Science.gov

Sample records for algorithms require significant

  1. Algorithm for Detecting Significant Locations from Raw GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kami, Nobuharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Baba, Teruyuki; Yoshikawa, Takashi

    We present a fast algorithm for probabilistically extracting significant locations from raw GPS data based on data point density. Extracting significant locations from raw GPS data is the first essential step of algorithms designed for location-aware applications. Assuming that a location is significant if users spend a certain time around that area, most current algorithms compare spatial/temporal variables, such as stay duration and a roaming diameter, with given fixed thresholds to extract significant locations. However, the appropriate threshold values are not clearly known in priori and algorithms with fixed thresholds are inherently error-prone, especially under high noise levels. Moreover, for N data points, they are generally O(N 2) algorithms since distance computation is required. We developed a fast algorithm for selective data point sampling around significant locations based on density information by constructing random histograms using locality sensitive hashing. Evaluations show competitive performance in detecting significant locations even under high noise levels.

  2. Least significant qubit algorithm for quantum images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Jianzhi; Wang, Shen; Li, Qiong

    2016-08-01

    To study the feasibility of the classical image least significant bit (LSB) information hiding algorithm on quantum computer, a least significant qubit (LSQb) information hiding algorithm of quantum image is proposed. In this paper, we focus on a novel quantum representation for color digital images (NCQI). Firstly, by designing the three qubits comparator and unitary operators, the reasonability and feasibility of LSQb based on NCQI are presented. Then, the concrete LSQb information hiding algorithm is proposed, which can realize the aim of embedding the secret qubits into the least significant qubits of RGB channels of quantum cover image. Quantum circuit of the LSQb information hiding algorithm is also illustrated. Furthermore, the secrets extracting algorithm and circuit are illustrated through utilizing control-swap gates. The two merits of our algorithm are: (1) it is absolutely blind and (2) when extracting secret binary qubits, it does not need any quantum measurement operation or any other help from classical computer. Finally, simulation and comparative analysis show the performance of our algorithm.

  3. Algorithms and Requirements for Measuring Network Bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Guojun

    2002-12-08

    This report unveils new algorithms for actively measuring (not estimating) available bandwidths with very low intrusion, computing cross traffic, thus estimating the physical bandwidth, provides mathematical proof that the algorithms are accurate, and addresses conditions, requirements, and limitations for new and existing algorithms for measuring network bandwidths. The paper also discusses a number of important terminologies and issues for network bandwidth measurement, and introduces a fundamental parameter -Maximum Burst Size that is critical for implementing algorithms based on multiple packets.

  4. Discovering sequence similarity by the algorithmic significance method

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavljevic, A.

    1993-02-01

    The minimal-length encoding approach is applied to define concept of sequence similarity. A sequence is defined to be similar to another sequence or to a set of keywords if it can be encoded in a small number of bits by taking advantage of common subwords. Minimal-length encoding of a sequence is computed in linear time, using a data compression algorithm that is based on a dynamic programming strategy and the directed acyclic word graph data structure. No assumptions about common word (``k-tuple``) length are made in advance, and common words of any length are considered. The newly proposed algorithmic significance method provides an exact upper bound on the probability that sequence similarity has occurred by chance, thus eliminating the need for any arbitrary choice of similarity thresholds. Preliminary experiments indicate that a small number of keywords can positively identify a DNA sequence, which is extremely relevant in the context of partial sequencing by hybridization.

  5. Discovering sequence similarity by the algorithmic significance method

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavljevic, A.

    1993-02-01

    The minimal-length encoding approach is applied to define concept of sequence similarity. A sequence is defined to be similar to another sequence or to a set of keywords if it can be encoded in a small number of bits by taking advantage of common subwords. Minimal-length encoding of a sequence is computed in linear time, using a data compression algorithm that is based on a dynamic programming strategy and the directed acyclic word graph data structure. No assumptions about common word ( k-tuple'') length are made in advance, and common words of any length are considered. The newly proposed algorithmic significance method provides an exact upper bound on the probability that sequence similarity has occurred by chance, thus eliminating the need for any arbitrary choice of similarity thresholds. Preliminary experiments indicate that a small number of keywords can positively identify a DNA sequence, which is extremely relevant in the context of partial sequencing by hybridization.

  6. Algorithms for Detecting Significantly Mutated Pathways in Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandin, Fabio; Upfal, Eli; Raphael, Benjamin J.

    Recent genome sequencing studies have shown that the somatic mutations that drive cancer development are distributed across a large number of genes. This mutational heterogeneity complicates efforts to distinguish functional mutations from sporadic, passenger mutations. Since cancer mutations are hypothesized to target a relatively small number of cellular signaling and regulatory pathways, a common approach is to assess whether known pathways are enriched for mutated genes. However, restricting attention to known pathways will not reveal novel cancer genes or pathways. An alterative strategy is to examine mutated genes in the context of genome-scale interaction networks that include both well characterized pathways and additional gene interactions measured through various approaches. We introduce a computational framework for de novo identification of subnetworks in a large gene interaction network that are mutated in a significant number of patients. This framework includes two major features. First, we introduce a diffusion process on the interaction network to define a local neighborhood of "influence" for each mutated gene in the network. Second, we derive a two-stage multiple hypothesis test to bound the false discovery rate (FDR) associated with the identified subnetworks. We test these algorithms on a large human protein-protein interaction network using mutation data from two recent studies: glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas and lung adenocarcinoma samples from the Tumor Sequencing Project. We successfully recover pathways that are known to be important in these cancers, such as the p53 pathway. We also identify additional pathways, such as the Notch signaling pathway, that have been implicated in other cancers but not previously reported as mutated in these samples. Our approach is the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate a computationally efficient strategy for de novo identification of statistically significant mutated subnetworks. We

  7. Parallel radiation transport algorithms and associated architectural requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J. E.; Baker, R. S.; Warsa, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    The radiation transport equation is a seven-dimensional equation that can be extremely expensive to solve. In general, transport can be expected to completely dominate the memory and CPU time requirements for the ASCI codes. Both traditional iterative transport solution methods and modern Krylov-subspace solution methods require the inversion of a large number of block lower-diagonal matrices. While such inversions are easily done in serial, a high level of sophistication is needed for implementations on massively parallel platforms. Rectangular-mesh methods are well-established and generally quite efficient but unstructured-mesh methods remain a research topic. Nonetheless, considerable progress has been made in unstructured-mesh methods over the last several years. In general, the efficiency of transport solution algorithms are quite sensitive to communication latencies and bandwidth, but there are other significant considerations as well. Some new parallel algorithms have recently been defined that may be significantly better than existing methods for time-dependent problems, but will be significantly less effective for steady-state problems in some circumstances. Transport methods would benefit from a machine architecture with low latencies, high bandwidth, and on the order of one thousand very fast, large-memory processors, as opposed to an architecture that consists of a very large number of slower processors with less memory. In addition, a lightweight operating system is highly desirable.

  8. A Hybrid Swarm Intelligence Algorithm for Intrusion Detection Using Significant Features.

    PubMed

    Amudha, P; Karthik, S; Sivakumari, S

    2015-01-01

    Intrusion detection has become a main part of network security due to the huge number of attacks which affects the computers. This is due to the extensive growth of internet connectivity and accessibility to information systems worldwide. To deal with this problem, in this paper a hybrid algorithm is proposed to integrate Modified Artificial Bee Colony (MABC) with Enhanced Particle Swarm Optimization (EPSO) to predict the intrusion detection problem. The algorithms are combined together to find out better optimization results and the classification accuracies are obtained by 10-fold cross-validation method. The purpose of this paper is to select the most relevant features that can represent the pattern of the network traffic and test its effect on the success of the proposed hybrid classification algorithm. To investigate the performance of the proposed method, intrusion detection KDDCup'99 benchmark dataset from the UCI Machine Learning repository is used. The performance of the proposed method is compared with the other machine learning algorithms and found to be significantly different. PMID:26221625

  9. A Hybrid Swarm Intelligence Algorithm for Intrusion Detection Using Significant Features

    PubMed Central

    Amudha, P.; Karthik, S.; Sivakumari, S.

    2015-01-01

    Intrusion detection has become a main part of network security due to the huge number of attacks which affects the computers. This is due to the extensive growth of internet connectivity and accessibility to information systems worldwide. To deal with this problem, in this paper a hybrid algorithm is proposed to integrate Modified Artificial Bee Colony (MABC) with Enhanced Particle Swarm Optimization (EPSO) to predict the intrusion detection problem. The algorithms are combined together to find out better optimization results and the classification accuracies are obtained by 10-fold cross-validation method. The purpose of this paper is to select the most relevant features that can represent the pattern of the network traffic and test its effect on the success of the proposed hybrid classification algorithm. To investigate the performance of the proposed method, intrusion detection KDDCup'99 benchmark dataset from the UCI Machine Learning repository is used. The performance of the proposed method is compared with the other machine learning algorithms and found to be significantly different. PMID:26221625

  10. Significant Advances in the AIRS Science Team Version-6 Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena; Molnar, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    AIRS/AMSU is the state of the art infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system flying aboard EOS Aqua. The Goddard DISC has analyzed AIRS/AMSU observations, covering the period September 2002 until the present, using the AIRS Science Team Version-S retrieval algorithm. These products have been used by many researchers to make significant advances in both climate and weather applications. The AIRS Science Team Version-6 Retrieval, which will become operation in mid-20l2, contains many significant theoretical and practical improvements compared to Version-5 which should further enhance the utility of AIRS products for both climate and weather applications. In particular, major changes have been made with regard to the algOrithms used to 1) derive surface skin temperature and surface spectral emissivity; 2) generate the initial state used to start the retrieval procedure; 3) compute Outgoing Longwave Radiation; and 4) determine Quality Control. This paper will describe these advances found in the AIRS Version-6 retrieval algorithm and demonstrate the improvement of AIRS Version-6 products compared to those obtained using Version-5,

  11. Design requirements and development of an airborne descent path definition algorithm for time navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Thompson, J. L.; Groce, J. L.; Schwab, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The design requirements for a 4D path definition algorithm are described. These requirements were developed for the NASA ATOPS as an extension of the Local Flow Management/Profile Descent algorithm. They specify the processing flow, functional and data architectures, and system input requirements, and recommended the addition of a broad path revision (reinitialization) function capability. The document also summarizes algorithm design enhancements and the implementation status of the algorithm on an in-house PDP-11/70 computer. Finally, the requirements for the pilot-computer interfaces, the lateral path processor, and guidance and steering function are described.

  12. Algorithmic requirements for swarm intelligence in differently coupled collective systems.

    PubMed

    Stradner, Jürgen; Thenius, Ronald; Zahadat, Payam; Hamann, Heiko; Crailsheim, Karl; Schmickl, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Swarm systems are based on intermediate connectivity between individuals and dynamic neighborhoods. In natural swarms self-organizing principles bring their agents to that favorable level of connectivity. They serve as interesting sources of inspiration for control algorithms in swarm robotics on the one hand, and in modular robotics on the other hand. In this paper we demonstrate and compare a set of bio-inspired algorithms that are used to control the collective behavior of swarms and modular systems: BEECLUST, AHHS (hormone controllers), FGRN (fractal genetic regulatory networks), and VE (virtual embryogenesis). We demonstrate how such bio-inspired control paradigms bring their host systems to a level of intermediate connectivity, what delivers sufficient robustness to these systems for collective decentralized control. In parallel, these algorithms allow sufficient volatility of shared information within these systems to help preventing local optima and deadlock situations, this way keeping those systems flexible and adaptive in dynamic non-deterministic environments. PMID:23805030

  13. Statistically significant performance results of a mine detector and fusion algorithm from an x-band high-resolution SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Arnold C.; Pachowicz, Peter W.

    2004-09-01

    Current mine detection research indicates that no single sensor or single look from a sensor will detect mines/minefields in a real-time manner at a performance level suitable for a forward maneuver unit. Hence, the integrated development of detectors and fusion algorithms are of primary importance. A problem in this development process has been the evaluation of these algorithms with relatively small data sets, leading to anecdotal and frequently over trained results. These anecdotal results are often unreliable and conflicting among various sensors and algorithms. Consequently, the physical phenomena that ought to be exploited and the performance benefits of this exploitation are often ambiguous. The Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision Laboratory and Electron Sensors Directorate has collected large amounts of multisensor data such that statistically significant evaluations of detection and fusion algorithms can be obtained. Even with these large data sets care must be taken in algorithm design and data processing to achieve statistically significant performance results for combined detectors and fusion algorithms. This paper discusses statistically significant detection and combined multilook fusion results for the Ellipse Detector (ED) and the Piecewise Level Fusion Algorithm (PLFA). These statistically significant performance results are characterized by ROC curves that have been obtained through processing this multilook data for the high resolution SAR data of the Veridian X-Band radar. We discuss the implications of these results on mine detection and the importance of statistical significance, sample size, ground truth, and algorithm design in performance evaluation.

  14. New Classification Method Based on Support-Significant Association Rules Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoxin; Shi, Wen

    One of the most well-studied problems in data mining is mining for association rules. There was also research that introduced association rule mining methods to conduct classification tasks. These classification methods, based on association rule mining, could be applied for customer segmentation. Currently, most of the association rule mining methods are based on a support-confidence structure, where rules satisfied both minimum support and minimum confidence were returned as strong association rules back to the analyzer. But, this types of association rule mining methods lack of rigorous statistic guarantee, sometimes even caused misleading. A new classification model for customer segmentation, based on association rule mining algorithm, was proposed in this paper. This new model was based on the support-significant association rule mining method, where the measurement of confidence for association rule was substituted by the significant of association rule that was a better evaluation standard for association rules. Data experiment for customer segmentation from UCI indicated the effective of this new model.

  15. A hybrid genetic algorithm-extreme learning machine approach for accurate significant wave height reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, E.; Cuadra, L.; Nieto-Borge, J. C.; Candil-García, G.; del Pino, M.; Salcedo-Sanz, S.

    2015-08-01

    Wave parameters computed from time series measured by buoys (significant wave height Hs, mean wave period, etc.) play a key role in coastal engineering and in the design and operation of wave energy converters. Storms or navigation accidents can make measuring buoys break down, leading to missing data gaps. In this paper we tackle the problem of locally reconstructing Hs at out-of-operation buoys by using wave parameters from nearby buoys, based on the spatial correlation among values at neighboring buoy locations. The novelty of our approach for its potential application to problems in coastal engineering is twofold. On one hand, we propose a genetic algorithm hybridized with an extreme learning machine that selects, among the available wave parameters from the nearby buoys, a subset FnSP with nSP parameters that minimizes the Hs reconstruction error. On the other hand, we evaluate to what extent the selected parameters in subset FnSP are good enough in assisting other machine learning (ML) regressors (extreme learning machines, support vector machines and gaussian process regression) to reconstruct Hs. The results show that all the ML method explored achieve a good Hs reconstruction in the two different locations studied (Caribbean Sea and West Atlantic).

  16. A Genetic Algorithm for Learning Significant Phrase Patterns in Radiology Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Beckerman, Barbara G; Treadwell, Jim N

    2009-01-01

    Radiologists disagree with each other over the characteristics and features of what constitutes a normal mammogram and the terminology to use in the associated radiology report. Recently, the focus has been on classifying abnormal or suspicious reports, but even this process needs further layers of clustering and gradation, so that individual lesions can be more effectively classified. Using a genetic algorithm, the approach described here successfully learns phrase patterns for two distinct classes of radiology reports (normal and abnormal). These patterns can then be used as a basis for automatically analyzing, categorizing, clustering, or retrieving relevant radiology reports for the user.

  17. 40 CFR 141.708 - Requirements when making a significant change in disinfection practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requirements when making a significant change in disinfection practice. 141.708 Section 141.708 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...) Changes to the point of disinfection; (2) Changes to the disinfectant(s) used in the treatment plant;...

  18. 40 CFR 141.708 - Requirements when making a significant change in disinfection practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements when making a significant change in disinfection practice. 141.708 Section 141.708 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...) Changes to the point of disinfection; (2) Changes to the disinfectant(s) used in the treatment plant;...

  19. 40 CFR 141.708 - Requirements when making a significant change in disinfection practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements when making a significant change in disinfection practice. 141.708 Section 141.708 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...) Changes to the point of disinfection; (2) Changes to the disinfectant(s) used in the treatment plant;...

  20. An algorithm for finding biologically significant features in microarray data based on a priori manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Hira, Zena M; Trigeorgis, George; Gillies, Duncan F

    2014-01-01

    Microarray databases are a large source of genetic data, which, upon proper analysis, could enhance our understanding of biology and medicine. Many microarray experiments have been designed to investigate the genetic mechanisms of cancer, and analytical approaches have been applied in order to classify different types of cancer or distinguish between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue. However, microarrays are high-dimensional datasets with high levels of noise and this causes problems when using machine learning methods. A popular approach to this problem is to search for a set of features that will simplify the structure and to some degree remove the noise from the data. The most widely used approach to feature extraction is principal component analysis (PCA) which assumes a multivariate Gaussian model of the data. More recently, non-linear methods have been investigated. Among these, manifold learning algorithms, for example Isomap, aim to project the data from a higher dimensional space onto a lower dimension one. We have proposed a priori manifold learning for finding a manifold in which a representative set of microarray data is fused with relevant data taken from the KEGG pathway database. Once the manifold has been constructed the raw microarray data is projected onto it and clustering and classification can take place. In contrast to earlier fusion based methods, the prior knowledge from the KEGG databases is not used in, and does not bias the classification process--it merely acts as an aid to find the best space in which to search the data. In our experiments we have found that using our new manifold method gives better classification results than using either PCA or conventional Isomap. PMID:24595155

  1. Testing earthquake prediction algorithms: Statistically significant advance prediction of the largest earthquakes in the Circum-Pacific, 1992-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kossobokov, V.G.; Romashkova, L.L.; Keilis-Borok, V. I.; Healy, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Algorithms M8 and MSc (i.e., the Mendocino Scenario) were used in a real-time intermediate-term research prediction of the strongest earthquakes in the Circum-Pacific seismic belt. Predictions are made by M8 first. Then, the areas of alarm are reduced by MSc at the cost that some earthquakes are missed in the second approximation of prediction. In 1992-1997, five earthquakes of magnitude 8 and above occurred in the test area: all of them were predicted by M8 and MSc identified correctly the locations of four of them. The space-time volume of the alarms is 36% and 18%, correspondingly, when estimated with a normalized product measure of empirical distribution of epicenters and uniform time. The statistical significance of the achieved results is beyond 99% both for M8 and MSc. For magnitude 7.5 + , 10 out of 19 earthquakes were predicted by M8 in 40% and five were predicted by M8-MSc in 13% of the total volume considered. This implies a significance level of 81% for M8 and 92% for M8-MSc. The lower significance levels might result from a global change in seismic regime in 1993-1996, when the rate of the largest events has doubled and all of them become exclusively normal or reversed faults. The predictions are fully reproducible; the algorithms M8 and MSc in complete formal definitions were published before we started our experiment [Keilis-Borok, V.I., Kossobokov, V.G., 1990. Premonitory activation of seismic flow: Algorithm M8, Phys. Earth and Planet. Inter. 61, 73-83; Kossobokov, V.G., Keilis-Borok, V.I., Smith, S.W., 1990. Localization of intermediate-term earthquake prediction, J. Geophys. Res., 95, 19763-19772; Healy, J.H., Kossobokov, V.G., Dewey, J.W., 1992. A test to evaluate the earthquake prediction algorithm, M8. U.S. Geol. Surv. OFR 92-401]. M8 is available from the IASPEI Software Library [Healy, J.H., Keilis-Borok, V.I., Lee, W.H.K. (Eds.), 1997. Algorithms for Earthquake Statistics and Prediction, Vol. 6. IASPEI Software Library]. ?? 1999 Elsevier

  2. Interactive evolutionary computation with minimum fitness evaluation requirement and offline algorithm design.

    PubMed

    Ishibuchi, Hisao; Sudo, Takahiko; Nojima, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    In interactive evolutionary computation (IEC), each solution is evaluated by a human user. Usually the total number of examined solutions is very small. In some applications such as hearing aid design and music composition, only a single solution can be evaluated at a time by a human user. Moreover, accurate and precise numerical evaluation is difficult. Based on these considerations, we formulated an IEC model with the minimum requirement for fitness evaluation ability of human users under the following assumptions: They can evaluate only a single solution at a time, they can memorize only a single previous solution they have just evaluated, their evaluation result on the current solution is whether it is better than the previous one or not, and the best solution among the evaluated ones should be identified after a pre-specified number of evaluations. In this paper, we first explain our IEC model in detail. Next we propose a ([Formula: see text])ES-style algorithm for our IEC model. Then we propose an offline meta-level approach to automated algorithm design for our IEC model. The main feature of our approach is the use of a different mechanism (e.g., mutation, crossover, random initialization) to generate each solution to be evaluated. Through computational experiments on test problems, our approach is compared with the ([Formula: see text])ES-style algorithm where a solution generation mechanism is pre-specified and fixed throughout the execution of the algorithm. PMID:27026888

  3. Effort required to finish shotgun-generated genome sequences differs significantly among vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The approaches for shotgun-based sequencing of vertebrate genomes are now well-established, and have resulted in the generation of numerous draft whole-genome sequence assemblies. In contrast, the process of refining those assemblies to improve contiguity and increase accuracy (known as 'sequence finishing') remains tedious, labor-intensive, and expensive. As a result, the vast majority of vertebrate genome sequences generated to date remain at a draft stage. Results To date, our genome sequencing efforts have focused on comparative studies of targeted genomic regions, requiring sequence finishing of large blocks of orthologous sequence (average size 0.5-2 Mb) from various subsets of 75 vertebrates. This experience has provided a unique opportunity to compare the relative effort required to finish shotgun-generated genome sequence assemblies from different species, which we report here. Importantly, we found that the sequence assemblies generated for the same orthologous regions from various vertebrates show substantial variation with respect to misassemblies and, in particular, the frequency and characteristics of sequence gaps. As a consequence, the work required to finish different species' sequences varied greatly. Application of the same standardized methods for finishing provided a novel opportunity to "assay" characteristics of genome sequences among many vertebrate species. It is important to note that many of the problems we have encountered during sequence finishing reflect unique architectural features of a particular vertebrate's genome, which in some cases may have important functional and/or evolutionary implications. Finally, based on our analyses, we have been able to improve our procedures to overcome some of these problems and to increase the overall efficiency of the sequence-finishing process, although significant challenges still remain. Conclusion Our findings have important implications for the eventual finishing of the draft whole

  4. Classification of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Significance Analysis of Microarray-Gene Set Reduction Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linlin; Du, Bochuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Pu

    2016-01-01

    Among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two major histology subtypes, accounting for roughly 40% and 30% of all lung cancer cases, respectively. Since AC and SCC differ in their cell of origin, location within the lung, and growth pattern, they are considered as distinct diseases. Gene expression signatures have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for distinguishing AC and SCC. Gene set analysis is regarded as irrelevant to the identification of gene expression signatures. Nevertheless, we found that one specific gene set analysis method, significance analysis of microarray-gene set reduction (SAMGSR), can be adopted directly to select relevant features and to construct gene expression signatures. In this study, we applied SAMGSR to a NSCLC gene expression dataset. When compared with several novel feature selection algorithms, for example, LASSO, SAMGSR has equivalent or better performance in terms of predictive ability and model parsimony. Therefore, SAMGSR is a feature selection algorithm, indeed. Additionally, we applied SAMGSR to AC and SCC subtypes separately to discriminate their respective stages, that is, stage II versus stage I. Few overlaps between these two resulting gene signatures illustrate that AC and SCC are technically distinct diseases. Therefore, stratified analyses on subtypes are recommended when diagnostic or prognostic signatures of these two NSCLC subtypes are constructed. PMID:27446945

  5. Classification of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Significance Analysis of Microarray-Gene Set Reduction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linlin; Du, Bochuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Pu; Tian, Suyan

    2016-01-01

    Among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two major histology subtypes, accounting for roughly 40% and 30% of all lung cancer cases, respectively. Since AC and SCC differ in their cell of origin, location within the lung, and growth pattern, they are considered as distinct diseases. Gene expression signatures have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for distinguishing AC and SCC. Gene set analysis is regarded as irrelevant to the identification of gene expression signatures. Nevertheless, we found that one specific gene set analysis method, significance analysis of microarray-gene set reduction (SAMGSR), can be adopted directly to select relevant features and to construct gene expression signatures. In this study, we applied SAMGSR to a NSCLC gene expression dataset. When compared with several novel feature selection algorithms, for example, LASSO, SAMGSR has equivalent or better performance in terms of predictive ability and model parsimony. Therefore, SAMGSR is a feature selection algorithm, indeed. Additionally, we applied SAMGSR to AC and SCC subtypes separately to discriminate their respective stages, that is, stage II versus stage I. Few overlaps between these two resulting gene signatures illustrate that AC and SCC are technically distinct diseases. Therefore, stratified analyses on subtypes are recommended when diagnostic or prognostic signatures of these two NSCLC subtypes are constructed. PMID:27446945

  6. On the retrieval of significant wave heights from spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar using the Max-Planck Institut algorithm.

    PubMed

    Violante-Carvalho, Nelson

    2005-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) onboard satellites is the only source of directional wave spectra with continuous and global coverage. Millions of SAR Wave Mode (SWM) imagettes have been acquired since the launch in the early 1990's of the first European Remote Sensing Satellite ERS-1 and its successors ERS-2 and ENVISAT, which has opened up many possibilities specially for wave data assimilation purposes. The main aim of data assimilation is to improve the forecasting introducing available observations into the modeling procedures in order to minimize the differences between model estimates and measurements. However there are limitations in the retrieval of the directional spectrum from SAR images due to nonlinearities in the mapping mechanism. The Max-Planck Institut (MPI) scheme, the first proposed and most widely used algorithm to retrieve directional wave spectra from SAR images, is employed to compare significant wave heights retrieved from ERS-1 SAR against buoy measurements and against the WAM wave model. It is shown that for periods shorter than 12 seconds the WAM model performs better than the MPI, despite the fact that the model is used as first guess to the MPI method, that is the retrieval is deteriorating the first guess. For periods longer than 12 seconds, the part of the spectrum that is directly measured by SAR, the performance of the MPI scheme is at least as good as the WAM model.

  7. 40 CFR 141.708 - Requirements when making a significant change in disinfection practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Changes to the point of disinfection; (2) Changes to the disinfectant(s) used in the treatment plant; (3... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Disinfection Profiling and Benchmarking Requirements § 141.708...

  8. 40 CFR 141.708 - Requirements when making a significant change in disinfection practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Changes to the point of disinfection; (2) Changes to the disinfectant(s) used in the treatment plant; (3... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Disinfection Profiling and Benchmarking Requirements § 141.708...

  9. 42 CFR 422.521 - Effective date of new significant regulatory requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements. 422.521 Section 422.521 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Application Procedures and Contracts for Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.521 Effective date of new...

  10. A matter of timing: identifying significant multi-dose radiotherapy improvements by numerical simulation and genetic algorithm search.

    PubMed

    Angus, Simon D; Piotrowska, Monika Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Multi-dose radiotherapy protocols (fraction dose and timing) currently used in the clinic are the product of human selection based on habit, received wisdom, physician experience and intra-day patient timetabling. However, due to combinatorial considerations, the potential treatment protocol space for a given total dose or treatment length is enormous, even for relatively coarse search; well beyond the capacity of traditional in-vitro methods. In constrast, high fidelity numerical simulation of tumor development is well suited to the challenge. Building on our previous single-dose numerical simulation model of EMT6/Ro spheroids, a multi-dose irradiation response module is added and calibrated to the effective dose arising from 18 independent multi-dose treatment programs available in the experimental literature. With the developed model a constrained, non-linear, search for better performing cadidate protocols is conducted within the vicinity of two benchmarks by genetic algorithm (GA) techniques. After evaluating less than 0.01% of the potential benchmark protocol space, candidate protocols were identified by the GA which conferred an average of 9.4% (max benefit 16.5%) and 7.1% (13.3%) improvement (reduction) on tumour cell count compared to the two benchmarks, respectively. Noticing that a convergent phenomenon of the top performing protocols was their temporal synchronicity, a further series of numerical experiments was conducted with periodic time-gap protocols (10 h to 23 h), leading to the discovery that the performance of the GA search candidates could be replicated by 17-18 h periodic candidates. Further dynamic irradiation-response cell-phase analysis revealed that such periodicity cohered with latent EMT6/Ro cell-phase temporal patterning. Taken together, this study provides powerful evidence towards the hypothesis that even simple inter-fraction timing variations for a given fractional dose program may present a facile, and highly cost-effecitive means

  11. Tacrolimus dose requirement in renal transplant recipients is significantly higher when used in combination with corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Hesselink, Dennis A; Ngyuen, Hien; Wabbijn, Marike; Gregoor, Peter J H Smak; Steyerberg, Ewout W; van Riemsdijk, Iza C; Weimar, Willem; van Gelder, Teun

    2003-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effect of corticosteroids on tacrolimus pharmacokinetics. Methods In a randomized trial, kidney transplant recipients were treated with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil with either daclizumab (n = 31) or 3 months of prednisone (n = 34). Tacrolimus dose-adjusted predose concentrations (C0) at month 1–6 were compared between both groups and within the corticosteroid group before and after prednisone withdrawal. Results At month 1 the tacrolimus dose-adjusted C0 in the corticosteroid group was 83 ± 8 vs 119 ± 17 ng ml−1 mg−1 kg−1 in the daclizumab group. The tacrolimus dose-adjusted C0 within the corticosteroid group at month 1 and 2 was 42% and 29% lower compared with month 4 (P < 0.001). Conclusions A higher tacrolimus dose is required to reach target concentrations when used in combination with corticosteroids. PMID:12919182

  12. Architectural and Algorithmic Requirements for a Next-Generation System Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    V.A. Mousseau

    2010-05-01

    This document presents high-level architectural and system requirements for a next-generation system analysis code (NGSAC) to support reactor safety decision-making by plant operators and others, especially in the context of light water reactor plant life extension. The capabilities of NGSAC will be different from those of current-generation codes, not only because computers have evolved significantly in the generations since the current paradigm was first implemented, but because the decision-making processes that need the support of next-generation codes are very different from the decision-making processes that drove the licensing and design of the current fleet of commercial nuclear power reactors. The implications of these newer decision-making processes for NGSAC requirements are discussed, and resulting top-level goals for the NGSAC are formulated. From these goals, the general architectural and system requirements for the NGSAC are derived.

  13. Significantly Reducing Post-Tonsillectomy Haemorrhage Requiring Surgery by Suturing the Faucial Pillars: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Senska, Götz; Schröder, Hilal; Pütter, Carolin; Dost, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Background The tonsillectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures. Given the comparatively frequent postsurgical bleeding associated with this procedure, particular attention has been paid to reduction of the postoperative bleeding rate. In 2006, we introduced routine suturing of the faucial pillars at our clinic to reduce postoperative haemorrhage. Methods Two groups from the years 2003–2005 (n = 1000) and 2007–2009 (n = 1000) have been compared. We included all patients who had an elective tonsillectomy due to a benign, non-acute inflammatory tonsil illness. In the years 2007–2009, we additionally sutured the faucial pillars after completing haemostasis. For primary haemostasis we used suture ligation and bipolar diathermy. Results The rate of bleeding requiring second surgery for haemostasis was 3.6% in 2003–2005 but only 2.0% in 2007–2009 (absolute risk reduction 1.6% (95% CI 0.22%–2.45%, p = 0.04)). The median surgery time—including adenoidectomy and paracentesis surgery—increased from 25 to 31 minutes (p<0.01). Conclusions We have been able to substantiate that suturing of the faucial pillars nearly halves the rate of postoperative haemorrhage. Surgery takes 8 minutes longer on average. Bleeding occurs later, mostly after 24 h. The limitations of this study relate to its retrospective character and all the potential biases related to observational studies. PMID:23118902

  14. Enhancements of evolutionary algorithm for the complex requirements of a nurse scheduling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tein, Lim Huai; Ramli, Razamin

    2014-12-01

    Over the years, nurse scheduling is a noticeable problem that is affected by the global nurse turnover crisis. The more nurses are unsatisfied with their working environment the more severe the condition or implication they tend to leave. Therefore, the current undesirable work schedule is partly due to that working condition. Basically, there is a lack of complimentary requirement between the head nurse's liability and the nurses' need. In particular, subject to highly nurse preferences issue, the sophisticated challenge of doing nurse scheduling is failure to stimulate tolerance behavior between both parties during shifts assignment in real working scenarios. Inevitably, the flexibility in shifts assignment is hard to achieve for the sake of satisfying nurse diverse requests with upholding imperative nurse ward coverage. Hence, Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) is proposed to cater for this complexity in a nurse scheduling problem (NSP). The restriction of EA is discussed and thus, enhancement on the EA operators is suggested so that the EA would have the characteristic of a flexible search. This paper consists of three types of constraints which are the hard, semi-hard and soft constraints that can be handled by the EA with enhanced parent selection and specialized mutation operators. These operators and EA as a whole contribute to the efficiency of constraint handling, fitness computation as well as flexibility in the search, which correspond to the employment of exploration and exploitation principles.

