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Sample records for alginate scaffold including

  1. Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticles Reinforced Electrospun Alginate-Based Nanofibrous Scaffolds with Improved Physical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Mantilaka, M. M. M. G. P. G.; Goh, K. L.; Ratnayake, S. P.; Amaratunga, G. A. J.; de Silva, K. M. Nalin

    2017-01-01

    Mechanically robust alginate-based nanofibrous scaffolds were successfully fabricated by electrospinning method to mimic the natural extracellular matrix structure which benefits development and regeneration of tissues. Alginate-based nanofibres were electrospun from an alginate/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) polyelectrolyte complex. SEM images revealed the spinnability of the complex composite nanofibrous scaffolds, showing randomly oriented, ultrafine, and virtually defects-free alginate-based/MgO nanofibrous scaffolds. Here, it is shown that an alginate/PVA complex scaffold, blended with near-spherical MgO nanoparticles (⌀ 45 nm) at a predetermined concentration (10% (w/w)), is electrospinnable to produce a complex composite nanofibrous scaffold with enhanced mechanical stability. For the comparison purpose, chemically cross-linked electrospun alginate-based scaffolds were also fabricated. Tensile test to rupture revealed the significant differences in the tensile strength and elastic modulus among the alginate scaffolds, alginate/MgO scaffolds, and cross-linked alginate scaffolds (P < 0.05). In contrast to cross-linked alginate scaffolds, alginate/MgO scaffolds yielded the highest tensile strength and elastic modulus while preserving the interfibre porosity of the scaffolds. According to the thermogravimetric analysis, MgO reinforced alginate nanofibrous scaffolds exhibited improved thermal stability. These novel alginate-based/MgO scaffolds are economical and versatile and may be further optimised for use as extracellular matrix substitutes for repair and regeneration of tissues. PMID:28694826

  2. Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticles Reinforced Electrospun Alginate-Based Nanofibrous Scaffolds with Improved Physical Properties.

    PubMed

    De Silva, R T; Mantilaka, M M M G P G; Goh, K L; Ratnayake, S P; Amaratunga, G A J; de Silva, K M Nalin

    2017-01-01

    Mechanically robust alginate-based nanofibrous scaffolds were successfully fabricated by electrospinning method to mimic the natural extracellular matrix structure which benefits development and regeneration of tissues. Alginate-based nanofibres were electrospun from an alginate/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) polyelectrolyte complex. SEM images revealed the spinnability of the complex composite nanofibrous scaffolds, showing randomly oriented, ultrafine, and virtually defects-free alginate-based/MgO nanofibrous scaffolds. Here, it is shown that an alginate/PVA complex scaffold, blended with near-spherical MgO nanoparticles (⌀ 45 nm) at a predetermined concentration (10% (w/w)), is electrospinnable to produce a complex composite nanofibrous scaffold with enhanced mechanical stability. For the comparison purpose, chemically cross-linked electrospun alginate-based scaffolds were also fabricated. Tensile test to rupture revealed the significant differences in the tensile strength and elastic modulus among the alginate scaffolds, alginate/MgO scaffolds, and cross-linked alginate scaffolds (P < 0.05). In contrast to cross-linked alginate scaffolds, alginate/MgO scaffolds yielded the highest tensile strength and elastic modulus while preserving the interfibre porosity of the scaffolds. According to the thermogravimetric analysis, MgO reinforced alginate nanofibrous scaffolds exhibited improved thermal stability. These novel alginate-based/MgO scaffolds are economical and versatile and may be further optimised for use as extracellular matrix substitutes for repair and regeneration of tissues.

  3. In vitro evaluation of alginate/halloysite nanotube composite scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxian; Dai, Libing; Shi, Huizhe; Xiong, Sheng; Zhou, Changren

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a series of alginate/halloysite nanotube (HNTs) composite scaffolds were prepared by solution-mixing and freeze-drying method. HNTs are incorporated into alginate to improve both the mechanical and cell-attachment properties of the scaffolds. The interfacial interactions between alginate and HNTs were confirmed by the atomic force microscope (AFM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and FTIR spectroscopy. The mechanical, morphological, and physico-chemical properties of the composite scaffolds were investigated. The composite scaffolds exhibit significant enhancement in compressive strength and compressive modulus compared with pure alginate scaffold both in dry and wet states. A well-interconnected porous structure with size in the range of 100-200μm and over 96% porosity is found in the composite scaffolds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) result shows that HNTs are uniformly dispersed and partly oriented in the composite scaffolds. The incorporation of HNTs leads to increase in the scaffold density and decrease in the water swelling ratio of alginate. HNTs improve the stability of alginate scaffolds against enzymatic degradation in PBS solution. Thermogravimetrica analysis (TGA) shows that HNTs can improve the thermal stability of the alginate. The mouse fibroblast cells display better attachment to the alginate/HNT composite than those to the pure alginate, suggesting the good cytocompatibility of the composite scaffolds. Alginate/HNT composite scaffolds exhibit great potential for applications in tissue engineering.

  4. Three-dimensional electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL)/alginate hybrid composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Seong; Kim, GeunHyung

    2014-12-19

    Micro/nanofibrous scaffolds have been used widely in biomedical applications because the micro/nano-scale fibres resemble natural extracellular matrix and the high surface-to-volume ratio encourages cellular activities (attachment and proliferation). However, poor mechanical properties, low controllability of various shapes and difficulties in obtaining controllable pore structure have been obstacles to their use in hard-tissue regeneration. To overcome these shortcomings, we suggest a new composite system, which uses a combination method of wet electrospinning, rapid prototyping and a physical punching process. Using the process, we obtained polycaprolactone (PCL)/alginate composite scaffolds, consisting of electrospun PCL/alginate fibres and micro-sized PCL struts, with mean pore sizes of 821 ± 55 μm. To show the feasibility of the scaffolds for hard-tissue regeneration, the scaffolds were assessed not only for physical properties, including hydrophilicity, water absorption, and tensile and compressive strength, but also in vitro cellular responses (cell viability and proliferation) and osteogenic differentiation (alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mineralisation) by culturing with pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cells). With the reinforcing micro-sized PCL struts, the elastic modulus of the PCL/alginate scaffold was significantly improved versus a pure PCL scaffold. Additionally, due to the alginate component in the fibrous scaffold, they showed significantly enhanced hydrophilic behaviour, water absorption (∼8-fold) and significant biological activities (∼1.6-fold for cell viability at 7 days, ∼2.3-fold for ALP activity at 14 days and ∼6.4-fold for calcium mineralisation at 14 days) compared with those of a pure PCL fibrous scaffold.

  5. A highly organized three-dimensional alginate scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering prepared by microfluidic technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen-Chie; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Lin, Keng-Hui; Liu, Hwa-Chang; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2011-10-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease and frequently involves the knee, hip and phalangeal joints. Current treatments used in small cartilage defects including multiple drilling, abrasion arthroplasty, mosaicplasty, and autogenous chondrocyte transplantation, however, there are problems needed to be solved. The standard treatment for severe osteoarthritis is total joint arthroplasty. The disadvantages of this surgery are the possibility of implant loosening. Therefore, tissue engineering for cartilage regeneration has become a promising topic. We have developed a new method to produce a highly organized single polymer (alginate) scaffold using microfluidic device. Scanning electron microscope and confocal fluoroscope examinations showed that the scaffold has a regular interconnected porous structure in the scale of 250 μm and high porosity. The scaffold is effective in chondrocyte culture; the cell viability test (WST-1 assay), cell toxicity (lactate dehydrogenase assay), cell survival rate, extracellular matrix production (glycosaminoglycans contents), cell proliferation (DNA quantification), and gene expression (real-time PCR) all revealed good results for chondrocyte culture. The chondrocytes can maintain normal phenotypes, highly express aggrecan and type II collagen, and secrete a great deal of extracellular matrix when seeded in the alginate scaffold. This study demonstrated that a highly organized alginate scaffold can be prepared with an economical microfluidic device, and this scaffold is effective in cartilage tissue engineering. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Chitosan and alginate scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Olmez, S S; Korkusuz, P; Bilgili, H; Senel, S

    2007-06-01

    Polymeric scaffold for tissue regeneration was developed for veterinary applications. Oxytetracycline hydrochloride (OTC), which is a widely used antibiotic in veterinary medicine was chosen as the model compound. Gel formulations using chitosan and alginate were prepared in distilled water or in 1% (v/v) acetic acid solution. Sponges were also prepared by a freeze-drying process. Tripolyphosphate was used for cross-linking. Viscosity was decreased in the presence of OTC in chitosan gels whereas no difference was found with alginate gels. All gels showed pseudoplastic behaviour. Water absorption capacity was highest with chitosan/alginate sponges. The solvent used for preparation of the chitosan gels was found to affect the release of OTC. The release of OTC from the sponges was increased by cross-linking. Chitosan/alginate sponges showed the slowest and lowest drug release among the developed sponge formulations in this study. The formulations were found to be biocompatible, inducing no adverse reaction in vivo on surgically formed bone defects of radius of rabbits. The level of organization of the remodelled new bone in the treatment groups was better than that of control. Incorporation of OTC into formulations did not show any considerable enhancing effect.

  7. Fabrication of individual alginate-TCP scaffolds for bone tissue engineering by means of powder printing.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Miguel; Rodrigues, Jorge; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Pereira, Manuel; Moseke, Claus; Groll, Jürgen; Ewald, Andrea; Vorndran, Elke

    2015-01-06

    The development of polymer-calcium phosphate composite scaffolds with tailored architectures and properties has great potential for bone regeneration. Herein, we aimed to improve the functional performance of brittle ceramic scaffolds by developing a promising biopolymer-ceramic network. For this purpose, two strategies, namely, direct printing of a powder composition consisting of a 60:40 mixture of α/β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) powder and alginate powder or vacuum infiltration of printed TCP scaffolds with an alginate solution, were tracked. Results of structural characterization revealed that the scaffolds printed with 2.5 wt% alginate-modified TCP powders presented a uniformly distributed and interfusing alginate TCP network. Mechanical results indicated a significant increase in strength, energy to failure and reliability of powder-modified scaffolds with an alginate content in the educts of 2.5 wt% when compared to pure TCP, as well as to TCP scaffolds containing 5 wt% or 7.5 wt% in the educts, in both dry and wet states. Culture of human osteoblast cells on these scaffolds also demonstrated a great improvement of cell proliferation and cell viability. While in the case of powder-mixed alginate TCP scaffolds, isolated alginate gels were formed between the calcium phosphate crystals, the vacuum-infiltration strategy resulted in the covering of the surface and internal pores of the TCP scaffold with a thin alginate film. Furthermore, the prediction of the scaffolds' critical fracture conditions under more complex stress states by the applied Mohr fracture criterion confirmed the potential of the powder-modified scaffolds with 2.5 wt% alginate in the educts as structural biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

  8. Alginate/nanohydroxyapatite scaffolds with designed core/shell structures fabricated by 3D plotting and in situ mineralization for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongxiang; Lode, Anja; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang; Gelinsky, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Composite scaffolds, especially polymer/hydroxyapatite (HAP) composite scaffolds with predesigned structures, are promising materials for bone tissue engineering. Various methods including direct mixing of HAP powder with polymers or incubating polymer scaffolds in simulated body fluid for preparing polymer/HAP composite scaffolds are either uncontrolled or require long times of incubation. In this work, alginate/nano-HAP composite scaffolds with designed pore parameters and core/shell structures were fabricated using 3D plotting technique and in situ mineralization under mild conditions (at room temperature and without the use of any organic solvents). Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, microcomputer tomography, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were applied to characterize the fabricated scaffolds. Mechanical properties and protein delivery of the scaffolds were evaluated, as well as the cell response to the scaffolds by culturing human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC). The obtained data indicate that this method is suitable to fabricate alginate/nano-HAP composite scaffolds with a layer of nano-HAP, coating the surface of the alginate strands homogeneously and completely. The surface mineralization enhanced the mechanical properties and improved the cell attachment and spreading, as well as supported sustaining protein release, compared to pure alginate scaffolds without nano-HAP shell layer. The results demonstrated that the method provides an interesting option for bone tissue engineering application.

  9. Mechanically reinforced cell-laden scaffolds formed using alginate-based bioink printed onto the surface of a PCL/alginate mesh structure for regeneration of hard tissue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Bok; Lee, Hyeongjin; Yang, Gi-Hoon; Choi, Chang Hyun; Lee, DaeWeon; Hwang, Heon; Jung, Won-Kyo; Yoon, Hyeon; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Cell-printing technology has provided a new paradigm for biofabrication, with potential to overcome several shortcomings of conventional scaffold-based tissue regeneration strategies via controlled delivery of various cell types in well-defined target regions. Here we describe a cell-printing method to obtain mechanically reinforced multi-layered cell-embedded scaffolds, formed of micron-scale poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)/alginate struts coated with alginate-based bioink. To compare the physical and cellular activities, we used a scaffold composed of pure alginate (without cells) coated PCL/alginate struts as a control. We systematically varied the ratio of alginate cross-linking agent, and determined the optimal cell-coating conditions to form the PCL/alginate struts. Following fabrication of the cell (MG63)-laden PCL/alginate scaffold, the bioactivity was evaluated in vitro. The laden cells exhibited a substantially more developed cytoskeleton compared with those on a control scaffold consisting of the same material composition. Based on these results, the printed cells exhibited a significantly more homogenous distribution within the scaffold compared with the control. Cell proliferation was determined via MTT assays at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days of culture, and the proliferation of the cell-printed scaffold was substantially in excess (∼2.4-fold) of that on the control. Furthermore, the osteogenic activity such as ALP was measured, and the cell-laden scaffold exhibited significantly greater activity (∼3.2-fold) compared with the control scaffold.

  10. Characterization of the flow behavior of alginate/hydroxyapatite mixtures for tissue scaffold fabrication.

    PubMed

    Tian, X Y; Li, M G; Cao, N; Li, J W; Chen, X B

    2009-12-01

    Mixtures of alginate and hydroxyapatite (HA) are promising materials for biomedical applications such as the fabrication of tissue scaffolds. In this paper, the flow behavior of alginate/HA mixtures was investigated and determined to be dependent on the concentration of both alginate and HA, and temperature. The relationships were mathematically established and verified with experimental results. As applied to the tissue scaffold fabrication, the flow rate of the biomaterial solution was predicted from the established flow behavior and verified by experiments. On this basis, the moving speed of the needle was determined and used in the tissue scaffold fabrication. The results obtained show that the knowledge of the flow behavior is essential to the fabrication of tissue scaffolds with an interconnected microstructure.

  11. An additive manufacturing-based PCL-alginate-chondrocyte bioprinted scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Joydip; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Regenerative medicine is targeted to improve, restore or replace damaged tissues or organs using a combination of cells, materials and growth factors. Both tissue engineering and developmental biology currently deal with the process of tissue self-assembly and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. In this investigation, additive manufacturing (AM) with a multihead deposition system (MHDS) was used to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) cell-printed scaffolds using layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of polycaprolactone (PCL) and chondrocyte cell-encapsulated alginate hydrogel. Appropriate cell dispensing conditions and optimum alginate concentrations for maintaining cell viability were determined. In vitro cell-based biochemical assays were performed to determine glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), DNA and total collagen contents from different PCL-alginate gel constructs. PCL-alginate gels containing transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) showed higher ECM formation. The 3D cell-printed scaffolds of PCL-alginate gel were implanted in the dorsal subcutaneous spaces of female nude mice. Histochemical [Alcian blue and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining] and immunohistochemical (type II collagen) analyses of the retrieved implants after 4 weeks revealed enhanced cartilage tissue and type II collagen fibril formation in the PCL-alginate gel (+TGFβ) hybrid scaffold. In conclusion, we present an innovative cell-printed scaffold for cartilage regeneration fabricated by an advanced bioprinting technology.

  12. Characterizing the Degradation of Alginate Hydrogel for Use in Multilumen Scaffolds for Spinal Cord Repair.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Dena; Koffler, Jacob; Lynam, Daniel A; Tuszynski, Mark H; Sakamoto, Jeffrey S

    2015-10-21

    Alginate was studied as a degradable nerve guidance scaffold material in vitro and in vivo. In vitro degradation rates were determined using rheology to measure the change in shear modulus vs time. The shear modulus decreased from 155 kPa to 5 kPa within 2 days; however, alginate samples maintained their superficial geometry for over 28 days. The degradation behavior was supported by materials characterization data showing alginate consisted of high internal surface area (400 m(2) /g), which likely facilitated the release of cross-linking cations resulting in the rapid decrease in shear modulus. To assess the degradation rate in vivo, multilumen scaffolds were fabricated using a fiber templating technique. The scaffolds were implanted in a 2 mm-long T3 full transection rodent spinal cord lesion model for 14 days. Although there was some evidence of axon guidance, in general, alginate scaffolds degraded before axons could grow over the 2 mm-long lesion. Enabling alginate-based scaffolds for nerve repair will likely require approaches to slow its degradation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Alginate hydrogel as a promising scaffold for dental-derived stem cells: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Ansari, Sahar; Xu, Xingtian; Chee, Winston W; Schricker, Scott R; Shi, Songtao

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop an injectable and biodegradable scaffold based on oxidized alginate microbeads encapsulating periodontal ligament (PDLSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate the stem cell viability, and osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells in vitro. Stem cells were encapsulated using alginate hydrogel. The stem cell viability, proliferation and differentiation to adipogenic and osteogenic tissues were studied. To investigate the expression of both adipogenesis and ontogenesis related genes, the RNA was extracted and RT-PCR was performed. The degradation behavior of hydrogel based on oxidized sodium alginate with different degrees of oxidation was studied in PBS at 37 °C as a function of time by monitoring the changes in weight loss. The swelling kinetics of alginate hydrogel was also investigated. The results showed that alginate is a promising candidate as a non-toxic scaffold for PDLSCs and GMSCs. It also has the ability to direct the differentiation of these stem cells to osteogenic and adipogenic tissues as compared to the control group in vitro. The encapsulated stem cells remained viable in vitro and both osteo-differentiated and adipo-differentiated after 4 weeks of culturing in the induction media. It was found that the degradation profile and swelling kinetics of alginate hydrogel strongly depends on the degree of oxidation showing its tunable chemistry and degradation rate. These findings demonstrate for the first time that immobilization of PDLSCs and GMSCs in the alginate microspheres provides a promising strategy for bone tissue engineering.

  14. Controlled nucleation of hydroxyapatite on alginate scaffolds for stem cell-based bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Suárez-González, Darilis; Barnhart, Kara; Saito, Eiji; Vanderby, Ray; Hollister, Scott J; Murphy, William L

    2010-10-01

    Current bone tissue engineering strategies aim to grow a tissue similar to native bone by combining cells and biologically active molecules with a scaffold material. In this study, a macroporous scaffold made from the seaweed-derived polymer alginate was synthesized and mineralized for cell-based bone tissue engineering applications. Nucleation of a bone-like hydroxyapatite mineral was achieved by incubating the scaffold in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF) for 4 weeks. Analysis using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral primarily composed of calcium and phosphorous. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite, the major inorganic constituent of human bone tissue. In addition to the mineral characterization, the ability to control nucleation on the surface, into the bulk of the material, or on the inner pore surfaces of scaffolds was demonstrated. Finally, human MSCs attached and proliferated on the mineralized scaffolds and cell attachment improved when seeding cells on mineral coated alginate scaffolds. This novel alginate- HAP composite material could be used in bone tissue engineering as a scaffold material to deliver cells, and perhaps also biologically active molecules.

  15. Interpenetrated Si-HPMC/alginate hydrogels as a potential scaffold for human tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Viguier, Alexia; Boyer, Cecile; Chassenieux, Christophe; Benyahia, Lazhar; Guicheux, Jérôme; Weiss, Pierre; Rethore, Gildas; Nicolai, Taco

    2016-05-01

    Interpenetrated gels of biocompatible polysaccharides alginate and silanized hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (Si-HPMC) have been studied in order to assess their potential as scaffolds for the regeneration of human tissues. Si-HPMC networks were formed by reduction of the pH to neutral and alginate networks were formed by progressive in situ release of Ca(2+). Linear and non-linear mechanical properties of the mixed gels at different polymer and calcium concentrations were compared with those of the corresponding single gels. The alginate/Si-HPMC gels were found to be stiffer than pure Si-HPMC gels, but weaker and more deformable than pure alginate gels. No significant difference was found for the maximum stress at rupture measured during compression for all these gels. The degrees of swelling or contraction in excess water at pH 7 as well as the release of Ca(2+) was measured as a function of time. Pure alginate gels contracted by as much as 50 % and showed syneresis, which was much reduced or even eliminated for mixed gels. The important release of Ca(2+) upon ageing for pure alginate gels was much reduced for the mixed gels. Furthermore, results of cytocompatibility assays indicated that there was no cytotoxicity of Si-HPMC/alginate hydrogels in 2D and 3D culture of human SW1353 cells. The results show that using interpenetrated Si-HPMC/alginate gels has clear advantages over the use of single gels for application in tissue regeneration.

  16. Injectable alginate/hydroxyapatite gel scaffold combined with gelatin microspheres for drug delivery and bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jingxuan; Miao, Yuting; Tan, Huaping; Zhou, Tianle; Ling, Zhonghua; Chen, Yong; Xing, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaohong

    2016-06-01

    Injectable and biodegradable alginate-based composite gel scaffolds doubly integrated with hydroxyapatite (HAp) and gelatin microspheres (GMs) were cross-linked via in situ release of calcium cations. As triggers of calcium cations, CaCO3 and glucono-D-lactone (GDL) were fixed as a mass ratio of 1:1 to control pH value ranging from 6.8 to 7.2 during gelation. Synchronously, tetracycline hydrochloride (TH) was encapsulated into GMs to enhance bioactivity of composite gel scaffolds. The effects of HAp and GMs on characteristics of gel scaffolds, including pH value, gelation time, mechanical properties, swelling ratio, degradation behavior and drug release, were investigated. The results showed that HAp and GMs successfully improved mechanical properties of gel scaffolds at strain from 0.1 to 0.5, which stabilized the gel network and decreased weight loss, as well as swelling ratio and gelation time. TH could be released from this composite gel scaffold into the local microenvironment in a controlled fashion by the organic/inorganic hybrid of hydrogel network. Our results demonstrate that the HAp and GMs doubly integrated alginate-based gel scaffolds, especially the one with 6% (w/v) HAp and 5% (w/v) GMs, have suitable physical performance and bioactive properties, thus provide a potential opportunity to be used for bone tissue engineering. The potential application of this gel scaffold in bone tissue engineering was confirmed by encapsulation behavior of osteoblasts. In combination with TH, the gel scaffold exhibited beneficial effects on osteoblast activity, which suggested a promising future for local treatment of pathologies involving bone loss.

  17. Reduced liver cell death using an alginate scaffold bandage: a novel approach for liver reconstruction after extended partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Shteyer, Eyal; Ben Ya'acov, Ami; Zolotaryova, Lidia; Sinai, Avital; Lichtenstein, Yoav; Pappo, Orit; Kryukov, Olga; Elkayam, Tsiona; Cohen, Smadar; Ilan, Yaron

    2014-07-01

    Extended partial hepatectomy may be needed in cases of large hepatic mass, and can lead to fulminant hepatic failure. Macroporous alginate scaffold is a biocompatible matrix which promotes the growth, differentiation and long-term hepatocellular function of primary hepatocytes in vitro. Our aim was to explore the ability of implanted macroporous alginate scaffolds to protect liver remnants from acute hepatic failure after extended partial hepatectomy. An 87% partial hepatectomy (PH) was performed on C57BL/6 mice to compare non-treated mice to mice in which alginate or collagen scaffolds were implanted after PH. Mice were scarified 3, 6, 24 and 48 h and 6 days following scaffold implantation and the extent of liver injury and repair was examined. Alginate scaffolds significantly increased animal survival to 60% vs. 10% in non-treated and collagen-treated mice (log rank=0.001). Mice with implanted alginate scaffolds manifested normal and prolonged aspartate aminotransferases and alanine aminotransferases serum levels as compared with the 2- to 20-fold increase in control groups (P<0.0001) accompanied with improved liver histology. Sustained normal serum albumin levels were observed in alginate-scaffold-treated mice 48 h after hepatectomy. Incorporation of BrdU-positive cells was 30% higher in the alginate-scaffold-treated group, compared with non-treated mice. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly decreased 3h post PH. Biotin-alginate scaffolds were quickly well integrated within the liver tissue. Collectively, implanted alginate scaffolds support liver remnants after extended partial hepatectomy, thus eliminating liver injury and leading to enhanced animal survival after extended partial hepatectomy.

  18. Biocompatible conducting chitosan/polypyrrole-alginate composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sajesh, K M; Jayakumar, R; Nair, Shantikumar V; Chennazhi, K P

    2013-11-01

    A polypyrrole based conducting scaffold was developed by incorporating polypyrrole-alginate (PPy-Alg) blend with chitosan using lyophilization technique and employed this composite as a substrate for bone tissue engineering. PPy-Alg blend was developed by oxidative chemical synthesis of polypyrrole using FeCl3 as oxidizing agent and characterized. The physiochemical characterization of the scaffold was done using SEM, FT-IR along with porosity measurement, swelling and in vitro degradation studies. Surface conductivity of the scaffolds was analyzed using Scanning Electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Results from cell viability and cell proliferation with MG-63 cells using Alamar blue assay confirmed the cytocompatible nature of the developed scaffold. In vitro biomineralization ability of the scaffold was assessed and thus the effectiveness of PPy-Alg/chitosan scaffold in the field of tissue engineering was evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Copper-releasing, boron-containing bioactive glass-based scaffolds coated with alginate for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Erol, M M; Mouriňo, V; Newby, P; Chatzistavrou, X; Roether, J A; Hupa, L; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize and characterize new boron-containing bioactive glass-based scaffolds coated with alginate cross-linked with copper ions. A recently developed bioactive glass powder with nominal composition (wt.%) 65 SiO2, 15 CaO, 18.4 Na2O, 0.1 MgO and 1.5 B2O3 was fabricated as porous scaffolds by the foam replica method. Scaffolds were alginate coated by dipping them in alginate solution. Scanning electron microscopy investigations indicated that the alginate effectively attached on the surface of the three-dimensional scaffolds leading to a homogeneous coating. It was confirmed that the scaffold structure remained amorphous after the sintering process and that the alginate coating improved the scaffold bioactivity and mechanical properties. Copper release studies showed that the alginate-coated scaffolds allowed controlled release of copper ions. The novel copper-releasing composite scaffolds represent promising candidates for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Microstructural, mechanical, and histological evaluation of modified alginate-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    de la Portilla, F; Pereira, S; Molero, M; De Marco, F; Perez-Puyana, V; Guerrero, A; Romero, A

    2016-12-01

    Scaffolds are three-dimensional structures used for tissue regeneration being the base in tissue engineering. These scaffolds are obtained from natural and/or synthetic polymers and they should satisfy some specific requirements such as biocompatibility, suitable mechanical, and microstructural properties to favor cellular adhesion and neovascularization. This work shows a preclinic study about the production of low and medium molecular weight alginate through the use of calcium salts (calcium glutamate). The results showed prove that better structures, distribution, and pore sizes as well as better mechanical properties correspond to medium molecular weight alginate and higher calcium salts concentration. This type of scaffold, after muscular cells cultivation, has been proved as an excellent material for muscle growth. The histopathological analysis shows a low inflammatory response, without a foreign body reaction, suitable neovascularization and good fibroblasts incorporation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3107-3114, 2016.

  1. Direct deposited porous scaffolds of calcium phosphate cement with alginate for drug delivery and bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gil-Su; Park, Jeong-Hui; Shin, Ueon Sang; Kim, Hae-Won

    2011-08-01

    This study reports the preparation of novel porous scaffolds of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) combined with alginate, and their potential usefulness as a three-dimensional (3-D) matrix for drug delivery and tissue engineering of bone. An α-tricalcium phosphate-based powder was mixed with sodium alginate solution and then directly injected into a fibrous structure in a Ca-containing bath. A rapid hardening reaction of the alginate with Ca(2+) helps to shape the composite into a fibrous form with diameters of hundreds of micrometers, and subsequent pressing in a mold allows the formation of 3-D porous scaffolds with different porosity levels. After transformation of the CPC into a calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite phase in simulated biological fluid the scaffold was shown to retain its mechanical stability. During the process biological proteins, such as bovine serum albumin and lysozyme, used as model proteins, were observed to be effectively loaded onto and released from the scaffolds for up to more than a month, proving the efficacy of the scaffolds as a drug delivering matrix. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated from rat bone marrow and then cultured on the CPC-alginate porous scaffolds to investigate the ability to support proliferation of cells and their subsequent differentiation along the osteogenic lineage. It was shown that MSCs increasingly actively populated and also permeated into the porous network with time of culture. In particular, cells cultured within a scaffold with a relatively high porosity level showed favorable proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. An in vivo pilot study of the CPC-alginate porous scaffolds after implantation into the rat calvarium for 6 weeks revealed the formation of new bone tissue within the scaffold, closing the defect almost completely. Based on these results, the newly developed CPC-alginate porous scaffolds could be potentially useful as a 3-D matrix for drug delivery and tissue engineering of bone.

  2. Development and characterization of novel porous 3D alginate-cockle shell powder nanobiocomposite bone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, B Hemabarathy; Abu Bakar, Md Zuki; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Yusof, Loqman Mohamed; Hamid, Muhajir

    2014-01-01

    A novel porous three-dimensional bone scaffold was developed using a natural polymer (alginate/Alg) in combination with a naturally obtained biomineral (nano cockle shell powder/nCP) through lyophilization techniques. The scaffold was developed in varying composition mixture of Alg-nCP and characterized using various evaluation techniques as well as preliminary in vitro studies on MG63 human osteoblast cells. Morphological observations using SEM revealed variations in structures with the use of different Alg-nCP composition ratios. All the developed scaffolds showed a porous structure with pore sizes ideal for facilitating new bone growth; however, not all combination mixtures showed subsequent favorable characteristics to be used for biological applications. Scaffolds produced using the combination mixture of 40% Alg and 60% nCP produced significantly promising results in terms of mechanical strength, degradation rate, and increased cell proliferation rates making it potentially the optimum composition mixture of Alg-nCP with future application prospects.

  3. Maintaining dimensions and mechanical properties of ionically crosslinked alginate hydrogel scaffolds in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Catherine K; Ma, Peter X

    2008-03-15

    Ionically crosslinked alginate hydrogels are attractive scaffolds because of their biocompatibility and mild gelation reaction that allows for gentle cell incorporation. However, the instability of ionically crosslinked hydrogels in an aqueous environment is a challenge that limits their application. This report presents a novel method to control the dimensions and mechanical properties of ionically crosslinked hydrogels via control of the ionic concentration of the medium. Homogeneous calcium-alginate gels were incubated in physiological saline baths adjusted to specific calcium ion concentrations. Swelling and shrinking occurred at low and high ionic concentrations of the medium, respectively, while an "optimal" intermediate calcium ion concentration of the medium was found to maintain original size and shape of the hydrogel. This optimal calcium ion concentration was found to be a function of crosslinking density and polymer concentration of the hydrogel and chemical composition of the alginate. The effects of optimal and high calcium ion concentrations of the medium on swelling behavior, calcium content, dry weight, and mechanical properties of the immersed hydrogels were investigated. It was found that the resulting hydrogel composition and mechanical properties depended on not only the calcium concentration of the medium, but also the crosslinking density and polymer concentration of the gel. In an 8-week experiment, controlled dimensions and mechanical properties of alginate gels in an aqueous environment were demonstrated. This new technique significantly enhances the potential of alginate hydrogels for tissue engineering and other biomedical applications.

  4. Friction of sodium alginate hydrogel scaffold fabricated by 3-D printing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Li, Jian; Xu, Heng; Long, Shijun; Li, Xuefeng

    2017-04-01

    A rapid prototyping technology, formed by three-dimensional (3-D) printing and then crosslinked by spraying Ca(2+) solution, is developed to fabricate a sodium alginate (SA) hydrogel scaffold. The porosity, swelling ratio, and compression modulus of the scaffold are investigated. A friction mechanism is developed by studying the reproducible friction behavior. Our results show that the scaffold can have 3-D structure with a porosity of 52%. The degree of swelling of the SA hydrogel scaffold is 8.5, which is nearly the same as bulk SA hydrogel. SA hydrogel exhibits better compressive resilience than bulk hydrogel despite its lower compressive modulus compared to bulk hydrogel. The SA hydrogel scaffold exhibits a higher frictional force at low sliding velocity (10(-6) to 10(-3) m/s) compared to bulk SA hydrogel, and they are equal at high sliding velocity (10(-2) to 1 m/s). For a small pressure (0.3 kPa), the SA hydrogel scaffold shows good friction reproducibility. In contrast, bulk SA hydrogel shows poor reproducibility with respect to friction behavior. The differences in friction behaviors between the SA hydrogel scaffold and bulk SA hydrogel are related to the structure of the scaffold, which can keep a stable hydrated lubrication layer.

  5. An ice-templated, linearly aligned chitosan-alginate scaffold for neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Francis, Nicola L; Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Riblett, Benjamin W; Zavaliangos, Antonios; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2013-12-01

    Several strategies have been investigated to enhance axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury, however, the resulting growth can be random and disorganized. Bioengineered scaffolds provide a physical substrate for guidance of regenerating axons towards their targets, and can be produced by freeze casting. This technique involves the controlled directional solidification of an aqueous solution or suspension, resulting in a linearly aligned porous structure caused by ice templating. In this study, freeze casting was used to fabricate porous chitosan-alginate (C/A) scaffolds with longitudinally oriented channels. Chick dorsal root ganglia explants adhered to and extended neurites through the scaffold in parallel alignment with the channel direction. Surface adsorption of a polycation and laminin promoted significantly longer neurite growth than the uncoated scaffold (poly-L-ornithine + Laminin = 793.2 ± 187.2 μm; poly-L-lysine + Laminin = 768.7 ± 241.2 μm; uncoated scaffold = 22.52 ± 50.14 μm) (P < 0.001). The elastic modulus of the hydrated scaffold was determined to be 5.08 ± 0.61 kPa, comparable to reported spinal cord values. The present data suggested that this C/A scaffold is a promising candidate for use as a nerve guidance scaffold, because of its ability to support neuronal attachment and the linearly aligned growth of DRG neurites.

  6. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold.

  7. A Biomimetic Silk Fibroin/Sodium Alginate Composite Scaffold for Soft Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiyu; Wang, Xinyu; Shi, Jian; Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Zongrui; Ma, Daiwei; Hou, Yuanjing; Lin, Fei; Yang, Jing; Mizuno, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    A cytocompatible porous scaffold mimicking the properties of extracellular matrices (ECMs) has great potential in promoting cellular attachment and proliferation for tissue regeneration. A biomimetic scaffold was prepared using silk fibroin (SF)/sodium alginate (SA) in which regular and uniform pore morphology can be formed through a facile freeze-dried method. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed the presence of interconnected pores, mostly spread over the entire scaffold with pore diameter around 54~532 μm and porosity 66~94%. With significantly better water stability and high swelling ratios, the blend scaffolds crosslinked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) provided sufficient time for the formation of neo-tissue and ECMs during tissue regeneration. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed random coil structure and silk I conformation were maintained in the blend scaffolds. What’s more, FI-TR spectra demonstrated crosslinking reactions occurred actually among EDC, SF and SA macromolecules, which kept integrity of the scaffolds under physiological environment. The suitable pore structure and improved equilibrium swelling capacity of this scaffold could imitate biochemical cues of natural skin ECMs for guiding spatial organization and proliferation of cells in vitro, indicating its potential candidate material for soft tissue engineering. PMID:27996001

  8. Electrospun chitosan-alginate nanofibers with in situ polyelectrolyte complexation for use as tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sung In; Krebs, Melissa D; Bonino, Christopher A; Samorezov, Julia E; Khan, Saad A; Alsberg, Eben

    2011-01-01

    Electrospun natural biopolymers are of great interest in the field of regenerative medicine due to their unique structure, biocompatibility, and potential to support controlled release of bioactive agents and/or the growth of cells near a site of interest. The ability to electrospin chitosan and alginate to form polyionic complexed nanofibrous scaffolds was investigated. These nanofibers crosslink in situ during the electrospinning process, and thus do not require an additional chemical crosslinking step. Although poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) is required for the electrospinning, it can be subsequently removed from the nanofibers simply by incubating in water for a few days, as confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared. Solutions that allowed uniform nanofiber formation were found to have viscosities in the range of 0.15-0.7 Pa·s and conductivities below 4 mS/cm for chitosan-PEO and below 2.2 mS/cm for alginate-PEO. The resultant nanofibers both before and after PEO extraction were found to be uniform and on the order of 100 nm as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The dynamic rheological properties of the polymer mixtures during gelation indicated that the hydrogel mixtures with low storage moduli provided uniform nanofiber formation without beaded structures. Increased amounts of chitosan in the PEO-extracted chitosan-alginate nanofibers resulted in a lower swelling ratio. Additionally, these nanofibrous scaffolds exhibit increased cell adhesion and proliferation compared to those made of alginate alone, due to the presence of the chitosan, which promotes the adsorption of serum proteins. Thus, these nanofibrous scaffolds formed purely via ionic complexation without toxic crosslinking agents have great potential for guiding cell behavior in tissue regeneration applications.

  9. Biocompatibility of biomimetic multilayered alginate-chitosan/β-TCP scaffold for osteochondral tissue.

    PubMed

    Algul, Derya; Sipahi, Hande; Aydin, Ahmet; Kelleci, Feyza; Ozdatli, Sukran; Yener, Fatma Gulgun

    2015-08-01

    Biomimetic three-layered monolithic scaffold (TLS) intended for treatment of osteochondral defects was fabricated by using freeze drying method. The multilayered material was prepared with chitosan (C) and alginate (A) polyelectrolyte complex (CA/PEC) as a cartilaginous layer, a combination of CA/PEC (60 wt%) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) (40 wt%) as an intermediate layer and a combination of CA/PEC (30 wt%) and β-TCP (70 wt%) as a subchondral layer in order to mimic the inherent gradient structure of healthy osteochondral tissue. Characterization of the scaffolds was performed using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis, swelling and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tests. In vitro cytotoxicity assay with L929 cells and EpiDerm skin irritation test (SIT) using the EpiDerm reconstructed human epidermal (RHE) model were performed to analyze biocompatibility of the scaffolds. Characterization results showed that there were strong ionic interactions among chitosan, alginate and β-TCP and the layers showed interconnected porous structure with different swelling ratios. The relative cell viability and SIT results were greater than 70% indicating that the scaffolds are considered nontoxic according to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard. All results taken together, biomimetic TLS can be considered to be suitable for osteochondral applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. In Situ Gelation for Cell Immobilization and Culture in Alginate Foam Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Markussen, Christine; Dornish, Michael; Heier-Baardson, Helene; Melvik, Jan Egil; Alsberg, Eben; Christensen, Bjørn E.

    2014-01-01

    Essential cellular functions are often lost under culture in traditional two-dimensional (2D) systems. Therefore, biologically more realistic three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems are needed that provide mechanical and biochemical cues which may otherwise be unavailable in 2D. For the present study, an alginate-based hydrogel system was used in which cells in an alginate solution were seeded onto dried alginate foams. A uniform distribution of NIH:3T3 and NHIK 3025 cells entrapped within the foam was achieved by in situ gelation induced by calcium ions integrated in the foam. The seeding efficiency of the cells was about 100% for cells added in a seeding solution containing 0.1–1.0% alginate compared with 18% when seeded without alginate. The NHIK 3025 cells were allowed to proliferate and form multi-cellular structures inside the transparent gel that were later vital stained and evaluated by confocal microcopy. Gels were de-gelled at different time points to isolate the multi-cellular structures and to determine the spheroid growth rate. It was also demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the gel could largely be varied through selection of type and concentration of the applied alginate and by immersing the already gelled disks in solutions providing additional gel-forming ions. Cells can efficiently be incorporated into the gel, and single cells and multi-cellular structures that may be formed inside can be retrieved without influencing cell viability or contaminating the sample with enzymes. The data show that the current system may overcome some limitations of current 3D scaffolds such as cell retrieval and in situ cell staining and imaging. PMID:24125496

  11. In situ gelation for cell immobilization and culture in alginate foam scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Therese; Markussen, Christine; Dornish, Michael; Heier-Baardson, Helene; Melvik, Jan Egil; Alsberg, Eben; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2014-02-01

    Essential cellular functions are often lost under culture in traditional two-dimensional (2D) systems. Therefore, biologically more realistic three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems are needed that provide mechanical and biochemical cues which may otherwise be unavailable in 2D. For the present study, an alginate-based hydrogel system was used in which cells in an alginate solution were seeded onto dried alginate foams. A uniform distribution of NIH:3T3 and NHIK 3025 cells entrapped within the foam was achieved by in situ gelation induced by calcium ions integrated in the foam. The seeding efficiency of the cells was about 100% for cells added in a seeding solution containing 0.1-1.0% alginate compared with 18% when seeded without alginate. The NHIK 3025 cells were allowed to proliferate and form multi-cellular structures inside the transparent gel that were later vital stained and evaluated by confocal microscopy. Gels were de-gelled at different time points to isolate the multi-cellular structures and to determine the spheroid growth rate. It was also demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the gel could largely be varied through selection of type and concentration of the applied alginate and by immersing the already gelled disks in solutions providing additional gel-forming ions. Cells can efficiently be incorporated into the gel, and single cells and multi-cellular structures that may be formed inside can be retrieved without influencing cell viability or contaminating the sample with enzymes. The data show that the current system may overcome some limitations of current 3D scaffolds such as cell retrieval and in situ cell staining and imaging.

  12. Proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells on alginate-gelatine-hydroxyapatite scaffolds with anisotropic pore structure.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, A; Despang, F; Lode, A; Demmler, A; Hanke, T; Gelinsky, M

    2009-01-01

    Porous mineralized scaffolds are required for various applications in bone engineering. In particular, tube-like pores with controlled orientation inside the scaffold may support homogeneous cell seeding as well as sufficient nutrient supply and may facilitate blood vessel ingrowth. Scaffolds with parallely orientated tube-like pores were generated by diffusion-controlled ionotropic gelation of alginate. Incorporation of hydroxyapatite (HA) during the gelation process yielded stable scaffolds with an average pore diameter of approximately 90 microm. To evaluate the potential use of alginate-gelatine-HA scaffolds for bone tissue engineering, in vitro tests with human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) were carried out. We analysed biocompatibility and cell penetration into the capillary pores by microscopic methods. hBMSCs were also cultivated on alginate-gelatine-HA scaffolds for 3 weeks in the presence and absence of osteogenic supplements. We studied proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in terms of total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, DNA content and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and found a 10-14-fold increase of cell number after 2 weeks of cultivation, as well as an increase of specific ALP activity for osteogenic-induced hBMSCs. Furthermore, the expression of bone-related genes [ALP, bone sialoprotein II (BSPII)] was analysed. We found an increase of ALP as well as BSPII expression for osteogenic-induced hBMSCs on alginate-gelatin-HA scaffolds. 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  13. Composite ECM-alginate microfibers produced by microfluidics as scaffolds with biomineralization potential.

    PubMed

    Angelozzi, Marco; Miotto, Martina; Penolazzi, Letizia; Mazzitelli, Stefania; Keane, Timothy; Badylak, Stephen F; Piva, Roberta; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    A novel approach to produce artificial bone composites (microfibers) with distinctive features mimicking natural tissue was investigated. Currently proposed inorganic materials (e.g. apatite matrixes) lack self-assembly and thereby limit interactions between cells and the material. The present work investigates the feasibility of creating "bio-inspired materials" specifically designed to overcome certain limitations inherent to current biomaterials. We examined the dimensions, morphology, and constitutive features of a composite hydrogel which combined an alginate based microfiber with a gelatin solution or a particulate form of urinary bladder matrix (UBM). The effectiveness of the composite microfibers to induce and modulate osteoblastic differentiation in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds without altering the viability and morphological characteristics of the cells was investigated. The present study describes a novel alginate microfiber production method with the use of microfluidics. The microfluidic procedure allowed for precise tuning of microfibers which resulted in enhanced viability and function of embedded cells.

  14. In vitro assessment of a collagen/alginate composite scaffold for regenerative endodontics.

    PubMed

    Devillard, R; Rémy, M; Kalisky, J; Bourget, J-M; Kérourédan, O; Siadous, R; Bareille, R; Amédée-Vilamitjana, J; Chassande, O; Fricain, J-C

    2017-01-01

    To develop a biological scaffold that could be moulded to reproduce the geometry of a gutta-percha point with precision and allow the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts to be used as a regenerative endodontic material. A collagen/alginate composite scaffold was cast into a sodium alginate mould to produce a gutta-percha point-like cone. Prior to gelation, the cone was seeded with human stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) to evaluate cell/scaffold interactions. The reconstructed tissue was characterized after 8 days in culture. Elastic modulus, tissue compaction and cell differentiation were assessed. Student t-tests and the Mann-Whitney U test were performed. The fabrication method developed enabled the shape of a gutta-percha point to be mimicked with great accuracy and reproducibility (P = 0.31). Stem cells seeded into this composite scaffold were able to spread, survive and proliferate (P < 0.001). Moreover, they were able to differentiate into osteoblasts and produce calcified osseous extracellular matrix (P < 0.001). The construct showed no significant contraction after 8 days, preserving its shape and tip diameter (P = 0.58). The composite scaffold could present substantial benefits compared to synthetic materials. It could provide a favourable healing environment in the root canal conducive for regenerative endodontics and is therefore appropriate to be evaluated in vivo in further studies. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Enhancing cell migration in shape-memory alginate-collagen composite scaffolds: In vitro and ex vivo assessment for intervertebral disc repair.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Olivier; Naqvi, Syeda Masooma; Lennon, Kerri; Buckley, Conor Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Lower lumbar disc disorders pose a significant problem in an aging society with substantial socioeconomic consequences. Both inner tissue (nucleus pulposus) and outer tissue (annulus fibrosus) of the intervertebral disc are affected by such debilitating disorders and can lead to disc herniation and lower back pain. In this study, we developed an alginate-collagen composite porous scaffold with shape-memory properties to fill defects occurring in annulus fibrosus tissue of degenerated intervertebral discs, which has the potential to be administered using minimal invasive surgery. In the first part of this work, we assessed how collagen incorporation on preformed alginate scaffolds influences the physical properties of the final composite scaffold. We also evaluated the ability of annulus fibrosus cells to attach, migrate, and proliferate on the composite alginate-collagen scaffolds compared to control scaffolds (alginate only). In vitro experiments, performed in intervertebral disc-like microenvironmental conditions (low glucose and low oxygen concentrations), revealed that for alginate only scaffolds, annulus fibrosus cells agglomerated in clusters with limited infiltration and migration capacity. In comparison, for alginate-collagen scaffolds, annulus fibrosus cells readily attached and colonized constructs, while preserving their typical fibroblastic-like cell morphology with spreading behavior and intense cytoskeleton expression. In a second part of this study, we investigated the effects of alginate-collagen scaffold when seeded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. In vitro, we observed that alginate-collagen porous scaffolds supported cell proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition (collagen type I), with secretion amplified by the local release of transforming growth factor-β3. In addition, when cultured in ex vivo organ defect model, alginate-collagen scaffolds maintained viability of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells for up to 5

  16. Design and Fabrication of a Biodegradable, Covalently Crosslinked Shape-Memory Alginate Scaffold for Cell and Growth Factor Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Shansky, Janet; Borselli, Cristina; Mooney, David

    2012-01-01

    The successful use of transplanted cells and/or growth factors for tissue repair is limited by a significant cell loss and/or rapid growth factor diffusion soon after implantation. Highly porous alginate scaffolds formed with covalent crosslinking have been used to improve cell survival and growth factor release kinetics, but require open-wound surgical procedures for insertion and have not previously been designed to readily degrade in vivo. In this study, a biodegradable, partially crosslinked alginate scaffold with shape-memory properties was fabricated for minimally invasive surgical applications. A mixture of high and low molecular weight partially oxidized alginate modified with RGD peptides was covalently crosslinked using carbodiimide chemistry. The scaffold was compressible 11-fold and returned to its original shape when rehydrated. Scaffold degradation properties in vitro indicated ∼85% mass loss by 28 days. The greater than 90% porous scaffolds released the recombinant growth factor insulin-like growth factor-1 over several days in vitro and allowed skeletal muscle cell survival, proliferation, and migration from the scaffold over a 28-day period. The compressible scaffold thus has the potential to be delivered by a minimally invasive technique, and when rehydrated in vivo with cells and/or growth factors, could serve as a temporary delivery vehicle for tissue repair. PMID:22646518

  17. Gelatin nanofiber-reinforced alginate gel scaffolds for corneal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tonsomboon, K; Strange, D G T; Oyen, M L

    2013-01-01

    A severe shortage of donor cornea is now an international crisis in public health. Substitutes for donor tissue need to be developed to meet the increasing demand for corneal transplantation. Current attempts in designing scaffolds for corneal tissue regeneration involve utilization of expensive materials. Yet, these corneal scaffolds still lack the highly-organized fibrous structure that functions as a load-bearing component in the native tissue. This work shows that transparent nanofiber-reinforced hydrogels could be developed from cheap, non-immunogenic and readily available natural polymers to mimic the cornea's microstructure. Electrospinning was employed to produce gelatin nanofibers, which were then infiltrated with alginate hydrogels. Introducing electrospun nanofibers into hydrogels improved their mechanical properties by nearly one order of magnitude, yielding mechanically robust composites. Such nanofiber-reinforced hydrogels could serve as alternatives to donor tissue for corneal transplantation.

  18. Determination and comparison of specifics of nucleus pulposus cells of human intervertebral disc in alginate and chitosan–gelatin scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Renani, Hamid Bahramian; Ghorbani, Masood; Beni, Batool Hashemibeni; Karimi, Z; Mirhosseini, MM; Zarkesh, H; Kabiri, A

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Low back pain is a major economical and social problem nowadays. Intervertebral disc herniation and central degeneration of disc are two major reasons of low back pain that occur because of structural impairment of disc. The intervertebral disc contains three parts as follows : Annulus fibrosus, transitional region, and nucleus pulposus, which forms the central nucleus of the disc. The reduction of cell count and extracellular matrix, especially in nucleus pulposus, causes disc degeneration. Different scaffolds (natural and synthetic) have been used for tissue repairing and regeneration of the intervertebral disc in tissue engineering. Most scaffolds have biodegradable and biocompatible characteristics and also prepare a fine condition for proliferation and migration of cells. In this study, proliferation of NP cells of human intervertebral disc compromised in Chitosan-gelatin scaffold with alginate scaffold was studied. Materials and Methods: NP cells derived from nucleus pulposus by collagenase enzymatic hydrolysis. They were derived from patients who undergoing open surgery for discectomy in the Isfahan Alzahra hospital. Chitosan was blended with gelatin and glutaraldehyde was used for cross linking the two polymers. Then, alginate scaffold was prepared. Cellular suspension with 1 × 105 transferred to each scaffold and cultured for 21 days. Cell viability and proliferation investigated by trypan blue and (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to assert the porosity and to survey structure of scaffold. Results: MTT assay dem1onstrated that cell viability of third day had significant difference in contrast by first day in both scaffolds. Accordingly, there was a significant decreased in cellular viability from day 3 to 21. Results of the cell count showed a punctual elevation cell numbers for alginate scaffold but there was no similar result for chitosan

  19. Dispensing of very low volumes of ultra high viscosity alginate gels: a new tool for encapsulation of adherent cells and rapid prototyping of scaffolds and implants.

    PubMed

    Gepp, Michael M; Ehrhart, Friederike; Shirley, Stephen G; Howitz, Steffen; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2009-01-01

    We present a tool for dispensing very low volumes (20 nL or more) of ultra high viscosity (UHV) medical-grade alginate hydrogels. It uses a modified piezo-driven micrometering valve, integrated into a versatile system that allows fast prototyping of encapsulation procedures and scaffold production. Valves show excellent dispensing properties for UHV alginate in concentrations of 0.4% and 0.7% and also for aqueous liquids. An optimized process flow provides excellent handling of biological samples under sterile conditions. This technique allows the encapsulation of adherent cells and structuring of substrates for biotechnology and regenerative medicine. A variety of cell lines showed at least 70% viability after encapsulation (including cell lines that are relevant in regenerative medicine like Hep G2), and time-lapse analysis revealed cells proliferating and showing limited motility under alginate spots. Cells show metabolic activity, gene product expression, and physiological function. Encapsulated cells have contact with the substrate and can exchange metabolites while being isolated from macromolecules in the environment. Contactless dispensing allows structuring of substrates with alginate, isolation and transfer of cell-alginate complexes, and the dispensing of biological active hydrogels like extracellular matrix-derived gels.

  20. Delivery of Alginate Scaffold Releasing Two Trophic Factors for Spinal Cord Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Grulova, I.; Slovinska, L.; Blaško, J.; Devaux, S.; Wisztorski, M.; Salzet, M.; Fournier, I.; Kryukov, O.; Cohen, S.; Cizkova, D.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has been implicated in neural cell loss and consequently functional motor and sensory impairment. In this study, we propose an alginate -based neurobridge enriched with/without trophic growth factors (GFs) that can be utilized as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. The bioavailability of key GFs, such as Epidermal Growth factor (EGF) and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) released from injected alginate biomaterial to the central lesion site significantly enhanced the sparing of spinal cord tissue and increased the number of surviving neurons (choline acetyltransferase positive motoneurons) and sensory fibres. In addition, we document enhanced outgrowth of corticospinal tract axons and presence of blood vessels at the central lesion. Tissue proteomics was performed at 3, 7 and 10 days after SCI in rats indicated the presence of anti-inflammatory factors in segments above the central lesion site, whereas in segments below, neurite outgrowth factors, inflammatory cytokines and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of the lectican protein family were overexpressed. Collectively, based on our data, we confirm that functional recovery was significantly improved in SCI groups receiving alginate scaffold with affinity-bound growth factors (ALG +GFs), compared to SCI animals without biomaterial treatment. PMID:26348665

  1. Human dental pulp cell culture and cell transplantation with an alginate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kumabe, Shunji; Nakatsuka, Michiko; Kim, Gi-Seup; Jue, Seong-Suk; Aikawa, Fumiko; Shin, Je-Won; Iwai, Yasutomo

    2006-02-01

    Many studies on tissue stem cells have been conducted in the field of regenerative medicine, and some studies have indicated that cultured dental pulp mesenchymal cells secrete dentin matrix. In the present study we used alginate as a scaffold to transplant subcultured human dental pulp cells subcutaneously into the backs of nude mice. We found that when beta-glycerophosphate was added to the culture medium, dentin sialophosphoprotein mRNA coding dentin sialoprotein (DSP) was expressed. An increase in alkaline phosphatase, which is an early marker for odontoblast differentiation, was also demonstrated. At 6 weeks after implantation the subcutaneous formation of radio-opaque calcified bodies was observed in situ. Immunohistochemical and fine structure studies identified expression of type I collagen, type III collagen, and DSP in the mineralizing transplants. Isolated odontoblast-like cells initiated dentin-like hard tissue formation and scattered autolyzing apoptotic cells were also observed in the transplants. The study showed that subcultured dental pulp cells actively differentiate into odontoblast-like cells and induce calcification in an alginate scaffold.

  2. Isolated rat dental pulp cell culture and transplantation with an alginate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shiro; Kumabe, Shunji; Iwai, Yasutomo

    2006-05-01

    Many studies have been conducted on tissue stem cells in the field of regenerative medicine, and cultured dental pulp mesenchymal cells have been reported to secrete dentin matrix. In the present study we used alginate as a scaffold to transplant subcultured rat dental-pulp-derived cells subcutaneously into the back of nude mice. We found that when beta-glycerophosphate was added to the culture medium, the mRNA of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene coding dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) was expressed, and an increase in alkaline phosphatase, an early marker of odontoblast differentiation, was also demonstrated. Six weeks after implantation, subcutaneous formation of radiopaque calcified bodies was observed in situ. Immunohistochemical and fine structure studies identified expression of type I collagen, type III collagen, and DSP in the mineralizing transplants, and isolated odontoblast-like cells began to form dentin-like hard tissue formation. Scattered autolyzing apoptotic cells were also observed in the transplants. The study showed that subcultured rat dental-pulp-derived cells actively differentiate into odontoblast-like cells and induce calcification in an alginate scaffold.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of novel nano-biocomposite scaffold of chitosan-gelatin-alginate-hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Chhavi; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Potdar, Pravin D; Chou, Chia-Fu; Mishra, Narayan Chandra

    2016-07-01

    A novel nano-biocomposite scaffold was fabricated in bead form by applying simple foaming method, using a combination of natural polymers-chitosan, gelatin, alginate and a bioceramic-nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp). This approach of combining nHAp with natural polymers to fabricate the composite scaffold, can provide good mechanical strength and biological property mimicking natural bone. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) images of the nano-biocomposite scaffold revealed the presence of interconnected pores, mostly spread over the whole surface of the scaffold. The nHAp particulates have covered the surface of the composite matrix and made the surface of the scaffold rougher. The scaffold has a porosity of 82% with a mean pore size of 112±19.0μm. Swelling and degradation studies of the scaffold showed that the scaffold possesses excellent properties of hydrophilicity and biodegradability. Short term mechanical testing of the scaffold does not reveal any rupturing after agitation under physiological conditions, which is an indicative of good mechanical stability of the scaffold. In vitro cell culture studies by seeding osteoblast cells over the composite scaffold showed good cell viability, proliferation rate, adhesion and maintenance of osteoblastic phenotype as indicated by MTT assay, ESEM of cell-scaffold construct, histological staining and gene expression studies, respectively. Thus, it could be stated that the nano-biocomposite scaffold of chitosan-gelatin-alginate-nHAp has the paramount importance for applications in bone tissue-engineering in future regenerative therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-dimensional plotted hydroxyapatite scaffolds with predefined architecture: comparison of stabilization by alginate cross-linking versus sintering.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Alok; Akkineni, Ashwini R; Basu, Bikramjit; Gelinsky, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Scaffolds for bone tissue engineering are essentially characterized by porous three-dimensional structures with interconnected pores to facilitate the exchange of nutrients and removal of waste products from cells, thereby promoting cell proliferation in such engineered scaffolds. Although hydroxyapatite is widely being considered for bone tissue engineering applications due to its occurrence in the natural extracellular matrix of this tissue, limited reports are available on additive manufacturing of hydroxyapatite-based materials. In this perspective, hydroxyapatite-based three-dimensional porous scaffolds with two different binders (maltodextrin and sodium alginate) were fabricated using the extrusion method of three-dimensional plotting and the results were compared in reference to the structural properties of scaffolds processed via chemical stabilization and sintering routes, respectively. With the optimal processing conditions regarding to pH and viscosity of binder-loaded hydroxyapatite pastes, scaffolds with parallelepiped porous architecture having up to 74% porosity were fabricated. Interestingly, sintering of the as-plotted hydroxyapatite-sodium alginate (cross-linked with CaCl2 solution) scaffolds led to the formation of chlorapatite (Ca9.54P5.98O23.8Cl1.60(OH)2.74). Both the sintered scaffolds displayed progressive deformation and delayed fracture under compressive loading, with hydroxyapatite-alginate scaffolds exhibiting a higher compressive strength (9.5 ± 0.5 MPa) than hydroxyapatite-maltodextrin scaffolds (7.0 ± 0.6 MPa). The difference in properties is explained in terms of the phase assemblage and microstructure.

  5. Strategies for neurotrophin-3 and chondroitinase ABC release from freeze-cast chitosan-alginate nerve-guidance scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Francis, Nicola L; Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2017-01-01

    Freeze casting, or controlled unidirectional solidification, can be used to fabricate chitosan-alginate (C-A) scaffolds with highly aligned porosity that are suitable for use as nerve-guidance channels. To augment the guidance of growth across a spinal cord injury lesion, these scaffolds are now evaluated in vitro to assess their ability to release neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and chondroitinase ABC (chABC) in a controlled manner. Protein-loaded microcapsules were incorporated into C-A scaffolds prior to freeze casting without affecting the original scaffold architecture. In vitro protein release was not significantly different when comparing protein loaded directly into the scaffolds with release from scaffolds containing incorporated microcapsules. NT-3 was released from the C-A scaffolds for 8 weeks in vitro, while chABC was released for up to 7 weeks. Low total percentages of protein released from the scaffolds over this time period were attributed to limitation of diffusion by the interpenetrating polymer network matrix of the scaffold walls. NT-3 and chABC released from the scaffolds retained bioactivity, as determined by a neurite outgrowth assay, and the promotion of neurite growth across an inhibitory barrier of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. This demonstrates the potential of these multifunctional scaffolds for enhancing axonal regeneration through growth-inhibiting glial scars via the sustained release of chABC and NT-3. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Structural modification and characterization of bacterial cellulose-alginate composite scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kirdponpattara, Suchata; Khamkeaw, Arnon; Sanchavanakit, Neeracha; Pavasant, Prasit; Phisalaphong, Muenduen

    2015-11-05

    A novel bacterial cellulose-alginate composite scaffold (N-BCA) was fabricated by freeze drying and subsequent crosslinking with Ca(2+). The N-BCA then underwent a second freeze drying step to remove water without altering the physical structure. A stable structure of N-BCA with open and highly interconnected pores in the range of 90-160 μm was constructed. The N-BCA was stable in both water and PBS. The swelling ability of N-BCA in water was approximately 50 times its weight, which was about 6.5 times that of the freeze dried bacterial cellulose pellicles. N-BCA demonstrated no cytotoxicity against L929 mouse fibroblast cells. For long-term culture, N-BCA supported attachment, spreading, and proliferation of human gingival fibroblast (GF) on the surface. However, under static conditions, the cell migration and growth inside the scaffold were limited. Because of its biocompatibility and open macroporous structure, N-BCA could potentially be used as a scaffold for tissue engineering.

  7. Development of a new carbon nanotube-alginate-hydroxyapatite tricomponent composite scaffold for application in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Rajendiran; Ravichandran, Y Dominic

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, tricomponent scaffolds prepared from naturally occurring polysaccharides, hydroxyapatite, and reinforcing materials have been gaining increased attention in the field of bone tissue engineering. In the current work, a tricomponent scaffold with an oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotube (fMWCNT)-alginate-hydroxyapatite with the required porosity was prepared for the first time by a freeze-drying method and characterized using analytical techniques. The hydroxyapatite for the scaffold was isolated from chicken bones by thermal calcination at 800°C. The Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray diffraction data confirmed ionic interactions and formation of the fMWCNT-alginate-hydroxyapatite scaffold. Interconnected porosity with a pore size of 130-170 µm was evident from field emission scanning electron microscopy. The total porosity calculated using the liquid displacement method was found to be 93.85%. In vitro biocompatibility and cell proliferation on the scaffold was checked using an MG-63 cell line by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and cell attachment by Hoechst stain assay. In vitro studies showed better cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cell attachment on the prepared scaffold. These results indicate that this scaffold could be a promising candidate for bone tissue engineering.

  8. Alginate hydrogel enriched with enamel matrix derivative to target osteogenic cell differentiation in TiO2 scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Pullisaar, Helen; Verket, Anders; Szoke, Krisztina; Tiainen, Hanna; Haugen, Håvard J; Brinchmann, Jan E; Reseland, Janne E; Østrup, Esben

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of bone tissue engineering is to employ scaffolds, cells, and growth factors to facilitate healing of bone defects. The aim of this study was to assess the viability and osteogenic differentiation of primary human osteoblasts and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells from various donors on titanium dioxide (TiO2) scaffolds coated with an alginate hydrogel enriched with enamel matrix derivative. Cells were harvested for quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on days 14 and 21, and medium was collected on days 2, 14, and 21 for protein analyses. Neither coating with alginate hydrogel nor alginate hydrogel enriched with enamel matrix derivative induced a cytotoxic response. Enamel matrix derivative-enriched alginate hydrogel significantly increased the expression of osteoblast markers COL1A1, TNFRSF11B, and BGLAP and secretion of osteopontin in human osteoblasts, whereas osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells seemed unaffected by enamel matrix derivative. The alginate hydrogel coating procedure may have potential for local delivery of enamel matrix derivative and other stimulatory factors for use in bone tissue engineering.

  9. Alginate hydrogel enriched with enamel matrix derivative to target osteogenic cell differentiation in TiO2 scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Pullisaar, Helen; Verket, Anders; Szoke, Krisztina; Tiainen, Hanna; Haugen, Håvard J; Brinchmann, Jan E; Reseland, Janne E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of bone tissue engineering is to employ scaffolds, cells, and growth factors to facilitate healing of bone defects. The aim of this study was to assess the viability and osteogenic differentiation of primary human osteoblasts and adipose tissue–derived mesenchymal stem cells from various donors on titanium dioxide (TiO2) scaffolds coated with an alginate hydrogel enriched with enamel matrix derivative. Cells were harvested for quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on days 14 and 21, and medium was collected on days 2, 14, and 21 for protein analyses. Neither coating with alginate hydrogel nor alginate hydrogel enriched with enamel matrix derivative induced a cytotoxic response. Enamel matrix derivative–enriched alginate hydrogel significantly increased the expression of osteoblast markers COL1A1, TNFRSF11B, and BGLAP and secretion of osteopontin in human osteoblasts, whereas osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue–derived mesenchymal stem cells seemed unaffected by enamel matrix derivative. The alginate hydrogel coating procedure may have potential for local delivery of enamel matrix derivative and other stimulatory factors for use in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26090086

  10. Manufacture of β-TCP/alginate scaffolds through a Fab@home model for application in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Diogo, G S; Gaspar, V M; Serra, I R; Fradique, R; Correia, I J

    2014-06-01

    The growing need to treat bone-related diseases in an elderly population compels the development of novel bone substitutes to improve patient quality of life. In this context, the advent of affordable and effective rapid prototyping equipment, such as the Fab@home plotter, has contributed to the development of novel scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this study, we report for the first time the use of a Fab@home plotter for the production of 3D scaffolds composed by beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP)/alginate hybrid materials. β-TCP/alginate mixtures were used in a proportion of 50/50% (w/w), 30/70% (w/w) and 20/80% (w/w). The printing parameters were optimized to a nozzle diameter of 20 Gauge for the production of rigid scaffolds with pre-defined architectures. We observed that, despite using similar printing parameters, both the precision and resolution of the scaffolds were significantly affected by the blend's viscosity. In particular, we demonstrate that the higher viscosity of 50/50 scaffolds (150.0 ± 3.91 mPa s) provides a higher precision in the extrusion process. The physicochemical and biological characterization of the samples demonstrated that the 50/50 scaffolds possessed a resistance to compression comparable to that of native trabecular bone. Moreover, this particular formulation also exhibited a Young's modulus that was higher than that of trabecular bone. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed that osteoblasts were able to adhere, proliferate and also penetrate into the scaffold's architecture. Altogether, our findings suggest that the Fab@home printer can be employed in the manufacture of reproducible scaffolds, using a formulation 50/50 alginate-β-TCP that has suitable properties to be applied as bone substitutes in the future.

