic conditions are required for early diagnosis and effective therapy. In the current report, the primary focus will be on clinical aspects of these CVJ abnormalities; the pathologic and radiologic aspects, such as developmental and pathophysiologic background or radiographic analysis, will be discussed briefly, confined to clinically relevant data. PMID:27344347

  19. Calcium Alginate and Calcium Alginate-Chitosan Beads Containing Celecoxib Solubilized in a Self-Emulsifying Phase.

    PubMed

    Segale, Lorena; Giovannelli, Lorella; Mannina, Paolo; Pattarino, Franco

    2016-01-01

    In this work alginate and alginate-chitosan beads containing celecoxib solubilized into a self-emulsifying phase were developed in order to obtain a drug delivery system for oral administration, able to delay the drug release in acidic environment and to promote it in the intestinal compartment. The rationale of this work was linked to the desire to improve celecoxib therapeutic effectiveness reducing its gastric adverse effects and to favor its use in the prophylaxis of colon cancer and as adjuvant in the therapy of familial polyposis. The systems were prepared by ionotropic gelation using needles with different diameters (400 and 600 μm). Morphology, particle size, swelling behavior, and in vitro drug release performance of the beads in aqueous media with different pH were investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that the presence of chitosan in the formulation caused an increase of the mechanical resistance of the bead structure and, as a consequence, a limitation of the bead swelling ability and a decrease of the drug release rate at neutral pH. Alginate-chitosan beads could be a good tool to guarantee a celecoxib colon delivery. PMID:27127680

  20. Calcium Alginate and Calcium Alginate-Chitosan Beads Containing Celecoxib Solubilized in a Self-Emulsifying Phase

    PubMed Central

    Segale, Lorena; Giovannelli, Lorella; Mannina, Paolo; Pattarino, Franco

    2016-01-01

    In this work alginate and alginate-chitosan beads containing celecoxib solubilized into a self-emulsifying phase were developed in order to obtain a drug delivery system for oral administration, able to delay the drug release in acidic environment and to promote it in the intestinal compartment. The rationale of this work was linked to the desire to improve celecoxib therapeutic effectiveness reducing its gastric adverse effects and to favor its use in the prophylaxis of colon cancer and as adjuvant in the therapy of familial polyposis. The systems were prepared by ionotropic gelation using needles with different diameters (400 and 600 μm). Morphology, particle size, swelling behavior, and in vitro drug release performance of the beads in aqueous media with different pH were investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that the presence of chitosan in the formulation caused an increase of the mechanical resistance of the bead structure and, as a consequence, a limitation of the bead swelling ability and a decrease of the drug release rate at neutral pH. Alginate-chitosan beads could be a good tool to guarantee a celecoxib colon delivery. PMID:27127680

  1. Design, Implementation, and Opening to the Public of an Impression-Based Music Retrieval System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, Tadahiko; Ohta, Kimiko

    Impression-based music retrieval helps users in finding musical pieces that suit their preferences, feelings, or mental states from the huge volume of a music database. We have therefore developed an impression-based music retrieval system that enables this. Users are asked to select one or more pairs of impression words from the multiple pairs presented by the system and estimate each of the selected pairs on a seven-step scale in order to input their impressions into the system. For instance, if they want to locate musical pieces that will create a happy impression, they should check the radio button ``Happy'' in the impression scale, ``Very happy -- Happy -- A little happy -- Neutral -- A little sad -- Sad -- Very sad,'' where a pair of impression words with a seven-step scale is called an ``impression scale'' in this paper. The system would measure the distance between the impressions of every musical piece in a user-specified music database and the impressions inputted by the user, and determine candidate musical pieces to be presented as retrieval results. In this paper, we define the form of vectors that numerically express impressions of musical pieces, and propose a method of generating such a vector from a musical piece. The most significant attribute of this method is that it uses n-gram statistics of information on pitch, strength, and length of every tone in that musical piece as features extracted from it. We also present the results of evaluating the performance of the system.

  2. Remembering first impressions: Effects of intentionality and diagnosticity on subsequent memory

    PubMed Central

    Gilron, Roee; Gutchess, Angela H.