  15. Using edge-preserving algorithm with non-local mean for significantly improved image-domain material decomposition in dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Tianye; Xing, Lei; Xie, Yaoqin; Xiong, Guanglei; Elmore, Kimberly; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Luyao; Min, James K

    2016-02-01

    Increased noise is a general concern for dual-energy material decomposition. Here, we develop an image-domain material decomposition algorithm for dual-energy CT (DECT) by incorporating an edge-preserving filter into the Local HighlY constrained backPRojection reconstruction (HYPR-LR) framework. With effective use of the non-local mean, the proposed algorithm, which is referred to as HYPR-NLM, reduces the noise in dual-energy decomposition while preserving the accuracy of quantitative measurement and spatial resolution of the material-specific dual-energy images. We demonstrate the noise reduction and resolution preservation of the algorithm with an iodine concentrate numerical phantom by comparing the HYPR-NLM algorithm to the direct matrix inversion, HYPR-LR and iterative image-domain material decomposition (Iter-DECT). We also show the superior performance of the HYPR-NLM over the existing methods by using two sets of cardiac perfusing imaging data. The DECT material decomposition comparison study shows that all four algorithms yield acceptable quantitative measurements of iodine concentrate. Direct matrix inversion yields the highest noise level, followed by HYPR-LR and Iter-DECT. HYPR-NLM in an iterative formulation significantly reduces image noise and the image noise is comparable to or even lower than that generated using Iter-DECT. For the HYPR-NLM method, there are marginal edge effects in the difference image, suggesting the high-frequency details are well preserved. In addition, when the search window size increases from to , there are no significant changes or marginal edge effects in the HYPR-NLM difference images. The reference drawn from the comparison study includes: (1) HYPR-NLM significantly reduces the DECT material decomposition noise while preserving quantitative measurements and high-frequency edge information, and (2) HYPR-NLM is robust with respect to parameter selection.

  16. Using edge-preserving algorithm with non-local mean for significantly improved image-domain material decomposition in dual-energy CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Tianye; Xing, Lei; Xie, Yaoqin; Xiong, Guanglei; Elmore, Kimberly; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Luyao; Min, James K.

    2016-02-01

    Increased noise is a general concern for dual-energy material decomposition. Here, we develop an image-domain material decomposition algorithm for dual-energy CT (DECT) by incorporating an edge-preserving filter into the Local HighlY constrained backPRojection reconstruction (HYPR-LR) framework. With effective use of the non-local mean, the proposed algorithm, which is referred to as HYPR-NLM, reduces the noise in dual-energy decomposition while preserving the accuracy of quantitative measurement and spatial resolution of the material-specific dual-energy images. We demonstrate the noise reduction and resolution preservation of the algorithm with an iodine concentrate numerical phantom by comparing the HYPR-NLM algorithm to the direct matrix inversion, HYPR-LR and iterative image-domain material decomposition (Iter-DECT). We also show the superior performance of the HYPR-NLM over the existing methods by using two sets of cardiac perfusing imaging data. The DECT material decomposition comparison study shows that all four algorithms yield acceptable quantitative measurements of iodine concentrate. Direct matrix inversion yields the highest noise level, followed by HYPR-LR and Iter-DECT. HYPR-NLM in an iterative formulation significantly reduces image noise and the image noise is comparable to or even lower than that generated using Iter-DECT. For the HYPR-NLM method, there are marginal edge effects in the difference image, suggesting the high-frequency details are well preserved. In addition, when the search window size increases from 11× 11 to 19× 19 , there are no significant changes or marginal edge effects in the HYPR-NLM difference images. The reference drawn from the comparison study includes: (1) HYPR-NLM significantly reduces the DECT material decomposition noise while preserving quantitative measurements and high-frequency edge information, and (2) HYPR-NLM is robust with respect to parameter selection.

  17. Improving a DWT-based compression algorithm for high image-quality requirement of satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiebaut, Carole; Latry, Christophe; Camarero, Roberto; Cazanave, Grégory

    2011-10-01

    Past and current optical Earth observation systems designed by CNES are using a fixed-rate data compression processing performed at a high-rate in a pushbroom mode (also called scan-based mode). This process generates fixed-length data to the mass memory and data downlink is performed at a fixed rate too. Because of on-board memory limitations and high data rate processing needs, the rate allocation procedure is performed over a small image area called a "segment". For both PLEIADES compression algorithm and CCSDS Image Data Compression recommendation, this rate allocation is realised by truncating to the desired rate a hierarchical bitstream of coded and quantized wavelet coefficients for each segment. Because the quantisation induced by truncation of the bit planes description is the same for the whole segment, some parts of the segment have a poor image quality. These artefacts generally occur in low energy areas within a segment of higher level of energy. In order to locally correct these areas, CNES has studied "exceptional processing" targeted for DWT-based compression algorithms. According to a criteria computed for each part of the segment (called block), the wavelet coefficients can be amplified before bit-plane encoding. As usual Region of Interest handling, these multiplied coefficients will be processed earlier by the encoder than in the nominal case (without exceptional processing). The image quality improvement brought by the exceptional processing has been confirmed by visual image analysis and fidelity criteria. The complexity of the proposed improvement for on-board application has also been analysed.

  18. Quantifying Seagrass Light Requirements Using an Algorithm to Spatially Resolve Depth of Colonization

    EPA Science Inventory

    The maximum depth of colonization (Zc) is a useful measure of seagrass growth that describes response to light attenuation in the water column. However, lack of standardization among methods for estimating Zc has limited the description of habitat requirements at spatial scales m...

  19. Semioptimal practicable algorithmic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2011-04-01

    Algorithmic cooling (AC) of spins applies entropy manipulation algorithms in open spin systems in order to cool spins far beyond Shannon’s entropy bound. Algorithmic cooling of nuclear spins was demonstrated experimentally and may contribute to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Several cooling algorithms were suggested in recent years, including practicable algorithmic cooling (PAC) and exhaustive AC. Practicable algorithms have simple implementations, yet their level of cooling is far from optimal; exhaustive algorithms, on the other hand, cool much better, and some even reach (asymptotically) an optimal level of cooling, but they are not practicable. We introduce here semioptimal practicable AC (SOPAC), wherein a few cycles (typically two to six) are performed at each recursive level. Two classes of SOPAC algorithms are proposed and analyzed. Both attain cooling levels significantly better than PAC and are much more efficient than the exhaustive algorithms. These algorithms are shown to bridge the gap between PAC and exhaustive AC. In addition, we calculated the number of spins required by SOPAC in order to purify qubits for quantum computation. As few as 12 and 7 spins are required (in an ideal scenario) to yield a mildly pure spin (60% polarized) from initial polarizations of 1% and 10%, respectively. In the latter case, about five more spins are sufficient to produce a highly pure spin (99.99% polarized), which could be relevant for fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  20. Application of heuristic satellite plan synthesis algorithms to requirements of the WARC-88 allotment plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.; Reilly, Charles H.; Walton, Eric K.; Mata, Fernando; Olen, Carl

    1990-01-01

    Creation of an Allotment Plan for the Fixed Satellite Service at the 1988 Space World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) represented a complex satellite plan synthesis problem, involving a large number of planned and existing systems. Solutions to this problem at WARC-88 required the use of both automated and manual procedures to develop an acceptable set of system positions. Development of an Allotment Plan may also be attempted through solution of an optimization problem, known as the Satellite Location Problem (SLP). Three automated heuristic procedures, developed specifically to solve SLP, are presented. The heuristics are then applied to two specific WARC-88 scenarios. Solutions resulting from the fully automated heuristics are then compared with solutions obtained at WARC-88 through a combination of both automated and manual planning efforts.

  1. POWER (power optimization for wireless energy requirements): A MATLAB based algorithm for design of hybrid energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K. A.; Albano, F.; Nevius, P. E.; Sastry, A. M.

    We have expanded and implemented an algorithm for selecting power supplies into a turnkey MATLAB code, "POWER" (power optimization for wireless energy requirements). Our algorithm uses three approaches to system design, specifying either: (1) a single, aggregate power profile; (2) a power system designed to satisfy several power ranges (micro-, milli- and Watt); or (3) a power system designed to be housed within specified spaces within the system. POWER was verified by conducting two case studies on hearing prosthetics: the TICA (LZ 3001) (Baumann group at the Tübingen University) and Amadeus cochlear implant (CI) (WIMS-ERC at the University of Michigan) based on a volume constraint of 2 cm 3. The most suitable solution identified by POWER for the TICA device came from Approach 1, wherein one secondary cell provided 26,000 cycles of 16 h operation. POWER identified Approach 2 as the solution for the WIMS-ERC Amadeus CI, which consisted of 1 cell for the microWatt power range and 1 cell for the milliWatt range (4.43 cm 3, ∼55% higher than the target volume), and provided 3280 cycles of 16 h operation (including re-charge of the batteries). Future work will be focused on continuously improving our present tool.

  2. 33 CFR 154.1035 - Specific requirements for facilities that could reasonably be expected to cause significant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facilities at 40 CFR part 112, appendix C, Attachment C-III may be substituted for the distances listed in... the first valve inside the secondary containment required by 40 CFR part 112. (iv) The appendix must... in bulk. A material safety data sheet meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200, 33 CFR...

  3. 33 CFR 154.1035 - Specific requirements for facilities that could reasonably be expected to cause significant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facilities at 40 CFR part 112, appendix C, Attachment C-III may be substituted for the distances listed in... the first valve inside the secondary containment required by 40 CFR part 112. (iv) The appendix must... in bulk. A material safety data sheet meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200, 33 CFR...

  4. 33 CFR 154.1035 - Specific requirements for facilities that could reasonably be expected to cause significant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facilities at 40 CFR part 112, appendix C, Attachment C-III may be substituted for the distances listed in... the first valve inside the secondary containment required by 40 CFR part 112. (iv) The appendix must... in bulk. A material safety data sheet meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200, 33 CFR...

  5. 33 CFR 154.1035 - Specific requirements for facilities that could reasonably be expected to cause significant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facilities at 40 CFR part 112, appendix C, Attachment C-III may be substituted for the distances listed in... the first valve inside the secondary containment required by 40 CFR part 112. (iv) The appendix must... in bulk. A material safety data sheet meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200, 33 CFR...

  6. 26 CFR 54.4980F-1 - Notice requirements for certain pension plan amendments significantly reducing the rate of future...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... amendments significantly reducing the rate of future benefit accrual. 54.4980F-1 Section 54.4980F-1 Internal... significantly reducing the rate of future benefit accrual. The following questions and answers concern the... a plan amendment of an applicable pension plan that significantly reduces the rate of future...

  7. 26 CFR 54.4980F-1 - Notice requirements for certain pension plan amendments significantly reducing the rate of future...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... amendments significantly reducing the rate of future benefit accrual. 54.4980F-1 Section 54.4980F-1 Internal... significantly reducing the rate of future benefit accrual. The following questions and answers concern the... a plan amendment of an applicable pension plan that significantly reduces the rate of future...

  8. Automata learning algorithms and processes for providing more complete systems requirements specification by scenario generation, CSP-based syntax-oriented model construction, and R2D2C system requirements transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G. (Inventor); Margaria, Tiziana (Inventor); Rash, James L. (Inventor); Rouff, Christopher A. (Inventor); Steffen, Bernard (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Systems, methods and apparatus are provided through which in some embodiments, automata learning algorithms and techniques are implemented to generate a more complete set of scenarios for requirements based programming. More specifically, a CSP-based, syntax-oriented model construction, which requires the support of a theorem prover, is complemented by model extrapolation, via automata learning. This may support the systematic completion of the requirements, the nature of the requirement being partial, which provides focus on the most prominent scenarios. This may generalize requirement skeletons by extrapolation and may indicate by way of automatically generated traces where the requirement specification is too loose and additional information is required.

  9. 26 CFR 54.4980F-1 - Notice requirements for certain pension plan amendments significantly reducing the rate of future...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... notification requirements imposed by 4980F of the Internal Revenue Code and section 204(h) of ERISA relating to... Code and section 204(h) of ERISA? Q-2. What are the differences between section 4980F and section 204(h)? Q-3. What is an “applicable pension plan” to which section 4980F and section 204(h) apply? Q-4....

  10. 26 CFR 54.4980F-1 - Notice requirements for certain pension plan amendments significantly reducing the rate of future...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... notification requirements imposed by 4980F of the Internal Revenue Code and section 204(h) of ERISA relating to... Code and section 204(h) of ERISA? Q-2. What are the differences between section 4980F and section 204(h)? Q-3. What is an “applicable pension plan” to which section 4980F and section 204(h) apply? Q-4....

  11. 26 CFR 54.4980F-1 - Notice requirements for certain pension plan amendments significantly reducing the rate of future...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... any participant who separates from service after December 31, 2009, and before January 1, 2015, will..., 2015), the amendment does not result in a reduction that is significant because the amount of...

  12. G/SPLINES: A hybrid of Friedman's Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) algorithm with Holland's genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, David

    1991-01-01

    G/SPLINES are a hybrid of Friedman's Multivariable Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) algorithm with Holland's Genetic Algorithm. In this hybrid, the incremental search is replaced by a genetic search. The G/SPLINE algorithm exhibits performance comparable to that of the MARS algorithm, requires fewer least squares computations, and allows significantly larger problems to be considered.

  13. Future US energy demands based upon traditional consumption patterns lead to requirements which significantly exceed domestic supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Energy consumption in the United States has risen in response to both increasing population and to increasing levels of affluence. Depletion of domestic energy reserves requires consumption modulation, production of fossil fuels, more efficient conversion techniques, and large scale transitions to non-fossile fuel energy sources. Widening disparity between the wealthy and poor nations of the world contributes to trends that increase the likelihood of group action by the lesser developed countries to achieve political and economic goals. The formation of anticartel cartels is envisioned.

  14. Muscle mechanical work requirements during normal walking: the energetic cost of raising the body's center-of-mass is significant.

    PubMed

    Neptune, R R; Zajac, F E; Kautz, S A

    2004-06-01

    Inverted pendulum models of walking predict that little muscle work is required for the exchange of body potential and kinetic energy in single-limb support. External power during walking (product of the measured ground reaction force and body center-of-mass (COM) velocity) is often analyzed to deduce net work output or mechanical energetic cost by muscles. Based on external power analyses and inverted pendulum theory, it has been suggested that a primary mechanical energetic cost may be associated with the mechanical work required to redirect the COM motion at the step-to-step transition. However, these models do not capture the multi-muscle, multi-segmental properties of walking, co-excitation of muscles to coordinate segmental energetic flow, and simultaneous production of positive and negative muscle work. In this study, a muscle-actuated forward dynamic simulation of walking was used to assess whether: (1). potential and kinetic energy of the body are exchanged with little muscle work; (2). external mechanical power can estimate the mechanical energetic cost for muscles; and (3.) the net work output and the mechanical energetic cost for muscles occurs mostly in double support. We found that the net work output by muscles cannot be estimated from external power and was the highest when the COM moved upward in early single-limb support even though kinetic and potential energy were exchanged, and muscle mechanical (and most likely metabolic) energetic cost is dominated not only by the need to redirect the COM in double support but also by the need to raise the COM in single support. PMID:15111069

  15. Algorithms and Algorithmic Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veselov, V. M.; Koprov, V. M.

    This paper is intended as an introduction to a number of problems connected with the description of algorithms and algorithmic languages, particularly the syntaxes and semantics of algorithmic languages. The terms "letter, word, alphabet" are defined and described. The concept of the algorithm is defined and the relation between the algorithm and…

  16. The lesson of causal discovery algorithms for quantum correlations: causal explanations of Bell-inequality violations require fine-tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Christopher J.; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2015-03-01

    An active area of research in the fields of machine learning and statistics is the development of causal discovery algorithms, the purpose of which is to infer the causal relations that hold among a set of variables from the correlations that these exhibit . We apply some of these algorithms to the correlations that arise for entangled quantum systems. We show that they cannot distinguish correlations that satisfy Bell inequalities from correlations that violate Bell inequalities, and consequently that they cannot do justice to the challenges of explaining certain quantum correlations causally. Nonetheless, by adapting the conceptual tools of causal inference, we can show that any attempt to provide a causal explanation of nonsignalling correlations that violate a Bell inequality must contradict a core principle of these algorithms, namely, that an observed statistical independence between variables should not be explained by fine-tuning of the causal parameters. In particular, we demonstrate the need for such fine-tuning for most of the causal mechanisms that have been proposed to underlie Bell correlations, including superluminal causal influences, superdeterminism (that is, a denial of freedom of choice of settings), and retrocausal influences which do not introduce causal cycles.

  17. An Algorithm Measuring Donor Cell-Free DNA in Plasma of Cellular and Solid Organ Transplant Recipients That Does Not Require Donor or Recipient Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Paul M. K.; Khan, Aneal; Sajid, Umair; Chang, Nicholas; Suresh, Varun; Dimnik, Leo; Lamont, Ryan E.; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Martin, Steven R.; Pon, Richard T.; Weatherhead, Jene; Wegener, Shelly; Isaac, Debra; Greenway, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has significant potential in the diagnosis and monitoring of clinical conditions. However, accurately and easily distinguishing the relative proportion of DNA molecules in a mixture derived from two different sources (i.e., donor and recipient tissues after transplantation) is challenging. In human cellular transplantation, there is currently no useable method to detect in vivo engraftment, and blood-based non-invasive tests for allograft rejection in solid organ transplantation are either non-specific or absent. Elevated levels of donor cfDNA have been shown to correlate with solid organ rejection, but complex methodology limits implementation of this promising biomarker. We describe a cost-effective method to quantify donor cfDNA in recipient plasma using a panel of high-frequency single nucleotide polymorphisms, next-generation (semiconductor) sequencing, and a novel mixture model algorithm. In vitro, our method accurately and rapidly determined donor:recipient DNA admixture. For in vivo testing, donor cfDNA was serially quantified in an infant with a urea cycle disorder after receiving six daily infusions of donor liver cells. Donor cfDNA isolated from 1 to 2 ml of recipient plasma was detected as late as 24 weeks after infusion suggesting engraftment. The percentage of circulating donor cfDNA was also assessed in pediatric and adult heart transplant recipients undergoing routine endomyocardial biopsy with levels observed to be stable over time and generally measuring <1% in cases without moderate or severe cellular rejection. Unlike existing non-invasive methods used to define the proportion of donor cfDNA in solid organ transplant patients, our assay does not require sex mismatch, donor genotyping, or whole-genome sequencing and potentially has broad application to detect cellular engraftment or allograft injury after transplantation. PMID:27713880

  18. Earth observing system. Output data products and input requirements, version 2.0. Volume 3: Algorithm summary tables and non-EOS data products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yun-Chi; Chang, Hyo Duck; Krupp, Brian; Kumar, Ravindar; Swaroop, Anand

    1992-01-01

    Volume 3 assists Earth Observing System (EOS) investigators in locating required non-EOS data products by identifying their non-EOS input requirements and providing the information on data sets available at various Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC's), including those from Pathfinder Activities and Earth Probes. Volume 3 is intended to complement, not to duplicate, the the EOSDIS Science Data Plan (SDP) by providing detailed data set information which was not presented in the SDP. Section 9 of this volume discusses the algorithm summary tables containing information on retrieval algorithms, expected outputs and required input data. Section 10 describes the non-EOS input requirements of instrument teams and IDS investigators. Also described are the current and future data holdings of the original seven DAACS and data products planned from the future missions and projects including Earth Probes and Pathfinder Activities. Section 11 describes source of information used in compiling data set information presented in this volume. A list of data set attributes used to describe various data sets is presented in section 12 along with their descriptions. Finally, Section 13 presents the SPSO's future plan to improve this report .

  19. Managing Algorithmic Skeleton Nesting Requirements in Realistic Image Processing Applications: The Case of the SKiPPER-II Parallel Programming Environment's Operating Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudarcher, Rémi; Duculty, Florent; Serot, Jocelyn; Jurie, Frédéric; Derutin, Jean-Pierre; Dhome, Michel

    2005-12-01

    SKiPPER is a SKeleton-based Parallel Programming EnviRonment being developed since 1996 and running at LASMEA Laboratory, the Blaise-Pascal University, France. The main goal of the project was to demonstrate the applicability of skeleton-based parallel programming techniques to the fast prototyping of reactive vision applications. This paper deals with the special features embedded in the latest version of the project: algorithmic skeleton nesting capabilities and a fully dynamic operating model. Throughout the case study of a complete and realistic image processing application, in which we have pointed out the requirement for skeleton nesting, we are presenting the operating model of this feature. The work described here is one of the few reported experiments showing the application of skeleton nesting facilities for the parallelisation of a realistic application, especially in the area of image processing. The image processing application we have chosen is a 3D face-tracking algorithm from appearance.

  20. So much to do, so little time. To accomplish the mandatory initiatives of ARRA, healthcare organizations will require significant and thoughtful planning, prioritization and execution.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) has set forth legislation for the healthcare community to achieve adoption of electronic health records (EHR), as well as form data standards, health information exchanges (HIE) and compliance with more stringent security and privacy controls under the HITECH Act. While the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONCHIT) works on the definition of both "meaningful use" and "certification" of information technology systems, providers in particular must move forward with their IT initiatives to achieve the basic requirements for Medicare and Medicaid incentives starting in 2011, and avoid penalties that will reduce reimbursement beginning in 2015. In addition, providers, payors, government and non-government stakeholders will all have to balance the implementation of EHRs, working with HIEs, at the same time that they must upgrade their systems to be in compliance with ICD-10 and HIPAA 5010 code sets. Compliance deadlines for EHRs and HIEs begin in 2011, while ICD-10 diagnosis and procedure code sets compliance is required by October 2013 and HIPAA 5010 transaction sets, with one exception, is required by January 1, 2012. In order to accomplish these strategic and mandatory initiatives successfully and simultaneously, healthcare organizations will require significant and thoughtful planning, prioritization and execution. PMID:20077923

  1. So much to do, so little time. To accomplish the mandatory initiatives of ARRA, healthcare organizations will require significant and thoughtful planning, prioritization and execution.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) has set forth legislation for the healthcare community to achieve adoption of electronic health records (EHR), as well as form data standards, health information exchanges (HIE) and compliance with more stringent security and privacy controls under the HITECH Act. While the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONCHIT) works on the definition of both "meaningful use" and "certification" of information technology systems, providers in particular must move forward with their IT initiatives to achieve the basic requirements for Medicare and Medicaid incentives starting in 2011, and avoid penalties that will reduce reimbursement beginning in 2015. In addition, providers, payors, government and non-government stakeholders will all have to balance the implementation of EHRs, working with HIEs, at the same time that they must upgrade their systems to be in compliance with ICD-10 and HIPAA 5010 code sets. Compliance deadlines for EHRs and HIEs begin in 2011, while ICD-10 diagnosis and procedure code sets compliance is required by October 2013 and HIPAA 5010 transaction sets, with one exception, is required by January 1, 2012. In order to accomplish these strategic and mandatory initiatives successfully and simultaneously, healthcare organizations will require significant and thoughtful planning, prioritization and execution.

  2. Exhaling a budesonide inhaler through the nose results in a significant reduction in dose requirement of budesonide nasal spray in patients having asthma with rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, W A

    1999-01-01

    Budesonide, an inhaled corticosteroid is used routinely in the treatment of bronchial asthma and rhinitis. Although inhaled corticosteroids in therapeutic doses are unlikely to result in systemic side effects, there is as yet skepticism about their routine and prolonged use. The aim of this study was to determine whether budesonide inhalation through a metered dose inhaler, when exhaled through the nose could result in a reduction in the dose requirement of budesonide metered nasal spray in patients having perennial allergic asthma with rhinitis. This study was an open, parallel, comparative, crossover trial in which 49 young patients having perennial allergic asthma with rhinitis were divided into two groups and administered either a combination of budesonide metered dose inhaler with a budesonide nasal spray or a budesonide inhaler alone, which was to be exhaled through the nose. Both groups were later crossed over and weekly symptom scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow rates were monitored during each phase of the study. Finally, patients who volunteered from both groups were instructed to note the reduction in dose requirement of budesonide nasal spray while using a budesonide inhaler and exhaling it through the nose. The results of this study reveal that when a budesonide inhaler is exhaled through the nose, it results in an improvement in symptom scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow rates, which were significantly less than those obtained in the group using both a budesonide nasal spray and a metered dose inhaler. In addition, exhaling budesonide through the nose results in a 40.1% reduction in the dose requirement of a budesonide nasal spray, which is statistically significant (p < 0.001).

  3. Algorithms for the Control of NTM by Localized ECRH. Principles and Requirements of the Real Time Diagnostic and Control System

    SciTech Connect

    D' Antona, G.; Cirant, S.; Farina, D.; Gandini, F.; Lazzaro, E.; Treuterer, W.; Manini, A.

    2008-03-12

    The diagnostics requirements for the control of NTM instabilities is outlined stressing the importance of correctly managing the estimate uncertainty by the control system. A methodology for the Bayesian assimilation of model predictions and observations is outlined together with an example of application.

  4. Inference from matrix products: a heuristic spin glass algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2008-01-01

    We present an algorithm for finding ground states of two-dimensional spin-glass systems based on ideas from matrix product states in quantum information theory. The algorithm works directly at zero temperature and defines an approximation to the energy whose accuracy depends on a parameter k. We test the algorithm against exact methods on random field and random bond Ising models, and we find that accurate results require a k which scales roughly polynomially with the system size. The algorithm also performs well when tested on small systems with arbitrary interactions, where no fast, exact algorithms exist. The time required is significantly less than Monte Carlo schemes.

  5. A universal algorithm for genome-wide in silicio identification of biologically significant gene promoter putative cis-regulatory-elements; identification of new elements for reactive oxygen species and sucrose signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Matt; Kleczkowski, Leszek A; Karpinski, Stanislaw

    2006-02-01

    Short motifs of many cis-regulatory elements (CREs) can be found in the promoters of most Arabidopsis genes, and this raises the question of how their presence can confer specific regulation. We developed a universal algorithm to test the biological significance of CREs by first identifying every Arabidopsis gene with a CRE and then statistically correlating the presence or absence of the element with the gene expression profile on multiple DNA microarrays. This algorithm was successfully verified for previously characterized abscisic acid, ethylene, sucrose and drought responsive CREs in Arabidopsis, showing that the presence of these elements indeed correlates with treatment-specific gene induction. Later, we used standard motif sampling methods to identify 128 putative motifs induced by excess light, reactive oxygen species and sucrose. Our algorithm was able to filter 20 out of 128 novel CREs which significantly correlated with gene induction by either heat, reactive oxygen species and/or sucrose. The position, orientation and sequence specificity of CREs was tested in silicio by analyzing the expression of genes with naturally occurring sequence variations. In three novel CREs the forward orientation correlated with sucrose induction and the reverse orientation with sucrose suppression. The functionality of the predicted novel CREs was experimentally confirmed using Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures transformed with short promoter fragments or artificial promoters fused with the GUS reporter gene. Our genome-wide analysis opens up new possibilities for in silicio verification of the biological significance of newly discovered CREs, and allows for subsequent selection of such CREs for experimental studies.

  6. Algorithms for improved performance in cryptographic protocols.

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn

    2003-11-01

    Public key cryptographic algorithms provide data authentication and non-repudiation for electronic transmissions. The mathematical nature of the algorithms, however, means they require a significant amount of computation, and encrypted messages and digital signatures possess high bandwidth. Accordingly, there are many environments (e.g. wireless, ad-hoc, remote sensing networks) where public-key requirements are prohibitive and cannot be used. The use of elliptic curves in public-key computations has provided a means by which computations and bandwidth can be somewhat reduced. We report here on the research conducted in an LDRD aimed to find even more efficient algorithms and to make public-key cryptography available to a wider range of computing environments. We improved upon several algorithms, including one for which a patent has been applied. Further we discovered some new problems and relations on which future cryptographic algorithms may be based.

  7. Improved Bat Algorithm Applied to Multilevel Image Thresholding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Multilevel image thresholding is a very important image processing technique that is used as a basis for image segmentation and further higher level processing. However, the required computational time for exhaustive search grows exponentially with the number of desired thresholds. Swarm intelligence metaheuristics are well known as successful and efficient optimization methods for intractable problems. In this paper, we adjusted one of the latest swarm intelligence algorithms, the bat algorithm, for the multilevel image thresholding problem. The results of testing on standard benchmark images show that the bat algorithm is comparable with other state-of-the-art algorithms. We improved standard bat algorithm, where our modifications add some elements from the differential evolution and from the artificial bee colony algorithm. Our new proposed improved bat algorithm proved to be better than five other state-of-the-art algorithms, improving quality of results in all cases and significantly improving convergence speed. PMID:25165733

  8. Barzilai-Borwein method in graph drawing algorithm based on Kamada-Kawai algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasal, Martin; Pospisil, Lukas; Nowakova, Jana

    2016-06-01

    Extension of Kamada-Kawai algorithm, which was designed for calculating layouts of simple undirected graphs, is presented in this paper. Graphs drawn by Kamada-Kawai algorithm exhibit symmetries, tend to produce aesthetically pleasing and crossing-free layouts for planar graphs. Minimization of Kamada-Kawai algorithm is based on Newton-Raphson method, which needs Hessian matrix of second derivatives of minimized node. Disadvantage of Kamada-Kawai embedder algorithm is computational requirements. This is caused by searching of minimal potential energy of the whole system, which is minimized node by node. The node with highest energy is minimized against all nodes till the local equilibrium state is reached. In this paper with Barzilai-Borwein (BB) minimization algorithm, which needs only gradient for minimum searching, instead of Newton-Raphson method, is worked. It significantly improves the computational time and requirements.

  9. Mapping algorithms on regular parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.

    1989-01-01

    It is significant that many of time-intensive scientific algorithms are formulated as nested loops, which are inherently regularly structured. In this dissertation the relations between the mathematical structure of nested loop algorithms and the architectural capabilities required for their parallel execution are studied. The architectural model considered in depth is that of an arbitrary dimensional systolic array. The mathematical structure of the algorithm is characterized by classifying its data-dependence vectors according to the new ZERO-ONE-INFINITE property introduced. Using this classification, the first complete set of necessary and sufficient conditions for correct transformation of a nested loop algorithm onto a given systolic array of an arbitrary dimension by means of linear mappings is derived. Practical methods to derive optimal or suboptimal systolic array implementations are also provided. The techniques developed are used constructively to develop families of implementations satisfying various optimization criteria and to design programmable arrays efficiently executing classes of algorithms. In addition, a Computer-Aided Design system running on SUN workstations has been implemented to help in the design. The methodology, which deals with general algorithms, is illustrated by synthesizing linear and planar systolic array algorithms for matrix multiplication, a reindexed Warshall-Floyd transitive closure algorithm, and the longest common subsequence algorithm.

  10. A novel algorithm for Bluetooth ECG.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Utpal T; Desai, Uday B

    2012-11-01

    In wireless transmission of ECG, data latency will be significant when battery power level and data transmission distance are not maintained. In applications like home monitoring or personalized care, to overcome the joint effect of previous issues of wireless transmission and other ECG measurement noises, a novel filtering strategy is required. Here, a novel algorithm, identified as peak rejection adaptive sampling modified moving average (PRASMMA) algorithm for wireless ECG is introduced. This algorithm first removes error in bit pattern of received data if occurred in wireless transmission and then removes baseline drift. Afterward, a modified moving average is implemented except in the region of each QRS complexes. The algorithm also sets its filtering parameters according to different sampling rate selected for acquisition of signals. To demonstrate the work, a prototyped Bluetooth-based ECG module is used to capture ECG with different sampling rate and in different position of patient. This module transmits ECG wirelessly to Bluetooth-enabled devices where the PRASMMA algorithm is applied on captured ECG. The performance of PRASMMA algorithm is compared with moving average and S-Golay algorithms visually as well as numerically. The results show that the PRASMMA algorithm can significantly improve the ECG reconstruction by efficiently removing the noise and its use can be extended to any parameters where peaks are importance for diagnostic purpose.