  11. Comparing different methods to fix and to dehydrate cells on alginate hydrogel scaffolds using scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Santana, Bianca Palma; Nedel, Fernanda; Perelló Ferrúa, Camila; Marques e Silva, Ricardo; da Silva, Adriana Fernandes; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Lenin Villarreal Carreño, Neftali

    2015-07-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is commonly used in the analysis of scaffolds morphology, as well as cell attachment, morphology and spreading on to the scaffolds. However, so far a specific methodology to prepare the alginate hydrogel (AH) scaffolds for SEM analysis has not been evaluated. This study compared different methods to fix/dehydrate cells in AH scaffolds for SEM analysis. AH scaffolds were prepared and seeded with NIH/3T3 cell line; fixed with glutaraldehyde, osmium tetroxide, or the freeze drying method and analyzed by SEM. Results demonstrated that the freeze dried method interferes less with cell morphology and density, and preserves the scaffolds structure. The fixation with glutaraldehyde did not affect cells morphology and density; however, the scaffolds morphology was affected in some level. The fixation with osmium tetroxide interfered in the natural structure of cells and scaffold. In conclusion the freeze drying and glutaraldehyde are suitable methods for cell fixation in AH scaffold for SEM, although scaffolds structure seems to be affected by glutaraldehyde.

  12. [Gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds prepared by 3D bioprinting promotes cell adhesion and proliferation of human dental pulp cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Yue; Ma, Dan-Dan; Wu, Bu-Ling

    2017-05-20

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds prepared by 3D bioprinting in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) and compare the cell adhesion and proliferation of the cells seeded in the biomaterial using two different methods. HDPCs isolated by tissue block culture and enzyme digestion were cultured and passaged. Gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds were printed using a bioplotter, and the cytotoxicity of the aqueous extracts of the scaffold material was tested in the third passage of HDPCs using cell counting kit-8. Scanning electron microscopy and trypan blue were used to assess the adhesion and proliferation of the cells seeded in the scaffold material at a low or high concentration. The aqueous extract of the scaffolds at different concentrations showed no obvious cytotoxicity and promoted the proliferation of HDPCs. The scaffolds had a good biocompatibility and HDPCs seeded in the scaffold showed good cell growth. Cell seeding at a high concentration in the scaffold better promoted the adhesion of HDPCs and resulted in a greater cell number on the scaffold surface compared with low-concentration cell seeding after a 5-day culture (P<0.05). Gelatin<alginate hydrogel scaffolds prepared by 3D bioprinting has a good biocompatibility and promotes the proliferation of HDPCs, and can be used as a scaffold material for tooth regeneration. Cell seeding at a high concentration can better promote cell adhesion to the scaffold material.

  13. Development of a novel alginate-polyvinyl alcohol-hydroxyapatite hydrogel for 3D bioprinting bone tissue engineered scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, Stephanie T; Quinnell, Sean P; Wei, Mei

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional printed biomaterials used as personalized tissue substitutes have the ability to promote and enhance regeneration in areas of defected tissue. The challenge with 3D printing for bone tissue engineering remains the selection of a material with optimal rheological properties for printing in addition to biocompatibility and capacity for uniform cell incorporation. Hydrogel biomaterials may provide sufficient printability to allow cell encapsulation and bioprinting of scaffolds with uniform cell distribution. In this study, a novel alginate-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-hydroxyapatite (HA) hydrogel formulation with optimal rheological properties for 3D bioprinting of mouse calvaria 3T3-E1 (MC3T3) cells into scaffolds of high shape fidelity has been developed. A systematic investigation was conducted to determine the effect of varying concentrations of alginate, phosphate, calcium, and the PVA-HA suspension in the formulation on the resulting viscosity and thus printability of the hydrogel. HA, the main mineral component in natural bone, was incorporated into the hydrogel formulation to create a favorable bone-forming environment due to its excellent osteoconductivity. Degradation studies in α-MEM cell culture media showed that the 3D printed alginate-PVA-HA scaffolds remained in-tact for 14 days. MC3T3 cells were well distributed and encapsulated throughout the optimal hydrogel formulation and expressed high viability through the completion of the 3D printing process. Thus, the development of this novel, osteoconductive, biodegradable, alginate-PVA-HA formulation and its ability to 3D bioprint tissue engineered scaffolds make it a promising candidate for treating personalized bone defects. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1457-1468, 2017.

  14. Chondrocytes culture in three-dimensional porous alginate scaffolds enhanced cell proliferation, matrix synthesis and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Yen, Chi-Nan; Hu, Yu-Chen; Wu, Yung-Chih; Liao, Chun-Jen; Chu, I-Ming

    2009-01-01

    For the limited availability of autologous chondrocytes, a cultured system for expansion in vitro until sufficient cells are obtained must be developed. These cells must maintain their chondrocyte phenotype in vitro as well as in vivo, following implantation to ensure that differentiated chondrocytes synthesize a normal hyaline cartilage matrix and not a fibro-cartilage matrix. This study uses porous three-dimensional (3-D) alginate scaffolds within a perfusion system to culture low-density (5 x 10(5) cells) primary porcine chondrocytes for 1-4 weeks to study their proliferation and differentiation. The results of RT-PCR reveal that most cells could maintain their differentiation state for up to 4 weeks of culturing. Chondrocytes proliferated to 3 x 10(7) cells after 4 weeks in culture. Alginate scaffolds induced the formation of chondrocyte clusters and stimulated the synthesis of matrix, which effects were evaluated using histology and electron microscopy. These findings demonstrate that culturing chondrocytes in alginate scaffolds may effectively prevent the dedifferentiation and improve autologous chondrocyte transplantation. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Self-crosslinked oxidized alginate/gelatin hydrogel as injectable, adhesive biomimetic scaffolds for cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Biji; Joshi, Nitin; Jayakrishnan, Athipettah; Banerjee, Rinti

    2014-08-01

    Biopolymeric hydrogels that mimic the properties of extracellular matrix have great potential in promoting cellular migration and proliferation for tissue regeneration. The authors reported earlier that rapidly gelling, biodegradable, injectable hydrogels can be prepared by self-crosslinking of periodate oxidized alginate and gelatin in the presence of borax, without using any toxic crosslinking agents. The present paper investigates the suitability of this hydrogel as a minimally invasive injectable, cell-attractive and adhesive scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering for the treatment of osteoarthritis. Time and frequency sweep rheology analysis confirmed gel formation within 20s. The hydrogel integrated well with the cartilage tissue, with a burst pressure of 70±3mmHg, indicating its adhesive nature. Hydrogel induced negligible inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, a prerequisite for the management and treatment of osteoarthritis. Scanning electron microscopy images of primary murine chondrocytes encapsulated within the matrix revealed attachment of cells onto the hydrogel matrix. Chondrocytes demonstrated viability, proliferation and migration within the matrix, while maintaining their phenotype, as seen by expression of collagen type II and aggrecan, and functionality, as seen by enhanced glycosoaminoglycan (GAG) deposition with time. DNA content and GAG deposition of chondrocytes within the matrix can be tuned by incorporation of bioactive signaling molecules such as dexamethasone, chondroitin sulphate, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and combination of these three agents. The results suggest that self-crosslinked oxidized alginate/gelatin hydrogel may be a promising injectable, cell-attracting adhesive matrix for neo-cartilage formation in the management and treatment of osteoarthritis.

  16. [Effects of alginate/collagen scaffold on cell proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Cheng, W; Han, X P; Mou, S L; Yang, F; Liu, L P

    2017-04-09

    Objective: To build scaffold materials with different concentrations of alginate and collagen, and to observe the effects of alginate/collagen ratio on the proliferation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSC) and osteogenic differentiation. The optimal concentration of alginate/collagen will be chosen for constructing hydrogel that will be used for bone tissue engineering. Methods: Soluble hydrogel scaffold materials containing alginate/collagen were prepared, and the following groups were established based on different alginate/collagen ratio: 4∶1 (group A), 2∶1 (group B), and 1∶1 (group C). Cell proliferation on the material surface was observed using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, while cell viability in each material group were observed using live/dead staining. Quantitative real-time PCR(qPCR) was used to measure the differential expression of osteogenesis-related genes on and in the materials. Immunofluorescence staining was used to measure the differential gene expression of osteogenesis-related proteins in each group. Results: The results from the CCK-8 assay showed increasing cell proliferation rate on the lyophilized hydrogel material surface as the collagen concentration increased, and the highest cell proliferation was observed in group C. Live/dead staining assay indicated that cells were able to proliferate in all three types of hydrogel materials, and the highest cell viability was found in material from group B ([87.50±2.65]%). qPCR showed that the expression of osteogenesis-related genes in group C was the highest, among the three groups, while the expression of osteocalcin in group B was significantly higher than those in the other two groups (P<0.05). Immunofluorescence staining was carried out for osteocalcin on and in the hydrogel material and the results were consistent with that of qPCR. Conclusions: The alginate/collagen scaffold materials did not show adverse effects on the cell proliferation of hAMSC and

  17. The promotion of in vitro vessel-like organization of endothelial cells in magnetically responsive alginate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sapir, Yulia; Cohen, Smadar; Friedman, Gary; Polyak, Boris

    2012-06-01

    One of the major challenges in engineering thick, complex tissues such as cardiac muscle, is the need to pre-vascularize the engineered tissue in vitro to enable its efficient integration with host tissue upon implantation. Herein, we explored new magnetic alginate composite scaffolds to provide means of physical stimulation to cells. Magnetite-impregnated alginate scaffolds seeded with aortic endothelial cells stimulated during the first 7 days out of a total 14 day experimental course showed significantly elevated metabolic activity during the stimulation period. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) indicated that magnetically stimulated cells had a lower proliferation index as compared to the non-stimulated cells. This suggests that the elevated metabolic activity could instead be related to cell migration and re-organization. Immunostaining and confocal microscopy analyses supported this observation showing that on day 14 in magnetically stimulated scaffolds without supplementation of any growth factors, cellular vessel-like (loop) structures, known as indicators of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis were formed as compared to cell sheets or aggregates observed in the non-stimulated (control) scaffolds. This work is the first step in our understanding of how to accurately control cellular organization to form tissue engineered constructs, which together with additional molecular signals could lead to a creation of an efficient pre-vascularized tissue construct with potential applicability for transplantation.

  18. 3D Porous Calcium-Alginate Scaffolds Cell Culture System Improved Human Osteoblast Cell Clusters for Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Yun; Ke, Cherng-Jyh; Yen, Ko-Chung; Hsieh, Hui-Chen; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Age-related orthopedic disorders and bone defects have become a critical public health issue, and cell-based therapy is potentially a novel solution for issues surrounding bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Long-term cultures of primary bone cells exhibit phenotypic and functional degeneration; therefore, culturing cells or tissues suitable for clinical use remain a challenge. A platform consisting of human osteoblasts (hOBs), calcium-alginate (Ca-Alginate) scaffolds, and a self-made bioreactor system was established for autologous transplantation of human osteoblast cell clusters. The Ca-Alginate scaffold facilitated the growth and differentiation of human bone cell clusters, and the functionally-closed process bioreactor system supplied the soluble nutrients and osteogenic signals required to maintain the cell viability. This system preserved the proliferative ability of cells and cell viability and up-regulated bone-related gene expression and biological apatite crystals formation. The bone-like tissue generated could be extracted by removal of calcium ions via ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) chelation, and exhibited a size suitable for injection. The described strategy could be used in therapeutic application and opens new avenues for surgical interventions to correct skeletal defects. PMID:25825603

  19. Primary human hepatocytes from metabolic-disordered children recreate highly differentiated liver-tissue-like spheroids on alginate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Bierwolf, Jeanette; Lutgehetmann, Marc; Deichmann, Steffen; Erbes, Johannes; Volz, Tassilo; Dandri, Maura; Cohen, Smadar; Nashan, Bjoern; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias

    2012-07-01

    Human hepatocyte transplantation has not been routinely established as an alternative to liver transplantation in liver disease due to low cell engraftment rates. Preimplantation in vitro engineering of liver tissue using primary human hepatocytes on three-dimensional scaffolds could be an alternative model. Alginate bioscaffolds were seeded with 1×10(6) hepatocytes freshly isolated from the livers of three children suffering from different metabolic disorders. During a culture period of 14 days only a marginal loss of hepatocytes was observed via measurement of DNA content per scaffold. Formation of hepatocyte spheroids was detected from day 3 onward using transmission light microscopy. Biochemical assays for albumin, α1-antitrypsin, and urea revealed excellent metabolic function with its maximum at day 7. Low lactate dehydrogenase enzyme release demonstrated minor cellular membrane damage. Hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid Schiff staining displayed high cell viability and well-preserved glycogen storage until day 7. Immunofluorescent staining of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, zonula occludens protein 1, and cytokeratin 18 revealed highly differentiated hepatocytes in spheroids with a tissue-like structure on scaffolds. Fluorescent labeling of cytochrome P450 and bile canaliculi demonstrated detoxification ability as well as a well-shaped bile canaliculi network. Almost constant expression levels in most target genes were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of TUNEL reaction implicated a safe scaffold-dissolving procedure. Our results indicate that alginate scaffolds provide a favorable microenvironment for liver neo-tissue recreation and regeneration. Further, we demonstrate that livers from children with inherited metabolic disorders could serve as an alternative cell source for in vitro experiments.

  20. Minimally traumatic alveolar ridge augmentation with a tunnel injectable thermo-sensitive alginate scaffold

    PubMed Central

    LI, Yifen; FANG, Xiaoqian; JIANG, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Injectable bone substitutes and techniques have been developed for use in minimally invasive procedures for bone augmentation. Objective : To develop a novel injectable thermo-sensitive alginate hydrogel (TSAH) as a scaffold to induce bone regeneration, using a minimally invasive tunnelling technique. Material and Methods : An injectable TSAH was prepared from a copolymer solution of 8.0 wt% Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and 8.0 wt% AAlg-g-PNIPAAm. In vitro properties of the material, such as its microstructure and the sustained release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), were investigated. Then, with the subperiosteal tunnelling technique, this material, carrying rhBMP-2, was injected under the labial periosteum of the maxillary anterior alveolar ridge in a rabbit model. New bone formation was evaluated by means of X-ray, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), fluorescence labelling, histological study, and immunohistochemistry study. Results : The material exhibited good injectability and thermo-irreversible properties. SEM showed an interconnected porous microstructure of the TSAH. The result of ALP activity indicated sustained delivery of BMP-2 from the TSAH from days 3 to 15. In a rabbit model, both TSAH and TSAH/rhBMP-2 induced alveolar ridge augmentation. The percentage of mineralised tissue in the TSAH/rhBMP-2 group (41.6±3.79%) was significantly higher than in the TSAH group (31.3±7.21%; p<0.05). The density of the regenerating tissue was higher in the TSAH/rhBMP-2 group than in the other groups (TSAH group, positive control, blank control; p<0.05). Conclusions : The TSAH provided convenient handling properties for clinical application. To some extent, TSAH could induce ridge augmentation and mineral deposition, which can be enhanced when combined with rhBMP-2 for a minimally invasive tunnelling injection. PMID:26018314

  1. Preparation and characterization of nano-sized hydroxyapatite/alginate/chitosan composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Lee; Jung, Gil-Yong; Yoon, Jun-Ho; Han, Jung-Suk; Park, Yoon-Jeong; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Zhang, Miqin; Kim, Dae-Joon

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop chitosan composite scaffolds with high strength and controlled pore structures by homogenously dispersed nano-sized hydroxyapatite (nano-HAp) powders. In the fabrication of composite scaffolds, nano-HAp powders distributed in an alginate (AG) solution with a pH higher than 10 were mixed with a chitosan (CS) solution and then freeze dried. While the HAp content increased up to 70 wt.%, the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of the composite scaffolds significantly increased from 0.27 MPa and 4.42 MPa to 0.68 MPa and 13.35 MPa, respectively. Higher content of the HAp also helped develop more differentiation and mineralization of the MC3T3-E1 cells on the composite scaffolds. The uniform pore structure and the excellent mechanical properties of the HAp/CS composite scaffolds likely resulted from the use of the AG solution at pH 10 as a dispersant for the nano-HAp powders.

  2. Coupling of gelatin to inner surfaces of pore walls in spongy alginate-based scaffolds facilitates the adhesion, growth and differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Yu A; Ivanov, R V; Petrenko, A Yu; Lozinsky, V I

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel wide-pore scaffold for cell 3D culturing, based on the technology of freeze-drying of Ca-alginate and gelatin. Two different preparation methodologies were compared: (i) freeze-drying of Na-alginate + gelatin mixed solution followed by the incubation of dried polymer in saturated ethanolic solution of CaCl₂; (ii) freeze-drying of the Na-alginate solution followed by the chemical "activation" of polysaccharide core with divinylsulfone with subsequent gelatin covalent attachment to the inner surfaces of pore walls. The scaffolds produced using the first approach did not provide adhesion and proliferation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Conversely, the second approach allowed to obtain scaffolds with a high adherence ability for the cells. When cultured within the latter type of scaffold, MSCs proliferated and were able to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic cell lineages, in response to specific induction stimuli. The results indicate that Ca-alginate wide-pore scaffolds with covalently attached gelatin could be useful for stem cell-based bone, cartilage and adipose tissue engineering.

  3. Macro- and micro-designed chitosan-alginate scaffold architecture by three-dimensional printing and directional freezing.

    PubMed

    Reed, Stephanie; Lau, Grace; Delattre, Benjamin; Lopez, David Don; Tomsia, Antoni P; Wu, Benjamin M

    2016-01-07

    While many tissue-engineered constructs aim to treat cartilage defects, most involve chondrocyte or stem cell seeding on scaffolds. The clinical application of cell-based techniques is limited due to the cost of maintaining cellular constructs on the shelf, potential immune response to allogeneic cell lines, and autologous chondrocyte sources requiring biopsy from already diseased or injured, scarce tissue. An acellular scaffold that can induce endogenous influx and homogeneous distribution of native stem cells from bone marrow holds great promise for cartilage regeneration. This study aims to develop such an acellular scaffold using designed, channeled architecture that simultaneously models the native zones of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Highly porous, hydrophilic chitosan-alginate (Ch-Al) scaffolds were fabricated in three-dimensionally printed (3DP) molds designed to create millimeter scale macro-channels. Different polymer preform casting techniques were employed to produce scaffolds from both negative and positive 3DP molds. Macro-channeled scaffolds improved cell suspension distribution and uptake overly randomly porous scaffolds, with a wicking volumetric flow rate of 445.6 ± 30.3 mm(3) s(-1) for aqueous solutions and 177 ± 16 mm(3) s(-1) for blood. Additionally, directional freezing was applied to Ch-Al scaffolds, resulting in lamellar pores measuring 300 μm and 50 μm on the long and short axes, thus creating micrometer scale micro-channels. After directionally freezing Ch-Al solution cast in 3DP molds, the combined macro- and micro-channeled scaffold architecture enhanced cell suspension uptake beyond either macro- or micro-channels alone, reaching a volumetric flow rate of 1782.1 ± 48 mm(3) s(-1) for aqueous solutions and 440.9 ± 0.5 mm(3) s(-1) for blood. By combining 3DP and directional freezing, we can control the micro- and macro-architecture of Ch-Al to drastically improve cell influx into and distribution within the scaffold

  4. Gelatinized Copper–Capillary Alginate Gel Functions as an Injectable Tissue Scaffolding System for Stem Cell Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Willenberg, Bradley Jay; Zheng, Tong; Meng, Fan-Wei; Meneses, Juan Carlos; Rossignol, Candace; Batich, Christopher D.; Terada, Naohiro; Steindler, Dennis A.; Weiss, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    In severe hypoxic–ischemic brain injury, cellular components such as neurons and astrocytes are injured or destroyed along with the supporting extracellular matrix. This presents a challenge to the field of regenerative medicine since the lack of extracellular matrix and supporting structures makes the transplant milieu inhospitable to the transplanted cells. A potential solution to this problem is the use of a biomaterial to provide the extracellular components needed to keep cells localized in cystic brain regions, allowing the cells to form connections and repair lost brain tissue. Ideally, this biomaterial would be combined with stem cells, which have been proven to have therapeutic potentials, and could be delivered via an injection. To study this approach, we derived a hydrogel biomaterial tissue scaffold from oligomeric gelatin and copper–capillary alginate gel (GCCAG). We then demonstrated that our multipotent astrocytic stem cells (MASCs) could be maintained in GCCAG scaffolds for up to 2 weeks in vitro and that the cells retained their multipotency. We next performed a pilot transplant study in which GCCAG was mixed with MASCs and injected into the brain of a neonatal rat pup. After a week in vivo, our results showed that: the GCCAG biomaterial did not cause a significant reactive gliosis; viable cells were retained within the injected scaffolds; and some delivered cells migrated into the surrounding brain tissue. Therefore, GCCAG tissue scaffolds are a promising, novel injectable system for transplantation of stem cells to the brain. PMID:20699061

  5. Facile fabrication of poly(L-lactic acid) microsphere-incorporated calcium alginate/hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds based on Pickering emulsion templates.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Ma, Shanshan; Yang, Zhuohong; Zhou, Wuyi; Du, Zhengshan; Huang, Jian; Yi, Huan; Wang, Chaoyang

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop a facile one-pot approach to the fabrication of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) microsphere-incorporated calcium alginate (ALG-Ca)/hydroxyapatite (HAp) porous scaffolds based on HAp nanoparticle-stabilized oil-in-water Pickering emulsion templates, which contain alginate in the aqueous phase and PLLA in the oil phase. The emulsion aqueous phase is solidified by in situ gelation of alginate with Ca(2+) released from HAp by decreasing pH with slow hydrolysis of D-gluconic acid δ-lactone (GDL) to produce emulsion droplet-incorporated gels, followed by freeze-drying to form porous scaffolds containing microspheres. The pore structure of porous scaffolds can be adjusted by varying the HAp or GDL concentration. The compressive tests show that the increase of HAp or GDL concentration is beneficial to improve the compressive property of porous scaffolds, while the excessive HAp can lead to the decrease in compressive property. Moreover, the swelling behavior studies display that the swelling ratios of porous scaffolds reduce with increasing HAp or GDL concentration. Furthermore, hydrophobic drug ibuprofen (IBU) and hydrophilic drug bovine serum albumin (BSA) are loaded into the microspheres and scaffold matrix, respectively. In vitro drug release results indicate that BSA has a rapid release while IBU has a sustained release in the dual drug-loaded scaffolds. In vitro cell culture experiments verify that mouse bone mesenchymal stem cells can proliferate on the porous scaffolds well, indicating the good biocompatibility of porous scaffolds. All these results demonstrate that the PLLA microsphere-incorporated ALG-Ca/HAp porous scaffolds have a promising potential for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cell-Laden Poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/Alginate Hybrid Scaffolds Fabricated by an Aerosol Cross-Linking Process for Obtaining Homogeneous Cell Distribution: Fabrication, Seeding Efficiency, and Cell Proliferation and Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, HyeongJin; Ahn, SeungHyun; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Chun, Wook

    2013-01-01

    Generally, solid-freeform fabricated scaffolds show a controllable pore structure (pore size, porosity, pore connectivity, and permeability) and mechanical properties by using computer-aided techniques. Although the scaffolds can provide repeated and appropriate pore structures for tissue regeneration, they have a low biological activity, such as low cell-seeding efficiency and nonuniform cell density in the scaffold interior after a long culture period, due to a large pore size and completely open pores. Here we fabricated three different poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL)/alginate scaffolds: (1) a rapid prototyped porous PCL scaffold coated with an alginate, (2) the same PCL scaffold coated with a mixture of alginate and cells, and (3) a multidispensed hybrid PCL/alginate scaffold embedded with cell-laden alginate struts. The three scaffolds had similar micropore structures (pore size=430–580 μm, porosity=62%–68%, square pore shape). Preosteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) were used at the same cell density in each scaffold. By measuring cell-seeding efficiency, cell viability, and cell distribution after various periods of culturing, we sought to determine which scaffold was more appropriate for homogeneously regenerated tissues. PMID:23469894

  7. Bone regeneration potential of stem cells derived from periodontal ligament or gingival tissue sources encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Chen, Chider; Xu, Xingtian; Akiyama, Kentaro; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Shi, Songtao

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide an advantageous alternative therapeutic option for bone regeneration in comparison to current treatment modalities. However, delivering MSCs to the defect site while maintaining a high MSC survival rate is still a critical challenge in MSC-mediated bone regeneration. Here, we tested the bone regeneration capacity of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) encapsulated in a novel RGD- (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid tripeptide) coupled alginate microencapsulation system in vitro and in vivo. Five-millimeter-diameter critical-size calvarial defects were created in immunocompromised mice and PDLSCs and GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate microspheres were transplanted into the defect sites. New bone formation was assessed using microcomputed tomography and histological analyses 8 weeks after transplantation. Results confirmed that our microencapsulation system significantly enhanced MSC viability and osteogenic differentiation in vitro compared with non-RGD-containing alginate hydrogel microspheres with larger diameters. Results confirmed that PDLSCs were able to repair the calvarial defects by promoting the formation of mineralized tissue, while GMSCs showed significantly lower osteogenic differentiation capability. Further, results revealed that RGD-coupled alginate scaffold facilitated the differentiation of oral MSCs toward an osteoblast lineage in vitro and in vivo, as assessed by expression of osteogenic markers Runx2, ALP, and osteocalcin. In conclusion, these results for the first time demonstrated that MSCs derived from orofacial tissue encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate scaffold show promise for craniofacial bone regeneration. This treatment modality has many potential dental and orthopedic applications.

  8. Enhanced bone tissue formation by alginate gel-assisted cell seeding in porous ceramic scaffolds and sustained release of growth factor.

    PubMed

    Florczyk, Stephen J; Leung, Matthew; Jana, Soumen; Li, Zhensheng; Bhattarai, Narayan; Huang, Jerry I; Hopper, Richard A; Zhang, Miqin

    2012-12-01

    Increasing cell seeding efficiency in a tissue engineering construct can enhance cellular activity and tissue formation in vivo. Here, we demonstrate the use of alginate gel as a secondary phase material in 3D porous β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds to improve cell seeding and provide controlled release of growth factors for bone tissue engineering. Cells were seeded in scaffolds in three ways: conventional seeding (CS), alginate gel-assisted seeding (GS), and alginate GS with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2, GSB). In vitro study with MG-63 cells showed that cell seeding efficiency and cell population 1 week after seeding were significantly elevated in GS and GSB samples compared to CS samples. The GSB system demonstrated a sustained, steady release of BMP-2 over 2 weeks. In vivo, scaffolds seeded with rat mesenchymal stem cells were implanted ectopically into Sprague-Dawley rats for 8 weeks. GS and GSB samples exhibited improved osteogenic activity, with the GSB samples inducing the greatest osteocalcin and osteoid deposition. This study suggests that the alginate gel-assisted cell seeding increases seeding efficiency and allows for sustained release of growth factors. The use of the secondary phase polymer bolsters bone formation in vivo and has the potential for improving outcome in other tissue engineering applications.

  9. Chondrocyte calcium signaling in response to fluid flow is regulated by matrix adhesion in 3-D alginate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Degala, Satish; Zipfel, Warren R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between chondrocytes and their surrounding extracellular matrix plays an important role in regulating cartilage metabolism in response to environmental cues. This study characterized the role of cell adhesion on the calcium signaling response of chondrocytes to fluid flow. Bovine chondrocytes were suspended in alginate hydrogels functionalized with RGD at concentrations of 0-400μM. The hydrogels were perfused and the calcium signaling response of the cells was measured over a range of fluid velocities from 0 to 68μm/s. Attachment to RGD-alginate doubled the sensitivity of chondrocytes to flows in the range of 8-13μm/s, but at higher fluid velocities, the contribution of cell adhesion to the observed calcium signaling response was no longer apparent. The enhanced sensitivity to flow was dependent on the density of RGD-ligand present in the scaffolds. The RGD-enhanced sensitivity to flow was completely inhibited by the addition of soluble RGD which acted as a competitive inhibitor. The results of this study indicate a role for matrix adhesion in regulating chondrocyte response to fluid flow through a calcium dependent mechanism.

  10. Design and Fabrication of Anatomical Bioreactor Systems Containing Alginate Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; Orazizadeh, Mahmoud; Ansari-Asl, Karim; Banoni, Salem; Izadi, Sina; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a tissue-engineering approach through alginate gel molding to mimic cartilage tissue in a three-dimensional culture system. The perfusion biomimetic bioreactor was designed to mimic natural joint. The shear stresses exerting on the bioreactor chamber were calculated by Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD). Several alginate/bovine chondrocyte constructs were prepared, and were cultured in the bioreactor. Histochemical and immunohistochemical staining methods for the presence of glycosaminoglycan(GAG), overall matrix production and type II collagen protein were performed, respectively. The dynamic mechanical device applied a linear mechanical displacement of 2 mm to 10 mm. The CFD modeling indicated peak velocity and maximum wall shear stress were 1.706×10−3 m/s and 0.02407 dyne/cm 2, respectively. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis revealed evidence of cartilage-like tissue with lacunas similar to those of natural cartilage and the production of sulfated GAG of matrix by the chondrons, metachromatic territorial matrix-surrounded cells and accumulation of type II collagen around the cells. The present study indicated that when chondrocytes were seeded in alginate hydrogel and cultured in biomimetic cell culture system, cells survived well and secreted newly synthesized matrix led to improvement of chondrogenesis. PMID:23408660

  11. Effect of crosslinking functionality on microstructure, mechanical properties, and in vitro cytocompatibility of cellulose nanocrystals reinforced poly (vinyl alcohol)/sodium alginate hybrid scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Lee, Yujin; Kim, Doyeon; Rao, Kummara Madhusudana; Kim, Jisoo; Park, Soyoung; Haider, Adnan; Lee, Do Hyun; Han, Sung Soo

    2017-02-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced poly (vinyl alcohol)/sodium alginate hybrid scaffolds were fabricated by using freeze casting and freeze drying method. In this study, the effect of crosslinking agents such as calcium chloride, orthophosphoric acid, and borax on morphological, structural, thermal, mechanical, and cytocompatibility (cell adhesion and proliferation) properties was investigated. The results showed that the change in type of crosslinking agent significantly changed the properties of the hybrid scaffolds. Based on this study, borax-crosslinked hybrid scaffold showed good fibrous porous structure with high porosity (95.2%), highest water uptake capacity, good thermal stability, mechanical stability (storage modulus), and in vitro cell adhesion and proliferation with fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells. This primarily research study explores the way for further use of this crosslinking agent to design and fabricate scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Bone Regeneration Potential of Stem Cells Derived from Periodontal Ligament or Gingival Tissue Sources Encapsulated in RGD-Modified Alginate Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chider; Xu, Xingtian; Akiyama, Kentaro; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H.; Shi, Songtao

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide an advantageous alternative therapeutic option for bone regeneration in comparison to current treatment modalities. However, delivering MSCs to the defect site while maintaining a high MSC survival rate is still a critical challenge in MSC-mediated bone regeneration. Here, we tested the bone regeneration capacity of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) encapsulated in a novel RGD- (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid tripeptide) coupled alginate microencapsulation system in vitro and in vivo. Five-millimeter-diameter critical-size calvarial defects were created in immunocompromised mice and PDLSCs and GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate microspheres were transplanted into the defect sites. New bone formation was assessed using microcomputed tomography and histological analyses 8 weeks after transplantation. Results confirmed that our microencapsulation system significantly enhanced MSC viability and osteogenic differentiation in vitro compared with non-RGD-containing alginate hydrogel microspheres with larger diameters. Results confirmed that PDLSCs were able to repair the calvarial defects by promoting the formation of mineralized tissue, while GMSCs showed significantly lower osteogenic differentiation capability. Further, results revealed that RGD-coupled alginate scaffold facilitated the differentiation of oral MSCs toward an osteoblast lineage in vitro and in vivo, as assessed by expression of osteogenic markers Runx2, ALP, and osteocalcin. In conclusion, these results for the first time demonstrated that MSCs derived from orofacial tissue encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate scaffold show promise for craniofacial bone regeneration. This treatment modality has many potential dental and orthopedic applications. PMID:24070211

  13. Silk fibroin/sodium alginate composite nano-fibrous scaffold prepared through thermally induced phase-separation (TIPS) method for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiping; Liu, Xiaotian; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Liangjun

    2015-10-01

    To mimic the natural fibrous structure of the tissue extracellular matrix, a nano-fibrous silk fibroin (SF)/sodium alginate (SA) composite scaffold was fabricated by a thermally-induced phase-separation method. The effects of SF/SA ratio on the structure and the porosity of the composite scaffolds were examined. Scanning electron microscopy and porosity results showed that the 5SF/1SA and 3SF/1SA scaffolds possessed an excellent nano-fibrous structure and a porosity of more than 90%. Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry results indicated the physical interaction between SF and SA molecules and their good compatibility in the 5SF/1SA and 3SF/1SA scaffolds, whereas they showed less compatibility in the 1SF/1SA scaffold. Cell culture results showed that MG-63 cells can attach and grow well on the surface of the SF/SA scaffolds. The nano-fibrous SF/SA scaffold can be potentially used in tissue engineering.

  14. Continuous delivery of stromal cell-derived factor-1 from alginate scaffolds accelerates wound healing.

    PubMed

    Rabbany, Sina Y; Pastore, Joseph; Yamamoto, Masaya; Miller, Tim; Rafii, Shahin; Aras, Rahul; Penn, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Proper wound diagnosis and management is an increasingly important clinical challenge and is a large and growing unmet need. Pressure ulcers, hard-to-heal wounds, and problematic surgical incisions are emerging at increasing frequencies. At present, the wound-healing industry is experiencing a paradigm shift towards innovative treatments that exploit nanotechnology, biomaterials, and biologics. Our study utilized an alginate hydrogel patch to deliver stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), a naturally occurring chemokine that is rapidly overexpressed in response to tissue injury, to assess the potential effects SDF-1 therapy on wound closure rates and scar formation. Alginate patches were loaded with either purified recombinant human SDF-1 protein or plasmid expressing SDF-1 and the kinetics of SDF-1 release were measured both in vitro and in vivo in mice. Our studies demonstrate that although SDF-1 plasmid- and protein-loaded patches were able to release therapeutic product over hours to days, SDF-1 protein was released faster (in vivo K(d) 0.55 days) than SDF-1 plasmid (in vivo K(d) 3.67 days). We hypothesized that chronic SDF-1 delivery would be more effective in accelerating the rate of dermal wound closure in Yorkshire pigs with acute surgical wounds, a model that closely mimics human wound healing. Wounds treated with SDF-1 protein (n = 10) and plasmid (n = 6) loaded patches healed faster than sham (n = 4) or control (n = 4). At day 9, SDF-1-treated wounds significantly accelerated wound closure (55.0 +/- 14.3% healed) compared to nontreated controls (8.2 +/- 6.0%, p < 0.05). Furthermore, 38% of SDF-1-treated wounds were fully healed at day 9 (vs. none in controls) with very little evidence of scarring. These data suggest that patch-mediated SDF-1 delivery may ultimately provide a novel therapy for accelerating healing and reducing scarring in clinical wounds.

  15. Cells (MC3T3-E1)-laden alginate scaffolds fabricated by a modified solid-freeform fabrication process supplemented with an aerosol spraying.

    PubMed

    Ahn, SeungHyun; Lee, HyeongJin; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Kim, GeunHyung

    2012-09-10

    In this study, we propose a new cell encapsulation method consisting of a dispensing method and an aerosol-spraying method. The aerosol spray using a cross-linking agent, calcium chloride (CaCl(2)), was used to control the surface gelation of dispensed alginate struts during dispensing. To show the feasibility of the method, we used preosteoblast (MC3T3-E1) cells. By changing the relationship between the various dispensing/aerosol-spraying conditions and cell viability, we could determine the optimal cell-dispensing process: a nozzle size (240 μm) and an aerosol spray flow rate (0.93 ± 0.12 mL min(-1)), 10 mm s(-1) nozzle moving speed, a 10 wt % concentration of CaCl(2) in the aerosol solution, and 2 wt % concentration of CaCl(2) in the second cross-linking process. Based on these optimized process conditions, we successfully fabricated a three-dimensional, pore-structured, cell-laden alginate scaffold of 20 × 20 × 4.6 mm(3) and 84% cell viability. During long cell culture periods (16, 25, 33, and 45 days), the preosteoblasts in the alginate scaffold survived and proliferated well.

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects of sodium alginate/gelatine porous scaffolds merged with fucoidan in murine microglial BV2 cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van-Tinh; Ko, Seok-Chun; Oh, Gun-Woo; Heo, Seong-Yeong; Jeon, You-Jin; Park, Won Sun; Choi, Il-Whan; Choi, Sung-Wook; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2016-12-01

    Microglia are the immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Overexpression of inflammatory mediators by microglia can induce several neurological diseases. Thus, the underlying basic requirement for neural tissue engineering is to develop materials that exhibit little or no neuro-inflammatory effects. In this study, we have developed a method to create porous scaffolds by adding fucoidan (Fu) into porous sodium alginate (Sa)/gelatine (G) (SaGFu). For mechanical characterization, in vitro degradation, stress/strain, swelling, and pore size were measured. Furthermore, the biocompatibility was evaluated by assessing the adhesion and proliferation of BV2 microglial cells on the SaGFu porous scaffolds using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, respectively. Moreover, we studied the neuro-inflammatory effects of SaGFu on BV2 microglial cells. The effect of gelatine and fucoidan content on the various properties of the scaffold was investigated and the results showed that mechanical properties increased porosity and swelling ratio with an increase in the gelatine and fucoidan, while the in vitro biodegradability decreased. The average SaGFu diameter attained by fabrication of SaGFu ranged from 60 to 120μm with high porosity (74.44%-88.30%). Cell culture using gelatine 2.0% (SaG2Fu) and 4.0% (SaG4Fu), showed good cell proliferation; more than 60-80% that with Sa alone. Following stimulation with 0.5μg/mL LPS, microglia cultured in porous SaGFu decreased their expression of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). SaG2Fu and SaG4Fu also inhibited the activation and translocation of p65 NF-κB protein levels, resulting in reduction of NO, ROS, and PGE2 production. These results provide insights into the diverse biological effects and opens new avenues for the applications of SaGFu in neuroscience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermogelling Bioadhesive Scaffolds for Intervertebral Disc Tissue Engineering: Preliminary In Vitro Comparison of Aldehyde-Based Versus Alginate Microparticle-Mediated Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Wiltsey, C.; Christiani, T.; Williams, J.; Scaramazza, J.; Van Sciver, C.; Toomer, K.; Sheehan, J.; Branda, A.; Nitzl, A.; England, E.; Kadlowec, J.; Iftode, C.; Vernengo, J.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering of certain load-bearing parts of the body can be dependent on scaffold adhesion or integration with the surrounding tissue to prevent dislocation. One such area is the regeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). In this work, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was grafted with chondroitin sulfate (CS) (PNIPAAm-g-CS) and blended with aldehyde-modified CS to generate an injectable polymer that can form covalent bonds with tissue upon contact. However, the presence of the reactive aldehyde groups can compromise the viability of encapsulated cells. Thus, liposomes were encapsulated in the blend, designed to deliver the ECM derivative, gelatin, after the polymer has adhered to tissue and reached physiological temperature. This work is based on the hypothesis that the discharge of gelatin will enhance the biocompatibility of the material by covalently reacting with, or “end-capping”, the aldehyde functionalities within the gel that did not participate in bonding with tissue upon contact. As a comparison, formulations were also created without CS aldehyde and with an alternative adhesion mediator, mucoadhesive calcium alginate particles. Gels formed from blends of PNIPAAm-g-CS and CS aldehyde exhibited increased adhesive strength compared to PNIPAAm-g-CS alone (p<0.05). However, the addition of gelatin-loaded liposomes to the blend significantly decreased the adhesive strength (p<0.05). The encapsulation of alginate microparticles within PNIPAAm-g-CS gels caused the tensile strength to increase two-fold over that of PNIPAAm-g-CS blends with CS aldehyde (p<0.05). Cytocompatibility studies indicate that formulations containing alginate particles exhibit reduced cytotoxicity over those containing CS aldehyde. Overall, the results indicated that the adhesives composed of alginate microparticles encapsulated in PNIPAAm-g-CS have the potential to serve as a scaffold for IVD regeneration. PMID:25641647

  18. Thermogelling bioadhesive scaffolds for intervertebral disk tissue engineering: preliminary in vitro comparison of aldehyde-based versus alginate microparticle-mediated adhesion.

    PubMed

    Wiltsey, C; Christiani, T; Williams, J; Scaramazza, J; Van Sciver, C; Toomer, K; Sheehan, J; Branda, A; Nitzl, A; England, E; Kadlowec, J; Iftode, C; Vernengo, J

    2015-04-01

    Tissue engineering of certain load-bearing parts of the body can be dependent on scaffold adhesion or integration with the surrounding tissue to prevent dislocation. One such area is the regeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). In this work, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was grafted with chondroitin sulfate (CS) (PNIPAAm-g-CS) and blended with aldehyde-modified CS to generate an injectable polymer that can form covalent bonds with tissue upon contact. However, the presence of the reactive aldehyde groups can compromise the viability of encapsulated cells. Thus, liposomes were encapsulated in the blend, designed to deliver the ECM derivative, gelatin, after the polymer has adhered to tissue and reached physiological temperature. This work is based on the hypothesis that the discharge of gelatin will enhance the biocompatibility of the material by covalently reacting with, or "end-capping", the aldehyde functionalities within the gel that did not participate in bonding with tissue upon contact. As a comparison, formulations were also created without CS aldehyde and with an alternative adhesion mediator, mucoadhesive calcium alginate particles. Gels formed from blends of PNIPAAm-g-CS and CS aldehyde exhibited increased adhesive strength compared to PNIPAAm-g-CS alone (p<0.05). However, the addition of gelatin-loaded liposomes to the blend significantly decreased the adhesive strength (p<0.05). The encapsulation of alginate microparticles within PNIPAAm-g-CS gels caused the tensile strength to increase twofold over that of PNIPAAm-g-CS blends with CS aldehyde (p<0.05). Cytocompatibility studies indicate that formulations containing alginate particles exhibit reduced cytotoxicity over those containing CS aldehyde. Overall, the results indicated that the adhesives composed of alginate microparticles encapsulated in PNIPAAm-g-CS have the potential to serve as a scaffold for IVD regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  19. 3D-Printed Atsttrin-Incorporated Alginate/Hydroxyapatite Scaffold Promotes Bone Defect Regeneration with TNF/TNFR Signaling Involvement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Xia, Qingqing; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Xiaolei; Wen, Feiqiu; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shufang; Heng, Boon Chin; He, Yong; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2015-08-05

    High expression levels of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α within bone defects can decelerate and impair bone regeneration. However, there are few available bone scaffolds with anti-inflammatory function. The progranulin (PGRN)-derived engineered protein, Atsttrin, is known to exert antagonistic effects on the TNF-α function. Hence, this study investigates whether 3D-printed Atsttrin-incorporated alginate(Alg)/hydroxyapatite(nHAp) scaffolds can facilitate bone healing through affecting the TNF/TNFR signaling. A 3D bioprinting system is used to fabricate Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp composite scaffolds, and the Atsttrin release from this scaffold is characterized, followed by evaluation of its efficacy on bone regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. The 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold exhibits a precisely defined structure, can sustain Atsttrin release for at least 5 days, has negligible cytotoxicity, and supports cell adhesion. Atsttrin can also attenuate the suppressive effects of TNF-α on BMP-2-induced osteoblastic differentiation in vitro. The 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold significantly reduces the number of TNF-α positive cells within wound sites, 7 days after post-calvarial defect surgery. Additionally, histological staining and X-ray scanning results also show that the 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffold enhances the regeneration of mice calvarial bone defects. These findings thus demonstrate that the precise structure and anti-inflammatory properties of 3D-printed Atsttrin-Alg/nHAp scaffolds may promote bone defect repair.

  20. Developing multi-cellular tumor spheroid model (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Zheng; Zhu, Yu-Xia; Ma, Hui-Chao; Chen, Si-Nan; Chao, Ji-Ye; Ruan, Wen-Ding; Wang, Duo; Du, Feng-guang; Meng, Yue-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a 3D MCTS-CCA system was constructed by culturing multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening. The CCA scaffolds were fabricated by spray-spinning. The interactions between the components of the spray-spun fibers were evidenced by methods of Coomassie Blue stain, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Co-culture indicated that MCF-7 cells showed a spatial growth pattern of multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the CCA fibrous scaffold with increased proliferation rate and drug-resistance to MMC, ADM and 5-Aza comparing with the 2D culture cells. Significant increases of total viable cells were found in 3D MCTS groups after drug administration by method of apoptotic analysis. Glucose-lactate analysis indicated that the metabolism of MCTS in CCA scaffold was closer to the tumor issue in vivo than the monolayer cells. In addition, MCTS showed the characteristic of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) which is subverted by carcinoma cells to facilitate metastatic spread. These results demonstrated that MCTS in CCA scaffold possessed a more conservative phenotype of tumor than monolayer cells, and anticancer drug screening in 3D MCTS-CCA system might be superior to the 2D culture system.

  1. Osteogenic differentiation of muscle satellite cells induced by platelet-rich plasma encapsulated in three-dimensional alginate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengyun; Jia, Shanshan; Liu, Guijun; Fang, Dong; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2012-11-01

    Osteogenic potential of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) makes them a possible source of seeding cells for bone tissue engineering. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs by encapsulation of PRP into 3-dimensional alginate hydrogel in vitro and in vivo. PRP was obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats using 2 centrifugation techniques. MSCs were expanded and differentiated in the presence or absence of PRP in monolayer and 3-dimensional cultures. Cell viability was evaluated with the use of an MTT proliferation assay after 1, 7, 14, and 21 days of stimulation. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of osteogenic-related genes were performed to study the effects of PRP on osteogenic differentiation of cultured MSCs by encapsulation of PRP in alginate gel. For in vivo study, the PRP-MSCs-alginate gel mixture was implanted in subcutaneous pockets of nude mice to examine the ectopic bone formation at 2 weeks. After 1, 7, 14, and 21 days of stimulation, PRP significantly promoted MSC proliferation in PRP-alginate gel mixture cultures. ALP activity, calcium deposition, and real-time RT-PCR showed enhanced cell osteogenic differentiation in the PRP-alginate group. Histologic examination demonstrated that large amount of fibrous tissue capsule, collagen, and new vascular growth were detected in the PRP-MSCs-alginate group compared with the alginate and MSCs-alginate groups. The results of this study suggest that MSCs induced by PRP encapsulated in an alginate gel mixture can undergo induction into osteoblastic phenotype both in vitro and in vivo, which makes the production of PRP-enhanced tissue-engineered bone using MSCs possible. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. In Vivo Articular Cartilage Regeneration Using Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Cultured in an Alginate Scaffold: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Milian, Lara; Oliver, Maria; Zurriaga, Javier; Sancho-Tello, Maria; de Llano, Jose Javier Martin; Carda, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory disease in which all joint-related elements, articular cartilage in particular, are affected. The poor regeneration capacity of this tissue together with the lack of pharmacological treatment has led to the development of regenerative medicine methodologies including microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The effectiveness of ACI has been shown in vitro and in vivo, but the use of other cell types, including bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, is necessary because of the poor proliferation rate of isolated articular chondrocytes. In this investigation, we assessed the chondrogenic ability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to regenerate cartilage in vitro and in vivo. hDPSCs and primary isolated rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in chondrogenic culture medium and found to express collagen II and aggrecan. Both cell types were cultured in 3% alginate hydrogels and implanted in a rabbit model of cartilage damage. Three months after surgery, significant cartilage regeneration was observed, particularly in the animals implanted with hDPSCs. Although the results presented here are preliminary, they suggest that hDPSCs may be useful for regeneration of articular cartilage. PMID:28951745

  3. Towards ready-to-use 3-D scaffolds for regenerative medicine: adhesion-based cryopreservation of human mesenchymal stem cells attached and spread within alginate-gelatin cryogel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Meiser, Ina; Petrenko, Yuriy A; Ivanov, Roman V; Lozinsky, Vladimir I; Zimmermann, Heiko; Petrenko, Alexander Yu

    2014-03-01

    Cultivation and proliferation of stem cells in three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds is a promising strategy for regenerative medicine. Mesenchymal stem cells with their potential to differentiate in various cell types, cryopreserved adhesion-based in fabricated scaffolds of biocompatible materials can serve as ready-to-use transplantation units for tissue repair, where pores allow a direct contact of graft cells and recipient tissue without further preparation. A successful cryopreservation of adherent cells depends on attachment and spreading processes that start directly after cell seeding. Here, we analyzed different cultivation times (0.5, 2, 24 h) prior to adhesion-based cryopreservation of human mesenchymal stem cells within alginate-gelatin cryogel scaffolds and its influence on cell viability, recovery and functionality at recovery times (0, 24, 48 h) in comparison to non-frozen control. Analysis with confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated that 2 h cultivation time enhanced cryopreservation success: cell number, visual cell contacts, membrane integrity, motility, as well as spreading were comparable to control. In contrast, cell number by short cultivation time (0.5 h) reduced dramatically after thawing and expanded cultivation time (24 h) decreased cell viability. Our results provide necessary information to enhance the production and to store ready-to-use transplantation units for application in bone, cartilage or skin regenerative therapy.

  4. Integration of a Novel Injectable Nano Calcium Sulfate/Alginate Scaffold and BMP2 Gene-Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoning; Dziak, Rosemary; Mao, Keya; Genco, Robert; Swithart, Mark; Li, Chunyi

    2013-01-01

    The repair of craniofacial bone defects is surgically challenging due to the complex anatomical structure of the craniofacial skeleton. Current strategies for bone tissue engineering using a preformed scaffold have not resulted in the expected clinical regeneration due to difficulty in seeding cells into the deep internal space of scaffold, and the inability to inject them in minimally invasive surgeries. In this study, we used the osteoconductive and mechanical properties of nano-scale calcium sulfate (nCS) and the biocompatibility of alginate to develop the injectable nCS/alginate (nCS/A) paste, and characterized the effect of this nCS/A paste loaded with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) gene-modified rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on bone and blood vessel growth. Our results showed that the nCS/A paste was injectable under small injection forces. The mechanical properties of the nCS/A paste were increased with an increased proportion of alginate. MSCs maintained their viability after the injection, and MSCs and BMP2 gene-modified MSCs in the injectable pastes remained viable, osteodifferentiated, and yielded high alkaline phosphatase activity. By testing the ability of this injectable paste and BMP2-gene-modified MSCs for the repair of critical-sized calvarial bone defects in a rat model, we found that BMP2-gene-modified MSCs in nCS/A (nCS/A+M/B2) showed robust osteogenic activity, which resulted in consistent bone bridging of the bone defects. The vessel density in nCS/A+M/B2 was significantly higher than that in the groups of blank control, nCS/A alone, and nCS/A mixed with MSCs (nCS/A+M). These results indicate that BMP2 promotes MSCs-mediated bone formation and vascularization in nCS/A paste. Overall, the results demonstrated that the combination of injectable nCS/A paste and BMP2-gene-modified MSCs is a new and effective strategy for the repair of bone defects. PMID:22994418

  5. Integration of a novel injectable nano calcium sulfate/alginate scaffold and BMP2 gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoning; Dziak, Rosemary; Mao, Keya; Genco, Robert; Swihart, Mark; Swithart, Mark; Li, Chunyi; Yang, Shuying

    2013-02-01

    The repair of craniofacial bone defects is surgically challenging due to the complex anatomical structure of the craniofacial skeleton. Current strategies for bone tissue engineering using a preformed scaffold have not resulted in the expected clinical regeneration due to difficulty in seeding cells into the deep internal space of scaffold, and the inability to inject them in minimally invasive surgeries. In this study, we used the osteoconductive and mechanical properties of nano-scale calcium sulfate (nCS) and the biocompatibility of alginate to develop the injectable nCS/alginate (nCS/A) paste, and characterized the effect of this nCS/A paste loaded with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) gene-modified rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on bone and blood vessel growth. Our results showed that the nCS/A paste was injectable under small injection forces. The mechanical properties of the nCS/A paste were increased with an increased proportion of alginate. MSCs maintained their viability after the injection, and MSCs and BMP2 gene-modified MSCs in the injectable pastes remained viable, osteodifferentiated, and yielded high alkaline phosphatase activity. By testing the ability of this injectable paste and BMP2-gene-modified MSCs for the repair of critical-sized calvarial bone defects in a rat model, we found that BMP2-gene-modified MSCs in nCS/A (nCS/A+M/B2) showed robust osteogenic activity, which resulted in consistent bone bridging of the bone defects. The vessel density in nCS/A+M/B2 was significantly higher than that in the groups of blank control, nCS/A alone, and nCS/A mixed with MSCs (nCS/A+M). These results indicate that BMP2 promotes MSCs-mediated bone formation and vascularization in nCS/A paste. Overall, the results demonstrated that the combination of injectable nCS/A paste and BMP2-gene-modified MSCs is a new and effective strategy for the repair of bone defects.

  6. Alginate as a cell culture substrate for growth and differentiation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Razeih; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Samiei, Shahram; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Davari, Maliheh; Nazemroaya, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Abouzar; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells' behavior in alginate beads that establish 3D environment for cellular growth and mimic extracellular matrix versus the conventional 2D monolayer culture. RPE cells were encapsulated in alginate beads by dripping alginate cell suspension into CaCl2 solution. Beads were suspended in three different media including Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/F12 alone, DMEM/F12 supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum (FBS), and DMEM/F12 supplemented with 30 % human amniotic fluid (HAF). RPE cells were cultivated on polystyrene under the same conditions as controls. Cell phenotype, cell proliferation, cell death, and MTT assay, immunocytochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR were performed to evaluate the effect of alginate on RPE cells characteristics and integrity. RPE cells can survive and proliferate in alginate matrixes. Immunocytochemistry analysis exhibited Nestin, RPE65, and cytokeratin expressions in a reasonable number of cultured cells in alginate beads. Real-time PCR data demonstrated high levels of Nestin, CHX10, RPE65, and tyrosinase gene expressions in RPE cells immobilized in alginate when compared to 2D monolayer culture systems. The results suggest that alginate can be used as a reliable scaffold for maintenance of RPE cells' integrity and in vitro propagation of human retinal progenitor cells for cell replacement therapies in retinal diseases.

  7. Boron nitride nanotubes included thermally cross-linked gelatin-glucose scaffolds show improved properties.

    PubMed

    Şen, Özlem; Culha, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are increasingly investigated for their medical and biomedical applications due to their unique properties such as resistance to oxidation, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. BNNTs can be used to enhance mechanical strength of biomedical structures such as scaffolds in tissue engineering applications. In this study, we report the use of BNNTs and hydroxylated BNNTs (BNNT-OH) to improve the properties of gelatin-glucose scaffolds prepared with electrospinning technique. Human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells are used for the toxicity assessment and cell seeding studies. It is found that the addition of BNNTs into the scaffold does not influence cell viability, decreases the scaffold degradation rate, and improves cell attachment and proliferation compared to only-gelatin scaffold.

  8. Engineering alginate for intervertebral disc repair.

    PubMed

    Bron, Johannes L; Vonk, Lucienne A; Smit, Theodoor H; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2011-10-01

    Alginate is frequently studied as a scaffold for intervertebral disc (IVD) repair, since it closely mimics mechanical and cell-adhesive properties of the nucleus pulposus (NP) of the IVD. The aim of this study was to assess the relation between alginate concentration and scaffold stiffness and find preparation conditions where the viscoelastic behaviour mimics that of the NP. In addition, we measured the effect of variations in scaffold stiffness on the expression of extracellular matrix molecules specific to the NP (proteoglycans and collagen) by native NP cells. We prepared sample discs of different concentrations of alginate (1%-6%) by two different methods, diffusion and in situ gelation. The stiffness increased with increasing alginate concentration, while the loss tangent (dissipative behaviour) remained constant. The diffusion samples were ten-fold stiffer than samples prepared by in situ gelation. Sample discs prepared from 2% alginate by diffusion closely matched the stiffness and loss tangent of the NP. The stiffness of all samples declined upon prolonged incubation in medium, especially for samples prepared by diffusion. The biosynthetic phenotype of native cells isolated from NPs was preserved in alginate matrices up to 4 weeks of culturing. Gene expression levels of extracellular matrix components were insensitive to alginate concentration and corresponding matrix stiffness, likely due to the poor adhesiveness of the cells to alginate. In conclusion, alginate can mimic the viscoelastic properties of the NP and preserve the biosynthetic phenotype of NP cells but certain limitations like long-term stability still have to be addressed.

  9. Novel alginate-based nanocarriers as a strategy to include high concentrations of hydrophobic compounds in hydrogels for topical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. T. P.; Munnier, E.; Souce, M.; Perse, X.; David, S.; Bonnier, F.; Vial, F.; Yvergnaux, F.; Perrier, T.; Cohen-Jonathan, S.; Chourpa, I.

    2015-06-01

    The cutaneous penetration of hydrophobic active molecules is of foremost concern in the dermatology and cosmetic formulation fields. The poor solubility in water of those molecules limits their use in hydrophilic forms such as gels, which are favored by patients with chronic skin disease. The aim of this work is to design a novel nanocarrier of hydrophobic active molecules and to determine its potential as an ingredient of a topical form. The nanocarrier consists of an oily core surrounded by a protective shell of alginate, a natural polysaccharide isolated from brown algae. These calcium alginate-based nanocarriers (CaANCs) were prepared at room temperature and without the use of organic solvent by an accelerated nanoemulsification-polymer crosslinking method. The size (hydrodynamic diameter ˜200 nm) and surface charge (zeta potential ˜ - 30 mV) of the CaANCs are both compatible with their application on skin. CaANCs loaded with a fluorescent label were stable in model hydrophilic galenic forms under different storage conditions. Curcumin was encapsulated in CaANCs with an efficiency of ˜95%, fully retaining its antioxidant activity. The application of the curcumin-loaded CaANCs on excised human skin led to a significant accumulation of the active molecules in the upper layers of the skin, asserting the potential of these nanocarriers in active pharmaceutical and cosmetic ingredients topical delivery.

  10. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue. PMID:27600217

  11. Understanding Alginate Gel Development for Bioclogging and Biogeophysical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, I.; Atekwana, E. A.; Abdel Aal, G. Z.; Atekwana, E. A.; Sarkisova, S.; Patrauchan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Bioremediation strategies to mitigate the transport of heavy metals and radionuclides in subsurface sediments have largely targeted to increase the mobility and/or solubility of these compounds by the stimulation of biogeochemical activity of the metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. The latter secrete and/or release out diverse biochemical molecule including, first of all, organic acids and biopolymers such as alginic acid, proteins and DNA. Alginate gel is one of the major components determining the structure of biofilm which causes clogging in porous media. Biopolymers composing biofilm having, at least, two main functions: to be a scaffold for a microbial biofilm, and to regulate the exchange of metabolites and ions between an environment and bacterial cells. Additionally, the accumulation of biopolymers and a matured biofilm within porous media was shown to contribute to a detectable biogeophysical signal, spectral induced polarization (SIP), in particular. Our objective is to understand the role of different biofilm components on the SIP response as the latter has been proposed as a non-invasive tool to monitor biofilm development and rate of clogging in the subsurface. Understanding the process of alginate gel development may aid in the understanding of the fate and transport of mineralized heavy metals and radionuclides in contaminated soils. Here we describe the reciprocal relationship between environmental chemistry and alginate gel development. Commercial (Sigma) alginic acid (AA) was used as a substratum for the preparation of a model gel. AA was solubilized by adjusting solutions with pH up to 4 with 0.1 NaOH. Both Ca(OH)2 or CaCl2 were used to initiate the gelation of alginate. pH, fluid conductivity, soluble Ca2+ concentration, and a yield of gelated alginate were monitored in both liquid and porous media after the interaction of calcium compounds with alginate. This study confirms the critical role of Ca2+ for alginate gelation, biofilm development

  12. Alginate/polyoxyethylene and alginate/gelatin hydrogels: preparation, characterization, and application in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Aroguz, Ayse Z; Baysal, Kemal; Adiguzel, Zelal; Baysal, Bahattin M

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogels are attractive biomaterials for three-dimensional cell culture and tissue engineering applications. The preparation of hydrogels using alginate and gelatin provides cross-linked hydrophilic polymers that can swell but do not dissolve in water. In this work, we first reinforced pure alginate by using polyoxyethylene as a supporting material. In an alginate/PEO sample that contains 20 % polyoxyethylene, we obtained a stable hydrogel for cell culture experiments. We also prepared a stable alginate/gelatin hydrogel by cross-linking a periodate-oxidized alginate with another functional component such as gelatin. The hydrogels were found to have a high fluid uptake. In this work, preparation, characterization, swelling, and surface properties of these scaffold materials were described. Lyophilized scaffolds obtained from hydrogels were used for cell viability experiments, and the results were presented in detail.

  13. A novel bio electro active alginate-aniline tetramer/ agarose scaffold for tissue engineering: synthesis, characterization, drug release and cell culture study.

    PubMed

    Atoufi, Zhale; Zarrintaj, Payam; Motlagh, Ghodratollah Hashemi; Amiri, Anahita; Bagher, Zohreh; Kamrava, Seyed Kamran

    2017-10-01

    In this study, synthesis of a novel biocompatible stimuli-responsive conducting hydrogel based on agarose/alginate-aniline tetramer with the capability of a tailored electrically controlled drug-release for neuroregeneration is investigated. First, aniline tetramer is synthesized and grafted onto sodium alginate. Then, this material is added to agarose as an electrical conductivity modifier to obtain Agarose/alginate-aniline tetramer hydrogel. The synthesized materials are characterized by H NMR and FTIR. The hydrogels are prepared with varying content of aniline tetramer and their swelling-deswelling and shape memory behavior is evaluated. The electroactivity and ionic conductivity of hydrogels against temperature is measured. The sample with 10% aniline tetramer (AT10) reveals the highest ionic conductivity. In MTT and SEM assays, AT10 shows the best cell viability and cell proliferation due to its highest ionic conductivity highlighting the fact that electrical stimuli cell signaling. Hydrogels also represent great potentials for passive and electro-stimulated dexamethasone release. These results demonstrate that the newly developed conducting hydrogels are promising materials for neuroregenerative medicine.

  14. Jellyfish collagen and alginate: Combined marine materials for superior chondrogenesis of hMSC.

    PubMed

    Pustlauk, W; Paul, B; Gelinsky, M; Bernhardt, A

    2016-07-01

    Marine, hybrid constructs of porous scaffolds from fibrillized jellyfish collagen and alginate hydrogel are mimicking both of the main tissue components of cartilage, thus being a promising approach for chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Investigating their potential for articular cartilage repair, the present study examined scaffolds being either infiltrated with an alginate-cell-suspension (ACS) or seeded with hMSC and embedded in alginate after cell adhesion (EAS). Hybrid constructs with 2×10(5) and 4.5×10(5)hMSC/scaffold were compared to hMSC encapsulated in pure alginate discs, both chondrogenically stimulated for 21days. Typical round, chondrocyte-like morphology was observed in pure alginate gels and ACS scaffolds, while cells in EAS were elongated and tightly attached to the collagen pores. Col 2 gene expression was comparable in all scaffold types examined. However, the Col 2/Col 1 ratio was higher for pure alginate discs and ACS scaffolds compared to EAS. In contrast, cells in EAS scaffolds displayed higher gene expression of Sox 9, Col 11 and ACAN compared to ACS and pure alginate. Secretion of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) was comparable for ACS and EAS scaffolds. In conclusion hybrid constructs of jellyfish collagen and alginate support hMSC chondrogenic differentiation and provide more stable and constructs compared to pure hydrogels.

  15. Efficient functionalization of alginate biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Vanacker, Julie; Najmi, Maryam A; Aachmann, Finn L; Strand, Berit L; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2016-02-01

    Peptide coupled alginates obtained by chemical functionalization of alginates are commonly used as scaffold materials for cells in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. We here present an alternative to the commonly used carbodiimide chemistry, using partial periodate oxidation followed by reductive amination. High and precise degrees of substitution were obtained with high reproducibility, and without formation of by-products. A protocol was established using l-Tyrosine methyl ester as a model compound and the non-toxic pic-BH3 as the reducing agent. DOSY was used to indirectly verify covalent binding and the structure of the product was further elucidated using NMR spectroscopy. The coupling efficiency was to some extent dependent on alginate composition, being most efficient on mannuronan. Three different bioactive peptide sequences (GRGDYP, GRGDSP and KHIFSDDSSE) were coupled to 8% periodate oxidized alginate resulting in degrees of substitution between 3.9 and 6.9%. Cell adhesion studies of mouse myoblasts (C2C12) and human dental stem cells (RP89) to gels containing various amounts of GRGDSP coupled alginate demonstrated the bioactivity of the material where RP89 cells needed higher peptide concentrations to adhere.

  16. Alginate: properties and biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Mooney, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Alginate is a biomaterial that has found numerous applications in biomedical science and engineering due to its favorable properties, including biocompatibility and ease of gelation. Alginate hydrogels have been particularly attractive in wound healing, drug delivery, and tissue engineering applications to date, as these gels retain structural similarity to the extracellular matrices in tissues and can be manipulated to play several critical roles. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of general properties of alginate and its hydrogels, their biomedical applications, and suggest new perspectives for future studies with these polymers. PMID:22125349

  17. Development of a morphogenetically active scaffold for three-dimensional growth of bone cells: biosilica-alginate hydrogel for SaOS-2 cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Feng, Qingling; Schlossmacher, Ute; Link, Thorben; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-11-01

    Polymeric silica is formed from ortho-silicate during a sol-gel formation process, while biosilica is the product of an enzymatically driven bio-polycondensation reaction. Both polymers have recently been described as a template that induces an increased expression of the genes encoding bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) and osteoprotegerin in osteoblast-related SaOS-2 cells; simultaneously or subsequently the cells respond with enhanced hydroxyapatite formation. In order to assess whether the biocompatible polymeric silica/biosilica can serve as a morphogenetically active matrix suitable for three-dimensional (3D) cell growth, or even for 3D cell bioprinting, SaOS-2 cells were embedded into a Na-alginate-based hydrogel. Four different gelatinous hydrogel matrices were used for suspending SaOS-2 cells: (a) the hydrogel alone; (b) the hydrogel with 400 μM ortho-silicate; (c) the hydrogel supplemented with 400 μM ortho-silicate and recombinant silicatein to allow biosilica synthesis to occur; and (d) the hydrogel with ortho-silicate and BSA. The SaOS-2 cells showed an increased growth if silica/biosilica components were present in the hydrogel. Likewise intensified was the formation of hydroxyapatite nodules in the silica-containing hydrogels. After an incubation period of 2 weeks, cells present in silica-containing hydrogels showed a significantly higher expression of the genes encoding the cytokine BMP-2, the major fibrillar structural protein collagen 1 and likewise of carbonic anhydrase. It is concluded that silica, and to a larger extent biosilica, retains its morphogenetic/osteogenic potential after addition to Na-alginate-based hydrogels. This property might qualify silica hydrogels to be also used as a matrix for 3D cell printing.