    2012-01-01

    People rely on first impressions every day as an important tool to interpret social behavior. While research is beginning to reveal the neural underpinnings of first impressions, particularly through understanding the role of dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), little is known about the way in which first impressions are encoded into memory. This is surprising because first impressions are relevant from a social perspective for future interactions, requiring that they be transferred to memory. The present study used a subsequent memory paradigm to test the conditions under which the dmPFC is implicated in the encoding of first impressions. We found that intentionally forming impressions engages the dmPFC more than incidentally forming impressions and that this engagement supports the encoding of remembered impressions. In addition, we found that diagnostic information, which more readily lends itself to forming trait impressions, engages the dmPFC more than neutral information. These results indicate that the neural system subserving memory for impressions is sensitive to consciously formed impressions. The results also suggest a distinction between a social memory system and other explicit memory systems governed by the medial temporal lobes. PMID:22139633

  3. Manager behavior in a social context: the impact of impression management on attributions and disciplinary actions.

    PubMed

    Wood, R E; Mitchell, T R

    1981-12-01

    Two experimental studies were run to test the effects of subordinate impression management on the appraisals and responses of a manager, following an incident of poor performance. Two common impression management tactics, accounts and apologies, were manipulated in each of the studies. Subjects in both studies were experienced nursing supervisors. On the basis of the "discounting effect" reported in the attributional literature it was hypothesized that accounts of external causes for poor performance, i.e., excuses, would lead subjects to (1) attribute less responsibility to the subordinate, (2) be less personal in their responses, and (3) be less punitive in their responses. Apologies, because of their "equity restoration" effects, were expected to influence subjects' disciplinary responses to the poor performance, without necessarily affecting their attributions of responsibility. Experiment 1. which employed written stimulus materials and a repeated-measures design, provided strong support for all hypotheses. Experiment 2. which employed a film stimulus and between-subjects design, provided strong support for the accounts hypotheses but only minimal support for the apology hypotheses. The results highlight the importance of social information cues in the appraisal of performance. PMID:10253557

  4. Comparison of the Accuracy of Different Transfer Impression Techniques for Osseointegrated Implants.

    PubMed

    Zen, Bruno Massucato; Soares, Eveline Freitas; Rodrigues, Mariana Agustinho; Luthi, Leonardo Flores; Consani, Rafael Leonardo X; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate 3 transfer techniques used to obtain working casts of implant-supported prostheses through the marginal misfit and strain induced to metallic framework. Thirty working casts were obtained from a metallic master cast, each one containing 2 implant analogs simulating a clinical situation of 3-unit implant-supported fixed prostheses according to the following transfer impression techniques: group A, squared transfers splinted with dental floss and acrylic resin, sectioned, and re-splinted; group B, squared transfers splinted with dental floss and bis-acrylic resin; and group N, squared transfers not splinted. A metallic framework was made for marginal misfit and strain measurements from the metallic master cast. The misfit between the metallic framework and working casts was evaluated with an optical microscope following the single-screw test protocol. In the same conditions, the strain was evaluated using strain gauges placed on the metallic framework. The data were submitted to one-way analysis of variance followed by the Tukey test (α = 5%). For both marginal misfit and strain, there were statistically significant differences between groups A and N (P < .01) and groups B and N (P < .01), with greater values for group N. According to the Pearson test, there was a positive correlation between the misfit and strain variables (r = 0.5642). The results of this study showed that the impression techniques with splinted transfers promoted better accuracy than the nonsplinted technique, regardless of the splinting material used. PMID:25438007

  5. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - part 3: amino acid staining.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Bandey, Helen; Savage, Kathleen; NicDaéid, Niamh

    2013-03-01

    Enhancement of footwear impressions, using ninhydrin or ninhydrin analogues is not considered common practice and such techniques are generally used to target amino acids present in fingermarks where the reaction gives rise to colour and possibly fluorescence. Ninhydrin and two of its analogues were used for the enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on various types, colours and porosities of fabric. Test footwear impressions on fabric were prepared using a specifically built rig to minimise the variability between each impression. Ninhydrin enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on light coloured fabric yielded good enhancement results, however the contrast was weak or non-existent on dark coloured fabrics. Other ninhydrin analogues which have the advantage of fluorescence failed to enhance the impressions in blood on all fabrics. The sequential treatment of impressions in blood on fabric with other blood enhancing reagents (e.g. protein stains and heme reagents) was also investigated. PMID:23380056