  11. A Challenging Case of Limb Salvage Requiring a Combination of Composite Fixation and Masquelet Technique to Address Significant Segmental Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Blair, C.; Simela, A. T.; Cross, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    Cases of limb salvage following skeletal trauma involving significant bone loss pose a particular challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Certain techniques for addressing this complex issue have been advanced in recent years and have met with considerable success. The Masquelet technique involves a staged procedure in which a temporary skeletal stabilization is paired with implantation of an antibiotic spacer and left in place for 6–8 weeks, during which time a “pseudomembrane” forms around the cement spacer. During the second stage of the procedure, the pseudomembrane is incised, the antibiotic spacer removed, and bone graft is placed. We present a case of significant segmental femur loss in a 19-year-old male opting for limb salvage in which a 17-centimeter segmental loss of bone was essentially regrown using a combination of the Masquelet technique with supplemental endosteal fixation. PMID:25789190

  12. A lateral guidance algorithm to reduce the post-aerobraking burn requirements for a lift-modulated orbital transfer vehicle. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    A lateral guidance algorithm which controls the location of the line of intersection between the actual and desired orbital planes (the hinge line) is developed for the aerobraking phase of a lift-modulated orbital transfer vehicle. The on-board targeting algorithm associated with this lateral guidance algorithm is simple and concise which is very desirable since computation time and space are limited on an on-board flight computer. A variational equation which describes the movement of the hinge line is derived. Simple relationships between the plane error, the desired hinge line position, the position out-of-plane error, and the velocity out-of-plane error are found. A computer simulation is developed to test the lateral guidance algorithm for a variety of operating conditions. The algorithm does reduce the total burn magnitude needed to achieve the desired orbit by allowing the plane correction and perigee-raising burn to be combined in a single maneuver. The algorithm performs well under vacuum perigee dispersions, pot-hole density disturbance, and thick atmospheres. The results for many different operating conditions are presented.

  13. Improved local linearization algorithm for solving the quaternion equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, K.; Cook, G.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a new and more accurate local linearization algorithm for numerically solving sets of linear time-varying differential equations. Of special interest is the application of this algorithm to the quaternion rate equations. The results are compared, both analytically and experimentally, with previous results using local linearization methods. The new algorithm requires approximately one-third more calculations per step than the previously developed local linearization algorithm; however, this disadvantage could be reduced by using parallel implementation. For some cases the new algorithm yields significant improvement in accuracy, even with an enlarged sampling interval. The reverse is true in other cases. The errors depend on the values of angular velocity, angular acceleration, and integration step size. One important result is that for the worst case the new algorithm can guarantee eigenvalues nearer the region of stability than can the previously developed algorithm.

  14. Advanced Imaging Algorithms for Radiation Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The intent of the proposed work, in collaboration with University of Michigan, is to develop the algorithms that will bring the analysis from qualitative images to quantitative attributes of objects containing SNM. The first step to achieving this is to develop an indepth understanding of the intrinsic errors associated with the deconvolution and MLEM algorithms. A significant new effort will be undertaken to relate the image data to a posited three-dimensional model of geometric primitives that can be adjusted to get the best fit. In this way, parameters of the model such as sizes, shapes, and masses can be extracted for both radioactive and non-radioactive materials. This model-based algorithm will need the integrated response of a hypothesized configuration of material to be calculated many times. As such, both the MLEM and the model-based algorithm require significant increases in calculation speed in order to converge to solutions in practical amounts of time.

  15. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  16. NOSS altimeter algorithm specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Forsythe, R. G.; Mcmillan, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    A description of all algorithms required for altimeter processing is given. Each description includes title, description, inputs/outputs, general algebraic sequences and data volume. All required input/output data files are described and the computer resources required for the entire altimeter processing system were estimated. The majority of the data processing requirements for any radar altimeter of the Seasat-1 type are scoped. Additions and deletions could be made for the specific altimeter products required by other projects.

  17. Competing Sudakov veto algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiss, Ronald; Verheyen, Rob

    2016-07-01

    We present a formalism to analyze the distribution produced by a Monte Carlo algorithm. We perform these analyses on several versions of the Sudakov veto algorithm, adding a cutoff, a second variable and competition between emission channels. The formal analysis allows us to prove that multiple, seemingly different competition algorithms, including those that are currently implemented in most parton showers, lead to the same result. Finally, we test their performance in a semi-realistic setting and show that there are significantly faster alternatives to the commonly used algorithms.

  18. Totally parallel multilevel algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, Paul O.

    1988-01-01

    Four totally parallel algorithms for the solution of a sparse linear system have common characteristics which become quite apparent when they are implemented on a highly parallel hypercube such as the CM2. These four algorithms are Parallel Superconvergent Multigrid (PSMG) of Frederickson and McBryan, Robust Multigrid (RMG) of Hackbusch, the FFT based Spectral Algorithm, and Parallel Cyclic Reduction. In fact, all four can be formulated as particular cases of the same totally parallel multilevel algorithm, which are referred to as TPMA. In certain cases the spectral radius of TPMA is zero, and it is recognized to be a direct algorithm. In many other cases the spectral radius, although not zero, is small enough that a single iteration per timestep keeps the local error within the required tolerance.

  19. New algorithms for the minimal form'' problem

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, J.S.; Cook, G.O. Jr. ); Purtill, M.R. . Center for Communications Research)

    1991-12-20

    It is widely appreciated that large-scale algebraic computation (performing computer algebra operations on large symbolic expressions) places very significant demands upon existing computer algebra systems. Because of this, parallel versions of many important algorithms have been successfully sought, and clever techniques have been found for improving the speed of the algebraic simplification process. In addition, some attention has been given to the issue of restructuring large expressions, or transforming them into minimal forms.'' By minimal form,'' we mean that form of an expression that involves a minimum number of operations in the sense that no simple transformation on the expression leads to a form involving fewer operations. Unfortunately, the progress that has been achieved to date on this very hard problem is not adequate for the very significant demands of large computer algebra problems. In response to this situation, we have developed some efficient algorithms for constructing minimal forms.'' In this paper, the multi-stage algorithm in which these new algorithms operate is defined and the features of these algorithms are developed. In a companion paper, we introduce the core algebra engine of a new tool that provides the algebraic framework required for the implementation of these new algorithms.

  20. Investigation of registration algorithms for the automatic tile processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamir, Dan E.

    1995-01-01

    The Robotic Tile Inspection System (RTPS), under development in NASA-KSC, is expected to automate the processes of post-flight re-water-proofing and the process of inspection of the Shuttle heat absorbing tiles. An important task of the robot vision sub-system is to register the 'real-world' coordinates with the coordinates of the robot model of the Shuttle tiles. The model coordinates relate to a tile data-base and pre-flight tile-images. In the registration process, current (post-flight) images are aligned with pre-flight images to detect the rotation and translation displacement required for the coordinate systems rectification. The research activities performed this summer included study and evaluation of the registration algorithm that is currently implemented by the RTPS, as well as, investigation of the utility of other registration algorithms. It has been found that the current algorithm is not robust enough. This algorithm has a success rate of less than 80% and is, therefore, not suitable for complying with the requirements of the RTPS. Modifications to the current algorithm has been developed and tested. These modifications can improve the performance of the registration algorithm in a significant way. However, this improvement is not sufficient to satisfy system requirements. A new algorithm for registration has been developed and tested. This algorithm presented very high degree of robustness with success rate of 96%.

  1. Automatic design of decision-tree algorithms with evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Barros, Rodrigo C; Basgalupp, Márcio P; de Carvalho, André C P L F; Freitas, Alex A

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the empirical analysis of a hyper-heuristic evolutionary algorithm that is capable of automatically designing top-down decision-tree induction algorithms. Top-down decision-tree algorithms are of great importance, considering their ability to provide an intuitive and accurate knowledge representation for classification problems. The automatic design of these algorithms seems timely, given the large literature accumulated over more than 40 years of research in the manual design of decision-tree induction algorithms. The proposed hyper-heuristic evolutionary algorithm, HEAD-DT, is extensively tested using 20 public UCI datasets and 10 microarray gene expression datasets. The algorithms automatically designed by HEAD-DT are compared with traditional decision-tree induction algorithms, such as C4.5 and CART. Experimental results show that HEAD-DT is capable of generating algorithms which are significantly more accurate than C4.5 and CART.

  2. Parallel implementation of an algorithm for Delaunay triangulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Marshal L.

    1992-01-01

    The theory and practice of implementing Tanemura's algorithm for 3D Delaunay triangulation on Intel's Gamma prototype, a 128 processor MIMD computer, is described. Efficient implementation of Tanemura's algorithm on a conventional, vector processing supercomputer is problematic. It does not vectorize to any significant degree and requires indirect addressing. Efficient implementation on a parallel architecture is possible, however. Speeds in excess of 20 times a single processor Cray Y-MP are realized on 128 processors of the Intel Gamma prototype.

  3. Parallel implementation of an algorithm for Delaunay triangulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Marshall L.

    1992-01-01

    This work concerns the theory and practice of implementing Tanemura's algorithm for 3D Delaunay triangulation on Intel's Gamma prototype, a 128 processor MIMD computer. Tanemura's algorithm does not vectorize to any significant degree and requires indirect addressing. Efficient implementation on a conventional, vector processing, supercomputer is problematic. Efficient implementation on a parallel architecture is possible, however. In this work, speeds in excess of 8 times a single processor Cray Y-mp are realized on 128 processors of the Intel Gamma prototype.

  4. Fast Combinatorial Algorithm for the Solution of Linearly Constrained Least Squares Problems

    DOEpatents

    Van Benthem, Mark H.; Keenan, Michael R.

    2008-11-11

    A fast combinatorial algorithm can significantly reduce the computational burden when solving general equality and inequality constrained least squares problems with large numbers of observation vectors. The combinatorial algorithm provides a mathematically rigorous solution and operates at great speed by reorganizing the calculations to take advantage of the combinatorial nature of the problems to be solved. The combinatorial algorithm exploits the structure that exists in large-scale problems in order to minimize the number of arithmetic operations required to obtain a solution.

  5. Tactical Synthesis Of Efficient Global Search Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedunuri, Srinivas; Smith, Douglas R.; Cook, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Algorithm synthesis transforms a formal specification into an efficient algorithm to solve a problem. Algorithm synthesis in Specware combines the formal specification of a problem with a high-level algorithm strategy. To derive an efficient algorithm, a developer must define operators that refine the algorithm by combining the generic operators in the algorithm with the details of the problem specification. This derivation requires skill and a deep understanding of the problem and the algorithmic strategy. In this paper we introduce two tactics to ease this process. The tactics serve a similar purpose to tactics used for determining indefinite integrals in calculus, that is suggesting possible ways to attack the problem.

  6. NOSS Altimeter Detailed Algorithm specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Mcmillan, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The details of the algorithms and data sets required for satellite radar altimeter data processing are documented in a form suitable for (1) development of the benchmark software and (2) coding the operational software. The algorithms reported in detail are those established for altimeter processing. The algorithms which required some additional development before documenting for production were only scoped. The algorithms are divided into two levels of processing. The first level converts the data to engineering units and applies corrections for instrument variations. The second level provides geophysical measurements derived from altimeter parameters for oceanographic users.

  7. An efficient algorithm for calculating the exact Hausdorff distance.

    PubMed

    Taha, Abdel Aziz; Hanbury, Allan

    2015-11-01

    The Hausdorff distance (HD) between two point sets is a commonly used dissimilarity measure for comparing point sets and image segmentations. Especially when very large point sets are compared using the HD, for example when evaluating magnetic resonance volume segmentations, or when the underlying applications are based on time critical tasks, like motion detection, then the computational complexity of HD algorithms becomes an important issue. In this paper we propose a novel efficient algorithm for computing the exact Hausdorff distance. In a runtime analysis, the proposed algorithm is demonstrated to have nearly-linear complexity. Furthermore, it has efficient performance for large point set sizes as well as for large grid size; performs equally for sparse and dense point sets; and finally it is general without restrictions on the characteristics of the point set. The proposed algorithm is tested against the HD algorithm of the widely used national library of medicine insight segmentation and registration toolkit (ITK) using magnetic resonance volumes with extremely large size. The proposed algorithm outperforms the ITK HD algorithm both in speed and memory required. In an experiment using trajectories from a road network, the proposed algorithm significantly outperforms an HD algorithm based on R-Trees. PMID:26440258

  8. Improved multiprocessor garbage collection algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, I.A.; Stallard, R.P.; Woodward, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines the results of an investigation of existing multiprocessor garbage collection algorithms and introduces two new algorithms which significantly improve some aspects of the performance of their predecessors. The two algorithms arise from different starting assumptions. One considers the case where the algorithm will terminate successfully whatever list structure is being processed and assumes that the extra data space should be minimised. The other seeks a very fast garbage collection time for list structures that do not contain loops. Results of both theoretical and experimental investigations are given to demonstrate the efficacy of the algorithms. 7 references.

  9. The Superior Lambert Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    der, G.

    2011-09-01

    Lambert algorithms are used extensively for initial orbit determination, mission planning, space debris correlation, and missile targeting, just to name a few applications. Due to the significance of the Lambert problem in Astrodynamics, Gauss, Battin, Godal, Lancaster, Gooding, Sun and many others (References 1 to 15) have provided numerous formulations leading to various analytic solutions and iterative methods. Most Lambert algorithms and their computer programs can only work within one revolution, break down or converge slowly when the transfer angle is near zero or 180 degrees, and their multi-revolution limitations are either ignored or barely addressed. Despite claims of robustness, many Lambert algorithms fail without notice, and the users seldom have a clue why. The DerAstrodynamics lambert2 algorithm, which is based on the analytic solution formulated by Sun, works for any number of revolutions and converges rapidly at any transfer angle. It provides significant capability enhancements over every other Lambert algorithm in use today. These include improved speed, accuracy, robustness, and multirevolution capabilities as well as implementation simplicity. Additionally, the lambert2 algorithm provides a powerful tool for solving the angles-only problem without artificial singularities (pointed out by Gooding in Reference 16), which involves 3 lines of sight captured by optical sensors, or systems such as the Air Force Space Surveillance System (AFSSS). The analytic solution is derived from the extended Godal’s time equation by Sun, while the iterative method of solution is that of Laguerre, modified for robustness. The Keplerian solution of a Lambert algorithm can be extended to include the non-Keplerian terms of the Vinti algorithm via a simple targeting technique (References 17 to 19). Accurate analytic non-Keplerian trajectories can be predicted for satellites and ballistic missiles, while performing at least 100 times faster in speed than most

  10. Noise filtering algorithm for the MFTF-B computer based control system

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, E.G.

    1983-11-30

    An algorithm to reduce the message traffic in the MFTF-B computer based control system is described. The algorithm filters analog inputs to the control system. Its purpose is to distinguish between changes in the inputs due to noise and changes due to significant variations in the quantity being monitored. Noise is rejected while significant changes are reported to the control system data base, thus keeping the data base updated with a minimum number of messages. The algorithm is memory efficient, requiring only four bytes of storage per analog channel, and computationally simple, requiring only subtraction and comparison. Quantitative analysis of the algorithm is presented for the case of additive Gaussian noise. It is shown that the algorithm is stable and tends toward the mean value of the monitored variable over a wide variety of additive noise distributions.

  11. Algorithm development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Lomax, Harvard

    1987-01-01

    The past decade has seen considerable activity in algorithm development for the Navier-Stokes equations. This has resulted in a wide variety of useful new techniques. Some examples for the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations are presented, divided into two parts. One is devoted to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and the other to the compressible form.

  12. A fast algorithm for sparse matrix computations related to inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Wu, W.; Darve, E.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a fast algorithm for computing certain entries of the inverse of a sparse matrix. Such computations are critical to many applications, such as the calculation of non-equilibrium Green's functions Gr and G< for nano-devices. The FIND (Fast Inverse using Nested Dissection) algorithm is optimal in the big-O sense. However, in practice, FIND suffers from two problems due to the width-2 separators used by its partitioning scheme. One problem is the presence of a large constant factor in the computational cost of FIND. The other problem is that the partitioning scheme used by FIND is incompatible with most existing partitioning methods and libraries for nested dissection, which all use width-1 separators. Our new algorithm resolves these problems by thoroughly decomposing the computation process such that width-1 separators can be used, resulting in a significant speedup over FIND for realistic devices — up to twelve-fold in simulation. The new algorithm also has the added advantage that desired off-diagonal entries can be computed for free. Consequently, our algorithm is faster than the current state-of-the-art recursive methods for meshes of any size. Furthermore, the framework used in the analysis of our algorithm is the first attempt to explicitly apply the widely-used relationship between mesh nodes and matrix computations to the problem of multiple eliminations with reuse of intermediate results. This framework makes our algorithm easier to generalize, and also easier to compare against other methods related to elimination trees. Finally, our accuracy analysis shows that the algorithms that require back-substitution are subject to significant extra round-off errors, which become extremely large even for some well-conditioned matrices or matrices with only moderately large condition numbers. When compared to these back-substitution algorithms, our algorithm is generally a few orders of magnitude more accurate, and our produced round-off errors

  13. AeroADL: applying the integration of the Suomi-NPP science algorithms with the Algorithm Development Library to the calibration and validation task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houchin, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    A common problem for the off-line validation of the calibration algorithms and algorithm coefficients is being able to run science data through the exact same software used for on-line calibration of that data. The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program solved part of this problem by making the Algorithm Development Library (ADL) available, which allows the operational algorithm code to be compiled and run on a desktop Linux workstation using flat file input and output. However, this solved only part of the problem, as the toolkit and methods to initiate the processing of data through the algorithms were geared specifically toward the algorithm developer, not the calibration analyst. In algorithm development mode, a limited number of sets of test data are staged for the algorithm once, and then run through the algorithm over and over as the software is developed and debugged. In calibration analyst mode, we are continually running new data sets through the algorithm, which requires significant effort to stage each of those data sets for the algorithm without additional tools. AeroADL solves this second problem by providing a set of scripts that wrap the ADL tools, providing both efficient means to stage and process an input data set, to override static calibration coefficient look-up-tables (LUT) with experimental versions of those tables, and to manage a library containing multiple versions of each of the static LUT files in such a way that the correct set of LUTs required for each algorithm are automatically provided to the algorithm without analyst effort. Using AeroADL, The Aerospace Corporation's analyst team has demonstrated the ability to quickly and efficiently perform analysis tasks for both the VIIRS and OMPS sensors with minimal training on the software tools.

  14. Temperature Corrected Bootstrap Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Joey C.; Zwally, H. Jay

    1997-01-01

    A temperature corrected Bootstrap Algorithm has been developed using Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer data in preparation to the upcoming AMSR instrument aboard ADEOS and EOS-PM. The procedure first calculates the effective surface emissivity using emissivities of ice and water at 6 GHz and a mixing formulation that utilizes ice concentrations derived using the current Bootstrap algorithm but using brightness temperatures from 6 GHz and 37 GHz channels. These effective emissivities are then used to calculate surface ice which in turn are used to convert the 18 GHz and 37 GHz brightness temperatures to emissivities. Ice concentrations are then derived using the same technique as with the Bootstrap algorithm but using emissivities instead of brightness temperatures. The results show significant improvement in the area where ice temperature is expected to vary considerably such as near the continental areas in the Antarctic, where the ice temperature is colder than average, and in marginal ice zones.

  15. Higher-order force gradient symplectic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Siu A.; Kidwell, Donald W.

    2000-12-01

    We show that a recently discovered fourth order symplectic algorithm, which requires one evaluation of force gradient in addition to three evaluations of the force, when iterated to higher order, yielded algorithms that are far superior to similarly iterated higher order algorithms based on the standard Forest-Ruth algorithm. We gauge the accuracy of each algorithm by comparing the step-size independent error functions associated with energy conservation and the rotation of the Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector when solving a highly eccentric Kepler problem. For orders 6, 8, 10, and 12, the new algorithms are approximately a factor of 103, 104, 104, and 105 better.

  16. Basic cluster compression algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.; Lee, J.

    1980-01-01

    Feature extraction and data compression of LANDSAT data is accomplished by BCCA program which reduces costs associated with transmitting, storing, distributing, and interpreting multispectral image data. Algorithm uses spatially local clustering to extract features from image data to describe spectral characteristics of data set. Approach requires only simple repetitive computations, and parallel processing can be used for very high data rates. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on SEL 32/55.

  17. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  18. An Improved Inertial Frame Alignment Algorithm Based on Horizontal Alignment Information for Marine SINS.

    PubMed

    Che, Yanting; Wang, Qiuying; Gao, Wei; Yu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an improved inertial frame alignment algorithm for a marine SINS under mooring conditions is proposed, which significantly improves accuracy. Since the horizontal alignment is easy to complete, and a characteristic of gravity is that its component in the horizontal plane is zero, we use a clever method to improve the conventional inertial alignment algorithm. Firstly, a large misalignment angle model and a dimensionality reduction Gauss-Hermite filter are employed to establish the fine horizontal reference frame. Based on this, the projection of the gravity in the body inertial coordinate frame can be calculated easily. Then, the initial alignment algorithm is accomplished through an inertial frame alignment algorithm. The simulation and experiment results show that the improved initial alignment algorithm performs better than the conventional inertial alignment algorithm, and meets the accuracy requirements of a medium-accuracy marine SINS.

  19. An Improved Inertial Frame Alignment Algorithm Based on Horizontal Alignment Information for Marine SINS

    PubMed Central

    Che, Yanting; Wang, Qiuying; Gao, Wei; Yu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an improved inertial frame alignment algorithm for a marine SINS under mooring conditions is proposed, which significantly improves accuracy. Since the horizontal alignment is easy to complete, and a characteristic of gravity is that its component in the horizontal plane is zero, we use a clever method to improve the conventional inertial alignment algorithm. Firstly, a large misalignment angle model and a dimensionality reduction Gauss-Hermite filter are employed to establish the fine horizontal reference frame. Based on this, the projection of the gravity in the body inertial coordinate frame can be calculated easily. Then, the initial alignment algorithm is accomplished through an inertial frame alignment algorithm. The simulation and experiment results show that the improved initial alignment algorithm performs better than the conventional inertial alignment algorithm, and meets the accuracy requirements of a medium-accuracy marine SINS. PMID:26445048

  20. [Algorithm for treating preoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Hemoglobin optimization and treatment of preoperative anemia in surgery with a moderate to high risk of surgical bleeding reduces the rate of transfusions and improves hemoglobin levels at discharge and can also improve postoperative outcomes. To this end, we need to schedule preoperative visits sufficiently in advance to treat the anemia. The treatment algorithm we propose comes with a simple checklist to determine whether we should refer the patient to a specialist or if we can treat the patient during the same visit. With the blood count test and additional tests for iron metabolism, inflammation parameter and glomerular filtration rate, we can decide whether to start the treatment with intravenous iron alone or erythropoietin with or without iron. With significant anemia, a visit after 15 days might be necessary to observe the response and supplement the treatment if required. The hemoglobin objective will depend on the type of surgery and the patient's characteristics.

  1. A new root-based direction-finding algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasylkiwskyj, Wasyl; Kopriva, Ivica; DoroslovačKi, Miloš; Zaghloul, Amir I.

    2007-04-01

    Polynomial rooting direction-finding (DF) algorithms are a computationally efficient alternative to search-based DF algorithms and are particularly suitable for uniform linear arrays of physically identical elements provided that mutual interaction among the array elements can be either neglected or compensated for. A popular algorithm in such situations is Root Multiple Signal Classification (Root MUSIC (RM)), wherein the estimation of the directions of arrivals (DOA) requires the computation of the roots of a (2N - 2) -order polynomial, where N represents number of array elements. The DOA are estimated from the L pairs of roots closest to the unit circle, where L represents number of sources. In this paper we derive a modified root polynomial (MRP) algorithm requiring the calculation of only L roots in order to estimate the L DOA. We evaluate the performance of the MRP algorithm numerically and show that it is as accurate as the RM algorithm but with a significantly simpler algebraic structure. In order to demonstrate that the theoretically predicted performance can be achieved in an experimental setting, a decoupled array is emulated in hardware using phase shifters. The results are in excellent agreement with theory.

  2. Algorithmic approach to intelligent robot mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, S.

    1983-05-01

    This paper presents Sutherland's algorithm, plus an alternative algorithm, which allows mobile robots to move about intelligently in environments resembling the rooms and hallways in which we move around. The main hardware requirements for a robot to use the algorithms presented are mobility and an ability to sense distances with some type of non-contact scanning device. This article does not discuss the actual robot construction. The emphasis is on heuristics and algorithms. 1 reference.

  3. An Accelerated Recursive Doubling Algorithm for Block Tridiagonal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, Sudip K

    2014-01-01

    Block tridiagonal systems of linear equations arise in a wide variety of scientific and engineering applications. Recursive doubling algorithm is a well-known prefix computation-based numerical algorithm that requires O(M^3(N/P + log P)) work to compute the solution of a block tridiagonal system with N block rows and block size M on P processors. In real-world applications, solutions of tridiagonal systems are most often sought with multiple, often hundreds and thousands, of different right hand sides but with the same tridiagonal matrix. Here, we show that a recursive doubling algorithm is sub-optimal when computing solutions of block tridiagonal systems with multiple right hand sides and present a novel algorithm, called the accelerated recursive doubling algorithm, that delivers O(R) improvement when solving block tridiagonal systems with R distinct right hand sides. Since R is typically about 100 1000, this improvement translates to very significant speedups in practice. Detailed complexity analyses of the new algorithm with empirical confirmation of runtime improvements are presented. To the best of our knowledge, this algorithm has not been reported before in the literature.

  4. Learning evasive maneuvers using evolutionary algorithms and neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Moung Hung

    In this research, evolutionary algorithms and recurrent neural networks are combined to evolve control knowledge to help pilots avoid being struck by a missile, based on a two-dimensional air combat simulation model. The recurrent neural network is used for representing the pilot's control knowledge and evolutionary algorithms (i.e., Genetic Algorithms, Evolution Strategies, and Evolutionary Programming) are used for optimizing the weights and/or topology of the recurrent neural network. The simulation model of the two-dimensional evasive maneuver problem evolved is used for evaluating the performance of the recurrent neural network. Five typical air combat conditions were selected to evaluate the performance of the recurrent neural networks evolved by the evolutionary algorithms. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) tests and response graphs were used to analyze the results. Overall, there was little difference in the performance of the three evolutionary algorithms used to evolve the control knowledge. However, the number of generations of each algorithm required to obtain the best performance was significantly different. ES converges the fastest, followed by EP and then by GA. The recurrent neural networks evolved by the evolutionary algorithms provided better performance than the traditional recommendations for evasive maneuvers, maximum gravitational turn, for each air combat condition. Furthermore, the recommended actions of the recurrent neural networks are reasonable and can be used for pilot training.

  5. An innovative localisation algorithm for railway vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allotta, B.; D'Adamio, P.; Malvezzi, M.; Pugi, L.; Ridolfi, A.; Rindi, A.; Vettori, G.

    2014-11-01

    In modern railway automatic train protection and automatic train control systems, odometry is a safety relevant on-board subsystem which estimates the instantaneous speed and the travelled distance of the train; a high reliability of the odometry estimate is fundamental, since an error on the train position may lead to a potentially dangerous overestimation of the distance available for braking. To improve the odometry estimate accuracy, data fusion of different inputs coming from a redundant sensor layout may be used. The aim of this work has been developing an innovative localisation algorithm for railway vehicles able to enhance the performances, in terms of speed and position estimation accuracy, of the classical odometry algorithms, such as the Italian Sistema Controllo Marcia Treno (SCMT). The proposed strategy consists of a sensor fusion between the information coming from a tachometer and an Inertial Measurements Unit (IMU). The sensor outputs have been simulated through a 3D multibody model of a railway vehicle. The work has provided the development of a custom IMU, designed by ECM S.p.a, in order to meet their industrial and business requirements. The industrial requirements have to be compliant with the European Train Control System (ETCS) standards: the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS), a project developed by the European Union to improve the interoperability among different countries, in particular as regards the train control and command systems, fixes some standard values for the odometric (ODO) performance, in terms of speed and travelled distance estimation. The reliability of the ODO estimation has to be taken into account basing on the allowed speed profiles. The results of the currently used ODO algorithms can be improved, especially in case of degraded adhesion conditions; it has been verified in the simulation environment that the results of the proposed localisation algorithm are always compliant with the ERTMS requirements

  6. An algorithmic method for reducing conductance-based neuron models.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Michael E; DeWeerth, Stephen P

    2006-08-01

    Although conductance-based neural models provide a realistic depiction of neuronal activity, their complexity often limits effective implementation and analysis. Neuronal model reduction methods provide a means to reduce model complexity while retaining the original model's realism and relevance. Such methods, however, typically include ad hoc components that require that the modeler already be intimately familiar with the dynamics of the original model. We present an automated, algorithmic method for reducing conductance-based neuron models using the method of equivalent potentials (Kelper et al., Biol Cybern 66(5):381-387, 1992) Our results demonstrate that this algorithm is able to reduce the complexity of the original model with minimal performance loss, and requires minimal prior knowledge of the model's dynamics. Furthermore, by utilizing a cost function based on the contribution of each state variable to the total conductance of the model, the performance of the algorithm can be significantly improved.

  7. Convergence behavior of a new DSMC algorithm.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Torczynski, John Robert; Bird, Graeme A.

    2008-10-01

    The convergence rate of a new direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, termed 'sophisticated DSMC', is investigated for one-dimensional Fourier flow. An argon-like hard-sphere gas at 273.15K and 266.644Pa is confined between two parallel, fully accommodating walls 1mm apart that have unequal temperatures. The simulations are performed using a one-dimensional implementation of the sophisticated DSMC algorithm. In harmony with previous work, the primary convergence metric studied is the ratio of the DSMC-calculated thermal conductivity to its corresponding infinite-approximation Chapman-Enskog theoretical value. As discretization errors are reduced, the sophisticated DSMC algorithm is shown to approach the theoretical values to high precision. The convergence behavior of sophisticated DSMC is compared to that of original DSMC. The convergence of the new algorithm in a three-dimensional implementation is also characterized. Implementations using transient adaptive sub-cells and virtual sub-cells are compared. The new algorithm is shown to significantly reduce the computational resources required for a DSMC simulation to achieve a particular level of accuracy, thus improving the efficiency of the method by a factor of 2.

  8. A Fast Implementation of the ISOCLUS Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Mount, David M.; Netanyahu, Nathan S.; LeMoigne, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    Unsupervised clustering is a fundamental building block in numerous image processing applications. One of the most popular and widely used clustering schemes for remote sensing applications is the ISOCLUS algorithm, which is based on the ISODATA method. The algorithm is given a set of n data points in d-dimensional space, an integer k indicating the initial number of clusters, and a number of additional parameters. The general goal is to compute the coordinates of a set of cluster centers in d-space, such that those centers minimize the mean squared distance from each data point to its nearest center. This clustering algorithm is similar to another well-known clustering method, called k-means. One significant feature of ISOCLUS over k-means is that the actual number of clusters reported might be fewer or more than the number supplied as part of the input. The algorithm uses different heuristics to determine whether to merge lor split clusters. As ISOCLUS can run very slowly, particularly on large data sets, there has been a growing .interest in the remote sensing community in computing it efficiently. We have developed a faster implementation of the ISOCLUS algorithm. Our improvement is based on a recent acceleration to the k-means algorithm of Kanungo, et al. They showed that, by using a kd-tree data structure for storing the data, it is possible to reduce the running time of k-means. We have adapted this method for the ISOCLUS algorithm, and we show that it is possible to achieve essentially the same results as ISOCLUS on large data sets, but with significantly lower running times. This adaptation involves computing a number of cluster statistics that are needed for ISOCLUS but not for k-means. Both the k-means and ISOCLUS algorithms are based on iterative schemes, in which nearest neighbors are calculated until some convergence criterion is satisfied. Each iteration requires that the nearest center for each data point be computed. Naively, this requires O

  9. CAVITY CONTROL ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski, J. Hovater

    2010-09-01

    A digital low level radio frequency (RF) system typically incorporates either a heterodyne or direct sampling technique, followed by fast ADCs, then an FPGA, and finally a transmitting DAC. This universal platform opens up the possibilities for a variety of control algorithm implementations. The foremost concern for an RF control system is cavity field stability, and to meet the required quality of regulation, the chosen control system needs to have sufficient feedback gain. In this paper we will investigate the effectiveness of the regulation for three basic control system algorithms: I&Q (In-phase and Quadrature), Amplitude & Phase and digital SEL (Self Exciting Loop) along with the example of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV cavity field control system.

  10. Algorithms versus architectures for computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The algorithms employed are computationally intensive and, as a result, increased performance (both algorithmic and architectural) is required to improve accuracy and to treat larger molecular systems. Several benchmark quantum chemistry codes are examined on a variety of architectures. While these codes are only a small portion of a typical quantum chemistry library, they illustrate many of the computationally intensive kernels and data manipulation requirements of some applications. Furthermore, understanding the performance of the existing algorithm on present and proposed supercomputers serves as a guide for future programs and algorithm development. The algorithms investigated are: (1) a sparse symmetric matrix vector product; (2) a four index integral transformation; and (3) the calculation of diatomic two electron Slater integrals. The vectorization strategies are examined for these algorithms for both the Cyber 205 and Cray XMP. In addition, multiprocessor implementations of the algorithms are looked at on the Cray XMP and on the MIT static data flow machine proposed by DENNIS.

  11. Fast voxel and polygon ray-tracing algorithms in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Dempsey, James F.