  18. Bacterial community structure and predicted alginate metabolic pathway in an alginate-degrading bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akihisa; Miura, Toyokazu; Kawata, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Methane fermentation is one of the effective approaches for utilization of brown algae; however, this process is limited by the microbial capability to degrade alginate, a main polysaccharide found in these algae. Despite its potential, little is known about anaerobic microbial degradation of alginate. Here we constructed a bacterial consortium able to anaerobically degrade alginate. Taxonomic classification of 16S rRNA gene, based on high-throughput sequencing data, revealed that this consortium included two dominant strains, designated HUA-1 and HUA-2; these strains were related to Clostridiaceae bacterium SK082 (99%) and Dysgonomonas capnocytophagoides (95%), respectively. Alginate lyase activity and metagenomic analyses, based on high-throughput sequencing data, revealed that this bacterial consortium possessed putative genes related to a predicted alginate metabolic pathway. However, HUA-1 and 2 did not grow on agar medium with alginate by using roll-tube method, suggesting the existence of bacterial interactions like symbiosis for anaerobic alginate degradation.

  19. Development of functionalized multi-walled carbon-nanotube-based alginate hydrogels for enabling biomimetic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joddar, Binata; Garcia, Eduardo; Casas, Atzimba; Stewart, Calvin M.

    2016-08-01

    Alginate is a hydrogel commonly used for cell culture by ionically crosslinking in the presence of divalent Ca2+ ions. However these alginate gels are mechanically unstable, not permitting their use as scaffolds to engineer robust biological bone, breast, cardiac or tumor tissues. This issue can be addressed via encapsulation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) serving as a reinforcing phase while being dispersed in a continuous phase of alginate. We hypothesized that adding functionalized MWCNT to alginate, would yield composite gels with distinctively different mechanical, physical and biological characteristics in comparison to alginate alone. Resultant MWCNT-alginate gels were porous, and showed significantly less degradation after 14 days compared to alginate alone. In vitro cell-studies showed enhanced HeLa cell adhesion and proliferation on the MWCNT-alginate compared to alginate. The extent of cell proliferation was greater when cultured atop 1 and 3 mg/ml MWCNT-alginate; although all MWCNT-alginates lead to enhanced cell cluster formation compared to alginate alone. Among all the MWCNT-alginates, the 1 mg/ml gels showed significantly greater stiffness compared to all other cases. These results provide an important basis for the development of the MWCNT-alginates as novel substrates for cell culture applications, cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  20. Development of functionalized multi-walled carbon-nanotube-based alginate hydrogels for enabling biomimetic technologies

    PubMed Central

    Joddar, Binata; Garcia, Eduardo; Casas, Atzimba; Stewart, Calvin M.

    2016-01-01

    Alginate is a hydrogel commonly used for cell culture by ionically crosslinking in the presence of divalent Ca2+ ions. However these alginate gels are mechanically unstable, not permitting their use as scaffolds to engineer robust biological bone, breast, cardiac or tumor tissues. This issue can be addressed via encapsulation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) serving as a reinforcing phase while being dispersed in a continuous phase of alginate. We hypothesized that adding functionalized MWCNT to alginate, would yield composite gels with distinctively different mechanical, physical and biological characteristics in comparison to alginate alone. Resultant MWCNT-alginate gels were porous, and showed significantly less degradation after 14 days compared to alginate alone. In vitro cell-studies showed enhanced HeLa cell adhesion and proliferation on the MWCNT-alginate compared to alginate. The extent of cell proliferation was greater when cultured atop 1 and 3 mg/ml MWCNT-alginate; although all MWCNT-alginates lead to enhanced cell cluster formation compared to alginate alone. Among all the MWCNT-alginates, the 1 mg/ml gels showed significantly greater stiffness compared to all other cases. These results provide an important basis for the development of the MWCNT-alginates as novel substrates for cell culture applications, cell therapy and tissue engineering. PMID:27578567

  1. Fibrous hydrogel scaffolds with cells embedded in the fibers as a potential tissue scaffold for skin repair.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Yi; Peng, Chih-Wei; Wu, Wei-Wen

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach was undertaken to create a potential skin wound dressing. L929 fibroblast cells and alginate solution were simultaneously dispensed into a calcium chloride solution using a three-dimensional plotting system to manufacture a fibrous alginate scaffold with interconnected pores. These cells were then embedded in the alginate hydrogel fibers of the scaffold. A conventional scaffold with cells directly seeded on the fiber surface was used as a control. The encapsulated fibroblasts made using the co-dispensing method distributed homogeneously within the scaffold and showed the delayed formation of large cell aggregates compared to the control. The cells embedded in the hydrogel fibers also deposited more type I collagen in the extracellular matrix and expressed higher levels of fgf11 and fn1 than the control, indicating increased cellular proliferation and attachment. The results indicate that the novel co-dispensing alginate scaffold may promote skin regeneration better than the conventional directly-seeded scaffold.

  2. Preparation and characterization of hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate biocomposites for bone implant application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanasan, Nanthini; Adzila, Sharifah; Suid, Mohd Syafiq; Gurubaran, P.

    2016-07-01

    In biomedical fields, synthetic scaffolds are being improved by using the ceramics, polymers and composites materials to avoid the limitations of allograft. Ceramic-polymer composites are appearing to be the most successful bone graft substitute in human body. The natural bones itself are well-known as composite of collagen and hydroxyapatite. In this research, precipitation method was used to synthesis hydroxyapatite (HA)/sodium alginate (SA) in various parameters. This paper describes the hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate biocomposite which suitable for use in bone defects or regeneration of bone through the characterizations which include FTIR, FESEM, EDS and DTA. In FTIR, the characteristi peaks of PO4-3 and OH- groups which corresponding to hydroxyapatite are existed in the mixing powders. The needle-size particle of hydroxyapatite/ alginate (HA/SA) are observed in FESEM in the range of 15.8nm-38.2nm.EDS confirmed the existence of HA/SA composition in the mixing powders. There is an endothermic peak which corresponds to the dehydration and the loss of physically adsorbed water molecules of the hydroxyapatite (HA)/sodium alginate (SA) powder which are described in DTA.

  3. Regulating in vivo calcification of alginate microbeads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christopher S.D.; Moyer, Hunter R.; Gittens, Rolando A.; Williams, Joseph K.; Boskey, Adele L.; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    Alginate calcification has been previously reported clinically and during animal implantation; however no study has investigated the mechanism, extensively characterized the mineral, or evaluated multiple methods to regulate or eliminate mineralization. In the present study, alginate calcification was first studied in vitro: calcium-crosslinked alginate beads sequestered surrounding phosphate while forming traces of hydroxyapatite. Calcification in vivo was then examined in nude mice using alginate microbeads with and without adipose stem cells (ASCs). Variables included the delivery method, site of delivery, sex of the animal, time in vivo, crosslinking solution, and method of storage prior to delivery. Calcium-crosslinked alginate microbeads mineralized when injected subcutaneously or implanted intramuscularly after 1–6 months. More extensive analysis with histology, microCT, FTIR, XRD, and EDS showed calcium phosphate deposits throughout the microbeads with surface mineralization that closely matched hydroxyapatite found in bone. Incorporating 25 mM bisphosphonate reduced alginate calcification whereas using barium chloride eliminated mineralization. Buffering the crosslinking solution with HEPES at pH 7.3 while washing and storing samples in basal media prior to implantation also eliminated calcification in vivo. This study shows that alginate processing prior to implantation can significantly influence bulk hydroxyapatite formation and presents a method to regulate alginate calcification. PMID:20363022

  4. Regulating in vivo calcification of alginate microbeads.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S D; Moyer, Hunter R; Gittens, Rolando A I; Williams, Joseph K; Boskey, Adele L; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2010-06-01

    Alginate calcification has been previously reported clinically and during animal implantation; however no study has investigated the mechanism, extensively characterized the mineral, or evaluated multiple methods to regulate or eliminate mineralization. In the present study, alginate calcification was first studied in vitro: calcium-crosslinked alginate beads sequestered surrounding phosphate while forming traces of hydroxyapatite. Calcification in vivo was then examined in nude mice using alginate microbeads with and without adipose stem cells (ASCs). Variables included the delivery method, site of delivery, sex of the animal, time in vivo, crosslinking solution, and method of storage prior to delivery. Calcium-crosslinked alginate microbeads mineralized when injected subcutaneously or implanted intramuscularly after 1-6 months. More extensive analysis with histology, microCT, FTIR, XRD, and EDS showed calcium phosphate deposits throughout the microbeads with surface mineralization that closely matched hydroxyapatite found in bone. Incorporating 25 mm bisphosphonate reduced alginate calcification whereas using barium chloride eliminated mineralization. Buffering the crosslinking solution with HEPES at pH 7.3 while washing and storing samples in basal media prior to implantation also eliminated calcification in vivo. This study shows that alginate processing prior to implantation can significantly influence bulk hydroxyapatite formation and presents a method to regulate alginate calcification. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Alginate: A Versatile Biomaterial to Encapsulate Isolated Ovarian Follicles.

    PubMed

    Vanacker, Julie; Amorim, Christiani A

    2017-02-28

    In vitro culture of ovarian follicles isolated or enclosed in ovarian tissue fragments and grafting of isolated ovarian follicles represent a potential alternative to restore fertility in cancer patients who cannot undergo cryopreservation of embryos or oocytes or transplantation of frozen-thawed ovarian tissue. In this regard, respecting the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of isolated follicles is crucial to maintaining their proper follicular physiology. To this end, alginate hydrogel has been widely investigated using follicles from numerous animal species, yielding promising results. The goal of this review is therefore to provide an overview of alginate applications utilizing the biomaterial as a scaffold for 3D encapsulation of isolated ovarian follicles. Different methods of isolated follicle encapsulation in alginate are discussed in this review, as its use of 3D alginate culture systems as a tool for in vitro follicle analysis. Possible improvements of this matrix, namely modification with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide or combination with fibrin, are also summarized. Encouraging results have been obtained in different animal models, and particularly with isolated follicles encapsulated in alginate matrices and grafted to mice. This summary is designed to guide the reader towards development of next-generation alginate scaffolds, with enhanced properties for follicle encapsulation.

  6. Development of a porous PLGA-based scaffold for mastoid air cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Toby W. A.; Birchall, John P.; Mallick, Ali S.; Alliston, Tamara; Lustig, Lawrence R.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a porous, biodegradable scaffold for mastoid air cell regeneration. Study Design In vitro development of a temperature-sensitive poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA/PEG) scaffold tailored for this application. Methods Human mastoid bone microstructure and porosity was investigated using micro-computed tomography. PLGA/PEG-alginate scaffolds were developed and scaffold porosity was assessed. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were cultured on the scaffolds in vitro. Scaffolds were loaded with ciprofloxacin and release of ciprofloxacin over time in vitro was assessed. Results Porosity of human mastoid bone was measured at 83% with an average pore size of 1.3mm. PLGA/PEG-alginate scaffold porosity ranged from 43–78% depending on the alginate bead content. hBM-MSCs proliferate on the scaffolds in vitro, and release of ciprofloxacin from the scaffolds was demonstrated over 7–10 weeks. Conclusion The PLGA/PEG-alginate scaffolds developed in this study demonstrate similar structural features to human mastoid bone, support cell growth and display sustained antibiotic release. These scaffolds may be of potential clinical use in mastoid air cell regeneration. Further in vivo studies to assess the suitability of PLGA/PEG-alginate scaffolds for this application are required. PMID:23670365

  7. Influence of mechanical properties of alginate-based substrates on the performance of Schwann cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Ning, Liqun; Xu, Yitong; Chen, Xiongbiao; Schreyer, David J

    2016-06-01

    In tissue engineering, artificial tissue scaffolds containing living cells have been studied for tissue repair and regeneration. Notably, the performance of these encapsulated-in-scaffolds cells in terms of cell viability, proliferation, and expression of function during and after the scaffold fabrication process, has not been well documented because of the influence of mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of the scaffold substrate materials. This paper presents our study on the influence of mechanical properties of alginate-based substrates on the performance of Schwann cells, which are the major glial cells of peripheral nervous system. Given the fact that alginate polysaccharide hydrogel has poor cell adhesion properties, in this study, we examined several types of cell-adhesion supplements and found that alginate covalently modified with RGD peptide provided improved cell proliferation and adhesion. We prepared alginate-based substrates for cell culture using varying alginate concentrations for altering their mechanical properties, which were confirmed by compression testing. Then, we examined the viability, proliferation, morphology, and expression of the extracellular matrix protein laminin of Schwann cells that were seeded on the surface of alginate-based substrates (or 2D culture) or encapsulated within alginate-based substrates (3D cultures), and correlated the examined cell performance to the alginate concentration (or mechanical properties) of hydrogel substrates. Our findings suggest that covalent attachment of RGD peptide can improve the success of Schwann cell encapsulation within alginate-based scaffolds, and provide guidance for regulating the mechanical properties of alginate-based scaffolds containing Schwann cells for applications in peripheral nervous system regeneration and repair.

  8. Controlling protein release from scaffolds using polymer blends and composites.

    PubMed

    Ginty, Patrick J; Barry, John J A; White, Lisa J; Howdle, Steve M; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2008-01-01

    We report the development of three protein loaded polymer blend and composite materials that modify the release kinetics of the protein from poly(dl-lactic acid) (P(dl)LA) scaffolds. P(dl)LA has been combined with either poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(caprolactone) (PCL) microparticles or calcium alginate fibres using supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) processing to form single and dual protein release scaffolds. P(dl)LA was blended with the hydrophilic polymer PEG using scCO(2) to increase the water uptake of the resultant scaffold and modify the release kinetics of an encapsulated protein. This was demonstrated by the more rapid release of the protein when compared to the release rate from P(dl)LA only scaffolds. For the P(dl)LA/alginate scaffolds, the protein loaded alginate fibres were processed into porous protein loaded P(dl)LA scaffolds using scCO(2) to produce dual release kinetics from the scaffolds. Protein release from the hydrophilic alginate fibres was more rapid in the initial stages, complementing the slower release from the slower degrading P(dl)LA scaffolds. In contrast, when protein loaded PCL particles were loaded into P(dl)LA scaffolds, the rate of protein release was retarded from the slow degrading PCL phase.

  9. Alginate composites for bone tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Bhatnagar, Ira; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Kang, Kyong-Hwa; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a complex and hierarchical tissue consisting of nano hydroxyapatite and collagen as major portion. Several attempts have been made to prepare the artificial bone so as to replace the autograft and allograft treatment. Tissue engineering is a promising approach to solve the several issues and is also useful in the construction of artificial bone with materials including polymer, ceramics, metals, cells and growth factors. Composites consisting of polymer-ceramics, best mimic the natural functions of bone. Alginate, an anionic polymer owing enormous biomedical applications, is gaining importance particularly in bone tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility and gel forming properties. Several composites such as alginate-polymer (PLGA, PEG and chitosan), alginate-protein (collagen and gelatin), alginate-ceramic, alginate-bioglass, alginate-biosilica, alginate-bone morphogenetic protein-2 and RGD peptides composite have been investigated till date. These alginate composites show enhanced biochemical significance in terms of porosity, mechanical strength, cell adhesion, biocompatibility, cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase increase, excellent mineralization and osteogenic differentiation. Hence, alginate based composite biomaterials will be promising for bone tissue regeneration. This review will provide a broad overview of alginate preparation and its applications towards bone tissue engineering.

  10. Preparation methods of alginate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Paques, Jerome P; van der Linden, Erik; van Rijn, Cees J M; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2014-07-01

    This article reviews available methods for the formation of alginate nano-aggregates, nanocapsules and nanospheres. Primarily, alginate nanoparticles are being prepared by two methods. In the "complexation method", complex formation on the interface of an oil droplet is used to form alginate nanocapsules, and complex formation in an aqueous solution is used to form alginate nano-aggregates. In a second method w/o emulsification coupled with gelation of the alginate emulsion droplet can be used to form alginate nanospheres. We review advantages and disadvantages of these methods, and give an overview of the properties of the alginate particles produced with these methods.

  11. ERK Signals: Scaffolding Scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    ERK1/2 MAP Kinases become activated in response to multiple intra- and extra-cellular stimuli through a signaling module composed of sequential tiers of cytoplasmic kinases. Scaffold proteins regulate ERK signals by connecting the different components of the module into a multi-enzymatic complex by which signal amplitude and duration are fine-tuned, and also provide signal fidelity by isolating this complex from external interferences. In addition, scaffold proteins play a central role as spatial regulators of ERKs signals. In this respect, depending on the subcellular localization from which the activating signals emanate, defined scaffolds specify which substrates are amenable to be phosphorylated. Recent evidence has unveiled direct interactions among different scaffold protein species. These scaffold-scaffold macro-complexes could constitute an additional level of regulation for ERK signals and may serve as nodes for the integration of incoming signals and the subsequent diversification of the outgoing signals with respect to substrate engagement. PMID:27303664

  12. Automated quantitative assessment of three-dimensional bioprinted hydrogel scaffolds using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Xu, Mingen; Zhang, LieLie; Zhou, QingQing; Luo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing and quantitatively assessing the internal architecture of opaque three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted hydrogel scaffolds is difficult but vital to the improvement of 3D bioprinting techniques and to the fabrication of functional engineered tissues. In this study, swept-source optical coherence tomography was applied to acquire high-resolution images of hydrogel scaffolds. Novel 3D gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds with six different representative architectures were fabricated using our 3D bioprinting system. Both the scaffold material networks and the interconnected flow channel networks were reconstructed through volume rendering and binarisation processing to provide a 3D volumetric view. An image analysis algorithm was developed based on the automatic selection of the spatially-isolated region-of–interest. Via this algorithm, the spatially-resolved morphological parameters including pore size, pore shape, strut size, surface area, porosity, and interconnectivity were quantified precisely. Fabrication defects and differences between the designed and as-produced scaffolds were clearly identified in both 2D and 3D; the locations and dimensions of each of the fabrication defects were also defined. It concludes that this method will be a key tool for non-destructive and quantitative characterization, design optimisation and fabrication refinement of 3D bioprinted hydrogel scaffolds. Furthermore, this method enables investigation into the quantitative relationship between scaffold structure and biological outcome. PMID:27231597

  13. Novel crosslinked alginate/hyaluronic acid hydrogels for nerve tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min-Dan; Zhai, Peng; Schreyer, David J.; Zheng, Ruo-Shi; Sun, Xiao-Dan; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Chen, Xiong-Biao

    2013-09-01

    Artificial tissue engineering scaffolds can potentially provide support and guidance for the regrowth of severed axons following nerve injury. In this study, a hybrid biomaterial composed of alginate and hyaluronic acid (HA) was synthesized and characterized in terms of its suitability for covalent modification, biocompatibility for living Schwann cells and feasibility to construct three dimensional (3D) scaffolds. Carbodiimide mediated amide formation for the purpose of covalent crosslinking of the HA was carried out in the presence of calciumions that ionically crosslink alginate. Amide formation was found to be dependent on the concentrations of carbodiimide and calcium chloride. The double-crosslinked composite hydrogels display biocompatibility that is comparable to simple HA hydrogels, allowing for Schwann cell survival and growth. No significant difference was found between composite hydrogels made from different ratios of alginate and HA. A 3D BioPlotter™ rapid prototyping system was used to fabricate 3D scaffolds. The result indicated that combining HA with alginate facilitated the fabrication process and that 3D scaffolds with porous inner structure can be fabricated from the composite hydrogels, but not from HA alone. This information provides a basis for continuing in vitro and in vivo tests of the suitability of alginate/HA hydrogel as a biomaterial to create living cell scaffolds to support nerve regeneration.

  14. Magneto-responsive alginate capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degen, Patrick; Zwar, Elena; Schulz, Imke; Rehage, Heinz

    2015-05-01

    Upon incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) into gels, composite materials called ferrogels are obtained. These magneto-responsive systems have a wide range of potential applications including switches and sensors as well as drug delivery systems. In this article, we focus on the properties of calcium alginate capsules, which are widely used as carrier systems in medicine and technology. We studied the incorporation of different kinds of mNPs in matrix capsules and in the core and the shell of hollow particles. We found out that not all particle-alginate or particle-CaCl2 solution combinations were suitable for a successful capsule preparation on grounds of a destabilization of the nanoparticles or the polymer. For those systems allowing the preparation of switchable beads or capsules, we systematically studied the size and microscopic structure of the capsules, their magnetic behavior and mechanical resistance.

  15. Preparation of carbon nanotube-alginate nanocomposite gel for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Minoru; Fukushima, Tadao; Hayakawa, Toru; Nakashima, Naotoshi; Inoue, Yusuke; Takeda, Shoji; Okamura, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Kunihisa

    2006-12-01

    A novel scaffold material based on an alginate hydrogel which contained carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was prepared, and its mechanical property and biocompatibility evaluated. Soluble CNTs were prepared with acid treatment and dispersed in sodium alginate solution as a cross-linker. After which, the mechanical property (elastic deformation), saline sorption, histological reaction, and cell viability of the resultant nanocomposite gel (CNT-Alg gel) were evaluated. The CNT-Alg gel showed faster gelling and higher mechanical strength than the conventional alginate gel. Saline sorption amount of freeze-dried CNT-Alg gel was equal to that of the alginate gel. In terms of histological evaluation and cell viability assay, CNT-Alg gel exhibited a mild inflammatory response and non-cytotoxicity. These results thus suggested that CNT-Alg gel could be useful as a scaffold material in tissue engineering with the sidewalls of CNTs acting as active sites for chemical functionalization.

  16. Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cell (GMSC) Delivery System Based on RGD-Coupled Alginate Hydrogel with Antimicrobial Properties: A Novel Treatment Modality for Peri-Implantitis.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Ivana M A; Chen, Chider; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Chee, Daniel; Marques, Márcia M; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2016-02-01

    Peri-implantitis is one of the most common inflammatory complications in dental implantology. Similar to periodontitis, in peri-implantitis, destructive inflammatory changes take place in the tissues surrounding a dental implant. Bacterial flora at the failing implant sites resemble the pathogens in periodontal disease and consist of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of a silver lactate (SL)-containing RGD-coupled alginate hydrogel scaffold as a promising stem cell delivery vehicle with antimicrobial properties. Gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) or human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) were encapsulated in SL-loaded alginate hydrogel microspheres. Stem cell viability, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation capacity were analyzed. Our results showed that SL exhibited antimicrobial properties against Aa in a dose-dependent manner, with 0.50 mg/ml showing the greatest antimicrobial properties while still maintaining cell viability. At this concentration, SL-containing alginate hydrogel was able to inhibit Aa growth on the surface of Ti discs and significantly reduce the bacterial load in Aa suspensions. Silver ions were effectively released from the SL-loaded alginate microspheres for up to 2 weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of GMSCs and hBMMSCs encapsulated in the SL-loaded alginate microspheres were confirmed by the intense mineral matrix deposition and high expression of osteogenesis-related genes. Taken together, our findings confirm that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel containing SL show promise for bone tissue engineering with antimicrobial properties against Aa bacteria in vitro. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cell (GMSC) Delivery System Based on RGD-Coupled Alginate Hydrogel with Antimicrobial Properties: A Novel Treatment Modality for Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Ivana M. A.; Chen, Chider; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H.; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Chee, Daniel; Marques, Márcia M.; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Peri-implantitis is one of the most common inflammatory complications in dental implantology. Similar to periodontitis, in peri-implantitis, destructive inflammatory changes take place in the tissues surrounding a dental implant. Bacterial flora at the failing implant sites resemble the pathogens in periodontal disease and consist of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of a silver lactate (SL)-containing RGD-coupled alginate hydrogel scaffold as a promising stem cell delivery vehicle with antimicrobial properties. Materials and Methods Gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) or human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) were encapsulated in SL-loaded alginate hydrogel microspheres. Stem cell viability, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation capacity were analyzed. Results Our results showed that SL exhibited antimicrobial properties against Aa in a dose-dependent manner, with 0.50 mg/ml showing the greatest antimicrobial properties while still maintaining cell viability. At this concentration, SL-containing alginate hydrogel was able to inhibit Aa on the surface of Ti discs and significantly reduce the bacterial load in Aa suspensions. Silver ions were effectively released from the SL-loaded alginate microspheres for up to 2 weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of GMSCs and hBMMSCs encapsulated in the SL-loaded alginate microspheres were confirmed by the intense mineral matrix deposition and high expression of osteogenesis-related genes. Conclusion Taken together, our findings confirm that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel containing SL show promise for bone tissue engineering with antimicrobial properties against Aa bacteria in vitro. PMID:26216081

  18. [Lead content in alginates].

    PubMed

    Castagnola, L; Wirz, J

    1977-03-01

    Alginates containing a high level of lead may lead to health damages in dentists and their personnel. Walter and Söremark have pointed out these hazards. The author's investigations with the Perkin-Elmer absorption-photospectrometer shall show how high the lead content of the 25 brands of alginate sold in this country is. Ca 37, Protex and Algihard S contain sizeable amounts of lead. Recommendations are given towards the protection of dentist and assistant.

  19. Alginate-polymethacrylate hybrid hydrogels with double ionic and covalent network for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schizzi, I.; Utzeri, R.; Castellano, M.; Stagnaro, P.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogels based on alginates are very promising candidates to realize scaffolds for tissue engineering. Indeed, alginate hydrogels are able to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) thus promoting in vitro and/or in vivo cell growth; moreover, their capability of giving rise to highly porous structures can specifically favor the osteochondral tissue regeneration. However, mechanical properties of polymeric hydrogels are often inadequate to endow the final constructs with the required characteristics of elasticity and toughness. Here alginate/polymethacrylate hybrid hydrogels, with a suitable porous structure and characterized by a double network, ionic (from alginate) and covalent (from polymethacrylate) were designed and realized. The mechanical performance of these hybrid materials resulted, as expected, improved due to the double interconnected network, where the alginate portion provides the appropriate micro-environment mimicking the ECM, whereas the polymethacrylate portion acts as a reinforce.

  20. A prospective comparison of alginate-hydrogel with standard medical therapy to determine impact on functional capacity and clinical outcomes in patients with advanced heart failure (AUGMENT-HF trial)

    PubMed Central

    Anker, Stefan D.; Coats, Andrew J.S.; Cristian, Gabriel; Dragomir, Dinu; Pusineri, Enrico; Piredda, Massimo; Bettari, Luca; Dowling, Robert; Volterrani, Maurizio; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mas, Jean-Louis; Danchin, Nicolas; Solomon, Scott D.; Lee, Randall J.; Ahmann, Frank; Hinson, Andy; Sabbah, Hani N.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims AUGMENT-HF was an international, multi-centre, prospective, randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and safety of a novel method of left ventricular (LV) modification with alginate-hydrogel. Methods Alginate-hydrogel is an inert permanent implant that is directly injected into LV heart muscle and serves as a prosthetic scaffold to modify the shape and size of the dilated LV. Patients with advanced chronic heart failure (HF) were randomized (1 : 1) to alginate-hydrogel (n = 40) in combination with standard medical therapy or standard medical therapy alone (Control, n = 38). The primary endpoint of AUGMENT-HF was the change in peak VO2 from baseline to 6 months. Secondary endpoints included changes in 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, as well as assessments of procedural safety. Results Enrolled patients were 63 ± 10 years old, 74% in NYHA functional class III, had a LV ejection fraction of 26 ± 5% and a mean peak VO2 of 12.2 ± 1.8 mL/kg/min. Thirty-five patients were successfully treated with alginate-hydrogel injections through a limited left thoracotomy approach without device-related complications; the 30-day surgical mortality was 8.6% (3 deaths). Alginate-hydrogel treatment was associated with improved peak VO2 at 6 months—treatment effect vs. Control: +1.24 mL/kg/min (95% confidence interval 0.26–2.23, P = 0.014). Also 6MWT distance and NYHA functional class improved in alginate-hydrogel-treated patients vs. Control (both P < 0.001). Conclusion Alginate-hydrogel in addition to standard medical therapy for patients with advanced chronic HF was more effective than standard medical therapy alone for improving exercise capacity and symptoms. The results of AUGMENT-HF provide proof of concept for a pivotal trial. Trial Registration Number NCT01311791. PMID:26082085

  1. Applications of Alginate-Based Bioinks in 3D Bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Axpe, Eneko; Oyen, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is on the cusp of permitting the direct fabrication of artificial living tissue. Multicellular building blocks (bioinks) are dispensed layer by layer and scaled for the target construct. However, only a few materials are able to fulfill the considerable requirements for suitable bioink formulation, a critical component of efficient 3D bioprinting. Alginate, a naturally occurring polysaccharide, is clearly the most commonly employed material in current bioinks. Here, we discuss the benefits and disadvantages of the use of alginate in 3D bioprinting by summarizing the most recent studies that used alginate for printing vascular tissue, bone and cartilage. In addition, other breakthroughs in the use of alginate in bioprinting are discussed, including strategies to improve its structural and degradation characteristics. In this review, we organize the available literature in order to inspire and accelerate novel alginate-based bioink formulations with enhanced properties for future applications in basic research, drug screening and regenerative medicine. PMID:27898010

  2. Applications of Alginate-Based Bioinks in 3D Bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Axpe, Eneko; Oyen, Michelle L

    2016-11-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is on the cusp of permitting the direct fabrication of artificial living tissue. Multicellular building blocks (bioinks) are dispensed layer by layer and scaled for the target construct. However, only a few materials are able to fulfill the considerable requirements for suitable bioink formulation, a critical component of efficient 3D bioprinting. Alginate, a naturally occurring polysaccharide, is clearly the most commonly employed material in current bioinks. Here, we discuss the benefits and disadvantages of the use of alginate in 3D bioprinting by summarizing the most recent studies that used alginate for printing vascular tissue, bone and cartilage. In addition, other breakthroughs in the use of alginate in bioprinting are discussed, including strategies to improve its structural and degradation characteristics. In this review, we organize the available literature in order to inspire and accelerate novel alginate-based bioink formulations with enhanced properties for future applications in basic research, drug screening and regenerative medicine.

  3. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  4. Impact of alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa on alveolar macrophage apoptotic cell clearance

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Christophe; Serban, Karina A.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a hallmark of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Acute infection with P. aeruginosa profoundly inhibits alveolar macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) via direct effect of virulence factors. During chronic infection, P. aeruginosa evades host defense by decreased virulence, which includes the production or, in the case of mucoidy, overproduction of alginate. The impact of alginate on innate immunity, in particular on macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells is not known. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa strains that exhibit reduced virulence impair macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells and we investigated if the polysaccharide alginate produced by mucoid P. aeruginosa is sufficient to inhibit alveolar macrophage efferocytosis. Rat alveolar or human peripheral blood monocyte (THP-1)-derived macrophages cell lines were exposed in vitro to exogenous alginate or to wild type or alginate-overproducing mucoid P. aeruginosa prior to challenge with apoptotic human Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The importance of LPS contamination and that of structural integrity of alginate polymers was tested using alginate of different purities and alginate lyase, respectively. Alginate inhibited alveolar macrophage efferocytosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was augmented but not exclusively attributed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) present in alginates. Alginate-producing P. aeruginosa inhibited macrophage efferocytosis by more than 50%. Although alginate lyase did not significantly restore efferocytosis in the presence of exogenous alginate, it had a marked beneficial effect on efferocytosis of alveolar macrophages exposed to mucoid P. aeruginosa. Despite decreased virulence, mucoid P. aeruginosa may contribute to ongoing airway inflammation through significant inhibition of alveolar clearance of apoptotic cells and debris. The mechanism by which mucoid bacteria inhibit efferocytosis may involve alginate production and

  5. Impact of alginate-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa on alveolar macrophage apoptotic cell clearance.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, Charles A; Petrusca, Daniela N; Poirier, Christophe; Serban, Karina A; Anderson, Gregory G; Petrache, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a hallmark of lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Acute infection with P. aeruginosa profoundly inhibits alveolar macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) via direct effect of virulence factors. During chronic infection, P. aeruginosa evades host defense by decreased virulence, which includes the production or, in the case of mucoidy, overproduction of alginate. The impact of alginate on innate immunity, in particular on macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells is not known. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa strains that exhibit reduced virulence impair macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells and we investigated if the polysaccharide alginate produced by mucoid P. aeruginosa is sufficient to inhibit alveolar macrophage efferocytosis. Rat alveolar or human peripheral blood monocyte (THP-1)-derived macrophage cell lines were exposed in vitro to exogenous alginate or to wild type or alginate-overproducing mucoid P. aeruginosa prior to challenge with apoptotic human Jurkat T-lymphocytes. The importance of LPS contamination and that of structural integrity of alginate polymers was tested using alginate of different purities and alginate lyase, respectively. Alginate inhibited alveolar macrophage efferocytosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was augmented but not exclusively attributed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) present in alginates. Alginate-producing P. aeruginosa inhibited macrophage efferocytosis by more than 50%. A mannuronic-specific alginate lyase did not restore efferocytosis inhibited by exogenous guluronic-rich marine alginate, but had a marked beneficial effect on efferocytosis of alveolar macrophages exposed to mucoid P. aeruginosa. Despite decreased virulence, mucoid P. aeruginosa may contribute to chronic airway inflammation through significant inhibition of alveolar clearance of apoptotic cells and debris. The mechanism by which mucoid bacteria inhibit efferocytosis may involve alginate

  6. Wound Dressing Model of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells-Alginates Complex Promotes Skin Wound Healing by Paracrine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huachao; Tang, Zhenrui; Long, Gang; Huang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To probe growth characteristics of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) cultured with alginate gel scaffolds, and to explore feasibility of wound dressing model of hUCMSCs-alginates compound. Methods. hUCMSCs were isolated, cultured, and identified in vitro. Then cells were cultivated in 100 mM calcium alginate gel, and the capacity of proliferation and migration and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) were investigated regularly. Wound dressing model of hUCMSCs-alginate gel mix was transplanted into Balb/c mice skin defects. Wound healing rate and immunohistochemistry were examined. Results. hUCMSCs grew well but with little migration ability in the alginate gel. Compared with control group, a significantly larger cell number and more VEGF expression were shown in the gel group after culturing for 3–6 days (P < 0.05). In addition, a faster skin wound healing rate with more neovascularization was observed in the hUCMSCs-alginate gel group than in control groups at 15th day after surgery (P < 0.05). Conclusion. hUCMSCs can proliferate well and express massive VEGF in calcium alginate gel porous scaffolds. Wound dressing model of hUCMSCs-alginate gel mix can promote wound healing through paracrine signaling. PMID:26880953

  7. Utilizing core-shell fibrous collagen-alginate hydrogel cell delivery system for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Perez, Roman A; Kim, Meeju; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Jeong-Hui; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional matrices that encapsulate and deliver stem cells with defect-tuned formulations are promising for bone tissue engineering. In this study, we designed a novel stem cell delivery system composed of collagen and alginate as the core and shell, respectively. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were loaded into the collagen solution and then deposited directly into a fibrous structure while simultaneously sheathing with alginate using a newly designed core-shell nozzle. Alginate encapsulation was achieved by the crosslinking within an adjusted calcium-containing solution that effectively preserved the continuous fibrous structure of the inner cell-collagen part. The constructed hydrogel carriers showed a continuous fiber with a diameter of ~700-1000 μm for the core and 200-500 μm for the shell area, which was largely dependent on the alginate concentration (2%-5%) as well as the injection rate (20-80 mL/h). The water uptake capacity of the core-shell carriers was as high as 98%, which could act as a pore channel to supply nutrients and oxygen to the cells. Degradation of the scaffolds showed a weight loss of ~22% at 7 days and ~43% at 14 days, suggesting a possible role as a degradable tissue-engineered construct. The MSCs encapsulated within the collagen core showed excellent viability, exhibiting significant cellular proliferation up to 21 days with levels comparable to those observed in the pure collagen gel matrix used as a control. A live/dead cell assay also confirmed similar percentages of live cells within the core-shell carrier compared to those in the pure collagen gel, suggesting the carrier was cell compatible and was effective for maintaining a cell population. Cells allowed to differentiate under osteogenic conditions expressed high levels of bone-related genes, including osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, and osteopontin. Further, when the core-shell fibrous carriers were implanted in a rat calvarium defect, the bone healing was significantly

  8. Utilizing Core–Shell Fibrous Collagen-Alginate Hydrogel Cell Delivery System for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Roman A.; Kim, Meeju; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Jeong-Hui; Knowles, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional matrices that encapsulate and deliver stem cells with defect-tuned formulations are promising for bone tissue engineering. In this study, we designed a novel stem cell delivery system composed of collagen and alginate as the core and shell, respectively. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were loaded into the collagen solution and then deposited directly into a fibrous structure while simultaneously sheathing with alginate using a newly designed core–shell nozzle. Alginate encapsulation was achieved by the crosslinking within an adjusted calcium-containing solution that effectively preserved the continuous fibrous structure of the inner cell-collagen part. The constructed hydrogel carriers showed a continuous fiber with a diameter of ∼700–1000 μm for the core and 200–500 μm for the shell area, which was largely dependent on the alginate concentration (2%–5%) as well as the injection rate (20–80 mL/h). The water uptake capacity of the core–shell carriers was as high as 98%, which could act as a pore channel to supply nutrients and oxygen to the cells. Degradation of the scaffolds showed a weight loss of ∼22% at 7 days and ∼43% at 14 days, suggesting a possible role as a degradable tissue-engineered construct. The MSCs encapsulated within the collagen core showed excellent viability, exhibiting significant cellular proliferation up to 21 days with levels comparable to those observed in the pure collagen gel matrix used as a control. A live/dead cell assay also confirmed similar percentages of live cells within the core–shell carrier compared to those in the pure collagen gel, suggesting the carrier was cell compatible and was effective for maintaining a cell population. Cells allowed to differentiate under osteogenic conditions expressed high levels of bone-related genes, including osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, and osteopontin. Further, when the core–shell fibrous carriers were implanted in a rat calvarium defect, the bone

  9. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005.... Calcium alginate is prepared by the neutralization of purified alginic acid with appropriate pH...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Sodium alginate...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food... GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Sodium alginate is prepared by...

  12. Mathematical model for predicting topographical properties of poly (ε-caprolactone) melt electrospun scaffolds including the effects of temperature and linear transitional speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Junghyuk; Khadem Mohtaram, Nima; Lee, Patrick C.; Willerth, Stephanie M.; Jun, Martin B. G.

    2015-04-01

    Melt electrospinning can be used to fabricate various fibrous biomaterial scaffolds with a range of mechanical properties and varying topographical properties for different applications such as tissue scaffold and filtration and etc, making it a powerful technique. Engineering the topography of such electrospun microfibers can be easily done by tuning the operational parameters of this process. Recent experimental studies have shown promising results for fabricating various topographies, but there is no body of work that focuses on using mathematical models of this technique to further understand the effect of operational parameters on these properties of microfiber scaffolds. In this study, we developed a novel mathematical model using numerical simulations to demonstrate the effect of temperature, feed rate and flow rate on controlling topographical properties such as fiber diameter of these spun fibrous scaffolds. These promising modelling results are also compared to our previous and current experimental results. Overall, we show that our novel mathematical model can predict the topographical properties affected by key operational parameters such as change in temperature, flow rate and feed rate, and this model could serve as a promising strategy for the controlling of topographical properties of such structures for different applications.

  13. Design of a Novel Two-Component Hybrid Dermal Scaffold for the Treatment of Pressure Sores.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vaibhav; Kohli, Nupur; Moulding, Dale; Afolabi, Halimat; Hook, Lilian; Mason, Chris; García-Gareta, Elena

    2017-09-12

    The aim of this study is to design a novel two-component hybrid scaffold using the fibrin/alginate porous hydrogel Smart Matrix combined to a backing layer of plasma polymerized polydimethylsiloxane (Sil) membrane to make the fibrin-based dermal scaffold more robust for the treatment of the clinically challenging pressure sores. A design criteria are established, according to which the Sil membranes are punched to avoid collection of fluid underneath. Manual peel test shows that native silicone does not attach to the fibrin/alginate component while the plasma polymerized silicone membranes are firmly bound to fibrin/alginate. Structural characterization shows that the fibrin/alginate matrix is intact after the addition of the Sil membrane. By adding a Sil membrane to the original fibrin/alginate scaffold, the resulting two-component scaffolds have a significantly higher shear or storage modulus G'. In vitro cell studies show that dermal fibroblasts remain viable, proliferate, and infiltrate the two-component hybrid scaffolds during the culture period. These results show that the design of a novel two-component hybrid dermal scaffold is successful according to the proposed design criteria. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study that reports the combination of a fibrin-based scaffold with a plasma-polymerized silicone membrane. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Mineralized Alginate Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Westhrin, Marita; Xie, Minli; Olderøy, Magnus Ø.; Sikorski, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Mineralized biomaterials are promising for use in bone tissue engineering. Culturing osteogenic cells in such materials will potentially generate biological bone grafts that may even further augment bone healing. Here, we studied osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in an alginate hydrogel system where the cells were co-immobilized with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) for gradual mineralization of the microenvironment. MSC were embedded in unmodified alginate beads and alginate beads mineralized with ALP to generate a polymer/hydroxyapatite scaffold mimicking the composition of bone. The initial scaffold mineralization induced further mineralization of the beads with nanosized particles, and scanning electron micrographs demonstrated presence of collagen in the mineralized and unmineralized alginate beads cultured in osteogenic medium. Cells in both types of beads sustained high viability and metabolic activity for the duration of the study (21 days) as evaluated by live/dead staining and alamar blue assay. MSC in beads induced to differentiate in osteogenic direction expressed higher mRNA levels of osteoblast-specific genes (RUNX2, COL1AI, SP7, BGLAP) than MSC in traditional cell cultures. Furthermore, cells differentiated in beads expressed both sclerostin (SOST) and dental matrix protein-1 (DMP1), markers for late osteoblasts/osteocytes. In conclusion, Both ALP-modified and unmodified alginate beads provide an environment that enhance osteogenic differentiation compared with traditional 2D culture. Also, the ALP-modified alginate beads showed profound mineralization and thus have the potential to serve as a bone substitute in tissue engineering. PMID:25769043

  15. Preparation of in situ hardening composite microcarriers: calcium phosphate cement combined with alginate for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hui; Lee, Eun-Jung; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-03-01

    Novel microcarriers consisting of calcium phosphate cement and alginate were prepared for use as three-dimensional scaffolds for the culture and expansion of cells that are effective for bone tissue engineering. The calcium phosphate cement-alginate composite microcarriers were produced by an emulsification of the composite aqueous solutions mixed at varying ratios (calcium phosphate cement powder/alginate solution = 0.8-1.2) in an oil bath and the subsequent in situ hardening of the compositions during spherodization. Moreover, a porous structure could be easily created in the solid microcarriers by soaking the produced microcarriers in water and a subsequent freeze-drying process. Bone mineral-like apatite nanocrystallites were shown to rapidly develop on the calcium phosphate cement-alginate microcarriers under moist conditions due to the conversion of the α-tricalcium phosphate phase in the calcium phosphate cement into a carbonate-hydroxyapatite. Osteoblastic cells cultured on the microspherical scaffolds were proven to be viable, with an active proliferative potential during 14 days of culture, and their osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity. The in situ hardening calcium phosphate cement-alginate microcarriers developed herein may be used as potential three-dimensional scaffolds for cell delivery and tissue engineering of bone.

  16. Preparation of in situ hardening composite microcarriers: Calcium phosphate cement combined with alginate for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Hui; Lee, Eun-Jung; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Novel microcarriers consisting of calcium phosphate cement and alginate were prepared for use as three-dimensional scaffolds for the culture and expansion of cells that are effective for bone tissue engineering. The calcium phosphate cement-alginate composite microcarriers were produced by an emulsification of the composite aqueous solutions mixed at varying ratios (calcium phosphate cement powder/alginate solution = 0.8–1.2) in an oil bath and the subsequent in situ hardening of the compositions during spherodization. Moreover, a porous structure could be easily created in the solid microcarriers by soaking the produced microcarriers in water and a subsequent freeze-drying process. Bone mineral-like apatite nanocrystallites were shown to rapidly develop on the calcium phosphate cement–alginate microcarriers under moist conditions due to the conversion of the α-tricalcium phosphate phase in the calcium phosphate cement into a carbonate–hydroxyapatite. Osteoblastic cells cultured on the microspherical scaffolds were proven to be viable, with an active proliferative potential during 14 days of culture, and their osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity. The in situ hardening calcium phosphate cement–alginate microcarriers developed herein may be used as potential three-dimensional scaffolds for cell delivery and tissue engineering of bone. PMID:23836845

  17. Comparison of the methods for seeding human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to macroporous alginate cryogel carriers.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Yu A; Ivanov, R V; Lozinsky, V I; Petrenko, A Yu

    2011-02-01

    We performed a comparative study of the localization, distribution, metabolic activity, and surface properties of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells after static and perfusion seeding to macroporous alginate cryogels. A simple perfusion system for mesenchymal stromal cell seeding to macroporous alginate cryogel sponges proposed in this study resulted in rapid and uniform distribution of cells within the whole volume of the scaffold preserving functional and morphological properties of the cells.

  18. Mimicking Metastases Including Tumor Stroma: A New Technique to Generate a Three-Dimensional Colorectal Cancer Model Based on a Biological Decellularized Intestinal Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Nietzer, Sarah; Baur, Florentin; Sieber, Stefan; Hansmann, Jan; Schwarz, Thomas; Stoffer, Carolin; Häfner, Heide; Gasser, Martin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Walles, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Tumor models based on cancer cell lines cultured two-dimensionally (2D) on plastic lack histological complexity and functionality compared to the native microenvironment. Xenogenic mouse tumor models display higher complexity but often do not predict human drug responses accurately due to species-specific differences. We present here a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro colon cancer model based on a biological scaffold derived from decellularized porcine jejunum (small intestine submucosa+mucosa, SISmuc). Two different cell lines were used in monoculture or in coculture with primary fibroblasts. After 14 days of culture, we demonstrated a close contact of human Caco2 colon cancer cells with the preserved basement membrane on an ultrastructural level as well as morphological characteristics of a well-differentiated epithelium. To generate a tissue-engineered tumor model, we chose human SW480 colon cancer cells, a reportedly malignant cell line. Malignant characteristics were confirmed in 2D cell culture: SW480 cells showed higher vimentin and lower E-cadherin expression than Caco2 cells. In contrast to Caco2, SW480 cells displayed cancerous characteristics such as delocalized E-cadherin and nuclear location of β-catenin in a subset of cells. One central drawback of 2D cultures—especially in consideration of drug testing—is their artificially high proliferation. In our 3D tissue-engineered tumor model, both cell lines showed decreased numbers of proliferating cells, thus correlating more precisely with observations of primary colon cancer in all stages (UICC I-IV). Moreover, vimentin decreased in SW480 colon cancer cells, indicating a mesenchymal to epithelial transition process, attributed to metastasis formation. Only SW480 cells cocultured with fibroblasts induced the formation of tumor-like aggregates surrounded by fibroblasts, whereas in Caco2 cocultures, a separate Caco2 cell layer was formed separated from the fibroblast compartment beneath. To foster tissue

  19. Dual drug-loaded nanoparticles on self-integrated scaffold for controlled delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bennet, Devasier; Marimuthu, Mohana; Kim, Sanghyo; An, Jeongho

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidant (quercetin) and hypoglycemic (voglibose) drug-loaded poly-D,L-lactideco-glycolide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using the solvent evaporation method. The dual drug-loaded nanoparticles were incorporated into a scaffold film using a solvent casting method, creating a controlled transdermal drug-delivery system. Key features of the film formulation were achieved utilizing several ratios of excipients, including polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol, hyaluronic acid, xylitol, and alginate. The scaffold film showed superior encapsulation capability and swelling properties, with various potential applications, eg, the treatment of diabetes-associated complications. Structural and light scattering characterization confirmed a spherical shape and a mean particle size distribution of 41.3 nm for nanoparticles in the scaffold film. Spectroscopy revealed a stable polymer structure before and after encapsulation. The thermoresponsive swelling properties of the film were evaluated according to temperature and pH. Scaffold films incorporating dual drug-loaded nanoparticles showed remarkably high thermoresponsivity, cell compatibility, and ex vivo drug-release behavior. In addition, the hybrid film formulation showed enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation. These dual drug-loaded nanoparticles incorporated into a scaffold film may be promising for development into a transdermal drug-delivery system. PMID:22888222

  20. Alginate synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: the role of AlgL (alginate lyase) and AlgX.

    PubMed Central

    Monday, S R; Schiller, N L

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies localized an alginate lyase gene (algL) within the alginate biosynthetic gene cluster at 34 min on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. Insertion of a Tn501 polar transposon in a gene (algX) directly upstream of algL in mucoid P. aeruginosa FRD1 inactivated expression of algX, algL, and other downstream genes, including algA. This strain is phenotypically nonmucoid; however, alginate production could be restored by complementation in trans with a plasmid carrying all of the genes inactivated by the insertion, including algL and algX. Alginate production was also recovered when a merodiploid that generated a complete alginate gene cluster on the chromosome was constructed. However, alginate production by merodiploids formed in the algX::Tn501 mutant using an alginate cluster with an algL deletion was not restored to wild-type levels unless algL was provided on a plasmid in trans. In addition, complementation studies of Tn501 mutants using plasmids containing specific deletions in either algL or algX revealed that both genes were required to restore the mucoid phenotype. Escherichia coli strains which expressed algX produced a unique protein of approximately 53 kDa, consistent with the gene product predicted from the DNA sequencing data. These studies demonstrate that AlgX, whose biochemical function remains to be defined, and AlgL, which has alginate lyase activity, are both involved in alginate production by P. aeruginosa. PMID:8550492

  1. Novel synthesis strategies for natural polymer and composite biomaterials as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hsu-Feng; Sfeir, Charles; Kumta, Prashant N

    2010-04-28

    Recent developments in tissue engineering approaches frequently revolve around the use of three-dimensional scaffolds to function as the template for cellular activities to repair, rebuild and regenerate damaged or lost tissues. While there are several biomaterials to select as three-dimensional scaffolds, it is generally agreed that a biomaterial to be used in tissue engineering needs to possess certain material characteristics such as biocompatibility, suitable surface chemistry, interconnected porosity, desired mechanical properties and biodegradability. The use of naturally derived polymers as three-dimensional scaffolds has been gaining widespread attention owing to their favourable attributes of biocompatibility, low cost and ease of processing. This paper discusses the synthesis of various polysaccharide-based, naturally derived polymers, and the potential of using these biomaterials to serve as tissue engineering three-dimensional scaffolds is also evaluated. In this study, naturally derived polymers, specifically cellulose, chitosan, alginate and agarose, and their composites, are examined. Single-component scaffolds of plain cellulose, plain chitosan and plain alginate as well as composite scaffolds of cellulose-alginate, cellulose-agarose, cellulose-chitosan, chitosan-alginate and chitosan-agarose are synthesized, and their suitability as tissue engineering scaffolds is assessed. It is shown that naturally derived polymers in the form of hydrogels can be synthesized, and the lyophilization technique is used to synthesize various composites comprising these natural polymers. The composite scaffolds appear to be sponge-like after lyophilization. Scanning electron microscopy is used to demonstrate the formation of an interconnected porous network within the polymeric scaffold following lyophilization. It is also established that HeLa cells attach and proliferate well on scaffolds of cellulose, chitosan or alginate. The synthesis protocols reported in this

  2. Novel synthesis strategies for natural polymer and composite biomaterials as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hsu-Feng; Sfeir, Charles; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in tissue engineering approaches frequently revolve around the use of three-dimensional scaffolds to function as the template for cellular activities to repair, rebuild and regenerate damaged or lost tissues. While there are several biomaterials to select as three-dimensional scaffolds, it is generally agreed that a biomaterial to be used in tissue engineering needs to possess certain material characteristics such as biocompatibility, suitable surface chemistry, interconnected porosity, desired mechanical properties and biodegradability. The use of naturally derived polymers as three-dimensional scaffolds has been gaining widespread attention owing to their favourable attributes of biocompatibility, low cost and ease of processing. This paper discusses the synthesis of various polysaccharide-based, naturally derived polymers, and the potential of using these biomaterials to serve as tissue engineering three-dimensional scaffolds is also evaluated. In this study, naturally derived polymers, specifically cellulose, chitosan, alginate and agarose, and their composites, are examined. Single-component scaffolds of plain cellulose, plain chitosan and plain alginate as well as composite scaffolds of cellulose–alginate, cellulose–agarose, cellulose–chitosan, chitosan–alginate and chitosan–agarose are synthesized, and their suitability as tissue engineering scaffolds is assessed. It is shown that naturally derived polymers in the form of hydrogels can be synthesized, and the lyophilization technique is used to synthesize various composites comprising these natural polymers. The composite scaffolds appear to be sponge-like after lyophilization. Scanning electron microscopy is used to demonstrate the formation of an interconnected porous network within the polymeric scaffold following lyophilization. It is also established that HeLa cells attach and proliferate well on scaffolds of cellulose, chitosan or alginate. The synthesis protocols reported

  3. Use of Interim Scaffolding and Neotissue Development to Produce a Scaffold-Free Living Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ting Ting; Leong, Wenyan; Peck, Yvonne; Su, Kai; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) constructs relies heavily on the use of biomaterial-based scaffolds. These are required as mechanical supports as well as to translate two-dimensional cultures to 3D cultures for clinical applications. Regardless of the choice of scaffold, timely degradation of scaffolds is difficult to achieve and undegraded scaffold material can lead to interference in further tissue development or morphogenesis. In cartilage tissue engineering, hydrogel is the highly preferred scaffold material as it shares many similar characteristics with native cartilaginous matrix. Hence, we employed gelatin microspheres as porogens to create a microcavitary alginate hydrogel as an interim scaffold to facilitate initial chondrocyte 3D culture and to establish a final scaffold-free living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG) for cartilage tissue engineering.

  4. A phase diagram for microfabrication of geometrically controlled hydrogel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Tirella, A; Orsini, A; Vozzi, G; Ahluwalia, A

    2009-12-01

    Hydrogels are considered as excellent candidates for tissue substitutes by virtue of their high water content and biphasic nature. However, the fact that they are soft, wet and floppy renders them difficult to process and use as custom-designed scaffolds. To address this problem alginate hydrogels were modeled and characterized by measuring stress-strain and creep behavior as well as viscosity as a function of sodium alginate concentration, cross-linking time and calcium ion concentration. The gels were then microfabricated into scaffolds using the pressure-assisted microsyringe. The mechanical and viscous characteristics were used to generate a processing window in the form of a phase diagram which describes the fidelity of the scaffolds as a function of the material and machine parameters. The approach can be applied to a variety of microfabrication methods and biomaterials in order to design well-controlled custom scaffolds.

  5. Terminal sterilization of alginate hydrogels: efficacy and impact on mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Stoppel, Whitney L; White, Joseph C; Horava, Sarena D; Henry, Anna C; Roberts, Susan C; Bhatia, Surita R

    2014-05-01

    Terminal, or postprocessing, sterilization of composite biomaterials is crucial for their use in wound healing and tissue-engineered devices. Recent research has focused on optimizing traditional biomaterial formulations to create better products for commercial and academic use which incorporate hydrophobic compounds or secondary gel networks. To use a hydrogel in a clinical setting, terminal sterilization is necessary to ensure patient safety. Lyophilization, gamma-irradiation, and ethylene oxide treatment all have negative consequences when applied to alginate scaffolds for clinical use. Here, we aim to find alternative terminal sterilization methods for alginate and alginate-based composite hydrogels which maintain the structure of composite alginate networks for use in biomedical applications. A thorough investigation of the effect of common sterilization methods on swollen alginate-based hydrogels has not been reported and therefore, this work examines autoclaving, ethanol washing, and ultraviolet light as sterilization techniques for alginate and alginate/Pluronic® F68 composite hydrogels. Preservation of structural integrity is evaluated using shear rheology and analysis of water retention, and efficacy of sterilization is determined via bacterial persistence within the hydrogel. Results indicate that ethanol sterilization is the best method of those investigated because ethanol washing results in minimal effects on mechanical properties and water retention and eliminates bacterial persistence. Furthermore, this study suggests that ethanol treatment is an efficacious method for terminally sterilizing interpenetrating networks or other composite hydrogel systems.

  6. Production and in vitro evaluation of macroporous, cell-encapsulating alginate fibres for nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sharon Chien-Yu; Wang, Yiwei; Wertheim, David F; Coombes, Allan G A

    2017-04-01

    The prospects for successful peripheral nerve repair using fibre guides are considered to be enhanced by the use of a scaffold material, which promotes attachment and proliferation of glial cells and axonal regeneration. Macroporous alginate fibres were produced by extraction of gelatin particle porogens from wet spun fibres produced using a suspension of gelatin particles in 1.5% w/v alginate solution. Gelatin loading of the starting suspension of 40.0, 57.0, and 62.5% w/w resulted in gelatin loading of the dried alginate fibres of 16, 21, and 24% w/w respectively. Between 45 and 60% of the gelatin content of hydrated fibres was released in 1h in distilled water at 37°C, leading to rapid formation of a macroporous structure. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and image processing provided qualitative and quantitative analysis of mean equivalent macropore diameter (48-69μm), pore size distribution, estimates of maximum porosity (14.6%) and pore connectivity. CLSM also revealed that gelatin residues lined the macropore cavities and infiltrated into the body of the alginate scaffolds, thus, providing cell adhesion molecules, which are potentially advantageous for promoting growth of glial cells and axonal extension. Macroporous alginate fibres encapsulating nerve cells [primary rat dorsal root ganglia (DRGs)] were produced by wet spinning alginate solution containing dispersed gelatin particles and DRGs. Marked outgrowth was evident over a distance of 150μm at day 11 in cell culture, indicating that pores and channels created within the alginate hydrogel were providing a favourable environment for neurite development. These findings indicate that macroporous alginate fibres encapsulating nerve cells may provide the basis of a useful strategy for nerve repair.

  7. Structural insights into alginate binding by bacterial cell-surface protein.

    PubMed

    Temtrirath, Kanate; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2015-03-02

    A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. strain A1 inducibly forms a mouth-like pit on the cell surface in the presence of alginate and directly incorporates polymers into the cytoplasm via the pit and ABC transporter. Among the bacterial proteins involved in import of alginate, a cell-surface EfeO-like Algp7 shows an ability to bind alginate, suggesting its contribution to accumulate alginate in the pit. Here, we show identification of its positively charged cluster involved in alginate binding using X-ray crystallography, docking simulation, and site-directed mutagenesis. The tertiary structure of Algp7 was determined at a high resolution (1.99Å) by molecular replacement, although no alginates were included in the structure. Thus, an in silico model of Algp7/oligoalginate was constructed by docking simulation using atomic coordinates of Algp7 and alginate oligosaccharides, where some charged residues were found to be potential candidates for alginate binding. Site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and five purified mutants K68A, K69A, E194A, N221A, and K68A/K69A were subjected to a binding assay. UV absorption difference spectroscopy along with differential scanning fluorimetry analysis indicated that K68A/K69A exhibited a significant reduction in binding affinity with alginate than wild-type Algp7. Based on these data, Lys68/Lys69 residues of Algp7 probably play an important role in binding alginate.

  8. Influence of structural load-bearing scaffolds on mechanical load- and BMP-2-mediated bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Anna M; Mason, Devon E; Lin, Angela S P; Guldberg, Robert E; Boerckel, Joel D

    2016-09-01

    A common design constraint in functional tissue engineering is that scaffolds intended for use in load-bearing sites possess similar mechanical properties to the replaced tissue. Here, we tested the hypothesis that in vivo loading would enhance bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-mediated bone regeneration in the presence of a load-bearing PLDL scaffold, whose pores and central core were filled with BMP-2-releasing alginate hydrogel. First, we evaluated the effects of in vivo mechanical loading on bone regeneration in the structural scaffolds. Second, we compared scaffold-mediated bone regeneration, independent of mechanical loading, with alginate hydrogel constructs, without the structural scaffold, that have been shown previously to facilitate in vivo mechanical stimulation of bone formation. Contrary to our hypothesis, mechanical loading had no effect on bone formation, distribution, or biomechanical properties in structural scaffolds. Independent of loading, the structural scaffolds reduced bone formation compared to non-structural alginate, particularly in regions in which the scaffold was concentrated, resulting in impaired functional regeneration. This is attributable to a combination of stress shielding by the scaffold and inhibition of cellular infiltration and tissue ingrowth. Collectively, these data question the necessity of scaffold similarity to mature tissue at the time of implantation and emphasize development of an environment conducive to cellular activation of matrix production and ultimate functional regeneration.

  9. Role of alginate in antibacterial finishing of textiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiwei; He, Jinmei; Huang, Yudong

    2017-01-01

    Antibacterial finishing of textiles has been introduced as a necessary process for various purposes especially creating a fabric with antimicrobial activities. Currently, the textile industry continues to look for textiles antimicrobial finishing process based on sustainable biopolymers from the viewpoints of environmental friendliness, industrialization, and economic concerns. This paper reviews the role of alginate, a sustainable biopolymer, in the development of antimicrobial textiles, including both basic physicochemical properties of alginate such as preparation, chemical structure, molecular weight, solubility, viscosity, and sol-gel transformation property. Then different processing routes (e.g. nanocomposite coating, ionic cross-linking coating, and Layer-by-Layer coating) for the antibacterial finishing of textiles by using alginate are revised in some detail. The achievements in this area have increased our knowledge of alginate application in the field of textile industry and promoted the development of green textile finishing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Injectable alginate-O-carboxymethyl chitosan/nano fibrin composite hydrogels for adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jaikumar, Dhanya; Sajesh, K M; Soumya, S; Nimal, T R; Chennazhi, K P; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2015-03-01

    Injectable, biodegradable scaffolds are required for soft tissue reconstruction owing to its minimally invasive approach. Such a scaffold can mimic the native extracellular matrix (ECM), provide uniform distribution of cells and overcome limitations like donor site morbidity, volume loss, etc. So, here we report two classes of biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogel blend systems namely, Alginate/O-carboxymethyl chitosan (O-CMC) and Alginate/poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with the inclusion of fibrin nanoparticles in each. The hydrogels were prepared by ionic cross-linking method. The developed hydrogels were compared in terms of its swelling ratio, degradation profile, compressive strength and elastic moduli. From these preliminary findings, it was concluded that Alginate/O-CMC formed a better blend for tissue engineering applications. The potential of the formed hydrogel as an injectable scaffold was revealed by the survival of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the scaffold by its adhesion, proliferation and differentiation into adipocytes. Cell differentiation studies of fibrin incorporated hydrogel scaffolds showed better differentiation was confirmed by Oil Red O staining technique. These injectable gels have potential in soft tissue regeneration.

  11. Calcium signaling in response to fluid flow by chondrocytes in 3D alginate culture.

    PubMed

    Degala, Satish; Williams, Rebecca; Zipfel, Warren; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2012-05-01

    Quantifying the effects of mechanical loading on the metabolic response of chondrocytes is difficult due to complicated structure of cartilage ECM and the coupled nature of the mechanical stimuli presented to the cells. In this study we describe the effects of fluid flow, particularly hydrostatic pressure and wall shear stress, on the Ca(2+) signaling response of bovine articular chondrocytes in 3D culture. Using well-established alginate hydrogel system to maintain spherical chondrocyte morphology, we altered solid volume fraction to change scaffold mechanics. Fluid velocities in the bulk of the scaffolds were directly measured via an optical technique and scaffold permeability and aggregate modulus was characterized to quantify the mechanical stimuli presented to cells. Ca(2+) signaling response to direct perfusion of chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds increased monotonically with flow rate and was found more directly dependent on fluid velocity rather than shear stress or hydrostatic pressure. Chondrocytes in alginate scaffolds responded to fluid flow at velocities and shear stresses 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than seen in previous monolayer studies. Our data suggest that flow-induced Ca(2+) signaling response of chondrocytes in alginate culture may be due to mechanical signaling pathways, which is influenced by the 3D nature of cell shape.