  6. A simple method for encapsulating single cells in alginate microspheres allows for direct PCR and whole genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Bigdeli, Saharnaz; Dettloff, Roger O; Frank, Curtis W; Davis, Ronald W; Crosby, Laurel D

    2015-01-01

    Microdroplets are an effective platform for segregating individual cells and amplifying DNA. However, a key challenge is to recover the contents of individual droplets for downstream analysis. This paper offers a method for embedding cells in alginate microspheres and performing multiple serial operations on the isolated cells. Rhodobacter sphaeroides cells were diluted in alginate polymer and sprayed into microdroplets using a fingertip aerosol sprayer. The encapsulated cells were lysed and subjected either to conventional PCR, or whole genome amplification using either multiple displacement amplification (MDA) or a two-step PCR protocol. Microscopic examination after PCR showed that the lumen of the occupied microspheres contained fluorescently stained DNA product, but multiple displacement amplification with phi29 produced only a small number of polymerase colonies. The 2-step WGA protocol was successful in generating fluorescent material, and quantitative PCR from DNA extracted from aliquots of microspheres suggested that the copy number inside the microspheres was amplified up to 3 orders of magnitude. Microspheres containing fluorescent material were sorted by a dilution series and screened with a fluorescent plate reader to identify single microspheres. The DNA was extracted from individual isolates, re-amplified with full-length sequencing adapters, and then a single isolate was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. After filtering the reads, the only sequences that collectively matched a genome in the NCBI nucleotide database belonged to R. sphaeroides. This demonstrated that sequencing-ready DNA could be generated from the contents of a single microsphere without culturing. However, the 2-step WGA strategy showed limitations in terms of low genome coverage and an uneven frequency distribution of reads across the genome. This paper offers a simple method for embedding cells in alginate microspheres and performing PCR on isolated cells in common bulk

  7. Impression formation in children: influence of gender and expectancy.

    PubMed

    McAninch, C B; Manolis, M B; Milich, R; Harris, M J

    1993-10-01

    The effect of expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information on subsequent impression formation and recall of a target peer was examined. 64 boys and 50 girls (ages 8 to 12) were given an expectancy that a stimulus child was either shy or outgoing. Subjects rated the target on several dimensions (e.g., friendly, shy) and then watched a videotape of a boy or girl confederate acting out a script containing both expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information. Subjects then rated the target child again and freely recalled as much of what the target said as they could remember. Results revealed that when children are presented with both expectancy-congruent and -incongruent information, impression formation appears largely attribute based, and the influence of the initial expectancy appears mitigated. However, ratings of liking appeared to be more influenced by the initial expectancy than by subsequent behavioral information. In addition, the results indicated that many of Maccoby's conclusions regarding the effects of gender on social interactions also apply to children's social information processing, indicating a strong bias toward same-sex peers. PMID:8222885

  8. Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex Involvement in Initial Negative Aesthetic Impression Formation

    PubMed Central

    Munar, Enric; Nadal, Marcos; Rosselló, Jaume; Flexas, Albert; Moratti, Stephan; Maestú, Fernando; Marty, Gisèle; Cela-Conde, Camilo J.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that aesthetic appreciation is related with activity in several different brain regions. The identification of the neural correlates of beauty or liking ratings has been the focus of most prior studies. Not much attention has been directed towards the fact that humans are surrounded by objects that lead them to experience aesthetic indifference or leave them with a negative aesthetic impression. Here we explore the neural substrate of such experiences. Given the neuroimaging techniques that have been used, little is known about the temporal features of such brain activity. By means of magnetoencephalography we registered the moment at which brain activity differed while participants viewed images they considered to be beautiful or not. Results show that the first differential activity appears between 300 and 400 ms after stimulus onset. During this period activity in right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC) was greater while participants rated visual stimuli as not beautiful than when they rated them as beautiful. We argue that this activity is associated with an initial negative aesthetic impression formation, driven by the relative hedonic value of stimuli regarded as not beautiful. Additionally, our results contribute to the understanding of the nature of the functional roles of the lOFC. PMID:22675517

  9. Chemical enhancement of soil based footwear impressions on fabric.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Bandey, Helen; Dawson, Lorna; Daéid, Niamh Nic