    2006-05-15

    We present work on combining three algorithms to improve ray-tracing efficiency in radiation therapy dose computation. The three algorithms include: An improved point-in-polygon algorithm, incremental voxel ray tracing algorithm, and stereographic projection of beamlets for voxel truncation. The point-in-polygon and incremental voxel ray-tracing algorithms have been used in computer graphics and nuclear medicine applications while the stereographic projection algorithm was developed by our group. These algorithms demonstrate significant improvements over the current standard algorithms in peer reviewed literature, i.e., the polygon and voxel ray-tracing algorithms of Siddon for voxel classification (point-in-polygon testing) and dose computation, respectively, and radius testing for voxel truncation. The presented polygon ray-tracing technique was tested on 10 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning cases that required the classification of between 0.58 and 2.0 million voxels on a 2.5 mm isotropic dose grid into 1-4 targets and 5-14 structures represented as extruded polygons (a.k.a. Siddon prisms). Incremental voxel ray tracing and voxel truncation employing virtual stereographic projection was tested on the same IMRT treatment planning cases where voxel dose was required for 230-2400 beamlets using a finite-size pencil-beam algorithm. Between a 100 and 360 fold cpu time improvement over Siddon's method was observed for the polygon ray-tracing algorithm to perform classification of voxels for target and structure membership. Between a 2.6 and 3.1 fold reduction in cpu time over current algorithms was found for the implementation of incremental ray tracing. Additionally, voxel truncation via stereographic projection was observed to be 11-25 times faster than the radial-testing beamlet extent approach and was further improved 1.7-2.0 fold through point-classification using the method of translation over the cross product technique.

  12. Statistically significant relational data mining :

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jonathan W.; Leung, Vitus Joseph; Phillips, Cynthia Ann; Pinar, Ali; Robinson, David Gerald; Berger-Wolf, Tanya; Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Casleton, Emily; Kaiser, Mark; Nordman, Daniel J.; Wilson, Alyson G.

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under the project (3z(BStatitically significant relational data mining.(3y (BThe goal of the project was to add more statistical rigor to the fairly ad hoc area of data mining on graphs. Our goal was to develop better algorithms and better ways to evaluate algorithm quality. We concetrated on algorithms for community detection, approximate pattern matching, and graph similarity measures. Approximate pattern matching involves finding an instance of a relatively small pattern, expressed with tolerance, in a large graph of data observed with uncertainty. This report gathers the abstracts and references for the eight refereed publications that have appeared as part of this work. We then archive three pieces of research that have not yet been published. The first is theoretical and experimental evidence that a popular statistical measure for comparison of community assignments favors over-resolved communities over approximations to a ground truth. The second are statistically motivated methods for measuring the quality of an approximate match of a small pattern in a large graph. The third is a new probabilistic random graph model. Statisticians favor these models for graph analysis. The new local structure graph model overcomes some of the issues with popular models such as exponential random graph models and latent variable models.

  13. Algorithmic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, W.

    1990-12-13

    In this paper complex adaptive systems are defined by a self- referential loop in which objects encode functions that act back on these objects. A model for this loop is presented. It uses a simple recursive formal language, derived from the lambda-calculus, to provide a semantics that maps character strings into functions that manipulate symbols on strings. The interaction between two functions, or algorithms, is defined naturally within the language through function composition, and results in the production of a new function. An iterated map acting on sets of functions and a corresponding graph representation are defined. Their properties are useful to discuss the behavior of a fixed size ensemble of randomly interacting functions. This function gas'', or Turning gas'', is studied under various conditions, and evolves cooperative interaction patterns of considerable intricacy. These patterns adapt under the influence of perturbations consisting in the addition of new random functions to the system. Different organizations emerge depending on the availability of self-replicators.

  14. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2011-08-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  15. A generalized memory test algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    A general algorithm for testing digital computer memory is presented. The test checks that (1) every bit can be cleared and set in each memory work, and (2) bits are not erroneously cleared and/or set elsewhere in memory at the same time. The algorithm can be applied to any size memory block and any size memory word. It is concise and efficient, requiring the very few cycles through memory. For example, a test of 16-bit-word-size memory requries only 384 cycles through memory. Approximately 15 seconds were required to test a 32K block of such memory, using a microcomputer having a cycle time of 133 nanoseconds.

  16. A novel algorithm for notch detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, C.; Salazar, D.; Morales, D.

    2013-06-01

    It is common knowledge that DFM guidelines require revisions to design data. These guidelines impose the need for corrections inserted into areas within the design data flow. At times, this requires rather drastic modifications to the data, both during the layer derivation or DRC phase, and especially within the RET phase. For example, OPC. During such data transformations, several polygon geometry changes are introduced, which can substantially increase shot count, geometry complexity, and eventually conversion to mask writer machine formats. In this resulting complex data, it may happen that notches are found that do not significantly contribute to the final manufacturing results, but do in fact contribute to the complexity of the surrounding geometry, and are therefore undesirable. Additionally, there are cases in which the overall figure count can be reduced with minimum impact in the quality of the corrected data, if notches are detected and corrected. Case in point, there are other cases where data quality could be improved if specific valley notches are filled in, or peak notches are cut out. Such cases generally satisfy specific geometrical restrictions in order to be valid candidates for notch correction. Traditional notch detection has been done for rectilinear data (Manhattan-style) and only in axis-parallel directions. The traditional approaches employ dimensional measurement algorithms that measure edge distances along the outside of polygons. These approaches are in general adaptations, and therefore ill-fitted for generalized detection of notches with strange shapes and in strange rotations. This paper covers a novel algorithm developed for the CATS MRCC tool that finds both valley and/or peak notches that are candidates for removal. The algorithm is generalized and invariant to data rotation, so that it can find notches in data rotated in any angle. It includes parameters to control the dimensions of detected notches, as well as algorithm tolerances

  17. Genetic algorithms as discovery programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, M.R.; Liepins, G.

    1986-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical counterparts to natural selection and gene recombination. As such, they have provided one of the few significant breakthroughs in machine learning. Used with appropriate reward functions and apportionment of credit, they have been successfully applied to gas pipeline operation, x-ray registration and mathematical optimization problems. This paper discusses the basics of genetic algorithms, describes a few successes, and reports on current progress at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in applications to set covering and simulated robots.

  18. A Dual-Microphone Speech Enhancement Algorithm Based on the Coherence Function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A novel dual-microphone speech enhancement technique is proposed in the present paper. The technique utilizes the coherence between the target and noise signals as a criterion for noise reduction and can be generally applied to arrays with closely-spaced microphones, where noise captured by the sensors is highly correlated. The proposed algorithm is simple to implement and requires no estimation of noise statistics. In addition, it offers the capability of coping with multiple interfering sources that might be located at different azimuths. The proposed algorithm was evaluated with normal hearing listeners using intelligibility listening tests and compared against a well-established beamforming algorithm. Results indicated large gains in speech intelligibility relative to the baseline (front microphone) algorithm in both single and multiple-noise source scenarios. The proposed algorithm was found to yield substantially higher intelligibility than that obtained by the beamforming algorithm, particularly when multiple noise sources or competing talker(s) were present. Objective quality evaluation of the proposed algorithm also indicated significant quality improvement over that obtained by the beamforming algorithm. The intelligibility and quality benefits observed with the proposed coherence-based algorithm make it a viable candidate for hearing aid and cochlear implant devices. PMID:22207823

  19. The Loop Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evertz, Hans Gerd

    1998-03-01

    Exciting new investigations have recently become possible for strongly correlated systems of spins, bosons, and fermions, through Quantum Monte Carlo simulations with the Loop Algorithm (H.G. Evertz, G. Lana, and M. Marcu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 875 (1993).) (For a recent review see: H.G. Evertz, cond- mat/9707221.) and its generalizations. A review of this new method, its generalizations and its applications is given, including some new results. The Loop Algorithm is based on a formulation of physical models in an extended ensemble of worldlines and graphs, and is related to Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithms. It performs nonlocal changes of worldline configurations, determined by local stochastic decisions. It overcomes many of the difficulties of traditional worldline simulations. Computer time requirements are reduced by orders of magnitude, through a corresponding reduction in autocorrelations. The grand-canonical ensemble (e.g. varying winding numbers) is naturally simulated. The continuous time limit can be taken directly. Improved Estimators exist which further reduce the errors of measured quantities. The algorithm applies unchanged in any dimension and for varying bond-strengths. It becomes less efficient in the presence of strong site disorder or strong magnetic fields. It applies directly to locally XYZ-like spin, fermion, and hard-core boson models. It has been extended to the Hubbard and the tJ model and generalized to higher spin representations. There have already been several large scale applications, especially for Heisenberg-like models, including a high statistics continuous time calculation of quantum critical exponents on a regularly depleted two-dimensional lattice of up to 20000 spatial sites at temperatures down to T=0.01 J.

  20. Improvements of HITS Algorithms for Spam Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Yasuhito; Tezuka, Yu; Nishizeki, Takao

    The HITS algorithm proposed by Kleinberg is one of the representative methods of scoring Web pages by using hyperlinks. In the days when the algorithm was proposed, most of the pages given high score by the algorithm were really related to a given topic, and hence the algorithm could be used to find related pages. However, the algorithm and the variants including Bharat's improved HITS, abbreviated to BHITS, proposed by Bharat and Henzinger cannot be used to find related pages any more on today's Web, due to an increase of spam links. In this paper, we first propose three methods to find “linkfarms,” that is, sets of spam links forming a densely connected subgraph of a Web graph. We then present an algorithm, called a trust-score algorithm, to give high scores to pages which are not spam pages with a high probability. Combining the three methods and the trust-score algorithm with BHITS, we obtain several variants of the HITS algorithm. We ascertain by experiments that one of them, named TaN+BHITS using the trust-score algorithm and the method of finding linkfarms by employing name servers, is most suitable for finding related pages on today's Web. Our algorithms take time and memory no more than those required by the original HITS algorithm, and can be executed on a PC with a small amount of main memory.

  1. An improved EZBC algorithm based on block bit length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renlong; Ruan, Shuangchen; Liu, Chengxiang; Wang, Wenda; Zhang, Li

    2011-12-01

    Embedded ZeroBlock Coding and context modeling (EZBC) algorithm has high compression performance. However, it consumes large amounts of memory space because an Amplitude Quadtree of wavelet coefficients and other two link lists would be built during the encoding process. This is one of the big challenges for EZBC to be used in real time or hardware applications. An improved EZBC algorithm based on bit length of coefficients was brought forward in this article. It uses Bit Length Quadtree to complete the coding process and output the context for Arithmetic Coder. It can achieve the same compression performance as EZBC and save more than 75% memory space required in the encoding process. As Bit Length Quadtree can quickly locate the wavelet coefficients and judge their significance, the improved algorithm can dramatically accelerate the encoding speed. These improvements are also beneficial for hardware. PACS: 42.30.Va, 42.30.Wb

  2. An integral conservative gridding-algorithm using Hermitian curve interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volken, Werner; Frei, Daniel; Manser, Peter; Mini, Roberto; Born, Ernst J.; Fix, Michael K.

    2008-11-01

    The problem of re-sampling spatially distributed data organized into regular or irregular grids to finer or coarser resolution is a common task in data processing. This procedure is known as 'gridding' or 're-binning'. Depending on the quantity the data represents, the gridding-algorithm has to meet different requirements. For example, histogrammed physical quantities such as mass or energy have to be re-binned in order to conserve the overall integral. Moreover, if the quantity is positive definite, negative sampling values should be avoided. The gridding process requires a re-distribution of the original data set to a user-requested grid according to a distribution function. The distribution function can be determined on the basis of the given data by interpolation methods. In general, accurate interpolation with respect to multiple boundary conditions of heavily fluctuating data requires polynomial interpolation functions of second or even higher order. However, this may result in unrealistic deviations (overshoots or undershoots) of the interpolation function from the data. Accordingly, the re-sampled data may overestimate or underestimate the given data by a significant amount. The gridding-algorithm presented in this work was developed in order to overcome these problems. Instead of a straightforward interpolation of the given data using high-order polynomials, a parametrized Hermitian interpolation curve was used to approximate the integrated data set. A single parameter is determined by which the user can control the behavior of the interpolation function, i.e. the amount of overshoot and undershoot. Furthermore, it is shown how the algorithm can be extended to multidimensional grids. The algorithm was compared to commonly used gridding-algorithms using linear and cubic interpolation functions. It is shown that such interpolation functions may overestimate or underestimate the source data by about 10-20%, while the new algorithm can be tuned to

  3. An algorithm for enforcement of contact constraints in quasistatic applications using matrix-free solution algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Heinstein, M.W.

    1997-10-01

    A contact enforcement algorithm has been developed for matrix-free quasistatic finite element techniques. Matrix-free (iterative) solution algorithms such as nonlinear Conjugate Gradients (CG) and Dynamic Relaxation (DR) are distinctive in that the number of iterations required for convergence is typically of the same order as the number of degrees of freedom of the model. From iteration to iteration the contact normal and tangential forces vary significantly making contact constraint satisfaction tenuous. Furthermore, global determination and enforcement of the contact constraints every iteration could be questioned on the grounds of efficiency. This work addresses this situation by introducing an intermediate iteration for treating the active gap constraint and at the same time exactly (kinematically) enforcing the linearized gap rate constraint for both frictionless and frictional response.

  4. LC-Grid: a linear global contact search algorithm for finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Lei, Zhou; Zang, Mengyan

    2014-11-01

    The contact searching is computationally intensive and its memory requirement is highly demanding; therefore, it is significant to develop an efficient contact search algorithm with less memory required. In this paper, we propose an efficient global contact search algorithm with linear complexity in terms of computational cost and memory requirement for the finite element analysis of contact problems. This algorithm is named LC-Grid (Lei devised the algorithm and Chen implemented it). The contact space is decomposed; thereafter, all contact nodes and segments are firstly mapped onto layers, then onto rows and lastly onto cells. In each mapping level, the linked-list technique is used for the efficient storing and retrieval of contact nodes and segments. The contact detection is performed in each non-empty cell along non-empty rows in each non-empty layer, and moves to the next non-empty layer once a layer is completed. The use of migration strategy makes the algorithm insensitive to mesh size. The properties of this algorithm are investigated and numerically verified to be linearly proportional to the number of contact segments. Besides, the ideal ranges of two significant scale factors of cell size and buffer zone which strongly affect computational efficiency are determined via an illustrative example.

  5. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  6. SLAP lesions: a treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Matthias; Tompkins, Marc; Kohn, Dieter M; Lorbach, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Tears of the superior labrum involving the biceps anchor are a common entity, especially in athletes, and may highly impair shoulder function. If conservative treatment fails, successful arthroscopic repair of symptomatic SLAP lesions has been described in the literature particularly for young athletes. However, the results in throwing athletes are less successful with a significant amount of patients who will not regain their pre-injury level of performance. The clinical results of SLAP repairs in middle-aged and older patients are mixed, with worse results and higher revision rates as compared to younger patients. In this population, tenotomy or tenodesis of the biceps tendon is a viable alternative to SLAP repairs in order to improve clinical outcomes. The present article introduces a treatment algorithm for SLAP lesions based upon the recent literature as well as the authors' clinical experience. The type of lesion, age of patient, concomitant lesions, and functional requirements, as well as sport activity level of the patient, need to be considered. Moreover, normal variations and degenerative changes in the SLAP complex have to be distinguished from "true" SLAP lesions in order to improve results and avoid overtreatment. The suggestion for a treatment algorithm includes: type I: conservative treatment or arthroscopic debridement, type II: SLAP repair or biceps tenotomy/tenodesis, type III: resection of the instable bucket-handle tear, type IV: SLAP repair (biceps tenotomy/tenodesis if >50 % of biceps tendon is affected), type V: Bankart repair and SLAP repair, type VI: resection of the flap and SLAP repair, and type VII: refixation of the anterosuperior labrum and SLAP repair.

  7. In Vivo Studies in Rhodospirillum rubrum Indicate That Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) Catalyzes Two Obligatorily Required and Physiologically Significant Reactions for Distinct Carbon and Sulfur Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swati; North, Justin A; Sriram, Jaya; Evans, Bradley S; Tabita, F Robert

    2015-12-25

    All organisms possess fundamental metabolic pathways to ensure that needed carbon and sulfur compounds are provided to the cell in the proper chemical form and oxidation state. For most organisms capable of using CO2 as sole source of carbon, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes primary carbon dioxide assimilation. In addition, sulfur salvage pathways are necessary to ensure that key sulfur-containing compounds are both available and, where necessary, detoxified in the cell. Using knock-out mutations and metabolomics in the bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, we show here that Rubisco concurrently catalyzes key and essential reactions for seemingly unrelated but physiologically essential central carbon and sulfur salvage metabolic pathways of the cell. In this study, complementation and mutagenesis studies indicated that representatives of all known extant functional Rubisco forms found in nature are capable of simultaneously catalyzing reactions required for both CO2-dependent growth as well as growth using 5-methylthioadenosine as sole sulfur source under anaerobic photosynthetic conditions. Moreover, specific inactivation of the CO2 fixation reaction did not affect the ability of Rubisco to support anaerobic 5-methylthioadenosine metabolism, suggesting that the active site of Rubisco has evolved to ensure that this enzyme maintains both key functions. Thus, despite the coevolution of both functions, the active site of this protein may be differentially modified to affect only one of its key functions.

  8. The Structure and Evolution of LOCBURST: The BATSE Burst Location Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Kippen, R. Marc; Paciesas, William S.; Stollberg, Mark; Woods, Pete; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; McCollough, Mike L.; Connaughton, Valerie

    1999-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) location algorithm used to produce the BATSE GRB locations is described. The general flow of control of the current location algorithm is presented, and the significant properties of the various physical inputs required are identified. The development of the burst location algorithm during the releases of the BATSE IB, 2B, and 3B GRB catalogs is presented so that the reasons for the differences in the positions and error estimates between the catalogs can be understood. In particular, differences between the 2B and 3B locations are discussed for events that have moved significantly and the reasons for the changes explained. The locations of bursts located independently by the interplanetary network (IPN) are used to illustrate the effect on burst location accuracy of various components of the algorithm. IPN data and locations from other gamma-ray instruments are used to calculate estimates of the systematic errors on BATSE burst locations.

  9. Parallel algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.F.

    1996-06-01

    Rapid changes in parallel computing technology are causing significant changes in the strategies being used for parallel algorithm development. One approach is simply to write computer code in a standard language like FORTRAN 77 or with the expectation that the compiler will produce executable code that will run in parallel. The alternatives are: (1) to build explicit message passing directly into the source code; or (2) to write source code without explicit reference to message passing or parallelism, but use a general communications library to provide efficient parallel execution. Application of these strategies is illustrated with examples of codes currently under development.

  10. Derivative Free Gradient Projection Algorithms for Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennrich, Robert I.

    2004-01-01

    A simple modification substantially simplifies the use of the gradient projection (GP) rotation algorithms of Jennrich (2001, 2002). These algorithms require subroutines to compute the value and gradient of any specific rotation criterion of interest. The gradient can be difficult to derive and program. It is shown that using numerical gradients…

  11. New algorithms for binary wavefront optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Kner, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Binary amplitude modulation promises to allow rapid focusing through strongly scattering media with a large number of segments due to the faster update rates of digital micromirror devices (DMDs) compared to spatial light modulators (SLMs). While binary amplitude modulation has a lower theoretical enhancement than phase modulation, the faster update rate should more than compensate for the difference - a factor of π2 /2. Here we present two new algorithms, a genetic algorithm and a transmission matrix algorithm, for optimizing the focus with binary amplitude modulation that achieve enhancements close to the theoretical maximum. Genetic algorithms have been shown to work well in noisy environments and we show that the genetic algorithm performs better than a stepwise algorithm. Transmission matrix algorithms allow complete characterization and control of the medium but require phase control either at the input or output. Here we introduce a transmission matrix algorithm that works with only binary amplitude control and intensity measurements. We apply these algorithms to binary amplitude modulation using a Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device. Here we report an enhancement of 152 with 1536 segments (9.90%×N) using a genetic algorithm with binary amplitude modulation and an enhancement of 136 with 1536 segments (8.9%×N) using an intensity-only transmission matrix algorithm.

  12. Library of Continuation Algorithms

    2005-03-01

    LOCA (Library of Continuation Algorithms) is scientific software written in C++ that provides advanced analysis tools for nonlinear systems. In particular, it provides parameter continuation algorithms. bifurcation tracking algorithms, and drivers for linear stability analysis. The algorithms are aimed at large-scale applications that use Newton’s method for their nonlinear solve.

  13. Highlights of TOMS Version 9 Total Ozone Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan; Haffner, David

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental basis of TOMS total ozone algorithm was developed some 45 years ago by Dave and Mateer. It was designed to estimate total ozone from satellite measurements of the backscattered UV radiances at few discrete wavelengths in the Huggins ozone absorption band (310-340 nm). Over the years, as the need for higher accuracy in measuring total ozone from space has increased, several improvements to the basic algorithms have been made. They include: better correction for the effects of aerosols and clouds, an improved method to account for the variation in shape of ozone profiles with season, latitude, and total ozone, and a multi-wavelength correction for remaining profile shape errors. These improvements have made it possible to retrieve total ozone with just 3 spectral channels of moderate spectral resolution (approx. 1 nm) with accuracy comparable to state-of-the-art spectral fitting algorithms like DOAS that require high spectral resolution measurements at large number of wavelengths. One of the deficiencies of the TOMS algorithm has been that it doesn't provide an error estimate. This is a particular problem in high latitudes when the profile shape errors become significant and vary with latitude, season, total ozone, and instrument viewing geometry. The primary objective of the TOMS V9 algorithm is to account for these effects in estimating the error bars. This is done by a straightforward implementation of the Rodgers optimum estimation method using a priori ozone profiles and their error covariances matrices constructed using Aura MLS and ozonesonde data. The algorithm produces a vertical ozone profile that contains 1-2.5 pieces of information (degrees of freedom of signal) depending upon solar zenith angle (SZA). The profile is integrated to obtain the total column. We provide information that shows the altitude range in which the profile is best determined by the measurements. One can use this information in data assimilation and analysis. A side

  14. Ocean observations with EOS/MODIS: Algorithm Development and Post Launch Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard R.

    1998-01-01

    Significant accomplishments made during the present reporting period: (1) We expanded our "spectral-matching" algorithm (SMA), for identifying the presence of absorbing aerosols and simultaneously performing atmospheric correction and derivation of the ocean's bio-optical parameters, to the point where it could be added as a subroutine to the MODIS water-leaving radiance algorithm; (2) A modification to the SMA that does not require detailed aerosol models has been developed. This is important as the requirement for realistic aerosol models has been a weakness of the SMA; and (3) We successfully acquired micro pulse lidar data in a Saharan dust outbreak during ACE-2 in the Canary Islands.

  15. Dynamic Programming Algorithm vs. Genetic Algorithm: Which is Faster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, Dušan

    The article compares two different approaches for the optimization problem of large join queries (LJQs). Almost all commercial database systems use a form of the dynamic programming algorithm to solve the ordering of join operations for large join queries, i.e. joins with more than dozen join operations. The property of the dynamic programming algorithm is that the execution time increases significantly in the case, where the number of join operations in a query is large. Genetic algorithms (GAs), as a data mining technique, have been shown as a promising technique in solving the ordering of join operations in LJQs. Using the existing implementation of GA, we compare the dynamic programming algorithm implemented in commercial database systems with the corresponding GA module. Our results show that the use of a genetic algorithm is a better solution for optimization of large join queries, i.e., that such a technique outperforms the implementations of the dynamic programming algorithm in conventional query optimization components for very large join queries.

  16. Comparison of Fully Numerical Predictor-Corrector and Apollo Skip Entry Guidance Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Christopher W.; Lu, Ping

    2012-09-01

    The dramatic increase in computational power since the Apollo program has enabled the development of numerical predictor-corrector (NPC) entry guidance algorithms that allow on-board accurate determination of a vehicle's trajectory. These algorithms are sufficiently mature to be flown. They are highly adaptive, especially in the face of extreme dispersion and off-nominal situations compared with reference-trajectory following algorithms. The performance and reliability of entry guidance are critical to mission success. This paper compares the performance of a recently developed fully numerical predictor-corrector entry guidance (FNPEG) algorithm with that of the Apollo skip entry guidance. Through extensive dispersion testing, it is clearly demonstrated that the Apollo skip entry guidance algorithm would be inadequate in meeting the landing precision requirement for missions with medium (4000-7000 km) and long (>7000 km) downrange capability requirements under moderate dispersions chiefly due to poor modeling of atmospheric drag. In the presence of large dispersions, a significant number of failures occur even for short-range missions due to the deviation from planned reference trajectories. The FNPEG algorithm, on the other hand, is able to ensure high landing precision in all cases tested. All factors considered, a strong case is made for adopting fully numerical algorithms for future skip entry missions.

  17. Investigations into a new algorithm for calculating H infinity optimal controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, R. Dennis

    1989-01-01

    A new algorithm for calculating H (sup infinity) optimal controllers is investigated. The algorithm is significantly simpler than existing approaches and yields much simpler controllers. The design equations are first presented. Special system transformations required to apply the algorithm are then presented. The use of the algorithm with sampled-data systems is outlined in detail. Several constraints on the characteristics of the problem formulation are required for the application of the design equations. The consequences of these constraints are investigated by applying the algorithm to a simplified design for a subsystem of a large space structure ground test facility. The investigation of these constraints is continued by application of the design equations and constraints to an extremely simple tracking problem. The result of these investigations is the development of a frequency dependent weighting strategy that allows realistic control problems to be cast in a form compatible with the new algorithm. Further work is indicated in the area of developing strategies for choosing frequency-dependent weights to achieve specific design goals. The use of the freedom in problem formulation to achieve robustness/performance tradeoffs should also be investigated. It is not clear that the algorithm always leads to simpler controllers. The more restrictive formulation may dictate that frequency-dependent weighting adds to the controller order disproportionately. This effect must also be investigated.

  18. An Efficient Reachability Analysis Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatan, Farrokh; Fijany, Amir

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses a new algorithm for generating higher-order dependencies for diagnostic and sensor placement analysis when a system is described with a causal modeling framework. This innovation will be used in diagnostic and sensor optimization and analysis tools. Fault detection, diagnosis, and prognosis are essential tasks in the operation of autonomous spacecraft, instruments, and in-situ platforms. This algorithm will serve as a power tool for technologies that satisfy a key requirement of autonomous spacecraft, including science instruments and in-situ missions.

  19. Randomized approximate nearest neighbors algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter Wilcox; Osipov, Andrei; Rokhlin, Vladimir

    2011-09-20

    We present a randomized algorithm for the approximate nearest neighbor problem in d-dimensional Euclidean space. Given N points {x(j)} in R(d), the algorithm attempts to find k nearest neighbors for each of x(j), where k is a user-specified integer parameter. The algorithm is iterative, and its running time requirements are proportional to T·N·(d·(log d) + k·(d + log k)·(log N)) + N·k(2)·(d + log k), with T the number of iterations performed. The memory requirements of the procedure are of the order N·(d + k). A by-product of the scheme is a data structure, permitting a rapid search for the k nearest neighbors among {x(j)} for an arbitrary point x ∈ R(d). The cost of each such query is proportional to T·(d·(log d) + log(N/k)·k·(d + log k)), and the memory requirements for the requisite data structure are of the order N·(d + k) + T·(d + N). The algorithm utilizes random rotations and a basic divide-and-conquer scheme, followed by a local graph search. We analyze the scheme's behavior for certain types of distributions of {x(j)} and illustrate its performance via several numerical examples.

  20. A simple suboptimal least-squares algorithm for attitude determination with multiple sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brozenec, Thomas F.; Bender, Douglas J.

    1994-01-01

    faster than all but a similarly specialized version of the QUEST algorithm. We also introduce a novel measurement averaging technique which reduces the n-measurement case to the two measurement case for our particular application, a star tracker and earth sensor mounted on an earth-pointed geosynchronous communications satellite. Using this technique, many n-measurement problems reduce to less than or equal to 3 measurements; this reduces the amount of required calculation without significant degradation in accuracy. Finally, we present the results of some tests which compare the least-squares algorithm with the QUEST and FOAM algorithms in the two-measurement case. For our example case, all three algorithms performed with similar accuracy.

  1. Parallel Algorithms for Graph Optimization using Tree Decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Weerapurage, Dinesh P; Sullivan, Blair D; Groer, Christopher S

    2013-01-01

    Although many NP-hard graph optimization problems can be solved in polynomial time on graphs of bounded tree-width, the adoption of these techniques into mainstream scientific computation has been limited due to the high memory requirements of required dynamic programming tables and excessive running times of sequential implementations. This work addresses both challenges by proposing a set of new parallel algorithms for all steps of a tree-decomposition based approach to solve maximum weighted independent set. A hybrid OpenMP/MPI implementation includes a highly scalable parallel dynamic programming algorithm leveraging the MADNESS task-based runtime, and computational results demonstrate scaling. This work enables a significant expansion of the scale of graphs on which exact solutions to maximum weighted independent set can be obtained, and forms a framework for solving additional graph optimization problems with similar techniques.

  2. A TLD dose algorithm using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Moscovitch, M.; Rotunda, J.E.; Tawil, R.A.; Rathbone, B.A.

    1995-12-31

    An artificial neural network was designed and used to develop a dose algorithm for a multi-element thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). The neural network architecture is based on the concept of functional links network (FLN). Neural network is an information processing method inspired by the biological nervous system. A dose algorithm based on neural networks is fundamentally different as compared to conventional algorithms, as it has the capability to learn from its own experience. The neural network algorithm is shown the expected dose values (output) associated with given responses of a multi-element dosimeter (input) many times. The algorithm, being trained that way, eventually is capable to produce its own unique solution to similar (but not exactly the same) dose calculation problems. For personal dosimetry, the output consists of the desired dose components: deep dose, shallow dose and eye dose. The input consists of the TL data obtained from the readout of a multi-element dosimeter. The neural network approach was applied to the Harshaw Type 8825 TLD, and was shown to significantly improve the performance of this dosimeter, well within the U.S. accreditation requirements for personnel dosimeters.

  3. A simple greedy algorithm for reconstructing pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Cowell, Robert G

    2013-02-01

    This paper introduces a simple greedy algorithm for searching for high likelihood pedigrees using micro-satellite (STR) genotype information on a complete sample of related individuals. The core idea behind the algorithm is not new, but it is believed that putting it into a greedy search setting, and specifically the application to pedigree learning, is novel. The algorithm does not require age or sex information, but this information can be incorporated if desired. The algorithm is applied to human and non-human genetic data and in a simulation study. PMID:23164633

  4. Block-Based Connected-Component Labeling Algorithm Using Binary Decision Trees.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wan-Yu; Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Yang, Jia-Horng

    2015-09-18

    In this paper, we propose a fast labeling algorithm based on block-based concepts. Because the number of memory access points directly affects the time consumption of the labeling algorithms, the aim of the proposed algorithm is to minimize neighborhood operations. Our algorithm utilizes a block-based view and correlates a raster scan to select the necessary pixels generated by a block-based scan mask. We analyze the advantages of a sequential raster scan for the block-based scan mask, and integrate the block-connected relationships using two different procedures with binary decision trees to reduce unnecessary memory access. This greatly simplifies the pixel locations of the block-based scan mask. Furthermore, our algorithm significantly reduces the number of leaf nodes and depth levels required in the binary decision tree. We analyze the labeling performance of the proposed algorithm alongside that of other labeling algorithms using high-resolution images and foreground images. The experimental results from synthetic and real image datasets demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is faster than other methods.

  5. Block-Based Connected-Component Labeling Algorithm Using Binary Decision Trees

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wan-Yu; Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Yang, Jia-Horng

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast labeling algorithm based on block-based concepts. Because the number of memory access points directly affects the time consumption of the labeling algorithms, the aim of the proposed algorithm is to minimize neighborhood operations. Our algorithm utilizes a block-based view and correlates a raster scan to select the necessary pixels generated by a block-based scan mask. We analyze the advantages of a sequential raster scan for the block-based scan mask, and integrate the block-connected relationships using two different procedures with binary decision trees to reduce unnecessary memory access. This greatly simplifies the pixel locations of the block-based scan mask. Furthermore, our algorithm significantly reduces the number of leaf nodes and depth levels required in the binary decision tree. We analyze the labeling performance of the proposed algorithm alongside that of other labeling algorithms using high-resolution images and foreground images. The experimental results from synthetic and real image datasets demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is faster than other methods. PMID:26393597

  6. WDM Multicast Tree Construction Algorithms and Their Comparative Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makabe, Tsutomu; Mikoshi, Taiju; Takenaka, Toyofumi

    We propose novel tree construction algorithms for multicast communication in photonic networks. Since multicast communications consume many more link resources than unicast communications, effective algorithms for route selection and wavelength assignment are required. We propose a novel tree construction algorithm, called the Weighted Steiner Tree (WST) algorithm and a variation of the WST algorithm, called the Composite Weighted Steiner Tree (CWST) algorithm. Because these algorithms are based on the Steiner Tree algorithm, link resources among source and destination pairs tend to be commonly used and link utilization ratios are improved. Because of this, these algorithms can accept many more multicast requests than other multicast tree construction algorithms based on the Dijkstra algorithm. However, under certain delay constraints, the blocking characteristics of the proposed Weighted Steiner Tree algorithm deteriorate since some light paths between source and destinations use many hops and cannot satisfy the delay constraint. In order to adapt the approach to the delay-sensitive environments, we have devised the Composite Weighted Steiner Tree algorithm comprising the Weighted Steiner Tree algorithm and the Dijkstra algorithm for use in a delay constrained environment such as an IPTV application. In this paper, we also give the results of simulation experiments which demonstrate the superiority of the proposed Composite Weighted Steiner Tree algorithm compared with the Distributed Minimum Hop Tree (DMHT) algorithm, from the viewpoint of the light-tree request blocking.