  12. Influence of amino acids, buffers, and ph on the γ-irradiation-induced degradation of alginates.

    PubMed

    Ulset, Ann-Sissel T; Mori, Hideki; Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Hara, Masayuki; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2014-12-08

    Alginate-based biomaterials and medical devices are commonly subjected to γ-irradiation as a means of sterilization, either in the dry state or the gel (hydrated) state. In this process the alginate chains degrade randomly in a dose-dependent manner, altering alginates' material properties. The addition of free radical scavenging amino acids such as histidine and phenylalanine protects the alginate significantly against degradation, as shown by monitoring changes in the molecular weight distributions using SEC-MALLS and determining the pseudo first order rate constants of degradation. Tris buffer (0.5 M), but not acetate, citrate, or phosphate buffers had a similar effect on the degradation rate. Changes in pH itself had only marginal effects on the rate of alginate degradation and on the protective effect of amino acids. Contrary to previous reports, the chemical composition (M/G profile) of the alginates, including homopolymeric mannuronan, was unaltered following irradiation up to 10 kGy.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1610 Potassium alginate. (a) Potassium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-36-1) is the potassium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1610 Potassium alginate. (a) Potassium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-36-1) is the potassium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1610 Potassium alginate. (a) Potassium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-36-1) is the potassium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1610 Potassium alginate. (a) Potassium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-36-1) is the potassium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 184.1724 Section 184.1724 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1724 Sodium alginate. (a) Sodium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-38-3) is the sodium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  20. Investigation of cell viability and morphology in 3D bio-printed alginate constructs with tunable stiffness.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pujiang; Laude, Augustinus; Yeong, Wai Yee

    2017-04-01

    In this article, mouse fibroblast cells (L929) were seeded on 2%, 5%, and 10% alginate hydrogels, and they were also bio-printed with 2%, 5%, and 10% alginate solutions individually to form constructs. The elastic and viscous moduli of alginate solutions, their interior structure and stiffness, interactions of cells and alginate, cell viability, migration and morphology were investigated by rheometer, MTT assay, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and fluorescent microscopy. The three types of bio-printed scaffolds of distinctive stiffness were prepared, and the seeded cells showed robust viability either on the alginate hydrogel surfaces or in the 3D bio-printed constructs. Majority of the proliferated cells in the 3D bio-printed constructs weakly attached to the surrounding alginate matrix. The concentration of alginate solution and hydrogel stiffness influenced cell migration and morphology, moreover the cells formed spheroids in the bio-printed 10% alginate hydrogel construct. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1009-1018, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Phage as versatile nanoink for printing 3-D cell-laden scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doe-Young; Lee, Hyeongjin; Kim, YongBok; Yoo, So Young; Chung, Woo-Jae; Kim, GeunHyung

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is an emerging technology for producing tissue-mimetic 3-D structures using cell-containing hydrogels (bioink). Various synthetic and natural hydrogels with key characteristics, including biocompatibility, biodegradability, printability and crosslinkability, have been employed as ink materials in bioprinting. Choosing the right cell-containing "bioink" material is the most essential step for fabricating 3-D constructs with a controlled mechanical and biochemical microenvironment that can lead to successful tissue regeneration and repair. Here, we demonstrate that the genetically engineered M13 phage holds great potential for use as a versatile nanoink for printing 3-D cell-laden matrices. In particular, M13 phages displaying integrin-binding (GRGDS) and calcium-binding (DDYD) domains on their surface were blended with alginate to successfully form Ca(2+)-crosslinked hydrogels. Furthermore, 3-D cell-laden scaffolds with high cell viability were generated after optimizing the printing process. The MC3T3-E1 cells within these scaffolds showed enhanced proliferation and differentiation rates that increased proportionally with the concentration of phages in the 3-D matrices compared with the rates of cells in pure alginate scaffolds. Bioprinting is an emerging technology for producing tissue-mimetic 3-D structures using cell-containing hydrogels called bioink. Choosing the right bioink is essential for fabricating 3-D structures with controlled mechanical and biochemical properties which lead to successful tissue regeneration. Therefore, there is a growing demand for a new bioink material that can be designed from molecular level. Here, we demonstrate that genetically engineered M13 phage holds great potential for use as versatile bioink. The phage-based bioink benefits from its replicability, self-assembling property, and tunable molecular design and enables bioprinted scaffolds to exhibit improved cell viability, proliferation and differentiation. This

  2. Sustained Delivery of Bioactive GDNF from Collagen and Alginate-Based Cell-Encapsulating Gel Promoted Photoreceptor Survival in an Inherited Retinal Degeneration Model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Barbara P.; Lo, Amy C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulated-cell therapy (ECT) is an attractive approach for continuously delivering freshly synthesized therapeutics to treat sight-threatening posterior eye diseases, circumventing repeated invasive intravitreal injections and improving local drug availability clinically. Composite collagen-alginate (CAC) scaffold contains an interpenetrating network that integrates the physical and biological merits of its constituents, including biocompatibility, mild gelling properties and availability. However, CAC ECT properties and performance in the eye are not well-understood. Previously, we reported a cultured 3D CAC system that supported the growth of GDNF-secreting HEK293 cells with sustainable GDNF delivery. Here, the system was further developed into an intravitreally injectable gel with 1x104 or 2x105 cells encapsulated in 2mg/ml type I collagen and 1% alginate. Gels with lower alginate concentration yielded higher initial cell viability but faster spheroid formation while increasing initial cell density encouraged cell growth. Continuous GDNF delivery was detected in culture and in healthy rat eyes for at least 14 days. The gels were well-tolerated with no host tissue attachment and contained living cell colonies. Most importantly, gel-implanted in dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons rat eyes for 28 days retained photoreceptors while those containing higher initial cell number yielded better photoreceptor survival. CAC ECT gels offers flexible system design and is a potential treatment option for posterior eye diseases. PMID:27441692

  3. Use of tissue-engineered nerve grafts consisting of a chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based scaffold included with bone marrow mesenchymal cells for bridging 50-mm dog sciatic nerve gaps.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Wu, Jian; Yang, Yumin; Hu, Wen; Zhu, Qi; Tang, Xin; Liu, Jie; Gu, Xiaosong

    2010-12-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal cells (MSCs) have attracted increasing research interest due to their possible use as support cells for nerve tissue-engineering approaches. We developed a novel design of tissue-engineered nerve grafts consisting of a chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-based neural scaffold included with autologous MSCs. The graft was used as an alternative to nerve autografts for bridging 50-mm-long gaps in dog sciatic nerve, and the repair outcome at 6 months after nerve grafting was evaluated by a combination of electrophysiological assessment, FluoroGold retrograde tracing, and histological investigation to regenerated nerve tissue and reinnervated target muscle. The experimental results indicated that introduction of autologous MSCs to the chitosan/PLGA-based neural scaffold promoted sciatic nerve regeneration and functional recovery, demonstrating significant efficacy that was, to a certain degree, close to that by nerve autografting, a gold standard for treating large peripheral nerve gaps, and better than that by grafting with the chitosan/PLGA-based scaffold alone.

  4. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  5. Alginate Hydrogel: A Shapeable and Versatile Platform for in Situ Preparation of Metal-Organic Framework-Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, He; Zhang, Qi; Zhu, Shiping

    2016-07-13

    This work reports a novel in situ growth approach for incorporating metal-organic framework (MOF) materials into an alginate substrate, which overcomes the challenges of processing MOF particles into specially shaped structures for real industrial applications. The MOF-alginate composites are prepared through the post-treatment of a metal ion cross-linked alginate hydrogel with a MOF ligand solution. MOF particles are well distributed and embedded in and on the surface of the composites. The macroscopic shape of the composite can be designed by controlling the shape of the corresponding hydrogel; thus MOF-alginate beads, fibers, and membranes are obtained. In addition, four different MOF-alginate composites, including HKUST-1-, ZIF-8-, MIL-100(Fe)-, and ZIF-67-alginate, were successfully prepared using different metal ion cross-linked alginate hydrogels. The mechanism of formation is revealed, and the composite is demonstrated to be an effective absorbent for water purification.

  6. Controllable 3D alginate hydrogel patterning via visible-light induced electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Dai, Gaole; Wan, Wenfeng; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Zixun; Li, Wenjun; Shi, Peng; Shen, Yajing

    2016-04-25

    The fabrication of alginate hydrogel in 3D has recently received increasing attention owing to its distinct efficacy as biocompatible scaffold for 3D cell culture, biomedical and tissue engineering. We report a controllable 3D alginate hydrogel patterning method by developing a visible-light induced electrodeposition chip. The chip mainly consists of a photoconductive titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) anode plate, an indium tin oxide (ITO) cathode plate and the mixed solution (1% sodium alginate and 0.25% CaCO3 nano particles) between them. After a designed visible-light pattern is projected onto the TiOPc plate, the produced H(+) by electrolysis will trigger Ca(2+) near the anode (illuminated area), and then the gelation of calcium alginate patterns, as desired, happens controllably. In addition, we further establish an exponential model to elucidate the gel growth v.s. time and current density. The results indicate that the proposed method is able to fabricate various 3D alginate hydrogel patterns in a well controllable manner, and maintain the laden cells at high survival rate (>98% right after gel formation). This research paves an alternative way for 3D alginate hydrogel patterning with high controllability and productivity, which would benefit the research in biomedical and tissue engineering.

  7. Effects of purified alginate sponge on the regeneration of chondrocytes: in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Song, Jeong Eun; Kim, A Ram; Lee, Cheon Jung; Tripathy, Nirmalya; Yoon, Kun Ho; Lee, Dongwon; Khang, Gilson

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration science has been studied using tissue engineering techniques due to the self-renewal difficulties of damaged or degenerated cartilage. A scaffold with biodegradability and biocompatibility features plays a key role in developing cartilage tissue similar to human biological materials. Herein, we have fabricated three-dimensional sponge using purified alginate for the regeneration of chondrocytes cells and formation of cartilage. We demonstrated that the alginate purification can effectively minimize inflammatory reaction through reducing the content of mannuronic acid causing immune rejection. Cartilage regeneration research was performed using three-dimensional non-purified and purified alginate sponges synthesized by modified Korbutt method. In vitro cell viability and specific gene expression in the cartilage cells were investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after seeding chondrocytes on the as-fabricated sponges. Specific extracellular matrix (ECM) of chondrocytes, sGAG, and the content of collagen were also measured. Histological staining was carried out after purified alginate sponge seeded with chondrocytes and was implanted in subcutaneous nude mouse followed by extraction. Compared to the non-purified ones, the purified alginate sponges showed positive effects on maintaining affinities and phenotype of chondrocytes. From these results, it can be suggested that the purified alginate sponges provide a promising platform for cartilage regeneration.

  8. Influence of Flow Behavior of Alginate-Cell Suspensions on Cell Viability and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ning, Liqun; Guillemot, Arthur; Zhao, Jingxuan; Kipouros, Georges; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2016-07-01

    Tissue scaffolds with living cells fabricated by three-dimensional bioprinting/plotting techniques are becoming more prevalent in tissue repair and regeneration. In the bioprinting process, cells are subject to process-induced forces (such as shear force) that can result in cell damage and loss of cell function. The flow behavior of the biomaterial solutions that encapsulate living cells in this process plays an important role. This study used a rheometer to examine the flow behavior of alginate solution and alginate-Schwann cell (RSC96), alginate-fibroblast cell (NIH-3T3), and alginate-skeletal muscle cell (L8) suspensions during shearing with respect to effects on cell viability and proliferation. The flow behavior of all the alginate-cell suspensions varied with alginate concentration and cell density and had a significant influence on the viability and proliferation of the cells once sheared as well as on the recovery of the sheared cells. These findings provide a mean to preserve cell viability and/or retain cell proliferation function in the bioprinting process by regulating the flow behavior of cell-biomaterial suspensions and process parameters.

  9. Hydroxyapatite-reinforced collagen tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Robert J.

    Scaffolds have been fabricated from a wide variety of materials and most have showed some success, either as bone graft substitutes or as tissue engineering scaffolds. However, all current scaffold compositions and architectures suffer from one or more flaws including poor mechanical properties, lack of biological response, nondegradability, or a scaffold architecture not conducive to osteointegration. Biomimetic approaches to scaffold design using the two main components of bone tissue, collagen and hydroxyapatite, resulted in scaffolds with superior biological properties but relatively poor mechanical properties and scaffold architecture. It was hypothesized that by optimizing scaffold composition and architecture, HA-collagen bone tissue engineering scaffolds could provide both an excellent biological response along with improved structural properties. The mechanical properties of freeze-dried HA-collagen scaffolds, the most common type of porous HA-collagen material, were first shown to be increased by the addition of HA reinforcements, but scaffold stiffness still fell far short of the desired range. Based on limitations inherent in the freeze-dried process, a new type of leached-porogen scaffold fabrication process was developed. Proof-of-concept scaffolds demonstrated the feasibility of producing leached-porogen HA-collagen materials, and the scaffold architecture was optimized though careful selection of porogen particle size and shape along with an improved crosslinking technique. The final scaffolds exhibited substantially increased compressive modulus compared to previous types HA-collagen scaffolds, while the porosity, pore size, and scaffold permeability were tailored to be suitable for bone tissue ingrowth. An in vitro study demonstrated the capacity of the leached-porogen scaffolds to serve as a substrate for the differentiation of osteoblasts and subsequent production of new bone tissue. The new leached-porogen scaffold HA-collagen scaffolds were

  10. Fabrication of Freestanding Alginate Microfibers and Microstructures for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, John M; Feinberg, Adam W

    2014-01-01

    Natural biopolymers such as alginate have become important materials for a variety of biotechnology applications including drug delivery, cell encapsulation and tissue engineering. This expanding use has spurred the development of new approaches to engineer these materials at the nano- and microscales to better control cell interactions. Here we describe a method to fabricate freestanding alginate-based microfibers and microstructures with tunable geometries down to approximately 3 μm. To do this, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp is used to micromold alginate or alginate-fibrin blends onto a sacrificial layer of thermally-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm). A warm calcium chloride solution is then used to crosslink the alginate and upon cooling below the lower critical solution temperature (~32° C) the PIPAAm layer dissolves and releases the alginate or alginate-fibrin as freestanding microfibers and microstructures. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that C2C12 myoblasts seeded onto the alginate-fibrin microfibers polarize along the fiber length forming interconnected cell strands. Thus, we have developed the ability to engineer alginate-based microstructured materials that can selectively bind cells and direct cellular assembly. PMID:24695323

  11. Coaxial additive manufacture of biomaterial composite scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cornock, R; Beirne, S; Thompson, B; Wallace, G G

    2014-06-01

    An inherent difficulty associated with the application of suitable bioscaffolds for tissue engineering is the incorporation of adequate mechanical characteristics into the materials which recapitulate that of the native tissue, whilst maintaining cell proliferation and nutrient transfer qualities. Biomaterial composites fabricated using rapid prototyping techniques can potentially improve the functionality and patient-specific processing of tissue engineering scaffolds. In this work, a technique for the coaxial melt extrusion printing of core-shell scaffold structures was designed, implemented and assessed with respect to the repeatability, cell efficacy and scaffold porosity obtainable. Encapsulated alginate hydrogel/thermoplastic polycaprolactone (Alg-PCL) cofibre scaffolds were fabricated. Selective laser melting was used to produce a high resolution stainless steel 316 L coaxial extrusion nozzle, exhibiting diameters of 300 μm/900 μm for the inner and outer nozzles respectively. We present coaxial melt extrusion printed scaffolds of Alg-PCL cofibres with ~0.4 volume fraction alginate, with total fibre diameter as low as 600 μm and core material offset as low as 10% of the total diameter. Furthermore the tuneability of scaffold porosity, pore size and interconnectivity, as well as the preliminary inclusion, compatibility and survival of an L-929 mouse fibroblast cell-line within the scaffolds were explored. This preliminary cell work highlighted the need for optimal material selection and further design reiteration in future research.

  12. Three-dimensional plotting of a cell-laden alginate/methylcellulose blend: towards biofabrication of tissue engineering constructs with clinically relevant dimensions.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Kathleen; Placht, Anna-Maria; Paul, Birgit; Brüggemeier, Sophie; Gelinsky, Michael; Lode, Anja

    2015-07-22

    Biofabrication of tissue engineering constructs with tailored architecture and organized cell placement using rapid prototyping technologies is a major research focus in the field of regenerative therapies. This study describes a novel alginate-based material suitable for both cell embedding and fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) structures with predefined geometry by 3D plotting. The favourable printing properties of the material were achieved by using a simple strategy: addition of methylcellulose (MC) to a 3% alginate solution resulted in a strongly enhanced viscosity, which enabled accurate and easy deposition without high technical efforts. After scaffold plotting, the alginate chains were crosslinked with Ca(2+) ; MC did not contribute to the gelation and was released from the scaffolds during the following cultivation. The resulting constructs are characterized by high elasticity and stability, as well as an enhanced microporosity caused by the transient presence of MC. The suitability of the alginate/MC blend for cell embedding was evaluated by direct incorporation of mesenchymal stem cells during scaffold fabrication. The embedded cells showed high viability after 3 weeks of cultivation, which was similar to those of cells within pure alginate scaffolds which served as control. Maintenance of the differentiation potential of embedded cells, as an important requirement for the generation of functional tissue engineering constructs, was proven for adipogenic differentiation as a model for soft tissue formation. In conclusion, the temporary integration of MC in to a low-concentrated alginate solution allowed the generation of scaffolds with dimensions in the range of centimetres without loss of the positive properties of low-concentrated alginate hydrogels with regard to cell embedding. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Modular Injectable Matrices Based on Alginate Solution/Microsphere Mixtures That Gel in situ and Co-Deliver Immunomodulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Yuki; Winans, Amy M.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2011-01-01

    Biocompatible polymer solutions that can crosslink in situ following injection to form stable hydrogels are of interest as depots for sustained delivery of therapeutic factors or cells, and as scaffolds for regenerative medicine. Here, injectable self-gelling alginate formulations obtained by mixing alginate microspheres (as calcium reservoirs) with soluble alginate solutions were characterized for potential use in immunotherapy. Rapid redistribution of calcium ions from microspheres into the surrounding alginate solution led to rapid crosslinking and formation of stable hydrogels. The mechanical properties of the resulting gels correlated with the concentration of calcium reservoir microspheres added to the solution. Soluble factors such as the cytokine interleukin-2 were readily incorporated into self-gelling alginate matrices by simply mixing them with the formulation prior to gelation. Using alginate microspheres as modular components, strategies for binding immunostimulatory CpG oligonucleotides onto the surface of microspheres were also demonstrated. When injected subcutaneously in the flanks of mice, self-gelling alginate formed soft macroporous gels supporting cellular infiltration and allowing ready access to microspheres carrying therapeutic factors embedded in the matrix. This in-situ gelling formulation may thus be useful for stimulating immune cells at a desired locale such as solid tumors or infection sites as well as for other soft tissue regeneration applications. PMID:19117820

  14. A honeycomb composite of mollusca shell matrix and calcium alginate.

    PubMed

    You, Hua-jian; Li, Jin; Zhou, Chan; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yao-guang

    2016-03-01

    A honeycomb composite is useful to carry cells for application in bone, cartilage, skin, and soft tissue regenerative therapies. To fabricate a composite, and expand the application of mollusca shells as well as improve preparing methods of calcium alginate in tissue engineering research, Anodonta woodiana shell powder was mixed with sodium alginate at varying mass ratios to obtain a gel mixture. The mixture was frozen and treated with dilute hydrochloric acid to generate a shell matrix/calcium alginate composite. Calcium carbonate served as the control. The composite was transplanted subcutaneously into rats. At 7, 14, 42, and 70 days after transplantation, frozen sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, followed by DAPI, β-actin, and collagen type-I immunofluorescence staining, and observed using laser confocal microscopy. The composite featured a honeycomb structure. The control and composite samples displayed significantly different mechanical properties. The water absorption rate of the composite and control group were respectively 205-496% and 417-586%. The composite (mass ratio of 5:5) showed good biological safety over a 70-day period; the subcutaneous structure of the samples was maintained and the degradation rate was lower than that of the control samples. Freezing the gel mixture afforded control over chemical reaction rates. Given these results, the composite is a promising honeycomb scaffold for tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural Characterization of Sodium Alginate and Calcium Alginate.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Hadas; Srebnik, Simcha

    2016-06-13

    Alginate readily aggregates and forms a physical gel in the presence of cations. The association of the chains, and ultimately gel structure and mechanics, depends not only on ion type, but also on the sequence and composition of the alginate chain that ultimately determines its stiffness. Chain flexibility is generally believed to decrease with guluronic residue content, but it is also known that both polymannuronate and polyguluronate blocks are stiffer than heteropolymeric blocks. In this work, we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulation to primarily explore the association and aggregate structure of different alginate chains under various Ca(2+) concentrations and for different alginate chain composition. We show that Ca(2+) ions in general facilitate chain aggregation and gelation. However, aggregation is predominantly affected by alginate monomer composition, which is found to correlate with chain stiffness under certain solution conditions. In general, greater fractions of mannuronic monomers are found to increase chain flexibility of heteropolymer chains. Furthermore, differences in chain guluronic acid content are shown to lead to different interchain association mechanisms, such as lateral association, zipper mechanism, and entanglement, where the mannuronic residues are shown to operate as an elasticity moderator and therefore promote chain association.

  16. A prospective comparison of alginate-hydrogel with standard medical therapy to determine impact on functional capacity and clinical outcomes in patients with advanced heart failure (AUGMENT-HF trial).

    PubMed

    Anker, Stefan D; Coats, Andrew J S; Cristian, Gabriel; Dragomir, Dinu; Pusineri, Enrico; Piredda, Massimo; Bettari, Luca; Dowling, Robert; Volterrani, Maurizio; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mas, Jean-Louis; Danchin, Nicolas; Solomon, Scott D; Lee, Randall J; Ahmann, Frank; Hinson, Andy; Sabbah, Hani N; Mann, Douglas L

    2015-09-07

    AUGMENT-HF was an international, multi-centre, prospective, randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and safety of a novel method of left ventricular (LV) modification with alginate-hydrogel. Alginate-hydrogel is an inert permanent implant that is directly injected into LV heart muscle and serves as a prosthetic scaffold to modify the shape and size of the dilated LV. Patients with advanced chronic heart failure (HF) were randomized (1 : 1) to alginate-hydrogel (n = 40) in combination with standard medical therapy or standard medical therapy alone (Control, n = 38). The primary endpoint of AUGMENT-HF was the change in peak VO2 from baseline to 6 months. Secondary endpoints included changes in 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, as well as assessments of procedural safety. Enrolled patients were 63 ± 10 years old, 74% in NYHA functional class III, had a LV ejection fraction of 26 ± 5% and a mean peak VO2 of 12.2 ± 1.8 mL/kg/min. Thirty-five patients were successfully treated with alginate-hydrogel injections through a limited left thoracotomy approach without device-related complications; the 30-day surgical mortality was 8.6% (3 deaths). Alginate-hydrogel treatment was associated with improved peak VO2 at 6 months-treatment effect vs. +1.24 mL/kg/min (95% confidence interval 0.26-2.23, P = 0.014). Also 6MWT distance and NYHA functional class improved in alginate-hydrogel-treated patients vs. Control (both P < 0.001). Alginate-hydrogel in addition to standard medical therapy for patients with advanced chronic HF was more effective than standard medical therapy alone for improving exercise capacity and symptoms. The results of AUGMENT-HF provide proof of concept for a pivotal trial. NCT01311791. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  17. Design and characterization of core-shell mPEG-PLGA composite microparticles for development of cell-scaffold constructs.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanhong; Gallego, Monica Ramos; Nielsen, Lene Feldskov; Jorgensen, Lene; Møller, Eva Horn; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2013-09-01

    Appropriate scaffolds capable of providing suitable biological and structural guidance are of great importance to generate cell-scaffold constructs for cell-based tissue engineering. The aim of the present study was to develop composite microparticles with a structure to provide functionality as a combined drug delivery/scaffold system. Composite microparticles were produced by incorporating either alginate/dermatan sulfate (Alg/DS) or alginate/chitosan/dermatan sulfate (Alg/CS/DS) particles in mPEG-PLGA microparticles using coaxial ultrasonic atomization. The encapsulation and distribution of Alg/DS or Alg/CS/DS particles in the mPEG-PLGA microparticles were significantly dependent on the operating conditions, including the flow rate ratio (Qout/Qin) and the viscosity of the polymer solutions (Vout, Vin) between the outer and the inner feeding channels. The core-shell composite microparticles containing the Alg/DS particles or the Alg/CS/DS particles displayed 40% and 65% DS release in 10 days, respectively, as compared to the DS directly loaded microparticles showing 90% DS release during the same time interval. The release profiles of DS correlate with the cell proliferation of fibroblasts, i.e. more sustainable cell growth was induced by the DS released from the core-shell composite microparticles comprising Alg/CS/DS particles. After seeding fibroblasts onto the composite microparticles, excellent cell adhesion was observed, and a successful assembly of the cell-scaffold constructs was induced within 7 days. Therefore, the present study demonstrates a novel strategy for fabrication of core-shell composite microparticles comprising additional particulate drug carriers in the core, which provides controlled delivery of DS and favorable cell biocompatibility; an approach to potentially achieve cell-based tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Adipogenic differentiation of stem cells in three-dimensional porous bacterial nanocellulose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Krontiras, Panagiotis; Gatenholm, Paul; Hägg, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    There is an increased interest in developing adipose tissue for in vitro and in vivo applications. Current two-dimensional (2D) cell-culture systems of adipocytes are limited, and new methods to culture adipocytes in three-dimensional (3D) are warranted as a more life-like model to study metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. In this study, we have evaluated different porous bacterial nanocellulose scaffolds for 3D adipose tissue. In an initial pilot study, we compared adipogenic differentiation of mice mesenchymal stem cells from a cell line on 2D and 3D scaffolds of bacterial nanocellulose. The 3D scaffolds were engineered by crosslinking homogenized cellulose fibrils using alginate and freeze drying the mixture to obtain a porous structure. Quenching the scaffolds in liquid nitrogen resulted in smaller pores compared to slower freezing using isopropanol. We found that on 2D surfaces, the cells were scarcely distributed and showed limited formation of lipid droplets, whereas cells grown in macroporous 3D scaffolds contained more cells growing in clusters, containing large lipid droplets. All four types of scaffolds contained a lot of adipocytes, but scaffolds with smaller pores contained larger cell clusters than scaffolds with bigger pores, with viable adipocytes present even 4 weeks after differentiation. Scaffolds with lower alginate fractions retained their pore integrity better. We conclude that 3D culturing of adipocytes in bacterial nanocellulose macroporous scaffolds is a promising method for fabrication of adipose tissue as an in vitro model for adipose biology and metabolic disease.

  19. The effect of calcium chloride concentration on alginate/Fmoc-diphenylalanine hydrogel networks.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Ekin; Bayram, Cem; Akçapınar, Rümeysa; Türk, Mustafa; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2016-09-01

    Peptide based hydrogels gained a vast interest in the tissue engineering studies thanks to great superiorities such as biocompatibility, supramolecular organization without any need of additional crosslinker, injectability and tunable nature. Fmoc-diphenylalanine (FmocFF) is one of the earliest and widely used example of these small molecule gelators that have been utilized in biomedical studies. However, Fmoc-peptides are not feasible for long term use due to low stability and weak mechanical properties at neutral pH. In this study, Fmoc-FF dipeptides were mechanically enhanced by incorporation of alginate, a biocompatible and absorbable polysaccharide. The binary hydrogel is obtained via molecular self-assembly of FmocFF dipeptide in alginate solution followed by ionic crosslinking of alginate moieties with varying concentrations of calcium chloride. Hydrogel characterization was evaluated in terms of morphology, viscoelastic moduli and diffusional phenomena and the structures were tested as 3D scaffolds for bovine chondrocytes. In vitro evaluation of scaffolds lasted up to 14days and cell viability, sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) levels, collagen type II synthesis were determined. Our results showed that alginate incorporation into FmocFF hydrogels leads to better mechanical properties and higher stability with good biocompatibility.

  20. Superabsorbent nanocomposite (alginate-g-PAMPS/MMT): synthesis, characterization and swelling behavior.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mithilesh; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2012-09-01

    A superabsorbent composite (alginate-g-PAMPS/MMT) was prepared by graft copolymerization from alginate, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) and Na+ montmorillonite (MMT) in an inert atmosphere. Effects of polymerization variables on water absorbency, including the content of Na+ montmorillonite, sodium alginate, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide and AMPS, were studied. The introduced montmorillonite formed a loose and porous surface and improved the water absorbency of the alginate-g-PAMPS/MMT superabsorbent composite. Swelling behaviors of the superabsorbent composites in various cationic salt solutions (NaCl, CaCl2 and FeCl3) and anionic salt solutions (NaCl and Na2SO4) were also systematically investigated. The superabsorbent composite was further characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), rheology, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) taking alginate-g-PAMPS as a reference. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 21 CFR 582.7610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 582.7610 Section 582.7610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium alginate. (a) Product. Potassium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  2. 21 CFR 582.7610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 582.7610 Section 582.7610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium alginate. (a) Product. Potassium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  3. 21 CFR 582.7610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 582.7610 Section 582.7610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium alginate. (a) Product. Potassium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  4. 21 CFR 582.7610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 582.7610 Section 582.7610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium alginate. (a) Product. Potassium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  5. 21 CFR 582.7610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 582.7610 Section 582.7610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium alginate. (a) Product. Potassium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  6. 21 CFR 582.7187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 582.7187 Section 582.7187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium alginate. (a) Product. Calcium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.7133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium alginate. 582.7133 Section 582.7133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Ammonium alginate. (a) Product. Ammonium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1011 - Alginic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alginic acid. 184.1011 Section 184.1011 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1011 Alginic acid. (a) Alginic acid is a colloidal, hydrophilic...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1011 - Alginic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alginic acid. 184.1011 Section 184.1011 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1011 Alginic acid. (a) Alginic acid is a colloidal, hydrophilic...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1011 - Alginic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Alginic acid. 184.1011 Section 184.1011 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1011 Alginic acid. (a) Alginic acid is a colloidal, hydrophilic...

  11. 21 CFR 582.7724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 582.7724 Section 582.7724 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7724 Sodium alginate. (a) Product. Sodium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  12. 21 CFR 582.7724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 582.7724 Section 582.7724 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7724 Sodium alginate. (a) Product. Sodium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  13. 21 CFR 582.7724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 582.7724 Section 582.7724 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7724 Sodium alginate. (a) Product. Sodium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  14. 21 CFR 582.7724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 582.7724 Section 582.7724 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7724 Sodium alginate. (a) Product. Sodium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  15. 21 CFR 582.7724 - Sodium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium alginate. 582.7724 Section 582.7724 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7724 Sodium alginate. (a) Product. Sodium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  16. An alginate-based platform for cancer stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shu-Pei; Zhao, Yu-Fang; Li, Chun-Feng; Yin, Yan-Bin; Meng, Qing-Yuan; Lin, Feng-Huei; Liu, Yi; Hou, Xiao-Lu; Guo, Kai; Chen, Xiong-Biao; Tian, Wei-Ming

    2016-06-01

    As the primary determinants of the clinical behaviors of human cancers, the discovery of cancer stem cells (CSCs) represents an ideal target for novel anti-cancer therapies (Kievit et al., 2014). Notably, CSCs are difficult to propagate in vitro, which severely restricts the study of CSC biology and the development of therapeutic agents. Emerging evidence indicates that CSCs rely on a niche that controls their differentiation and proliferation, as is the case with normal stem cells (NSCs). Replicating the in vivo CSC microenvironment in vitro using three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds can provide means to effectively generate CSCs, thus enabling the discovery of CSC biology. This paper presents our study on a novel alginate-based platform for mimicking the CSC niche to promote CSC proliferation and enrichment. In this study, we used a versatile mouse 4T1 breast cancer model to independently evaluate the matrix parameters of a CSC niche - including the material's mechanical properties, cytokine immobilization, and the composition of the extracellular matrix's (ECM's) molecular impact - on CSC proliferation and enrichment. On this basis, the optimal stiffness and concentration of hyaluronic acid (HA), as well as epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor immobilization, were identified to establish the platform for mimicking the 4T1 breast CSCs (4T1 CSCs) niche. The 4T1 CSCs obtained from the platform show increased expression of the genes involved in breast CSC and NSC, as compared to general 2D or 3D culture, and 4T1 CSCs were also demonstrated to have the ability to quickly form a subcutaneous tumor in homologous Balb/c mice in vivo. In addition, the platform can be adjusted according to different parameters for CSC screening. Our results indicate that our platform offers a simple and efficient means to isolate and enrich CSCs in vitro, which can help researchers better understand CSC biology and thus develop more effective therapeutic agents to

  17. Nonlinear elasticity of alginate gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemnejad, Seyed Meysam; Kundu, Santanu

    Alginate is a naturally occurring anionic polysaccharide extracted from brown algae. Because of biocompatibility, low toxicity, and simple gelation process, alginate gels are used in biomedical and food applications. Here, we report the rheological behavior of ionically crosslinked alginate gels, which are obtained by in situ gelation of alginates with calcium salts, in between two parallel plates of a rheometer. Strain stiffening behavior was captured using large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) experiments. In addition, negative normal stress was observed for these gels, which has not been reported earlier for any polysaccharide networks. The magnitude of negative normal stress increases with applied strain and can exceed that of the shear stress at large strain. Rheological results fitted with a constitutive model that considers both stretching and bending of chains indicate that nonlinearity is likely related to the stretching of the chains between the crosslink junctions. The results provide an improved understanding of the deformation mechanism of ionically crosslinked alginate gel and the results will be important in developing synthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) from these materials.

  18. Application of neutral electrolyzed water to disinfection of alginate impression.

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Yuki; Chen, Ker-Kong; Nagamatsu, Hiroshi; Kozono, Yoshio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Neutral electrolyzed water was developed with new concepts of long-term good durability and minimum corrosiveness to metal in addition to its excellent bactericidal activities similar to acid type of electrolyzed waters. The present study examined the bactericidal effects of the neutral electrolyzed water on disinfection of the alginate impression of a dental arch model contaminated by bacteria. Only 1-min immersion in neutral electrolyzed water could sufficiently disinfect the alginate impression including the metallic tray under ultrasonic with no significant differences from acid electrolyzed waters. No bactericidal effects were found in any electrolyzed water when used as mixing water. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of each electrolyzed water in a comprehensive way, it was suggested that neutral electrolyzed water may be the most appropriate for the disinfection of alginate impression.

  19. Postelectrospinning modifications for alginate nanofiber-based wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Leung, Victor; Hartwell, Ryan; Elizei, Sanam Salimi; Yang, Heejae; Ghahary, Aziz; Ko, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Alginate nanofibers have been attractive for potential tissue regeneration applications due to a combination of their moisture retention ability and large surface area available in a nonwoven nanofiber form. This study aims to address several challenges in alginate nanofiber application, including the lack of structural stability in aqueous environment and limited cell attachment as compared to commercial wound dressings, via examining crosslinking techniques. In addition to the commonly performed divalent ion crosslinking, a glutaraldehyde double-crosslinking step and polylysine addition were applied to an electrospun alginate nanofiber nonwoven mat. With optimization of the electrospinning solution, nanofiber morphology was maintained after the two-stage crosslinking process. Extensibility of the nanofiber mat reduced after the crosslinking process. However, both aqueous stability and cell attachment improved after the postspinning modifications, as shown through degradation tests in phosphate buffered saline solutions and fibroblast cell culture studies, respectively.

  20. Scaffolded biology.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Descriptions and interpretations of the natural world are dominated by dichotomies such as organism vs. environment, nature vs. nurture, genetic vs. epigenetic, but in the last couple of decades strong dissatisfaction with those partitions has been repeatedly voiced and a number of alternative perspectives have been suggested, from perspectives such as Dawkins' extended phenotype, Turner's extended organism, Oyama's Developmental Systems Theory and Odling-Smee's niche construction theory. Last in time is the description of biological phenomena in terms of hybrids between an organism (scaffolded system) and a living or non-living scaffold, forming unit systems to study processes such as reproduction and development. As scaffold, eventually, we can define any resource used by the biological system, especially in development and reproduction, without incorporating it as happens in the case of resources fueling metabolism. Addressing biological systems as functionally scaffolded systems may help pointing to functional relationships that can impart temporal marking to the developmental process and thus explain its irreversibility; revisiting the boundary between development and metabolism and also regeneration phenomena, by suggesting a conceptual framework within which to investigate phenomena of regular hypermorphic regeneration such as characteristic of deer antlers; fixing a periodization of development in terms of the times at which a scaffolding relationship begins or is terminated; and promoting plant galls to legitimate study objects of developmental biology.

  1. Immobilization of salvianolic acid B-loaded chitosan microspheres distributed three-dimensionally and homogeneously on the porous surface of hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyu; Wang, Qin; Zhi, Wei; Wang, Jianxin; Feng, Bo; Qu, Shuxin; Mu, Yandong; Weng, Jie

    2016-10-07

    Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds combined with a drug delivery system have attracted much attention for bone tissue engineering. In this study, an easy and highly efficient method was developed to immobilize salvianolic acid B (Sal B)-loaded chitosan (CS) microspheres three dimensionally and homogeneously on the surface of HA scaffolds pre-coated with alginate. Porous HA scaffolds were prepared via a template-leaching process and CS microspheres (used as drug carriers) were fabricated by an emulsion method. To improve adhesion between the microspheres and HA scaffolds, alginate was used to pre-coat the porous surface of the HA scaffolds. Various concentrations of alginate were used to optimize the adhesion of Sal B-loaded CS microspheres to the scaffold surface. During the adherence process, coated HA scaffolds were immersed in an aqueous solution containing Sal B-loaded CS microspheres, followed by standing or shaking at 37 °C for a certain time. The results showed that the microspheres were solidly and homogeneously distributed on the porous surface of the alginate pre-coated HA scaffolds via electrostatic interactions. Few microspheres detached from the porous surface, even after the HA scaffolds with microspheres were treated by shaking in distilled water for as long as 7 d. Compared with the static condition, the distribution of Sal B-loaded CS microspheres on the porous surface of pre-coated HA scaffolds in the shaken condition was more homogeneous and almost unaggregated. Additionally, the compressive strength of the scaffolds coated with alginate was obviously improved. The optimal alginate coating concentration was 1% (i.e. the microstructure of the porous surfaces of the HA scaffolds was almost unchanged). The release profile of Sal B over a 30 d immersion found an initial burst release followed by a sustained release. The result of cell culture in vitro was that 1% alginate-coated scaffolds with Sal B-loaded CS microspheres obviously promoted cell

  2. Detoxification of Hg(II) from aqueous and enzyme media: Pristine vs. tailored calcium alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Kangkana; Ansari, Zarina; Sen, Kamalika

    2016-10-01

    Calcium alginate (CA) hydrogels were tailored using phenolic compounds (PC) like, thymol, morin, catechin, hesperidin, during their preparation. The PC incorporated gels show modified surface features as indicated by scanning electron microscopic images (SEM). The rheological studies show that excepting the hesperidin incorporated gels all the other kinds including calcium alginate pristine have similar mechanical strength. The hesperidine incorporated CA gels had the maximum capacity to adsorb Hg. The Freundlich adsorption isotherms show higher values of adsorption capacity for all PC incorporated CA beads than the pristine CA (PCA). The hesperidin incorporated CA gels were found to show the best adsorption condition at neutral pH and an optimum contact time of 2.5h at 25°C. Considering the possibility of ingested Hg detoxification from human alimentary tract, the hesperidin and morin incorporated CA beads were further modified through incorporation of cod liver oil as the digestion time of fat in stomach is higher. In vitro uptake capacities of Hg in pepsin and pancreatin containing enzyme media were studied with hesperidin and morin incorporated beads and their corresponding fat incorporated beads also. In the pepsin medium, there was no uptake by hesperidin and fat-hesperidin incorporated beads, which is possibly due to the higher acidity of the medium. But in pancreatin medium Hg was taken up by both kinds of beads. Morin and morin-fat incorporated beads were efficient to uptake Hg from both the pepsin and pancreatin medium. The tailored CA beads may therefore serve as efficient scaffolds to rescue Hg ingested individuals.

  3. Alginate Production by Plant-Pathogenic Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Fett, William F.; Osman, Stanley F.; Fishman, Marshall L.; Siebles, T. S.

    1986-01-01

    Eighteen plant-pathogenic and three non-plant-pathogenic pseudomonads were tested for the ability to produce alginic acid as an exopolysaccharide in vitro. Alginate production was demonstrated for 10 of 13 fluorescent plant-pathogenic pseudomonads tested with glucose or gluconate as the carbon source, but not for all 5 nonfluorescent plant pathogens and all 3 non-plant pathogens tested. With sucrose as the carbon source, some strains produced alginate while others produced both polyfructan (levan) and alginate. Alginates ranged from <1 to 28% guluronic acid, were acetylated, and had number-average molecular weights of 11.3 × 103 to 47.1 × 103. Polyfructans and alginates were not elicitors of the soybean phytoalexin glyceollin when applied to wounded cotyledon surfaces and did not induce prolonged water soaking of soybean leaf tissues. All or most pseudomonads in rRNA-DNA homology group I may be capable of synthesizing alginate as an exopolysaccharide. PMID:16347146

  4. Injectable hydrogels derived from phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Sem; Song, Minsoo; Lee, Eun-Jung; Shin, Ueon Sang

    2015-06-01

    Phosphorylation of sodium alginate salt (NaAlg) was carried out using H3PO4/P2O5/Et3PO4 followed by acid-base reaction with Ca(OAc)2 to give phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes (CaPAlg), as a water dispersible alginic acid derivative. The modified alginate derivatives including phosphorylated alginic acid (PAlg) and CaPAlg were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for (1)H, and (31)P nuclei, high resolution inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. CaPAlg hydrogels were prepared simply by mixing CaPAlg solution (2w/v%) with NaAlg solution (2w/v%) in various ratios (2:8, 4:6, 6:4, 8:2) of volume. No additional calcium salts such as CaSO4 or CaCl2 were added externally. The gelation was completed within about 3-40min indicating a high potential of hydrogel delivery by injection in vivo. Their mechanical properties were tested to be ≤6.7kPa for compressive strength at break and about 8.4kPa/mm for elastic modulus. SEM analysis of the CaPAlg hydrogels showed highly porous morphology with interconnected pores of width in the range of 100-800μm. Cell culture results showed that the injectable hydrogels exhibited comparable properties to the pure alginate hydrogel in terms of cytotoxicity and 3D encapsulation of cells for a short time period. The developed injectable hydrogels showed suitable physicochemical and mechanical properties for injection in vivo, and could therefore be beneficial for the field of soft tissue engineering.

  5. In vivo bioengineered ovarian tumors based on collagen, matrigel, alginate and agarose hydrogels: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Hu, Xuefeng; Huang, Yuanjie; Xu, Guojie; Yang, Jinsong; Li, Li

    2015-01-29

    Scaffold-based tumor engineering is rapidly evolving the study of cancer progression. However, the effects of scaffolds and environment on tumor formation have seldom been investigated. In this study, four types of injectable hydrogels, namely, collagen type I, Matrigel, alginate and agarose gels, were loaded with human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells and then injected into nude mice subcutaneously. The growth of the tumors in vitro was also investigated. After four weeks, the specimens were harvested and analyzed. We found that tumor formation by SKOV3 cells was best supported by collagen, followed by Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose in vivo. The collagen I group exhibited a larger tumor volume with increased neovascularization and increased necrosis compared with the other materials. Further, increased MMP activity, upregulated expression of laminin and fibronectin and higher levels of HIF-1α and VEGF-A in the collagen group revealed that the engineered tumor is closer to human ovarian carcinoma. In order, collagen, Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose exhibited decreases in tumor formation. All evidence indicated that the in vivo engineered tumor is scaffold-dependent. Bioactive hydrogels are superior to inert hydrogels at promoting tumor regeneration. In particular, biomimetic hydrogels are advantageous because they provide a microenvironment that mimics the ECM of natural tumors. On the other hand, typical features of cancer cells and the expression of genes related to cancer malignancy were far less similar to the natural tumor in vitro, which indicated the importance of culture environment in vivo. Superior to the in vitro culture, nude mice can be considered satisfactory in vivo 'bioreactors' for the screening of favorable cell vehicles for tumor engineering in vitro.

  6. Alginate impressions: A practical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nandini, V Vidyashree; Venkatesh, K Vijay; Nair, K Chandrasekharan

    2008-01-01

    The choice of an impression material for a particular situation depends on the treatment being provided, operator preference, and so on. Even with the introduction of more advanced and more accurate rubber base impression materials, irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials have stood the test of time. This article gives a detailed perspective of how best to make alginate impressions. PMID:20142882

  7. Biomimetic Scaffold with Aligned Microporosity Designed for Dentin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Panseri, Silvia; Montesi, Monica; Dozio, Samuele Maria; Savini, Elisa; Tampieri, Anna; Sandri, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Tooth loss is a common result of a variety of oral diseases due to physiological causes, trauma, genetic disorders, and aging and can lead to physical and mental suffering that markedly lowers the individual’s quality of life. Tooth is a complex organ that is composed of mineralized tissues and soft connective tissues. Dentin is the most voluminous tissue of the tooth and its formation (dentinogenesis) is a highly regulated process displaying several similarities with osteogenesis. In this study, gelatin, thermally denatured collagen, was used as a promising low-cost material to develop scaffolds for hard tissue engineering. We synthetized dentin-like scaffolds using gelatin biomineralized with magnesium-doped hydroxyapatite and blended it with alginate. With a controlled freeze-drying process and alginate cross-linking, it is possible to obtain scaffolds with microscopic aligned channels suitable for tissue engineering. 3D cell culture with mesenchymal stem cells showed the promising properties of the new scaffolds for tooth regeneration. In detail, the chemical–physical features of the scaffolds, mimicking those of natural tissue, facilitate the cell adhesion, and the porosity is suitable for long-term cell colonization and fine cell–material interactions. PMID:27376060

  8. 3D Printing Facilitated Scaffold-free Tissue Unit Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan J.; Trusk, Thomas C.; Visconti, Richard P.; Yost, Michael J.; Kindy, Mark S.; Drake, Christopher J.; Argraves, William Scott; Markwald, Roger R.; Mei, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Tissue spheroids hold great potential in tissue engineering as building blocks to assemble into functional tissues. To date, agarose molds have been extensively used to facilitate fusion process of tissue spheroids. As a molding material, agarose typically requires low temperature plates for gelation and/or heated dispenser units. Here, we proposed and developed an alginate-based, direct 3D mold-printing technology: 3D printing micro-droplets of alginate solution into biocompatible, bio-inert alginate hydrogel molds for the fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Specifically, we developed a 3D printing technology to deposit micro-droplets of alginate solution on calcium containing substrates in a layer-by-layer fashion to prepare ring-shaped 3D hydrogel molds. Tissue spheroids composed of 50% endothelial cells and 50% smooth muscle cells were robotically placed into the 3D printed alginate molds using a 3D printer, and were found to rapidly fuse into toroid-shaped tissue units. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cells secreted collagen type I playing a critical role in promoting cell-cell adhesion, tissue formation and maturation. PMID:24717646

  9. 3D printing facilitated scaffold-free tissue unit fabrication.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan J; Trusk, Thomas C; Visconti, Richard P; Yost, Michael J; Kindy, Mark S; Drake, Christopher J; Argraves, William Scott; Markwald, Roger R; Mei, Ying

    2014-06-01

    Tissue spheroids hold great potential in tissue engineering as building blocks to assemble into functional tissues. To date, agarose molds have been extensively used to facilitate fusion process of tissue spheroids. As a molding material, agarose typically requires low temperature plates for gelation and/or heated dispenser units. Here, we proposed and developed an alginate-based, direct 3D mold-printing technology: 3D printing microdroplets of alginate solution into biocompatible, bio-inert alginate hydrogel molds for the fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Specifically, we developed a 3D printing technology to deposit microdroplets of alginate solution on calcium containing substrates in a layer-by-layer fashion to prepare ring-shaped 3D hydrogel molds. Tissue spheroids composed of 50% endothelial cells and 50% smooth muscle cells were robotically placed into the 3D printed alginate molds using a 3D printer, and were found to rapidly fuse into toroid-shaped tissue units. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cells secreted collagen type I playing a critical role in promoting cell-cell adhesion, tissue formation and maturation.

  10. Design and pharmaceutical evaluation of a nano-enabled crosslinked multipolymeric scaffold for prolonged intracranial release of Zidovudine.

    PubMed

    Harilall, Sheri-lee; Choonara, Yahya E; Modi, Girish; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Iyuke, Sunny E; Danckwerts, Michael P; Pillay, Viness

    2013-01-01

    Nanomedicine explores and allows for the development of drug delivery devices with superior drug uptake, controlled release and fewer drug side-effects. This study explored the use of nanosystems to formulate an implantable drug delivery device capable of sustained zidovudine release over a prolonged period. Pectin and alginate nanoparticles were prepared by applying a salting out and controlled gelification approach, respectively. The nanoparticles were characterized by attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) and were further evaluated for zidovudine (AZT) entrapment efficiency. Multipolymeric scaffolds were prepared by crosslinking carboxymethyl cellulose, polyethylene oxide and epsilon caprolactone for entrapment of zidovudine-loaded alginate nanoparticles to impart enhanced controlled release of zidovudine over the time period. Swelling and textural analysis were conducted on the scaffolds. Prepared scaffolds were treated with hydrochloric acid (HCl) to reduce the swelling of matrix in the hydrated environment thereby further controlling the drug release. Drug release studies in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4, 37°C) were undertaken on both zidovudine-loaded nanoparticles and native scaffolds containing alginate nanoparticles. A higher AZT entrapment efficiency was observed in alginate nanoparticles. Biphasic release was observed with both nanoparticle formulations, exhibiting an initial burst release of drug within hours of exposure to PBS, followed by a constant release rate of AZT over the remaining 30 days of nanoparticle analysis. Exposure of the scaffolds to HCl served to reduce the drug release rate from the entrapped alginate nanoparticles and extended the AZT release up to 30 days. The crosslinked multipolymeric scaffold loaded with alginate nanoparticles and treated with 1% HCl showed the potential

  11. The use of biodegradable polymers in design of cellular scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Orłowska, Joanna; Kurczewska, Urszula; Derwińska, Katarzyna; Orłowski, Wojciech; Orszulak-Michalak, Daria

    2015-03-05

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the usage of biodegradable polymers, made of calcium alginate and dibutyrylchitin, in the design of cellular scaffolds having broad application in reconstructive therapy (dentistry, orthopedics). To visualize cells seeded on calcium alginate and dibutyrylchitin polymers DAPI staining of fibroblasts nuclei was used. The cytotoxicity of the materials and microscopic evaluation of the viability of seeded cells was tested with a PKH 67 fluorescent dye. To assess the cellular toxicity the proliferation of fibroblasts adjacent to the tested polymers was examined. The vitability of cells seeded on polymers was also evaluated by measuring the fluorescence intensity of calcein which binds only to live cells. The conducted experiments (DAPI and PKH 67 staining) show that the tested materials have a positive influence on cell adhesion crucial for wound healing - fibroblasts. The self-made dibutyrylchitin dressing do not cause the reduction of viability of cells seeded on them. The in vitro study illustrated the interactions between the tested materials, constructed of calcium alginate or dibutyrylchitin and mouse fibroblasts and proved their usefulness in the design of cellular scaffolds. Examined polymers turned out to be of great interest and promise for cellular scaffolds design.

  12. Enzyme-catalyzed phase transition of alginate gels and gelatin-alginate interpenetrated networks.

    PubMed

    Doumèche, Bastien; Picard, Julien; Larreta-Garde, Véronique

    2007-11-01

    The enzyme-catalyzed gel-sol transition of calcium-alginate obtained by internal gelling strategy with the help of an entrapped alginate lyase is described. We show that alginate molecules and enzyme-produced oligoalginates shorten the gel time of physical gelatin gels (5% and 1.5%), probably due to local protein concentration increase. Interpenetrated networks composed of calcium-alginate and of gelatin were obtained only if elongation of gelatin helices inside a pre-existing calcium-alginate network could occur and only for low gelatin concentration (1.5%). The physical gelatin network is almost reversible inside the alginate one. Both networks can be obtained in the presence of alginate lyase, but gel-sol transition of calcium-alginate cannot be obtained in the presence of gelatin.

  13. Quantification of alginate by aggregation induced by calcium ions and fluorescent polycations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hewen; Korendovych, Ivan V; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2016-01-01

    For quantification of polysaccharides, including heparins and alginates, the commonly used carbazole assay involves hydrolysis of the polysaccharide to form a mixture of UV-active dye conjugate products. Here, we describe two efficient detection and quantification methods that make use of the negative charges of the alginate polymer and do not involve degradation of the targeted polysaccharide. The first method utilizes calcium ions to induce formation of hydrogel-like aggregates with alginate polymer; the aggregates can be quantified readily by staining with a crystal violet dye. This method does not require purification of alginate from the culture medium and can measure the large amount of alginate that is produced by a mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture. The second method employs polycations tethering a fluorescent dye to form suspension aggregates with the alginate polyanion. Encasing the fluorescent dye in the aggregates provides an increased scattering intensity with a sensitivity comparable to that of the conventional carbazole assay. Both approaches provide efficient methods for monitoring alginate production by mucoid P. aeruginosa.

  14. Different utilization of alginate and other algal polysaccharides by marine Alteromonas macleodii ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Anna M; Balmonte, John P; Berger, Martine; Giebel, Helge-Ansgar; Arnosti, Carol; Voget, Sonja; Simon, Meinhard; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Wietz, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The marine bacterium Alteromonas macleodii is a copiotrophic r-strategist, but little is known about its potential to degrade polysaccharides. Here, we studied the degradation of alginate and other algal polysaccharides by A. macleodii strain 83-1 in comparison to other A. macleodii strains. Cell densities of strain 83-1 with alginate as sole carbon source were comparable to those with glucose, but the exponential phase was delayed. The genome of 83-1 was found to harbour an alginolytic system comprising five alginate lyases, whose expression was induced by alginate. The alginolytic system contains additional CAZymes, including two TonB-dependent receptors, and is part of a 24 kb genomic island unique to the A. macleodii 'surface clade' ecotype. In contrast, strains of the 'deep clade' ecotype contain only a single alginate lyase in a separate 7 kb island. This difference was reflected in an eightfold greater efficiency of surface clade strains to grow on alginate. Strain 83-1 furthermore hydrolysed laminarin, pullulan and xylan, and corresponding polysaccharide utilization loci were detected in the genome. Alteromonas macleodii alginate lyases were predominantly detected in Atlantic Ocean metagenomes. The demonstrated hydrolytic capacities are likely of ecological relevance and represent another level of adaptation among A. macleodii ecotypes.

  15. Functionalized alginate with liquid-like behaviors and its application in wet-spinning.

    PubMed

    Sang, Zhen; Zhang, Wenqian; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Fu, Huakang; Tan, Yeqiang; Sui, Kunyan; Xia, Yanzhi

    2017-10-15

    Alginate is a kind of marine-derived plant polysaccharide with useful properties including inherent flame-retardancy and biocompatibility, yet poor flowability and low processing efficiency induced by high viscosity impede its further industrial applications. In this study, PEG-substituted tertiary amines were adapted to functionalize alginate with different molecular weight via acid-base reaction to improve the flowability. Based on alginate with low molecular weight, alginate fluids exhibited excellent flowability at room temperature in the absence of solvent. For alginate with high molecular weight, gelatinous precipitated phase exhibited significant shear-thinning properties and higher solid content despite lack of solvent-free flowability, which was applied to wet-spinning. The alginate fibers exhibited increased tensile strength by 104% and elongation at break by 132% compared with conventional alginate fibers, and the spinning efficiency was significantly improved. The proposed strategy is expected to extend to highly efficient processing of other polysaccharides to obtain high-performance biomedical materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Preventative Effects of Sodium Alginate on Indomethacin-induced Small-intestinal Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Sayo; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Kawauchi, Shoji; Mizuno, Shigeto; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic technologies have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious mucosal injury in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract (including the small intestine). A drug to treat NSAID-induced small-intestinal injury (SII) is lacking. Sodium alginate is a soluble dietary fiber extracted from brown seaweed and its solution has been used as a hemostatic agent to treat gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric ulcers. Whether sodium alginate has therapeutic effects on NSAID-induced SII and its mechanism of action are not known. Here, we investigated if administration of two forms (high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW)) of sodium alginate could ameliorate indomethacin-induced SII. Pretreatment with HMW sodium alginate or LMW sodium alginate before indomethacin administration improved ulceration and the resultant intestinal shortening was associated with reduced histological severity of mucosal injury and ameliorated mRNA expression of inflammation-related molecules in the small intestine. We found that mRNAs of secretory Muc2 and membrane-associated Muc1, Muc3 and Muc4 were expressed in the small intestine. mRNA expression of Muc1-4 was increased in indomethacin-induced SII, and these increases were prevented by sodium alginate. Thus, administration of sodium alginate could be a therapeutic approach to prevent indomethacin-induced SII.

  17. Non-Invasive Evaluation of Alginate/Poly-L-lysine/Alginate Microcapsules by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Constantinidis, Ioannis; Grant, Samuel C.; Celper, Susanne; Gauffin-Holmberg, Isabel; Agering, Kristina; Oca-Cossio, Jose A.; Bui, Jonathan D.; Flint, Jeremy; Hamaty, Christine; Simpson, Nicholas E.; Blackband, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    In this report, we present data to demonstrate the utility of 1H MR microscopy to noninvasively examine alginate/poly-L-lysine/alginate (APA) microcapsules. Specifically, high-resolution images were used to visualize and quantify the poly-L-lysine (PLL) layer, and monitor temporal changes in the alginate gel microstructure during a month long in vitro culture. The thickness of the alginate/PLL layer was quantified to be 40.6±6.2 μm regardless of the alginate composition used to generate the beads or the time of alginate/PLL interaction (2, 6, or 20 minutes). However, there was a notable difference in the contrast of the PLL layer that depended upon the guluronic content of the alginate and the alginate/PLL interaction time. The T2 relaxation time and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the alginate matrix were measured periodically throughout the month long culture period. Alginate beads generated with a high guluronic content alginate demonstrated a temporal decrease in T2 over the duration of the experiment, while ADC was unaffected. This decrease in T2 is attributed to a reorganization of the alginate microstructure due to periodic media exchanges that mimicked a regular feeding regiment for cultured cells. In beads coated with a PLL layer, this temporal decrease in T2 was less pronounced suggesting that the PLL layer helped maintain the integrity of the initial alginate microstructure. Conversely, alginate beads generated with a high mannuronic content alginate (with or without a PLL layer) did not display temporal changes in either T2 or ADC. This observation suggests that the microstructure of high mannuronic content alginate beads is less susceptible to culture conditions. PMID:17239948

  18. Synergistic effects in semidilute mixed solutions of alginate and lactose-modified chitosan (chitlac).

    PubMed

    Donati, Ivan; Haug, Ingvild J; Scarpa, Tommaso; Borgogna, Massimiliano; Draget, Kurt I; Skjåk-Braek, Gudmund; Paoletti, Sergio

    2007-03-01

    The present study specifically aimed at preparing and characterizing semidilute binary polymer mixtures of alginate and chitlac which might find an application in the field of cell encapsulation. A polyanion, alginate, and a polycation, a lactose-modified chitosan, were mixed under physiological conditions (pH 7.4 and NaCl 0.15) and at a semidilute concentration avoiding associative phase separation. The mutual solubility was found to be dependent on the charge screening effect of the added NaCl salt, being prevented below 0.05 M NaCl. A comparison with the behavior of the polyanion (alginate) under the same experimental conditions revealed that both the viscosity and the relaxation times of the binary polymer solutions are strongly affected by the presence of the polycation. In particular, the occurrence of electrostatic interactions between the two oppositely charged polysaccharides led to a synergistic effect on the zero-shear viscosity of the solution, which showed a 4.2-fold increase with respect to that of the main component of the solution, i.e., alginate. Moreover, the relaxation time, calculated as the reciprocal of the critical share rate, markedly increased upon reducing the alginate fraction in the binary polysaccharide solution. However, the formation of the soluble complexes and the synergistic effect are reduced upon increasing the concentration of the 1:1 electrolyte. By containing a gel-forming polyanion (alginate, e.g., with Ca(2+) ions) and a bioactive polycation (chitlac, bearing a beta-linked D-galactose), the present system can be regarded as a first step toward the development of biologically active scaffold from polysaccharide mixtures.

  19. Three-dimensional bioprinting of complex cell laden alginate hydrogel structures.

    PubMed

    Tabriz, Atabak Ghanizadeh; Hermida, Miguel A; Leslie, Nicholas R; Shu, Wenmiao

    2015-12-21

    Different bioprinting techniques have been used to produce cell-laden alginate hydrogel structures, however these approaches have been limited to 2D or simple three-dimension (3D) structures. In this study, a new extrusion based bioprinting technique was developed to produce more complex alginate hydrogel structures. This was achieved by dividing the alginate hydrogel cross-linking process into three stages: primary calcium ion cross-linking for printability of the gel, secondary calcium cross-linking for rigidity of the alginate hydrogel immediately after printing and tertiary barium ion cross-linking for long-term stability of the alginate hydrogel in culture medium. Simple 3D structures including tubes were first printed to ensure the feasibility of the bioprinting technique and then complex 3D structures such as branched vascular structures were successfully printed. The static stiffness of the alginate hydrogel after printing was 20.18 ± 1.62 KPa which was rigid enough to sustain the integrity of the complex 3D alginate hydrogel structure during the printing. The addition of 60 mM barium chloride was found to significantly extend the stability of the cross-linked alginate hydrogel from 3 d to beyond 11 d without compromising the cellular viability. The results based on cell bioprinting suggested that viability of U87-MG cells was 93 ± 0.9% immediately after bioprinting and cell viability maintained above 88% ± 4.3% in the alginate hydrogel over the period of 11 d.

  20. Engineering alginate as bioink for bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Richards, Dylan J.; Pollard, Samuel; Tan, Yu; Rodriguez, Joshua; Visconti, Richard P.; Trusk, Thomas C.; Yost, Michael J.; Yao, Hai; Markwald, Roger R.; Mei, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in 3D printing offer an excellent opportunity to address critical challenges faced by current tissue engineering approaches. Alginate hydrogels have been extensively utilized as bioinks for 3D bioprinting. However, most previous research has focused on native alginates with limited degradation. The application of oxidized alginates with controlled degradation in bioprinting has not been explored. Here, we prepared a collection of 30 different alginate hydrogels with varied oxidation percentages and concentrations to develop a bioink platform that can be applied to a multitude of tissue engineering applications. We systematically investigated the effects of two key material properties (i.e. viscosity and density) of alginate solutions on their printabilities to identify a suitable range of material properties of alginates to be applied to bioprinting. Further, four alginate solutions with varied biodegradability were printed with human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) into lattice-structured, cell-laden hydrogels with high accuracy. Notably, these alginate-based bioinks were shown to be capable of modulating proliferation and spreading of hADSCs without affecting structure integrity of the lattice structures (except the highly degradable one) after 8 days in culture. This research lays a foundation for the development of alginate-based bioink for tissue-specific tissue engineering applications. PMID:24998183

  1. Engineering alginate as bioink for bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia; Richards, Dylan J; Pollard, Samuel; Tan, Yu; Rodriguez, Joshua; Visconti, Richard P; Trusk, Thomas C; Yost, Michael J; Yao, Hai; Markwald, Roger R; Mei, Ying

    2014-10-01

    Recent advances in three-dimensional (3-D) printing offer an excellent opportunity to address critical challenges faced by current tissue engineering approaches. Alginate hydrogels have been used extensively as bioinks for 3-D bioprinting. However, most previous research has focused on native alginates with limited degradation. The application of oxidized alginates with controlled degradation in bioprinting has not been explored. Here, a collection of 30 different alginate hydrogels with varied oxidation percentages and concentrations was prepared to develop a bioink platform that can be applied to a multitude of tissue engineering applications. The authors systematically investigated the effects of two key material properties (i.e. viscosity and density) of alginate solutions on their printabilities to identify a suitable range of material properties of alginates to be applied to bioprinting. Further, four alginate solutions with varied biodegradability were printed with human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) into lattice-structured, cell-laden hydrogels with high accuracy. Notably, these alginate-based bioinks were shown to be capable of modulating proliferation and spreading of hADSCs without affecting the structure integrity of the lattice structures (except the highly degradable one) after 8days in culture. This research lays a foundation for the development of alginate-based bioink for tissue-specific tissue engineering applications.

  2. Identification of enzymes responsible for extracellular alginate depolymerization and alginate metabolism in Vibrio algivorus.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hidetaka; Tokura, Yuriko; Mori, Yukiko; Mori, Kenichi; Asakura, Yoko; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Hiroo; Chinen, Akito

    2017-02-01

    Alginate is a marine non-food-competing polysaccharide that has potential applications in biorefinery. Owing to its large size (molecular weight >300,000 Da), alginate cannot pass through the bacterial cell membrane. Therefore, bacteria that utilize alginate are presumed to have an enzyme that degrades extracellular alginate. Recently, Vibrio algivorus sp. SA2(T) was identified as a novel alginate-decomposing and alginate-utilizing species. However, little is known about the mechanism of alginate degradation and metabolism in this species. To address this issue, we screened the V. algivorus genomic DNA library for genes encoding polysaccharide-decomposing enzymes using a novel double-layer plate screening method and identified alyB as a candidate. Most identified alginate-decomposing enzymes (i.e., alginate lyases) must be concentrated and purified before extracellular alginate depolymerization. AlyB of V. algivorus heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli depolymerized extracellular alginate without requiring concentration or purification. We found seven homologues in the V. algivorus genome (alyB, alyD, oalA, oalB, oalC, dehR, and toaA) that are thought to encode enzymes responsible for alginate transport and metabolism. Introducing these genes into E. coli enabled the cells to assimilate soluble alginate depolymerized by V. algivorus AlyB as the sole carbon source. The alginate was bioconverted into L-lysine (43.3 mg/l) in E. coli strain AJIK01. These findings demonstrate a simple and novel screening method for identifying polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in bacteria and provide a simple alginate biocatalyst and fermentation system with potential applications in industrial biorefinery.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of collagen type I scaffolds, including gelatin-collagen microparticles and loaded with a hydroglycolic Calendula officinalis extract in a lagomorph model of full-thickness skin wound.

    PubMed

    Millán, D; Jiménez, R A; Nieto, L E; Linero, I; Laverde, M; Fontanilla, M R

    2016-02-01

    Previously, we have developed collagen type I scaffolds including microparticles of gelatin-collagen type I (SGC) that are able to control the release of a hydroglycolic extract of the Calendula officinalis flower. The main goal of the present work was to carry out the preclinical evaluation of SGC alone or loaded with the C. officinalis extract (SGC-E) in a lagomorph model of full-thickness skin wound. A total of 39 rabbits were distributed in three groups, of 13 animals each. The first group was used to compare wound healing by secondary intention (control) with wound healing observed when wounds were grafted with SGC alone. Comparison of control wounds with wounds grafted with SGC-E was performed in the second group, and comparison of wounds grafted with SGC with wounds grafted with SGC-E was performed in the third group. Clinical follow-ups were carried in all animals after surgery, and histological and histomorphometric analyses were performed on tissues taken from the healed area and healthy surrounding tissue. Histological and histomorphometric results indicate that grafting of SGC alone favors wound healing and brings a better clinical outcome than grafting SGC-E. In vitro collagenase digestion data suggested that the association of the C. officinalis extract to SGC increased the SGC-E cross-linking, making it difficult to degrade and affecting its biocompatibility.

  4. Preparation and characterization of electrospun alginate/PLA nanofibers as tissue engineering material by emulsion eletrospinning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weihong; Shen, Renzhe; Yan, Yurong; Gao, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Scaffolds made by biomaterials offer favorite environment for cell grow and show a wide potential application in tissue engineering. Novel biocompatibility materials polylatic acid (PLA) nanofiber membranes with favorable biocompatibility and good mechanical strength could serve as an innovative tissue engineering scaffold. Sodium alginate (SA) could be used in biomedical areas because of its anti-bacterial property, hydrophilicity and biocompatibility. In this article, we chose PLA as continuous phase and SA as dispersion phase to prepare a W/O emulsion and then electrospun it to get a SA/PLA composite nanofiber membranes. The CLSM images illustrated that the existence of SA was located on the surface of composite fibers and the FTIR results confirmed the result. A calcium ion replacement step was used as an after-treatment for SA/PLA nanofiber membranes in order to anchor the alginic ion in a form of gelated calcium alginate (CA). The single fiber tensile test shows a good mechanical property of CA/PLA nanofiber membranes, and the nanofiber membranes are beneficial for cell proliferation and differentiation owing to MTT array as well as Alizarin red S (ARS) staining test.