    2012-06-10

    This study investigates the enhancement of footwear impressions prepared with soils from different locations on a variety of fabric surfaces with different morphology. Preliminary experiments using seventeen techniques were carried out and the best responding reagents were evaluated further. Results indicated that the soils investigated (a cross-section of soils from Scotland) are more likely to respond to reagents that target iron ions rather than calcium, aluminium or phosphorus ions. Furthermore, the concentration of iron and soil pH did not appear to have an effect on the performance of the enhancement techniques. For the techniques tested, colour enhancement was observed on all light coloured substrates while enhancement on dark coloured fabrics, denim and leatherette was limited due to poor contrast with the background. Of the chemical enhancement reagents tested, 2,2'-dipyridil was a suitable replacement for the more common enhancement technique using potassium thiocyanate. The main advantages are the use of less toxic and flammable solvents and improved clarity and sharpness of the enhanced impression. The surface morphology of the fabrics did not have a significant effect on the enhancement ability of the reagents apart from a slight tendency for diffusion to occur on less porous fabrics such as polyester and nylon/lycra blends. PMID:22153620

  10. Neural dissociations between meaningful and mere inconsistency in impression updating.

    PubMed

    Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Todorov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Recent neuroimaging work has identified a network of regions that work in concert to update impressions of other people, particularly in response to inconsistent behavior. However, the specific functional contributions of these regions to the updating process remain unclear. Using fMRI, we tested whether increases in activity triggered by inconsistent behavior reflect changes in the stored representations of other people in response to behavioral inconsistency, or merely a response to the inconsistency itself. Participants encountered a series of individuals whose behavior either changed in an attributionally meaningful fashion or was merely inconsistent with the immediately preceding behavior. We observed that left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) and left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were preferentially recruited in response to unexpected, immoral behavior, whereas a separate set of regions (including dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and temporoparietal junction/inferior parietal lobule) was preferentially recruited in response to more mundane inconsistencies in behavior. These results shed light on the distributed systems supporting impression updating. Specifically, while many regions supporting updating may primarily respond to moment-to-moment changes in behavior, a subset of regions (e.g. vlPFC and IFG) may contribute to updating person representations in response to trait-relevant changes in behavior. PMID:27217118

  11. Three dimensional visualization and comparison of impressions on fired bullets.

    PubMed

    Banno, Atsuhiko; Masuda, Tomohito; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    2004-03-10

    Currently, optical devices, such as microscopes and CCD cameras, are utilized for identification of bullets and tool marks in the field of forensic science. While these optical methods are easily manageable and effective, they are under great influence of illumination condition. In other words, appearances of striations through these optical devices have possibility to be changed by lighting condition. Besides these appearance-based approaches, we can utilize three dimensional (3D) geometric data of tool marks that are free from lighting condition. In this study, we focused on 3D geometric data of landmark impressions on fired bullets for identification. We obtained the 3D surface data of tool marks by a confocal microscope and reconstructed virtual impressions on a PC monitor from the geometric data. Furthermore, the 3D data are exploited to numerical matching of two surface shapes. We also visualized the difference of two shapes. In order to do this, two surface models are aligned automatically. In this process, pairings of correspondent points on both surfaces are determined. Distance analysis between these pairs leads to a shape comparison. Since comparison results are visualized, they are intuitive and easily perceptive. PMID:15036444

  12. Three Alginate Lyases from Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HZJ216: Purification and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Liyan, Li; Jiang, Xiaolu; Wang, Peng; Guan, Huashi; Guo, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Three alginate lyases (A, B, and C) from an alginate-degrading marine bacterium strain HZJ216 isolated from brown seaweed in the Yellow Sea of China and identified preliminarily as Pseudomonas fluorescens are purified, and their biochemical properties are described. Molecular masses of the three enzymes are determined by SDS-PAGE to be 60.25, 36, and 23 kDa with isoelectric points of 4, 4.36, and 4.59, respectively. Investigations of these enzymes at different pH and temperatures show that they are most active at pH 7.0 and 35 C. Alginate lyases A and B are stable in the pH range of 5.0 9.0, while alginate lyase C is stable in the pH range of 5.0 7.0. Among the metal ions tested, additions of Na+, K+, and Mg2+ ions can enhance the enzyme activities while Fe2+, Fe3+, Ba2+, and Zn2+ ions show inhibitory effects. The substrate specificity results demonstrate that alginate lyase C has the specificity for G block while alginate lyases A and B have the activities for both M and G blocks. It is the first report about extracellular alginate lyases with high alginate-degrading activity from P. fluorescens.