  7. An efficient parallel termination detection algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A. H.; Crivelli, S.; Jessup, E. R.

    2004-05-27

    Information local to any one processor is insufficient to monitor the overall progress of most distributed computations. Typically, a second distributed computation for detecting termination of the main computation is necessary. In order to be a useful computational tool, the termination detection routine must operate concurrently with the main computation, adding minimal overhead, and it must promptly and correctly detect termination when it occurs. In this paper, we present a new algorithm for detecting the termination of a parallel computation on distributed-memory MIMD computers that satisfies all of those criteria. A variety of termination detection algorithms have been devised. Of these, the algorithm presented by Sinha, Kale, and Ramkumar (henceforth, the SKR algorithm) is unique in its ability to adapt to the load conditions of the system on which it runs, thereby minimizing the impact of termination detection on performance. Because their algorithm also detects termination quickly, we consider it to be the most efficient practical algorithm presently available. The termination detection algorithm presented here was developed for use in the PMESC programming library for distributed-memory MIMD computers. Like the SKR algorithm, our algorithm adapts to system loads and imposes little overhead. Also like the SKR algorithm, ours is tree-based, and it does not depend on any assumptions about the physical interconnection topology of the processors or the specifics of the distributed computation. In addition, our algorithm is easier to implement and requires only half as many tree traverses as does the SKR algorithm. This paper is organized as follows. In section 2, we define our computational model. In section 3, we review the SKR algorithm. We introduce our new algorithm in section 4, and prove its correctness in section 5. We discuss its efficiency and present experimental results in section 6.

  8. An Efficient Supervised Training Algorithm for Multilayer Spiking Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiurui; Qu, Hong; Liu, Guisong; Zhang, Malu; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The spiking neural networks (SNNs) are the third generation of neural networks and perform remarkably well in cognitive tasks such as pattern recognition. The spike emitting and information processing mechanisms found in biological cognitive systems motivate the application of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism in spiking neural networks, which have exhibited strong computational capability. However, the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding approach require neurons to process information serially in space and time respectively, which reduce the training efficiency significantly. For training the hierarchical SNNs, most existing methods are based on the traditional back-propagation algorithm, inheriting its drawbacks of the gradient diffusion and the sensitivity on parameters. To keep the powerful computation capability of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism, but to overcome the low efficiency of the existing algorithms, a new training algorithm, the Normalized Spiking Error Back Propagation (NSEBP) is proposed in this paper. In the feedforward calculation, the output spike times are calculated by solving the quadratic function in the spike response model instead of detecting postsynaptic voltage states at all time points in traditional algorithms. Besides, in the feedback weight modification, the computational error is propagated to previous layers by the presynaptic spike jitter instead of the gradient decent rule, which realizes the layer-wised training. Furthermore, our algorithm investigates the mathematical relation between the weight variation and voltage error change, which makes the normalization in the weight modification applicable. Adopting these strategies, our algorithm outperforms the traditional SNN multi-layer algorithms in terms of learning efficiency and parameter sensitivity, that are also demonstrated by the comprehensive experimental results in this paper. PMID:27044001

  9. An Efficient Supervised Training Algorithm for Multilayer Spiking Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiurui; Qu, Hong; Liu, Guisong; Zhang, Malu; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The spiking neural networks (SNNs) are the third generation of neural networks and perform remarkably well in cognitive tasks such as pattern recognition. The spike emitting and information processing mechanisms found in biological cognitive systems motivate the application of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism in spiking neural networks, which have exhibited strong computational capability. However, the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding approach require neurons to process information serially in space and time respectively, which reduce the training efficiency significantly. For training the hierarchical SNNs, most existing methods are based on the traditional back-propagation algorithm, inheriting its drawbacks of the gradient diffusion and the sensitivity on parameters. To keep the powerful computation capability of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism, but to overcome the low efficiency of the existing algorithms, a new training algorithm, the Normalized Spiking Error Back Propagation (NSEBP) is proposed in this paper. In the feedforward calculation, the output spike times are calculated by solving the quadratic function in the spike response model instead of detecting postsynaptic voltage states at all time points in traditional algorithms. Besides, in the feedback weight modification, the computational error is propagated to previous layers by the presynaptic spike jitter instead of the gradient decent rule, which realizes the layer-wised training. Furthermore, our algorithm investigates the mathematical relation between the weight variation and voltage error change, which makes the normalization in the weight modification applicable. Adopting these strategies, our algorithm outperforms the traditional SNN multi-layer algorithms in terms of learning efficiency and parameter sensitivity, that are also demonstrated by the comprehensive experimental results in this paper.

  10. An Efficient Supervised Training Algorithm for Multilayer Spiking Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiurui; Qu, Hong; Liu, Guisong; Zhang, Malu; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The spiking neural networks (SNNs) are the third generation of neural networks and perform remarkably well in cognitive tasks such as pattern recognition. The spike emitting and information processing mechanisms found in biological cognitive systems motivate the application of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism in spiking neural networks, which have exhibited strong computational capability. However, the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding approach require neurons to process information serially in space and time respectively, which reduce the training efficiency significantly. For training the hierarchical SNNs, most existing methods are based on the traditional back-propagation algorithm, inheriting its drawbacks of the gradient diffusion and the sensitivity on parameters. To keep the powerful computation capability of the hierarchical structure and temporal encoding mechanism, but to overcome the low efficiency of the existing algorithms, a new training algorithm, the Normalized Spiking Error Back Propagation (NSEBP) is proposed in this paper. In the feedforward calculation, the output spike times are calculated by solving the quadratic function in the spike response model instead of detecting postsynaptic voltage states at all time points in traditional algorithms. Besides, in the feedback weight modification, the computational error is propagated to previous layers by the presynaptic spike jitter instead of the gradient decent rule, which realizes the layer-wised training. Furthermore, our algorithm investigates the mathematical relation between the weight variation and voltage error change, which makes the normalization in the weight modification applicable. Adopting these strategies, our algorithm outperforms the traditional SNN multi-layer algorithms in terms of learning efficiency and parameter sensitivity, that are also demonstrated by the comprehensive experimental results in this paper. PMID:27044001

  11. Fast impedance measurements at very low frequencies using curve fitting algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Tomasz

    2015-06-01

    The method for reducing the time of impedance measurements at very low frequencies was proposed and implemented. The reduction was achieved by using impedance estimation algorithms that do not require the acquisition of the momentary voltage and current values for at least one whole period of the excitation signal. The algorithms were based on direct least squares ellipse and sine fitting to recorded waveforms. The performance of the algorithms was evaluated based on the sampling time, signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and sampling frequency using a series of Monte Carlo experiments. An improved algorithm for the detection of the ellipse direction was implemented and compared to a voting algorithm. The sine fitting algorithm provided significantly better results. It was less sensitive to the sampling start point and measured impedance argument and did not exhibit any systematic error of impedance estimation. It allowed a significant reduction of the measurement time. A 1% standard deviation of impedance estimation was achieved using a sine fitting algorithm with a measurement time reduced to 11% of the excitation signal period.

  12. Fast training algorithms for multilayer neural nets.

    PubMed

    Brent, R P

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm that is faster than back-propagation and for which it is not necessary to specify the number of hidden units in advance is described. The relationship with other fast pattern-recognition algorithms, such as algorithms based on k-d trees, is discussed. The algorithm has been implemented and tested on artificial problems, such as the parity problem, and on real problems arising in speech recognition. Experimental results, including training times and recognition accuracy, are given. Generally, the algorithm achieves accuracy as good as or better than nets trained using back-propagation. Accuracy is comparable to that for the nearest-neighbor algorithm, which is slower and requires more storage space.

  13. Orbital objects detection algorithm using faint streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Oda, Hiroshi; Hanada, Toshiya

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes an algorithm to detect orbital objects that are small or moving at high apparent velocities from optical images by utilizing their faint streaks. In the conventional object-detection algorithm, a high signal-to-noise-ratio (e.g., 3 or more) is required, whereas in our proposed algorithm, the signals are summed along the streak direction to improve object-detection sensitivity. Lower signal-to-noise ratio objects were detected by applying the algorithm to a time series of images. The algorithm comprises the following steps: (1) image skewing, (2) image compression along the vertical axis, (3) detection and determination of streak position, (4) searching for object candidates using the time-series streak-position data, and (5) selecting the candidate with the best linearity and reliability. Our algorithm's ability to detect streaks with signals weaker than the background noise was confirmed using images from the Australia Remote Observatory.

  14. Evaluation of Various Radar Data Quality Control Algorithms Based on Accumulated Radar Rainfall Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Michael; Steiner, Matthias; Wolff, David B.; Ferrier, Brad S.; Kessinger, Cathy; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The primary function of the TRMM Ground Validation (GV) Program is to create GV rainfall products that provide basic validation of satellite-derived precipitation measurements for select primary sites. A fundamental and extremely important step in creating high-quality GV products is radar data quality control. Quality control (QC) processing of TRMM GV radar data is based on some automated procedures, but the current QC algorithm is not fully operational and requires significant human interaction to assure satisfactory results. Moreover, the TRMM GV QC algorithm, even with continuous manual tuning, still can not completely remove all types of spurious echoes. In an attempt to improve the current operational radar data QC procedures of the TRMM GV effort, an intercomparison of several QC algorithms has been conducted. This presentation will demonstrate how various radar data QC algorithms affect accumulated radar rainfall products. In all, six different QC algorithms will be applied to two months of WSR-88D radar data from Melbourne, Florida. Daily, five-day, and monthly accumulated radar rainfall maps will be produced for each quality-controlled data set. The QC algorithms will be evaluated and compared based on their ability to remove spurious echoes without removing significant precipitation. Strengths and weaknesses of each algorithm will be assessed based on, their abilit to mitigate both erroneous additions and reductions in rainfall accumulation from spurious echo contamination and true precipitation removal, respectively. Contamination from individual spurious echo categories will be quantified to further diagnose the abilities of each radar QC algorithm. Finally, a cost-benefit analysis will be conducted to determine if a more automated QC algorithm is a viable alternative to the current, labor-intensive QC algorithm employed by TRMM GV.

  15. Audio detection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neta, B.; Mansager, B.

    1992-08-01

    Audio information concerning targets generally includes direction, frequencies, and energy levels. One use of audio cueing is to use direction information to help determine where more sensitive visual direction and acquisition sensors should be directed. Generally, use of audio cueing will shorten times required for visual detection, although there could be circumstances where the audio information is misleading and degrades visual performance. Audio signatures can also be useful for helping classify the emanating platform, as well as to provide estimates of its velocity. The Janus combat simulation is the premier high resolution model used by the Army and other agencies to conduct research. This model has a visual detection model which essentially incorporates algorithms as described by Hartman(1985). The model in its current form does not have any sound cueing capability. This report is part of a research effort to investigate the utility of developing such a capability.

  16. Fighting Censorship with Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, Mohammad

    In countries such as China or Iran where Internet censorship is prevalent, users usually rely on proxies or anonymizers to freely access the web. The obvious difficulty with this approach is that once the address of a proxy or an anonymizer is announced for use to the public, the authorities can easily filter all traffic to that address. This poses a challenge as to how proxy addresses can be announced to users without leaking too much information to the censorship authorities. In this paper, we formulate this question as an interesting algorithmic problem. We study this problem in a static and a dynamic model, and give almost tight bounds on the number of proxy servers required to give access to n people k of whom are adversaries. We will also discuss how trust networks can be used in this context.

  17. HEATR project: ATR algorithm parallelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deardorf, Catherine E.

    1998-09-01

    High Performance Computing (HPC) Embedded Application for Target Recognition (HEATR) is a project funded by the High Performance Computing Modernization Office through the Common HPC Software Support Initiative (CHSSI). The goal of CHSSI is to produce portable, parallel, multi-purpose, freely distributable, support software to exploit emerging parallel computing technologies and enable application of scalable HPC's for various critical DoD applications. Specifically, the CHSSI goal for HEATR is to provide portable, parallel versions of several existing ATR detection and classification algorithms to the ATR-user community to achieve near real-time capability. The HEATR project will create parallel versions of existing automatic target recognition (ATR) detection and classification algorithms and generate reusable code that will support porting and software development process for ATR HPC software. The HEATR Team has selected detection/classification algorithms from both the model- based and training-based (template-based) arena in order to consider the parallelization requirements for detection/classification algorithms across ATR technology. This would allow the Team to assess the impact that parallelization would have on detection/classification performance across ATR technology. A field demo is included in this project. Finally, any parallel tools produced to support the project will be refined and returned to the ATR user community along with the parallel ATR algorithms. This paper will review: (1) HPCMP structure as it relates to HEATR, (2) Overall structure of the HEATR project, (3) Preliminary results for the first algorithm Alpha Test, (4) CHSSI requirements for HEATR, and (5) Project management issues and lessons learned.

  18. Motion Cueing Algorithm Development: Initial Investigation and Redesign of the Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telban, Robert J.; Wu, Weimin; Cardullo, Frank M.; Houck, Jacob A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In this project four motion cueing algorithms were initially investigated. The classical algorithm generated results with large distortion and delay and low magnitude. The NASA adaptive algorithm proved to be well tuned with satisfactory performance, while the UTIAS adaptive algorithm produced less desirable results. Modifications were made to the adaptive algorithms to reduce the magnitude of undesirable spikes. The optimal algorithm was found to have the potential for improved performance with further redesign. The center of simulator rotation was redefined. More terms were added to the cost function to enable more tuning flexibility. A new design approach using a Fortran/Matlab/Simulink setup was employed. A new semicircular canals model was incorporated in the algorithm. With these changes results show the optimal algorithm has some advantages over the NASA adaptive algorithm. Two general problems observed in the initial investigation required solutions. A nonlinear gain algorithm was developed that scales the aircraft inputs by a third-order polynomial, maximizing the motion cues while remaining within the operational limits of the motion system. A braking algorithm was developed to bring the simulator to a full stop at its motion limit and later release the brake to follow the cueing algorithm output.

  19. GPU Accelerated Event Detection Algorithm

    2011-05-25

    Smart grid external require new algorithmic approaches as well as parallel formulations. One of the critical components is the prediction of changes and detection of anomalies within the power grid. The state-of-the-art algorithms are not suited to handle the demands of streaming data analysis. (i) need for events detection algorithms that can scale with the size of data, (ii) need for algorithms that can not only handle multi dimensional nature of the data, but alsomore » model both spatial and temporal dependencies in the data, which, for the most part, are highly nonlinear, (iii) need for algorithms that can operate in an online fashion with streaming data. The GAEDA code is a new online anomaly detection techniques that take into account spatial, temporal, multi-dimensional aspects of the data set. The basic idea behind the proposed approach is to (a) to convert a multi-dimensional sequence into a univariate time series that captures the changes between successive windows extracted from the original sequence using singular value decomposition (SVD), and then (b) to apply known anomaly detection techniques for univariate time series. A key challenge for the proposed approach is to make the algorithm scalable to huge datasets by adopting techniques from perturbation theory, incremental SVD analysis. We used recent advances in tensor decomposition techniques which reduce computational complexity to monitor the change between successive windows and detect anomalies in the same manner as described above. Therefore we propose to develop the parallel solutions on many core systems such as GPUs, because these algorithms involve lot of numerical operations and are highly data-parallelizable.« less

  20. GPU Accelerated Event Detection Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    2011-05-25

    Smart grid external require new algorithmic approaches as well as parallel formulations. One of the critical components is the prediction of changes and detection of anomalies within the power grid. The state-of-the-art algorithms are not suited to handle the demands of streaming data analysis. (i) need for events detection algorithms that can scale with the size of data, (ii) need for algorithms that can not only handle multi dimensional nature of the data, but also model both spatial and temporal dependencies in the data, which, for the most part, are highly nonlinear, (iii) need for algorithms that can operate in an online fashion with streaming data. The GAEDA code is a new online anomaly detection techniques that take into account spatial, temporal, multi-dimensional aspects of the data set. The basic idea behind the proposed approach is to (a) to convert a multi-dimensional sequence into a univariate time series that captures the changes between successive windows extracted from the original sequence using singular value decomposition (SVD), and then (b) to apply known anomaly detection techniques for univariate time series. A key challenge for the proposed approach is to make the algorithm scalable to huge datasets by adopting techniques from perturbation theory, incremental SVD analysis. We used recent advances in tensor decomposition techniques which reduce computational complexity to monitor the change between successive windows and detect anomalies in the same manner as described above. Therefore we propose to develop the parallel solutions on many core systems such as GPUs, because these algorithms involve lot of numerical operations and are highly data-parallelizable.

  1. Algorithms for automated DNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Densmore, Douglas; Hsiau, Timothy H.-C.; Kittleson, Joshua T.; DeLoache, Will; Batten, Christopher; Anderson, J. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Generating a defined set of genetic constructs within a large combinatorial space provides a powerful method for engineering novel biological functions. However, the process of assembling more than a few specific DNA sequences can be costly, time consuming and error prone. Even if a correct theoretical construction scheme is developed manually, it is likely to be suboptimal by any number of cost metrics. Modular, robust and formal approaches are needed for exploring these vast design spaces. By automating the design of DNA fabrication schemes using computational algorithms, we can eliminate human error while reducing redundant operations, thus minimizing the time and cost required for conducting biological engineering experiments. Here, we provide algorithms that optimize the simultaneous assembly of a collection of related DNA sequences. We compare our algorithms to an exhaustive search on a small synthetic dataset and our results show that our algorithms can quickly find an optimal solution. Comparison with random search approaches on two real-world datasets show that our algorithms can also quickly find lower-cost solutions for large datasets. PMID:20335162

  2. Threshold extended ID3 algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. B. Rajesh; Ramesh, C. Phani; Madhusudhan, E.; Padmavathamma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Information exchange over insecure networks needs to provide authentication and confidentiality to the database in significant problem in datamining. In this paper we propose a novel authenticated multiparty ID3 Algorithm used to construct multiparty secret sharing decision tree for implementation in medical transactions.

  3. Some Practical Payments Clearance Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumlander, Deniss

    The globalisation of corporations' operations has produced a huge volume of inter-company invoices. Optimisation of those known as payment clearance can produce a significant saving in costs associated with those transfers and handling. The paper revises some common and so practical approaches to the payment clearance problem and proposes some novel algorithms based on graphs theory and heuristic totals' distribution.

  4. An automatic and fast centerline extraction algorithm for virtual colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangxiang; Gu, Lixu

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces a new refined centerline extraction algorithm, which is based on and significantly improved from distance mapping algorithms. The new approach include three major parts: employing a colon segmentation method; designing and realizing a fast Euclidean Transform algorithm and inducting boundary voxels cutting (BVC) approach. The main contribution is the BVC processing, which greatly speeds up the Dijkstra algorithm and improves the whole performance of the new algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate that the new centerline algorithm was more efficient and accurate comparing with existing algorithms. PMID:17281406

  5. The Structure of Evolution LOCBURST: The BATSE Burst Location Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Kippen, R. March; Paciesas, William S.; Stollberg, Mark; Woods, Pete; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; McCollough, M. L.; Connaughton, V.

    1998-01-01

    The gamma-ray bursts (GRB) location algorithm used to produce the BATSE GRB locations is described. The general flow of control of the current location algorithm is presented and the significant properties of the various physical inputs required are identified. The development of the burst location algorithm during the releases of the BATSE 1B, 2B, and 3B gamma-ray burst catalogs is presented so that the reasons for the differences in the positions and error estimates between the catalogs can be understood. In particular, differences between the 2B and 3B locations are discussed for events that have moved significantly and the reasons for the changes explained. The locations of bursts located independently by the interplanetary network are used to illustrate the effect on burst location accuracy of various components of the algorithm. IPN data as well as locations from other gamma-ray instruments are used to calculate estimates of the systematic errors on BATSE burst locations.

  6. Reasoning about systolic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Purushothaman, S.

    1986-01-01

    Systolic algorithms are a class of parallel algorithms, with small grain concurrency, well suited for implementation in VLSI. They are intended to be implemented as high-performance, computation-bound back-end processors and are characterized by a tesselating interconnection of identical processing elements. This dissertation investigates the problem of providing correctness of systolic algorithms. The following are reported in this dissertation: (1) a methodology for verifying correctness of systolic algorithms based on solving the representation of an algorithm as recurrence equations. The methodology is demonstrated by proving the correctness of a systolic architecture for optimal parenthesization. (2) The implementation of mechanical proofs of correctness of two systolic algorithms, a convolution algorithm and an optimal parenthesization algorithm, using the Boyer-Moore theorem prover. (3) An induction principle for proving correctness of systolic arrays which are modular. Two attendant inference rules, weak equivalence and shift transformation, which capture equivalent behavior of systolic arrays, are also presented.

  7. Algorithm-development activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall L.

    1994-01-01

    The task of algorithm-development activities at USF continues. The algorithm for determining chlorophyll alpha concentration, (Chl alpha) and gelbstoff absorption coefficient for SeaWiFS and MODIS-N radiance data is our current priority.

  8. A Kalman Filter-Based Algorithm for Measuring the Parameters of Moving Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dichev, Dimitar; Koev, Hristofor; Bakalova, Totka; Louda, Petr

    2015-02-01

    One of the most complex problems in measuring equipment is related to the provision of the required dynamic accuracy of measuring systems determining the parameters of moving objects. The present paper views an algorithm for improving the dynamic accuracy of such measuring systems. It is based on the Kalman method. The algorithm aims to eliminate the influence of a number of interference sources, each of which is of secondary significance. However, their total effect can cause considerable distortion of the measurement signal. The algorithm model is designed for gyro-free measuring systems. It is based on one of the most widely used elements in the dynamic systems, namely the physical pendulum, due to which measuring systems of high dynamic accuracy and low cost can be developed. The presented experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm with respect to the dynamic accuracy of measuring systems of this type.

  9. Experiments with a Parallel Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm for Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Matthew; Johnston, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary multi-objective algorithms have great potential for scheduling in those situations where tradeoffs among competing objectives represent a key requirement. One challenge, however, is runtime performance, as a consequence of evolving not just a single schedule, but an entire population, while attempting to sample the Pareto frontier as accurately and uniformly as possible. The growing availability of multi-core processors in end user workstations, and even laptops, has raised the question of the extent to which such hardware can be used to speed up evolutionary algorithms. In this paper we report on early experiments in parallelizing a Generalized Differential Evolution (GDE) algorithm for scheduling long-range activities on NASA's Deep Space Network. Initial results show that significant speedups can be achieved, but that performance does not necessarily improve as more cores are utilized. We describe our preliminary results and some initial suggestions from parallelizing the GDE algorithm. Directions for future work are outlined.

  10. An algorithm for the automatic synchronization of Omega receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonestreet, W. M.; Marzetta, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The Omega navigation system and the requirement for receiver synchronization are discussed. A description of the synchronization algorithm is provided. The numerical simulation and its associated assumptions were examined and results of the simulation are presented. The suggested form of the synchronization algorithm and the suggested receiver design values were surveyed. A Fortran of the synchronization algorithm used in the simulation was also included.

  11. Correlation Wave-Front Sensing Algorithms for Shack-Hartmann-Based Adaptive Optics using a Point Source

    SciTech Connect

    Poynee, L A

    2003-05-06

    Shack-Hartmann based Adaptive Optics system with a point-source reference normally use a wave-front sensing algorithm that estimates the centroid (center of mass) of the point-source image 'spot' to determine the wave-front slope. The centroiding algorithm suffers for several weaknesses. For a small number of pixels, the algorithm gain is dependent on spot size. The use of many pixels on the detector leads to significant propagation of read noise. Finally, background light or spot halo aberrations can skew results. In this paper an alternative algorithm that suffers from none of these problems is proposed: correlation of the spot with a ideal reference spot. The correlation method is derived and a theoretical analysis evaluates its performance in comparison with centroiding. Both simulation and data from real AO systems are used to illustrate the results. The correlation algorithm is more robust than centroiding, but requires more computation.

  12. INSENS classification algorithm report

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.E.; Frerking, C.J.; Myers, D.W.

    1993-07-28

    This report describes a new algorithm developed for the Imigration and Naturalization Service (INS) in support of the INSENS project for classifying vehicles and pedestrians using seismic data. This algorithm is less sensitive to nuisance alarms due to environmental events than the previous algorithm. Furthermore, the algorithm is simple enough that it can be implemented in the 8-bit microprocessor used in the INSENS system.

  13. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  14. Automatic control algorithm effects on energy production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnerney, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model was developed using actual wind time series and turbine performance data to simulate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model was used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long term energy production. The results from local site and turbine characteristics were generalized to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

  15. Authenticated algorithms for Byzantine agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Dolev, D.; Strong, H.R.

    1983-11-01

    Reaching agreement in a distributed system in the presence of fault processors is a central issue for reliable computer systems. Using an authentication protocol, one can limit the undetected behavior of faulty processors to a simple failure to relay messages to all intended targets. In this paper the authors show that, in spite of such an ability to limit faulty behavior, and no matter what message types or protocols are allowed, reaching (Byzantine) agreement requires at least t+1 phases or rounds of information exchange, where t is an upper bound on the number of faulty processors. They present algorithms for reaching agreement based on authentication that require a total number of messages sent by correctly operating processors that is polynomial in both t and the number of processors, n. The best algorithm uses only t+1 phases and o(nt) messages. 9 references.

  16. The significance of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-02-01

    When promoting the value of their research or procuring funding, researchers often need to explain the significance of their work to the community -- something that can be just as tricky as the research itself.

  17. Visualizing output for a data learning algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Daniel; Graham, James; Ternovskiy, Igor

    2016-05-01

    This paper details the process we went through to visualize the output for our data learning algorithm. We have been developing a hierarchical self-structuring learning algorithm based around the general principles of the LaRue model. One example of a proposed application of this algorithm would be traffic analysis, chosen because it is conceptually easy to follow and there is a significant amount of already existing data and related research material with which to work with. While we choose the tracking of vehicles for our initial approach, it is by no means the only target of our algorithm. Flexibility is the end goal, however, we still need somewhere to start. To that end, this paper details our creation of the visualization GUI for our algorithm, the features we included and the initial results we obtained from our algorithm running a few of the traffic based scenarios we designed.

  18. Ensemble algorithms in reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Wiering, Marco A; van Hasselt, Hado

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes several ensemble methods that combine multiple different reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms in a single agent. The aim is to enhance learning speed and final performance by combining the chosen actions or action probabilities of different RL algorithms. We designed and implemented four different ensemble methods combining the following five different RL algorithms: Q-learning, Sarsa, actor-critic (AC), QV-learning, and AC learning automaton. The intuitively designed ensemble methods, namely, majority voting (MV), rank voting, Boltzmann multiplication (BM), and Boltzmann addition, combine the policies derived from the value functions of the different RL algorithms, in contrast to previous work where ensemble methods have been used in RL for representing and learning a single value function. We show experiments on five maze problems of varying complexity; the first problem is simple, but the other four maze tasks are of a dynamic or partially observable nature. The results indicate that the BM and MV ensembles significantly outperform the single RL algorithms.

  19. Ensemble algorithms in reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Wiering, Marco A; van Hasselt, Hado

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes several ensemble methods that combine multiple different reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms in a single agent. The aim is to enhance learning speed and final performance by combining the chosen actions or action probabilities of different RL algorithms. We designed and implemented four different ensemble methods combining the following five different RL algorithms: Q-learning, Sarsa, actor-critic (AC), QV-learning, and AC learning automaton. The intuitively designed ensemble methods, namely, majority voting (MV), rank voting, Boltzmann multiplication (BM), and Boltzmann addition, combine the policies derived from the value functions of the different RL algorithms, in contrast to previous work where ensemble methods have been used in RL for representing and learning a single value function. We show experiments on five maze problems of varying complexity; the first problem is simple, but the other four maze tasks are of a dynamic or partially observable nature. The results indicate that the BM and MV ensembles significantly outperform the single RL algorithms. PMID:18632380

  20. Distilling the Verification Process for Prognostics Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Indranil; Saxena, Abhinav; Celaya, Jose R.; Goebel, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The goal of prognostics and health management (PHM) systems is to ensure system safety, and reduce downtime and maintenance costs. It is important that a PHM system is verified and validated before it can be successfully deployed. Prognostics algorithms are integral parts of PHM systems. This paper investigates a systematic process of verification of such prognostics algorithms. To this end, first, this paper distinguishes between technology maturation and product development. Then, the paper describes the verification process for a prognostics algorithm as it moves up to higher maturity levels. This process is shown to be an iterative process where verification activities are interleaved with validation activities at each maturation level. In this work, we adopt the concept of technology readiness levels (TRLs) to represent the different maturity levels of a prognostics algorithm. It is shown that at each TRL, the verification of a prognostics algorithm depends on verifying the different components of the algorithm according to the requirements laid out by the PHM system that adopts this prognostics algorithm. Finally, using simplified examples, the systematic process for verifying a prognostics algorithm is demonstrated as the prognostics algorithm moves up TRLs.

  1. On the convergence of the phase gradient autofocus algorithm for synthetic aperture radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging is a class of coherent range and Doppler signal processing techniques applied to remote sensing. The aperture is synthesized by recording and processing coherent signals at known positions along the flight path. Demands for greater image resolution put an extreme burden on requirements for inertial measurement units that are used to maintain accurate pulse-to-pulse position information. The recently developed Phase Gradient Autofocus algorithm relieves this burden by taking a data-driven digital signal processing approach to estimating the range-invariant phase aberrations due to either uncompensated motions of the SAR platform or to atmospheric turbulence. Although the performance of this four-step algorithm has been demonstrated, its convergence has not been modeled mathematically. A new sensitivity study of algorithm performance is a necessary step towards this model. Insights that are significant to the application of this algorithm to both SAR and to other coherent imaging applications are developed. New details on algorithm implementation identify an easily avoided biased phase estimate. A new algorithm for defining support of the point spread function is proposed, which promises to reduce the number of iterations required even for rural scenes with low signal-to-clutter ratios.

  2. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  3. An efficient QoS-aware routing algorithm for LEO polar constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xin; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Tian, Zhi; Shen, Dan; Chen, Genshe

    2013-05-01

    In this work, a Quality of Service (QoS)-aware routing (QAR) algorithm is developed for Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) polar constellations. LEO polar orbits are the only type of satellite constellations where inter-plane inter-satellite links (ISLs) are implemented in real world. The QAR algorithm exploits features of the topology of the LEO satellite constellation, which makes it more efficient than general shortest path routing algorithms such as Dijkstra's or extended Bellman-Ford algorithms. Traffic density, priority, and error QoS requirements on communication delays can be easily incorporated into the QAR algorithm through satellite distances. The QAR algorithm also supports efficient load balancing in the satellite network by utilizing the multiple paths from the source satellite to the destination satellite, and effectively lowers the rate of network congestion. The QAR algorithm supports a novel robust routing scheme in LEO polar constellation, which is able to significantly reduce the impact of inter-satellite link (ISL) congestions on QoS in terms of communication delay and jitter.

  4. A symbol-map wavelet zero-tree image coding algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Liu, Wenyao; Peng, Xiang; Liu, Xiaoli

    2008-03-01

    A improved SPIHT image compression algorithm called symbol-map zero-tree coding algorithm (SMZTC) is proposed in this paper based on wavelet transform. The SPIHT algorithm is a high efficiency wavelet coefficients coding method and have good image compressing effect, but it has more complexity and need too much memory. The algorithm presented in this paper utilizes two small symbol-maps Mark and FC to store the status of coefficients and zero tree sets during coding procedure so as to reduce the memory requirement. By this strategy, the memory cost is reduced distinctly as well as the scanning speed of coefficients is improved. Those comparison experiments for 512 by 512 images are done with some other zerotree coding algorithms, such as SPIHT, NLS method. During the experiments, the biorthogonal 9/7 lifting wavelet transform is used to image transform. The results of coding experiments show that this algorithm speed of codec is improved significantly, and compression-ratio is almost uniformed with SPIHT algorithm.

  5. Significant lexical relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, T.; Kayaalp, M.; Bruce, R.

    1996-12-31

    Statistical NLP inevitably deals with a large number of rare events. As a consequence, NLP data often violates the assumptions implicit in traditional statistical procedures such as significance testing. We describe a significance test, an exact conditional test, that is appropriate for NLP data and can be performed using freely available software. We apply this test to the study of lexical relationships and demonstrate that the results obtained using this test are both theoretically more reliable and different from the results obtained using previously applied tests.