  5. Physicochemical characterization and biocompatibility of alginate-polycation microcapsules designed for islet transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Susan Kimberly

    diabetic mice. To achieve these aims, extensive physicochemical analyses of the alginates and microcapsules were carried out. Among the properties of the alginates that were investigated include their purity (LAL assay, microBCA), chemical composition (nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR), elemental composition (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS), and hydrophilicity (contact angle technique). As for the microcapsules, we also examined their surface chemical composition (XPS), hydrophilicity, as well as alginate-polycation interactions (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, FTIR), and membrane strength (osmotic swelling). The results of this research led to a number of important conclusions about the biocompatibility of alginates and alginate-based microcapsules. First of all, purifying an alginate does not guarantee its biocompatibility. Indeed, we provided evidence that both the alginate chemical composition (i.e. relative content of mannuronate and guluronate) and its intrinsic viscosity influence the extent of host cell adhesion to alginate gel beads. Using a biocompatible alginate, we then provided evidence that microcapsule biocompatibility is greatly compromised by its polycationic membrane. We showed that this membrane is responsible for the adsorption of opsonizing proteins in vitro and the adhesion of immune cells in vivo. That said, the severity of inflammatory response to the membrane can vary, and this depended on the microcapsule design, including the choice of alginate and polycation type. Results of our physicochemical analyses suggested that the most important factor determining biocompatibility is the ability of the polycation to diffuse into, and subsequently bind to, the alginate gel core. Moreover, adding a final coating of alginate had no significant effect on reversing the effects of the membrane on various microcapsule properties (surface composition, hydrophobicity, stability), nor did this coating reduce its immunogenicity. Although we

  6. Electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promises in providing successful treatments of human body tissue loss that current methods are unable to treat or unable to achieve satisfactory clinical outcomes. In scaffold-based tissue engineering, a highperformance scaffold underpins the success of a tissue engineering strategy and a major direction in the field is to create multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds for enhanced biological performance and for regenerating complex body tissues. Electrospinning can produce nanofibrous scaffolds that are highly desirable for tissue engineering. The enormous interest in electrospinning and electrospun fibrous structures by the science, engineering and medical communities has led to various developments of the electrospinning technology and wide investigations of electrospun products in many industries, including biomedical engineering, over the past two decades. It is now possible to create novel, multicomponent tissue engineering scaffolds with multiple functions. This article provides a concise review of recent advances in the R & D of electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds. It also presents our philosophy and research in the designing and fabrication of electrospun multicomponent scaffolds with multiple functions.

  7. Effects of Chitin Whiskers on Physical Properties and Osteoblast Culture of Alginate Based Nanocomposite Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao; Yao, Mengyu; Zheng, Xing; Liang, Xichao; Su, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Ang; Zhang, Lina

    2015-11-09

    Novel nanocomposite hydrogels composed of polyelectrolytes alginate and chitin whiskers with biocompatibility were successfully fabricated based on the pH-induced charge shifting behavior of chitin whiskers. The chitin whiskers with mean length and width of 300 and 20 nm were uniformly dispersed in negatively charged sodium alginate aqueous solution, leading to the formation of the homogeneous nanocomposite hydrogels. The experimental results indicated that their mechanical properties were significantly improved compared to alginate hydrogel and the swelling trends were inhibited as a result of the strong electrostatic interactions between the chitin whiskers and alginate. The nanocomposite hydrogels exhibited certain crystallinity and hierarchical structure with nanoscale chitin whiskers, similar to the structure of the native extracellular matrix. Moreover, the nanocomposite hydrogels were successfully applied as bone scaffolds for MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells, showing their excellent biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. The results of fluorescent micrographs and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) images revealed that the addition of chitin whiskers into the nanocomposite hydrogels markedly promoted the cell adhesion and proliferation of the osteoblast cells. The biocompatible nanocomposite hydrogels have potential application in bone tissue engineering.

  8. Alginate/Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) Base Biocompatible Gel for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wing P.; Kung, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Yu-Lin; Yang, Ming-Chen; Lai, Wen-Fu Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A technique for synthesizing biocompatible hydrogels by cross-linking calcium-form poly(γ-glutamic acid), alginate sodium, and Pluronic F-127 was created, in which alginate can be cross-linked by Ca2+ from Ca–γ-PGA directly and γ-PGA molecules introduced into the alginate matrix to provide pH sensitivity and hemostasis. Mechanical properties, swelling behavior, and blood compatibility were investigated for each hydrogel compared with alginate and for γ-PGA hydrogel with the sodium form only. Adding F-127 improves mechanical properties efficiently and influences the temperature-sensitive swelling of the hydrogels but also has a minor effect on pH-sensitive swelling and promotes anticoagulation. MG-63 cells were used to test biocompatibility. Gelation occurred gradually through change in the elastic modulus as the release of calcium ions increased over time and caused ionic cross-linking, which promotes the elasticity of gel. In addition, the growth of MG-63 cells in the gel reflected nontoxicity. These results showed that this biocompatible scaffold has potential for application in bone materials. PMID:26504784

  9. Alginate cryogel based glucose biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatoni, Amin; Windy Dwiasi, Dian; Hermawan, Dadan

    2016-02-01

    Cryogel is macroporous structure provides a large surface area for biomolecule immobilization. In this work, an alginate cryogel based biosensor was developed to detect glucose. The cryogel was prepared using alginate cross-linked by calcium chloride under sub-zero temperature. This porous structure was growth in a 100 μL micropipette tip with a glucose oxidase enzyme entrapped inside the cryogel. The glucose detection was based on the colour change of redox indicator, potassium permanganate, by the hydrogen peroxide resulted from the conversion of glucose. The result showed a porous structure of alginate cryogel with pores diameter of 20-50 μm. The developed glucose biosensor was showed a linear response in the glucose detection from 1.0 to 5.0 mM with a regression of y = 0.01x+0.02 and R2 of 0.994. Furthermore, the glucose biosensor was showed a high operational stability up to 10 times of uninterrupted glucose detections.

  10. Computational Exploration of Molecular Scaffolds in Medicinal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-05-12

    The scaffold concept is widely applied in medicinal chemistry. Scaffolds are mostly used to represent core structures of bioactive compounds. Although the scaffold concept has limitations and is often viewed differently from a chemical and computational perspective, it has provided a basis for systematic investigations of molecular cores and building blocks, going far beyond the consideration of individual compound series. Over the past 2 decades, alternative scaffold definitions and organization schemes have been introduced and scaffolds have been studied in a variety of ways and increasingly on a large scale. Major applications of the scaffold concept include the generation of molecular hierarchies, structural classification, association of scaffolds with biological activities, and activity prediction. This contribution discusses computational approaches for scaffold generation and analysis, with emphasis on recent developments impacting medicinal chemistry. A variety of scaffold-based studies are discussed, and a perspective on scaffold methods is provided.

  11. Alginate Biosynthesis Factories in Pseudomonas fluorescens: Localization and Correlation with Alginate Production Level.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Susan; Almaas, Eivind; Zotchev, Sergey; Valla, Svein; Ertesvåg, Helga

    2015-12-11

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is able to produce the medically and industrially important exopolysaccharide alginate. The proteins involved in alginate biosynthesis and secretion form a multiprotein complex spanning the inner and outer membranes. In the present study, we developed a method by which the porin AlgE was detected by immunogold labeling and transmission electron microscopy. Localization of the AlgE protein was found to depend on the presence of other proteins in the multiprotein complex. No correlation was found between the number of alginate factories and the alginate production level, nor were the numbers of these factories affected in an algC mutant that is unable to produce the precursor needed for alginate biosynthesis. Precursor availability and growth phase thus seem to be the main determinants for the alginate production rate in our strain. Clustering analysis demonstrated that the alginate multiprotein complexes were not distributed randomly over the entire outer cell membrane surface.

  12. Drastic difference in porous structure of calcium alginate microspheres prepared with fresh or hydrolyzed sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Kazuki; Maruyama, Kaho; Chen, Wei; Nakao, Aiko; Nakao, Shin-ichi

    2011-11-15

    Fresh or hydrolyzed sodium alginate was used as a material for preparing calcium alginate microspheres, and a drastic difference in porous structure was observed between them, even though the other materials and the preparation method except for the sodium alginate were exactly the same. When fresh sodium alginate was used, nonporous microspheres were obtained. In contrast, when 82-day-hydrolyzed sodium alginate, whose molecular weight became 7% of the molecular weight of the fresh sodium alginate, was used, porous microspheres with 6.5 times larger BET surface area were obtained. XPS studies indicated that the atomic ratio of Ca, the crosslinker of the alginic acid polymer, was almost the same in both cases. Therefore, the difference in porous structure was not attributed to the amount of crosslinking points, but to the low-molecular-weight compounds formed by hydrolysis, and they would work as pore-generating agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Alginate Biosynthesis Factories in Pseudomonas fluorescens: Localization and Correlation with Alginate Production Level

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Susan; Almaas, Eivind; Zotchev, Sergey; Valla, Svein

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is able to produce the medically and industrially important exopolysaccharide alginate. The proteins involved in alginate biosynthesis and secretion form a multiprotein complex spanning the inner and outer membranes. In the present study, we developed a method by which the porin AlgE was detected by immunogold labeling and transmission electron microscopy. Localization of the AlgE protein was found to depend on the presence of other proteins in the multiprotein complex. No correlation was found between the number of alginate factories and the alginate production level, nor were the numbers of these factories affected in an algC mutant that is unable to produce the precursor needed for alginate biosynthesis. Precursor availability and growth phase thus seem to be the main determinants for the alginate production rate in our strain. Clustering analysis demonstrated that the alginate multiprotein complexes were not distributed randomly over the entire outer cell membrane surface. PMID:26655760

  14. Evaluation of polyelectrolyte complex-based scaffolds for mesenchymal stem cell therapy in cardiac ischemia treatment.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Caroline; Bushkalova, Raya; Alfarano, Chiara; Lairez, Olivier; Calise, Denis; Bourin, Philippe; Frugier, Celine; Rouzaud-Laborde, Charlotte; Cussac, Daniel; Parini, Angelo; Sallerin, Brigitte; Fullana, Sophie Girod

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds hold great potential for stem cell-based therapies. Indeed, recent results have shown that biomimetic scaffolds may enhance cell survival and promote an increase in the concentration of therapeutic cells at the injury site. The aim of this work was to engineer an original polymeric scaffold based on the respective beneficial effects of alginate and chitosan. Formulations were made from various alginate/chitosan ratios to form opposite-charge polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs). After freeze-drying, the resultant matrices presented a highly interconnected porous microstructure and mechanical properties suitable for cell culture. In vitro evaluation demonstrated their compatibility with mesenchymal stell cell (MSC) proliferation and their ability to maintain paracrine activity. Finally, the in vivo performance of seeded 3D PEC scaffolds with a polymeric ratio of 40/60 was evaluated after an acute myocardial infarction provoked in a rat model. Evaluation of cardiac function showed a significant increase in the ejection fraction, improved neovascularization, attenuated fibrosis as well as less left ventricular dilatation as compared to an animal control group. These results provide evidence that 3D PEC scaffolds prepared from alginate and chitosan offer an efficient environment for 3D culturing of MSCs and represent an innovative solution for tissue engineering.

  15. Dielectric characterization of hepatocytes in suspension and embedded into two different polymeric scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Massimi, M; Stampella, A; Devirgiliis, L Conti; Rizzitelli, G; Barbetta, A; Dentini, M; Cametti, C

    2013-02-01

    The dielectric and conductometric properties of hepatocytes in two different environments (in aqueous suspension and embedded into polymeric scaffolds) have been investigated in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 GHz, where the interfacial electrical polarization gives rise to marked dielectric relaxation effects. We analyzed the dielectric behavior of hepatocytes in complete medium aqueous suspensions in the light of effective medium approximation for heterogeneous systems and hepatocytes cultured into two different highly porous and interconnected polymeric structures. In the former case, we have evaluated the passive electrical parameters associated with both the plasmatic and nuclear membrane, finding a general agreement with the values reported elsewhere, based on a partially different analysis of the experimental spectra. In the latter case, we have evaluated the cell growth into two different polymeric scaffolds made of alginate and gelatin with a similar pore distribution and similar inter-connectivity. Based on a qualitative analysis of the dielectric spectra, we were able to provide evidence that alginate scaffolds allow an overall survival of cells better than gelatin scaffold can do. These indications, confirmed by biological tests on cell viability, suggest that hepatocytes embedded in alginate scaffolds are able to perform liver specific functions even over on extended period of time.

  16. The effect of alginate, hyaluronate and hyaluronate derivatives biomaterials on synthesis of non-articular chondrocyte extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Gerard, C; Catuogno, C; Amargier-Huin, C; Grossin, L; Hubert, P; Gillet, P; Netter, P; Dellacherie, E; Payan, E

    2005-06-01

    Cartilage engineering consists of re-constructing functional cartilage by seeding chondrocytes in suitable biomaterials in vitro. The characteristics of neocartilage differ upon the type of biomaterial chosen. This study aims at determining the appropriate scaffold material for articular cartilage reconstruction using non articular chondrocytes harvested from rat sternum. For this purpose, the use of polysaccharide hydrogels such as alginate (AA) and hyaluronic acid (HA) was investigated. Several ratios of AA/HA were used as well as three derivatives obtained by chemical modification of HA (HA-C18, HA-C12(2.3), HA-C12(2.5)-TEG0.5). Sternal chondrocytes were successfully cultured in 3D alginate and alginate/HA scaffolds. HA retention in alginate beads was found to be higher in beads seeded with cells than in beads without cells. HA-C18 improved HA retention in beads but inhibited the chondrocyte synthesis process. Cell proliferation and metabolism were enhanced in all biomaterials when beads were mechanically agitated. Preliminary results have shown that the chondrocyte neo-synthesised matrix had acquired articular characteristics after 21 days culture.

  17. Multilayered Short Peptide-Alginate Blends as New Materials for Potential Applications in Cartilage Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Grant A; Romanelli, Steven M; Brown, Alexandra M; Sortino, Rachel M; Banerjee, Ipsita A

    2016-03-01

    Peptide based nanomaterials have been gaining increased prominence due to their ability to form permeable scaffolds that promote growth and regeneration of new tissue. In this work for the first time a short hexapeptide motif VQIVYK, derived from the Tau protein family was conjugated with an organic polyamine linker, putrescine and utilized as a template for developing new materials for cartilage tissue regeneration. Our results showed that the conjugate formed extensive nanofibrous assemblies upon self-assembly under aqueous conditions. We then employed the layer-by-layer (LBL) approach to design the scaffold by first incorporating a short segment of the dentin sialophosphoprotein motif GDASYNSDESK followed by integration with the peptide sequence GSGAGAGSGAGAGSGAGA. This sequence mimics Ala, Gly, Ser repeats seen in the spider silk protein. We then incorporated the polysaccharide alginate which served as a hydrogel. To further enhance binding interactions with chondrocytes, and promote the formation of cartilage in vitro, the bionanocomposites were then attached to the chondrocyte binding peptide sequence HDSQLEALIKFM. The thermal properties as well as biodegradability of the scaffold was examined. To confirm biocompatibility, we examined cell viability, attachment and morphology in the presence of bovine chondrocytes. The cells were found to efficiently adhere to the scaffolds which formed an intricate mesh mimicking the extracellular matrix of cartilage tissue. To evaluate if differentiation occurred in the presence of the scaffolds, we examined in vitro deposition of proteoglycans. Thus, we have developed a new family of nanoscale scaffolds that may be utilized for cartilage tissue regeneration.

  18. Alginate lyase: Review of major sources and classification, properties, structure-function analysis and applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Benwei; Yin, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Alginate lyases catalyze the degradation of alginate, a complex copolymer of α-L-guluronate and its C5 epimer β-D-mannuronate. The enzymes have been isolated from various kinds of organisms with different substrate specificities, including algae, marine mollusks, marine and terrestrial bacteria, and some viruses and fungi. With the progress of structural biology, many kinds of alginate lyases of different polysaccharide lyases families have been characterized by obtaining crystal structures, and the catalytic mechanism has also been elucidated. Combined with various studies, we summarized the source, classification and properties of the alginate lyases from different polysaccharide lyases families. The relationship between substrate specificity and protein sequence was also investigated. PMID:25831216

  19. Fabrication of micro-alginate gel tubes utilizing micro-gelatin fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Arai, Takafumi; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Umezu, Shinjiro

    2017-05-01

    Tissues engineered utilizing biofabrication techniques have recently been the focus of much attention, because these bioengineered tissues have great potential to improve the quality of life of patients with various hard-to-treat diseases. Most tissues contain micro-tubular structures including blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and bile canaliculus. Therefore, we bioengineered a micro diameter tube using alginate gel to coat the core gelatin gel. Micro-gelatin fibers were fabricated by the coacervation method and then coated with a very thin alginate gel layer by dipping. A micro diameter alginate tube was produced by dissolving the core gelatin gel. Consequently, these procedures led to the formation of micro-alginate gel tubes of various shapes and sizes. This biofabrication technique should contribute to tissue engineering research fields.

  20. Preparation of calcium alginate microgel beads in an electrodispersion reactor using an internal source of calcium carbonate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yinyan; Carvajal, M Teresa; Won, You-Yeon; Harris, Michael T

    2007-12-04

    An electrodispersion reactor has been used to prepare calcium alginate (Ca-alginate) microgel beads in this study. In the electrodispersion reactor, pulsed electric fields are utilized to atomize aqueous mixtures of sodium alginate and CaCO3 nanoparticles (dispersed phase) from a nozzle into an immiscible, insulating second liquid (continuous phase) containing a soluble organic acid. This technique combines the features of the electrohydrodynamic force driven emulsion processes and externally triggered gelations in microreactors (the droplets) ultimately to yield soft gel beads. The average particle size of the Ca-alginate gels generated by this method changed from 412 +/- 90 to 10 +/- 3 microm as the applied peak voltage was increased. A diagram depicting structural information for the Ca-alginate was constructed as a function of the concentrations of sodium alginate and CaCO3 nanoparticles. From this diagram, a critical concentration of sodium alginate required for sol-gel transformation was observed. The characteristic highly porous structure of Ca-alginate particles made by this technique appears suitable for microencapsulation applications. Finally, time scale analysis was performed for the electrodispersion processes that include reactions in the microreactor droplets to provide guidelines for the future employment of this technique. This electrodispersion reactor can be used potentially in the formation of many reaction-based microencapsulation systems.

  1. Alginate as a protease inhibitor in vitro and in a model gut system; selective inhibition of pepsin but not trypsin.

    PubMed

    Chater, Peter Ian; Wilcox, Mathew D; Brownlee, Iain A; Pearson, Jeffrey P

    2015-10-20

    Alginates are widely used in the food and medical industries, including as a Gastro-Oesophagul Reflux treatment. This work investigates the inhibitory effects of alginate on the reflux aggressors trypsin and pepsin and the role of alginate-substrate binding, pH and alginate structure on inhibition. Alginates were shown to reduce pepsin activity by up to 53.9% (±9.5SD) in vitro. Strong positive correlation between alginate mannuronate residue frequency and levels of pepsin inhibition was observed. Limited inhibition of trypsin was shown. Viscometric observations of pH dependent interactions between alginate and protein suggest a mechanism whereby pH dependent ionic interactions reduce substrate availability to enzyme at acidic pH. To understand how dietary protein digestion is affected by alginate, proteolytic digestion was investigated in an in vitro model of the upper digestive tract. Significant inhibition of proteolysis was shown in the gastric phase of digestion, but not the small intestinal phase. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Alginate as a protease inhibitor in vitro and in a model gut system; selective inhibition of pepsin but not trypsin

    PubMed Central

    Chater, Peter Ian; Wilcox, Mathew D.; Brownlee, Iain A.; Pearson, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Alginates are widely used in the food and medical industries, including as a Gastro-Oesophagul Reflux treatment. This work investigates the inhibitory effects of alginate on the reflux aggressors trypsin and pepsin and the role of alginate-substrate binding, pH and alginate structure on inhibition. Alginates were shown to reduce pepsin activity by up to 53.9% (±9.5SD) in vitro. Strong positive correlation between alginate mannuronate residue frequency and levels of pepsin inhibition was observed. Limited inhibition of trypsin was shown. Viscometric observations of pH dependent interactions between alginate and protein suggest a mechanism whereby pH dependent ionic interactions reduce substrate availability to enzyme at acidic pH. To understand how dietary protein digestion is affected by alginate, proteolytic digestion was investigated in an in vitro model of the upper digestive tract. Significant inhibition of proteolysis was shown in the gastric phase of digestion, but not the small intestinal phase. PMID:26256170

  3. Scaling law and microstructure of alginate hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sijun; Li, Huijun; Tang, Bijun; Bi, Shuguang; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The gelation of alginate in aqueous solution was studied as a function of Ca(2+) concentration. At each given concentration of alginate, a critical gel concentration [Formula: see text] , was successfully determined for the first time using the Winter-Chambon criterion. The critical gel concentration [Formula: see text] was found to increase linearly with alginate concentration. At the same time, the critical relaxation exponent n decreased and the critical gel strength Sg increased linearly with alginate concentration. An improved egg-box model was proposed to describe the change in gel junction and gel network. In the stable gel state, the plateau modulus Ge of alginate gel depended on Ca(2+) concentration according to a power-law scaling, Ge=kɛ(1.5), where ɛ is the relative distance of a gelling variable (Ca(2+) concentration in this case) from the gel point ( [Formula: see text] ). The FESEM images verified the microstructure of alginate gel in which alginate chains associated into fibrils in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. The fibrillar diameter and network density increased with increasing Ca(2+) ion concentration while alginate concentration had a weak influence on fibrillar diameter.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Calcium alginate is prepared by... Do. Fats and oils, § 170.3(n)(12) of this chapter 0.5 Do. Gelatins, puddings, § 170.3(n)(22) of...

  5. An alginate-like exopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene cluster involved in biofilm aerial structure formation by Pseudomonas alkylphenolia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung; Lim, Eun Jin; Kim, Keun Soo; Huang, Shir-Ly; Veeranagouda, Yaligara; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2014-05-01

    Pseudomonas alkylphenolia is known to form different types of multicellular structures depending on the environmental stimuli. Aerial structures formed during vapor p-cresol utilization are unique. Transposon mutants that showed a smooth colony phenotype failed to form a differentiated biofilm, including aerial structures and pellicles, and showed deficient surface spreading motility. The transposon insertion sites were located to a gene cluster designated epm (extracellular polymer matrix), which comprises 11 ORFs in the same transcriptional orientation. The putative proteins encoded by the genes in the epm cluster showed amino acid sequence homology to those found in the alginate biosynthesis gene clusters, e.g., in Pseudomonas aeruginosa at similarity levels of 32.3-86.4 %. This overall resemblance indicated that the epm gene cluster encodes proteins that mediate the synthesis of an exopolysaccharide composed of uronic acid(s) similar to alginate. Our preliminary results suggested that the epm-derived polymer is a substituted polymannuronic acid. Gene clusters homologous to the epm gene cluster are found in the genomes of a few species of the genera Pseudomonas, Alcanivorax, and Marinobacter. A mutational analysis showed that the epmJ and epmG genes encoding putative exopolysaccharide-modifying enzymes are required to form multicellular structures. An analysis of the activity of the promoter P epmD using a transcriptional fusion to the green fluorescence protein gene showed that the epm genes are strongly expressed at the tips of the specialized aerial structures. Our results suggested that the epm gene cluster is involved in the formation of a scaffold polysaccharide that is required to form multicellular structures in P. alkylphenolia.

  6. Biocompatibility of mannuronic acid-rich alginates.

    PubMed

    Klöck, G; Pfeffermann, A; Ryser, C; Gröhn, P; Kuttler, B; Hahn, H J; Zimmermann, U

    1997-05-01

    Highly purified algin preparations free of adverse contaminants with endotoxins and other mitogens recently became available by a new purification process (Klöck et al., Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol., 1994, 40, 638-643). An advantage of this purification protocol is that it can be applied to alginates with various ratios of mannuronic acid to guluronic acid. High mannuronic acid alginate capsules are of particular practical interest for cell transplantation and for biohybrid organs, because mannuronate-rich alginates are usually less viscous, allowing one to make gels with a higher alginate content. This will increase their stability and reduce the diffusion permeability and could therefore protect immobilized cells more efficiently against the host immune system. Here we report the biocompatibility of purified, mannuronic acid-rich alginate (68% mannuronate residues) in a series of in vitro, as well as in vivo, assays. In contrast to raw alginate extracts, the purified product showed no mitogenic activity towards murine lymphocytes in vitro. Its endotoxin content was reduced to the level of the solvent. Animal studies with these new, purified algin formulations revealed the absence of a mitogen-induced foreign body reaction, even when the purified material (after cross-linking with Ba2+ ions) is implanted into animal models with elevated macrophage activity (diabetes-prone BB/OK rat). Thus, alginate capsules with high mannuronic acid content become available for applications such as implantation. In addition to the utilization as implantable cell reactors in therapy and biotechnology, these purified algins have broad application potential as ocular fillings, tissue replacements, microencapsulated growth factors and/or interleukins or slow-release dosage forms of antibodies, surface coatings of sensors and other invasive medical devices, and in encapsulation of genetically engineered cells for gene therapy.

  7. Self-cross-linking biopolymers as injectable in situ forming biodegradable scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Biji; Jayakrishnan, A

    2005-06-01

    The injectable polymer scaffolds which are biocompatible and biodegradable are important biomaterials for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Hydrogels derived from natural proteins and polysaccharides are ideal scaffolds for tissue engineering since they resemble the extracellular matrices of the tissue comprised of various amino acids and sugar-based macromolecules. Here, we report a new class of hydrogels derived from oxidized alginate and gelatin. We show that periodate-oxidized sodium alginate having appropriate molecular weight and degree of oxidation rapidly cross-links proteins such as gelatin in the presence of small concentrations of sodium tetraborate (borax) to give injectable systems for tissue engineering, drug delivery and other medical applications. The rapid gelation in the presence of borax is attributed to the slightly alkaline pH of the medium as well as the ability of borax to complex with hydroxyl groups of polysaccharides. The effect of degree of oxidation and concentration of alginate dialdehyde, gelatin and borax on the speed of gelation was examined. As a general rule, the gelling time decreased with increase in concentration of oxidized alginate, gelatin and borax and increase in the degree of oxidation of alginate. Cross-linking parameters of the gel matrix were studied by swelling measurements and trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) assay. In general, the degree of cross-linking was found to increase with increase in the degree of oxidation of alginate, whereas the swelling ratio and the degree of swelling decreased. The gel was found to be biocompatible and biodegradable. The potential of the system as an injectable drug delivery vehicle and as a tissue-engineering scaffold is demonstrated by using primaquine as a model drug and by encapsulation of hepatocytes inside the gel matrix, respectively.

  8. The visualisation and speed of kill of wound isolates on a silver alginate dressing.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Samuel J; Percival, Steven L; Hill, Katja E; Thomas, David W; Hayes, A J; Williams, David W

    2012-12-01

    In chronic wound management, alginate dressings are used to absorb exudate and reduce the microbial burden. Silver alginate offers the added benefit of an additional antimicrobial pressure on contaminating microorganisms. This present study compares the antimicrobial activity of a RESTORE silver alginate dressing with a silver-free control dressing using a combination of in vitro culture and imaging techniques. The wound pathogens examined included Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, β-haemolytic Streptococcus, and strictly anaerobic bacteria. The antimicrobial efficacy of the dressings was assessed using log(10) reduction and 13-day corrected zone of inhibition (CZOI) time-course assays. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to visualise the relative proportions of live/dead microorganisms sequestered into the dressings over 24 hours and estimate the comparative speed of kill. The RESTORE silver alginate dressing showed significantly greater log(10) reductions and CZOIs for all microorganisms compared with the control, indicating the antimicrobial effect of ionic silver. Antimicrobial activity was evident against all test organisms for up to 5 days and, in some cases, up to 12 days following an on-going microbial challenge. Imaging bacteria sequestered in the silver-free dressing showed that each microbial species aggregated in the dressing and remained viable for more than 20 hours. Growth was not observed inside of the dressing, indicating a possible microbiostatic effect of the alginate fibres. In comparison, organisms in the RESTORE silver alginate dressing were seen to lose viability at a considerably greater rate. After 16 hours of contact with the RESTORE silver alginate dressing, >90% of cells of all bacteria and yeast were no longer viable. In conclusion, collectively, the data highlights the rapid speed of kill and antimicrobial suitability of this RESTORE silver alginate dressing on wound

  9. Quantifying Pb and Cd complexation by alginates and the role of metal binding on macromolecular aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lamelas, Cristina; Avaltroni, Fabrice; Benedetti, Marc; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2005-01-01

    The Pb and Cd binding capacity of alginates were quantified by the determination of their complex stability constants and the concentration of complexing sites using H+, Pb2+, or Cd2+ selective electrodes in both static and dynamic titrations. Centrifugation filter devices (30 kDa filter cutoff), followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements of lead or cadmium in the filtrates, were used to validate the results. The influence of ionic strength, pH, and the metal-to-alginate ratio was determined for a wide range of metal concentrations. Because of their polyelectrolytic properties, alginates may adopt different conformations depending on the physicochemistry of the medium, including the presence of metals. Therefore, molecular diffusion coefficients of the alginate were determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy under the same conditions of pH, ionic strength, and metal-to-alginate ratios that were used for the metal binding studies. The complexation and conformational properties of the alginate were related within the framework of the nonideal competitive adsorption isotherm (NICA) combined with a Donnan approach to account for both intrinsic and electrostatic contributions.

  10. Performance evaluation of bipolar and tripolar excitations during nozzle-jetting-based alginate microsphere fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herran, C. Leigh; Huang, Yong; Chai, Wenxuan

    2012-08-01

    Microspheres, small spherical (polymeric) particles with or without second phase materials embedded or encapsulated, are important for many biomedical applications such as drug delivery and organ printing. Scale-up fabrication with the ability to precisely control the microsphere size and morphology has always been of great manufacturing interest. The objective of this work is to experimentally study the performance differences of bipolar and tripolar excitation waveforms in using drop-on-demand (DOD)-based single nozzle jetting for alginate microsphere fabrication. The fabrication performance has been evaluated based on the formability of alginate microspheres as a function of materials properties (sodium alginate and calcium chloride concentrations) and operating conditions. The operating conditions for each excitation include voltage rise/fall times, dwell times and excitation voltage amplitudes. Overall, the bipolar excitation is more robust in making spherical, monodispersed alginate microspheres as good microspheres for its wide working range of material properties and operating conditions, especially during the fabrication of highly viscous materials such as the 2% sodium alginate solution. For both bipolar and tripolar excitations, the sodium alginate concentration and the voltage dwell times should be carefully selected to achieve good microsphere formability.

  11. Effects of the biologically produced polymer alginic acid on macroscopic and microscopic calcite dissolution rates.

    PubMed

    Perry, Thomas D; Duckworth, Owen W; McNamara, Christopher J; Martin, Scot T; Mitchell, Ralph

    2004-06-01

    Dissolution of carbonate minerals has significant environmental effects. Microorganisms affect carbonate dissolution rates by producing extracellular metabolites, including complex polysaccharides such as alginic acid. Using a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)/flowthrough reactor apparatus, we investigated the effects of alginic acid on calcite dissolution. Macroscopic dissolution rates, derived from the aqueous metal ion concentrations, are 10(-5.5) mol m(-2) s(-1) for 5 < pH < 12 in the absence of alginic acid compared to 10(-4.8) mol m(-2) s(-1) in its presence. The AFM images demonstrate that alginic acid preferentially attacks the obtuse steps of dissolution pits on the calcite surface. In pure water, the obtuse and acute steps retreat at similar rates, and the pits are nearly isotropic except under highly acidic conditions. In alginic acid, the acute step retreat rate is nearly unchanged in comparison to water, whereas the obtuse step retreat rate increases with decreasing pH values. As a result, the pits remain rhombohedral but propagate faster in the obtuse direction. To explain these observations, we propose that alginic acid preferentially forms dissolution active surface complexes with calcium atoms on the obtuse step, which results in anisotropic ligand-promoted dissolution.

  12. Stratified Scaffolds for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-01-01

    Stratified scaffolds are promising devices finding application in the field of osteochondral tissue engineering. In this scaffold type, different biomaterials are chosen to fulfill specific features required to mimic the complex osteochondral tissue interface, including cartilage, interlayer tissue, and subchondral bone. Here, the biomaterials and fabrication methods currently used to manufacture stratified multilayered scaffolds as well as cell seeding techniques for their characterization are presented.

  13. Alginate-modifying enzymes: biological roles and biotechnological uses

    PubMed Central

    Ertesvåg, Helga

    2015-01-01

    Alginate denotes a group of industrially important 1-4-linked biopolymers composed of the C-5-epimers β-D-mannuronic acid (M) and α-L-guluronic acid (G). The polysaccharide is manufactured from brown algae where it constitutes the main structural cell wall polymer. The physical properties of a given alginate molecule, e.g., gel-strength, water-binding capacity, viscosity and biocompatibility, are determined by polymer length, the relative amount and distribution of G residues and the acetyl content, all of which are controlled by alginate modifying enzymes. Alginate has also been isolated from some bacteria belonging to the genera Pseudomonas and Azotobacter, and bacterially synthesized alginate may be O-acetylated at O-2 and/or O-3. Initially, alginate is synthesized as polymannuronic acid, and some M residues are subsequently epimerized to G residues. In bacteria a mannuronan C-5-epimerase (AlgG) and an alginate acetylase (AlgX) are integral parts of the protein complex necessary for alginate polymerization and export. All alginate-producing bacteria use periplasmic alginate lyases to remove alginate molecules aberrantly released to the periplasm. Alginate lyases are also produced by organisms that utilize alginate as carbon source. Most alginate-producing organisms encode more than one mannuronan C-5 epimerase, each introducing its specific pattern of G residues. Acetylation protects against further epimerization and from most alginate lyases. An enzyme from Pseudomonas syringae with alginate deacetylase activity has been reported. Functional and structural studies reveal that alginate lyases and epimerases have related enzyme mechanisms and catalytic sites. Alginate lyases are now utilized as tools for alginate characterization. Secreted epimerases have been shown to function well in vitro, and have been engineered further in order to obtain enzymes that can provide alginates with new and desired properties for use in medical and pharmaceutical applications

  14. Potential toxicants in alginate powders.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, J F

    1980-08-01

    Twenty-five dental alginate impression powders were obtained locally and analysed for Pb, Zn, Ba, Cd, As, Be, Hg, Sb, and V contents by atomic absorption spectroscopy; also total fluoride was determined by a conventional wet-way procedure. In addition, some lead containing powders were investigated for the lead content of the aerosol and that extractable from the surface of the set material by aqueous solutions. The results are detailed and concern is expressed at a possible hazard to health, mainly by inhalation of these materials.

  15. Transforming growth factor Beta-releasing scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Rey-Rico, Ana; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh K; Johnstone, Brian; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2014-04-01

    The maintenance of a critical threshold concentration of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) for a given period of time is crucial for the onset and maintenance of chondrogenesis. Thus, the development of scaffolds that provide temporal and/or spatial control of TGF-β bioavailability has appeal as a mechanism to induce the chondrogenesis of stem cells in vitro and in vivo for articular cartilage repair. In the past decade, many types of scaffolds have been designed to advance this goal: hydrogels based on polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid, and alginate; protein-based hydrogels such as fibrin, gelatin, and collagens; biopolymeric gels and synthetic polymers; and solid and hybrid composite (hydrogel/solid) scaffolds. In this study, we review the progress in developing strategies to deliver TGF-β from scaffolds with the aim of enhancing chondrogenesis. In the future, such scaffolds could prove critical for tissue engineering cartilage, both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Muscle Tissue Engineering Using Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells Encapsulated in Alginate Hydrogels Containing Multiple Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Sahar; Chen, Chider; Xu, Xingtian; Annabi, Nasim; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Wu, Benjamin M; Khademhosseini, Ali; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2016-06-01

    Repair and regeneration of muscle tissue following traumatic injuries or muscle diseases often presents a challenging clinical situation. If a significant amount of tissue is lost the native regenerative potential of skeletal muscle will not be able to grow to fill the defect site completely. Dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in combination with appropriate scaffold material, present an advantageous alternative therapeutic option for muscle tissue engineering in comparison to current treatment modalities available. To date, there has been no report on application of gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) in three-dimensional scaffolds for muscle tissue engineering. The objectives of the current study were to develop an injectable 3D RGD-coupled alginate scaffold with multiple growth factor delivery capacity for encapsulating GMSCs, and to evaluate the capacity of encapsulated GMSCs to differentiate into myogenic tissue in vitro and in vivo where encapsulated GMSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. The results demonstrate that after 4 weeks of differentiation in vitro, GMSCs as well as the positive control human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) exhibited muscle cell-like morphology with high levels of mRNA expression for gene markers related to muscle regeneration (MyoD, Myf5, and MyoG) via qPCR measurement. Our quantitative PCR analyzes revealed that the stiffness of the RGD-coupled alginate regulates the myogenic differentiation of encapsulated GMSCs. Histological and immunohistochemical/fluorescence staining for protein markers specific for myogenic tissue confirmed muscle regeneration in subcutaneous transplantation in our in vivo animal model. GMSCs showed significantly greater capacity for myogenic regeneration in comparison to hBMMSCs (p < 0.05). Altogether, our findings confirmed that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel with multiple growth factor delivery capacity is a promising

  17. Multifunctional hydrogel-based scaffold for improving the functionality of encapsulated therapeutic cells and reducing inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Acarregui, Argia; Herrán, Enara; Igartua, Manoli; Blanco, Francisco Javier; Pedraz, José Luis; Orive, Gorka; Hernandez, Rosa Maria

    2014-10-01

    Since the introduction of cell immunoisolation as an alternative to protect transplanted cells from host immune attack, much effort has been made to develop this technology into a realistic clinical proposal. Several promising approaches have been investigated to resolve the biotechnological and biosafety challenges related to cell microencapsulation. Here, a multifunctional hydrogel-based scaffold consisting of cell-loaded alginate-poly-l-lysine-alginate (APA) microcapsules and dexamethasone (DXM)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microspheres embedded in alginate hydrogel is developed and evaluated. Initially, the feasibility of using an alginate hydrogel for enclosing APA microcapsules was studied in a xenogeneic approach. In addition, the performance of the local release of DXM was addressed. The in vitro studies confirmed the correct adaptation of the enclosed cells to the scaffolds in terms of metabolic activity and viability. The posterior implantation of the hydrogel-based scaffolds containing cell-loaded microcapsules revealed that the hematocrit levels were maintained high and constant, and the pericapsular overgrowth was reduced in the DXM-treated rats for at least 2months. This multifunctional scaffold might have a synergistic effect: (1) providing a physical support for APA microcapsules, facilitating administration, ensuring retention and recuperation and preventing dissemination; and (2) reducing post-transplantation inflammation and foreign body reaction, thus prolonging the lifetime of the implant by the continuous and localized release of DXM. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Functionalized scaffolds to enhance tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Baolin; Lei, Bo; Li, Peng; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds play a vital role in regenerative medicine. It not only provides a temporary 3-dimensional support during tissue repair, but also regulates the cell behavior, such as cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In this review, we summarize the development and trends of functional scaffolding biomaterials including electrically conducting hydrogels and nanocomposites of hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioactive glasses (BGs) with various biodegradable polymers. Furthermore, the progress on the fabrication of biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds from conducting polymers and composites of HA and BG via electrospinning, deposition and thermally induced phase separation is discussed. Moreover, bioactive molecules and surface properties of scaffolds are very important during tissue repair. Bioactive molecule-releasing scaffolds and antimicrobial surface coatings for biomedical implants and scaffolds are also reviewed. PMID:25844177

  19. Functionalized scaffolds to enhance tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baolin; Lei, Bo; Li, Peng; Ma, Peter X

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds play a vital role in regenerative medicine. It not only provides a temporary 3-dimensional support during tissue repair, but also regulates the cell behavior, such as cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In this review, we summarize the development and trends of functional scaffolding biomaterials including electrically conducting hydrogels and nano-composites of hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioactive glasses (BGs) with various biodegradable polymers. Furthermore, the progress on the fabrication of biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds from conducting polymers and composites of HA and BG via electrospinning, deposition and thermally induced phase separation is discussed. Moreover, bioactive molecules and surface properties of scaffolds are very important during tissue repair. Bioactive molecule-releasing scaffolds and antimicrobial surface coatings for biomedical implants and scaffolds are also reviewed.

  20. Laser-assisted fabrication of highly viscous alginate microsphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yafu; Huang, Yong

    2011-04-01

    Encapsulated microspheres have been widely used in various biomedical applications. However, fabrication of encapsulated microspheres from highly viscous materials has always been a manufacturing challenge. The objective of this study is to explore a novel metallic foil-assisted laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), a laser-assisted fabrication technique, to make encapsulated microspheres using high sodium alginate concentration solutions. The proposed four-layer approach includes a quartz disk, a sacrificial and adhesive layer, a metallic foil, and a transferred suspension layer. It is found that the proposed four-layer modified LIFT approach provides a promising fabrication technology for making of bead-encapsulated microspheres from highly viscous solutions. During the process, the microsphere only can be formed if the direct-writing height is larger than the critical direct-writing height; otherwise, tail structured droplets are formed; and the encapsulated microsphere diameter linearly increases with the laser fluence and decreases with the sodium alginate concentration.

  1. Photonic monitoring of chitosan nanostructured alginate microcapsules for drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajuria, Deepak Kumar; Konnur, Manish C.; Vasireddi, Ramakrishna; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2015-02-01

    By using a novel microfluidic set-up for drug screening applications, this study examines delivery of a novel risedronate based drug formulation for treatment of osteoporosis that was developed to overcome the usual shortcomings of risedronate, such as its low bioavailability and adverse gastric effects. Risedronate nanoparticles were prepared using muco-adhesive polymers such as chitosan as matrix for improving the intestinal cellular absorption of risedronate and also using a gastric-resistant polymer such as sodium alginate for reducing the gastric inflammation of risedronate. The in-vitro characteristics of the alginate encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles are investigated, including their stability, muco-adhesiveness, and Caco-2 cell permeability. Fluorescent markers are tagged with the polymers and their morphology within the microcapsules is imaged at various stages of drug release.

  2. Alginic Acid Accelerates Calcite Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, T. D.; Duckworth, O. W.; McNamara, C. J.; Martin, S. T.; Mitchell, R.

    2003-12-01

    Accelerated carbonate weathering through biological activity affects both geochemical cycling and the local pH and alkalinity of terrestrial and marine waters. Microbes affect carbonate dissolution through metabolic activity, production of acidic or chelating exudates, and cation binding by cell walls. Dissolution occurs within microbial biofilms - communities of microorganisms attached to stone in an exopolymer matrix. We investigated the effect of alginic acid, a common biological polymer produced by bacteria and algae, on calcite dissolution using a paired atomic force microscopy/flow-through reactor apparatus. The alginic acid caused up to an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate at 3 < pH < 12. Additionally, the polymer preferentially binds to the obtuse pit steps and increases step velocity. We propose that the polymer is actively chelating surficial cations reducing the activation energy and increasing dissolution rate. The role of biologically produced polymers in mineral weathering is important in the protection of cultural heritage materials and understanding of marine and terrestrial systems.

  3. Simvastatin coating of TiO₂ scaffold induces osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pullisaar, Helen; Reseland, Janne E; Haugen, Håvard J; Brinchmann, Jan E; Ostrup, Esben

    2014-04-25

    Bone tissue engineering requires an osteoconductive scaffold, multipotent cells with regenerative capacity and bioactive molecules. In this study we investigated the osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAD-MSCs) on titanium dioxide (TiO2) scaffold coated with alginate hydrogel containing various concentrations of simvastatin (SIM). The mRNA expression of osteoblast-related genes such as collagen type I alpha 1 (COL1A1), alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), osteopontin (SPP1), osteocalcin (BGLAP) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) was enhanced in hAD-MSCs cultured on scaffolds with SIM in comparison to scaffolds without SIM. Furthermore, the secretion of osteoprotegerin (OPG), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OC) to the cell culture medium was higher from hAD-MSCs cultured on scaffolds with SIM compared to scaffolds without SIM. The TiO2 scaffold coated with alginate hydrogel containing SIM promote osteogenic differentiation of hAD-MSCs in vitro, and demonstrate feasibility as scaffold for hAD-MSC based bone tissue engineering.

  4. Hydrogel-laden paper scaffold system for origami-based tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Hwan; Lee, Hak Rae; Yu, Seung Jung; Han, Min-Eui; Lee, Doh Young; Kim, Soo Yeon; Ahn, Hee-Jin; Han, Mi-Jung; Lee, Tae-Ik; Kim, Taek-Soo; Kwon, Seong Keun; Im, Sung Gap; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2015-12-15

    In this study, we present a method for assembling biofunctionalized paper into a multiform structured scaffold system for reliable tissue regeneration using an origami-based approach. The surface of a paper was conformally modified with a poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) layer via initiated chemical vapor deposition followed by the immobilization of poly-l-lysine (PLL) and deposition of Ca(2+). This procedure ensures the formation of alginate hydrogel on the paper due to Ca(2+) diffusion. Furthermore, strong adhesion of the alginate hydrogel on the paper onto the paper substrate was achieved due to an electrostatic interaction between the alginate and PLL. The developed scaffold system was versatile and allowed area-selective cell seeding. Also, the hydrogel-laden paper could be folded freely into 3D tissue-like structures using a simple origami-based method. The cylindrically constructed paper scaffold system with chondrocytes was applied into a three-ring defect trachea in rabbits. The transplanted engineered tissues replaced the native trachea without stenosis after 4 wks. As for the custom-built scaffold system, the hydrogel-laden paper system will provide a robust and facile method for the formation of tissues mimicking native tissue constructs.

  5. Hydrogel-laden paper scaffold system for origami-based tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Hwan; Lee, Hak Rae; Yu, Seung Jung; Han, Min-Eui; Lee, Doh Young; Kim, Soo Yeon; Ahn, Hee-Jin; Han, Mi-Jung; Lee, Tae-Ik; Kim, Taek-Soo; Kwon, Seong Keun; Im, Sung Gap; Hwang, Nathaniel S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present a method for assembling biofunctionalized paper into a multiform structured scaffold system for reliable tissue regeneration using an origami-based approach. The surface of a paper was conformally modified with a poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) layer via initiated chemical vapor deposition followed by the immobilization of poly-l-lysine (PLL) and deposition of Ca2+. This procedure ensures the formation of alginate hydrogel on the paper due to Ca2+ diffusion. Furthermore, strong adhesion of the alginate hydrogel on the paper onto the paper substrate was achieved due to an electrostatic interaction between the alginate and PLL. The developed scaffold system was versatile and allowed area-selective cell seeding. Also, the hydrogel-laden paper could be folded freely into 3D tissue-like structures using a simple origami-based method. The cylindrically constructed paper scaffold system with chondrocytes was applied into a three-ring defect trachea in rabbits. The transplanted engineered tissues replaced the native trachea without stenosis after 4 wks. As for the custom-built scaffold system, the hydrogel-laden paper system will provide a robust and facile method for the formation of tissues mimicking native tissue constructs. PMID:26621717

  6. Cardiac tissue engineering in magnetically actuated scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Yulia; Polyak, Boris; Cohen, Smadar

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers new possibilities for the functional and structural restoration of damaged or lost heart tissue by applying cardiac patches created in vitro. Engineering such functional cardiac patches is a complex mission, involving material design on the nano- and microscale as well as the application of biological cues and stimulation patterns to promote cell survival and organization into a functional cardiac tissue. Herein, we present a novel strategy for creating a functional cardiac patch by combining the use of a macroporous alginate scaffold impregnated with magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) and the application of external magnetic stimulation. Neonatal rat cardiac cells seeded within the magnetically responsive scaffolds and stimulated by an alternating magnetic field of 5 Hz developed into matured myocardial tissue characterized by anisotropically organized striated cardiac fibers, which preserved its features for longer times than non-stimulated constructs. A greater activation of AKT phosphorylation in cardiac cell constructs after applying a short-term (20 min) external magnetic field indicated the efficacy of magnetic stimulation to actuate at a distance and provided a possible mechanism for its action. Our results point to a synergistic effect of magnetic field stimulation together with nanoparticulate features of the scaffold surface as providing the regenerating environment for cardiac cells driving their organization into functionally mature tissue.

  7. The paths of musculoskeletal scaffold research leading to long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Fred R T

    2012-01-01

    Developing successful musculoskeletal scaffolds for specific tissue replacement has many challenges. Ideal scaffolds support the physiologic needs of the ingrowth tissue until new cells establish a matrix approximating the biomechanical properties of the original tissue or organ construct. Short- and long-term effects on matrix formation and surrounding tissue are critical for clinical applications. This is a review of scaffold development of alginate, fibrin, and poly glycolic and polylactic acid scaffolds by three laboratories. Varied chain structures of alginate modified with an RGD-containing peptide sequence (G4RGDY) promotes cell multiplication. Given the proper mix of chain size and radiation used to reduce chain size, the adjusted rate of degradation showed no long-term effect at 21 weeks in vitro. To date, there are no long-term fibrin-based scaffold constructs. Plasmid DNA-laden 75:25 PLGA microspheres were able to have the microsphere incorporated into the polymer solution, resulting in sustained plasmid DNA release for more than 70 days without significant surrounding tissue effects. Years of research on the same construct are required before long-term effects of tissue engineering scaffolds can be determined.

  8. Electrospinning of photocrosslinked and degradable fibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrea R; Ifkovits, Jamie L; Baker, Brendon M; Brey, Darren M; Mauck, Robert L; Burdick, Jason A

    2008-12-15

    Electrospun fibrous scaffolds are being developed for the engineering of numerous tissues. Advantages of electrospun scaffolds include the similarity in fiber diameter to elements of the native extracellular matrix and the ability to align fibers within the scaffold to control and direct cellular interactions and matrix deposition. To further expand the range of properties available in fibrous scaffolds, we developed a process to electrospin photocrosslinkable macromers from a library of multifunctional poly(beta-amino ester)s. In this study, we utilized one macromer (A6) from this library for initial examination of fibrous scaffold formation. A carrier polymer [poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)] was used for fiber formation because of limitations in electrospinning A6 alone. Various ratios of A6 and PEO were successfully electrospun and influenced the scaffold fiber diameter and appearance. When electrospun with a photoinitiator and exposed to light, the macromers crosslinked rapidly to high double bond conversions and fibrous scaffolds displayed higher elastic moduli compared to uncrosslinked scaffolds. When these fibers were deposited onto a rotating mandrel and crosslinked, organized fibrous scaffolds were obtained, which possessed higher moduli (approximately 4-fold) in the fiber direction than perpendicular to the fiber direction, as well as higher moduli (approximately 12-fold) than that of nonaligned crosslinked scaffolds. With exposure to water, a significant mass loss and a decrease in mechanical properties were observed, correlating to a rapid initial loss of PEO which reached an equilibrium after 7 days. Overall, these results present a process that allows for formation of fibrous scaffolds from a wide variety of possible photocrosslinkable macromers, increasing the diversity and range of properties achievable in fibrous scaffolds for tissue regeneration.

  9. Preparation, Modification, and Characterization of Alginate Hydrogel with Nano-/Microfibers: A New Perspective for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Palma Santana, Bianca; Piva, Evandro; Varella de Carvalho, Rodrigo; Fernando Demarco, Flávio; Lenin Villarreal Carreño, Neftali

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to develop an alginate hydrogel (AH) modified with nano-/microfibers of titanium dioxide (nfTD) and hydroxyapatite (nfHY) and evaluated its biological and chemical properties. Nano-/microfibers of nfTD and nfHY were combined with AH, and its chemical properties were evaluated by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-Ray analysis, and the cytocompatibility by the WST-1 assay. The results demonstrate that the association of nfTD and nfHY nano-/microfibers to AH did not modified the chemical characteristics of the scaffold and that the association was not cytotoxic. In the first 3 h of culture with NIH/3T3 cells nfHY AH scaffolds showed a slight increase in cell viability when compared to AH alone or associated with nfTD. However, an increase in cell viability was observed in 24 h when nfTD was associated with AH scaffold. In conclusion our study demonstrates that the combination of nfHY and nfTD nano-/microfibers in AH scaffold maintains the chemical characteristics of alginate and that this association is cytocompatible. Additionally the combination of nfHY with AH favored cell viability in a short term, and the addition of nfTD increased cell viability in a long term. PMID:23862142

  10. Scaffolding Adolescents' Comprehension of Short Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, David N. E.; Graves, Michael F.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an approach to assisting seventh-grade students' comprehension of individual texts with a Scaffolded Reading Experience (SRE). Includes an outline of the scaffolded reading experience. Describes a classroom study of the effect of using SREs. Finds SREs can increase students' comprehension of short stories. (SG)

  11. Scaffolding Children's Informal Expository Discourse Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns-Hoffman, Rebecca

    The term "scaffolding" refers to adult behaviors that support and guide children's participation in activities, including speech events, enabling the children to extend the range of what they are able to do without assistance. A study examined how scaffolding behavior in support of expository discourse differed among preschool teachers in…

  12. [Progress of alginate-based biomedical materials].

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojuan; Xi, Tingfei; Gu, Qisheng; Zheng, Yufeng

    2013-08-01

    To review the current situation of alginate-based biomedical materials, especially focus on the clinical strategies and research progress in the clinical applications and point out several key issues that should be concerned about. Based on extensive investigation of domestic and foreign alginate-based biomedical materials research and related patent, literature, and medicine producted, the paper presented the comprehensive analysis of its research and development, application status, and then put forward several new research directions which should be focused on. Alginate-based biomedical materials have been widely used in clinical field with a number of patients, but mainly in the fields of wound dressings and dental impression. Heart failure treatment, embolization, tissue engineering, and stem cells culture are expected to become new directions of research and products development. Development of alginate-based new products has good clinical feasibility and necessity, but a lot of applied basic researches should be carried out in the further investigations.

  13. Relevance of rheological properties of sodium alginate in solution to calcium alginate gel properties.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shao; Thacker, Ankur; Sperger, Diana M; Boni, Riccardo L; Buckner, Ira S; Velankar, Sachin; Munson, Eric J; Block, Lawrence H

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether sodium alginate solutions' rheological parameters are meaningful relative to sodium alginate's use in the formulation of calcium alginate gels. Calcium alginate gels were prepared from six different grades of sodium alginate (FMC Biopolymer), one of which was available in ten batches. Cylindrical gel samples were prepared from each of the gels and subjected to compression to fracture on an Instron Universal Testing Machine, equipped with a 1-kN load cell, at a cross-head speed of 120 mm/min. Among the grades with similar % G, (grades 1, 3, and 4), there is a significant correlation between deformation work (L(E)) and apparent viscosity (η(app)). However, the results for the partial correlation analysis for all six grades of sodium alginate show that L(E) is significantly correlated with % G, but not with the rheological properties of the sodium alginate solutions. Studies of the ten batches of one grade of sodium alginate show that η(app) of their solutions did not correlate with L(E) while tan δ was significantly, but minimally, correlated to L(E). These results suggest that other factors--polydispersity and the randomness of guluronic acid sequencing--are likely to influence the mechanical properties of the resultant gels. In summary, the rheological properties of solutions for different grades of sodium alginate are not indicative of the resultant gel properties. Inter-batch differences in the rheological behavior for one specific grade of sodium alginate were insufficient to predict the corresponding calcium alginate gel's mechanical properties.

  14. Lead removal in rats using calcium alginate.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Olga V; Sgrebneva, Marina N; Kiselev, Vladimir I; Khotimchenko, Yuri S

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure, even at low levels, causes a variety of health problems. The aims of this study were to investigate the tissue distribution of lead in the bodies of rats, to evaluate lead removal from the internal organs and bones using calcium alginate in doses of 500, 200 and 100 mg/kg per day for 28 days and to assess the impact of calcium alginate on the level of essential elements. Lead (Pb), calcium (Ca), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) levels in the blood, hearts, kidneys, livers and femurs of the experimental animals were measured using mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. The results revealed that lead acetate exposure increased the levels of Pb in the blood and organs of the animals and significantly reduced contents of Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. Treatment with calcium alginate in dose 500 mg/kg contributed to significant decreases in the amount of lead in the kidney, heart and bones of animals and a slight increase in the content of essential elements in the liver, kidneys and heart, although these changes were not significant. Decreasing of lead was not significant in the internal organs, bones and blood of animals treated with calcium alginate 200 and 100 mg/kg. Consequently, calcium alginate dose of 500 mg/kg more efficiently removes lead accumulated in the body. Calcium alginate does not have negative effect on level of essential elements quite the contrary; reducing the levels of lead, calcium alginate helps normalize imbalances of Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. The results of this study suggest that calcium alginate may potentially be useful for the treatment and prevention of heavy metal intoxications.

  15. Development of porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramay, Hassna Rehman

    -liquid phase separation technique with a polyelectrolyte complex of chitosan and alginate as scaffolding material. These scaffolds were used to study sustained delivery of a model protein. The effect of size of ceramic in polymer matrix on mechanical and biological properties of scaffold is also examined by using both nano- and micron-sized ceramic particles.

  16. Hypochlorite scavenging by Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate.

    PubMed Central

    Learn, D B; Brestel, E P; Seetharama, S

    1987-01-01

    Alginic acid was purified from a mucoid clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated neutrophils was inhibited by this alginate, but oxygen consumption was unaffected. Further studies indicated that this effect was due to the ability of the pseudomonal alginate to scavenge hypochlorite. A seaweed alginate was less effective and dextran T500 was ineffective in hypochlorite scavenging. It appears that the uronic acid core and the O-acetyl groups of pseudomonal alginate are involved in its hypochlorite-scavenging ability. The relevance of this phenomenon was demonstrated by the greater resistance to killing by hypochlorite of mucoid P. aeruginosa compared with a nonmucoid revertant, and the addition of purified alginate to the nonmucoid revertant protected the organism from hypochlorite. Thus, this extracellular polysaccharide may enhance the virulence of P. aeruginosa by scavenging the phagocyte-generated oxidant HOCl. This enhanced virulence may be involved in disease processes in which mucoid organisms predominate, such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:3038752

  17. Enrichment of committed human nucleus pulposus cells expressing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans under alginate encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Lv, M; Zhou, L; Tam, V; Lv, F; Chan, D; Wang, H; Zheng, Z; Cheung, K M C; Leung, V Y L

    2015-07-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is associated with a malfunction of the nucleus pulposus (NP). Alginate culturing provides a favorable microenvironment for the phenotypic maintenance of chondrocyte-like NP cells. However, NP cells are recently evidenced to present heterogeneous populations, including progenitors, fibroblastic cells and primitive NP cells. The aim of this study is to profile the phenotypic changes of distinct human NP cells populations and describe the dynamic expression of chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans (CS-GAGs) in extended alginate encapsulation. Non-degenerated (ND-NPC) and degenerated (D-NPC) NP cells were expanded in monolayers, and subject to 28-day culture in alginate after serial passaging. CS-GAG compositional expression in monolayer-/alginate-cultured NP cells was evaluated by carbohydrate electrophoresis. Cellular phenotypic changes were assessed by immunologic detection and gene expression analysis. Relative to D-NPC, ND-NPC displayed remarkably higher expression levels of chondroitin-4-sulfate GAGs over the 28-day culture. Compared with monolayer culture, ND-NPC showed increased NP marker expression of KRT18, KRT19, and CDH2, as well as chondrocyte markers SOX9 and MIA in alginate culture. In contrast, expression of fibroblastic marker COL1A1, COL3A1, and FN1 were reduced. Interestingly, ND-NPC showed a loss of Tie2+ but gain in KRT19+/CD24+ population during alginate culture. In contrast, D-NPC showed more consistent expression levels of NP surface markers during culture. We demonstrate for the first time that extended alginate culture selectively enriches the committed NP cells and favors chondroitin-4-sulfate proteoglycan production. These findings suggest its validity as a model to investigate IVD cell function. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Control of Alginate Core Size in Alginate-Poly (Lactic-Co-Glycolic) Acid Microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lio, Daniel; Yeo, David; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell alginate-poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microparticles are potential candidates to improve hydrophilic drug loading while facilitating controlled release. This report studies the influence of the alginate core size on the drug release profile of alginate-PLGA microparticles and its size. Microparticles are synthesized through double-emulsion fabrication via a concurrent ionotropic gelation and solvent extraction. The size of alginate core ranges from approximately 10, 50, to 100 μm when the emulsification method at the first step is homogenization, vortexing, or magnetic stirring, respectively. The second step emulsification for all three conditions is performed with magnetic stirring. Interestingly, although the alginate core has different sizes, alginate-PLGA microparticle diameter does not change. However, drug release profiles are dramatically different for microparticles comprising different-sized alginate cores. Specifically, taking calcein as a model drug, microparticles containing the smallest alginate core (10 μm) show the slowest release over a period of 26 days with burst release less than 1 %.

  19. Nanocomposite scaffolds with tunable mechanical and degradation capabilities: co-delivery of bioactive agents for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cattalini, Juan P; Roether, Judith; Hoppe, Alexander; Pishbin, Fatemeh; Haro Durand, Luis; Gorustovich, Alejandro; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Lucangioli, Silvia; Mouriño, Viviana

    2016-10-21

    Novel multifunctional nanocomposite scaffolds made of nanobioactive glass and alginate crosslinked with therapeutic ions such as calcium and copper were developed for delivering therapeutic agents, in a highly controlled and sustainable manner, for bone tissue engineering. Alendronate, a well-known antiresorptive agent, was formulated into microspheres under optimized conditions and effectively loaded within the novel multifunctional scaffolds with a high encapsulation percentage. The size of the cation used for the alginate crosslinking impacted directly on porosity and viscoelastic properties, and thus, on the degradation rate and the release profile of copper, calcium and alendronate. According to this, even though highly porous structures were created with suitable pore sizes for cell ingrowth and vascularization in both cases, copper-crosslinked scaffolds showed higher values of porosity, elastic modulus, degradation rate and the amount of copper and alendronate released, when compared with calcium-crosslinked scaffolds. In addition, in all cases, the scaffolds showed bioactivity and mechanical properties close to the endogenous trabecular bone tissue in terms of viscoelasticity. Furthermore, the scaffolds showed osteogenic and angiogenic properties on bone and endothelial cells, respectively, and the extracts of the biomaterials used promoted the formation of blood vessels in an ex vivo model. These new bioactive nanocomposite scaffolds represent an exciting new class of therapeutic cell delivery carrier with tunable mechanical and degradation properties; potentially useful in the controlled and sustainable delivery of therapeutic agents with active roles in bone formation and angiogenesis, as well as in the support of cell proliferation and osteogenesis for bone tissue engineering.

  20. Is there a cause-and-effect relationship between physicochemical properties and cell behavior of alginate-based hydrogel obtained after sterilization?

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Cauchois, Ghislaine; Schmitt, Jean-François; Louvet, Nicolas; Six, Jean-Luc; Chen, Yun; Rahouadj, Rachid; Huselstein, Céline

    2017-01-25

    Alginate-based hydrogel scaffolds are widely used in the field of cartilage regeneration and repair. If the effect of autoclaving on the alginate powder is well known, it is not the same for the possible effects of the sterilization UV treatment on the properties of the hydrogel after polymerization. To select an effective sterilization treatment of alginate-based materials, one must find what are inter-relationship between the characteristics (chemical, physical and mechanical) of alginate-based hydrogel during sterilization, and what consequences have affected on cell behavior. In this study, we investigated the influence of UV sterilization treatments (UV-1 and UV-2: 25 and 50min, respectively) and autoclaving to obtain alginate (Alg)/hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel, as well as further evaluated the relationship between physicochemical properties and cell behavior of Alg/HA hydrogel after UVs and autoclaving. The physicochemical properties of this mixture at the powder or polymerized states were analyzed using ATR-FTIR, HPLC-SEC, rheological, indentation testing and sterility testing. The cell behaviors of hydrogels were evaluated by cell viability and proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation. The effects of treatment parameters and their correlation with the others characteristics were determined statistically by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). In this study, we have shown that the cell behavior in alginate-based hydrogels was not only regulated by physicochemical properties (as molar mass or/and viscosity), but also associated with the controlling of sterilization time. It can provide a basis for choosing an effective method of sterilization, which can keep the mechanical or physical-chemical properties of Alg-based hydrogel scaffold and maintain its cytocompatibility and its ability to induce chondrogenesis from mesenchymal stem cells.

  1. Influence of modified alginate hydrogels on mesenchymal stem cells and olfactory bulb-derived glial cells cultures.

    PubMed

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Szarek, Dariusz; Grzesiak, Jakub; Wrzeszcz, Karol

    2014-01-01

    Great potential of cellular therapies has generated extensive research in the field of cells harvesting and culturing. Transplantation of cell cultures has been used in a variety of therapeutic programs but in many cases it appeared that biomaterial scaffold or sheath would enhance cells regenerative potential. Hydrogels composed of different proportions sodium and calcium alginates, were undertaken to evaluate their influence on mesenchymal stem cells and olfactory bulb-derived glial cells cultures. Additionally, these biomaterials were also enriched with fibrin protein. The structure of materials was visualized by means of scanning electron microscopy. After seeding with cells - hydrogels were observed with inverted and fluorescence microscope. Cell's morphology, behavior and phenotype were analyzed in investigated materials by means of light, fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes. Also, viability assay was performed with Alamar Blue cytotoxic test. Our observations showed that basic alginate hydrogels had significant influence on both cell types. Materials maintained cells alive, which is desired attribute, however none of them kept cells in normal, flat form. Alginates with significant calcium component kept cells alive for longer period of culture. Addition of fibrin protein resulted in material's biocompatibility properties improvement, by creation of adhesion surface, which helps cells to keep proper morphology and behavior. Our findings suggest that addition of fibrin protein to alginate hydrogels improves them as cell carriers for regenerative medicine applications.

  2. Functionalised alginate flow seeding microparticles for use in Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV).

    PubMed

    Varela, Sylvana; Balagué, Isaac; Sancho, Irene; Ertürk, Nihal; Ferrando, Montserrat; Vernet, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Alginate microparticles as flow seeding fulfil all the requirements that are recommended for the velocity measurements in Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). These spherical microparticles offer the advantage of being environmentally friendly, having excellent seeding properties and they can be produced via a very simple process. In the present study, the performances of alginate microparticles functionalised with a fluorescent dye, Rhodamine B (RhB), for PIV have been studied. The efficacy of fluorescence is appreciated in a number of PIV applications since it can boost the signal-to-noise ratio. Alginate microparticles functionalised with RhB have high emission efficiency, desirable match with fluid density and controlled size. The study of the particles behaviour in strong acid and basic solutions and ammonia is also included. This type of particles can be used for measurements with PIV and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) simultaneously, including acid-base reactions.