  13. Alginate-Iron Speciation and Its Effect on In Vitro Cellular Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Horniblow, Richard D.; Dowle, Miriam; Iqbal, Tariq H.; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O.; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Alginates are a class of biopolymers with known iron binding properties which are routinely used in the fabrication of iron-oxide nanoparticles. In addition, alginates have been implicated in influencing human iron absorption. However, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles employs non-physiological pH conditions and whether nanoparticle formation in vivo is responsible for influencing cellular iron metabolism is unclear. Thus the aims of this study were to determine how alginate and iron interact at gastric-comparable pH conditions and how this influences iron metabolism. Employing a range of spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions alginate-iron complexation was confirmed and, in conjunction with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticles were observed. The results infer a nucleation-type model of iron binding whereby alginate is templating the condensation of iron-hydroxide complexes to form iron oxide centred nanoparticles. The interaction of alginate and iron at a cellular level was found to decrease cellular iron acquisition by 37% (p < 0.05) and in combination with confocal microscopy the alginate inhibits cellular iron transport through extracellular iron chelation with the resulting complexes not internalised. These results infer alginate as being useful in the chelation of excess iron, especially in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer where excess unabsorbed luminal iron is thought to be a driver of disease. PMID:26378798

  14. Decolourisation of dyes under electro-Fenton process using Fe alginate gel beads.

    PubMed

    Rosales, E; Iglesias, O; Pazos, M; Sanromán, M A

    2012-04-30

    This study focuses on the application of electro-Fenton technique by use of catalytic activity of Fe alginate gel beads for the remediation of wastewater contaminated with synthetic dyes. The Fe alginate gel beads were evaluated for decolourisation of two typical dyes, Lissamine Green B and Azure B under electro-Fenton process. After characterization of Fe alginate gel beads, the pH effect on the process with Fe alginate beads and a comparative study of the electro-Fenton process with free Fe and Fe alginate bead was done. The results showed that the use of Fe alginate beads increases the efficiency of the process; moreover the developed particles show a physical integrity in a wide range of pH (2-8). Around 98-100% of dye decolourisation was obtained for both dyes by electro-Fenton process in successive batches. Therefore, the process was performed with Fe alginate beads in a bubble continuous reactor. High color removal (87-98%) was attained for both dyes operating at a residence time of 30 min, without operational problems and maintaining particle shapes throughout the oxidation process. Consequently, the stable performance of Fe alginate beads opens promising perspectives for fast and economical treatment of wastewater polluted by dyes or similar organic contaminants. PMID:22381372

  15. Interpenetrated Si-HPMC/alginate hydrogels as a potential scaffold for human tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Viguier, Alexia; Boyer, Cecile; Chassenieux, Christophe; Benyahia, Lazhar; Guicheux, Jérôme; Weiss, Pierre; Rethore, Gildas; Nicolai, Taco

    2016-05-01

    Interpenetrated gels of biocompatible polysaccharides alginate and silanized hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (Si-HPMC) have been studied in order to assess their potential as scaffolds for the regeneration of human tissues. Si-HPMC networks were formed by reduction of the pH to neutral and alginate networks were formed by progressive in situ release of Ca(2+). Linear and non-linear mechanical properties of the mixed gels at different polymer and calcium concentrations were compared with those of the corresponding single gels. The alginate/Si-HPMC gels were found to be stiffer than pure Si-HPMC gels, but weaker and more deformable than pure alginate gels. No significant difference was found for the maximum stress at rupture measured during compression for all these gels. The degrees of swelling or contraction in excess water at pH 7 as well as the release of Ca(2+) was measured as a function of time. Pure alginate gels contracted by as much as 50 % and showed syneresis, which was much reduced or even eliminated for mixed gels. The important release of Ca(2+) upon ageing for pure alginate gels was much reduced for the mixed gels. Furthermore, results of cytocompatibility assays indicated that there was no cytotoxicity of Si-HPMC/alginate hydrogels in 2D and 3D culture of human SW1353 cells. The results show that using interpenetrated Si-HPMC/alginate gels has clear advantages over the use of single gels for application in tissue regeneration. PMID:27022979