  6. The remote sensing image segmentation mean shift algorithm parallel processing based on MapReduce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Zhou, Liqing

    2015-12-01

    With the development of satellite remote sensing technology and the remote sensing image data, traditional remote sensing image segmentation technology cannot meet the massive remote sensing image processing and storage requirements. This article put cloud computing and parallel computing technology in remote sensing image segmentation process, and build a cheap and efficient computer cluster system that uses parallel processing to achieve MeanShift algorithm of remote sensing image segmentation based on the MapReduce model, not only to ensure the quality of remote sensing image segmentation, improved split speed, and better meet the real-time requirements. The remote sensing image segmentation MeanShift algorithm parallel processing algorithm based on MapReduce shows certain significance and a realization of value.

  7. Design and Optimization of Low-thrust Orbit Transfers Using Q-law and Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; vonAllmen, Paul; Fink, Wolfgang; Petropoulos, Anastassios; Terrile, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Future space missions will depend more on low-thrust propulsion (such as ion engines) thanks to its high specific impulse. Yet, the design of low-thrust trajectories is complex and challenging. Third-body perturbations often dominate the thrust, and a significant change to the orbit requires a long duration of thrust. In order to guide the early design phases, we have developed an efficient and efficacious method to obtain approximate propellant and flight-time requirements (i.e., the Pareto front) for orbit transfers. A search for the Pareto-optimal trajectories is done in two levels: optimal thrust angles and locations are determined by Q-law, while the Q-law is optimized with two evolutionary algorithms: a genetic algorithm and a simulated-annealing-related algorithm. The examples considered are several types of orbit transfers around the Earth and the asteroid Vesta.

  8. A new algorithm for reliable and general NMR resonance assignment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Elena; Güntert, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The new FLYA automated resonance assignment algorithm determines NMR chemical shift assignments on the basis of peak lists from any combination of multidimensional through-bond or through-space NMR experiments for proteins. Backbone and side-chain assignments can be determined. All experimental data are used simultaneously, thereby exploiting optimally the redundancy present in the input peak lists and circumventing potential pitfalls of assignment strategies in which results obtained in a given step remain fixed input data for subsequent steps. Instead of prescribing a specific assignment strategy, the FLYA resonance assignment algorithm requires only experimental peak lists and the primary structure of the protein, from which the peaks expected in a given spectrum can be generated by applying a set of rules, defined in a straightforward way by specifying through-bond or through-space magnetization transfer pathways. The algorithm determines the resonance assignment by finding an optimal mapping between the set of expected peaks that are assigned by definition but have unknown positions and the set of measured peaks in the input peak lists that are initially unassigned but have a known position in the spectrum. Using peak lists obtained by purely automated peak picking from the experimental spectra of three proteins, FLYA assigned correctly 96-99% of the backbone and 90-91% of all resonances that could be assigned manually. Systematic studies quantified the impact of various factors on the assignment accuracy, namely the extent of missing real peaks and the amount of additional artifact peaks in the input peak lists, as well as the accuracy of the peak positions. Comparing the resonance assignments from FLYA with those obtained from two other existing algorithms showed that using identical experimental input data these other algorithms yielded significantly (40-142%) more erroneous assignments than FLYA. The FLYA resonance assignment algorithm thus has the

  9. A novel hardware-friendly algorithm for hyperspectral linear unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Raúl; Santos, Lucana; López, Sebastián.; Sarmiento, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Linear unmixing of hyperspectral images has rapidly become one of the most widely utilized tools for analyzing the content of hyperspectral images captured by state-of-the-art remote hyperspectral sensors. The aforementioned unmixing process consists of the following three sequential steps: dimensionality estimation, endmember extraction and abundances computation. Within this procedure, the first two steps are by far the most demanding from a computational point of view, since they involve a large amount of matrix operations. Moreover, the complex nature of these operations seriously difficult the hardware implementation of these two unmixing steps, leading to non-optimized implementations which are not able to satisfy the strict delay requirements imposed by those applications under real-time or near real-time requirements. This paper uncovers a new algorithm which is capable of estimating the number of endmembers and extracting them from a given hyperspectral image with at least the same accuracy than state-of-the-art approaches while demanding a much lower computational effort, with independence of the characteristics of the image under analysis. In particular, the proposed algorithm is based on the concept of orthogonal projections and allows performing the estimation of the number of end- members and their extraction simultaneously, using simple operations, which can be also easily parallelized. In this sense, it is worth to mention that our algorithm does not perform complex matrix operations, such as the inverse of a matrix or the extraction of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, which makes easier its ulterior hardware. The experimental results obtained with synthetic and real hyperspectral images demonstrate that the accuracy obtained with the proposed algorithm when estimating the number of endmembers and extracting them is similar or better than the one provided by well-known state-of-the-art algorithms, while the complexity of the overall process is

  10. A collaborative approach to developing an electronic health record phenotyping algorithm for drug-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Pathak, Jyotishman; Gottesman, Omri; Haerian, Krystl; Perotte, Adler; Murphy, Sean; Bruce, Kevin; Johnson, Stephanie; Talwalkar, Jayant; Shen, Yufeng; Ellis, Steve; Kullo, Iftikhar; Chute, Christopher; Friedman, Carol; Bottinger, Erwin; Hripcsak, George; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe a collaborative approach for developing an electronic health record (EHR) phenotyping algorithm for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Methods We analyzed types and causes of differences in DILI case definitions provided by two institutions—Columbia University and Mayo Clinic; harmonized two EHR phenotyping algorithms; and assessed the performance, measured by sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value, of the resulting algorithm at three institutions except that sensitivity was measured only at Columbia University. Results Although these sites had the same case definition, their phenotyping methods differed by selection of liver injury diagnoses, inclusion of drugs cited in DILI cases, laboratory tests assessed, laboratory thresholds for liver injury, exclusion criteria, and approaches to validating phenotypes. We reached consensus on a DILI phenotyping algorithm and implemented it at three institutions. The algorithm was adapted locally to account for differences in populations and data access. Implementations collectively yielded 117 algorithm-selected cases and 23 confirmed true positive cases. Discussion Phenotyping for rare conditions benefits significantly from pooling data across institutions. Despite the heterogeneity of EHRs and varied algorithm implementations, we demonstrated the portability of this algorithm across three institutions. The performance of this algorithm for identifying DILI was comparable with other computerized approaches to identify adverse drug events. Conclusions Phenotyping algorithms developed for rare and complex conditions are likely to require adaptive implementation at multiple institutions. Better approaches are also needed to share algorithms. Early agreement on goals, data sources, and validation methods may improve the portability of the algorithms. PMID:23837993

  11. Significance of brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    The significance of brown dwarfs for resolving some major problems in astronomy is discussed. The importance of brown dwarfs for models of star formation by fragmentation of molecular clouds and for obtaining independent measurements of the ages of stars in binary systems is addressed. The relationship of brown dwarfs to planets is considered.

  12. Statistical Significance Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, James E., Ed.; Kaufman, Alan S., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    The controversy about the use or misuse of statistical significance testing has become the major methodological issue in educational research. This special issue contains three articles that explore the controversy, three commentaries on these articles, an overall response, and three rejoinders by the first three authors. They are: (1)…

  13. Scheduling with genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennel, Theron R.; Underbrink, A. J., Jr.; Williams, George P. W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    In many domains, scheduling a sequence of jobs is an important function contributing to the overall efficiency of the operation. At Boeing, we develop schedules for many different domains, including assembly of military and commercial aircraft, weapons systems, and space vehicles. Boeing is under contract to develop scheduling systems for the Space Station Payload Planning System (PPS) and Payload Operations and Integration Center (POIC). These applications require that we respect certain sequencing restrictions among the jobs to be scheduled while at the same time assigning resources to the jobs. We call this general problem scheduling and resource allocation. Genetic algorithms (GA's) offer a search method that uses a population of solutions and benefits from intrinsic parallelism to search the problem space rapidly, producing near-optimal solutions. Good intermediate solutions are probabalistically recombined to produce better offspring (based upon some application specific measure of solution fitness, e.g., minimum flowtime, or schedule completeness). Also, at any point in the search, any intermediate solution can be accepted as a final solution; allowing the search to proceed longer usually produces a better solution while terminating the search at virtually any time may yield an acceptable solution. Many processes are constrained by restrictions of sequence among the individual jobs. For a specific job, other jobs must be completed beforehand. While there are obviously many other constraints on processes, it is these on which we focussed for this research: how to allocate crews to jobs while satisfying job precedence requirements and personnel, and tooling and fixture (or, more generally, resource) requirements.

  14. Univariate time series forecasting algorithm validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Suzilah; Zakaria, Rohaiza; Muda, Tuan Zalizam Tuan

    2014-12-01

    Forecasting is a complex process which requires expert tacit knowledge in producing accurate forecast values. This complexity contributes to the gaps between end users and expert. Automating this process by using algorithm can act as a bridge between them. Algorithm is a well-defined rule for solving a problem. In this study a univariate time series forecasting algorithm was developed in JAVA and validated using SPSS and Excel. Two set of simulated data (yearly and non-yearly); several univariate forecasting techniques (i.e. Moving Average, Decomposition, Exponential Smoothing, Time Series Regressions and ARIMA) and recent forecasting process (such as data partition, several error measures, recursive evaluation and etc.) were employed. Successfully, the results of the algorithm tally with the results of SPSS and Excel. This algorithm will not just benefit forecaster but also end users that lacking in depth knowledge of forecasting process.

  15. Algorithmic Summaries of Perioperative Blood Pressure Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Toddenroth, Dennis; Ganslandt, Thomas; Drescher, Caroline; Weith, Thomas; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Schuettler, Juergen; Muenster, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Automated perioperative measurements such as cardiovascular monitoring data are commonly compared to established upper and lower thresholds, but could also allow for more complex interpretations. Analyzing such time series in extensive electronic medical records for research purposes may itself require customized automation, so we developed a set of algorithms for quantifying different aspects of temporal fluctuations. We implemented conventional measures of dispersion, summaries of absolute gradients between successive values, and Poincaré plots. We aggregated the severity and duration of hypotensive episodes by calculating the average area under different mean arterial pressure (MAP) thresholds. We applied these methods to 30,452 de-identified MAP series, and analyzed the similarity between alternative indices via hierarchical clustering. To explore the potential utility of these propositional metrics, we computed their statistical association with presumed complications due to cardiovascular instability. We observed that hierarchical clustering reliably segregated features that had been designed to quantify dissimilar aspects. Summaries of temporary hypotension turned out to be significantly increased among patient subgroups with subsequent signs of a complicated recovery. These associations were even stronger for measures that were specifically geared to capturing short-term MAP variability. These observations suggest the potential capability of our proposed algorithms for quantifying heterogeneous aspects of short-term MAP fluctuations. Future research might also target a wider selection of outcomes and other attributes that may be subject to intraoperative variability. PMID:27577440

  16. Algorithms for Automatic Alignment of Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Oliker, Leonid; Schreiber, Robert; Sheffler, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    Aggregate data objects (such as arrays) are distributed across the processor memories when compiling a data-parallel language for a distributed-memory machine. The mapping determines the amount of communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. A common approach is to break the mapping into two stages: an alignment that maps all the objects to an abstract template, followed by a distribution that maps the template to the processors. This paper describes algorithms for solving the various facets of the alignment problem: axis and stride alignment, static and mobile offset alignment, and replication labeling. We show that optimal axis and stride alignment is NP-complete for general program graphs, and give a heuristic method that can explore the space of possible solutions in a number of ways. We show that some of these strategies can give better solutions than a simple greedy approach proposed earlier. We also show how local graph contractions can reduce the size of the problem significantly without changing the best solution. This allows more complex and effective heuristics to be used. We show how to model the static offset alignment problem using linear programming, and we show that loop-dependent mobile offset alignment is sometimes necessary for optimum performance. We describe an algorithm with for determining mobile alignments for objects within do loops. We also identify situations in which replicated alignment is either required by the program itself or can be used to improve performance. We describe an algorithm based on network flow that replicates objects so as to minimize the total amount of broadcast communication in replication.

  17. Coagulation algorithms with size binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statton, David M.; Gans, Jason; Williams, Eric

    1994-01-01

    The Smoluchowski equation describes the time evolution of an aerosol particle size distribution due to aggregation or coagulation. Any algorithm for computerized solution of this equation requires a scheme for describing the continuum of aerosol particle sizes as a discrete set. One standard form of the Smoluchowski equation accomplishes this by restricting the particle sizes to integer multiples of a basic unit particle size (the monomer size). This can be inefficient when particle concentrations over a large range of particle sizes must be calculated. Two algorithms employing a geometric size binning convention are examined: the first assumes that the aerosol particle concentration as a function of size can be considered constant within each size bin; the second approximates the concentration as a linear function of particle size within each size bin. The output of each algorithm is compared to an analytical solution in a special case of the Smoluchowski equation for which an exact solution is known . The range of parameters more appropriate for each algorithm is examined.

  18. Diagnostic Accuracy Comparison of Artificial Immune Algorithms for Primary Headaches.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Ufuk; Yurtay, Nilüfer; Koç, Emine Rabia; Tepe, Nermin; Güllüoğlu, Halil; Ertaş, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of immune system algorithms with the aim of classifying the primary types of headache that are not related to any organic etiology. They are divided into four types: migraine, tension, cluster, and other primary headaches. After we took this main objective into consideration, three different neurologists were required to fill in the medical records of 850 patients into our web-based expert system hosted on our project web site. In the evaluation process, Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) were used as the classification algorithms. The AIS are classification algorithms that are inspired by the biological immune system mechanism that involves significant and distinct capabilities. These algorithms simulate the specialties of the immune system such as discrimination, learning, and the memorizing process in order to be used for classification, optimization, or pattern recognition. According to the results, the accuracy level of the classifier used in this study reached a success continuum ranging from 95% to 99%, except for the inconvenient one that yielded 71% accuracy.

  19. A convergent hybrid decomposition algorithm model for SVM training.

    PubMed

    Lucidi, Stefano; Palagi, Laura; Risi, Arnaldo; Sciandrone, Marco

    2009-06-01

    Training of support vector machines (SVMs) requires to solve a linearly constrained convex quadratic problem. In real applications, the number of training data may be very huge and the Hessian matrix cannot be stored. In order to take into account this issue, a common strategy consists in using decomposition algorithms which at each iteration operate only on a small subset of variables, usually referred to as the working set. Training time can be significantly reduced by using a caching technique that allocates some memory space to store the columns of the Hessian matrix corresponding to the variables recently updated. The convergence properties of a decomposition method can be guaranteed by means of a suitable selection of the working set and this can limit the possibility of exploiting the information stored in the cache. We propose a general hybrid algorithm model which combines the capability of producing a globally convergent sequence of points with a flexible use of the information in the cache. As an example of a specific realization of the general hybrid model, we describe an algorithm based on a particular strategy for exploiting the information deriving from a caching technique. We report the results of computational experiments performed by simple implementations of this algorithm. The numerical results point out the potentiality of the approach.

  20. Optimal classification of standoff bioaerosol measurements using evolutionary algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyhavn, Ragnhild; Moen, Hans J. F.; Farsund, Øystein; Rustad, Gunnar

    2011-05-01

    Early warning systems based on standoff detection of biological aerosols require real-time signal processing of a large quantity of high-dimensional data, challenging the systems efficiency in terms of both computational complexity and classification accuracy. Hence, optimal feature selection is essential in forming a stable and efficient classification system. This involves finding optimal signal processing parameters, characteristic spectral frequencies and other data transformations in large magnitude variable space, stating the need for an efficient and smart search algorithm. Evolutionary algorithms are population-based optimization methods inspired by Darwinian evolutionary theory. These methods focus on application of selection, mutation and recombination on a population of competing solutions and optimize this set by evolving the population of solutions for each generation. We have employed genetic algorithms in the search for optimal feature selection and signal processing parameters for classification of biological agents. The experimental data were achieved with a spectrally resolved lidar based on ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence, and included several releases of 5 common simulants. The genetic algorithm outperform benchmark methods involving analytic, sequential and random methods like support vector machines, Fisher's linear discriminant and principal component analysis, with significantly improved classification accuracy compared to the best classical method.

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy Comparison of Artificial Immune Algorithms for Primary Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Ufuk; Yurtay, Nilüfer; Koç, Emine Rabia; Tepe, Nermin; Güllüoğlu, Halil; Ertaş, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of immune system algorithms with the aim of classifying the primary types of headache that are not related to any organic etiology. They are divided into four types: migraine, tension, cluster, and other primary headaches. After we took this main objective into consideration, three different neurologists were required to fill in the medical records of 850 patients into our web-based expert system hosted on our project web site. In the evaluation process, Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) were used as the classification algorithms. The AIS are classification algorithms that are inspired by the biological immune system mechanism that involves significant and distinct capabilities. These algorithms simulate the specialties of the immune system such as discrimination, learning, and the memorizing process in order to be used for classification, optimization, or pattern recognition. According to the results, the accuracy level of the classifier used in this study reached a success continuum ranging from 95% to 99%, except for the inconvenient one that yielded 71% accuracy. PMID:26075014

  2. Significant Tsunami Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Furtney, M.; McLean, S. J.; Sweeney, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis have inflicted death and destruction on the coastlines of the world throughout history. The occurrence of tsunamis and the resulting effects have been collected and studied as far back as the second millennium B.C. The knowledge gained from cataloging and examining these events has led to significant changes in our understanding of tsunamis, tsunami sources, and methods to mitigate the effects of tsunamis. The most significant, not surprisingly, are often the most devastating, such as the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and tsunami. The goal of this poster is to give a brief overview of the occurrence of tsunamis and then focus specifically on several significant tsunamis. There are various criteria to determine the most significant tsunamis: the number of deaths, amount of damage, maximum runup height, had a major impact on tsunami science or policy, etc. As a result, descriptions will include some of the most costly (2011 Tohoku, Japan), the most deadly (2004 Sumatra, 1883 Krakatau), and the highest runup ever observed (1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska). The discovery of the Cascadia subduction zone as the source of the 1700 Japanese "Orphan" tsunami and a future tsunami threat to the U.S. northwest coast, contributed to the decision to form the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. The great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 marked the beginning of the modern era of seismology. Knowledge gained from the 1964 Alaska earthquake and tsunami helped confirm the theory of plate tectonics. The 1946 Alaska, 1952 Kuril Islands, 1960 Chile, 1964 Alaska, and the 2004 Banda Aceh, tsunamis all resulted in warning centers or systems being established.The data descriptions on this poster were extracted from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) global historical tsunami database. Additional information about these tsunamis, as well as water level data can be found by accessing the NGDC website www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/

  3. An Efficient Next Hop Selection Algorithm for Multi-Hop Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahitafti, Vahid; Ngadi, Md Asri; Mohamad Sharif, Johan bin; Abdullahi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Body Area Networks (BANs) consist of various sensors which gather patient’s vital signs and deliver them to doctors. One of the most significant challenges faced, is the design of an energy-efficient next hop selection algorithm to satisfy Quality of Service (QoS) requirements for different healthcare applications. In this paper, a novel efficient next hop selection algorithm is proposed in multi-hop BANs. This algorithm uses the minimum hop count and a link cost function jointly in each node to choose the best next hop node. The link cost function includes the residual energy, free buffer size, and the link reliability of the neighboring nodes, which is used to balance the energy consumption and to satisfy QoS requirements in terms of end to end delay and reliability. Extensive simulation experiments were performed to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm using the NS-2 simulator. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm provides significant improvement in terms of energy consumption, number of packets forwarded, end to end delay and packet delivery ratio compared to the existing routing protocol. PMID:26771586

  4. A New Pivot Algorithm for Star Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, Jakyoung; Yi, Yu; Kim, Yong Ha

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a star identification algorithm which utilizes pivot patterns instead of apparent magnitude information was developed. The new star identification algorithm consists of two steps of recognition process. In the first step, the brightest star in a sensor image is identified using the orientation of brightness between two stars as recognition information. In the second step, cell indexes are used as new recognition information to identify dimmer stars, which are derived from the brightest star already identified. If we use the cell index information, we can search over limited portion of the star catalogue database, which enables the faster identification of dimmer stars. The new pivot algorithm does not require calibrations on the apparent magnitude of a star but it shows robust characteristics on the errors of apparent magnitude compared to conventional pivot algorithms which require the apparent magnitude information.

  5. A hierarchical algorithm for molecular similarity (H-FORMS).

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Manzanares, Alonso; Peña, Joaquin; Azpiroz, Jon M; Merino, Gabriel

    2015-07-15

    A new hierarchical method to determine molecular similarity is introduced. The goal of this method is to detect if a pair of molecules has the same structure by estimating a rigid transformation that aligns the molecules and a correspondence function that matches their atoms. The algorithm firstly detect similarity based on the global spatial structure. If this analysis is not sufficient, the algorithm computes novel local structural rotation-invariant descriptors for the atom neighborhood and uses this information to match atoms. Two strategies (deterministic and stochastic) on the matching based alignment computation are tested. As a result, the atom-matching based on local similarity indexes decreases the number of testing trials and significantly reduces the dimensionality of the Hungarian assignation problem. The experiments on well-known datasets show that our proposal outperforms state-of-the-art methods in terms of the required computational time and accuracy.

  6. Parallel Algorithms for Graph Optimization using Tree Decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Blair D; Weerapurage, Dinesh P; Groer, Christopher S

    2012-06-01

    Although many $\\cal{NP}$-hard graph optimization problems can be solved in polynomial time on graphs of bounded tree-width, the adoption of these techniques into mainstream scientific computation has been limited due to the high memory requirements of the necessary dynamic programming tables and excessive runtimes of sequential implementations. This work addresses both challenges by proposing a set of new parallel algorithms for all steps of a tree decomposition-based approach to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem. A hybrid OpenMP/MPI implementation includes a highly scalable parallel dynamic programming algorithm leveraging the MADNESS task-based runtime, and computational results demonstrate scaling. This work enables a significant expansion of the scale of graphs on which exact solutions to maximum weighted independent set can be obtained, and forms a framework for solving additional graph optimization problems with similar techniques.

  7. Signal processing algorithms for staring single pixel hyperspectral sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolakis, Dimitris; Rossacci, Michael; O'Donnell, Erin; D'Amico, Francis M.

    2006-08-01

    Remote sensing of chemical warfare agents (CWA) with stand-off hyperspectral sensors has a wide range of civilian and military applications. These sensors exploit the spectral changes in the ambient photon flux produced thermal emission or absorption after passage through a region containing the CWA cloud. In this work we focus on (a) staring single-pixel sensors that sample their field of view at regular intervals of time to produce a time series of spectra and (b) scanning single or multiple pixel sensors that sample their FOV as they scan. The main objective of signal processing algorithms is to determine if and when a CWA enters the FOV of the sensor. We shall first develop and evaluate algorithms for staring sensors following two different approaches. First, we will assume that no threat information is available and we design an adaptive anomaly detection algorithm to detect a statistically-significant change in the observed spectrum. The algorithm processes the observed spectra sequentially-in-time, estimates adaptively the background, and checks whether the next spectrum differs significantly from the background based on the Mahalanobis distance or the distance from the background subspace. In the second approach, we will assume that we know the spectral signature of the CWA and develop sequential-in-time adaptive matched filter detectors. In both cases, we assume that the sensor starts its operation before the release of the CWA; otherwise, staring at a nearby CWA-free area is required for background estimation. Experimental evaluation and comparison of the proposed algorithms is accomplished using data from a long-wave infrared (LWIR) Fourier transform spectrometer.

  8. Automated Antenna Design with Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Derek; Hornby, Greg; Lohn, Jason; Globus, Al; Krishunkumor, K.

    2006-01-01

    Current methods of designing and optimizing antennas by hand are time and labor intensive, and limit complexity. Evolutionary design techniques can overcome these limitations by searching the design space and automatically finding effective solutions. In recent years, evolutionary algorithms have shown great promise in finding practical solutions in large, poorly understood design spaces. In particular, spacecraft antenna design has proven tractable to evolutionary design techniques. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years as computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Two requirements-compliant antennas, one for ST5 and another for TDRS-C, have been automatically designed by evolutionary algorithms. The ST5 antenna is slated to fly this year, and a TDRS-C phased array element has been fabricated and tested. Such automated evolutionary design is enabled by medium-to-high quality simulators and fast modern computers to evaluate computer-generated designs. Evolutionary algorithms automate cut-and-try engineering, substituting automated search though millions of potential designs for intelligent search by engineers through a much smaller number of designs. For evolutionary design, the engineer chooses the evolutionary technique, parameters and the basic form of the antenna, e.g., single wire for ST5 and crossed-element Yagi for TDRS-C. Evolutionary algorithms then search for optimal configurations in the space defined by the engineer. NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) mission will launch three small spacecraft to test innovative concepts and technologies. Advanced evolutionary algorithms were used to automatically design antennas for ST5. The combination of wide beamwidth for a circularly-polarized wave and wide impedance bandwidth made for a challenging antenna design problem. From past experience in designing wire antennas, we chose to

  9. Facial Composite System Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahradníková, Barbora; Duchovičová, Soňa; Schreiber, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The article deals with genetic algorithms and their application in face identification. The purpose of the research is to develop a free and open-source facial composite system using evolutionary algorithms, primarily processes of selection and breeding. The initial testing proved higher quality of the final composites and massive reduction in the composites processing time. System requirements were specified and future research orientation was proposed in order to improve the results.

  10. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  11. Tales of significance.

    PubMed

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment, the authors were interested in testing the effect of a small molecule inhibitor on the ratio of males and females in the offspring of their model Dipteran species. The authors report that in a wild-type population, ~50 % of offspring are male. They then test the effect of treating females with the chemical, which they think might affect the male:female ratio compared with the untreated group. They claim that there is a statistically significant increase in the percentage of males produced and conclude that the drug affects sex ratios. PMID:27338560

  12. Exact significance test for Markov order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethel, S. D.; Hahs, D. W.

    2014-02-01

    We describe an exact significance test of the null hypothesis that a Markov chain is nth order. The procedure utilizes surrogate data to yield an exact test statistic distribution valid for any sample size. Surrogate data are generated using a novel algorithm that guarantees, per shot, a uniform sampling from the set of sequences that exactly match the nth order properties of the observed data. Using the test, the Markov order of Tel Aviv rainfall data is examined.

  13. A GROUP FINDING ALGORITHM FOR MULTIDIMENSIONAL DATA SETS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sanjib; Johnston, Kathryn V. E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.ed

    2009-09-20

    We describe a density-based hierarchical group finding algorithm capable of identifying structures and substructures of any shape and density in multidimensional data sets where each dimension can be a numeric attribute with arbitrary measurement scale. This has applications in a wide variety of fields from finding structures in galaxy redshift surveys, to identifying halos and subhalos in N-body simulations and group finding in Local Group chemodynamical data sets. In general, clustering schemes require an a priori definition of a metric (a non-negative function that gives the distance between two points in a space) and the quality of clustering depends upon this choice. The general practice is to use a constant global metric which is optimal only if the clusters in the data are self-similar. For complex data configurations even the most finely tuned constant global metric turns out to be suboptimal. Moreover, the correct choice of metric also becomes increasingly important as the number of dimensions increase. To address these problems, we present an entropy-based binary space partitioning algorithm which uses a locally adaptive metric for each data point. The metric is employed to calculate the density at each point and a list of its nearest neighbors, and this information is then used to form a hierarchy of groups. Finally, the ratio of maximum to minimum density of points in a group is used to estimate the significance of the groups. Setting a threshold on this significance can effectively screen out groups arising due to Poisson noise and helps organize the groups into meaningful clusters. For a data set of N points, the algorithm requires only O(N) space and O(N(log N){sup 3}) time which makes it ideally suitable for analyzing large data sets. As an example, we apply the algorithm to identify structures in a simulated stellar halo using the full six-dimensional phase space coordinates.

  14. Hardware implementation of Corner2 lossless compression algorithm for maskless lithography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jeehong; Li, Xiaohui; Savari, Serap A.

    2012-03-01

    The data delivery throughput of maskless lithography systems can be improved by applying a lossless image compression algorithm to the layout images and using a lithography writer that contains a decoding circuit packed in single silicon to decode the compressed image on-the-fly. In our past research we have introduced Corner2, a layout image compression algorithm which achieved significantly better performance in all aspects (compression ratio, encoding/decoding speed, decoder memory requirement) than Block C4. In this paper, we present the synthesis results of the Corner2 decoder for FPGA implementation.

  15. Adaptation algorithms for satellite communication systems equipped with hybrid reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsan, I. N.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Tyapkin, V. N.; Dmitriev, D. D.; Goncharov, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reviews adaptation algorithms influenced by active interferences in satellite communication systems. A multi-beam antenna is suggested as an adaptive system; it is built on the basis of a hybrid reflector antenna with a 19-element array feed element, which incorporates a modified algorithm for radiation pattern synthesis used for suppressing targeted interferences. As a criterion for this synthesis, antenna gains are used at fixed points. As a result, the size of the objective function and time required for the synthesis can be significantly limited.

  16. Reasoning about systolic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Purushothaman, S.; Subrahmanyam, P.A.

    1988-12-01

    The authors present a methodology for verifying correctness of systolic algorithms. The methodology is based on solving a set of Uniform Recurrence Equations obtained from a description of systolic algorithms as a set of recursive equations. They present an approach to mechanically verify correctness of systolic algorithms, using the Boyer-Moore theorem proven. A mechanical correctness proof of an example from the literature is also presented.

  17. Algorithm for Autonomous Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwata, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Because of their small size, high maneuverability, and easy deployment, micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) are used for a wide variety of both civilian and military missions. One of their current drawbacks is the vast array of sensors (such as GPS, altimeter, radar, and the like) required to make a landing. Due to the MAV s small payload size, this is a major concern. Replacing the imaging sensors with a single monocular camera is sufficient to land a MAV. By applying optical flow algorithms to images obtained from the camera, time-to-collision can be measured. This is a measurement of position and velocity (but not of absolute distance), and can avoid obstacles as well as facilitate a landing on a flat surface given a set of initial conditions. The key to this approach is to calculate time-to-collision based on some image on the ground. By holding the angular velocity constant, horizontal speed decreases linearly with the height, resulting in a smooth landing. Mathematical proofs show that even with actuator saturation or modeling/ measurement uncertainties, MAVs can land safely. Landings of this nature may have a higher velocity than is desirable, but this can be compensated for by a cushioning or dampening system, or by using a system of legs to grab onto a surface. Such a monocular camera system can increase vehicle payload size (or correspondingly reduce vehicle size), increase speed of descent, and guarantee a safe landing by directly correlating speed to height from the ground.

  18. Statistical or biological significance?

    PubMed

    Saxon, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Oat plants grown at an agricultural research facility produce higher yields in Field 1 than in Field 2, under well fertilised conditions and with similar weather exposure; all oat plants in both fields are healthy and show no sign of disease. In this study, the authors hypothesised that the soil microbial community might be different in each field, and these differences might explain the difference in oat plant growth. They carried out a metagenomic analysis of the 16 s ribosomal 'signature' sequences from bacteria in 50 randomly located soil samples in each field to determine the composition of the bacterial community. The study identified >1000 species, most of which were present in both fields. The authors identified two plant growth-promoting species that were significantly reduced in soil from Field 2 (Student's t-test P < 0.05), and concluded that these species might have contributed to reduced yield. PMID:26541972

  19. Anthropological significance of phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, L F

    1975-01-01

    The highest incidence rates of phenylketonuria (PKU) have been observed in Ireland and Scotlant. Parents heterozygous for PKU in Norway differ significantly from the general population in the Rhesus, Kell and PGM systems. The parents investigated showed an excess of Rh negative, Kell plus and PGM type 1 individuals, which makes them similar to the present populations in Ireland and Scotlant. It is postulated that the heterozygotes for PKU in Norway are descended from a completely assimilated sub-population of Celtic origin, who came or were brought here, 1ooo years ago. Bronze objects of Western European (Scottish, Irish) origin, found in Viking graves widely distributed in Norway, have been taken as evidence of Vikings returning with loot (including a number of Celts) from Western Viking settlements. The continuity of residence since the Viking age in most habitable parts of Norway, and what seems to be a nearly complete regional relationship between the sites where Viking graves contain western imported objects and the birthplaces of grandparents of PKUs identified in Norway, lend further support to the hypothesis that the heterozygotes for PKU in Norway are descended from a completely assimilated subpopulation. The remarkable resemblance between Iceland and Ireland, in respect of several genetic markers (including the Rhesus, PGM and Kell systems), is considered to be an expression of a similar proportion of people of Celtic origin in each of the two countries. Their identical, high incidence rates of PKU are regarded as further evidence of this. The significant decline in the incidence of PKU when one passes from Ireland, Scotland and Iceland, to Denmark and on to Norway and Sweden, is therefore explained as being related to a reduction in the proportion of inhabitants of Celtic extraction in the respective populations.