  3. Biomimetic magnetic silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Declercq, Heidi A; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Dubruel, Peter; Cornelissen, Maria; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rivas, Jose; Padeletti, Giuseppina; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L; Dediu, V Alek

    2015-03-25

    Magnetic silk fibroin protein (SFP) scaffolds integrating magnetic materials and featuring magnetic gradients were prepared for potential utility in magnetic-field assisted tissue engineering. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were introduced into SFP scaffolds via dip-coating methods, resulting in magnetic SFP scaffolds with different strengths of magnetization. Magnetic SFP scaffolds showed excellent hyperthermia properties achieving temperature increases up to 8 °C in about 100 s. The scaffolds were not toxic to osteogenic cells and improved cell adhesion and proliferation. These findings suggest that tailored magnetized silk-based biomaterials can be engineered with interesting features for biomaterials and tissue-engineering applications.

  4. Sargassum filipendula alginate from Brazil: seasonal influence and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Caroline; Espindola, Ana Paula D M; Kleinübing, Sirlei Jaiana; Tasic, Ljubica; da Silva, Meuris Gurgel Carlos

    2014-10-13

    The aim of this work is focused on the extraction and characterization of the Brazilian seaweed Sargassum filipendula alginate. Alginates obtained at different seasons were characterized by liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The alginate extraction efficiency was about 20%. Different seasons of the year and different stages in the life cycle of Sargassum sp. in southeastern Brazil influenced the M/G and, consequently, the technological properties of extracted alginates.

  5. Encapsulated dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells in an injectable and biodegradable scaffold for applications in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Xu, Xingtian; Chee, Winston W L; Schricker, Scott R; Shi, Songtao

    2013-11-01

    Bone grafts are currently the major family of treatment options in modern reconstructive dentistry. As an alternative, stem cell-scaffold constructs seem to hold promise for bone tissue engineering. However, the feasibility of encapsulating dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells in scaffold biomaterials such as alginate hydrogel remains to be tested. The objectives of this study were, therefore, to: (1) develop an injectable scaffold based on oxidized alginate microbeads encapsulating periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate the cell viability and osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells in the microbeads both in vitro and in vivo. Microbeads with diameters of 1 ± 0.1 mm were fabricated with 2 × 10(6) stem cells/mL of alginate. Microbeads containing PDLSCs, GMSCs, and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as a positive control were implanted subcutaneously and ectopic bone formation was analyzed by micro CT and histological analysis at 8-weeks postimplantation. The encapsulated stem cells remained viable after 4 weeks of culturing in osteo-differentiating induction medium. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction results confirmed that apatitic mineral was deposited by the stem cells. In vivo, ectopic mineralization was observed inside and around the implanted microbeads containing the immobilized stem cells. These findings demonstrate for the first time that immobilization of PDLSCs and GMSCs in alginate microbeads provides a promising strategy for bone tissue engineering.

  6. Effects of alginate hydrogel cross-linking density on mechanical and biological behaviors for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jinah; Seol, Young-Joon; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Kundu, Joydip; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2014-09-01

    An effective cross-linking of alginate gel was made through reaction with calcium carbonate (CaCO3). We used human chondrocytes as a model cell to study the effects of cross-linking density. Three different pore size ranges of cross-linked alginate hydrogels were fabricated. The morphological, mechanical, and rheological properties of various alginate hydrogels were characterized and responses of biosynthesis of cells encapsulated in each gel to the variation in cross-linking density were investigated. Desired outer shape of structure was maintained when the alginate solution was cross-linked with the applied method. The properties of alginate hydrogel could be tailored through applying various concentrations of CaCO3. The rate of synthesized GAGs and collagens was significantly higher in human chondrocytes encapsulated in the smaller pore structure than that in the larger pore structure. The expression of chondrogenic markers, including collagen type II and aggrecan, was enhanced in the smaller pore structure. It was found that proper structural morphology is a critical factor to enhance the performance and tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Formulating the alginate-polyornithine biocapsule for prolonged stability: evaluation of composition and manufacturing technique.

    PubMed

    Thanos, C G; Calafiore, R; Basta, G; Bintz, B E; Bell, W J; Hudak, J; Vasconcellos, A; Schneider, P; Skinner, S J M; Geaney, M; Tan, P; Elliot, R B; Tatnell, M; Escobar, L; Qian, H; Mathiowitz, E; Emerich, D F

    2007-10-01

    Alginate encapsulation is one of the most widely used techniques for introducing cell-based therapeutics into the body. Numerous encapsulation methodologies exist, utilizing a variety of alginates, purification technologies, and unique polycationic membrane components. The stability of a conventional alginate formulation encapsulated using a commercially available technique and apparatus has been characterized extensively. The current study employs an encapsulation protocol and ultra-pure alginate pioneered at the University of Perugia. The enhanced microcapsules were produced, characterized, and implanted into the brain, peritoneal cavity, and subcutaneous space of Long-Evans rats. After 14, 28, 60, 90, 120, and 180 or 215 days, capsules were explanted and the surface was analyzed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Image analysis was carried out to measure changes in diameter and wall thickness. FTIR peak analysis and surface morphology from SEM indicated that the enhanced encapsulation technique and formulation produced a stable biocapsule capable of survival in all sites, including the harsh peritoneal environment, for at least 215 days. Preimplant analysis showed a marked increase in the structural integrity of the enhanced formulation with improved elasticity and burst strength compared with the baseline formulation, which remained stable for less than 60 days. The enhanced microcapsule composition showed advantages in physical strength and longevity, indicating that small changes in encapsulation methodologies and materials selection can dramatically impact the stability and longevity of alginate microcapsules and their contents.

  8. Efficiency of uronic acid uptake in marine alginate-degrading fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaumann, K.; Weide, G.

    1995-03-01

    Despite the fact that many marine fungi, including phycomycetes, yeasts, ascomycetes and hyphomycetes, have been recorded from living and/or dead phaeophytes, only a few of these have been shown to be capable of degrading alginic acid or alginates. The degradation is achieved by the action of an exoenzyme complex, comprising alginate lyase, as well as alginate hydrolase activities. The latter was detected only recently by the authors. In this study, the growth of two marine sodiumalginate-degrading deuteromycetes, Asteromyces cruciatus and Dendryphiella salina, was investigated, and the assimilation efficiency of sodiumalginate and its uronic acid degradation products, respectively, was estimated from the economic coefficient (E). E is calculated from the mycelial dry weight, divided by the weight of substrate consumed for this production. The economic coefficient for A. cruciatus was 48.6%, and that of D. salina 38.9%. This indicates that the former species uses the alginate degradation products more efficiently than the latter. The observed E-values for the marine deuteromycetes agree with those from other fungi, e.g. terrestrial species. In general, it is concluded that the marine fungi appear to play a more important role in kelp-based ecosystems than was realized previously.

  9. Vanadate and triclosan synergistically induce alginate production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Damron, F. Heath; Davis, Michael R.; Withers, T. Ryan; Ernst, Robert K.; Goldberg, Joanna B.; Yu, Guangli; Yu, Hongwei D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Alginate overproduction by P. aeruginosa strains, also known as mucoidy, is associated with chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF). It is not clear how alginate induction occurs in the wild type (wt) mucA strains. When grown on Pseudomonas isolation agar (PIA), P. aeruginosa strains PAO1 and PA14 are nonmucoid producing minimal amounts of alginate. Here we report the addition of ammonium metavanadate (AMV), a phosphatase inhibitor, to PIA (PIA-AMV) induced mucoidy in both these laboratory strains and early lung colonizing nonmucoid isolates with a wt mucA. This phenotypic switch was reversible depending on the availability of vanadate salts and triclosan, a component of PIA. Alginate induction in PAO1 on PIA-AMV was correlated with increased proteolytic degradation of MucA, and required envelope proteases AlgW or MucP, and a two-component phosphate regulator, PhoP. Other changes included the addition of palmitate to lipid A, a phenotype also observed in chronic CF isolates. Proteomic analysis revealed the upregulation of stress chaperones, which was confirmed by increased expression of the chaperone/protease MucD. Altogether, these findings suggest a model of alginate induction and the PIA-AMV medium may be suitable for examining early lung colonization phenotypes in CF before the selection of the mucA mutants. PMID:21631603

  10. Purification and characterisation of a bifunctional alginate lyase from novel Isoptericola halotolerans CGMCC 5336.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenfang; Wei, Dan; Li, Hui; Li, Heng; Rahman, Muhammad Masfiqur; Shi, Jinsong; Xu, Zhenghong; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-11-06

    A novel halophilic alginate-degrading microorganism was isolated from rotten seaweed and identified as Isoptericola halotolerans CGMCC5336. The lyase from the strain was purified to homogeneity by combining of ammonium sulfate fractionation and anion-exchange chromatography with a specific activity of 8409.19 U/ml and a recovery of 25.07%. This enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of approximately 28 kDa. The optimal temperature and pH were 50 °C and pH 7.0, respectively. The lyase maintained stability at neutral pH (7.0-8.0) and temperatures below 50 °C. Metal ions including Na(+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), and Ca(2+) notably increased the activity of the enzyme. With sodium alginate as the substrate, the Km and Vmax were 0.26 mg/ml and 1.31 mg/ml min, respectively. The alginate lyase had substrate specificity for polyguluronate and polymannuronate units in alginate molecules, indicating its bifunctionality. These excellent characteristics demonstrated the potential applications in alginate oligosaccharides production with low polymerisation degrees. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of molecular events during in vitro re-epithelialization under honey-alginate matrix ambience.

    PubMed

    Barui, Ananya; Mandal, Naresh; Majumder, Subhadipa; Das, Raunak Kumar; Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Banerjee, Provas; Ray, Ajoy Kumar; RoyChaudhuri, Chirosree; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2013-08-01

    Re-epithelialization is one of the most important stages of cutaneous regeneration and its success requires supportive micro-ambience which may be provided with suitable bio-matrix. Biocompatibility and efficacy of such bio-matrix in re-epithelialization could be explored by multimodal analysis of structural and functional attributes of in vitro wound healing model including evaluation of prime molecular expressions of the epithelial cells during repair. Present study examines the influence of honey-alginate and alginate matrices on re-epithelialization in keratinocyte (HaCaT) population in a 2-D wound model. Cellular viability, proliferation and cell-cell adhesion status were assessed during wound closure using live/dead cell assay and by evaluating expressions of Ki67, p63 and E-cadherin along-with % change in cellular electrical impedance. Efficacy of honey-alginate matrix in comparison to only alginate one was demonstrated by a quicker reduction in wound gap, improved cellular viability, enhanced expressions of Ki67, p63 and its isoforms (TAp63, ΔNp63) as well as E-cadherin. Faster restoration of electrical attribute (% of impedance change) after wounding also indicated better impact of honey-alginate matrix in re-epithelialization.

  12. Hematoma-inspired alginate/platelet releasate/CaPO4 composite: initiation of the inflammatory-mediated response associated with fracture repair in vitro and ex vivo injection delivery.

    PubMed

    McCanless, Jonathan D; Jennings, Lisa K; Bumgardner, Joel D; Cole, Judith A; Haggard, Warren O

    2012-08-01

    A clinical need continues for consistent bone remodeling within problematic sites such as those of fracture nonunion, avascular necrosis, or irregular bone formations. In attempt to address such needs, a biomaterial system is proposed to induce early inflammatory responses after implantation and to provide later osteoconductive scaffolding for bone regeneration. Biomaterial-induced inflammation would parallel the early stage of hematoma-induced fracture repair and allow scaffold-promoted remodeling of osseous tissue to a healthy state. Initiation of the wound healing cascade by two human concentrated platelet releasate-containing alginate/β-tricalcium phosphate biocomposites has been studied in vitro using the TIB-71™ RAW264.7 mouse monocyte cell line. Inflammatory responses inherent to the base material were found and could be modulated through incorporation of platelet releasate. Differences in hydrogel wt% (2 vs. 8 %) and/or calcium phosphate granule vol.% (20 vs. 10 %) allowed for tuning the response associated with platelet releasate-associated growth factor elution. Tunability from completely suppressing the inflammatory response to augmenting the response was observed through varied elution profiles of both releasate-derived bioagents and impurities inherent to alginate. A 2.5-fold upregulation of inducible-nitric oxide synthase gene expression followed by a tenfold increase in nitrite media levels was induced by inclusion of releasate within the 8 wt%/10 vol.% formulation and was comparable to an endotoxin positive control. Whereas, near complete elimination of inflammation was seen when releasate was included within the 2 wt%/20 vol.% formulation. These in vitro results suggested tunable interactions between the multiple platelet releasate-derived bioagents and the biocomposites for enhancing hematoma-like fracture repair. Additionally, minimally invasive delivery for in situ curing of the implant system via injection was demonstrated in rat tail

  13. Fabrication of engineered heart tissue grafts from alginate/collagen barium composite microbeads.

    PubMed

    Bai, X P; Zheng, H X; Fang, R; Wang, T R; Hou, X L; Li, Y; Chen, X B; Tian, W M

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering holds great promise for the treatment of myocardial infarction. However, insufficient cell migration into the scaffolds used and inflammatory reactions due to scaffold biodegradation remain as issues to be addressed. Engineered heart tissue (EHT) grafts fabricated by means of a cell encapsulation technique provide cells with a tissue-like environment, thereby potentially enhancing cellular processes such as migration, proliferation, and differentiation, and tissue regeneration. This paper presents a study on the fabrication and characterization of EHT grafts from novel alginate/collagen composite microbeads by means of cell encapsulation. Specifically, the microbeads were fabricated from alginate and collagen by barium ion cross-linking, with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes encapsulated in the composite microbeads during the fabrication of the EHT grafts. To evaluate the suitablity of these EHT grafts for heart muscle repair, the growth of cardiac cells in the microbeads was examined by means of confocal microscopy and staining with DAPI and F-actin. The EHT grafts were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and the contractile function of the EHT grafts monitored using a digital video camera at different time points. The results show the proliferation of cardiac cells in the microbeads and formation of interconnected multilayer heart-like tissues, the presence of well-organized and dense cell structures, the presence of intercalated discs and spaced Z lines, and the spontaneous synchronized contractility of EHT grafts (at a rate of 20-30 beats min(-1) after two weeks in culture). Taken together, these observations demonstrate that the novel alginate/collagen composite microbeads can provide a tissue-like microenvironment for cardiomyocytes that is suitable for fabricating native heart-like tissues.

  14. Silk scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yao, Danyu; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2016-02-01

    The musculoskeletal system, which includes bone, cartilage, tendon/ligament, and skeletal muscle, is becoming the targets for tissue engineering because of the high need for their repair and regeneration. Numerous factors would affect the use of musculoskeletal tissue engineering for tissue regeneration ranging from cells used for scaffold seeding to the manufacture and structures of materials. The essential function of the scaffolds is to convey growth factors as well as cells to the target site to aid the regeneration of the injury. Among the variety of biomaterials used in scaffold engineering, silk fibroin is recognized as an ideal material for its impressive cytocompatibility, slow biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties. The current review describes the advances made in the fabrication of silk fibroin scaffolds with different forms such as films, particles, electrospun fibers, hydrogels, three-dimensional porous scaffolds, and their applications in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues.

  15. Silk scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Danyu

    2015-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system, which includes bone, cartilage, tendon/ligament, and skeletal muscle, is becoming the targets for tissue engineering because of the high need for their repair and regeneration. Numerous factors would affect the use of musculoskeletal tissue engineering for tissue regeneration ranging from cells used for scaffold seeding to the manufacture and structures of materials. The essential function of the scaffolds is to convey growth factors as well as cells to the target site to aid the regeneration of the injury. Among the variety of biomaterials used in scaffold engineering, silk fibroin is recognized as an ideal material for its impressive cytocompatibility, slow biodegradability, and excellent mechanical properties. The current review describes the advances made in the fabrication of silk fibroin scaffolds with different forms such as films, particles, electrospun fibers, hydrogels, three-dimensional porous scaffolds, and their applications in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:26445979

  16. Composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moutos, Franklin T; Guilak, Farshid

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering remains a promising therapeutic strategy for the repair or regeneration of diseased or damaged tissues. Previous approaches have typically focused on combining cells and bioactive molecules (e.g., growth factors, cytokines and DNA fragments) with a biomaterial scaffold that functions as a template to control the geometry of the newly formed tissue, while facilitating the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of embedded cells. Biomaterial scaffolds also play a crucial role in determining the functional properties of engineered tissues, including biomechanical characteristics such as inhomogeneity, anisotropy, nonlinearity or viscoelasticity. While single-phase, homogeneous materials have been used extensively to create numerous types of tissue constructs, there continue to be significant challenges in the development of scaffolds that can provide the functional properties of load-bearing tissues such as articular cartilage. In an attempt to create more complex scaffolds that promote the regeneration of functional engineered tissues, composite scaffolds comprising two or more distinct materials have been developed. This paper reviews various studies on the development and testing of composite scaffolds for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage, using techniques such as embedded fibers and textiles for reinforcement, embedded solid structures, multi-layered designs, or three-dimensionally woven composite materials. In many cases, the use of composite scaffolds can provide unique biomechanical and biological properties for the development of functional tissue engineering scaffolds.

  17. Composite Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Moutos, Franklin T.; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering remains a promising therapeutic strategy for the repair or regeneration of diseased or damaged tissues. Previous approaches have typically focused on combining cells and bioactive molecules (e.g., growth factors, cytokines, and DNA fragments) with a biomaterial scaffold that function as a template to control the geometry of the newly formed tissue, while facilitating the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of embedded cells. Biomaterial scaffolds also play a crucial role in determining the functional properties of engineered tissues, including biomechanical characteristics such as inhomogeneity, anisotropy, nonlinearity, or viscoelasticity. While single-phase, homogenous materials have been used extensively to create numerous types of tissue constructs, there continue to be significant challenges in the development of scaffolds that can provide the functional properties of load-bearing tissues such as articular cartilage. In an attempt to create more complex scaffolds that promote the regeneration of functional engineered tissues, composite scaffolds comprising two or more distinct materials have been developed. This paper reviews various studies on the development and testing of composite scaffolds for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage, using techniques such as embedded fibers and textiles for reinforcement, embedded solid structures, multi-layered designs, or three-dimensionally woven composite materials. In many cases, the use of composite scaffolds can provide unique biomechanical and biological properties for the development of functional tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:18836249

  18. 21 CFR 172.858 - Propylene glycol alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Propylene glycol alginate. 172.858 Section 172.858... Propylene glycol alginate. The food additive propylene glycol alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-37-2) may be used... the act: (1) The name of the additive, “propylene glycol alginate” or “propylene glycol ester...

  19. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Alginate to Produce Oligosaccharides by a New Purified Endo-Type Alginate Lyase

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Benwei; Chen, Meijuan; Yin, Heng; Du, Yuguang; Ning, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of sodium alginate to produce alginate oligosaccharides has drawn increasing attention due to its advantages of containing a wild reaction condition, excellent gel properties and specific products easy for purification. However, the efficient commercial enzyme tools are rarely available. A new alginate lyase with high activity (24,038 U/mg) has been purified from a newly isolated marine strain, Cellulophaga sp. NJ-1. The enzyme was most active at 50 °C and pH 8.0 and maintained stability at a broad pH range (6.0–10.0) and temperature below 40 °C. It had broad substrate specificity toward sodium alginate, heteropolymeric MG blocks (polyMG), homopolymeric M blocks (polyM) and homopolymeric G blocks (polyG), and possessed higher affinity toward polyG (15.63 mM) as well as polyMG (23.90 mM) than polyM (53.61 mM) and sodium alginate (27.21 mM). The TLC and MS spectroscopy analysis of degradation products suggested that it completely hydrolyzed sodium alginate into oligosaccharides of low degrees of polymerization (DPs). The excellent properties would make it a promising tool for full use of sodium alginate to produce oligosaccharides. PMID:27275826

  20. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Alginate to Produce Oligosaccharides by a New Purified Endo-Type Alginate Lyase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Benwei; Chen, Meijuan; Yin, Heng; Du, Yuguang; Ning, Limin

    2016-06-06

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of sodium alginate to produce alginate oligosaccharides has drawn increasing attention due to its advantages of containing a wild reaction condition, excellent gel properties and specific products easy for purification. However, the efficient commercial enzyme tools are rarely available. A new alginate lyase with high activity (24,038 U/mg) has been purified from a newly isolated marine strain, Cellulophaga sp. NJ-1. The enzyme was most active at 50 °C and pH 8.0 and maintained stability at a broad pH range (6.0-10.0) and temperature below 40 °C. It had broad substrate specificity toward sodium alginate, heteropolymeric MG blocks (polyMG), homopolymeric M blocks (polyM) and homopolymeric G blocks (polyG), and possessed higher affinity toward polyG (15.63 mM) as well as polyMG (23.90 mM) than polyM (53.61 mM) and sodium alginate (27.21 mM). The TLC and MS spectroscopy analysis of degradation products suggested that it completely hydrolyzed sodium alginate into oligosaccharides of low degrees of polymerization (DPs). The excellent properties would make it a promising tool for full use of sodium alginate to produce oligosaccharides.

  1. Novel bilayer bacterial nanocellulose scaffold supports neocartilage formation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Martínez Ávila, Héctor; Feldmann, Eva-Maria; Pleumeekers, Mieke M; Nimeskern, Luc; Kuo, Willy; de Jong, Willem C; Schwarz, Silke; Müller, Ralph; Hendriks, Jeanine; Rotter, Nicole; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Stok, Kathryn S; Gatenholm, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineering provides a promising alternative therapy to the complex surgical reconstruction of auricular cartilage by using ear-shaped autologous costal cartilage. Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) is proposed as a promising scaffold material for auricular cartilage reconstruction, as it exhibits excellent biocompatibility and secures tissue integration. Thus, this study evaluates a novel bilayer BNC scaffold for auricular cartilage tissue engineering. Bilayer BNC scaffolds, composed of a dense nanocellulose layer joined with a macroporous composite layer of nanocellulose and alginate, were seeded with human nasoseptal chondrocytes (NC) and cultured in vitro for up to 6 weeks. To scale up for clinical translation, bilayer BNC scaffolds were seeded with a low number of freshly isolated (uncultured) human NCs combined with freshly isolated human mononuclear cells (MNC) from bone marrow in alginate and subcutaneously implanted in nude mice for 8 weeks. 3D morphometric analysis showed that bilayer BNC scaffolds have a porosity of 75% and mean pore size of 50 ± 25 μm. Furthermore, endotoxin analysis and in vitro cytotoxicity testing revealed that the produced bilayer BNC scaffolds were non-pyrogenic (0.15 ± 0.09 EU/ml) and non-cytotoxic (cell viability: 97.8 ± 4.7%). This study demonstrates that bilayer BNC scaffolds offer a good mechanical stability and maintain a structural integrity while providing a porous architecture that supports cell ingrowth. Moreover, bilayer BNC scaffolds provide a suitable environment for culture-expanded NCs as well as a combination of freshly isolated NCs and MNCs to form cartilage in vitro and in vivo as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry, biochemical and biomechanical analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Minimally Invasive Approach to the Repair of Injured Skeletal Muscle With a Shape-memory Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Cao, Lan; Shansky, Janet; Wang, Zheng; Mooney, David; Vandenburgh, Herman

    2014-01-01

    Repair of injured skeletal muscle by cell therapies has been limited by poor survival of injected cells. Use of a carrier scaffold delivering cells locally, may enhance in vivo cell survival, and promote skeletal muscle regeneration. Biomaterial scaffolds are often implanted into muscle tissue through invasive surgeries, which can result in trauma that delays healing. Minimally invasive approaches to scaffold implantation are thought to minimize these adverse effects. This hypothesis was addressed in the context of a severe mouse skeletal muscle injury model. A degradable, shape-memory alginate scaffold that was highly porous and compressible was delivered by minimally invasive surgical techniques to injured tibialis anterior muscle. The scaffold controlled was quickly rehydrated in situ with autologous myoblasts and growth factors (either insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) alone or IGF-1 with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)). The implanted scaffolds delivering myoblasts and IGF-1 significantly reduced scar formation, enhanced cell engraftment, and improved muscle contractile function. The addition of VEGF to the scaffold further improved functional recovery likely through increased angiogenesis. Thus, the delivery of myoblasts and dual local release of VEGF and IGF-1 from degradable scaffolds implanted through a minimally invasive procedure effectively promoted the functional regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. PMID:24769909

  3. A nano-micro alternating multilayer scaffold loading with rBMSCs and BMP-2 for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shan; Li, Long; Liu, Xian; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Guangliang; Zhou, Shaobing

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we develop a nano-micro alternating multilayer scaffold for bone tissue engineering by incorporation of monodispersed calcium alginate microbeads into electrospun polymer nanofibers. Both rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) are simultaneously loaded into the microbeads, which are generated from a microfluidic device. The layer number of the scaffold can be readily controlled by alternately repeating the electrospinning and the microfluidic processes. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and Alizarin Red S staining results demonstrate that this rBMSCs and BMP-2 loaded nano-micro alternating multilayer scaffold presents an outstanding osteogenic effect in vitro. Histological and immunohistochemical assessments further reveal that this multilayer scaffold has a significant capability of ectopic bone formation in vivo, enabling this newly developed scaffold to be suitable for wide applications in tissue engineering.

  4. Stereolithographic Bone Scaffold Design Parameters: Osteogenic Differentiation and Signal Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyobum; Yeatts, Andrew; Dean, David

    2010-01-01

    Scaffold design parameters including porosity, pore size, interconnectivity, and mechanical properties have a significant influence on osteogenic signal expression and differentiation. This review evaluates the influence of each of these parameters and then discusses the ability of stereolithography (SLA) to be used to tailor scaffold design to optimize these parameters. Scaffold porosity and pore size affect osteogenic cell signaling and ultimately in vivo bone tissue growth. Alternatively, scaffold interconnectivity has a great influence on in vivo bone growth but little work has been done to determine if interconnectivity causes changes in signaling levels. Osteogenic cell signaling could be also influenced by scaffold mechanical properties such as scaffold rigidity and dynamic relationships between the cells and their extracellular matrix. With knowledge of the effects of these parameters on cellular functions, an optimal tissue engineering scaffold can be designed, but a proper technology must exist to produce this design to specification in a repeatable manner. SLA has been shown to be capable of fabricating scaffolds with controlled architecture and micrometer-level resolution. Surgical implantation of these scaffolds is a promising clinical treatment for successful bone regeneration. By applying knowledge of how scaffold parameters influence osteogenic cell signaling to scaffold manufacturing using SLA, tissue engineers may move closer to creating the optimal tissue engineering scaffold. PMID:20504065

  5. Alginate lyases from alginate-degrading Vibrio splendidus 12B01 are endolytic.

    PubMed

    Badur, Ahmet H; Jagtap, Sujit Sadashiv; Yalamanchili, Geethika; Lee, Jung-Kul; Zhao, Huimin; Rao, Christopher V

    2015-03-01

    Alginate lyases are enzymes that degrade alginate through β-elimination of the glycosidic bond into smaller oligomers. We investigated the alginate lyases from Vibrio splendidus 12B01, a marine bacterioplankton species that can grow on alginate as its sole carbon source. We identified, purified, and characterized four polysaccharide lyase family 7 alginates lyases, AlyA, AlyB, AlyD, and AlyE, from V. splendidus 12B01. The four lyases were found to have optimal activity between pH 7.5 and 8.5 and at 20 to 25°C, consistent with their use in a marine environment. AlyA, AlyB, AlyD, and AlyE were found to exhibit a turnover number (kcat) for alginate of 0.60 ± 0.02 s(-1), 3.7 ± 0.3 s(-1), 4.5 ± 0.5 s(-1), and 7.1 ± 0.2 s(-1), respectively. The Km values of AlyA, AlyB, AlyD, and AlyE toward alginate were 36 ± 7 μM, 22 ± 5 μM, 60 ± 2 μM, and 123 ± 6 μM, respectively. AlyA and AlyB were found principally to cleave the β-1,4 bonds between β-d-mannuronate and α-l-guluronate and subunits; AlyD and AlyE were found to principally cleave the α-1,4 bonds involving α-l-guluronate subunits. The four alginate lyases degrade alginate into longer chains of oligomers.

  6. Alginate Lyases from Alginate-Degrading Vibrio splendidus 12B01 Are Endolytic

    PubMed Central

    Badur, Ahmet H.; Jagtap, Sujit Sadashiv; Yalamanchili, Geethika; Lee, Jung-Kul; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Alginate lyases are enzymes that degrade alginate through β-elimination of the glycosidic bond into smaller oligomers. We investigated the alginate lyases from Vibrio splendidus 12B01, a marine bacterioplankton species that can grow on alginate as its sole carbon source. We identified, purified, and characterized four polysaccharide lyase family 7 alginates lyases, AlyA, AlyB, AlyD, and AlyE, from V. splendidus 12B01. The four lyases were found to have optimal activity between pH 7.5 and 8.5 and at 20 to 25°C, consistent with their use in a marine environment. AlyA, AlyB, AlyD, and AlyE were found to exhibit a turnover number (kcat) for alginate of 0.60 ± 0.02 s−1, 3.7 ± 0.3 s−1, 4.5 ± 0.5 s−1, and 7.1 ± 0.2 s−1, respectively. The Km values of AlyA, AlyB, AlyD, and AlyE toward alginate were 36 ± 7 μM, 22 ± 5 μM, 60 ± 2 μM, and 123 ± 6 μM, respectively. AlyA and AlyB were found principally to cleave the β-1,4 bonds between β-d-mannuronate and α-l-guluronate and subunits; AlyD and AlyE were found to principally cleave the α-1,4 bonds involving α-l-guluronate subunits. The four alginate lyases degrade alginate into longer chains of oligomers. PMID:25556193

  7. Assessment of the Behavior of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Immobilized in Biomimetic Alginate Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Garate, Ane; Ciriza, Jesús; Casado, Javier G; Blazquez, Rebeca; Pedraz, José Luis; Orive, Gorka; Hernandez, Rosa Maria

    2015-11-02

    The combination of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and biomimetic matrices for cell-based therapies has led to enormous advances, including the field of cell microencapsulation technology. In the present work, we have evaluated the potential of genetically modified MSCs from mice bone marrow, D1-MSCs, immobilized in alginate microcapsules with different RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) densities. Results demonstrated that the microcapsules represent a suitable platform for D1-MSC encapsulation since cell immobilization into alginate matrices does not affect their main characteristics. The in vitro study showed a higher activity of D1-MSCs when they are immobilized in RGD-modified alginate microcapsules, obtaining the highest therapeutic factor secretion with low and intermediate densities of the bioactive molecule. In addition, the inclusion of RGD increased the differentiation potential of immobilized cells upon specific induction. However, subcutaneous implantation did not induce differentiation of D1-MSCs toward any lineage remaining at an undifferentiated state in vivo.

  8. Microencapsulation in Alginate and Chitosan Microgels to Enhance Viability of Bifidobacterium longum for Oral Delivery.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Timothy W; Üçok, Elif F; Tiani, Kendra A; McClements, David J; Sela, David A

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms are incorporated into a wide variety of foods, supplements, and pharmaceuticals to promote human health and wellness. However, maintaining bacterial cell viability during storage and gastrointestinal transit remains a challenge. Encapsulation of bifidobacteria within food-grade hydrogel particles potentially mitigates their sensitivity to environmental stresses. In this study, Bifidobacterium longum subspecies and strains were encapsulated in core-shell microgels consisting of an alginate core and a microgel shell. Encapsulated obligate anaerobes Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum exhibited differences in viability in a strain-dependent manner, without a discernable relationship to subspecies lineage. This includes viability under aerobic storage conditions and modeled gastrointestinal tract conditions. Coating alginate microgels with chitosan did not improve viability compared to cells encapsulated in alginate microgels alone, suggesting that modifying the surface charge alone does not enhance delivery. Thus hydrogel beads have great potential for improving the stability and efficacy of bifidobacterial probiotics in various nutritional interventions.

  9. Microencapsulation in Alginate and Chitosan Microgels to Enhance Viability of Bifidobacterium longum for Oral Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Timothy W.; Üçok, Elif F.; Tiani, Kendra A.; McClements, David J.; Sela, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms are incorporated into a wide variety of foods, supplements, and pharmaceuticals to promote human health and wellness. However, maintaining bacterial cell viability during storage and gastrointestinal transit remains a challenge. Encapsulation of bifidobacteria within food-grade hydrogel particles potentially mitigates their sensitivity to environmental stresses. In this study, Bifidobacterium longum subspecies and strains were encapsulated in core-shell microgels consisting of an alginate core and a microgel shell. Encapsulated obligate anaerobes Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum exhibited differences in viability in a strain-dependent manner, without a discernable relationship to subspecies lineage. This includes viability under aerobic storage conditions and modeled gastrointestinal tract conditions. Coating alginate microgels with chitosan did not improve viability compared to cells encapsulated in alginate microgels alone, suggesting that modifying the surface charge alone does not enhance delivery. Thus hydrogel beads have great potential for improving the stability and efficacy of bifidobacterial probiotics in various nutritional interventions. PMID:27148184

  10. Role of Calcium Alginate and Mannitol in Protecting Bifidobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Mishra, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was carried out to ascertain the mechanism of Ca-alginate and mannitol protection of cell envelope components and secondary proteins of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12 after freeze-drying and after 10 weeks of storage at room temperature (25°C) at low water activities (aw) of 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2. Preparation of Ca-alginate and Ca-alginate-mannitol as microencapsulants was carried out by dropping an alginate or alginate-mannitol emulsion containing bacteria using a burette into CaCl2 solution to obtain Ca-alginate beads and Ca-alginate-mannitol beads, respectively. The wet beads were then freeze-dried. The aw of freeze-dried beads was then adjusted to 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2 using saturated salt solutions; controls were prepared by keeping Ca-alginate and Ca-alginate-mannitol in aluminum foil without aw adjustment. Mannitol in the Ca-alginate system interacted with cell envelopes during freeze-drying and during storage at low aws. In contrast, Ca-alginate protected cell envelopes after freeze-drying but not during 10-week storage. Unlike Ca-alginate, Ca-alginate-mannitol was effective in retarding the changes in secondary proteins during freeze-drying and during 10 weeks of storage at low aws. It appears that Ca-alginate-mannitol is more effective than Ca-alginate in preserving cell envelopes and proteins after freeze-drying and after 10 weeks of storage at room temperature (25°C). PMID:22843535

  11. In Vivo Assessment of Bone Regeneration in Alginate/Bone ECM Hydrogels with Incorporated Skeletal Stem Cells and Single Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gothard, David; Smith, Emma L.; Kanczler, Janos M.; Black, Cameron R.; Wells, Julia A.; Roberts, Carol A.; White, Lisa J.; Qutachi, Omar; Peto, Heather; Rashidi, Hassan; Rojo, Luis; Stevens, Molly M.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Rose, Felicity R. A. J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.

    2015-01-01

    The current study has investigated the use of decellularised, demineralised bone extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel constructs for in vivo tissue mineralisation and bone formation. Stro-1-enriched human bone marrow stromal cells were incorporated together with select growth factors including VEGF, TGF-β3, BMP-2, PTHrP and VitD3, to augment bone formation, and mixed with alginate for structural support. Growth factors were delivered through fast (non-osteogenic factors) and slow (osteogenic factors) release PLGA microparticles. Constructs of 5 mm length were implanted in vivo for 28 days within mice. Dense tissue assessed by micro-CT correlated with histologically assessed mineralised bone formation in all constructs. Exogenous growth factor addition did not enhance bone formation further compared to alginate/bone ECM (ALG/ECM) hydrogels alone. UV irradiation reduced bone formation through degradation of intrinsic growth factors within the bone ECM component and possibly also ECM cross-linking. BMP-2 and VitD3 rescued osteogenic induction. ALG/ECM hydrogels appeared highly osteoinductive and delivery of angiogenic or chondrogenic growth factors led to altered bone formation. All constructs demonstrated extensive host tissue invasion and vascularisation aiding integration and implant longevity. The proposed hydrogel system functioned without the need for growth factor incorporation or an exogenous inducible cell source. Optimal growth factor concentrations and spatiotemporal release profiles require further assessment, as the bone ECM component may suffer batch variability between donor materials. In summary, ALG/ECM hydrogels provide a versatile biomaterial scaffold for utilisation within regenerative medicine which may be tailored, ultimately, to form the tissue of choice through incorporation of select growth factors. PMID:26675008

  12. In Vivo Assessment of Bone Regeneration in Alginate/Bone ECM Hydrogels with Incorporated Skeletal Stem Cells and Single Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Gothard, David; Smith, Emma L; Kanczler, Janos M; Black, Cameron R; Wells, Julia A; Roberts, Carol A; White, Lisa J; Qutachi, Omar; Peto, Heather; Rashidi, Hassan; Rojo, Luis; Stevens, Molly M; El Haj, Alicia J; Rose, Felicity R A J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2015-01-01

    The current study has investigated the use of decellularised, demineralised bone extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel constructs for in vivo tissue mineralisation and bone formation. Stro-1-enriched human bone marrow stromal cells were incorporated together with select growth factors including VEGF, TGF-β3, BMP-2, PTHrP and VitD3, to augment bone formation, and mixed with alginate for structural support. Growth factors were delivered through fast (non-osteogenic factors) and slow (osteogenic factors) release PLGA microparticles. Constructs of 5 mm length were implanted in vivo for 28 days within mice. Dense tissue assessed by micro-CT correlated with histologically assessed mineralised bone formation in all constructs. Exogenous growth factor addition did not enhance bone formation further compared to alginate/bone ECM (ALG/ECM) hydrogels alone. UV irradiation reduced bone formation through degradation of intrinsic growth factors within the bone ECM component and possibly also ECM cross-linking. BMP-2 and VitD3 rescued osteogenic induction. ALG/ECM hydrogels appeared highly osteoinductive and delivery of angiogenic or chondrogenic growth factors led to altered bone formation. All constructs demonstrated extensive host tissue invasion and vascularisation aiding integration and implant longevity. The proposed hydrogel system functioned without the need for growth factor incorporation or an exogenous inducible cell source. Optimal growth factor concentrations and spatiotemporal release profiles require further assessment, as the bone ECM component may suffer batch variability between donor materials. In summary, ALG/ECM hydrogels provide a versatile biomaterial scaffold for utilisation within regenerative medicine which may be tailored, ultimately, to form the tissue of choice through incorporation of select growth factors.

  13. Compatibility study of alginate/keratin blend for biopolymer development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pratima; Nayak, Kush Kumar

    2015-12-18

    The ultimate characteristics of blend film depend on the properties of its polymeric components, composition, and on the compatibility of the polymers. Binary polymer blend films of alginate (ALG) and keratin (KER) fibers (obtained from chicken feathers) were prepared by simple solution casting techniques and their compatibility properties were studied by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The tensile strength and percent of elongation were measured by a tensile strength tester. The results of the present studies elucidate that ALG and KER are compatible and suitable for the development of a blend film. It was found that the ALG/KER blend ratios of 90:10 and 80:20 possess characteristics to make a blend film with a high tensile strength value. The blend with composition 90:10 of ALG/KER is the one of the strongest candidates in the preparation of blending films, because it has the highest tensile strength (0.38 MPa) and percentage of elongation (59.5%) among all tested blend compositions. The blend ratio of 80:20 of ALG/KER achieves maximum compatibility, since its intensity pattern changes drastically as recorded in an X-ray diffraction study. The fabricated blend film can be a suitable candidate for a range of biomaterials such as for a drug delivery vesicle, hydrogel, and scaffolding, etc.

  14. Composite alginate gels for tunable cellular microenvironment mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Khavari, Adele; Nydén, Magnus; Weitz, David A.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanics of the cellular microenvironment can be as critical as biochemistry in directing cell behavior. Many commonly utilized materials derived from extra-cellular-matrix create excellent scaffolds for cell growth, however, evaluating the relative mechanical and biochemical effects independently in 3D environments has been difficult in frequently used biopolymer matrices. Here we present 3D sodium alginate hydrogel microenvironments over a physiological range of stiffness (E = 1.85 to 5.29 kPa), with and without RGD binding sites or collagen fibers. We use confocal microscopy to measure the growth of multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), of increasing metastatic potential in different elastic moduli of hydrogels, with and without binding factors. We find that the hydrogel stiffness regulates the growth and morphology of these cell clusters; MCAs grow larger and faster in the more rigid environments similar to cancerous breast tissue (E = 4–12 kPa) as compared to healthy tissue (E = 0.4–2 kpa). Adding binding factors from collagen and RGD peptides increases growth rates, and change maximum MCA sizes. These findings demonstrate the utility of these independently tunable mechanical/biochemistry gels, and that mechanical confinement in stiffer microenvironments may increase cell proliferation. PMID:27484403

  15. Composite alginate gels for tunable cellular microenvironment mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavari, Adele; Nydén, Magnus; Weitz, David A.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.

    2016-08-01

    The mechanics of the cellular microenvironment can be as critical as biochemistry in directing cell behavior. Many commonly utilized materials derived from extra-cellular-matrix create excellent scaffolds for cell growth, however, evaluating the relative mechanical and biochemical effects independently in 3D environments has been difficult in frequently used biopolymer matrices. Here we present 3D sodium alginate hydrogel microenvironments over a physiological range of stiffness (E = 1.85 to 5.29 kPa), with and without RGD binding sites or collagen fibers. We use confocal microscopy to measure the growth of multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), of increasing metastatic potential in different elastic moduli of hydrogels, with and without binding factors. We find that the hydrogel stiffness regulates the growth and morphology of these cell clusters; MCAs grow larger and faster in the more rigid environments similar to cancerous breast tissue (E = 4–12 kPa) as compared to healthy tissue (E = 0.4–2 kpa). Adding binding factors from collagen and RGD peptides increases growth rates, and change maximum MCA sizes. These findings demonstrate the utility of these independently tunable mechanical/biochemistry gels, and that mechanical confinement in stiffer microenvironments may increase cell proliferation.

  16. Review article: alginate-raft formulations in the treatment of heartburn and acid reflux.

    PubMed

    Mandel, K G; Daggy, B P; Brodie, D A; Jacoby, H I

    2000-06-01

    Alginate-based raft-forming formulations have been marketed word-wide for over 30 years under various brand names, including Gaviscon. They are used for the symptomatic treatment of heartburn and oesophagitis, and appear to act by a unique mechanism which differs from that of traditional antacids. In the presence of gastric acid, alginates precipitate, forming a gel. Alginate-based raft-forming formulations usually contain sodium or potassium bicarbonate; in the presence of gastric acid, the bicarbonate is converted to carbon dioxide which becomes entrapped within the gel precipitate, converting it into a foam which floats on the surface of the gastric contents, much like a raft on water. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that alginate-based rafts can entrap carbon dioxide, as well as antacid components contained in some formulations, thus providing a relatively pH-neutral barrier. Several studies have demonstrated that the alginate raft can preferentially move into the oesophagus in place, or ahead, of acidic gastric contents during episodes of gastro-oesophageal reflux; some studies further suggest that the raft can act as a physical barrier to reduce reflux episodes. Although some alginate-based formulations also contain antacid components which can provide significant acid neutralization capacity, the efficacy of these formulations to reduce heartburn symptoms does not appear to be totally dependent on the neutralization of bulk gastric contents. The strength of the alginate raft is dependant on several factors, including the amount of carbon dioxide generated and entrapped in the raft, the molecular properties of the alginate, and the presence of aluminium or calcium in the antacid components of the formulation. Raft formation occurs rapidly, often within a few seconds of dosing; hence alginate-containing antacids are comparable to traditional antacids for speed of onset of relief. Since the raft can be retained in the stomach for several

  17. Activation Mechanism and Cellular Localization of Membrane-Anchored Alginate Polymerase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Moradali, M Fata; Ghods, Shirin; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2017-03-03

    The exopolysaccharide, alginate, produced by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a survival advantage by contributing to formation of characteristic biofilms during infection. Membrane anchored proteins Alg8 (catalytic subunit) and Alg44 (co-polymerase) constitute the alginate polymerase which is being activated by the second messenger molecule c-di-GMP, but the mechanism of activation remains elusive. To shed light on the c-di-GMP mediated activation of alginate polymerization in vivo, an in silico structural model of Alg8 fused to the c-di-GMP binding PilZ domain informed by the structure of cellulose synthase, BcsA, was developed. This structural model was probed by site-specific mutagenesis and different cellular levels of c-di-GMP. Results suggested that c-di-GMP-mediated activation of alginate polymerization involves amino acids residing at two loops including H323 (loop A), T457 and E460 (loop B) surrounding the catalytic site in the predicted model. Activity of respective Alg8 variants suggested that c-di-GMP-mediated control of substrate access to the catalytic site of Alg8 is dissimilar to the known activation mechanism of BcsA. Alg8 variants responded differently to various c-di-GMP levels while MucR imparted c-di-GMP for activation of alginate polymerase. Furthermore, we showed that Alg44 co-polymerase constituted a stable dimer, with its periplasmic domains required for protein localization, alginate polymerization and modification. Superfolder GFP fusions of Alg8 and Alg44 showed a non-uniform, punctuate and patchy arrangement of both proteins surrounding the cell. Overall, this study provides insights into the c-di-GMP mediated activation of alginate polymerization while assigning functional roles to Alg8 and Alg44 including their subcellular localization and distribution.IMPORTANCE The exopolysaccharide, alginate, is an important biofilm component of the opportunistic human pathogen P. aeruginosa and the principle

  18. New insights into Pseudomonas fluorescens alginate biosynthesis relevant for the establishment of an efficient production process for microbial alginates.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Susan; Mærk, Mali; Hrudikova, Radka; Valla, Svein; Ertesvåg, Helga

    2017-07-25

    Alginate denotes a family of linear polysaccharides with a wide range of industrial and pharmaceutical applications. Presently, all commercially available alginates are manufactured from brown algae. However, bacterial alginates have advantages with regard to compositional homogeneity and reproducibility. In order to be able to design bacterial strains that are better suited for industrial alginate production, defining limiting factors for alginate biosynthesis is of vital importance. Our group has been studying alginate biosynthesis in Pseudomonas fluorescens using several complementary approaches. Alginate is synthesised and transported out of the cell by a multiprotein complex spanning from the inner to the outer membrane. We have developed an immunogold labelling procedure in which the porin AlgE, as a part of this alginate factory, could be detected by transmission electron microscopy. No time-dependent correlation between the number of such factories on the cell surface and alginate production level was found in alginate-producing strains. Alginate biosynthesis competes with the central carbon metabolism for the key metabolite fructose 6-phosphate. In P. fluorescens, glucose, fructose and glycerol, are metabolised via the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways. Mutational analysis revealed that disruption of the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene zwf-1 resulted in increased alginate production when glycerol was used as carbon source. Furthermore, alginate-producing P. fluorescens strains cultivated on glucose experience acid stress due to the simultaneous production of alginate and gluconate. The combined results from our studies strongly indicate that the availability of fructose 6-phosphate and energy requires more attention in further research aimed at the development of an optimised alginate production process.

  19. Scaffold Translation: Barriers Between Concept and Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Translation of scaffold-based bone tissue engineering (BTE) therapies to clinical use remains, bluntly, a failure. This dearth of translated tissue engineering therapies (including scaffolds) remains despite 25 years of research, research funding totaling hundreds of millions of dollars, over 12,000 papers on BTE and over 2000 papers on BTE scaffolds alone in the past 10 years (PubMed search). Enabling scaffold translation requires first an understanding of the challenges, and second, addressing the complete range of these challenges. There are the obvious technical challenges of designing, manufacturing, and functionalizing scaffolds to fill the Form, Fixation, Function, and Formation needs of bone defect repair. However, these technical solutions should be targeted to specific clinical indications (e.g., mandibular defects, spine fusion, long bone defects, etc.). Further, technical solutions should also address business challenges, including the need to obtain regulatory approval, meet specific market needs, and obtain private investment to develop products, again for specific clinical indications. Finally, these business and technical challenges present a much different model than the typical research paradigm, presenting the field with philosophical challenges in terms of publishing and funding priorities that should be addressed as well. In this article, we review in detail the technical, business, and philosophical barriers of translating scaffolds from Concept to Clinic. We argue that envisioning and engineering scaffolds as modular systems with a sliding scale of complexity offers the best path to addressing these translational challenges. PMID:21902613

  20. Effect of alginate/nano-Ag coating on microbial and physicochemical characteristics of shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) during cold storage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianjia; Feng, Lifang; Wang, Yanbo

    2013-11-15

    The effect of a novel alginate/nano-Ag coating material on the preservation quality of shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) during 4±1°C storage was investigated. The results showed that the alginate/nano-Ag coating had quite a beneficial effect on the physicochemical and sensory quality, compared to the control treatment. After a 16-day storage, mushroom weight loss, softening, and browning of the alginate/nano-Ag coating were significantly inhibited. The lower microbial counts, including mesophilic, psychrophilic, pseudomonad, and yeasts and moulds, in treated mushrooms during storage should be attributed to the alginate/nano-Ag coating. Meanwhile, the contents of the reducing sugar, total sugar, total soluble solids and electrolyte leakage rate were increased to 3.9mg/g, 11.2mg/g, 5.1% and 16.5% for the alginate/nano-Ag coating and 3.7mg/g, 8.3mg/g, 6.3% and 31.7% for the control treatment. Therefore, the alginate/nano-Ag coating could be applied for preservation of the shiitake mushroom to expand its shelf life and improve its preservation quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Delaying cluster growth of ionotropic induced alginate gelation by oligoguluronate.

    PubMed

    Padoł, Anna Maria; Maurstad, Gjertrud; Draget, Kurt Ingar; Stokke, Bjørn Torger

    2015-11-20

    Alginates form gels in the presence of various divalent ions, such as Ca(2+) that mediate lateral association of chain segments. Various procedures exist that introduce Ca(2+) to yield alginate hydrogels with overall homogeneous or controlled gradients in the concentration profiles. In the present study, the effect of adding oligomers of α-l-guluronic acid (oligoGs) to gelling solutions of alginate was investigated by determination of the cluster growth stimulated by in situ release of Ca(2+). Three different alginate samples varying in fraction of α-l-guluronic acid and molecular weights were employed. The cluster growth was determined for both pure alginates and alginates with two different concentrations of the oligoGs employing dynamic light scattering. The results show that addition of oligoG slows down the cluster growth, the more efficient for the alginates with higher fraction of α-l-guluronic acid, and the higher molecular weight. The efficiency in delaying and slowing the cluster growth induced by added oligoG were discussed in view of the molecular parameters of the alginates. These results show that oligoG can be added to alginate solutions to control the cluster growth and eventually also transition to the gel state. Quantitative relation between the concentration of added oligoG, type and molecular weight of the alginate, and concentration, can be employed as guidelines in tuning alginate cluster growth with specific properties.

  2. Engineering three-dimensional macroporous hydroxyethyl methacrylate-alginate-gelatin cryogel for growth and proliferation of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepti; Zo, Sun Mi; Kumar, Ashok; Han, Sung Soo

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) growth of cell is of particular interest in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Scaffolds used for this purpose are often tailor-made to mimic the microenvironment and the extracellular matrix of the tissue with defined role such as to provide appropriate structural, chemical, and mechanical support. The aim of the study was to design the macroporous matrix with potential in the field of tissue engineering especially for lung muscle regeneration. Blend of hydroxyethyl methacrylate-alginate-gelatin (HAG) cryogel scaffold was synthesized using cryogelation technique and this polymer material combination is being reported first time. The rheology study showed the elastic property of the material in wet state with no variation in storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G″), and phase angle upon temperature variation. The microcomputer tomography (micro-CT) analysis confirmed the homogenous polymer structure with average pore diameter of 84 μm. Scaffold synthesized using polymer combinations which is mixture of polysaccharide (alginate) and protein (gelatin) provides supportive environment for human lung epithelial cell proliferation confirmed by cytoskeletal stain phalloidin and nuclei staining 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole checked for over three weeks. The in vivo biocompatibility was further performed which showed integration of scaffold to the surrounding tissue with ability to recruit cells. However, at first week, small amount of infiltrating mast cells were found which subsequently diminished in following weeks. Immunohistochemistry for dendritic cells confirmed in vivo biocompatible nature of the HAG scaffold. The mechanical strength, stiffness, elastic measurements, in vivo compatibility, and in vitro lung cell proliferation show the potentiality of HAG materials for lung tissue engineering.

  3. Development of bioactive glass based scaffolds for controlled antibiotic release in bone tissue engineering via biodegradable polymer layered coating.

    PubMed

    Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Li, Wei; Roether, Judith A; Mouriño, Viviana; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-12-01

    Highly porous 45S5 Bioglass(®)-based scaffolds coated with two polymer layers were fabricated to serve as a multifunctional device with controlled drug release capability for bone regeneration applications. An interior poly(d,l-lactide)/poly(ethylene glycol)-(polypropylene glycol)-poly(ethylene glycol) triblock copolymer (Pluronic P123) coating improved the mechanical stability of Bioglass-based scaffolds, while an exterior natural polymer (alginate or gelatin) coating served as an antibiotic drug carrier. The results showed improved mechanical properties of Bioglass-based scaffolds by the bilayer polymer coating. In addition, hydrochloride tetracycline loaded in either alginate or gelatin coatings was released rapidly at the initial stage (∼1 h), while the released rate subsequently decreased and was sustained for 14 days in phosphate buffered saline. Therefore, these layered polymer coated scaffolds exhibit attractive characteristics in terms of improved mechanical properties and controlled drug release, simultaneously with the added advantage that the drug release rate is decoupled from the intrinsic scaffold Bioglass degradation mechanism. The layered polymer coated scaffolds are of interest for drug-delivery enhanced bone regeneration applications.

  4. Biosynthesis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Extracellular Polysaccharides, Alginate, Pel, and Psl

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Michael J.; Nivens, David E.; Weadge, Joel T.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa thrives in many aqueous environments and is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause both acute and chronic infections. Environmental conditions and host defenses cause differing stresses on the bacteria, and to survive in vastly different environments, P. aeruginosa must be able to adapt to its surroundings. One strategy for bacterial adaptation is to self-encapsulate with matrix material, primarily composed of secreted extracellular polysaccharides. P. aeruginosa has the genetic capacity to produce at least three secreted polysaccharides; alginate, Psl, and Pel. These polysaccharides differ in chemical structure and in their biosynthetic mechanisms. Since alginate is often associated with chronic pulmonary infections, its biosynthetic pathway is the best characterized. However, alginate is only produced by a subset of P. aeruginosa strains. Most environmental and other clinical isolates secrete either Pel or Psl. Little information is available on the biosynthesis of these polysaccharides. Here, we review the literature on the alginate biosynthetic pathway, with emphasis on recent findings describing the structure of alginate biosynthetic proteins. This information combined with the characterization of the domain architecture of proteins encoded on the Psl and Pel operons allowed us to make predictive models for the biosynthesis of these two polysaccharides. The results indicate that alginate and Pel share certain features, including some biosynthetic proteins with structurally or functionally similar properties. In contrast, Psl biosynthesis resembles the EPS/CPS capsular biosynthesis pathway of Escherichia coli, where the Psl pentameric subunits are assembled in association with an isoprenoid lipid carrier. These models and the environmental cues that cause the cells to produce predominantly one polysaccharide over the others are subjects of current investigation. PMID:21991261

  5. Alginate hydrogel-mediated crystallization of calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yufei; Feng, Qingling

    2011-05-15

    We documented a specific method for combining calcium ions and alginate molecules slowly and continuously in the mineralization system for the purpose of understanding the mediating function of alginate on the crystallization of calcium carbonate. The alginate was involved in the nucleation and the growth process of CaCO{sub 3}. The crystal size, morphology and roughness of crystal surface were significantly influenced by the type of the alginate, which could be accounted for by the length of the G blocks in alginate. A combination of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis showed that there were the chemical interactions between the alginate and the mineral phase. This strategic approach revealed the biologically controlled CaCO{sub 3} mineralization within calcium alginate hydrogels via the selective nucleation and the confined crystallization of CaCO{sub 3}. The results presented here could contribute to the understanding of the mineralization process in hydrogel systems. -- Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the growth of calcite aggregates with different morphologies obtained from (a) Low G alginate gels and (b) High G alginate gels. Display Omitted highlights: > We use a specific method for combining calcium ions and alginate molecules slowly and continuously in the mineralization system to understand the mediating function of alginate on the crystallization of CaCO{sub 3} crystals. > The crystal size, morphology and crystal surface roughness are influenced by the length of G blocks in alginate. There are chemical interactions between the alginate and the mineral phase. > We propose a potential mechanism of CaCO{sub 3} crystallization within High G and Low G calcium alginate hydrogel.

  6. Structural properties of scaffolds: Crucial parameters towards stem cells differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Tian, Lingling; Shamirzaei-Jeshvaghani, Elham; Dehghani, Leila; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life-sciences for regeneration of damaged tissues. Stem cells have attracted much interest in tissue engineering as a cell source due to their ability to proliferate in an undifferentiated state for prolonged time and capability of differentiating to different cell types after induction. Scaffolds play an important role in tissue engineering as a substrate that can mimic the native extracellular matrix and the properties of scaffolds have been shown to affect the cell behavior such as the cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Here, we focus on the recent reports that investigated the various aspects of scaffolds including the materials used for scaffold fabrication, surface modification of scaffolds, topography and mechanical properties of scaffolds towards stem cells differentiation effect. We will present a more detailed overview on the effect of mechanical properties of scaffolds on stem cells fate. PMID:26029344

  7. [Research progress of scaffold materials in skeletal muscle tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Huang, Weiyi; Liao, Hua

    2010-11-01

    To review the current researches of scaffold materials for skeletal muscle tissue engineering, to predict the development trend of scaffold materials in skeletal muscle tissue engineering in future. The related literature on skeletal muscle tissue engineering, involving categories and properties of scaffold materials, preparative technique and biocompatibility, was summarized and analyzed. Various scaffold materials were used in skeletal muscle tissue engineering, including inorganic biomaterials, biodegradable polymers, natural biomaterial, and biomedical composites. According to different needs of the research, various scaffolds were prepared due to different biomaterials, preparative techniques, and surface modifications. The development trend and perspective of skeletal muscle tissue engineering are the use of composite materials, and the preparation of composite scaffolds and surface modification according to the specific functions of scaffolds.

  8. Effect of nutrients on alginate synthesis in Azotobacter vinelandii and characterization of the produced alginate.

    PubMed

    Sabry, S A; Ghanem, K M; Sabra, W A

    1996-12-01

    The role of nutrients on alginate production by Azotobacter vinelandii was studied in batch cultures. The largest amount of bacterial alginate was obtained in presence of: 0.3 g/l MgSO4.7H2O. 0.4 g/l NaCl, 42 mg/l CaCl2.2H2O,.4 mg/l KH2PO4, 16 mg/l K2HPO4, 2.5 mg/l FeSO4.7H2O, 2.9 mg/l H3BO3, 2 mg/l ZnSO4.7H2O, 2 mg/l Na2MoO4.2H2O, 0.3 mg/l CuSO4.5H2O, 0.2 mg/l MnCl2.4H2O. Alginate production was not enhanced by natural additives or inducing agents, except for acetate, which increased alginate yield. The pure alginate contained 0.36% ash and 0.4% protein. It is similar to algal alginate, but it has an extra acetyl group. It contains 69.5% M-M block, 27.5% M-G block and 3% G-G block.

  9. Sustained release of verapamil hydrochloride from sodium alginate microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Farhana, S Ayesha; Shantakumar, S M; Shyale, Somashekar; Shalam, Md; Narasu, Laxmi

    2010-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop sustained release microcapsules of verapamil hydrochloride (VH) using biodegradable polymers. For this purpose microcapsules embedded verapamil hydrochloride were prepared using sodium alginate alone and also by incorporating some co polymers like methyl cellulose (MC), sodium carboxy methyl cellulose (SCMC) , poly vinyl pyrollidone (PVP) and xanthan gum by employing complex emulsion method of microencapsulation. Microcapsules were prepared in various core: coat ratios to know the effect of polymer and co polymers on drug release. Overall ten formulations were prepared and evaluated for flow behaviour, sieve analysis, drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro dissolution studies, stability studies, including scanning electron microscopy and DSC. The resulting microcapsules were discrete, large, spherical and also free flowing. The drug content in all the batches of microcapsules was found to be uniform. The release was depended on core: coat ratio and nature of the polymers. FTIR analysis revealed chemical integrity between Verapamil hydrochloride (VH), sodium alginate and between the copolymers. Among the four copolymers used methyl cellulose retarded the drug release more than the other three, hence the same formulation was subjected for in vivo studies. The drug release from the microcapsules was found to be following non fickian diffusion. Mechanism of drug release was diffusion controlled first order kinetics. Drug diffusion co efficient and correlation co efficient were also assessed by using various mathematical models. In vivo result analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters revealed that t max of reference and test formulations were almost same. From the study it was concluded that, sustained release Verapamil hydro chloride microcapsules could be achieved with success using sodium alginate alone and also in combination with other biodegradable polymers.

  10. Inverse Opal Scaffolds and Their Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Zhu, Chunlei; Xia, Younan

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional porous scaffolds play a pivotal role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine by functioning as biomimetic substrates to manipulate cellular behaviors. While many techniques have been developed to fabricate porous scaffolds, most of them rely on stochastic processes that typically result in scaffolds with pores uncontrolled in terms of size, structure, and interconnectivity, greatly limiting their use in tissue regeneration. Inverse opal scaffolds, in contrast, possess uniform pores inheriting from the template comprised of a closely packed lattice of monodispersed microspheres. The key parameters of such scaffolds, including architecture, pore structure, porosity, and interconnectivity, can all be made uniform across the same sample and among different samples. In conjunction with a tight control over pore sizes, inverse opal scaffolds have found widespread use in biomedical applications. In this review, we provide a detailed discussion on this new class of advanced materials. After a brief introduction to their history and fabrication, we highlight the unique advantages of inverse opal scaffolds over their non-uniform counterparts. We then showcase their broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, followed by a summary and perspective on future directions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Fabrication of polymeric scaffolds with a controlled distribution of pores.

    PubMed

    Capes, J S; Ando, H Y; Cameron, R E

    2005-12-01

    The design of tissue engineering scaffolds must take into account many factors including successful vascularisation and the growth of cells. Research has looked at refining scaffold architecture to promote more directed growth of tissues through well-defined anisotropy in the pore structure. In many cases it is also desirable to incorporate therapeutic ingredients, such as growth factors, into the scaffold so that their release occurs as the scaffold degrades. Therefore, scaffold fabrication techniques must be found to precisely control, not only the overall porosity of scaffolds, but also the pore size, shape and spatial distribution. This work describes the use of a regularly shaped porogen, sugar spheres, to manufacture polymeric scaffolds. Results show that pre-assembling the spheres created scaffolds with a constant porosity of 60%, but with varying pores sizes from 200-800 microm, leading to a variation in the surface area and likely degradation rate of the scaffolds. Employing different polymer impregnation techniques tailored the number of pores present with a diameter of less than 100 microm to suit different functions, and altering the packing structure of the sugar spheres created scaffolds with novel layered porosity. Replacing sugar spheres with sugar strands formed scaffolds with pores aligned in one direction.

  12. Phase separation in calcium alginate gels.

    PubMed

    Straatmann, A; Borchard, W

    2003-08-01

    Alginates are polysaccharides consisting of beta-D-mannuronate and alpha-L-guluronate units. In the presence of bivalent cations like calcium the guluronate blocks form physically cross-linked gels. The gelation properties of alginates play an important role in the stability of extracellular polymer substances and in the food industry. When stock solutions of Ca2+ ions and alginate are mixed, the gelation starts before the Ca2+ ions are evenly distributed, which leads to non-uniform gels. In this contribution, Ca alginate gels were prepared by in situ gelation using glucono-delta-lactone and CaCO3. In this way, uniform gels could be prepared directly in the measuring cell. Below a critical concentration, highly viscous solutions were obtained, which were below the critical point of gel formation. In these solutions at low rotational speeds a Schlieren peak arose, which became smaller and steeper with increasing time until a new meniscus could be detected. This behaviour is in contrast to the peak broadening due to diffusion after a synthetic boundary was formed. Evaluation of the data leads to negative diffusion coefficients. It has been shown by others that the mutual diffusion coefficient must be negative in the spinodal region. This phenomena is known as uphill diffusion and leads to phase separation of a binary system. The formation of the gel phase in this case is therefore discussed as uphill diffusion.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae... this chapter 0.6 Do. Fats and oils, § 170.3(n)(12) of this chapter 0.5 Do. Gelatins, puddings, §...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-34-9) is the ammonium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae..., § 170.3(n)(9) of this chapter 0.4 Stabilizer, thickener, § 170.3(o)(28) of this chapter. Fats and...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae... this chapter 0.6 Do. Fats and oils, § 170.3(n)(12) of this chapter 0.5 Do. Gelatins, puddings, §...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-34-9) is the ammonium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae..., § 170.3(n)(9) of this chapter 0.4 Stabilizer, thickener, § 170.3(o)(28) of this chapter. Fats and...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: Category of food Maximum level of use in food (as served) (percent) Functional use Confections, frostings... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium alginate. 184.1133 Section 184.1133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... use in food (as served) (percent) Functional use Baked goods, § 170.3(n)(1) of this chapter 0.002... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: Category of food Maximum level of use in food (as served) (percent) Functional use Confections, frostings... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium alginate. 184.1133 Section 184.1133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1011 - Alginic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alginic acid. 184.1011 Section 184.1011 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1011 - Alginic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alginic acid. 184.1011 Section 184.1011 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD... brown algae by alkaline extraction. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium alginate. 184.1133 Section 184.1133 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as...