  16. Digital microfluidic three-dimensional cell culture and chemical screening platform using alginate hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electro wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidics (DMF) can be used to develop improved chemical screening platforms using 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture. Alginate hydrogels are one common method by which a 3D cell culture environment is created. This paper presents a study of alginate gelation on EWOD DMF and investigates designs to obtain uniform alginate hydrogels that can be repeatedly addressed by any desired liquids. A design which allows for gels to be retained in place during liquid delivery and removal without using any physical barriers or hydrophilic patterning of substrates is presented. A proof of concept screening platform is demonstrated by examining the effects of different concentrations of a test chemical on 3D cells in alginate hydrogels. In addition, the temporal effects of the various chemical concentrations on different hydrogel posts are demonstrated, thereby establishing the benefits of an EWOD DMF 3D cell culture and chemical screening platform using alginate hydrogels. PMID:25945142

  17. Digital microfluidic three-dimensional cell culture and chemical screening platform using alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    George, Subin M; Moon, Hyejin

    2015-03-01

    Electro wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidics (DMF) can be used to develop improved chemical screening platforms using 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture. Alginate hydrogels are one common method by which a 3D cell culture environment is created. This paper presents a study of alginate gelation on EWOD DMF and investigates designs to obtain uniform alginate hydrogels that can be repeatedly addressed by any desired liquids. A design which allows for gels to be retained in place during liquid delivery and removal without using any physical barriers or hydrophilic patterning of substrates is presented. A proof of concept screening platform is demonstrated by examining the effects of different concentrations of a test chemical on 3D cells in alginate hydrogels. In addition, the temporal effects of the various chemical concentrations on different hydrogel posts are demonstrated, thereby establishing the benefits of an EWOD DMF 3D cell culture and chemical screening platform using alginate hydrogels. PMID:25945142

  18. Gelling process of sodium alginate with bivalent ions rich microsphere: Nature of bivalent ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Marco; Vicini, Silvia; Castellano, Maila

    2016-05-01

    In the paper we present a new approach for obtaining a controlled gelling process of sodium alginate, based on the quantity of bivalent ions rich alginate micro-beads added as crosslinkers. Typically, calcium ions are used in gelation of alginate solutions. In this study we present different gelling systems realized with alginate microspheres, made by electrospinning methodology, enriched with different bivalent ions (Ca2+, Ba2+ and Mg2+). The microspheres were characterized under the point of view of the morphology by OM and as the ions content. Realized gels were characterized in light of the amount of the ions added to the alginate solution, and in light of the different dimensions of the micro-beads, using rheological measurements to assess the variation in the storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G″) and complex viscosity (η*).

  19. Superabsorbent nanocomposite (alginate-g-PAMPS/MMT): synthesis, characterization and swelling behavior.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mithilesh; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2012-09-01

    A superabsorbent composite (alginate-g-PAMPS/MMT) was prepared by graft copolymerization from alginate, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) and Na+ montmorillonite (MMT) in an inert atmosphere. Effects of polymerization variables on water absorbency, including the content of Na+ montmorillonite, sodium alginate, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide and AMPS, were studied. The introduced montmorillonite formed a loose and porous surface and improved the water absorbency of the alginate-g-PAMPS/MMT superabsorbent composite. Swelling behaviors of the superabsorbent composites in various cationic salt solutions (NaCl, CaCl2 and FeCl3) and anionic salt solutions (NaCl and Na2SO4) were also systematically investigated. The superabsorbent composite was further characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), rheology, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) taking alginate-g-PAMPS as a reference. PMID:24751026

  20. Preparation of tadpole-shaped calcium alginate microparticles with sphericity control.

    PubMed

    Dang, T D; Joo, S W

    2013-02-01

    Monosized sodium alginate microdroplets are prepared using a flow-focusing microdevice by adjusting the flow rate of the continuous phase (soybean oil) and the dispersed phase (sodium alginate solution). The gelation process of the semi-product, sodium alginate microdroplets, occurs outside the channel in a calcium chloride solution to form tadpole-shaped calcium alginate microparticles. The microparticles prepared are in the range of 100-250 μm in diameter, depending on the experimental conditions. The shape, size and size distribution of these calcium alginate microparticles depend strongly on the calcium solution concentration and the stirring mode. The shaping mechanism of the microparticles and the impact of the experimental conditions on particle shape and size are investigated. PMID:23107954