  20. An NOy* Algorithm for SOLVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, M.; Greenblatt. B. J.; Jost, H.; Podolske, J. R.; Elkins, Jim; Hurst, Dale; Romanashkin, Pavel; Atlas, Elliott; Schauffler, Sue; Donnelly, Steve; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    De-nitrification and excess re-nitrification was widely observed by ER-2 instruments in the Arctic vortex during SOLVE in winter/spring 2000. Analyses of these events requires a knowledge of the initial or pre-vortex state of the sampled air masses. The canonical relationship of NOy to the long-lived tracer N2O observed in the unperturbed stratosphere is generally used for this purpose. In this paper we will attempt to establish the current unperturbed NOy:N2O relationship (NOy* algorithm) using the ensemble of extra-vortex data from in situ instruments flying on the ER-2 and DC-8, and from the Mark IV remote measurements on the OMS balloon. Initial analysis indicates a change in the SOLVE NOy* from the values predicted by the 1994 Northern Hemisphere NOy* algorithm which was derived from the observations in the ASHOE/MAESA campaign.

  1. A fast meteor detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gural, P.

    2016-01-01

    A low latency meteor detection algorithm for use with fast steering mirrors had been previously developed to track and telescopically follow meteors in real-time (Gural, 2007). It has been rewritten as a generic clustering and tracking software module for meteor detection that meets both the demanding throughput requirements of a Raspberry Pi while also maintaining a high probability of detection. The software interface is generalized to work with various forms of front-end video pre-processing approaches and provides a rich product set of parameterized line detection metrics. Discussion will include the Maximum Temporal Pixel (MTP) compression technique as a fast thresholding option for feeding the detection module, the detection algorithm trade for maximum processing throughput, details on the clustering and tracking methodology, processing products, performance metrics, and a general interface description.

  2. Big Data: A Parallel Particle Swarm Optimization-Back-Propagation Neural Network Algorithm Based on MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianfang; Cui, Hongyan; Shi, Hao; Jiao, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    A back-propagation (BP) neural network can solve complicated random nonlinear mapping problems; therefore, it can be applied to a wide range of problems. However, as the sample size increases, the time required to train BP neural networks becomes lengthy. Moreover, the classification accuracy decreases as well. To improve the classification accuracy and runtime efficiency of the BP neural network algorithm, we proposed a parallel design and realization method for a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-optimized BP neural network based on MapReduce on the Hadoop platform using both the PSO algorithm and a parallel design. The PSO algorithm was used to optimize the BP neural network's initial weights and thresholds and improve the accuracy of the classification algorithm. The MapReduce parallel programming model was utilized to achieve parallel processing of the BP algorithm, thereby solving the problems of hardware and communication overhead when the BP neural network addresses big data. Datasets on 5 different scales were constructed using the scene image library from the SUN Database. The classification accuracy of the parallel PSO-BP neural network algorithm is approximately 92%, and the system efficiency is approximately 0.85, which presents obvious advantages when processing big data. The algorithm proposed in this study demonstrated both higher classification accuracy and improved time efficiency, which represents a significant improvement obtained from applying parallel processing to an intelligent algorithm on big data. PMID:27304987

  3. Big Data: A Parallel Particle Swarm Optimization-Back-Propagation Neural Network Algorithm Based on MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianfang; Cui, Hongyan; Shi, Hao; Jiao, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    A back-propagation (BP) neural network can solve complicated random nonlinear mapping problems; therefore, it can be applied to a wide range of problems. However, as the sample size increases, the time required to train BP neural networks becomes lengthy. Moreover, the classification accuracy decreases as well. To improve the classification accuracy and runtime efficiency of the BP neural network algorithm, we proposed a parallel design and realization method for a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-optimized BP neural network based on MapReduce on the Hadoop platform using both the PSO algorithm and a parallel design. The PSO algorithm was used to optimize the BP neural network's initial weights and thresholds and improve the accuracy of the classification algorithm. The MapReduce parallel programming model was utilized to achieve parallel processing of the BP algorithm, thereby solving the problems of hardware and communication overhead when the BP neural network addresses big data. Datasets on 5 different scales were constructed using the scene image library from the SUN Database. The classification accuracy of the parallel PSO-BP neural network algorithm is approximately 92%, and the system efficiency is approximately 0.85, which presents obvious advantages when processing big data. The algorithm proposed in this study demonstrated both higher classification accuracy and improved time efficiency, which represents a significant improvement obtained from applying parallel processing to an intelligent algorithm on big data.

  4. Big Data: A Parallel Particle Swarm Optimization-Back-Propagation Neural Network Algorithm Based on MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianfang; Cui, Hongyan; Shi, Hao; Jiao, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    A back-propagation (BP) neural network can solve complicated random nonlinear mapping problems; therefore, it can be applied to a wide range of problems. However, as the sample size increases, the time required to train BP neural networks becomes lengthy. Moreover, the classification accuracy decreases as well. To improve the classification accuracy and runtime efficiency of the BP neural network algorithm, we proposed a parallel design and realization method for a particle swarm optimization (PSO)-optimized BP neural network based on MapReduce on the Hadoop platform using both the PSO algorithm and a parallel design. The PSO algorithm was used to optimize the BP neural network’s initial weights and thresholds and improve the accuracy of the classification algorithm. The MapReduce parallel programming model was utilized to achieve parallel processing of the BP algorithm, thereby solving the problems of hardware and communication overhead when the BP neural network addresses big data. Datasets on 5 different scales were constructed using the scene image library from the SUN Database. The classification accuracy of the parallel PSO-BP neural network algorithm is approximately 92%, and the system efficiency is approximately 0.85, which presents obvious advantages when processing big data. The algorithm proposed in this study demonstrated both higher classification accuracy and improved time efficiency, which represents a significant improvement obtained from applying parallel processing to an intelligent algorithm on big data. PMID:27304987

  5. Investigating the performance of neural network backpropagation algorithms for TEC estimations using South African GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habarulema, J. B.; McKinnell, L.-A.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, results obtained by investigating the application of different neural network backpropagation training algorithms are presented. This was done to assess the performance accuracy of each training algorithm in total electron content (TEC) estimations using identical datasets in models development and verification processes. Investigated training algorithms are standard backpropagation (SBP), backpropagation with weight delay (BPWD), backpropagation with momentum (BPM) term, backpropagation with chunkwise weight update (BPC) and backpropagation for batch (BPB) training. These five algorithms are inbuilt functions within the Stuttgart Neural Network Simulator (SNNS) and the main objective was to find out the training algorithm that generates the minimum error between the TEC derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) observations and the modelled TEC data. Another investigated algorithm is the MatLab based Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation (L-MBP), which achieves convergence after the least number of iterations during training. In this paper, neural network (NN) models were developed using hourly TEC data (for 8 years: 2000-2007) derived from GPS observations over a receiver station located at Sutherland (SUTH) (32.38° S, 20.81° E), South Africa. Verification of the NN models for all algorithms considered was performed on both "seen" and "unseen" data. Hourly TEC values over SUTH for 2003 formed the "seen" dataset. The "unseen" dataset consisted of hourly TEC data for 2002 and 2008 over Cape Town (CPTN) (33.95° S, 18.47° E) and SUTH, respectively. The models' verification showed that all algorithms investigated provide comparable results statistically, but differ significantly in terms of time required to achieve convergence during input-output data training/learning. This paper therefore provides a guide to neural network users for choosing appropriate algorithms based on the availability of computation capabilities used for research.

  6. Indexing and Automatic Significance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinacker, Ivo

    1974-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed to solve the problem of sequential indexing which does not use any grammatical or semantic analysis, but follows the principle of emulating human judgement by evaluation of machine-recognizable attributes of structured word assemblies. (Author)

  7. Passive microwave algorithm development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, Grant W.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific objectives of this grant are: (1) thoroughly evaluate, both theoretically and empirically, all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) retrieval algorithms for column water vapor, column liquid water, and surface wind speed; (2) where both appropriate and feasible, develop, validate, and document satellite passive microwave retrieval algorithms that offer significantly improved performance compared with currently available algorithms; and (3) refine and validate a novel physical inversion scheme for retrieving rain rate over the ocean. This report summarizes work accomplished or in progress during the first year of a three year grant. The emphasis during the first year has been on the validation and refinement of the rain rate algorithm published by Petty and on the analysis of independent data sets that can be used to help evaluate the performance of rain rate algorithms over remote areas of the ocean. Two articles in the area of global oceanic precipitation are attached.

  8. Basic firefly algorithm for document clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Athraa Jasim; Yusof, Yuhanis; Husni, Husniza

    2015-12-01

    The Document clustering plays significant role in Information Retrieval (IR) where it organizes documents prior to the retrieval process. To date, various clustering algorithms have been proposed and this includes the K-means and Particle Swarm Optimization. Even though these algorithms have been widely applied in many disciplines due to its simplicity, such an approach tends to be trapped in a local minimum during its search for an optimal solution. To address the shortcoming, this paper proposes a Basic Firefly (Basic FA) algorithm to cluster text documents. The algorithm employs the Average Distance to Document Centroid (ADDC) as the objective function of the search. Experiments utilizing the proposed algorithm were conducted on the 20Newsgroups benchmark dataset. Results demonstrate that the Basic FA generates a more robust and compact clusters than the ones produced by K-means and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO).

  9. System engineering approach to GPM retrieval algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C. R.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2004-01-01

    System engineering principles and methods are very useful in large-scale complex systems for developing the engineering requirements from end-user needs. Integrating research into system engineering is a challenging task. The proposed Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) satellite will use a dual-wavelength precipitation radar to measure and map global precipitation with unprecedented accuracy, resolution and areal coverage. The satellite vehicle, precipitation radars, retrieval algorithms, and ground validation (GV) functions are all critical subsystems of the overall GPM system and each contributes to the success of the mission. Errors in the radar measurements and models can adversely affect the retrieved output values. Ground validation (GV) systems are intended to provide timely feedback to the satellite and retrieval algorithms based on measured data. These GV sites will consist of radars and DSD measurement systems and also have intrinsic constraints. One of the retrieval algorithms being studied for use with GPM is the dual-wavelength DSD algorithm that does not use the surface reference technique (SRT). The underlying microphysics of precipitation structures and drop-size distributions (DSDs) dictate the types of models and retrieval algorithms that can be used to estimate precipitation. Many types of dual-wavelength algorithms have been studied. Meneghini (2002) analyzed the performance of single-pass dual-wavelength surface-reference-technique (SRT) based algorithms. Mardiana (2003) demonstrated that a dual-wavelength retrieval algorithm could be successfully used without the use of the SRT. It uses an iterative approach based on measured reflectivities at both wavelengths and complex microphysical models to estimate both No and Do at each range bin. More recently, Liao (2004) proposed a solution to the Do ambiguity problem in rain within the dual-wavelength algorithm and showed a possible melting layer model based on stratified spheres. With the No and Do

  10. Algorithm Development Library for Environmental Satellite Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. C.; Grant, K. D.; Miller, S. W.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    science will need to migrate into the operational system. In addition, as new techniques are found to improve, supplement, or replace existing products, these changes will also require implementation into the operational system. In the past, operationalizing science algorithms and integrating them into active systems often required months of work. In order to significantly shorten the time and effort required for this activity, Raytheon has developed the Algorithm Development Library (ADL). The ADL enables scientist and researchers to develop algorithms on their own platforms, and provide these to Raytheon in a form that can be rapidly integrated directly into the operational baseline. As the JPSS CGS is a multi-mission ground system, algorithms are not restricted to Suomi NPP or JPSS missions. The ADL provides a development environment that any environmental remote sensing mission scientist can use to create algorithms that will plug into a JPSS CGS instantiation. This paper describes the ADL and how scientists and researchers can use it in their own environments.

  11. Direct and iterative algorithms for the three-dimensional Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    vanden, Kirk Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Direct and iterative algorithms have been developed for solving a finite volume discretization of the three-dimensional Euler equations in curvilinear coordinates. The Euler equations are discretized using numerical derivatives of the numerical flux vector for the Jacobians. This has the advantage of keeping the Jacobians consistent with the numerical flux vector without extremely complex or impractical analytic differentiations. The increased execution time necessary for the computation of the numerical Jacobians is greatly offset by the significant increase in convergence they provide. The direct algorithms were formulated as block-tridiagonal systems and then solved using a block LU factorization followed by forward and backward substitution. A diagonal plane matrix structure is presented that has significantly lower memory requirements than more conventional direct solver formulations. The direct solvers are used as a benchmark in measuring the convergence rate and robustness of more computationally efficient iterative solvers. The factored and iterative algorithms studied include two factored approaches, a Newton-relaxation algorithm and a discretized Newton-relaxation algorithm, which uses numerical Jacobians. A diagonal plane formulation for the Newton-relaxation algorithms has also been developed. It is demonstrated that the Newton-relaxation approach can give convergence rates and robustness equal to that of a direct solver for three-dimensional problems. Modifications to the two Newton-relaxation algorithms are presented which allow iterative calculation of implicit characteristic variable farfield boundary conditions. As a demonstration of the robustness of the Newton-relaxation algorithm and numerical Jacobians, quadratic convergence to machine zero is demonstrated.

  12. An Automatic Editing Algorithm for GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, Geoffrey

    1990-03-01

    An algorithm has been developed to edit automatically Global Positioning System data such that outlier deletion, cycle slip identification and correction are independent of clock instability, selective availability, receiver-satellite kinematics, and tropospheric conditions. This algorithm, called TurboEdit, operates on undifferenced, dual frequency carrier phase data, and requires (1) the use of P code pseudorange data and (2) a smoothly varying ionospheric electron content. The latter requirement can be relaxed if the analysis software incorporates ambiguity resolution techniques to estimate unresolved cycle slip parameters. TurboEdit was tested on the large data set from the CASA Uno experiment, which contained over 2500 cycle slips. Analyst intervention was required on 1% of the station-satellite passes, almost all of these problems being due to difficulties in extrapolating variations in the ionospheric delay. The algorithm is presently being adapted for real time data editing in the Rogue receiver for continuous monitoring applications.

  13. Automated Analysis of 1p/19q Status by FISH in Oligodendroglial Tumors: Rationale and Proposal of an Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Céline; de Tayrac, Marie; Michaud, Karine; Cabillic, Florian; Paquet, Claudie; Gould, Peter Vincent; Saikali, Stéphan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To propose a new algorithm facilitating automated analysis of 1p and 19q status by FISH technique in oligodendroglial tumors with software packages available in the majority of institutions using this technique. Methods We documented all green/red (G/R) probe signal combinations in a retrospective series of 53 oligodendroglial tumors according to literature guidelines (Algorithm 1) and selected only the most significant combinations for a new algorithm (Algorithm 2). This second algorithm was then validated on a prospective internal series of 45 oligodendroglial tumors and on an external series of 36 gliomas. Results Algorithm 2 utilizes 24 G/R combinations which represent less than 40% of combinations observed with Algorithm 1. The new algorithm excludes some common G/R combinations (1/1, 3/2) and redefines the place of others (defining 1/2 as compatible with normal and 3/3, 4/4 and 5/5 as compatible with imbalanced chromosomal status). The new algorithm uses the combination + ratio method of signal probe analysis to give the best concordance between manual and automated analysis on samples of 100 tumor cells (91% concordance for 1p and 89% concordance for 19q) and full concordance on samples of 200 tumor cells. This highlights the value of automated analysis as a means to identify cases in which a larger number of tumor cells should be studied by manual analysis. Validation of this algorithm on a second series from another institution showed a satisfactory concordance (89%, κ = 0.8). Conclusion Our algorithm can be easily implemented on all existing FISH analysis software platforms and should facilitate multicentric evaluation and standardization of 1p/19q assessment in gliomas with reduction of the professional and technical time required. PMID:26135922

  14. Algorithm That Synthesizes Other Algorithms for Hashing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm that includes a collection of several subalgorithms has been devised as a means of synthesizing still other algorithms (which could include computer code) that utilize hashing to determine whether an element (typically, a number or other datum) is a member of a set (typically, a list of numbers). Each subalgorithm synthesizes an algorithm (e.g., a block of code) that maps a static set of key hashes to a somewhat linear monotonically increasing sequence of integers. The goal in formulating this mapping is to cause the length of the sequence thus generated to be as close as practicable to the original length of the set and thus to minimize gaps between the elements. The advantage of the approach embodied in this algorithm is that it completely avoids the traditional approach of hash-key look-ups that involve either secondary hash generation and look-up or further searching of a hash table for a desired key in the event of collisions. This algorithm guarantees that it will never be necessary to perform a search or to generate a secondary key in order to determine whether an element is a member of a set. This algorithm further guarantees that any algorithm that it synthesizes can be executed in constant time. To enforce these guarantees, the subalgorithms are formulated to employ a set of techniques, each of which works very effectively covering a certain class of hash-key values. These subalgorithms are of two types, summarized as follows: Given a list of numbers, try to find one or more solutions in which, if each number is shifted to the right by a constant number of bits and then masked with a rotating mask that isolates a set of bits, a unique number is thereby generated. In a variant of the foregoing procedure, omit the masking. Try various combinations of shifting, masking, and/or offsets until the solutions are found. From the set of solutions, select the one that provides the greatest compression for the representation and is executable in the

  15. Advancements to the planogram frequency–distance rebinning algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Champley, Kyle M; Raylman, Raymond R; Kinahan, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider the task of image reconstruction in positron emission tomography (PET) with the planogram frequency–distance rebinning (PFDR) algorithm. The PFDR algorithm is a rebinning algorithm for PET systems with panel detectors. The algorithm is derived in the planogram coordinate system which is a native data format for PET systems with panel detectors. A rebinning algorithm averages over the redundant four-dimensional set of PET data to produce a three-dimensional set of data. Images can be reconstructed from this rebinned three-dimensional set of data. This process enables one to reconstruct PET images more quickly than reconstructing directly from the four-dimensional PET data. The PFDR algorithm is an approximate rebinning algorithm. We show that implementing the PFDR algorithm followed by the (ramp) filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm in linogram coordinates from multiple views reconstructs a filtered version of our image. We develop an explicit formula for this filter which can be used to achieve exact reconstruction by means of a modified FBP algorithm applied to the stack of rebinned linograms and can also be used to quantify the errors introduced by the PFDR algorithm. This filter is similar to the filter in the planogram filtered backprojection algorithm derived by Brasse et al. The planogram filtered backprojection and exact reconstruction with the PFDR algorithm require complete projections which can be completed with a reprojection algorithm. The PFDR algorithm is similar to the rebinning algorithm developed by Kao et al. By expressing the PFDR algorithm in detector coordinates, we provide a comparative analysis between the two algorithms. Numerical experiments using both simulated data and measured data from a positron emission mammography/tomography (PEM/PET) system are performed. Images are reconstructed by PFDR+FBP (PFDR followed by 2D FBP reconstruction), PFDRX (PFDR followed by the modified FBP algorithm for exact

  16. Fungi producing significant mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of microfungi that are known to cause sickness or death in humans or animals. Although many such toxic metabolites are known, it is generally agreed that only a few are significant in causing disease: aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, and ergot alkaloids. These toxins are produced by just a few species from the common genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, and Claviceps. All Aspergillus and Penicillium species either are commensals, growing in crops without obvious signs of pathogenicity, or invade crops after harvest and produce toxins during drying and storage. In contrast, the important Fusarium and Claviceps species infect crops before harvest. The most important Aspergillus species, occurring in warmer climates, are A. flavus and A. parasiticus, which produce aflatoxins in maize, groundnuts, tree nuts, and, less frequently, other commodities. The main ochratoxin A producers, A. ochraceus and A. carbonarius, commonly occur in grapes, dried vine fruits, wine, and coffee. Penicillium verrucosum also produces ochratoxin A but occurs only in cool temperate climates, where it infects small grains. F. verticillioides is ubiquitous in maize, with an endophytic nature, and produces fumonisins, which are generally more prevalent when crops are under drought stress or suffer excessive insect damage. It has recently been shown that Aspergillus niger also produces fumonisins, and several commodities may be affected. F. graminearum, which is the major producer of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone, is pathogenic on maize, wheat, and barley and produces these toxins whenever it infects these grains before harvest. Also included is a short section on Claviceps purpurea, which produces sclerotia among the seeds in grasses, including wheat, barley, and triticale. The main thrust of the chapter contains information on the identification of these fungi and their morphological characteristics, as well as factors

  17. Optimal reservoir operation policies using novel nested algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delipetrev, Blagoj; Jonoski, Andreja; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    Historically, the two most widely practiced methods for optimal reservoir operation have been dynamic programming (DP) and stochastic dynamic programming (SDP). These two methods suffer from the so called "dual curse" which prevents them to be used in reasonably complex water systems. The first one is the "curse of dimensionality" that denotes an exponential growth of the computational complexity with the state - decision space dimension. The second one is the "curse of modelling" that requires an explicit model of each component of the water system to anticipate the effect of each system's transition. We address the problem of optimal reservoir operation concerning multiple objectives that are related to 1) reservoir releases to satisfy several downstream users competing for water with dynamically varying demands, 2) deviations from the target minimum and maximum reservoir water levels and 3) hydropower production that is a combination of the reservoir water level and the reservoir releases. Addressing such a problem with classical methods (DP and SDP) requires a reasonably high level of discretization of the reservoir storage volume, which in combination with the required releases discretization for meeting the demands of downstream users leads to computationally expensive formulations and causes the curse of dimensionality. We present a novel approach, named "nested" that is implemented in DP, SDP and reinforcement learning (RL) and correspondingly three new algorithms are developed named nested DP (nDP), nested SDP (nSDP) and nested RL (nRL). The nested algorithms are composed from two algorithms: 1) DP, SDP or RL and 2) nested optimization algorithm. Depending on the way we formulate the objective function related to deficits in the allocation problem in the nested optimization, two methods are implemented: 1) Simplex for linear allocation problems, and 2) quadratic Knapsack method in the case of nonlinear problems. The novel idea is to include the nested

  18. 48 CFR 2110.7003 - Significant events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Significant events. 2110..., AND OTHER PURCHASE DESCRIPTIONS Contract Specifications 2110.7003 Significant events. The contractor is required to inform the contracting officer of all significant events....

  19. 48 CFR 2110.7003 - Significant events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Significant events. 2110..., AND OTHER PURCHASE DESCRIPTIONS Contract Specifications 2110.7003 Significant events. The contractor is required to inform the contracting officer of all significant events....

  20. 48 CFR 2110.7003 - Significant events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Significant events. 2110..., AND OTHER PURCHASE DESCRIPTIONS Contract Specifications 2110.7003 Significant events. The contractor is required to inform the contracting officer of all significant events....

  1. 48 CFR 2110.7003 - Significant events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Significant events. 2110..., AND OTHER PURCHASE DESCRIPTIONS Contract Specifications 2110.7003 Significant events. The contractor is required to inform the contracting officer of all significant events....

  2. 48 CFR 2110.7003 - Significant events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Significant events. 2110..., AND OTHER PURCHASE DESCRIPTIONS Contract Specifications 2110.7003 Significant events. The contractor is required to inform the contracting officer of all significant events....

  3. Grooming of arbitrary traffic using improved genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yueguang; Xu, Zhengchun; Zhang, Hanyi

    2004-04-01

    A genetic algorithm is proposed with permutation based chromosome presentation and roulette wheel selection to solve traffic grooming problems in WDM ring network. The parameters of the algorithm are evaluated by calculating of large amount of traffic patterns at different conditions. Four methods were developed to improve the algorithm, which can be used combining with each other. Effects of them on the algorithm are studied via computer simulations. The results show that they can all make the algorithm more powerful to reduce the number of add-drop multiplexers or wavelengths required in a network.

  4. Novel biomedical tetrahedral mesh methods: algorithms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Jin, Yanfeng; Chen, Weitao; Huang, Pengfei; Gu, Lixu

    2007-12-01

    Tetrahedral mesh generation algorithm, as a prerequisite of many soft tissue simulation methods, becomes very important in the virtual surgery programs because of the real-time requirement. Aiming to speed up the computation in the simulation, we propose a revised Delaunay algorithm which makes a good balance of quality of tetrahedra, boundary preservation and time complexity, with many improved methods. Another mesh algorithm named Space-Disassembling is also presented in this paper, and a comparison of Space-Disassembling, traditional Delaunay algorithm and the revised Delaunay algorithm is processed based on clinical soft-tissue simulation projects, including craniofacial plastic surgery and breast reconstruction plastic surgery.

  5. Fast proximity algorithm for MAP ECT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si; Krol, Andrzej; Shen, Lixin; Xu, Yuesheng

    2012-03-01

    We arrived at the fixed-point formulation of the total variation maximum a posteriori (MAP) regularized emission computed tomography (ECT) reconstruction problem and we proposed an iterative alternating scheme to numerically calculate the fixed point. We theoretically proved that our algorithm converges to unique solutions. Because the obtained algorithm exhibits slow convergence speed, we further developed the proximity algorithm in the transformed image space, i.e. the preconditioned proximity algorithm. We used the bias-noise curve method to select optimal regularization hyperparameters for both our algorithm and expectation maximization with total variation regularization (EM-TV). We showed in the numerical experiments that our proposed algorithms, with an appropriately selected preconditioner, outperformed conventional EM-TV algorithm in many critical aspects, such as comparatively very low noise and bias for Shepp-Logan phantom. This has major ramification for nuclear medicine because clinical implementation of our preconditioned fixed-point algorithms might result in very significant radiation dose reduction in the medical applications of emission tomography.

  6. Performance analysis of cone detection algorithms.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Letizia; Devaney, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    Many algorithms have been proposed to help clinicians evaluate cone density and spacing, as these may be related to the onset of retinal diseases. However, there has been no rigorous comparison of the performance of these algorithms. In addition, the performance of such algorithms is typically determined by comparison with human observers. Here we propose a technique to simulate realistic images of the cone mosaic. We use the simulated images to test the performance of three popular cone detection algorithms, and we introduce an algorithm which is used by astronomers to detect stars in astronomical images. We use Free Response Operating Characteristic (FROC) curves to evaluate and compare the performance of the four algorithms. This allows us to optimize the performance of each algorithm. We observe that performance is significantly enhanced by up-sampling the images. We investigate the effect of noise and image quality on cone mosaic parameters estimated using the different algorithms, finding that the estimated regularity is the most sensitive parameter. PMID:26366758

  7. An improved localization algorithm based on genetic algorithm in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Li, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Wireless sensor network (WSN) are widely used in many applications. A WSN is a wireless decentralized structure network comprised of nodes, which autonomously set up a network. The node localization that is to be aware of position of the node in the network is an essential part of many sensor network operations and applications. The existing localization algorithms can be classified into two categories: range-based and range-free. The range-based localization algorithm has requirements on hardware, thus is expensive to be implemented in practice. The range-free localization algorithm reduces the hardware cost. Because of the hardware limitations of WSN devices, solutions in range-free localization are being pursued as a cost-effective alternative to more expensive range-based approaches. However, these techniques usually have higher localization error compared to the range-based algorithms. DV-Hop is a typical range-free localization algorithm utilizing hop-distance estimation. In this paper, we propose an improved DV-Hop algorithm based on genetic algorithm. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm improves the localization accuracy compared with previous algorithms.

  8. Dual signal subspace projection (DSSP): a novel algorithm for removing large interference in biomagnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekihara, Kensuke; Kawabata, Yuya; Ushio, Shuta; Sumiya, Satoshi; Kawabata, Shigenori; Adachi, Yoshiaki; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. In functional electrophysiological imaging, signals are often contaminated by interference that can be of considerable magnitude compared to the signals of interest. This paper proposes a novel algorithm for removing such interferences that does not require separate noise measurements. Approach. The algorithm is based on a dual definition of the signal subspace in the spatial- and time-domains. Since the algorithm makes use of this duality, it is named the dual signal subspace projection (DSSP). The DSSP algorithm first projects the columns of the measured data matrix onto the inside and outside of the spatial-domain signal subspace, creating a set of two preprocessed data matrices. The intersection of the row spans of these two matrices is estimated as the time-domain interference subspace. The original data matrix is projected onto the subspace that is orthogonal to this interference subspace. Main results. The DSSP algorithm is validated by using the computer simulation, and using two sets of real biomagnetic data: spinal cord evoked field data measured from a healthy volunteer and magnetoencephalography data from a patient with a vagus nerve stimulator. Significance. The proposed DSSP algorithm is effective for removing overlapped interference in a wide variety of biomagnetic measurements.

  9. Parallel Transferable Uniform Multi-Round Algorithm for Minimizing Makespan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Masato; Yamazaki, Katsuyuki; Oie, Yuji

    In parallel computing systems using the master/worker model for distributed grid computing, as the size of handling data grows, the increase in the data transmission time degrades the performance. For divisible workload applications, therefore, multiple-round scheduling algorithms have been being developed to mitigate the adverse effect of longer data transmission time by dividing the data into chunks to be sent out in multiple rounds, thus overlapping the times required for computation and transmission. However, a standard multiple-round scheduling algorithm, Uniform Multi-Round (UMR), adopts a sequential transmission model where the master communicates with one worker at a time, thus the transmission capacity of the link attached to the master cannot be fully utilized due to the limits of worker-side capacity. In the present study, a Parallel Transferable Uniform Multi-Round algorithm (PTUMR) is proposed. It efficiently utilizes the data transmission capacity of network links by allowing chunks to be transmitted in parallel to workers. This algorithm divides workers into groups in a way that fully uses the link bandwidth of the master under some constraints and considers each group of workers as one virtual worker. In particular, introducing a Grouping Threshold effectively deals with very heterogeneous workers in both data transmission and computation capacities. Then, the master schedules sequential data transmissions to the virtual workers in an optimal way like in UMR. The performance evaluations show that the proposed algorithm achieves significantly shorter turnaround times (i.e., makespan) compared with UMR regardless of heterogeneity of workers, which are close to the theoretical lower limits.

  10. JavaGenes and Condor: Cycle-Scavenging Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Langhirt, Eric; Livny, Miron; Ramamurthy, Ravishankar; Soloman, Marvin; Traugott, Steve

    2000-01-01

    A genetic algorithm code, JavaGenes, was written in Java and used to evolve pharmaceutical drug molecules and digital circuits. JavaGenes was run under the Condor cycle-scavenging batch system managing 100-170 desktop SGI workstations. Genetic algorithms mimic biological evolution by evolving solutions to problems using crossover and mutation. While most genetic algorithms evolve strings or trees, JavaGenes evolves graphs representing (currently) molecules and circuits. Java was chosen as the implementation language because the genetic algorithm requires random splitting and recombining of graphs, a complex data structure manipulation with ample opportunities for memory leaks, loose pointers, out-of-bound indices, and other hard to find bugs. Java garbage-collection memory management, lack of pointer arithmetic, and array-bounds index checking prevents these bugs from occurring, substantially reducing development time. While a run-time performance penalty must be paid, the only unacceptable performance we encountered was using standard Java serialization to checkpoint and restart the code. This was fixed by a two-day implementation of custom checkpointing. JavaGenes is minimally integrated with Condor; in other words, JavaGenes must do its own checkpointing and I/O redirection. A prototype Java-aware version of Condor was developed using standard Java serialization for checkpointing. For the prototype to be useful, standard Java serialization must be significantly optimized. JavaGenes is approximately 8700 lines of code and a few thousand JavaGenes jobs have been run. Most jobs ran for a few days. Results include proof that genetic algorithms can evolve directed and undirected graphs, development of a novel crossover operator for graphs, a paper in the journal Nanotechnology, and another paper in preparation.

  11. Oscillation Detection Algorithm Development Summary Report and Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Tuffner, Francis K.; Jin, Shuangshuang

    2009-10-03

    Small signal stability problems are one of the major threats to grid stability and reliability in California and the western U.S. power grid. An unstable oscillatory mode can cause large-amplitude oscillations and may result in system breakup and large-scale blackouts. There have been several incidents of system-wide oscillations. Of them, the most notable is the August 10, 1996 western system breakup produced as a result of undamped system-wide oscillations. There is a great need for real-time monitoring of small-signal oscillations in the system. In power systems, a small-signal oscillation is the result of poor electromechanical damping. Considerable understanding and literature have been developed on the small-signal stability problem over the past 50+ years. These studies have been mainly based on a linearized system model and eigenvalue analysis of its characteristic matrix. However, its practical feasibility is greatly limited as power system models have been found inadequate in describing real-time operating conditions. Significant efforts have been devoted to monitoring system oscillatory behaviors from real-time measurements in the past 20 years. The deployment of phasor measurement units (PMU) provides high-precision time-synchronized data needed for estimating oscillation modes. Measurement-based modal analysis, also known as ModeMeter, uses real-time phasor measure-ments to estimate system oscillation modes and their damping. Low damping indicates potential system stability issues. Oscillation alarms can be issued when the power system is lightly damped. A good oscillation alarm tool can provide time for operators to take remedial reaction and reduce the probability of a system breakup as a result of a light damping condition. Real-time oscillation monitoring requires ModeMeter algorithms to have the capability to work with various kinds of measurements: disturbance data (ringdown signals), noise probing data, and ambient data. Several measurement

  12. A fast rank-reduction algorithm for three-dimensional seismic data interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yongna; Yu, Siwei; Liu, Lina; Ma, Jianwei

    2016-09-01

    Rank-reduction methods have been successfully used for seismic data interpolation and noise attenuation. However, highly intense computation is required for singular value decomposition (SVD) in most rank-reduction methods. In this paper, we propose a simple yet efficient interpolation algorithm, which is based on the Hankel matrix, for randomly missing traces. Following the multichannel singular spectrum analysis (MSSA) technique, we first transform the seismic data into a low-rank block Hankel matrix for each frequency slice. Then, a fast orthogonal rank-one matrix pursuit (OR1MP) algorithm is employed to minimize the low-rank constraint of the block Hankel matrix. In the new algorithm, only the left and right top singular vectors are needed to be computed, thereby, avoiding the complexity of computation required for SVD. Thus, we improve the calculation efficiency significantly. Finally, we anti-average the rank-reduction block Hankel matrix and obtain the reconstructed data in the frequency domain. Numerical experiments on 3D seismic data show that the proposed interpolation algorithm provides much better performance than the traditional MSSA algorithm in computational speed, especially for large-scale data processing.