  4. Thermo-responsive non-woven scaffolds for "smart" 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Rossouw, Claire L; Chetty, Avashnee; Moolman, Francis Sean; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Hoppe, Heinrich; Mancama, Dalu T

    2012-08-01

    The thermo-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) has received widespread attention for its in vitro application in the non-invasive, non-destructive release of adherent cells on two dimensional surfaces. In this study, 3D non-woven scaffolds fabricated from poly(propylene) (PP), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and nylon that had been grafted with PNIPAAm were tested for their ability to support the proliferation and subsequent thermal release of HC04 and HepG2 hepatocytes. Hepatocyte viability and proliferation were estimated using the Alamar Blue assay and Hoechst 33258 total DNA quantification. The assays revealed that the pure and grafted non-woven scaffolds maintained the hepatocytes within the matrix and promoted 3D proliferation comparable to that of the commercially available Algimatrix™ alginate scaffold. Albumin production and selected cytochrome P450 genes expression was found to be superior in cells growing on pure and grafted non-woven PP scaffolds as compared to cells grown as a 2D monolayer. Two scaffolds, namely, PP-g-PNIPAAm-A and PP-g-PNIPAAm-B were identified as having far superior thermal release capabilities; releasing the majority of the cells from the matrices within 2 h. This is the first report for the development of 3D non-woven, thermo-responsive scaffolds able to release cells from the matrix without the use of any enzymatic assistance or scaffold degradation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nano-composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering containing silver nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Marsich, Eleonora; Bellomo, Francesca; Turco, Gianluca; Travan, Andrea; Donati, Ivan; Paoletti, Sergio

    2013-07-01

    In this study nano-composite scaffolds to be used as bone grafts have been endowed with antibacterial properties owing to the presence of silver nanoparticles. The alginate/hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds were prepared by internal gelation followed by a freeze-drying procedure to obtain a porous structure. The nanoparticles were prepared in presence of a lactose modified-chitosan and this colloidal solution was adsorbed on the scaffolds by exploiting electrostatic interactions. The adsorption and release of the silver from the composite scaffold was measured by ICP-AES and spectrofluorimetry measurements. Micro-computed tomography analysis of the scaffolds showed a homogeneous porous structure with average pore sizes of 341.5 μm and porosity of 80 %. In vitro biological tests (MTS and killing kinetics assays) demonstrated that silver does not affect the ability of the scaffolds to promote osteoblasts proliferation and that at the same time it exerts a strong bactericidal effect against both Gram+ and Gram- bacterial strains. Overall, the combined results indicate that these biocompatible antimicrobial scaffolds possess ideal characteristics for tissue engineering applications.

  6. Sterilization techniques for biodegradable scaffolds in tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zheng; Ronholm, Jennifer; Tian, Yiping; Sethi, Benu; Cao, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable scaffolds have been extensively studied due to their wide applications in biomaterials and tissue engineering. However, infections associated with in vivo use of these scaffolds by different microbiological contaminants remain to be a significant challenge. This review focuses on different sterilization techniques including heat, chemical, irradiation, and other novel sterilization techniques for various biodegradable scaffolds. Comparisons of these techniques, including their sterilization mechanisms, post-sterilization effects, and sterilization efficiencies, are discussed. PMID:27247758

  7. HAp granules encapsulated oxidized alginate-gelatin-biphasic calcium phosphate hydrogel for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Avik; Amirian, Jhaleh; Min, Young Ki; Lee, Byong Taek

    2015-11-01

    Bone repair in the critical size defect zone using 3D hydrogel scaffold is still a challenge in tissue engineering field. A novel type of hydrogel scaffold combining ceramic and polymer materials, therefore, was fabricated to meet this challenge. In this study, oxidized alginate-gelatin-biphasic calcium phosphate (OxAlg-Gel-BCP) and spherical hydroxyapatite (HAp) granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel complex were fabricated using freeze-drying method. Detailed morphological and material characterizations of OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel (OGB00), 25wt% and 35wt% granules encapsulated hydrogel (OGB25 and OGB35) were carried out for micro-structure, porosity, chemical constituents, and compressive stress analysis. Cell viability, cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation behavior of rat bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC) on OGB00, OGB25 and OGB35 scaffolds were confirmed by MTT assay, Live-Dead assay, and confocal imaging in vitro experiments. Finally, OGB00 and OGB25 hydrogel scaffolds were implanted in the critical size defect of rabbit femoral chondyle for 4 and 8 weeks. The micro-CT analysis and histological studies conducted by H&E and Masson's trichrome demonstrated that a significantly higher (***p<0.001) and earlier bone formation happened in case of 25% HAp granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP hydrogel than in OxAlg-Gel-BCP complex alone. All results taken together, HAp granules encapsulated OxAlg-Gel-BCP system can be a promising 3D hydrogel scaffold for the healing of a critical bone defect.

  8. Scaffolding: A Broader View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, D. Kim

    1998-01-01

    This commentary on C. Addison Stone's paper on the scaffolding metaphor for the learning disabilities field identifies issues in the metaphor's use and concludes that effective special education has been inhibited by isolation of interventions from theory and by the way teacher education is structured. Use of the scaffolding metaphor to refocus…

  9. Adsorption of CO2 by alginate immobilized zeolite beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratman, A.; Kunarti, E. S.; Aprilita, N. H.; Pamurtya, I. C.

    2017-03-01

    Immobilized zeolit in alginate beads for adsorption of CO2 was developed. Alginate immobilized zeolit beads was generated by dropping the mixture of Na-alginate and zeolite solution into Ca2+ solution. The adsorption efficacy such as the influence of contact time, mass of zeolite, flowrate of CO2, and mass of adsorbent was evaluated. The adsorption of CO2 onto alginate immobilized zeolit beads was investigated by performing both equilibrium and kinetic batch test. Bead was characterized by FTIR and SEM. Alginate immobilized zeolit beads demonstrated significantly higher sorption efficacy compared to plain alginate beads and zeolite with 0.25 mmol CO2 adsorbed /g adsorbent. Optimum condition was achieved with mass composition of alginate:zeolite (3:1), flowrate 50 mL/min for 20 minutes. The alginate immobilized zeolit beads showed that adsorption of CO2 followed Freundlich isotherm and pseudo second order kinetic model. Adsorption of CO2 onto alginate immobilized zeolite beads is a physisorption with adsorption energy of 6.37 kJ/mol. This results indicates that the alginate immobilized zeolit beads can be used as promising adsorbents for CO2.

  10. Raman probing of molecular interactions of alginate biopolymers with cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourpa, Igor; Carpentier, Philippe; Maingault, Philippe; Fetissoff, Franck; Dubois, Pierre

    2000-05-01

    The biological polymers extracted from brown algae, alginates, are novel materials in biotechnology and biomedicine. Their ability to form viscous gels is used to immobilize or encapsulate yeast, enzymes, living cells and drugs. Calcium-alginate fibers are extensively used in wound dressings since exhibit antihaemostatic and healing properties. The problem with alginate-made dressings in surgery is their slow biodegradability: if entrapped within tissues, they can induce a local cellular recruitment with an inflammatory response contemporaneous to the resorption phase. In part, this problem is a consequence of poor solubility of the calcium alginates in water. Although calcium alginate fibers can exchange calcium ions with sodium ions from the wound exudate to create a calcium/sodium alginate fibers, the residual alginates are thought to be not totally degradable in vivo. Rapid and non- destructive characterization of series of the crude alginates and calcium alginate fibers has been performed using Raman spectroscopy with near IR excitation. Study of structural organization of the polymeric chains within calcium alginate fibers have been previously reported as made by confocal Raman multispectral imaging (CRMSI) in visible. Here, the Raman approach has been used to monitor the ion exchange reactions for different types of alginates and their salts in vitro. For in vivo evaluation, histological sections of alginate-treated rat tissue have been analyzed by light microscopy and CRMSI. The in vitro Raman modeling and the histochemical mapping were a necessary precursor for application of the Raman microprobe to follow in a non-invasive way the alginate-cell molecular interactions in rat tissue.

  11. Sustained Release of BMP-2 in Bioprinted Alginate for Osteogenicity in Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Poldervaart, Michelle T.; Wang, Huanan; van der Stok, Johan; Weinans, Harrie; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C. G.; Öner, F. Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J. A.; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The design of bioactive three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds is a major focus in bone tissue engineering. Incorporation of growth factors into bioprinted scaffolds offers many new possibilities regarding both biological and architectural properties of the scaffolds. This study investigates whether the sustained release of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) influences osteogenicity of tissue engineered bioprinted constructs. BMP-2 loaded on gelatin microparticles (GMPs) was used as a sustained release system, which was dispersed in hydrogel-based constructs and compared to direct inclusion of BMP-2 in alginate or control GMPs. The constructs were supplemented with goat multipotent stromal cells (gMSCs) and biphasic calcium phosphate to study osteogenic differentiation and bone formation respectively. BMP-2 release kinetics and bioactivity showed continuous release for three weeks coinciding with osteogenicity. Osteogenic differentiation and bone formation of bioprinted GMP containing constructs were investigated after subcutaneous implantation in mice or rats. BMP-2 significantly increased bone formation, which was not influenced by the release timing. We showed that 3D printing of controlled release particles is feasible and that the released BMP-2 directs osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23977328

  12. Inter-grade and inter-batch variability of sodium alginate used in alginate-based matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shao; Buckner, Ira S; Block, Lawrence H

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the inter-grade and inter-batch variability of sodium alginate used in the formulation of matrix tablets. Four different grades and three batches of one grade of sodium alginate were used to prepare matrix tablets. Swelling, erosion, and drug release tests of sodium alginate matrix tablets were conducted in a USP dissolution apparatus. Substantial differences in swelling and erosion behavior of sodium alginate matrix tablets were evident among different viscosity grades. Even different batches of the same grade exhibit substantial differences in the swelling and erosion behavior of their matrix tablets. The erosion behavior of sodium alginate matrix tablets can be partly explained by their rheological properties (both apparent viscosity and viscoelasticity) in solution. Sodium alginate with higher apparent viscosity and viscoelasticity in solution show slower erosion rate and higher swelling rate. Compacts prepared from grades or batches with higher viscosity and higher viscoelasticity show slower drug release. For grades or batches with similar apparent viscosities, apparent viscosities of sodium alginate solution at low concentration alone are not sufficient to predict the functionality of sodium alginate in matrix tablets. Viscoelastic properties of sodium alginate solutions at one high concentration corresponding to the polymer gel state, may be suitable indicia of the extended release behavior of sodium alginate matrix tablets.

  13. Falsirhodobacter sp. alg1 Harbors Single Homologs of Endo and Exo-Type Alginate Lyases Efficient for Alginate Depolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Mami; Tanaka, Reiji; Miyake, Hideo; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Chow, Seinen; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Takeyama, Haruko

    2016-01-01

    Alginate-degrading bacteria play an important role in alginate degradation by harboring highly efficient and unique alginolytic genes. Although the general mechanism for alginate degradation by these bacteria is fairly understood, much is still required to fully exploit them. Here, we report the isolation of a novel strain, Falsirhodobacter sp. alg1, the first report for an alginate-degrading bacterium from the family Rhodobacteraceae. Genome sequencing reveals that strain alg1 harbors a primary alginate degradation pathway with only single homologs of an endo- and exo-type alginate lyase, AlyFRA and AlyFRB, which is uncommon among such bacteria. Subsequent functional analysis showed that both enzymes were extremely efficient to depolymerize alginate suggesting evolutionary interests in the acquirement of these enzymes. The exo-type alginate lyase, AlyFRB in particular could depolymerize alginate without producing intermediate products making it a highly efficient enzyme for the production of 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH). Based on our findings, we believe that the discovery of Falsirhodobacter sp. alg1 and its alginolytic genes hints at the potentiality of a more diverse and unique population of alginate-degrading bacteria. PMID:27176711

  14. Protein Scaffolds in MAP Kinase Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew D.; Sacks, David B.

    2009-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway allows cells to interpret external signals and respond in an appropriate way. Diverse cellular functions, ranging from differentiation and proliferation to migration and inflammation, are regulated by MAPK signalling. Therefore, cells have developed mechanisms by which this single pathway modulates numerous cellular responses from a wide range of activating factors. This specificity is achieved by several mechanisms, including temporal and spatial control of MAPK signalling components. Key to this control are protein scaffolds, which are multidomain proteins that interact with components of the MAPK cascade in order to assemble signalling complexes. Studies conducted on different scaffolds, in different biological systems, have shown that scaffolds exert substantial control over MAPK signalling, influencing the signal intensity, time course and, importantly, the cellular responses. Protein scaffolds, therefore, are integral elements in the modulation of the MAPK network in fundamental physiological processes. PMID:19091303

  15. Development of a Multi-Functional Biopolymer Scaffold for Neural Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Nicola Louise

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects approximately 270,000 people in the U.S., with approximately 12,000 new cases occurring every year. Several strategies have been investigated to enhance axonal regeneration after SCI, however, the resulting growth can be random and disorganized. Bioengineered scaffolds provide a physical substrate for the guidance of regenerating axons towards their targets, and can be produced by freeze casting. This technique involves the controlled directional solidification of an aqueous solution or suspension, resulting in a linearly aligned porous structure caused by ice templating. In this thesis, freeze casting was used to create novel porous chitosan-alginate (C/A) scaffolds with longitudinally aligned channels and a compressive modulus (5.08 ± 0.61 kPa) comparable to that of native spinal cord tissue. These C/A scaffolds supported the viability, attachment, and directionally oriented growth of chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurites in vitro, with surface adsorptions of polycations and laminin promoting significantly longer neurite growth than the uncoated scaffolds (p<0.001). In order to integrate therapeutic biomolecules within the scaffolds for sustained release, alginate and chitosan microcapsules produced by spray drying were used to encapsulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and the enzyme chondroitinase ABC (chABC) prior to scaffold incorporation. BDNF and NT-3 were released from the C/A scaffolds in a sustained manner for 8 weeks in vitro, while chABC was released for up to 35 days. However, up to 85% of biomolecules emained entrapped within the scaffold walls, due to limitation of diffusion by the scaffold wall mesh size. Release of bioactive chABC and neurotrophins from the multifunctional scaffolds promoted the growth of DRG neurites through an in vitro barrier of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, a main inhibitory component of the growth-inhibiting glial scar in the injured spinal cord

  16. Antibacterial Performance of Alginic Acid Coating on Polyethylene Film

    PubMed Central

    Karbassi, Elika; Asadinezhad, Ahmad; Lehocký, Marian; Humpolíček, Petr; Vesel, Alenka; Novák, Igor; Sáha, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Alginic acid coated polyethylene films were examined in terms of surface properties and bacteriostatic performance against two most representative bacterial strains, that is, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Microwave plasma treatment followed by brush formation in vapor state from three distinguished precursors (allylalcohol, allylamine, hydroxyethyl methacrylate) was carried out to deposit alginic acid on the substrate. Surface analyses via various techniques established that alginic acid was immobilized onto the surface where grafting (brush) chemistry influenced the amount of alginic acid coated. Moreover, alginic acid was found to be capable of bacterial growth inhibition which itself was significantly affected by the brush type. The polyanionic character of alginic acid as a carbohydrate polymer was assumed to play the pivotal role in antibacterial activity. The cell wall composition of two bacterial strains along with the substrates physicochemical properties accounted for different levels of bacteriostatic performance. PMID:25196604

  17. Antibacterial performance of alginic acid coating on polyethylene film.

    PubMed

    Karbassi, Elika; Asadinezhad, Ahmad; Lehocký, Marian; Humpolíček, Petr; Vesel, Alenka; Novák, Igor; Sáha, Petr

    2014-08-21

    Alginic acid coated polyethylene films were examined in terms of surface properties and bacteriostatic performance against two most representative bacterial strains, that is, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Microwave plasma treatment followed by brush formation in vapor state from three distinguished precursors (allylalcohol, allylamine, hydroxyethyl methacrylate) was carried out to deposit alginic acid on the substrate. Surface analyses via various techniques established that alginic acid was immobilized onto the surface where grafting (brush) chemistry influenced the amount of alginic acid coated. Moreover, alginic acid was found to be capable of bacterial growth inhibition which itself was significantly affected by the brush type. The polyanionic character of alginic acid as a carbohydrate polymer was assumed to play the pivotal role in antibacterial activity. The cell wall composition of two bacterial strains along with the substrates physicochemical properties accounted for different levels of bacteriostatic performance.

  18. A review: fabrication of porous polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Janik, H; Marzec, M

    2015-03-01

    The aim of tissue engineering is the fabrication of three-dimensional scaffolds that can be used for the reconstruction and regeneration of damaged or deformed tissues and organs. A wide variety of techniques have been developed to create either fibrous or porous scaffolds from polymers, metals, composite materials and ceramics. However, the most promising materials are biodegradable polymers due to their comprehensive mechanical properties, ability to control the rate of degradation and similarities to natural tissue structures. Polyurethanes (PUs) are attractive candidates for scaffold fabrication, since they are biocompatible, and have excellent mechanical properties and mechanical flexibility. PU can be applied to various methods of porous scaffold fabrication, among which are solvent casting/particulate leaching, thermally induced phase separation, gas foaming, emulsion freeze-drying and melt moulding. Scaffold properties obtained by these techniques, including pore size, interconnectivity and total porosity, all depend on the thermal processing parameters, and the porogen agent and solvents used. In this review, various polyurethane systems for scaffolds are discussed, as well as methods of fabrication, including the latest developments, and their advantages and disadvantages.

  19. ASTM International Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Carl G.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Tomlins, Paul; Luginbuehl, Reto; Tesk, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The “Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds” was held on May 21, 2013 in Indianapolis, IN and was sponsored by the ASTM International (ASTM). The purpose of the workshop was to identify the highest priority items for future standards work for scaffolds used in the development and manufacture of tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs). Eighteen speakers and 78 attendees met to assess current scaffold standards and to prioritize needs for future standards. A key finding was that the ASTM TEMPs subcommittees (F04.41-46) have many active “guide” documents for educational purposes, but that few standard “test methods” or “practices” have been published. Overwhelmingly, the most clearly identified need was standards for measuring the structure of scaffolds, followed by standards for biological characterization, including in vitro testing, animal models and cell-material interactions. The third most pressing need was to develop standards for assessing the mechanical properties of scaffolds. Additional needs included standards for assessing scaffold degradation, clinical outcomes with scaffolds, effects of sterilization on scaffolds, scaffold composition and drug release from scaffolds. Discussions also highlighted the need for additional scaffold reference materials and the need to use them for measurement traceability. Finally, dialogue emphasized the needs to promote the use of standards in scaffold fabrication, characterization, and commercialization and to assess the use and impact of standards in the TEMPs community. Many scaffold standard needs have been identified and focus should now turn to generating these standards to support the use of scaffolds in TEMPs. PMID:25220952

  20. Dimensional stability of newer alginate impression materials over seven days.

    PubMed

    Wandrekar, Siddharth; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Clark, Robert K F; Radford, David R

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dimensional stability of the so called '5 day stable' alginates. Ten specimens each of three alginate materials were prepared using a standardised impression technique and a typodont model. Travelling microscope measurements were recorded for six distances at 24 hour intervals. SEM and EDX analysis was undertaken. Changes in dimension over time and differences between materials were tested using analysis of variance. 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the percentage change for comparison with a target of 1.5% based on the ISO Standard. Statistically significant dimensional changes were observed in some measured distances for all materials, but only six out of fifty four distances measured at 1, 5 and 7 days in three materials showed 95% confidence intervals that included the 1.5% ISO standard. There were no statistically significant differences in the proportional change between the three materials. The three materials showed similar appearance under SEM and similar composition by EDX analysis. It is concluded that all materials demonstrated good dimensional stability over the recommended maximum of 5 days.

  1. Contamination level of alginate impressions arriving at a dental laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sofou, A; Larsen, T; Fiehn, N-E; Owall, B

    2002-09-01

    The contamination level of alginate impressions delivered to a large dental laboratory in Sweden was determined. One hundred and seven consecutive alginate impressions were included during 7 days. Samples were taken and transferred into sterile physiological saline and analysed microbiologically for colony-forming units (cfu) as well as nonhemolytic, alpha-hemolytic, and beta-hemolytic colonies. After sampling, the clinics were contacted and asked to fill in simple questionnaires about their routines of disinfecting impressions. The questionnaire study revealed that about half of the clinics had some kind of disinfection routine, while the others rinsed in running water only. Seventy-two percent of the impressions yielded growth of bacteria, with a median number of 1.3x10(2) cfu. Thirteen per cent of the samples yielded >10(3) cfu, with a maximum number of 3.4x10(4) cfu. The majority of isolates were non- and alpha-hemolytic bacteria. Growth was recorded in 61.3% of disinfected impressions, and the numbers of bacteria in disinfected and nondisinfected impressions were similar. These findings raise the question of whether impressions need to be disinfected or if proper handling and hygienic procedures are sufficient to block the possible route of infection.

  2. Genipin-Crosslinked Chitosan Gels and Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regeneration of Cartilage and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Muzzarelli, Riccardo A. A.; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Bottegoni, Carlo; Aquili, Alberto; Gigante, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The present review article intends to direct attention to the technological advances made since 2009 in the area of genipin-crosslinked chitosan (GEN-chitosan) hydrogels. After a concise introduction on the well recognized characteristics of medical grade chitosan and food grade genipin, the properties of GEN-chitosan obtained with a safe, spontaneous and irreversible chemical reaction, and the quality assessment of the gels are reviewed. The antibacterial activity of GEN-chitosan has been well assessed in the treatment of gastric infections supported by Helicobacter pylori. Therapies based on chitosan alginate crosslinked with genipin include stem cell transplantation, and development of contraction free biomaterials suitable for cartilage engineering. Collagen, gelatin and other proteins have been associated to said hydrogels in view of the regeneration of the cartilage. Viability and proliferation of fibroblasts were impressively enhanced upon addition of poly-l-lysine. The modulation of the osteocytes has been achieved in various ways by applying advanced technologies such as 3D-plotting and electrospinning of biomimetic scaffolds, with optional addition of nano hydroxyapatite to the formulations. A wealth of biotechnological advances and know-how has permitted reaching outstanding results in crucial areas such as cranio-facial surgery, orthopedics and dentistry. It is mandatory to use scaffolds fully characterized in terms of porosity, pore size, swelling, wettability, compressive strength, and degree of acetylation, if the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells is sought: in fact, the novel characteristics imparted by GEN-chitosan must be simultaneously of physico-chemical and cytological nature. Owing to their high standard, the scientific publications dated 2010–2015 have met the expectations of an interdisciplinary audience. PMID:26690453

  3. Use of chitosan-alginate as alternative pelletization aid to microcrystalline cellulose in extrusion/spheronization.

    PubMed

    Charoenthai, Nattawut; Kleinebudde, Peter; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2007-09-01

    Two types of different molecular weight chitosan were investigated as a pelletization aid in extrusion/spheronization using water as granulation liquid. Spherical pellets with a maximum fraction of 60% w/w chitosan could be produced when 1.25-2.5% w/w sodium alginate was included in the formulations with no microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). Chitosan with lower molecular weight of 190 kDa showed a better pellet forming property. The pellets obtained had acceptable physical characteristics and a fast drug release. The results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and (13)C CP-MAS nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed the formation of polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) between chitosan and sodium alginate, which might be a reason for successful pelletization by extrusion/spheronization. Moreover, the presence of PEC might influence the physical characteristics and dissolution behavior of chitosan-alginate pellets. The results indicated an achievement in production of pellets by extrusion/spheronization without using MCC. Moreover, chitosan combined with sodium alginate could be used as a promising alternative pelletization aid to MCC in extrusion/spheronization. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  4. Enhancement of surface graft density of MPEG on alginate/chitosan hydrogel microcapsules for protein repellency.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiani; Xie, Hongguo; Yu, Weiting; Tan, Mingqian; Gong, Faquan; Liu, Xiudong; Wang, Feng; Lv, Guojun; Liu, Wanfa; Zheng, Guoshuang; Yang, Yan; Xie, Weiyang; Ma, Xiaojun

    2012-09-18

    Alginate/chitosan/alginate (ACA) hydrogel microcapsules were modified with methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG) to improve protein repellency and biocompatibility. Increased MPEG surface graft density (n(S)) on hydrogel microcapsules was achieved by controlling the grafting parameters including the buffer layer substrate, membrane thickness, and grafting method. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) model was employed to quantitatively analyze n(S) on this three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel network structure. Our results indicated that neutralizing with alginate, increasing membrane thickness, and in situ covalent grafting could increase n(S) effectively. ACAC(PEG) was more promising than ACC(PEG) in protein repellency because alginate supplied more -COO(-) negative binding sites and prevented MPEG from diffusing. The n(S) increased with membrane thickness, showing better protein repellency. Moreover, the in situ covalent grafting provided an effective way to enhance n(S), and 1.00 ± 0.03 chains/nm(2) was achieved, exhibiting almost complete immunity to protein adsorption. This antifouling hydrogel biomaterial is expected to be useful in transplantation in vivo.

  5. Alginate copper oxide nano-biocomposite as a novel material for amperometric glucose biosensing.

    PubMed

    Buk, Vuslat; Emregul, Emel; Emregul, Kaan Cebesoy

    2017-05-01

    A novel amperometric glucose biosensor based on alginate-CuO nano-biocomposite and glucose oxidase (GOD) film was developed and characterized. The properties of the alginate-CuO-GOD film were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Amperometric measurements were employed to characterize the analytical performance of the biosensor. Several parameters including amount of alginate, concentration of GOD and cross-linkers, amount of CuO nanoparticles, and effect of pH were studied and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the developed alginate-CuO-GOD biosensor was shown to have two linear ranges; from 0.04mM to 3mM (with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996 and the sensitivity of 30.443μAmM(-1)cm(-2)) and from 4mM to 35mM (with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994 and the sensitivity of 7.205μAmM(-1)cm(-2)). The overall detection limit was estimated to be 1.6μM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3) and the Km value of 2.82mM. The biosensor exhibited rather good performance with long-term stability (remainder of activity is 78% after 15days) and significant specificity for glucose when compared to possible interfering molecules such as ascorbic acid, uric acid and acetaminophen.

  6. Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles from Persimmon Byproducts and Incorporation in Biodegradable Sodium Alginate Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Ramachandraiah, Karna; Gnoc, Nguyen Trong Bao; Chin, Koo Bok

    2017-09-08

    Fruit industrial wastes such as persimmon seed, peel, and calyx were used to synthesize silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and their antioxidant activities were compared with byproduct powders having different granularities. The AgNPs were incorporated in sodium alginate thin films and transparency and mechanical properties of the films was analyzed. Persimmon byproduct AgNPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The byproduct AgNPs displayed higher antioxidant activities than powders of different granularities (P < 0.05). Fabrication of alginate thin films incorporating byproduct AgNPs resulted in improved transparency (P < 0.05). The incorporation of persimmon byproduct AgNPs with excellent antioxidant activities into sodium alginate thin films did not diminish the mechanical properties of the thin films. Therefore, fruit industrial waste such as persimmon byproducts could be used to derive AgNPs and could be incorporated into biodegradable alginate thin films, with numerous applications including food packaging. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  7. Gelation of Na-alginate aqueous solution: A study of sodium ion dynamics via NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Congxian; Zhang, Chao; Kang, Hongliang; Xia, Yanzhi; Sui, Kunyan; Liu, Ruigang

    2017-08-01

    Sodium alginate (SA) hydrogels have a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, drug delivery and formulations for preventing gastric reflux. The dynamics of sodium ions during the gelation process of SA solution is critical for clarification of the gelation procedure. In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) NMR diffusometry were used to investigate the dynamics of the sodium ions during the gelation of SA alginate. We find that sodium ions are in two different states with the addition of divalent calcium ions, corresponding to Ca(2+) crosslinked and un-crosslinked regions in the hydrogels. The sodium ions within the un-crosslinked regions are those released from the alginate chains without Ca(2+) crosslinking. The relative content of sodium ions within the Ca(2+) crosslinked regions decreased with the increase in the content of calcium ions in the system. The relaxation time T2 of sodium ions within the Ca(2+) crosslinked and un-crosslinked regions shift to shorter and longer relaxation time with the increase in concentration of calcium ion, which indicates the closer package of SA chains and the larger space for the diffusion of free sodium ions. This work clarifies the dynamics of (23)Na(+) in a calcium alginate gel at the equilibrium state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular modeling and redesign of alginate lyase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa for accelerating CRPA biofilm degradation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hoon; Huang, Xiaoqin; Lan Piao, Yu; Eun Kim, Da; Yeon Lee, So; Jeong Yoon, Eun; Hee Park, So; Lee, Kyoung; Ho Jang, Chul; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-12-01

    Administration of an efficient alginate lyase (AlgL) or AlgL mutant may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of cystic fibrosis patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. Nevertheless, the catalytic activity of wild-type AlgL is not sufficiently high. It is highly desired to design and discover an AlgL mutant with significantly improved catalytic efficiency against alginate substrates. For the purpose of identifying an AlgL mutant with significantly improved catalytic activity, in this study, we first constructed and validated a structural model of AlgL interacting with substrate, providing a better understanding of the interactions between AlgL and its substrate. Based on the modeling insights, further enzyme redesign and experimental testing led to discovery of AlgL mutants, including the K197D/K321A mutant, with significantly improved catalytic activities against alginate and acetylated alginate in ciprofloxacin-resistant P. aeruginosa (CRPA) biofilms. Further anti-biofilm activity assays have confirmed that the K197D/K321A mutant with piperacillin/tazobactam is indeed effective in degrading the CRPA biofilms. Co-administration of the potent mutant AlgL and an antibiotic (such as a nebulizer) could be effective for therapeutic treatment of CRPA-infected patients with cystic fibrosis. Proteins 2016; 84:1875-1887. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Galactosylated alginate-curcumin micelles for enhanced delivery of curcumin to hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; James, Nirmala Rachel; Kumar, P R Anil; Raj, Deepa K

    2016-05-01

    Galactosylated alginate-curcumin conjugate (LANH2-Alg Ald-Cur) is synthesized for targeted delivery of curcumin to hepatocytes exploiting asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) on hepatocytes. The synthetic procedure includes oxidation of alginate (Alg), modification of lactobionic acid (LA), grafting of targeting group (modified lactobinic acid, LANH2) and conjugation of curcumin to alginate. Alginate-curcumin conjugate (Alg-Cur) without targeting group is also prepared for the comparison of properties. LANH2-Alg Ald-Cur self assembles to micelle with diameter of 235 ± 5 nm and zeta potential of -29 mV in water. Cytotoxicity analysis demonstrates enhanced toxicity of LANH2-Alg Ald-Cur over Alg-Cur on HepG2 cells. Cellular uptake studies confirm that LANH2-Alg Ald-Cur can selectively recognize HepG2 cells and shows higher internalization than Alg-Cur conjugate. Results indicate that LANH2-Alg Ald-Cur conjugate micelles are suitable candidates for targeted delivery of curcumin to HepG2 cells.

  10. 3D Printing of Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration Applications

    PubMed Central

    Do, Anh-Vu; Khorsand, Behnoush; Geary, Sean M.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2015-01-01

    The current need for organ and tissue replacement, repair and regeneration for patients is continually growing such that supply is not meeting the high demand primarily due to a paucity of donors as well as biocompatibility issues that lead to immune rejection of the transplant. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, scientists working in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have investigated the use of scaffolds as an alternative to transplantation. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) by providing structural support as well as promoting attachment, proliferation, and differentiation with the ultimate goal of yielding functional tissues or organs. Initial attempts at developing scaffolds were problematic and subsequently inspired a growing interest in 3D printing as a mode for generating scaffolds. Utilizing three-dimensional printing (3DP) technologies, ECM-like scaffolds can be produced with a high degree of complexity and precision, where fine details can be included at a micron level. In this review, we discuss the criteria for printing viable and functional scaffolds, scaffolding materials, and 3DP technologies used to print scaffolds for tissue engineering. A hybrid approach, employing both natural and synthetic materials, as well as multiple printing processes may be the key to yielding an ECM-like scaffold with high mechanical strength, porosity, interconnectivity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and high processability. Creating such biofunctional scaffolds could potentially help to meet the demand by patients for tissues and organs without having to wait or rely on donors for transplantation. PMID:26097108

  11. Regulation of electrospun scaffold stiffness via coaxial core diameter.

    PubMed

    Drexler, J W; Powell, H M

    2011-03-01

    Scaffold mechanics influence cellular behavior, including migration, phenotype and viability. Scaffold stiffness is commonly modulated through cross-linking, polymer density, or bioactive coatings on stiff substrates. These approaches provide useful information about cellular response to substrate stiffness; however, they are not ideal as the processing can change substrate morphology, density or chemistry. Coaxial electrospinning was investigated as a fabrication method to produce scaffolds with tunable stiffness and strength without changing architecture or surface chemistry. Core solution concentration, solvent and feed rate were utilized to control core diameter with higher solution concentration and feed rate positively correlating with increased fiber diameter and stiffness. Coaxial scaffolds electrospun with an 8 wt./vol.% polycaprolactone (PCL)-HFP solution at 1 ml h(-1) formed scaffolds with an average core diameter of 1.1±0.2 μm and stiffness of 0.027±3.3×10(-3) N mm(-1). In contrast, fibers which were 2.6±0.1 μm in core diameter yielded scaffolds with a stiffness of 0.065±4.7×10(-3) N mm(-1). Strength and stiffness positively correlated with core diameter with no significant difference in total fiber diameter and interfiber distance observed in as-spun scaffolds. These data indicate that coaxial core diameter can be utilized to tailor mechanical properties of three-dimensional scaffolds and would provide an ideal scaffold for assessing the effect of scaffold mechanics on cell behavior.

  12. Scaffold Design for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Polo-Corrales, Liliana; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bone grafts is the standard to treat skeletal fractures, or to replace and regenerate lost bone, as demonstrated by the large number of bone graft procedures performed worldwide. The most common of these is the autograft, however, its use can lead to complications such as pain, infection, scarring, blood loss, and donor-site morbidity. The alternative is allografts, but they lack the osteoactive capacity of autografts and carry the risk of carrying infectious agents or immune rejection. Other approaches, such as the bone graft substitutes, have focused on improving the efficacy of bone grafts or other scaffolds by incorporating bone progenitor cells and growth factors to stimulate cells. An ideal bone graft or scaffold should be made of biomaterials that imitate the structure and properties of natural bone ECM, include osteoprogenitor cells and provide all the necessary environmental cues found in natural bone. However, creating living tissue constructs that are structurally, functionally and mechanically comparable to the natural bone has been a challenge so far. This focus of this review is on the evolution of these scaffolds as bone graft substitutes in the process of recreating the bone tissue microenvironment, including biochemical and biophysical cues. PMID:24730250

  13. Shape-controlled fabrication of cell-laden calcium alginate-PLL hydrogel microcapsules by electrodeposition on microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weinan; Zhu, Bowen; Ma, Li; Hua, Xiaoqing

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we propose an electrodeposition method of fabricating shape-controlled calcium alginate-poly-L-lysine hydrogel microcapsules. The micro-patterned electrodes, which are produced by coating a patterned photoresist layer onto fluorine-doped tin oxide glass slide based on photolithography technique, are used for making different shapes of microcapsules. By the electrolysis of water in alginate gelation on micro-patterned anode electrode, the 2D alginate hydrogel structures embedded with yeast cells are formed on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass slide. Then, the 2D structures would be detached from the microelectrode surface and treated with given reagent to be transformed into 3D microcapsules while maintaining the ring and hexagon shapes. Finally, the yeast cells within the microcapsules are further promoted into compact tissues by cultivation. The experimental results indicate the method can successfully fabricate tissues which can maintain certain cells bioactivity after 24 h cultivation. The recommended method can lead to fabricating cell-laden scaffold for tissue engineering, biological studies and drug discovery with higher accuracy and efficiency.

  14. Increasing capillary diameter and the incorporation of gelatin enhance axon outgrowth in alginate-based anisotropic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Kiran; Mueller, Rainer; Caioni, Massimiliano; Prang, Peter; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Kunz, Werner; Weidner, Norbert

    2011-07-01

    Substantial recovery of function following peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) injury critically depends on longitudinally directed axon regeneration across the injury site, which requires a mechanical guidance providing scaffold. We have previously shown that anisotropic alginate-based hydrogels with a defined capillary diameter (25 μm), which form via a self-organizing process driven by unidirectional diffusion of divalent cations into sodium alginate sols, promoted longitudinally oriented elongation of CNS axons in vitro and in vivo. In the present study the influence of various capillary diameters and the incorporation of gelatin to promote directed axon outgrowth and Schwann cell migration were assessed in a dorsal root ganglion outgrowth assay in vitro. Superimposing an alginate sol with Cu(2+), Sr(2+), or Zn(2+) ion containing solutions allowed the creation of hydrogels with capillaries 18, 25 and 55 μm in diameter, respectively. Axon outgrowth and Schwann cell migration were analyzed in terms of axon length/density and Schwann cell density within the capillary structures. Axon ingrowth into capillary hydrogels, which was always accompanied by Schwann cells, was enhanced with increasing capillary diameter. The incorporation of gelatin did not influence overall axon density, but promoted the length of axon outgrowth within the hydrogels. The longitudinal orientation of axons decreased in wider capillaries, which suggests that medium-sized capillaries are the optimal substrate to elicit substantial axon growth and longitudinal orientation after axon injury. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Versatile click alginate hydrogels crosslinked via tetrazine-norbornene chemistry.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rajiv M; Koshy, Sandeep T; Hilderbrand, Scott A; Mooney, David J; Joshi, Neel S

    2015-05-01

    Alginate hydrogels are well-characterized, biologically inert materials that are used in many biomedical applications for the delivery of drugs, proteins, and cells. Unfortunately, canonical covalently crosslinked alginate hydrogels are formed using chemical strategies that can be biologically harmful due to their lack of chemoselectivity. In this work we introduce tetrazine and norbornene groups to alginate polymer chains and subsequently form covalently crosslinked click alginate hydrogels capable of encapsulating cells without damaging them. The rapid, bioorthogonal, and specific click reaction is irreversible and allows for easy incorporation of cells with high post-encapsulation viability. The swelling and mechanical properties of the click alginate hydrogel can be tuned via the total polymer concentration and the stoichiometric ratio of the complementary click functional groups. The click alginate hydrogel can be modified after gelation to display cell adhesion peptides for 2D cell culture using thiol-ene chemistry. Furthermore, click alginate hydrogels are minimally inflammatory, maintain structural integrity over several months, and reject cell infiltration when injected subcutaneously in mice. Click alginate hydrogels combine the numerous benefits of alginate hydrogels with powerful bioorthogonal click chemistry for use in tissue engineering applications involving the stable encapsulation or delivery of cells or bioactive molecules.

  16. PLGA/alginate composite microspheres for hydrophilic protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng; Chen, X B; Schreyer, David J

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres were prepared by a novel double emulsion and solvent evaporation technique and loaded with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or rabbit anti-laminin antibody protein. The addition of alginate and the use of a surfactant during microsphere preparation increased the encapsulation efficiency and reduced the initial burst release of hydrophilic BSA. Confocal laser scanning microcopy (CLSM) of BSA-loaded PLGA/alginate composite microspheres showed that PLGA, alginate, and BSA were distributed throughout the depths of microspheres; no core/shell structure was observed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that PLGA microspheres erode and degrade more quickly than PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. When loaded with anti-laminin antibody, the function of released antibody was well preserved in both PLGA and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. The biocompatibility of PLGA and PLGA/alginate microspheres were examined using four types of cultured cell lines, representing different tissue types. Cell survival was variably affected by the inclusion of alginate in composite microspheres, possibly due to the sensitivity of different cell types to excess calcium that may be released from the calcium cross-linked alginate.

  17. Comparative characterization of three bacterial exo-type alginate lyases.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Makoto; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2016-05-01

    Alginate, a major acidic polysaccharide in brown macroalgae, has attracted attention as a carbon source for production of ethanol and other chemical compounds. Alginate is monomerized by exo-type alginate lyase into an unsaturated uronate; thus, this enzyme is critical for the saccharification and utilization of alginate. Although several exo-type alginate lyases have been characterized independently, their activities were not assayed under the same conditions or using the same unit definition, making it difficult to compare enzymatic properties or to select the most suitable enzyme for saccharification of alginate. In this study, we characterized the three bacterial exo-type alginate lyases under the same conditions: A1-IV of Sphingomonas sp. strain A1, Atu3025 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Alg17c of Saccharophagus degradans. A1-IV had the highest specific activity as well as the highest productivity of uronate, whereas Alg17c had the lowest activity and productivity. Only dialyzed Atu3025 and Alg17c were tolerant to freezing. Alg17c exhibited a remarkable halotolerance, which may be advantageous for monomerization of alginate from marine brown algae. Thus, each enzyme exhibited particular desirable and undesirable properties. Our results should facilitate further utilization of the promising polysaccharide alginate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of silver sulfadiazine loaded bacterial cellulose/sodium alginate composite films with enhanced antibacterial property.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Hui; Liu, Xiufeng; Wang, Shuxia; Wu, Jimin; Zhang, Rui; Min, Huihua; Huang, Min

    2015-11-05

    Sodium alginate (SA) and bacterial cellulose (BC) are widely used in many applications such as scaffolds and wound dressings due to its biocompatibility. Silver sulfadiazine (AgSD) is a topical antibacterial agents used as a topical cream on burns. In the study, novel BC/SA-AgSD composites were prepared and characterized by SEM, FTIR and TG analyses. These results indicate AgSD successfully impregnated into BC/SA matrix. The swelling behaviors in different pH were studied and the results showed pH-responsive swelling behaviors. The antibacterial performances of BC/SA-AgSD composites were evaluated with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of BC/SA-AgSD composites was performed on HEK 293 cells. The experimental results showed BC/SA-AgSD composites have excellent antibacterial activities and good biocompatibility, thus confirming its utility as potential wound dressings.

  19. 3D printing of mineral–polymer bone substitutes based on sodium alginate and calcium phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Egorov, Aleksey A; Fedotov, Alexander Yu; Mironov, Anton V; Popov, Vladimir K; Zobkov, Yury V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a relatively simple route for three-dimensional (3D) printing of complex-shaped biocompatible structures based on sodium alginate and calcium phosphate (CP) for bone tissue engineering. The fabrication of 3D composite structures was performed through the synthesis of inorganic particles within a biopolymer macromolecular network during 3D printing process. The formation of a new CP phase was studied through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Both the phase composition and the diameter of the CP particles depend on the concentration of a liquid component (i.e., the “ink”). The 3D printed structures were fabricated and found to have large interconnected porous systems (mean diameter ≈800 μm) and were found to possess compressive strengths from 0.45 to 1.0 MPa. This new approach can be effectively applied for fabrication of biocompatible scaffolds for bone tissue engineering constructions. PMID:28144529

  20. Neuralization of mouse embryonic stem cells in alginate hydrogels under retinoic acid and SAG treatment.

    PubMed

    Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Peto, Heather

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the differentiation of a mouse embryonic stem cell line (CGR8) into neurons, under retinoic acid (RA) and smoothened agonist (SAG) treatment. When stem cells underwent through an embryoid body (EB) formation stage, dissociation and seeding on glass coverslips, immunofluorescent labelling for neuronal markers (Nestin, b-Tubulin III, MAP2) revealed the presence of both immature neural progenitors and mature neurons. Undifferentiated CGR8 were also encapsulated in tubular, alginate-gelatin hydrogels and incubated in differentiation media containing retinoic acid (RA) and smoothened agonist (SAG). Cryo-sections of the hydrogel tubes were positive for Nestin, Pax6 and b-Tubulin III, verifying the presence of neurons and neural progenitors. Provided neural induction can be more precisely directed in the tubular hydrogels, these scaffolds will become a powerful model of neural tube development in embryos and will highlight potential strategies for spinal cord regeneration.

  1. 3D printing of mineral-polymer bone substitutes based on sodium alginate and calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Aleksey A; Fedotov, Alexander Yu; Mironov, Anton V; Komlev, Vladimir S; Popov, Vladimir K; Zobkov, Yury V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a relatively simple route for three-dimensional (3D) printing of complex-shaped biocompatible structures based on sodium alginate and calcium phosphate (CP) for bone tissue engineering. The fabrication of 3D composite structures was performed through the synthesis of inorganic particles within a biopolymer macromolecular network during 3D printing process. The formation of a new CP phase was studied through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Both the phase composition and the diameter of the CP particles depend on the concentration of a liquid component (i.e., the "ink"). The 3D printed structures were fabricated and found to have large interconnected porous systems (mean diameter ≈800 μm) and were found to possess compressive strengths from 0.45 to 1.0 MPa. This new approach can be effectively applied for fabrication of biocompatible scaffolds for bone tissue engineering constructions.

  2. Stability testing of alginate-chitosan films.

    PubMed

    Rabisková, Miloslava; Dvorácková, Katerina; Kofronvá, Lenka

    2012-02-01

    Pellets containing rutin prepared by the extrusion/spheronization method were coated with sodium alginate-chitosan film. Important quality parameters in the pellets before coating were determined, and after coating the dissolution profiles of the drug were evaluated in dissolution media of the pH corresponding to the conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. Samples of coated pellets were located in the boxes for stability testing under different conditions, i.e. 25 degrees C and 60% of relative humidity (RH); 30 degrees C and 65% RH and 40 degrees C and 75% RH. After 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months (or 1, 3 and 6 months), the dissolution test was repeated and compared with the original profiles using similarity factors. All similarity factor values above 50 indicate excellent stability of alginate-chitosan films.

  3. Rapid 3D Printing of Multifunctional Calcium Alginate Gel Pipes using Coaxial Jet Extruder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Damle, Viraj

    2014-11-01

    Calcium alginate (CA) forms when solution containing sodium alginate (SA) comes in contact with a CaCl2 solution. The resulting gel is biocompatible as well as edible and is used in production of bio-scaffolds, artificial plant seeds, and edible substances. In the latter application, referred to in the culinary world as ``spherification,'' flavored liquids are mixed with the SA and dripped into CaCl2 solution to form gel encapsulated flavored ``marbles.'' Previously, crude 3D printing of CA structures has been achieved by stacking of such flavored liquid filled marbles. In turn, solid CA rods have been fabricated by properly mixing flow of the two solutions using a microfluidic device. Here we show that by using two circular cross-section coaxial nozzles to produce coaxial jets of the SA and CaCl2 solutions, liquid filled CA micro-to-mili scale gel pipes can be produced at speeds around ~ 150 mm/s. Such extrusion rate is compatible with most commercially available 3D printers, facilitating adoption of the CA pipe coaxial jet extruder. Here, the impact of inner and outer liquid properties and flow speeds on the gel pipe extrusion process is discussed. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  4. The control of cell orientation using biodegradable alginate fibers fabricated by near-field electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Wu, Yun-Chung; He, Zhe-Yu; Huang, Zih-Ming; Hu, Wei-Wen

    2016-05-01

    For spatially controlling cell alignment, near field electrospinning (NFES) was developed to direct-write alginate fiber patterns. Compared to randomly electrospun fibers, NFES fibers guided the extension of HEK 293T cells and the levels of cell alignment increased with decreasing fiber distances. However, these guiding fibers were unfavorable for cell adhesion and limited cell growth. To preserve cell alignment ability and improve biocompatibility, the stability of patterned alginate fibers was adjusted by regulating the level of ion crosslinking. These partially crosslinked NFES fibers demonstrated parallel line-patterns in the initial stage while gradually degraded with time. The reduction of fiber density increased the available area for cell growth and enhanced cell viability. On the other hand, aligned cells were still found on these degraded patterns, suggesting that cell morphologies were mainly guided during cell seeding. This dynamically controlled fiber pattern system fulfilled the need of controlling cell orientation and biocompatibility, thus was potential to modify scaffold surfaces for tissue engineering application.

  5. Alginate and DNA Gels Are Suitable Delivery Systems for Diabetic Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Tellechea, Ana; Silva, Eduardo A; Min, Jianghong; Leal, Ermelindo C; Auster, Michael E; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Shih, William; Mooney, David J; Veves, Aristidis

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) represent a severe health problem and an unmet clinical challenge. In this study, we tested the efficacy of novel biomaterials in improving wound healing in mouse models of diabetes mellitus (DM). The biomaterials are composed of alginate- and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based gels that allow incorporation of effector cells, such as outgrowth endothelial cells (OEC), and provide sustained release of bioactive factors, such as neuropeptides and growth factors, which have been previously validated in experimental models of DM wound healing or hind limb ischemia. We tested these biomaterials in mice and demonstrate that they are biocompatible and can be injected into the wound margins without major adverse effects. In addition, we show that the combination of OEC and the neuropeptide Substance P has a better healing outcome than the delivery of OEC alone, while subtherapeutic doses of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are required for the transplanted cells to exert their beneficial effects in wound healing. In summary, alginate and DNA scaffolds could serve as potential delivery systems for the next-generation DFU therapies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Novel porous graphene oxide and hydroxyapatite nanosheets-reinforced sodium alginate hybrid nanocomposites for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Guangyao; Luo, Honglin; Zuo, Guifu; Ren, Kaijing; Wan, Yizao

    2015-09-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) and hydroxyapatite (HAp) are frequently used as reinforcements in polymers to improve mechanical and biological properties. In this work, novel porous hybrid nanocomposites consisting of GO, HAp, and sodium alginate (SA) have been prepared by facile solution mixing and freeze drying in an attempt to obtain a scaffold with desirable mechanical and biological properties. The as-prepared porous GO/HAp/SA hybrid nanocomposites were characterized by SEM, XRD, FTIR, TGA, and mechanical testing. In addition, preliminary cell behavior was assessed by CCK8 assay. It is found that the GO/HAp/SA nanocomposites show improved compressive strength and modulus over neat SA and HAp/SA nanocomposites. CCK8 results reveal that the GO/HAp/SA nanocomposites show enhanced cell proliferation over neat SA and GO/SA nanocomposite. It has been demonstrated that GO/HAp20/SA holds promise in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Graphene oxide (GO), hydroxyapatite (HAp), and alginate (SA) nanocomposites were fabricated. • The novel porous composites were prepared by solution mixture and freeze drying. • The GO/HAp/SA had porous structure with porosity > 85% and pore size > 150 μm. • The GO/HAp/SA exhibited improved mechanical properties over HAp/SA counterparts. • The GO/HAp/SA showed enhanced cell proliferation over GO/SA counterparts.

  7. Bioinspired Strong and Highly Porous Glass Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2011-03-22

    The quest for more efficient energy-related technologies is driving the development of porous and high-performance structural materials with exceptional mechanical strength. Natural materials achieve their strength through complex hierarchical designs and anisotropic structures that are extremely difficult to replicate synthetically. We emulate nature's design by direct-ink-write assembling of glass scaffolds with a periodic pattern, and controlled sintering of the filaments into anisotropic constructs similar to biological materials. The final product is a porous glass scaffold with a compressive strength (136 MPa) comparable to that of cortical bone and a porosity (60%) comparable to that of trabecular bone. The strength of this porous glass scaffold is ~100 times that of polymer scaffolds and 4-5 times that of ceramic and glass scaffolds with comparable porosities reported elsewhere. The ability to create both porous and strong structures opens a new avenue for fabricating scaffolds for a broad array of applications, including tissue engineering, filtration, lightweight composites, and catalyst support.

  8. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2015-01-01

    We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel. PMID:28787971

  9. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2015-02-16

    We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel.

  10. Exact approaches for scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents new structural and algorithmic results around the scaffolding problem, which occurs prominently in next generation sequencing. The problem can be formalized as an optimization problem on a special graph, the "scaffold graph". We prove that the problem is polynomial if this graph is a tree by providing a dynamic programming algorithm for this case. This algorithm serves as a basis to deduce an exact algorithm for general graphs using a tree decomposition of the input. We explore other structural parameters, proving a linear-size problem kernel with respect to the size of a feedback-edge set on a restricted version of Scaffolding. Finally, we examine some parameters of scaffold graphs, which are based on real-world genomes, revealing that the feedback edge set is significantly smaller than the input size. PMID:26451725

  11. Biocompatibility of microcapsules for cell immobilization elaborated with different type of alginates.

    PubMed

    Orive, G; Ponce, S; Hernández, R M; Gascón, A R; Igartua, M; Pedraz, J L

    2002-09-01

    The biocompatibility of alginate-PLL-alginate (APA) microcapsules has been evaluated with respect to impurity levels. The impurity content of three different alginates (a raw high M-alginate, a raw high G-alginate and a purified high G-alginate) has been determined and the in vivo antigenic response of APA beads made with each alginate assessed. Results show that purification of the alginate not only reduces the total amount of impurities (63% less in polyphenols, 91.45% less in endotoxins and 68.5% less in protein in relation to raw high M-alginate), but also avoids an antibody response when microcapsules of this material are implanted in mice. In contrast, raw alginates produced a detectable antibody response though the differences in their impurity content. Consequently, this work revealed that purity of the alginate rather than their chemical composition, is probably of greater importance in determining microcapsule biocompatibility.

  12. Further Development of Scaffolds for Regeneration of Nerves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Tuszynski, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Progress has been made in continuing research on scaffolds for the guided growth of nerves to replace damaged ones. The scaffolds contain pores that are approximately cylindrical and parallel, with nearly uniform widths ranging from tens to hundreds of microns. At the earlier stage of development, experimental scaffolds had been made from agarose hydrogel. Such a scaffold was made in a multistep process in which poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] fibers were used as templates for the pores. The process included placement of a bundle of the PMMA fibers in a tube, filling the interstices in the tube with a hot agarose solution, cooling to turn the solution into a gel, and then immersion in acetone to dissolve the PMMA fibers. The scaffolds were typically limited to about 25 pores per scaffold, square cross sections of no more than about 1.5 by 1.5 mm, and lengths of no more than about 2 mm.

  13. Active scaffolds for on-demand drug and cell delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuanhe; Kim, Jaeyun; Cezar, Christine A.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Lee, Kangwon; Bouhadir, Kamal; Mooney, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Porous biomaterials have been widely used as scaffolds in tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. The release of biological agents from conventional porous scaffolds is typically governed by molecular diffusion, material degradation, and cell migration, which do not allow for dynamic external regulation. We present a new active porous scaffold that can be remotely controlled by a magnetic field to deliver various biological agents on demand. The active porous scaffold, in the form of a macroporous ferrogel, gives a large deformation and volume change of over 70% under a moderate magnetic field. The deformation and volume variation allows a new mechanism to trigger and enhance the release of various drugs including mitoxantrone, plasmid DNA, and a chemokine from the scaffold. The porous scaffold can also act as a depot of various cells, whose release can be controlled by external magnetic fields. PMID:21149682

  14. Alginate Beads Containing Lactase: Stability and Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Traffano-Schiffo, Maria Victoria; Aguirre Calvo, Tatiana R; Castro-Giraldez, Marta; Fito, Pedro J; Santagapita, Patricio R

    2017-06-12

    β-Galactosidase (lactase) is a widely used enzyme in the food industry; however, it has low stability against thermal and mechanical treatments. Due to this, the purpose of the present research was to analyze the encapsulation of lactase in alginate-Ca(II) beads in order to maintain its enzymatic activity toward freezing, freezing/thawing, and storage. Also, the effect of the addition of trehalose, and arabic and guar gums and their influence on the microstructure as well as on thermal properties and molecular mobility were studied. Lactase was successfully encapsulated in alginate-Ca(II) beads, and the inclusion of trehalose was critical for activity preservation toward treatments, being improved in guar gum-containing systems. The gums increased the Tm' values, which represents a valuable technological improvement. Finally, the presence of secondary excipients affected the microstructure, showing rods with smaller outer diameter and with lower compactness than alginate-Ca(II) beads. Also, bead composition greatly affects the size, shape, and relaxation times.

  15. Scaffold Diversity of Fungal Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    González-Medina, Mariana; Owen, John R.; El-Elimat, Tamam; Pearce, Cedric J.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Figueroa, Mario; Medina-Franco, José L.

    2017-01-01

    Many drug discovery projects rely on commercial compounds to discover active leads. However, current commercial libraries, with mostly synthetic compounds, access a small fraction of the possible chemical diversity. Natural products, in contrast, possess a vast structural diversity and have proven to be an outstanding source of new drugs. Several chemoinformatic analyses of natural products have demonstrated their diversity and structural complexity. However, to our knowledge, the scaffold content and structural diversity of fungal secondary metabolites have never been studied. Herein, the scaffold diversity of 223 fungal metabolites was measured and compared to the diversity of approved drugs and commercial libraries for HTS containing natural, synthetic, and semi-synthetic compounds. In addition, the global diversity of the fungal isolates was assessed and compared to other reference data sets using Consensus Diversity Plots, a chemoinformatic tool recently developed. It was concluded that fungal secondary metabolites are cyclic systems with few ramifications and more diverse than the commercial libraries with natural products and semi-synthetic compounds. The fungal metabolites data set was one of the most structurally diverse, containing a large proportion of different and unique scaffolds not found in the other compound data sets including ChEMBL. Therefore, fungal metabolites offer a rich source of molecules suited for identifying diverse candidates for drug discovery. PMID:28420994

  16. Scaffold Diversity of Fungal Metabolites.

    PubMed

    González-Medina, Mariana; Owen, John R; El-Elimat, Tamam; Pearce, Cedric J; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Figueroa, Mario; Medina-Franco, José L

    2017-01-01

    Many drug discovery projects rely on commercial compounds to discover active leads. However, current commercial libraries, with mostly synthetic compounds, access a small fraction of the possible chemical diversity. Natural products, in contrast, possess a vast structural diversity and have proven to be an outstanding source of new drugs. Several chemoinformatic analyses of natural products have demonstrated their diversity and structural complexity. However, to our knowledge, the scaffold content and structural diversity of fungal secondary metabolites have never been studied. Herein, the scaffold diversity of 223 fungal metabolites was measured and compared to the diversity of approved drugs and commercial libraries for HTS containing natural, synthetic, and semi-synthetic compounds. In addition, the global diversity of the fungal isolates was assessed and compared to other reference data sets using Consensus Diversity Plots, a chemoinformatic tool recently developed. It was concluded that fungal secondary metabolites are cyclic systems with few ramifications and more diverse than the commercial libraries with natural products and semi-synthetic compounds. The fungal metabolites data set was one of the most structurally diverse, containing a large proportion of different and unique scaffolds not found in the other compound data sets including ChEMBL. Therefore, fungal metabolites offer a rich source of molecules suited for identifying diverse candidates for drug discovery.

  17. Effects of microbial transglutaminase, fibrimex and alginate on physicochemical properties of cooked ground meat with reduced salt level.

    PubMed

    Atilgan, Esra; Kilic, Birol

    2017-02-01

    Effects of microbial transglutaminase (MTGase), fibrin/thrombin combination (fibrimex), alginate or combination of these binding agents on physicochemical parameters of cooked ground beef with reduced salt level were investigated. Seventeen treatments included three control (no binding agent) groups incorporated with varying concentrations of salt (0.5, 1, 2%, w/w) and fourteen treatment groups produced with MTGase or fibrimex or alginate or their combinations at 0.5 or 1% salt levels. The samples were analyzed for cooking loss (CL), pH, color, moisture, fat, protein, ash, salt, texture and TBARS. The results indicated that the use of MTGase or fibrimex or MTGase/fibrimex combination had significant effect on preventing textural deterioration caused by salt reduction. Even though the use of MTGase resulted in higher CL values, formulation of ground beef with fibrimex or alginate or MTGase/fibrimex/alginate combinations reduced CL when compared with the control groups. The use of fibrimex in ground beef resulted in a decrease in TBARS, lightness, redness and pH values. However, the use of alginate caused an increase in pH, lightness and redness values of ground beef. Based on the present study, the use of fibrimex or a combination of fibrimex with MTGase in the product formulation can be an effective strategy to reduce cooking loss, to improve or maintain the textural properties and to extend shelf life of cooked ground beef with reduced salt level.

  18. Tailoring the porosity and pore size of electrospun synthetic human elastin scaffolds for dermal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Wise, Steven G; Li, Zhe; Maitz, Peter K M; Young, Cara J; Wang, Yiwei; Weiss, Anthony S

    2011-10-01

    We obtained low and high porosity synthetic human elastin scaffolds by adapting low (1 mL/h) and high (3 mL/h) flow rates respectively during electrospinning. Physical, mechanical and biological properties of these scaffolds were screened to identify the best candidates for the bioengineering of dermal tissue. SHE scaffolds that were electrospun at the higher flow rate presented increased fiber diameter and greater average pore size and over doubling of overall scaffold porosity. Both types of scaffold displayed Young's moduli comparable to that of native elastin, but the high porosity scaffolds possessed higher tensile strength. Low and high porosity scaffolds supported early attachment, spreading and proliferation of primary dermal fibroblasts, but only high porosity scaffolds supported active cell migration and infiltration into the scaffold. High porosity SHE scaffolds promoted cell persistence and scaffold remodeling in vitro with only moderate scaffold contraction. The scaffolds persisted for at least 6 weeks in a mouse subcutaneous implantation study with fibroblasts on the exterior and infiltrating, evidence of scaffold remodeling including de novo collagen synthesis and early stage angiogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Soy Protein Scaffold Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Karen B.

    Developing functional biomaterials using highly processable materials with tailorable physical and bioactive properties is an ongoing challenge in tissue engineering. Soy protein is an abundant, natural resource with potential use for regenerative medicine applications. Preliminary studies show that soy protein can be physically modified and fabricated into various biocompatible constructs. However, optimized soy protein structures for tissue regeneration (i.e. 3D porous scaffolds) have not yet been designed. Furthermore, little work has established the in vivo biocompatibility of implanted soy protein and the benefit of using soy over other proteins including FDA-approved bovine collagen. In this work, freeze-drying and 3D printing fabrication processes were developed using commercially available soy protein to create porous scaffolds that improve cell growth and infiltration compared to other soy biomaterials previously reported. Characterization of scaffold structure, porosity, and mechanical/degradation properties was performed. In addition, the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on various designed soy scaffolds was analyzed. Biological characterization of the cell-seeded scaffolds was performed to assess feasibility for use in liver tissue regeneration. The acute and humoral response of soy scaffolds implanted in an in vivo mouse subcutaneous model was also investigated. All fabricated soy scaffolds were modified using thermal, chemical, and enzymatic crosslinking to change properties and cell growth behavior. 3D printing allowed for control of scaffold pore size and geometry. Scaffold structure, porosity, and degradation rate significantly altered the in vivo response. Freeze-dried soy scaffolds had similar biocompatibility as freeze-dried collagen scaffolds of the same protein content. However, the soy scaffolds degraded at a much faster rate, minimizing immunogenicity. Interestingly, subcutaneously implanted soy scaffolds affected blood

  20. Small-angle X-ray scattering and rheological characterization of alginate gels. 3. Alginic acid gels.

    PubMed

    Draget, Kurt Ingar; Stokke, Bjørn T; Yuguchi, Yoshiaki; Urakawa, Hiroshi; Kajiwara, Kanji

    2003-01-01

    Alginic acid gels were studied by small-angle X-ray scattering and rheology to elucidate the influence of alginate chemical composition and molecular weight on the gel elasticity and molecular structure. The alginic acid gels were prepared by homogeneous pH reduction throughout the sample. Three alginates with different chemical composition and sequence, and two to three different molecular weights of each sample were examined. Three alginate samples with fractions of guluronic acid residues of 0.39 (LoG), 0.50 (InG), and 0.68 (HiG), covering the range of commercially available alginates, were employed. The excess scattering intensity I of the alginic acid gels was about 1 order of magnitude larger and exhibited a stronger curvature toward low q compared to ionically cross-linked alginate. The I(q) were decomposed into two components by assuming that the alginic acid gel is composed of aggregated multiple junctions and single chains. Time-resolved experiments showed a large increase in the average size of aggregates and their weight fraction within the first 2 h after onset of gelling, which also coincides with the most pronounced rheological changes. At equilibrium, little or no effect of molecular weight was observed, whereas at comparable molecular weights, an increased scattering intensity with increasing content of guluronic acid residues was recorded, probably because of a larger apparent molecular mass of domains. The results suggest a quasi-ordered junction zone is formed in the initial stage, followed by subsequent assembling of such zones, forming domains in the order of 50 A. The average length of the initial junction zones, being governed by the relative fraction of stabilizing G-blocks and destabilizing alternating (MG) blocks, determines the density of the final random aggregates. Hence, high-G alginates give alginic acid gels of a higher aggregate density compared to domains composed of loosely packed shorter junction zones in InG or LoG system.

  1. Screening of Alginate Lyase-Producing Bacteria and Optimization of Media Compositions for Extracellular Alginate Lyase Production

    PubMed Central

    Tavafi, Hadis; Abdi- Ali, Ahya A; Ghadam, Parinaz; Gharavi, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Background: Alginate is a linear polysaccharide consisting of guluronate (polyG) and mannuronate (polyM) subunits. Methods: In the initial screening of alginate-degrading bacteria from soil, 10 isolates were able to grow on minimal medium containing alginate. The optimization of cell growth and alginate lyase (algL) production was carried out by the addition of 0.8% alginate and 0.2-0.3 M NaCl to the culture medium. Of 10 isolates, one was selected based on its fast growth rate on minimal 9 medium containing 0.4% sodium alginate. The selected bacterium, identified based on morphological and biochemical characteristics, as well as 16S rDNA sequence data, was confirmed to be an isolate belonging to the genus Bacillus and designated as Bacillus sp. TAG8. Results: The results showed the ability of Bacillus sp. TAG8 in utilizing alginate as a sole carbon source. Bacillus sp. TAG8 growth and algL production were augmented with an increase in sodium alginate concentration and also by the addition of 0.2-0.3 M NaCl. Molecular analysis of TAG8 algL gene showed 99% sequence identity with algL of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The algL produced by Bacillus sp. TAG8 cleaved both polyM and polyG blocks in alginate molecule, as well as acetylated alginate residues, confirming the bifunctionality of the isolated lyase. Conclusion: The identification of novel algL genes from microbial communities constitutes a new approach for exploring lyases with specific activity against bacterial alginates and may thus contribute to the eradication of persistent biofilms from clinical samples. PMID:27432784

  2. Screening of Alginate Lyase-Producing Bacteria and Optimization of Media Compositions for Extracellular Alginate Lyase Production.

    PubMed

    Tavafi, Hadis; Abdi-Ali, Ahya; Ghadam, Parinaz; Gharavi, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Alginate is a linear polysaccharide consisting of guluronate (polyG) and mannuronate (polyM) subunits. In the initial screening of alginate-degrading bacteria from soil, 10 isolates were able to grow on minimal medium containing alginate. The optimization of cell growth and alginate lyase (algL) production was carried out by the addition of 0.8% alginate and 0.2-0.3 M NaCl to the culture medium. Of 10 isolates, one was selected based on its fast growth rate on minimal 9 medium containing 0.4% sodium alginate. The selected bacterium, identified based on morphological and biochemical characteristics as well as 16S rDNA sequence data, was confirmed to be an isolate belonging to the genus Bacillus and designated as Bacillus sp. TAG8. Resuls: The results showed the ability of Bacillus sp. TAG8 to utilize alginate as a sole carbon source. Bacillus sp. TAG8 growth and algL production were augmented with an increase in sodium alginate concentration and also by the addition of 0.2-0.3 M NaCl. Molecular analysis of TAG8 algL gene showed 99% sequence identity with algL of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. algL produced by Bacillus sp. TAG8 cleaved both polyM and polyG blocks in alginate molecule as well as acetylated alginate residues, confirming the bifunctionality of the isolated lyase. The identification of novel algL genes from microbial communities constitutes a new approach for exploring lyases with specific activity against bacterial alginates and may thus contribute to the eradication of persistent biofilms from clinical samples.

  3. Engineering functionally graded tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Leong, K F; Chua, C K; Sudarmadji, N; Yeong, W Y

    2008-04-01

    Tissue Engineering (TE) aims to create biological substitutes to repair or replace failing organs or tissues due to trauma or ageing. One of the more promising approaches in TE is to grow cells on biodegradable scaffolds, which act as temporary supports for the cells to attach, proliferate and differentiate; after which the scaffold will degrade, leaving behind a healthy regenerated tissue. Tissues in nature, including human tissues, exhibit gradients across a spatial volume, in which each identifiable layer has specific functions to perform so that the whole tissue/organ can behave normally. Such a gradient is termed a functional gradient. A good TE scaffold should mimic such a gradient, which fulfils the biological and mechanical requirements of the target tissue. Thus, the design and fabrication process of such scaffolds become more complex and the introduction of computer-aided tools will lend themselves well to ease these challenges. This paper reviews the needs and characterization of these functional gradients and the computer-aided systems used to ease the complexity of the scaffold design stage. These include the fabrication techniques capable of building functionally graded scaffolds (FGS) using both conventional and rapid prototyping (RP) techniques. They are able to fabricate both continuous and discrete types of FGS. The challenge in fabricating continuous FGS using RP techniques lies in the development of suitable computer aided systems to facilitate continuous FGS design. What have been missing are the appropriate models that relate the scaffold gradient, e.g. pore size, porosity or material gradient, to the biological and mechanical requirements for the regeneration of the target tissue. The establishment of these relationships will provide the foundation to develop better computer-aided systems to help design a suitable customized FGS.

  4. Design and Fabrication of Complex Scaffolds for Bone Defect Healing: Combined 3D Plotting of a Calcium Phosphate Cement and a Growth Factor-Loaded Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Ahlfeld, Tilman; Akkineni, Ashwini Rahul; Förster, Yvonne; Köhler, Tino; Knaack, Sven; Gelinsky, Michael; Lode, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing enables the fabrication of scaffolds with defined architecture. Versatile printing technologies such as extrusion-based 3D plotting allow in addition the incorporation of biological components increasing the capability to restore functional tissues. We have recently described the fabrication of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds by 3D plotting of an oil-based CPC paste under mild conditions. In the present study, we have developed a strategy for growth factor loading based on multichannel plotting: a biphasic scaffold design was realised combining CPC with VEGF-laden, highly concentrated hydrogel strands. As hydrogel component, alginate and an alginate-gellan gum blend were evaluated; the blend exhibited a more favourable VEGF release profile and was chosen for biphasic scaffold fabrication. After plotting, two-step post-processing was performed for both, hydrogel crosslinking and CPC setting, which was shown to be compatible with both materials. Finally, a scaffold was designed and fabricated which can be applied for testing in a rat critical size femur defect. Optimization of CPC plotting enabled the fabrication of highly resolved structures with strand diameters of only 200 µm. Micro-computed tomography revealed a precise strand arrangement and an interconnected pore space within the biphasic scaffold even in swollen state of the hydrogel strands.

  5. A Controlled Drug-Delivery Experiment Using Alginate Beads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Stephanie; Vernengo, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, cost-effective experiment which introduces students to drug delivery and modeling using alginate beads. Students produce calcium alginate beads loaded with drug and measure the rate of release from the beads for systems having different stir rates, geometries, extents of cross-linking, and drug molecular weight.…

  6. A Controlled Drug-Delivery Experiment Using Alginate Beads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Stephanie; Vernengo, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, cost-effective experiment which introduces students to drug delivery and modeling using alginate beads. Students produce calcium alginate beads loaded with drug and measure the rate of release from the beads for systems having different stir rates, geometries, extents of cross-linking, and drug molecular weight.…

  7. The depolymerization of sodium alginate by oxidative degradation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shirui; Zhang, Tingting; Sun, Wei; Ren, Xuhong

    2012-01-01

    Alginate has been extensively used as a carrier for macromolecules and as gene delivery vehicle. Both properties are molecular weight (Mw) dependent. Herein, we investigated factors affecting the oxidative depolymerization of alginate. The depolymerization process occurred mainly in the first 1 h. The Mw of the depolymerized alginate was influenced by the reaction temperature. At temperature 20 and 30°C, Mw of the alginate fragment kept constant and further Mw decrease was observed at 40°C. Along with the increase of hydrogen peroxide concentration, the Mw of the fragments decreased gradually. Influence of alginate initial concentration was marginal. A linear decrease of Mw was observed when the system pH was in the range of 5-7, whereas no further change was found when the system pH decreased from 7 to 8. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy spectra revealed that degradation undergoes by the breakage of the glycosidic bonds of polymers. No structural change was observed during the depolymerization process by UV spectroscopy. Cloud point pH increase was found for alginate 30 k. In summary, this method is an effective and convenient approach for preparing low Mw oligosaccharides from sodium alginate and may be potentially useful for the drug delivery system design with alginate.

  8. Use of laboratory-grown bacterial alginate in copper removal.

    PubMed

    Kivilcimdan Moral, Ç; Doğan, Ö; Sanin, F D

    2012-01-01

    Industrial production leads to toxic heavy metal pollution in water bodies. Copper is one of the examples that requires removal from effluents before being discharged. It is difficult and sometimes very expensive to remove toxic heavy metals by conventional treatment techniques. This study aims to remove copper by the use of bacterial alginate as a non-conventional technique. Bacterial alginates (natural polymers composed of mannuronic and guluronic acid monomers) were synthesized by Azotobacter vinelandii ATCC(®) 9046 in a laboratory fermentor under controlled environmental conditions. The alginates produced, with a range of different characteristics in terms of monomer distribution and viscosity, were investigated for maximum copper uptake capacities. The average copper uptake capacities of alginates produced were found to be about 1.90 mmol/L Cu(2+)/g alginate. Although the GG-block amount of alginates was varied from 12 to 87% and culture broth viscosities were changed within the range of 1.47 and 14 cP, neither the block distribution nor viscosities of alginate samples considerably affected the copper uptake of alginates.

  9. 21 CFR 172.858 - Propylene glycol alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Propylene glycol alginate. 172.858 Section 172.858... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.858 Propylene glycol alginate. The food additive propylene glycol... information required by the act: (1) The name of the additive, “propylene glycol alginate” or...

  10. 21 CFR 172.858 - Propylene glycol alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Propylene glycol alginate. 172.858 Section 172.858... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.858 Propylene glycol alginate. The food additive propylene glycol... information required by the act: (1) The name of the additive, “propylene glycol alginate” or...

  11. 21 CFR 172.858 - Propylene glycol alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Propylene glycol alginate. 172.858 Section 172.858... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.858 Propylene glycol alginate. The food additive propylene glycol... information required by the act: (1) The name of the additive, “propylene glycol alginate” or...

  12. A Non-Destructive Culturing and Cell Sorting Method for Cardiomyocytes and Neurons Using a Double Alginate Layer

    PubMed Central

    Terazono, Hideyuki; Kim, Hyonchol; Hayashi, Masahito; Hattori, Akihiro; Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    A non-destructive method of collecting cultured cells after identifying their in situ functional characteristics is proposed. In this method, cells are cultivated on an alginate layer in a culture dish and released by spot application of a calcium chelate buffer that locally melts the alginate layer and enables the collection of cultured cells at the single-cell level. Primary hippocampal neurons, beating human embryonic stem (hES) cell-derived cardiomyocytes, and beating hES cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters cultivated on an alginate layer were successfully released and collected with a micropipette. The collected cells were recultured while maintaining their physiological function, including beating, and elongated neurites. These results suggest that the proposed method may eventually facilitate the transplantation of ES- or iPS-derived cardiomyocytes and neurons differentiated in culture. PMID:22870332

  13. Relationships between degradability of silk scaffolds and osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyug; Gil, Eun Seok; Kim, Hyeon Joo; Lee, Kyongbum; Kaplan, David L

    2010-08-01

    Bone repairs represent a major focus in orthopedic medicine with biomaterials as a critical aspect of the regenerative process. However, only a limited set of biomaterials are utilized today and few studies relate biomaterial scaffold design to degradation rate and new bone formation. Matching biomaterial remodeling rate towards new bone formation is important in terms of the overall rate and quality of bone regeneration outcomes. We report on the osteogenesis and metabolism of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in 3D silk scaffolds. The scaffolds were prepared with two different degradation rates in order to study relationships between matrix degradation, cell metabolism and bone tissue formation in vitro. SEM, histology, chemical assays, real-time PCR and metabolic analyses were assessed to investigate these relationships. More extensively mineralized ECM formed in the scaffolds designed to degrade more rapidly, based on SEM, von Kossa and type I collagen staining and calcium content. Measures of osteogenic ECM were significantly higher in the more rapidly degrading scaffolds than in the more slowly degrading scaffolds over 56 days of study in vitro. Metabolic analysis, including glucose and lactate levels, confirmed the degradation rate differences with the two types of scaffolds, with the more rapidly degrading scaffolds supporting higher levels of glucose consumption and lactate synthesis by the hMSCs upon osteogenesis, in comparison to the more slowly degrading scaffolds. The results demonstrate that scaffold degradation rates directly impact the metabolism of hMSCs, and in turn the rate of osteogenesis. An understanding of the interplay between cellular metabolism and scaffold degradability should aid in the more rational design of scaffolds for bone regeneration needs both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Novel Biodegradable Porous Scaffold Applied to Skin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Min; Chou, Yi-Ting; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Zhao-Ren; Chen, Chun-Hong; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Skin wound healing is an important lifesaving issue for massive lesions. A novel porous scaffold with collagen, hyaluronic acid and gelatin was developed for skin wound repair. The swelling ratio of this developed scaffold was assayed by water absorption capacity and showed a value of over 20 g water/g dried scaffold. The scaffold was then degraded in time- and dose-dependent manners by three enzymes: lysozyme, hyaluronidase and collagenase I. The average pore diameter of the scaffold was 132.5±8.4 µm measured from SEM images. With human skin cells growing for 7 days, the SEM images showed surface fractures on the scaffold due to enzymatic digestion, indicating the biodegradable properties of this scaffold. To simulate skin distribution, the human epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts were seeded on the porous scaffold and the cross-section immunofluorescent staining demonstrated normal human skin layer distributions. The collagen amount was also quantified after skin cells seeding and presented an amount 50% higher than those seeded on culture wells. The in vivo histological results showed that the scaffold ameliorated wound healing, including decreasing neutrophil infiltrates and thickening newly generated skin compared to the group without treatments. PMID:23762223

  15. 3D Printing of Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration Applications.

    PubMed

    Do, Anh-Vu; Khorsand, Behnoush; Geary, Sean M; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-08-26

    The current need for organ and tissue replacement, repair, and regeneration for patients is continually growing such that supply is not meeting demand primarily due to a paucity of donors as well as biocompatibility issues leading to immune rejection of the transplant. In order to overcome these drawbacks, scientists have investigated the use of scaffolds as an alternative to transplantation. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) by providing structural support as well as promoting attachment, proliferation, and differentiation with the ultimate goal of yielding functional tissues or organs. Initial attempts at developing scaffolds were problematic and subsequently inspired an interest in 3D printing as a mode for generating scaffolds. Utilizing three-dimensional printing (3DP) technologies, ECM-like scaffolds can be produced with a high degree of complexity, where fine details can be included at a micrometer level. In this Review, the criteria for printing viable and functional scaffolds, scaffolding materials, and 3DP technologies used to print scaffolds for tissue engineering are discussed. Creating biofunctional scaffolds could potentially help to meet the demand by patients for tissues and organs without having to wait or rely on donors for transplantation.

  16. Novel biodegradable porous scaffold applied to skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Chou, Yi-Ting; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Chau-Zen; Wang, Zhao-Ren; Chen, Chun-Hong; Ho, Mei-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Skin wound healing is an important lifesaving issue for massive lesions. A novel porous scaffold with collagen, hyaluronic acid and gelatin was developed for skin wound repair. The swelling ratio of this developed scaffold was assayed by water absorption capacity and showed a value of over 20 g water/g dried scaffold. The scaffold was then degraded in time- and dose-dependent manners by three enzymes: lysozyme, hyaluronidase and collagenase I. The average pore diameter of the scaffold was 132.5±8.4 µm measured from SEM images. With human skin cells growing for 7 days, the SEM images showed surface fractures on the scaffold due to enzymatic digestion, indicating the biodegradable properties of this scaffold. To simulate skin distribution, the human epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts were seeded on the porous scaffold and the cross-section immunofluorescent staining demonstrated normal human skin layer distributions. The collagen amount was also quantified after skin cells seeding and presented an amount 50% higher than those seeded on culture wells. The in vivo histological results showed that the scaffold ameliorated wound healing, including decreasing neutrophil infiltrates and thickening newly generated skin compared to the group without treatments.

  17. Compatible compositions based on aqueous polyurethane dispersions and sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Daemi, Hamed; Barikani, Mehdi; Barmar, Mohammad

    2013-01-30

    A series of aqueous polyurethane dispersions were synthesized by the reaction of polytetramethylene glycol and isophorone diisocyanate, extended with dimethylol propionic acid. Their chemical structures were characterized using FTIR, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR, and thermal properties were determined by DMTA. Then, a number of aqueous polyurethane dispersions-sodium alginate (PUD/SA) compositions were prepared by addition of sodium alginate solution with different concentrations into the aqueous polyurethane dispersion. Characterization of chemical structure and thermal properties of these blends were performed by FTIR, EDX and DMTA, respectively. The morphology of the alginate in polyurethane matrix was studied by SEM. The hydrophilicity of the prepared samples decreases by increasing the content of sodium alginate in blends. These observations were attributed to the increase of hydrophilicity of the blends as a consequence of addition of hydrophilic carboxylate, hydroxyl and ether functional groups of the alginate to them.

  18. Maximization of volatile fatty acids production from alginate in acidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hong Duc; Seon, Jiyun; Lee, Seong Chan; Song, Minkyung; Woo, Hee-Chul

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to determine the optimum fermentative condition of alginate with the respect to the simultaneous effects of alginate concentration and initial pH to maximize the production of total volatile fatty acids (TVFAs) and alcohols. The results showed that the alginate fermentation was significantly affected by initial pH than by alginate concentration and there was no interaction between the two variables. The optimum condition was 6.2g alginate/L and initial pH 7.6 with a maximum TVFAs yield of 37.1%. Acetic acids were the main constituents of the TVFAs mixtures (i.e., 71.9-95.5%), while alcohols (i.e., ethanol, butanol, and propanol) were not detected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Alginate microparticles as oral colon drug delivery device: A review.

    PubMed

    Agüero, Lissette; Zaldivar-Silva, Dionisio; Peña, Luis; Dias, Marcos L

    2017-07-15

    The increase in the research interest on alginate microparticles in pharmaceutical and biomedical areas confirms its potential use as an effective matrix for drug and cell delivery. Among the well known alginate properties, pH sensitivity remains as an attractive option for targeting of drug in the colon region. This essential aspect is advantageous to enhance therapeutic efficacy of treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, which require multi-drug administration frequently in a long period. As consequence, severe side effect appears leading to discontinuation of therapy and affecting quality of patient life. This review gives an overview of relevant properties of alginate as oral colon delivery systems and the recent innovative strategies of using alginate with other polymers as well as microencapsulation techniques. At the same time, it describes the several advantages of coating processes involving alginate over microparticles in order to design better material with sustained release characteristic for colon-targeted delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Underwater Contact Behavior of Alginate and Catechol-Conjugated Alginate Hydrogel Beads.

    PubMed

    Cholewinski, Aleksander; Yang, Fut K; Zhao, Boxin

    2017-08-29

    Modifying hydrogels with catechol functionality is a promising approach for improving their mechanical and interfacial properties in water, particularly in biological environments. However, the effects of this modification on hydrogels' contact behavior with soft tissues are not well-studied due to the complexity of hydrogels and lack of suitable techniques to probe this behavior. In addition, modification can alter the mechanical properties of hydrogels, resulting in consequences for adhesive strength as well. In this work, we report an investigation of the contact behavior of alginate hydrogels with and without conjugation of catechol functionality, aiming to elucidate the role of catechol modification on wet adhesion of alginates to a model tissue-like material, gelatin. To directly characterize this soft-on-soft contact, which has commonly been a challenge, we developed an indentation-based contact adhesion measurement using alginate hydrogel beads as the testing probe. We found that <3% conjugation of catechol can significantly improve the adhesion of alginate to gelatin by half an order of magnitude, with this adhesion depending heavily on contact time and pH. In contrast, the reduced elastic modulus from modification resulted in lower adhesive strength on rigid substrates. These findings provide valuable insight into the effects of catechol modification of hydrogels, especially in their interaction with tissue-like soft substrates, as well as a simple method for the direct measurement of time- and pH-dependent hydrogel adhesion behavior underwater.

  1. Modified bacterial cellulose scaffolds for localized doxorubicin release in human colorectal HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Cacicedo, Maximiliano L; León, Ignacio E; Gonzalez, Jimena S; Porto, Luismar M; Alvarez, Vera A; Castro, Guillermo R

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) films modified by the in situ method with the addition of alginate (Alg) during the microbial cultivation of Gluconacetobacter hansenii under static conditions increased the loading of doxorubicin by at least three times. Biophysical analysis of BC-Alg films by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and FTIR showed a highly homogeneous interpenetrated network scaffold without changes in the BC crystalline structure but with an increased amorphous phase. The main molecular interactions determined by FTIR between both biopolymers clearly suggest high compatibility. These results indicate that alginate plays a key role in the biophysical properties of the hybrid BC matrix. BC-Alg scaffold analysis by nitrogen adsorption isotherms revealed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method an increase in surface area of about 84% and in pore volume of more than 200%. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model also showed an increase of about 25% in the pore size compared to the BC film. Loading BC-Alg scaffolds with different amounts of doxorubicin decreased the cell viability of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line compared to the free Dox from around 95-53% after 24h and from 63% to 37% after 48 h. Dox kinetic release from the BC-Alg nanocomposite displayed hyperbolic curves related to the different amounts of drug payload and was stable for at least 14 days. The results of the BC-Alg nanocomposites show a promissory potential for anticancer therapies of solid tumors.

  2. Comparison of some biochemical properties of artichoke polyphenol oxidase entrapped in alginate-carrageenan and alginate gels.

    PubMed

    Yagar, Hulya; Kocaturk, Selin

    2014-08-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC.1.14.18.1) isolated from artichoke (Cynara scolymus) was entrapped within alginate and alginate+ carrageenan beads, and the catecholase and cresolase activities of both entrapped enzymes were determined. Some properties of these immobilized enzymes such as optimum pH and temperature, kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax), thermal, and storage stability were determined and compared to each other. The highest catecholase activity was observed in alginate gel (370 U/g bead) while the highest cresolase activity was in alginate+ carrageenan gel (90 U/g bead). For catecholase and cresolase activities, optimum pHs of alginate and alginate+ carrageenan beads were determined to be 7.0 and 4.0, respectively. Optimum temperatures for catecholase activity were determined to be 40°C for both entrapped enzymes. These values for cresolase activity were 30°C and 20°C, respectively. Immobilized artichoke PPOs greatly preserved their thermal stability which exists anyway. The catalytic efficiency value (Vmax/Km) of the alginate beads is approximately high as two-and-a-half folds of that of alginate+κ-carrageenan beads for cresolase activity. These values were very close for catecholase activity. Immobilized beads saved their both activities after 30 days of storage at 4°C.

  3. Alginate gel-coated oil-entrapped alginate-tamarind gum-magnesium stearate buoyant beads of risperidone.

    PubMed

    Bera, Hriday; Boddupalli, Shashank; Nandikonda, Sridhar; Kumar, Sanoj; Nayak, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A novel alginate gel-coated oil-entrapped calcium-alginate-tamarind gum (TG)-magnesium stearate (MS) composite floating beads was developed for intragastric risperidone delivery with a view to improving its oral bioavailability. The TG-blended alginate core beads containing olive oil and MS as low-density materials were accomplished by ionotropic gelation technique. Effects of polymer-blend ratio (sodium alginate:TG) and crosslinker (CaCl2) concentration on drug entrapment efficiency (DEE, %) and cumulative drug release after 8 h (Q8h, %) were studied to optimize the core beads by a 3(2) factorial design. The optimized beads (F-O) exhibited DEE of 75.19±0.75% and Q8h of 78.04±0.38% with minimum errors in prediction. The alginate gel-coated optimized beads displayed superior buoyancy and sustained drug release property. The drug release profiles of the drug-loaded uncoated and coated beads were best fitted in Higuchi kinetic model with Fickian and anomalous diffusion driven mechanisms, respectively. The optimized beads yielded a notable sustained drug release profile as compared to marketed immediate release preparation. The uncoated and coated Ca-alginate-TG-MS beads were also characterized by SEM, FTIR and P-XRD analyses. Thus, the newly developed alginate-gel coated oil-entrapped alginate-TG-MS composite beads are suitable for intragastric delivery of risperidone over a prolonged period of time.

  4. Ion exchange in alginate gels--dynamic behaviour revealed by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Gabriela; Ariciu, Ana Maria; Smith, David K; Chechik, Victor

    2015-12-14

    The formation of alginate gel from low molecular weight alginate and very low molecular weight alginate in the presence of divalent cations was investigated using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The transition from sol to gel in the presence of divalent cations was monitored by the changes in the dynamics of spin labelled alginate. The immobilisation of the spin labelled alginate in the gel reflects the strength of interaction between the cation and alginate chain. Diffusion experiments showed that both the cation and alginate polyanion in the gel fibres can exchange with molecules in solution. In particular, we showed that dissolved alginate polyanions can replace alginates in the gel fibres, which can hence diffuse through the bulk of the gel. This illustrates the surprisingly highly dynamic nature of these gels and opens up the possibility of preparing multicomponent alginate gels via polyanion exchange process.

  5. [Strategies to choose scaffold materials for tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qingdong; Zhu, Xulong; Xiang, Junxi; Lü, Yi; Li, Jianhui

    2016-02-01

    Current therapies of organ failure or a wide range of tissue defect are often not ideal. Transplantation is the only effective way for long time survival. But it is hard to meet huge patients demands because of donor shortage, immune rejection and other problems. Tissue engineering could be a potential option. Choosing a suitable scaffold material is an essential part of it. According to different sources, tissue engineering scaffold materials could be divided into three types which are natural and its modified materials, artificial and composite ones. The purpose of tissue engineering scaffold is to repair the tissues or organs damage, so could reach the ideal recovery in its function and structure aspect. Therefore, tissue engineering scaffold should even be as close as much to the original tissue or organs in function and structure. We call it "organic scaffold" and this strategy might be the drastic perfect substitute for the tissues or organs in concern. Optimized organization with each kind scaffold materials could make up for biomimetic structure and function of the tissue or organs. Scaffold material surface modification, optimized preparation procedure and cytosine sustained-release microsphere addition should be considered together. This strategy is expected to open new perspectives for tissue engineering. Multidisciplinary approach including material science, molecular biology, and engineering might find the most ideal tissue engineering scaffold. Using the strategy of drawing on each other strength and optimized organization with each kind scaffold material to prepare a multifunctional biomimetic tissue engineering scaffold might be a good method for choosing tissue engineering scaffold materials. Our research group had differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into bile canaliculi like cells. We prepared poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(ε-caprolactone) biliary stent. The scaffold's internal played a part in the long-term release of cytokines which

  6. (*) Central Growth Factor Loaded Depots in Bone Tissue Engineering Scaffolds for Enhanced Cell Attraction.

    PubMed

    Quade, Mandy; Knaack, Sven; Akkineni, Ashwini Rahul; Gabrielyan, Anastasia; Lode, Anja; Rösen-Wolff, Angela; Gelinsky, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Tissue engineering, the application of stem and progenitor cells in combination with an engineered extracellular matrix, is a promising strategy for bone regeneration. However, its success is limited by the lack of vascularization after implantation. The concept of in situ tissue engineering envisages the recruitment of cells necessary for tissue regeneration from the host environment foregoing ex vivo cell seeding of the scaffold. In this study, we developed a novel scaffold system for enhanced cell attraction, which is based on biomimetic mineralized collagen scaffolds equipped with a central biopolymer depot loaded with chemotactic agents. In humid milieu, as after implantation, the signaling factors are expected to slowly diffuse out of the central depot forming a gradient that stimulates directed cell migration toward the scaffold center. Heparin, hyaluronic acid, and alginate have been shown to be capable of depot formation. By using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as model factor, it was demonstrated that the release kinetics can be adjusted by varying the depot composition. While alginate and hyaluronic acid are able to reduce the initial burst and prolong the release of VEGF, the addition of heparin led to a much stronger retention that resulted in an almost linear release over 28 days. The biological activity of released VEGF was proven for all variants using an endothelial cell proliferation assay. Furthermore, migration experiments with endothelial cells revealed a relationship between the degree of VEGF retention and migration distance: cells invaded deepest in scaffolds containing a heparin-based depot indicating that the formation of a steep gradient is crucial for cell attraction. In conclusion, this novel in situ tissue engineering approach, specifically designed to recruit and accommodate endogenous cells upon implantation, appeared highly promising to stimulate cell invasion, which in turn would promote vascularization and finally new

  7. A Transient Cell-Shielding Method for Viable MSC Delivery within Hydrophobic Scaffolds Polymerized In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruijing; Ward, Catherine L.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have emerged as promising approaches for regenerative medicine. Hydrophobic poly(ester urethane)s offer the advantages of robust mechanical properties, cell attachment without the use of peptides, and controlled degradation by oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms. However, the application of injectable hydrophobic polymers to cell delivery is limited by the challenges of protecting cells from reaction products and creating a macroporous architecture post-cure. We designed injectable carriers for cell delivery derived from reactive, hydrophobic polyisocyanate and polyester triol precursors. To overcome cell death caused by reaction products from in situ polymerization, we encapsulated bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) in fast-degrading, oxidized alginate beads prior to mixing with the hydrophobic precursors. Cells survived the polymerization at >70% viability, and rapid dissolution of oxidized alginate beads after the scaffold cured created interconnected macropores that facilitated cellular adhesion to the scaffold in vitro. Applying this injectable system to deliver BMSCs to rat excisional skin wounds showed that the scaffolds supported survival of transplanted cells and infiltration of host cells, which improved new tissue formation compared to both implanted, pre-formed scaffolds seeded with cells and acellular controls. Our design is the first to enable injectable delivery of settable, hydrophobic scaffolds where cell encapsulation provides a mechanism for both temporary cytoprotection during polymerization and rapid formation of macropores post-polymerization. This simple approach provides potential advantages for cell delivery relative to hydrogel technologies, which have weaker mechanical properties and require incorporation of peptides to achieve cell adhesion and degradability. PMID:25907036

  8. Carbon nanotubes as vaccine scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Dao, Tao; Mulvey, Justin J.; Feinberg, Evan; Alidori, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes display characteristics that are potentially useful in their development as scaffolds for vaccine compositions. These features include stability in vivo, lack of intrinsic immunogenicity, low toxicity, and the ability to be appended with multiple copies of antigens. In addition, the particulate nature of carbon nanotubes and their unusual properties of rapid entry into antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, make them especially useful as carriers of antigens. Early attempts demonstrating carbon nanotube-based vaccines can be used in both infectious disease settings and cancer are promising. PMID:23899863

  9. Dimensional changes of alginate dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Nallamuthu, N; Braden, M; Patel, M P

    2006-12-01

    The weight loss and corresponding dimensional changes of two dental alginate impression materials have been studied. The weight loss kinetics indicate this to be a diffusion controlled process, but with a boundary condition at the surface of the concentration decreasing exponentially with time. This is in marked contrast to most desorption processes, where the surface concentration becomes instantaneously zero. The appropriate theory has been developed for an exponential boundary condition, and its predictions compared with experimental data; the agreement was satisfactory. The diffusion coefficients for two thicknesses of the same material were not identical as predicted by theory; the possible reasons for this are discussed.

  10. Magnetically actuated tissue engineered scaffold: insights into mechanism of physical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir-Lekhovitser, Yulia; Rotenberg, Menahem Y.; Jopp, Juergen; Friedman, Gary; Polyak, Boris; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-02-01

    Providing the right stimulatory conditions resulting in efficient tissue promoting microenvironment in vitro and in vivo is one of the ultimate goals in tissue development for regenerative medicine. It has been shown that in addition to molecular signals (e.g. growth factors) physical cues are also required for generation of functional cell constructs. These cues are particularly relevant to engineering of biological tissues, within which mechanical stress activates mechano-sensitive receptors, initiating biochemical pathways which lead to the production of functionally mature tissue. Uniform magnetic fields coupled with magnetizable nanoparticles embedded within three dimensional (3D) scaffold structures remotely create transient physical forces that can be transferrable to cells present in close proximity to the nanoparticles. This study investigated the hypothesis that magnetically responsive alginate scaffold can undergo reversible shape deformation due to alignment of scaffold's walls in a uniform magnetic field. Using custom made Helmholtz coil setup adapted to an Atomic Force Microscope we monitored changes in matrix dimensions in situ as a function of applied magnetic field, concentration of magnetic particles within the scaffold wall structure and rigidity of the matrix. Our results show that magnetically responsive scaffolds exposed to an externally applied time-varying uniform magnetic field undergo a reversible shape deformation. This indicates on possibility of generating bending/stretching forces that may exert a mechanical effect on cells due to alternating pattern of scaffold wall alignment and relaxation. We suggest that the matrix structure deformation is produced by immobilized magnetic nanoparticles within the matrix walls resulting in a collective alignment of scaffold walls upon magnetization. The estimated mechanical force that can be imparted on cells grown on the scaffold wall at experimental conditions is in the order of 1 pN, which

  11. The development of computer-aided system for tissue scaffolds (CASTS) system for functionally graded tissue-engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sudarmadji, Novella; Chua, Chee Kai; Leong, Kah Fai

    2012-01-01

    Computer-aided system for tissue scaffolds (CASTS) is an in-house parametric library of polyhedral units that can be assembled into customized tissue scaffolds. Thirteen polyhedral configurations are available to select, depending on the biological and mechanical requirements of the target tissue/organ. Input parameters include the individual polyhedral units and overall scaffold block as well as the scaffold strut diameter. Taking advantage of its repeatability and reproducibility, the scaffold file is then converted into .STL file and fabricated using selective laser sintering, a rapid prototyping system. CASTS seeks to fulfill anatomical, biological, and mechanical requirements of the target tissue/organ. Customized anatomical scaffold shape is achieved through a Boolean operation between the scaffold block and the tissue defect image. Biological requirements, such as scaffold pore size and porosity, are unique for different type of cells. Matching mechanical properties, such as stiffness and strength, between the scaffold and target organ is very important, particularly in the regeneration of load-bearing organ, i.e., bone. This includes mimicking the compressive stiffness variation across the bone to prevent stress shielding and ensuring that the scaffold can withstand the load normally borne by the bone. The stiffness variation is tailored by adjusting the scaffold porosity based on the porosity-stiffness relationship of the CASTS scaffolds. Two types of functional gradients based on the gradient direction include radial and axial/linear gradient. Radial gradient is useful in the case of regenerating a section of long bones while the gradient in linear direction can be used in short or irregular bones. Stiffness gradient in the radial direction is achieved by using cylindrical unit cells arranged in a concentric manner, in which the porosity decreases from the center of the structure toward the outside radius, making the scaffold stiffer at the outer radius

  12. Alginate therapy is effective treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Leiman, D A; Riff, B P; Morgan, S; Metz, D C; Falk, G W; French, B; Umscheid, C A; Lewis, J D

    2016-09-26

    In patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and erosive esophagitis, treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is highly effective. However, in some patients, especially those with non-erosive reflux disease or atypical GERD symptoms, acid suppressive therapy with PPIs is not as successful. Alginates are medications that work through an alternative mechanism by displacing the post-prandial gastric acid pocket. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the benefit of alginate-containing compounds in the treatment of patients with symptoms of GERD.PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane library electronic databases were searched through October 2015 for randomized controlled trials comparing alginate-containing compounds to placebo, antacids, histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) or PPIs for the treatment of GERD symptoms. Additional studies were identified through bibliography review. Non-English studies and those with pediatric patients were excluded. Meta-analyses were performed using random-effects models to calculate odds ratios (OR). Heterogeneity between studies was estimated using the I(2) statistic. Analyses were stratified by type of comparator. The search strategy yielded 665 studies and 15 (2.3%) met inclusion criteria. Fourteen were included in the meta-analysis (N = 2095 subjects). Alginate-based therapies increased the odds of resolution of GERD symptoms when compared to placebo or antacids (OR: 4.42; 95% CI 2.45-7.97) with a moderate degree of heterogeneity between studies (I(2)  = 71%, P = .001). Compared to PPIs or H2RAs, alginates appear less effective but the pooled estimate was not statistically significant (OR: 0.58; 95% CI 0.27-1.22). Alginates are more effective than placebo or antacids for treating GERD symptoms.

  13. Heterogeneity of Scaffold Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lauren; McNamara, Kyle; Wong, Theresa; Tamburrini, Riccardo; Katari, Ravi; Orlando, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) offers a potential solution for the shortage of transplantable organs and the need for novel methods of tissue repair. Methods of TE have advanced significantly in recent years, but there are challenges to using engineered tissues and organs including but not limited to: biocompatibility, immunogenicity, biodegradation, and toxicity. Analysis of biomaterials used as scaffolds may, however, elucidate how TE can be enhanced. Ideally, biomaterials should closely mimic the characteristics of desired organ, their function and their in vivo environments. A review of biomaterials used in TE highlighted natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and decellularized organs as sources of scaffolding. Studies of discarded organs supported that decellularization offers a remedy to reducing waste of donor organs, but does not yet provide an effective solution to organ demand because it has shown varied success in vivo depending on organ complexity and physiological requirements. Review of polymer-based scaffolds revealed that a composite scaffold formed by copolymerization is more effective than single polymer scaffolds because it allows copolymers to offset disadvantages a single polymer may possess. Selection of biomaterials for use in TE is essential for transplant success. There is not, however, a singular biomaterial that is universally optimal. PMID:28773457

  14. CRYOPRESERVATION EFFECTS ON RECOMBINANT MYOBLASTS ENCAPSULATED IN ADHESIVE ALGINATE HYDROGELS

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Hajira F.; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2013-01-01

    Cell encapsulation in hydrogels is widely used in tissue engineering applications, including encapsulation of islets or other insulin-secreting cells in pancreatic substitutes. Use of adhesive, bio-functionalized hydrogels is receiving increasing attention, as cell-matrix interactions in 3-D can be important for various cell processes. With pancreatic substitutes, studies have indicated benefits of 3-D adhesion on the viability and/or function of insulin-secreting cells. As long-term storage of microencapsulated cells is critical for their clinical translation, cryopreservation of cells in hydrogels is actively being investigated. Previous studies have examined the cryopreservation response of cells encapsulated in non-adhesive hydrogels using conventional freezing and/or vitrification (ice-free cryopreservation), however, none have systematically compared the two cryopreservation methods with cells encapsulated within an adhesive 3-D environment. The latter would be significant, as evidence suggests adhesion influences cellular response to cryopreservation. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the response to conventional freezing and vitrification of insulin-secreting cells encapsulated in an adhesive biomimetic hydrogel. Recombinant insulin-secreting C2C12 myoblasts were encapsulated in oxidized RGD-alginate and cultured 1 or 4 days post-encapsulation, cryopreserved, and assessed up to 3 days post-warming for metabolic activity and insulin secretion, and one day post-warming for cell morphology. Besides certain transient differences of the vitrified group relative to the Fresh control, both conventional freezing and vitrification maintained metabolism, secretion and morphology of the recombinant C2C12 cells. Thus, due to a simpler procedure and slightly superior results, conventional freezing is recommended over vitrification for the cryopreservation of C2C12 cells in oxidized RGD-modified alginate. PMID:23499987

  15. Cell infiltration and growth in a low density, uncompressed three-dimensional electrospun nanofibrous scaffold.

    PubMed

    Blakeney, Bryan A; Tambralli, Ajay; Anderson, Joel M; Andukuri, Adinarayana; Lim, Dong-Jin; Dean, Derrick R; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2011-02-01

    A limiting factor of traditional electrospinning is that the electrospun scaffolds consist entirely of tightly packed nanofiber layers that only provide a superficial porous structure due to the sheet-like assembly process. This unavoidable characteristic hinders cell infiltration and growth throughout the nanofibrous scaffolds. Numerous strategies have been tried to overcome this challenge, including the incorporation of nanoparticles, using larger microfibers, or removing embedded salt or water-soluble fibers to increase porosity. However, these methods still produce sheet-like nanofibrous scaffolds, failing to create a porous three-dimensional scaffold with good structural integrity. Thus, we have developed a three-dimensional cotton ball-like electrospun scaffold that consists of an accumulation of nanofibers in a low density and uncompressed manner. Instead of a traditional flat-plate collector, a grounded spherical dish and an array of needle-like probes were used to create a Focused, Low density, Uncompressed nanoFiber (FLUF) mesh scaffold. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the cotton ball-like scaffold consisted of electrospun nanofibers with a similar diameter but larger pores and less-dense structure compared to the traditional electrospun scaffolds. In addition, laser confocal microscopy demonstrated an open porosity and loosely packed structure throughout the depth of the cotton ball-like scaffold, contrasting the superficially porous and tightly packed structure of the traditional electrospun scaffold. Cells seeded on the cotton ball-like scaffold infiltrated into the scaffold after 7 days of growth, compared to no penetrating growth for the traditional electrospun scaffold. Quantitative analysis showed approximately a 40% higher growth rate for cells on the cotton ball-like scaffold over a 7 day period, possibly due to the increased space for in-growth within the three-dimensional scaffolds. Overall, this method assembles a nanofibrous scaffold

  16. Review: development of clinically relevant scaffolds for vascularised bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuchun; Lim, Jing; Teoh, Swee-Hin

    2013-01-01

    Clinical translation of scaffold-based bone tissue engineering (BTE) therapy still faces many challenges despite intense investigations and advancement over the years. To address these clinical barriers, it is important to analyse the current technical challenges in constructing a clinically relevant scaffold and subsequent clinical issues relating to bone repair. This review highlights the key challenges hampering widespread clinical translation of scaffold-based vascularised BTE, with a focus on the repair of large non-union defects. The main limitations of current scaffolds include the lack of sufficient vascularisation, insufficient mechanical strength as well as issues relating to the osseointegration of the bioresorbable scaffold and bone infection management. Critical insights on the current trends of scaffold technologies and future directions for advancing next-generation BTE scaffolds into the clinical realm are discussed. Considerations concerning regulatory approval and the route towards commercialisation of the scaffolds for widespread clinical utility will also be introduced. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydroxyapatite reinforced inherent RGD containing silk fibroin composite scaffolds: Promising platform for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Behera, Sibaram; Naskar, Deboki; Sapru, Sunaina; Bhattacharjee, Promita; Dey, Tuli; Ghosh, Ananta K; Mandal, Mahitosh; Kundu, Subhas C

    2017-03-08

    Replacement and repair of ectopic bone defects and traumatized bone tissues are done using porous scaffolds and composites. The prerequisites for such scaffolds include high mechanical strength, osseoconductivity and cytocompatibility. The present work is designed to address such requirements by fabricating a reinforced cytocompatible scaffold. Biocompatible silk protein fibroin collected from tropical non-mulberry tasar silkworm (Antheraea mylitta) is used to fabricate fibroin-hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocomposite particles using chemical precipitation method. In situ reinforcement of fibroin-HAp nanocomposite and external deposition of HAp particles on fibroin scaffold is carried out for comparative evaluations of bio-physical and biochemical characteristics. HAp deposited fibroin scaffolds provide greater mechanical strength and cytocompatibility, when compared with fibroin-HAp nanoparticles reinforced fibroin scaffolds. Minimal immune responses of both types of composite scaffolds are observed using osteoblast-macrophage co-culture model. Nanocomposite reinforced fibroin scaffold can be tailored further to accommodate different requirements depending on bone type or bone regeneration period.

  18. L_RNA_scaffolder: scaffolding genomes with transcripts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Generation of large mate-pair libraries is necessary for de novo genome assembly but the procedure is complex and time-consuming. Furthermore, in some complex genomes, it is hard to increase the N50 length even with large mate-pair libraries, which leads to low transcript coverage. Thus, it is necessary to develop other simple scaffolding approaches, to at least solve the elongation of transcribed fragments. Results We describe L_RNA_scaffolder, a novel genome scaffolding method that uses long transcriptome reads to order, orient and combine genomic fragments into larger sequences. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method, the zebrafish genome was scaffolded. With expanded human transcriptome data, the N50 of human genome was doubled and L_RNA_scaffolder out-performed most scaffolding results by existing scaffolders which employ mate-pair libraries. In these two examples, the transcript coverage was almost complete, especially for long transcripts. We applied L_RNA_scaffolder to the highly polymorphic pearl oyster draft genome and the gene model length significantly increased. Conclusions The simplicity and high-throughput of RNA-seq data makes this approach suitable for genome scaffolding. L_RNA_scaffolder is available at http://www.fishbrowser.org/software/L_RNA_scaffolder. PMID:24010822

  19. Molecular engineering of manipulated alginate-based polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Daemi, Hamed; Barikani, Mehdi

    2014-11-04

    The novel soluble alginate-based polyurethanes in organic solvents were synthesized by the reaction of NCO-terminated prepolymers and tributylammonium alginate (TBA-Alg) for the first time. The chemical structures of synthesized polyurethanes were characterized using FTIR, (1)H NMR and TGA. The reaction completion was confirmed by disappearing of NCO band in FTIR spectra. Furthermore, a peak at 4.71 ppm and some small peaks at a range of 4.12-4.37 ppm in the (1)H NMR of alginate-based polyurethanes were assigned to the backbone of alginate. The results of both FTIR and (1)H NMR were remarkably confirmed by TGA data. The ionic nature of polyurethane backbone not only affects on thermal properties of samples, but it also changes the chemically-bonded alginate morphology. Both polyether and polyester based non-ionic polyurethanes extended by TBA-Alg illustrated the distinct alginate, whereas those ionomers extended by alginate were appeared as the continuous systems at nanoscale.

  20. Strontium- and zinc-alginate hydrogels for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Place, Elsie S; Rojo, Luis; Gentleman, Eileen; Sardinha, José P; Stevens, Molly M

    2011-11-01

    The development of bone replacement materials is an important healthcare objective due to the drawbacks of treating defects with bone autografts. In this work we propose a bone tissue engineering approach in which arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-modified alginate hydrogels are crosslinked with bioactive strontium and zinc ions as well as calcium. Strontium was chosen for its ability to stimulate bone formation, and zinc is essential for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Calcium and strontium gels had similar stiffnesses but different stabilities over time. Strontium gels made with alginate with a high percentage of guluronic acid residues (high G) were slow to degrade, whereas those made with alginate rich in mannuronic acid (high M) degraded more quickly, and supported proliferation of Saos-2 osteoblast-like cells. After an initial burst, strontium release from alginate gels was steady and sustained, and the magnitude of release from high M gels was biologically relevant. Saos-2 cultured within alginate gels upregulated the osteoblast phenotypic marker genes RUNX2, collagen I (COL1A1) and bone sialoprotein (BSP), and ALP protein activity was highest in alginate gels cast with strontium ions. This strategy has the potential to be combined with other alginate-based systems for bone tissue engineering, or adapted to other tissue engineering applications.

  1. Preparation and characterization of amidated derivatives of alginic acid.

    PubMed

    Taubner, Tomáš; Marounek, Milan; Synytsya, Andriy

    2017-10-01

    Alginic acid is a suitable material for modification to prepare new derivatives because of presence of its carboxyl groups. The high content of carboxyl groups over the entire length of its chain renders it an easily modifiable material with a possibility of achieving a high degree of substitution in the prepared derivatives. The salt of alginic acid (sodium alginate) is readily commercially available and is widely used in many branches of chemistry. Alginic acid was thus selected as the substrate for amidation. The amidation used two-steps: methyl esterification followed by amino-de-alkoxylation. The aim of this study was to prepare highly substituted derivatives with different polysaccharide chain characteristics. As such, the alginic acid was modified by the two-step amidation based on the esterification of the alginic acid carboxyl groups by reaction with methanol and further amino-de-alkoxylation (aminolysis) of the obtained methyl ester with amidation reagents (n-alkylamines, hydrazine and hydroxylamine). The purity and substitution degree of the prepared derivatives were monitored by vibration spectroscopic methods (FTIR and FT Raman) and organic elemental analysis. These analytical methods confirmed the preparation of highly or moderately substituted N-alkylamides, hydrazide and hydroxamic acid of alginic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrospun Silk Biomaterial Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Reagan, Michaela R; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile technique that enables the development of nanofiber-based biomaterial scaffolds. Scaffolds can be generated that are useful for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine since they mimic the nanoscale properties of certain fibrous components of the native extracellular matrix in tissues. Silk is a natural protein with excellent biocompatibility, remarkable mechanical properties as well as tailorable degradability. Integrating these protein polymer advantages with electrospinning results in scaffolds with combined biochemical, topographical and mechanical cues with versatility for a range of biomaterial, cell and tissue studies and applications. This review covers research related to electrospinning of silk, including process parameters, post treatment of the spun fibers, functionalization of nanofibers, and the potential applications for these material systems in regenerative medicine. Research challenges and future trends are also discussed. PMID:19643154

  3. Silk fibroin scaffolds for urologic tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Bryan S.; Mauney, Joshua R.; Estrada, Carlos R.

    2016-01-01

    Urologic tissue engineering efforts have been largely focused on bladder and urethral defect repair. The current surgical gold standard for treatment of poorly compliant pathological bladders and severe urethral stricture disease is enterocystoplasty and onlay urethroplasty with autologous tissue, respectively. The complications associated with autologous tissue use and harvesting have led to efforts to develop tissue-engineered alternatives. Natural and synthetic materials have been used with varying degrees of success, but none has proved consistently reliable for urologic tissue defect repair in humans. Silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds have been tested in bladder and urethral repair because of their favorable biomechanical properties including structural strength, elasticity, biodegradability and biocompatibility. SF scaffolds have been used in multiple animal models, and have demonstrated robust regeneration of smooth muscle and urothelium. The pre-clinical data involving SF scaffolds in urologic defect repair are encouraging and suggest that they hold potential for future clinical use. PMID:26801192

  4. Immune response to biologic scaffold materials.

    PubMed

    Badylak, Stephen F; Gilbert, Thomas W

    2008-04-01

    Biologic scaffold materials composed of mammalian extracellular matrix are commonly used in regenerative medicine and in surgical procedures for the reconstruction of numerous tissue and organs. These biologic materials are typically allogeneic or xenogeneic in origin and are derived from tissues such as small intestine, urinary bladder, dermis, and pericardium. The innate and acquired host immune response to these biologic materials and the effect of the immune response upon downstream remodeling events has been largely unexplored. Variables that affect the host response include manufacturing processes, the rate of scaffold degradation, and the presence of cross species antigens. This manuscript provides an overview of studies that have evaluated the immune response to biologic scaffold materials and variables that affect this response.

  5. Producing ORMOSIL scaffolds by femtosecond laser polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A.; Zamfirescu, M.; Radu, C.; Buruiana, E. C.; Buruiana, T.; Mustaciosu, C.; Petcu, I.; Radu, M.; Dinescu, M.

    2012-07-01

    Structures with different geometries and sizes were built via direct femtosecond laser writing, starting from new organic/inorganic hybrid monomers based on hybrid methacrylate containing triethoxysilane, in addition to urethane and urea groups. Multifunctional oligomer of urethane dimethacrylate type was chosen as comonomer in polymerization experiments because dimethacrylates give rise to the formation of a polymer network, having a number of favorable properties including biocompatibility and surface nanostructuring. Free standing polymeric structures were designed and created in order to be tested in fibroblast cells culture. Investigations of the cellular adhesion, proliferation, and viability of L929 mouse fibroblasts on free-standing laser processed scaffolds were performed for different scaffold designs.

  6. Microporous dermal-like electrospun scaffolds promote accelerated skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bonvallet, Paul P; Culpepper, Bonnie K; Bain, Jennifer L; Schultz, Matthew J; Thomas, Steven J; Bellis, Susan L

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this study was to synthesize skin substitutes that blend native extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules with synthetic polymers which have favorable mechanical properties. To this end, scaffolds were electrospun from collagen I (col) and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and then pores were introduced mechanically to promote fibroblast infiltration, and subsequent filling of the pores with ECM. A 70:30 col/PCL ratio was determined to provide optimal support for dermal fibroblast growth, and a pore diameter, 160 μm, was identified that enabled fibroblasts to infiltrate and fill pores with native matrix molecules, including fibronectin and collagen I. Mechanical testing of 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with 160 μm pores revealed a tensile strength of 1.4 MPa, and the scaffolds also exhibited a low rate of contraction (<19%). Upon implantation, scaffolds should support epidermal regeneration; we, therefore, evaluated keratinocyte growth on fibroblast-embedded scaffolds with matrix-filled pores. Keratinocytes formed a stratified layer on the surface of fibroblast-remodeled scaffolds, and staining for cytokeratin 10 revealed terminally differentiated keratinocytes at the apical surface. When implanted, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds degraded within 3-4 weeks, an optimal time frame for degradation in vivo. Finally, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with or without 160 μm pores were implanted into full-thickness critical-sized skin defects. Relative to nonporous scaffolds or sham wounds, scaffolds with 160 μm pores induced accelerated wound closure, and stimulated regeneration of healthy dermal tissue, evidenced by a more normal-appearing matrix architecture, blood vessel in-growth, and hair follicle development. Collectively, these results suggest that microporous electrospun scaffolds are effective substrates for skin regeneration.

  7. Microporous Dermal-Like Electrospun Scaffolds Promote Accelerated Skin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bonvallet, Paul P.; Culpepper, Bonnie K.; Bain, Jennifer L.; Schultz, Matthew J.; Thomas, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to synthesize skin substitutes that blend native extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules with synthetic polymers which have favorable mechanical properties. To this end, scaffolds were electrospun from collagen I (col) and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and then pores were introduced mechanically to promote fibroblast infiltration, and subsequent filling of the pores with ECM. A 70:30 col/PCL ratio was determined to provide optimal support for dermal fibroblast growth, and a pore diameter, 160 μm, was identified that enabled fibroblasts to infiltrate and fill pores with native matrix molecules, including fibronectin and collagen I. Mechanical testing of 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with 160 μm pores revealed a tensile strength of 1.4 MPa, and the scaffolds also exhibited a low rate of contraction (<19%). Upon implantation, scaffolds should support epidermal regeneration; we, therefore, evaluated keratinocyte growth on fibroblast-embedded scaffolds with matrix-filled pores. Keratinocytes formed a stratified layer on the surface of fibroblast-remodeled scaffolds, and staining for cytokeratin 10 revealed terminally differentiated keratinocytes at the apical surface. When implanted, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds degraded within 3–4 weeks, an optimal time frame for degradation in vivo. Finally, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with or without 160 μm pores were implanted into full-thickness critical-sized skin defects. Relative to nonporous scaffolds or sham wounds, scaffolds with 160 μm pores induced accelerated wound closure, and stimulated regeneration of healthy dermal tissue, evidenced by a more normal-appearing matrix architecture, blood vessel in-growth, and hair follicle development. Collectively, these results suggest that microporous electrospun scaffolds are effective substrates for skin regeneration. PMID:24568584

  8. Autologous fibrin scaffolds cultured dermal fibroblasts and enriched with encapsulated bFGF for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Ludeña, Dolores; Fernández, Ana; Aranda, Jose L; Varela, Gonzalo; Iglesias, Javier

    2011-12-15

    Autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs) enriched with cells and specific growth factors represent a promising biocompatible scaffold for tissue engineering. Here, we analyzed the in vitro behavior of dermal fibroblasts (DFs) (cellular attachment, distribution, viability and proliferation, histological and immunohistochemical changes), comparing AFS with and without alginate microcapsules loaded with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), to validate our scaffold in a future animal model in vivo. In all cases, DFs showed good adhesion and normal distribution, while in scaffolds with bFGF at 14 days, the cell counts detected in proliferation and viability assays were greatly improved, as was the proliferative state, and there was a decrease in muscle specific actin expression and collagen synthesis in comparison with the scaffolds without bFGF. In addition, the use of plasma without fibrinogen concentration methods, together with the maximum controlled release of bFGF at 14 days, favored cell proliferation. To conclude, we have been able to create an AFS enriched with fully functional DFs and release-controlled bFGF that could be used in multiple applications for tissue engineering.

  9. Alginate-based hybrid aerogel microparticles for mucosal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, V S S; Gurikov, P; Poejo, J; Matias, A A; Heinrich, S; Duarte, C M M; Smirnova, I

    2016-10-01

    The application of biopolymer aerogels as drug delivery systems (DDS) has gained increased interest during the last decade since these structures have large surface area and accessible pores allowing for high drug loadings. Being biocompatible, biodegradable and presenting low toxicity, polysaccharide-based aerogels are an attractive carrier to be applied in pharmaceutical industry. Moreover, some polysaccharides (e.g. alginate and chitosan) present mucoadhesive properties, an important feature for mucosal drug delivery. This feature allows to extend the contact of DDS with biological membranes, thereby increasing the absorption of drugs through the mucosa. Alginate-based hybrid aerogels in the form of microparticles (<50μm) were investigated in this work as carriers for mucosal administration of drugs. Low methoxyl pectin and κ-carrageenan were co-gelled with alginate and further dried with supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2). Spherical mesoporous aerogel microparticles were obtained for alginate, hybrid alginate/pectin and alginate/κ-carrageenan aerogels, presenting high specific surface area (370-548m(2)g(-1)) and mucoadhesive properties. The microparticles were loaded with ketoprofen via adsorption from its solution in sc-CO2, and with quercetin via supercritical anti-solvent precipitation. Loading of ketoprofen was in the range between 17 and 22wt% whereas quercetin demonstrated loadings of 3.1-5.4wt%. Both the drugs were present in amorphous state. Loading procedure allowed the preservation of antioxidant activity of quercetin. Release of both drugs from alginate/κ-carrageenan aerogel was slightly faster compared to alginate/pectin. The results indicate that alginate-based aerogel microparticles can be viewed as promising matrices for mucosal drug delivery applications.

  10. An anomalous behavior of trypsin immobilized in alginate network.

    PubMed

    Ganachaud, Chrystelle; Bernin, Diana; Isaksson, Dan; Holmberg, Krister

    2013-05-01

    Alginate is a biopolymer used in drug formulations and for surgical purposes. In the presence of divalent cations, it forms solid gels, and such gels are of interest for immobilization of cells and enzymes. In this work, we entrapped trypsin in an alginate gel together with a known substrate, N α-benzoyl-L-arginine-4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (L-BAPNA), and in the presence or absence of D-BAPNA, which is known to be a competitive inhibitor. Interactions between alginate and the substrate as well as the enzyme were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, rheology, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biocatalysis was monitored by spectrophotometry at temperatures ranging from 10 to 42 °C. It was found that at 37 and 42 °C a strong acceleration of the reaction was obtained, whereas at 10 °C and at room temperature, the presence of D-BAPNA leads to a retardation of the reaction rate. The same effect was found when the reaction was performed in a non-cross-linked alginate solution. In alginate-free buffer solution, as well as in a solution of carboxymethylcellulose, a biopolymer that resembles alginate, the normal behavior was obtained; however, with D-BAPNA acting as an inhibitor at all temperatures. A more detailed investigation of the reaction kinetics showed that at higher temperature and in the presence of alginate, the curve of initial reaction rate versus L-BAPNA concentration had a sigmoidal shape, indicating an allosteric behavior. We believe that the anomalous behavior of trypsin in the presence of alginate is due to conformational changes caused by interactions between the positively charged trypsin and the strongly negatively charged alginate.

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Islets of Langerhans Encapsulated in Alginate

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy S.; O'Sullivan, Esther; D'Aoust, Laura N.; Omer, Abdulkadir; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Fisher, Robert J.; Weir, Gordon C.

    2011-01-01

    Improved methods have recently been developed for assessing islet viability and quantity in human islet preparations for transplantation, and these measurements have proven useful for predicting transplantation outcome. The objectives of this study were to adapt these methods for use with microencapsulated islets, to verify that they provide meaningful quantitative measurements, and to test them with two model systems: (1) barium alginate and (2) barium alginate containing a 70% (w/v) perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion, which presents challenges to use of these assays and is of interest in its own right as a means for reducing oxygen supply limitations to encapsulated tissue. Mitochondrial function was assessed by oxygen consumption rate measurements, and the analysis of data was modified to account for the increased solubility of oxygen in the PFC-alginate capsules. Capsules were dissolved and tissue recovered for nuclei counting to measure the number of cells. Capsule volume was determined from alginate or PFC content and used to normalize measurements. After low oxygen culture for 2 days, islets in normal alginate lost substantial viable tissue and displayed necrotic cores, whereas most of the original oxygen consumption rate was recovered with PFC alginate, and little necrosis was observed. All nuclei were recovered with normal alginate, but some nuclei from nonrespiring cells were lost with PFC alginate. Biocompatibility tests revealed toxicity at the islet periphery associated with the lipid emulsion used to provide surfactants during the emulsification process. We conclude that these new assay methods can be applied to islets encapsulated in materials as complex as PFC-alginate. Measurements made with these materials revealed that enhancement of oxygen permeability of the encapsulating material with a concentrated PFC emulsion improves survival of encapsulated islets under hypoxic conditions, but reformulation of the PFC emulsion is needed to reduce toxicity

  12. Microfluidic chip-based synthesis of alginate microspheres for encapsulation of immortalized human cells

    PubMed Central

    Workman, V. L.; Dunnett, S. B.; Kille, P.; Palmer, D. D.

    2007-01-01

    Cellular transplantation is a promising technology with great clinical potential in regenerative medicine and disease management. However, effective control over patient immunological response is essential. The encapsulation of cells within hydrogel microspheres is an increasingly prevalent method for the protection of cellular grafts from immune rejection. Microfluidic “chip” reactors present elegant solutions to several capsule generation issues, including the requirement for intercapsule uniformity, high reproducibility, and sterile, good manufacturing practice compliance. This study presents a novel method for the on-chip production of stable, highly monodisperse alginate microspheres and demonstrates its utility in the encapsulation of an immortalized human-derived cell line. Four populations of immortalized human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) were encapsulated on chip within monodisperse alginate capsules. Cell viability measurements were recorded for each of the four encapsulated populations for 90 days. PMID:19693354

  13. Chitosan-alginate membranes accelerate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Guilherme Ferreira; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Leite, Marcel Nani; Bueno, Cecilia Zorzi; Moraes, Ângela Maria; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chitosan-alginate membrane to accelerate wound healing in experimental cutaneous wounds. Two wounds were performed in Wistar rats by punching (1.5 cm diameter), treated with membranes moistened with saline solution (CAM group) or with saline only (SL group). After 2, 7, 14, and 21 days of surgery, five rats of each group were euthanized and reepithelialization was evaluated. The wounds/scars were harvested for histological, flow cytometry, neutrophil infiltrate, and hydroxyproline analysis. CAM group presented higher inflammatory cells recruitment as compared to SL group on 2(nd) day. On the 7(th) day, CAM group showed higher CD11b(+) level and lower of neutrophils than SL group. The CAM group presented higher CD4(+) cells influx than SL group on 2(nd) day, but it decreased during the follow up and became lower on 14(th) and 21(st) days. Higher fibroplasia was noticed on days 7 and 14 as well as higher collagenesis on 21(st) in the CAM group in comparison to SL group. CAM group showed faster reepithelialization on 7(th) day than SL group, although similar in other days. In conclusion, chitosan-alginate membrane modulated the inflammatory phase, stimulated fibroplasia and collagenesis, accelerating wound healing process in rats.

  14. Scaffold: Quantum Programming Language

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-24

    hardware languages (System-C) [14] and existing quantum programming languages ( QCL ) [23]. • Variant of C and Verilog: Scaffold syntax was chosen to be...Quantum Information. Cam- bridge University Press. [23] B. Ömer, “Quantum Programming in QCL ,” January 2000, Master’s Thesis, Technical Uni- versity

  15. Scaffolding Reading Comprehension Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Ashraf Atta Mohamed Safein

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigates whether English language teachers use scaffolding strategies for developing their students' reading comprehension skills or just for assessing their comprehension. It also tries to demonstrate whether teachers are aware of these strategies or they use them as a matter of habit. A questionnaire as well as structured…

  16. Scaffold library for tissue engineering: a geometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chantarapanich, Nattapon; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Sucharitpwatskul, Sedthawatt; Jeamwatthanachai, Pongnarin; Inglam, Samroeng; Sitthiseripratip, Kriskrai

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffold is a biological substitute that aims to restore, to maintain, or to improve tissue functions. Currently available manufacturing technology, that is, additive manufacturing is essentially applied to fabricate the scaffold according to the predefined computer aided design (CAD) model. To develop scaffold CAD libraries, the polyhedrons could be used in the scaffold libraries development. In this present study, one hundred and nineteen polyhedron models were evaluated according to the established criteria. The proposed criteria included considerations on geometry, manufacturing feasibility, and mechanical strength of these polyhedrons. CAD and finite element (FE) method were employed as tools in evaluation. The result of evaluation revealed that the close-cellular scaffold included truncated octahedron, rhombicuboctahedron, and rhombitruncated cuboctahedron. In addition, the suitable polyhedrons for using as open-cellular scaffold libraries included hexahedron, truncated octahedron, truncated hexahedron, cuboctahedron, rhombicuboctahedron, and rhombitruncated cuboctahedron. However, not all pore size to beam thickness ratios (PO:BT) were good for making the open-cellular scaffold. The PO:BT ratio of each library, generating the enclosed pore inside the scaffold, was excluded to avoid the impossibility of material removal after the fabrication. The close-cellular libraries presented the constant porosity which is irrespective to the different pore sizes. The relationship between PO:BT ratio and porosity of open-cellular scaffold libraries was displayed in the form of Logistic Power function. The possibility of merging two different types of libraries to produce the composite structure was geometrically evaluated in terms of the intersection index and was mechanically evaluated by means of FE analysis to observe the stress level. The couples of polyhedrons presenting low intersection index and high stress level were excluded. Good couples for

  17. Chemical modification of alginic acid by ultrasonic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdzheva, Dilyana; Denev, Panteley

    2016-03-01

    Abstract: Chemical modification of alginic acid has been done by ultrasonic irradiation to obtain its methylated, ethylated and isopropylated derivatives. The influence of ultrasonic frequency and power on esterification process of alginic acid has been investigated. Alginate derivatives have been characterized by degree of esterification (DE) and IR-FT spectroscopy. It has been found that 45 kHz ultrasonic frequency accelerated modification process as reduced the reaction time from 16 hours to 2 hours. The obtained results showed that ultrasound irradiation increased the reaction efficiency in methanol and depended on the ratio of the M/G.

  18. Microbial alginate dressings show improved binding capacity for pathophysiological factors in chronic wounds compared to commercial alginate dressings of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Melissa; Gebhard, Florian; Hammer, Timo; Zurek, Christian; Meurer, Guido; Marquardt, Christoph; Hoefer, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Marine alginates are well established in wound management. Compared with different modern wound dressings, marine alginates cannot prove superior effects on wound healing. Alginates from bacteria have never been studied for medical applications so far, although the microbial polymer raises expectations for improved binding of wound factors because of its unique O-acetylation. Due to its possible positive effects on wound healing, alginates from bacteria might be a superior future medical product for clinical use. To prove the binding capacity of microbial alginates to pathophysiological factors in chronic wounds, we processed microbial alginate fibres, produced from fermentation of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii ATCC 9046, into needle web dressings and compared them with commercial dressings made of marine alginate. Four dressings were assessed: Marine alginate dressings containing either ionic silver or zinc/manganese/calcium, and microbial alginate dressings with and without nanosilver. All dressings were tested in an in vitro approach for influence on chronic wound parameters such as elastase, matrix metalloproteases-2, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-8, and free radical formation. Despite the alginate origin or addition of antimicrobials, all dressings were able to reduce the concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-8. However, microbial alginate was found to bind considerable larger amounts of elastase and matrix metalloproteases-2 in contrast to the marine alginate dressings. The incorporation of zinc, silver or nanosilver into alginate fibres did not improve their binding capacity for proteases or cytokines. The addition of nanosilver slightly enhanced the antioxidant capacity of microbial alginate dressings, whereas the marine alginate dressing containing zinc/manganese/calcium was unable to inhibit the formation of free radicals. The enhanced binding affinity by microbial alginate of Azotobacter vinelandii to

  19. Design Strategies of Biodegradable Scaffolds for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Khalil N; Zakhem, Elie

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous available biodegradable materials that can be used as scaffolds in regenerative medicine. Currently, there is a huge emphasis on the designing phase of the scaffolds. Materials can be designed to have different properties in order to match the specific application. Modifying scaffolds enhances their bioactivity and improves the regeneration capacity. Modifications of the scaffolds can be later characterized using several tissue engineering tools. In addition to the material, cell source is an important component of the regeneration process. Modified materials must be able to support survival and growth of different cell types. Together, cells and modified biomaterials contribute to the remodeling of the engineered tissue, which affects its performance. This review focuses on the recent advancements in the designs of the scaffolds including the physical and chemical modifications. The last part of this review also discusses designing processes that involve viability of cells. PMID:25288907

  20. Engineered yeast whole-cell biocatalyst for direct degradation of alginate from macroalgae and production of non-commercialized useful monosaccharide from alginate.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Toshiyuki; Yokoi, Takahiro; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Alginate is a major component of brown macroalgae. In macroalgae, an endolytic alginate lyase first degrades alginate into oligosaccharides. These oligosaccharides are further broken down into monosaccharides by an exolytic alginate lyase. In this study, genes encoding various alginate lyases derived from alginate-assimilating marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans were isolated, and their enzymes were displayed using the yeast cell surface display system. Alg7A-, Alg7D-, and Alg18J-displaying yeasts showed endolytic alginate lyase activity. On the other hand, Alg7K-displaying yeast showed exolytic alginate lyase activity. Alg7A, Alg7D, Alg7K, and Alg18J, when displayed on yeast cell surface, demonstrated both polyguluronate lyase and polymannuronate lyase activities. Additionally, polyguluronic acid could be much easily degraded by Alg7A, Alg7K, and Alg7D than polymannuronic acid. In contrast, polymannuronic acid could be much easily degraded by Alg18J than polyguluronic acid. We further constructed yeasts co-displaying endolytic and exolytic alginate lyases. Degradation efficiency by the co-displaying yeasts were significantly higher than single alginate lyase-displaying yeasts. Alg7A/Alg7K co-displaying yeast had maximum alginate degrading activity, with production of 1.98 g/L of reducing sugars in a 60-min reaction. This system developed, along with our findings, will contribute to the efficient utilization and production of useful and non-commercialized monosaccharides from alginate by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.