  13. Eligibility Requirements

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Donating Blood > Eligibility Requirements Printable Version Eligibility Requirements This page uses Javascript. Your browser either doesn' ... donors » Weigh at least 110 lbs. Additional weight requirements apply for donors 18-years-old and younger ...

  14. Algorithms for optimal dyadic decision trees

    SciTech Connect

    Hush, Don; Porter, Reid

    2009-01-01

    A new algorithm for constructing optimal dyadic decision trees was recently introduced, analyzed, and shown to be very effective for low dimensional data sets. This paper enhances and extends this algorithm by: introducing an adaptive grid search for the regularization parameter that guarantees optimal solutions for all relevant trees sizes, revising the core tree-building algorithm so that its run time is substantially smaller for most regularization parameter values on the grid, and incorporating new data structures and data pre-processing steps that provide significant run time enhancement in practice.

  15. Updated treatment algorithm of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Galiè, Nazzareno; Corris, Paul A; Frost, Adaani; Girgis, Reda E; Granton, John; Jing, Zhi Cheng; Klepetko, Walter; McGoon, Michael D; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Preston, Ioana R; Rubin, Lewis J; Sandoval, Julio; Seeger, Werner; Keogh, Anne

    2013-12-24

    The demands on a pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treatment algorithm are multiple and in some ways conflicting. The treatment algorithm usually includes different types of recommendations with varying degrees of scientific evidence. In addition, the algorithm is required to be comprehensive but not too complex, informative yet simple and straightforward. The type of information in the treatment algorithm are heterogeneous including clinical, hemodynamic, medical, interventional, pharmacological and regulatory recommendations. Stakeholders (or users) including physicians from various specialties and with variable expertise in PAH, nurses, patients and patients' associations, healthcare providers, regulatory agencies and industry are often interested in the PAH treatment algorithm for different reasons. These are the considerable challenges faced when proposing appropriate updates to the current evidence-based treatment algorithm.The current treatment algorithm may be divided into 3 main areas: 1) general measures, supportive therapy, referral strategy, acute vasoreactivity testing and chronic treatment with calcium channel blockers; 2) initial therapy with approved PAH drugs; and 3) clinical response to the initial therapy, combination therapy, balloon atrial septostomy, and lung transplantation. All three sections will be revisited highlighting information newly available in the past 5 years and proposing updates where appropriate. The European Society of Cardiology grades of recommendation and levels of evidence will be adopted to rank the proposed treatments. PMID:24355643

  16. Algorithm Optimally Allocates Actuation of a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motaghedi, Shi

    2007-01-01

    A report presents an algorithm that solves the following problem: Allocate the force and/or torque to be exerted by each thruster and reaction-wheel assembly on a spacecraft for best performance, defined as minimizing the error between (1) the total force and torque commanded by the spacecraft control system and (2) the total of forces and torques actually exerted by all the thrusters and reaction wheels. The algorithm incorporates the matrix vector relationship between (1) the total applied force and torque and (2) the individual actuator force and torque values. It takes account of such constraints as lower and upper limits on the force or torque that can be applied by a given actuator. The algorithm divides the aforementioned problem into two optimization problems that it solves sequentially. These problems are of a type, known in the art as semi-definite programming problems, that involve linear matrix inequalities. The algorithm incorporates, as sub-algorithms, prior algorithms that solve such optimization problems very efficiently. The algorithm affords the additional advantage that the solution requires the minimum rate of consumption of fuel for the given best performance.

  17. Power optimization of digital baseband WCDMA receiver components on algorithmic and architectural level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schämann, M.; Bücker, M.; Hessel, S.; Langmann, U.

    2008-05-01

    High data rates combined with high mobility represent a challenge for the design of cellular devices. Advanced algorithms are required which result in higher complexity, more chip area and increased power consumption. However, this contrasts to the limited power supply of mobile devices. This presentation discusses the application of an HSDPA receiver which has been optimized regarding power consumption with the focus on the algorithmic and architectural level. On algorithmic level the Rake combiner, Prefilter-Rake equalizer and MMSE equalizer are compared regarding their BER performance. Both equalizer approaches provide a significant increase of performance for high data rates compared to the Rake combiner which is commonly used for lower data rates. For both equalizer approaches several adaptive algorithms are available which differ in complexity and convergence properties. To identify the algorithm which achieves the required performance with the lowest power consumption the algorithms have been investigated using SystemC models regarding their performance and arithmetic complexity. Additionally, for the Prefilter Rake equalizer the power estimations of a modified Griffith (LMS) and a Levinson (RLS) algorithm have been compared with the tool ORINOCO supplied by ChipVision. The accuracy of this tool has been verified with a scalable architecture of the UMTS channel estimation described both in SystemC and VHDL targeting a 130 nm CMOS standard cell library. An architecture combining all three approaches combined with an adaptive control unit is presented. The control unit monitors the current condition of the propagation channel and adjusts parameters for the receiver like filter size and oversampling ratio to minimize the power consumption while maintaining the required performance. The optimization strategies result in a reduction of the number of arithmetic operations up to 70% for single components which leads to an estimated power reduction of up to 40

  18. A fast, robust algorithm for power line interference cancellation in neural recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshtkaran, Mohammad Reza; Yang, Zhi

    2014-04-01

    Objective. Power line interference may severely corrupt neural recordings at 50/60 Hz and harmonic frequencies. The interference is usually non-stationary and can vary in frequency, amplitude and phase. To retrieve the gamma-band oscillations at the contaminated frequencies, it is desired to remove the interference without compromising the actual neural signals at the interference frequency bands. In this paper, we present a robust and computationally efficient algorithm for removing power line interference from neural recordings. Approach. The algorithm includes four steps. First, an adaptive notch filter is used to estimate the fundamental frequency of the interference. Subsequently, based on the estimated frequency, harmonics are generated by using discrete-time oscillators, and then the amplitude and phase of each harmonic are estimated by using a modified recursive least squares algorithm. Finally, the estimated interference is subtracted from the recorded data. Main results. The algorithm does not require any reference signal, and can track the frequency, phase and amplitude of each harmonic. When benchmarked with other popular approaches, our algorithm performs better in terms of noise immunity, convergence speed and output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). While minimally affecting the signal bands of interest, the algorithm consistently yields fast convergence (<100 ms) and substantial interference rejection (output SNR >30 dB) in different conditions of interference strengths (input SNR from -30 to 30 dB), power line frequencies (45-65 Hz) and phase and amplitude drifts. In addition, the algorithm features a straightforward parameter adjustment since the parameters are independent of the input SNR, input signal power and the sampling rate. A hardware prototype was fabricated in a 65 nm CMOS process and tested. Software implementation of the algorithm has been made available for open access at https://github.com/mrezak/removePLI. Significance. The proposed

  19. Quality control algorithms for rainfall measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golz, Claudia; Einfalt, Thomas; Gabella, Marco; Germann, Urs

    2005-09-01

    One of the basic requirements for a scientific use of rain data from raingauges, ground and space radars is data quality control. Rain data could be used more intensively in many fields of activity (meteorology, hydrology, etc.), if the achievable data quality could be improved. This depends on the available data quality delivered by the measuring devices and the data quality enhancement procedures. To get an overview of the existing algorithms a literature review and literature pool have been produced. The diverse algorithms have been evaluated to meet VOLTAIRE objectives and sorted in different groups. To test the chosen algorithms an algorithm pool has been established, where the software is collected. A large part of this work presented here is implemented in the scope of the EU-project VOLTAIRE ( Validati on of mu ltisensors precipit ation fields and numerical modeling in Mediter ran ean test sites).

  20. Scheduling Earth Observing Satellites with Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Crawford, James; Lohn, Jason; Pryor, Anna

    2003-01-01

    We hypothesize that evolutionary algorithms can effectively schedule coordinated fleets of Earth observing satellites. The constraints are complex and the bottlenecks are not well understood, a condition where evolutionary algorithms are often effective. This is, in part, because evolutionary algorithms require only that one can represent solutions, modify solutions, and evaluate solution fitness. To test the hypothesis we have developed a representative set of problems, produced optimization software (in Java) to solve them, and run experiments comparing techniques. This paper presents initial results of a comparison of several evolutionary and other optimization techniques; namely the genetic algorithm, simulated annealing, squeaky wheel optimization, and stochastic hill climbing. We also compare separate satellite vs. integrated scheduling of a two satellite constellation. While the results are not definitive, tests to date suggest that simulated annealing is the best search technique and integrated scheduling is superior.

  1. Non-Manhattan layout extraction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satkhozhina, Aziza; Ahmadullin, Ildus; Allebach, Jan P.; Lin, Qian; Liu, Jerry; Tretter, Daniel; O'Brien-Strain, Eamonn; Hunter, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Automated publishing requires large databases containing document page layout templates. The number of layout templates that need to be created and stored grows exponentially with the complexity of the document layouts. A better approach for automated publishing is to reuse layout templates of existing documents for the generation of new documents. In this paper, we present an algorithm for template extraction from a docu- ment page image. We use the cost-optimized segmentation algorithm (COS) to segment the image, and Voronoi decomposition to cluster the text regions. Then, we create a block image where each block represents a homo- geneous region of the document page. We construct a geometrical tree that describes the hierarchical structure of the document page. We also implement a font recognition algorithm to analyze the font of each text region. We present a detailed description of the algorithm and our preliminary results.

  2. Algorithm for in-flight gyroscope calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, P. B.; Welter, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    An optimal algorithm for the in-flight calibration of spacecraft gyroscope systems is presented. Special consideration is given to the selection of the loss function weight matrix in situations in which the spacecraft attitude sensors provide significantly more accurate information in pitch and yaw than in roll, such as will be the case in the Hubble Space Telescope mission. The results of numerical tests that verify the accuracy of the algorithm are discussed.

  3. Self-organization and clustering algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezdek, James C.

    1991-01-01

    Kohonen's feature maps approach to clustering is often likened to the k or c-means clustering algorithms. Here, the author identifies some similarities and differences between the hard and fuzzy c-Means (HCM/FCM) or ISODATA algorithms and Kohonen's self-organizing approach. The author concludes that some differences are significant, but at the same time there may be some important unknown relationships between the two methodologies. Several avenues of research are proposed.

  4. Cyclic cooling algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rempp, Florian; Mahler, Guenter; Michel, Mathias

    2007-09-15

    We introduce a scheme to perform the cooling algorithm, first presented by Boykin et al. in 2002, for an arbitrary number of times on the same set of qbits. We achieve this goal by adding an additional SWAP gate and a bath contact to the algorithm. This way one qbit may repeatedly be cooled without adding additional qbits to the system. By using a product Liouville space to model the bath contact we calculate the density matrix of the system after a given number of applications of the algorithm.

  5. Firefly algorithm with chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandomi, A. H.; Yang, X.-S.; Talatahari, S.; Alavi, A. H.

    2013-01-01

    A recently developed metaheuristic optimization algorithm, firefly algorithm (FA), mimics the social behavior of fireflies based on the flashing and attraction characteristics of fireflies. In the present study, we will introduce chaos into FA so as to increase its global search mobility for robust global optimization. Detailed studies are carried out on benchmark problems with different chaotic maps. Here, 12 different chaotic maps are utilized to tune the attractive movement of the fireflies in the algorithm. The results show that some chaotic FAs can clearly outperform the standard FA.

  6. Network-Control Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Hak-Wai; Yan, Tsun-Yee

    1989-01-01

    Algorithm developed for optimal routing of packets of data along links of multilink, multinode digital communication network. Algorithm iterative and converges to cost-optimal assignment independent of initial assignment. Each node connected to other nodes through links, each containing number of two-way channels. Algorithm assigns channels according to message traffic leaving and arriving at each node. Modified to take account of different priorities among packets belonging to different users by using different delay constraints or imposing additional penalties via cost function.

  7. New stereo matching algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Yasser A.; Afifi, Hossam; Rubino, Gerardo

    1999-05-01

    This paper present a new algorithm for stereo matching. The main idea is to decompose the original problem into independent hierarchical and more elementary problems that can be solved faster without any complicated mathematics using BBD. To achieve that, we use a new image feature called 'continuity feature' instead of classical noise. This feature can be extracted from any kind of images by a simple process and without using a searching technique. A new matching technique is proposed to match the continuity feature. The new algorithm resolves the main disadvantages of feature based stereo matching algorithms.

  8. An Algorithm for Autonomous Formation Obstacle Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Yunior I.

    The level of human interaction with Unmanned Aerial Systems varies greatly from remotely piloted aircraft to fully autonomous systems. In the latter end of the spectrum, the challenge lies in designing effective algorithms to dictate the behavior of the autonomous agents. A swarm of autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles requires collision avoidance and formation flight algorithms to negotiate environmental challenges it may encounter during the execution of its mission, which may include obstacles and chokepoints. In this work, a simple algorithm is developed to allow a formation of autonomous vehicles to perform point to point navigation while avoiding obstacles and navigating through chokepoints. Emphasis is placed on maintaining formation structures. Rather than breaking formation and individually navigating around the obstacle or through the chokepoint, vehicles are required to assemble into appropriately sized/shaped sub-formations, bifurcate around the obstacle or negotiate the chokepoint, and reassemble into the original formation at the far side of the obstruction. The algorithm receives vehicle and environmental properties as inputs and outputs trajectories for each vehicle from start to the desired ending location. Simulation results show that the algorithm safely routes all vehicles past the obstruction while adhering to the aforementioned requirements. The formation adapts and successfully negotiates the obstacles and chokepoints in its path while maintaining proper vehicle separation.

  9. [An Algorithm for Correcting Fetal Heart Rate Baseline].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodong; Lu, Yaosheng

    2015-10-01

    Fetal heart rate (FHR) baseline estimation is of significance for the computerized analysis of fetal heart rate and the assessment of fetal state. In our work, a fetal heart rate baseline correction algorithm was presented to make the existing baseline more accurate and fit to the tracings. Firstly, the deviation of the existing FHR baseline was found and corrected. And then a new baseline was obtained finally after treatment with some smoothing methods. To assess the performance of FHR baseline correction algorithm, a new FHR baseline estimation algorithm that combined baseline estimation algorithm and the baseline correction algorithm was compared with two existing FHR baseline estimation algorithms. The results showed that the new FHR baseline estimation algorithm did well in both accuracy and efficiency. And the results also proved the effectiveness of the FHR baseline correction algorithm.

  10. Social significance of community structure: Statistical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Jia; Daniels, Jasmine J.

    2015-01-01

    Community structure analysis is a powerful tool for social networks that can simplify their topological and functional analysis considerably. However, since community detection methods have random factors and real social networks obtained from complex systems always contain error edges, evaluating the significance of a partitioned community structure is an urgent and important question. In this paper, integrating the specific characteristics of real society, we present a framework to analyze the significance of a social community. The dynamics of social interactions are modeled by identifying social leaders and corresponding hierarchical structures. Instead of a direct comparison with the average outcome of a random model, we compute the similarity of a given node with the leader by the number of common neighbors. To determine the membership vector, an efficient community detection algorithm is proposed based on the position of the nodes and their corresponding leaders. Then, using a log-likelihood score, the tightness of the community can be derived. Based on the distribution of community tightness, we establish a connection between p -value theory and network analysis, and then we obtain a significance measure of statistical form . Finally, the framework is applied to both benchmark networks and real social networks. Experimental results show that our work can be used in many fields, such as determining the optimal number of communities, analyzing the social significance of a given community, comparing the performance among various algorithms, etc.

  11. Annealed Importance Sampling Reversible Jump MCMC algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Andrieu, Christophe

    2013-03-20

    It will soon be 20 years since reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJ-MCMC) algorithms have been proposed. They have significantly extended the scope of Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation methods, offering the promise to be able to routinely tackle transdimensional sampling problems, as encountered in Bayesian model selection problems for example, in a principled and flexible fashion. Their practical efficient implementation, however, still remains a challenge. A particular difficulty encountered in practice is in the choice of the dimension matching variables (both their nature and their distribution) and the reversible transformations which allow one to define the one-to-one mappings underpinning the design of these algorithms. Indeed, even seemingly sensible choices can lead to algorithms with very poor performance. The focus of this paper is the development and performance evaluation of a method, annealed importance sampling RJ-MCMC (aisRJ), which addresses this problem by mitigating the sensitivity of RJ-MCMC algorithms to the aforementioned poor design. As we shall see the algorithm can be understood as being an “exact approximation” of an idealized MCMC algorithm that would sample from the model probabilities directly in a model selection set-up. Such an idealized algorithm may have good theoretical convergence properties, but typically cannot be implemented, and our algorithms can approximate the performance of such idealized algorithms to an arbitrary degree while not introducing any bias for any degree of approximation. Our approach combines the dimension matching ideas of RJ-MCMC with annealed importance sampling and its Markov chain Monte Carlo implementation. We illustrate the performance of the algorithm with numerical simulations which indicate that, although the approach may at first appear computationally involved, it is in fact competitive.

  12. An item-oriented recommendation algorithm on cold-start problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tian; Chen, Guang; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Tao

    2011-09-01

    Based on a hybrid algorithm incorporating the heat conduction and probability spreading processes (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 107 (2010) 4511), in this letter, we propose an improved method by introducing an item-oriented function, focusing on solving the dilemma of the recommendation accuracy between the cold and popular items. Differently from previous works, the present algorithm does not require any additional information (e.g., tags). Further experimental results obtained in three real datasets, RYM, Netflix and MovieLens, show that, compared with the original hybrid method, the proposed algorithm significantly enhances the recommendation accuracy of the cold items, while it keeps the recommendation accuracy of the overall and the popular items. This work might shed some light on both understanding and designing effective methods for long-tailed online applications of recommender systems.

  13. Efficient Out of Core Sorting Algorithms for the Parallel Disks Model.

    PubMed

    Kundeti, Vamsi; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we present efficient algorithms for sorting on the Parallel Disks Model (PDM). Numerous asymptotically optimal algorithms have been proposed in the literature. However many of these merge based algorithms have large underlying constants in the time bounds, because they suffer from the lack of read parallelism on PDM. The irregular consumption of the runs during the merge affects the read parallelism and contributes to the increased sorting time. In this paper we first introduce a novel idea called the dirty sequence accumulation that improves the read parallelism. Secondly, we show analytically that this idea can reduce the number of parallel I/O's required to sort the input close to the lower bound of [Formula: see text]. We experimentally verify our dirty sequence idea with the standard R-Way merge and show that our idea can reduce the number of parallel I/Os to sort on PDM significantly.

  14. A Variable Splitting based Algorithm for Fast Multi-Coil Blind Compressed Sensing MRI reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Sampada; Lingala, Sajan Goud; Jacob, Mathews

    2015-01-01

    Recent work on blind compressed sensing (BCS) has shown that exploiting sparsity in dictionaries that are learnt directly from the data at hand can outperform compressed sensing (CS) that uses fixed dictionaries. A challenge with BCS however is the large computational complexity during its optimization, which limits its practical use in several MRI applications. In this paper, we propose a novel optimization algorithm that utilize variable splitting strategies to significantly improve the convergence speed of the BCS optimization. The splitting allows us to efficiently decouple the sparse coefficient, and dictionary update steps from the data fidelity term, resulting in subproblems that take closed form analytical solutions, which otherwise require slower iterative conjugate gradient algorithms. Through experiments on multi coil parametric MRI data, we demonstrate the superior performance of BCS, while achieving convergence speed up factors of over 15 fold over the previously proposed implementation of the BCS algorithm. PMID:25570473

  15. Cloud model bat algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongquan; Xie, Jian; Li, Liangliang; Ma, Mingzhi

    2014-01-01

    Bat algorithm (BA) is a novel stochastic global optimization algorithm. Cloud model is an effective tool in transforming between qualitative concepts and their quantitative representation. Based on the bat echolocation mechanism and excellent characteristics of cloud model on uncertainty knowledge representation, a new cloud model bat algorithm (CBA) is proposed. This paper focuses on remodeling echolocation model based on living and preying characteristics of bats, utilizing the transformation theory of cloud model to depict the qualitative concept: "bats approach their prey." Furthermore, Lévy flight mode and population information communication mechanism of bats are introduced to balance the advantage between exploration and exploitation. The simulation results show that the cloud model bat algorithm has good performance on functions optimization. PMID:24967425

  16. High performance graphics processor based computed tomography reconstruction algorithms for nuclear and other large scale applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Edward Steven,

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a fast computed tomography (CT) reconstruction algorithm based on graphics processing units (GPU) that achieves significant improvement over traditional central processing unit (CPU) based implementations. The main challenge in developing a CT algorithm that is capable of handling very large datasets is parallelizing the algorithm in such a way that data transfer does not hinder performance of the reconstruction algorithm. General Purpose Graphics Processing (GPGPU) is a new technology that the Science and Technology (S&T) community is starting to adopt in many fields where CPU-based computing is the norm. GPGPU programming requires a new approach to algorithm development that utilizes massively multi-threaded environments. Multi-threaded algorithms in general are difficult to optimize since performance bottlenecks occur that are non-existent in single-threaded algorithms such as memory latencies. If an efficient GPU-based CT reconstruction algorithm can be developed; computational times could be improved by a factor of 20. Additionally, cost benefits will be realized as commodity graphics hardware could potentially replace expensive supercomputers and high-end workstations. This project will take advantage of the CUDA programming environment and attempt to parallelize the task in such a way that multiple slices of the reconstruction volume are computed simultaneously. This work will also take advantage of the GPU memory by utilizing asynchronous memory transfers, GPU texture memory, and (when possible) pinned host memory so that the memory transfer bottleneck inherent to GPGPU is amortized. Additionally, this work will take advantage of GPU-specific hardware (i.e. fast texture memory, pixel-pipelines, hardware interpolators, and varying memory hierarchy) that will allow for additional performance improvements.

  17. A comprehensive evaluation of alignment algorithms in the context of RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Friedel, Caroline C

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) overcomes limitations of previously used RNA quantification methods and provides one experimental framework for both high-throughput characterization and quantification of transcripts at the nucleotide level. The first step and a major challenge in the analysis of such experiments is the mapping of sequencing reads to a transcriptomic origin including the identification of splicing events. In recent years, a large number of such mapping algorithms have been developed, all of which have in common that they require algorithms for aligning a vast number of reads to genomic or transcriptomic sequences. Although the FM-index based aligner Bowtie has become a de facto standard within mapping pipelines, a much larger number of possible alignment algorithms have been developed also including other variants of FM-index based aligners. Accordingly, developers and users of RNA-seq mapping pipelines have the choice among a large number of available alignment algorithms. To provide guidance in the choice of alignment algorithms for these purposes, we evaluated the performance of 14 widely used alignment programs from three different algorithmic classes: algorithms using either hashing of the reference transcriptome, hashing of reads, or a compressed FM-index representation of the genome. Here, special emphasis was placed on both precision and recall and the performance for different read lengths and numbers of mismatches and indels in a read. Our results clearly showed the significant reduction in memory footprint and runtime provided by FM-index based aligners at a precision and recall comparable to the best hash table based aligners. Furthermore, the recently developed Bowtie 2 alignment algorithm shows a remarkable tolerance to both sequencing errors and indels, thus, essentially making hash-based aligners obsolete.

  18. An automatic editing algorithm for GPS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blewitt, Geoffrey

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to edit automatically Global Positioning System data such that outlier deletion, cycle slip identification, and correction are independent of clock instability, selective availability, receiver-satellite kinematics, and tropospheric conditions. This algorithm, called TurboEdit, operates on undifferenced, dual frequency carrier phase data, and requires the use of P code pseudorange data and a smoothly varying ionospheric electron content. TurboEdit was tested on the large data set from the CASA Uno experiment, which contained over 2500 cycle slips.Analyst intervention was required on 1 percent of the station-satellite passes, almost all of these problems being due to difficulties in extrapolating variations in the ionospheric delay. The algorithm is presently being adapted for real time data editing in the Rogue receiver for continuous monitoring applications.

  19. OpenEIS Algorithms

    2013-07-29

    The OpenEIS Algorithm package seeks to provide a low-risk path for building owners, service providers and managers to explore analytical methods for improving building control and operational efficiency. Users of this software can analyze building data, and learn how commercial implementations would provide long-term value. The code also serves as a reference implementation for developers who wish to adapt the algorithms for use in commercial tools or service offerings.

  20. New algorithm for the rapid evaluation of electron repulsion integrals: elementary basis algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Masato

    2004-04-01

    We propose a new algorithm for the rapid evaluation of electron repulsion integrals over Gaussian type orbitals, termed elementary basis algorithm (EBA). In the EBA, the information of the atomic basis functions is divided into two parts: an elementary and an atomic basis part. In the conventional algorithm, all information is assigned to atoms, which requires that all computations must be performed in the atomic loops. In the EBA, computations can be partly carried out in the elementary loops. We apply the EBA to the accompanying coordinate expansion method of Ishida.

  1. Filtered refocusing: a volumetric reconstruction algorithm for plenoptic-PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahringer, Timothy W.; Thurow, Brian S.

    2016-09-01

    A new algorithm for reconstruction of 3D particle fields from plenoptic image data is presented. The algorithm is based on the technique of computational refocusing with the addition of a post reconstruction filter to remove the out of focus particles. This new algorithm is tested in terms of reconstruction quality on synthetic particle fields as well as a synthetically generated 3D Gaussian ring vortex. Preliminary results indicate that the new algorithm performs as well as the MART algorithm (used in previous work) in terms of the reconstructed particle position accuracy, but produces more elongated particles. The major advantage to the new algorithm is the dramatic reduction in the computational cost required to reconstruct a volume. It is shown that the new algorithm takes 1/9th the time to reconstruct the same volume as MART while using minimal resources. Experimental results are presented in the form of the wake behind a cylinder at a Reynolds number of 185.

  2. A Scalable Gaussian Process Analysis Algorithm for Biomass Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Biomass monitoring is vital for studying the carbon cycle of earth's ecosystem and has several significant implications, especially in the context of understanding climate change and its impacts. Recently, several change detection methods have been proposed to identify land cover changes in temporal profiles (time series) of vegetation collected using remote sensing instruments, but do not satisfy one or both of the two requirements of the biomass monitoring problem, i.e., {\\em operating in online mode} and {\\em handling periodic time series}. In this paper, we adapt Gaussian process regression to detect changes in such time series in an online fashion. While Gaussian process (GP) have been widely used as a kernel based learning method for regression and classification, their applicability to massive spatio-temporal data sets, such as remote sensing data, has been limited owing to the high computational costs involved. We focus on addressing the scalability issues associated with the proposed GP based change detection algorithm. This paper makes several significant contributions. First, we propose a GP based online time series change detection algorithm and demonstrate its effectiveness in detecting different types of changes in {\\em Normalized Difference Vegetation Index} (NDVI) data obtained from a study area in Iowa, USA. Second, we propose an efficient Toeplitz matrix based solution which significantly improves the computational complexity and memory requirements of the proposed GP based method. Specifically, the proposed solution can analyze a time series of length $t$ in $O(t^2)$ time while maintaining a $O(t)$ memory footprint, compared to the $O(t^3)$ time and $O(t^2)$ memory requirement of standard matrix manipulation based methods. Third, we describe a parallel version of the proposed solution which can be used to simultaneously analyze a large number of time series. We study three different parallel implementations: using threads, MPI, and a hybrid

  3. Exact and approximate Fourier rebinning algorithms for the solution of the data truncation problem in 3-D PET.

    PubMed

    Bouallègue, Fayçal Ben; Crouzet, Jean-François; Comtat, Claude; Fourcade, Marjolaine; Mohammadi, Bijan; Mariano-Goulart, Denis

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents an extended 3-D exact rebinning formula in the Fourier space that leads to an iterative reprojection algorithm (iterative FOREPROJ), which enables the estimation of unmeasured oblique projection data on the basis of the whole set of measured data. In first approximation, this analytical formula also leads to an extended Fourier rebinning equation that is the basis for an approximate reprojection algorithm (extended FORE). These algorithms were evaluated on numerically simulated 3-D positron emission tomography (PET) data for the solution of the truncation problem, i.e., the estimation of the missing portions in the oblique projection data, before the application of algorithms that require complete projection data such as some rebinning methods (FOREX) or 3-D reconstruction algorithms (3DRP or direct Fourier methods). By taking advantage of all the 3-D data statistics, the iterative FOREPROJ reprojection provides a reliable alternative to the classical FOREPROJ method, which only exploits the low-statistics nonoblique data. It significantly improves the quality of the external reconstructed slices without loss of spatial resolution. As for the approximate extended FORE algorithm, it clearly exhibits limitations due to axial interpolations, but will require clinical studies with more realistic measured data in order to decide on its pertinence. PMID:17649913

  4. A collision detection algorithm for telerobotic arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Doan Minh; Bartholomew, Maureen Obrien

    1991-01-01

    The telerobotic manipulator's collision detection algorithm is described. Its applied structural model of the world environment and template representation of objects is evaluated. Functional issues that are required for the manipulator to operate in a more complex and realistic environment are discussed.

  5. Control algorithms for autonomous robot navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1985-09-20

    This paper examines control algorithm requirements for autonomous robot navigation outside laboratory environments. Three aspects of navigation are considered: navigation control in explored terrain, environment interactions with robot sensors, and navigation control in unanticipated situations. Major navigation methods are presented and relevance of traditional human learning theory is discussed. A new navigation technique linking graph theory and incidental learning is introduced.

  6. Parallel algorithms for mapping pipelined and parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Many computational problems in image processing, signal processing, and scientific computing are naturally structured for either pipelined or parallel computation. When mapping such problems onto a parallel architecture it is often necessary to aggregate an obvious problem decomposition. Even in this context the general mapping problem is known to be computationally intractable, but recent advances have been made in identifying classes of problems and architectures for which optimal solutions can be found in polynomial time. Among these, the mapping of pipelined or parallel computations onto linear array, shared memory, and host-satellite systems figures prominently. This paper extends that work first by showing how to improve existing serial mapping algorithms. These improvements have significantly lower time and space complexities: in one case a published O(nm sup 3) time algorithm for mapping m modules onto n processors is reduced to an O(nm log m) time complexity, and its space requirements reduced from O(nm sup 2) to O(m). Run time complexity is further reduced with parallel mapping algorithms based on these improvements, which run on the architecture for which they create the mappings.

  7. Improving CMD Areal Density Analysis: Algorithms and Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    2014-06-01

    Essential ideas, successes, and difficulties of Areal Density Analysis (ADA) for color-magnitude diagrams (CMD¡¯s) of resolved stellar populations are examined, with explanation of various algorithms and strategies for optimal performance. A CMDgeneration program computes theoretical datasets with simulated observational error and a solution program inverts the problem by the method of Differential Corrections (DC) so as to compute parameter values from observed magnitudes and colors, with standard error estimates and correlation coefficients. ADA promises not only impersonal results, but also significant saving of labor, especially where a given dataset is analyzed with several evolution models. Observational errors and multiple star systems, along with various single star characteristics and phenomena, are modeled directly via the Functional Statistics Algorithm (FSA). Unlike Monte Carlo, FSA is not dependent on a random number generator. Discussions include difficulties and overall requirements, such as need for fast evolutionary computation and realization of goals within machine memory limits. Degradation of results due to influence of pixelization on derivatives, Initial Mass Function (IMF) quantization, IMF steepness, low Areal Densities (A ), and large variation in A are reduced or eliminated through a variety of schemes that are explained sufficiently for general application. The Levenberg-Marquardt and MMS algorithms for improvement of solution convergence are contained within the DC program. An example of convergence, which typically is very good, is shown in tabular form. A number of theoretical and practical solution issues are discussed, as are prospects for further development.

  8. Multitasking the Davidson algorithm for the large, sparse eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, V.M.; Fischer, C.F. )

    1989-01-01

    The authors report how the Davidson algorithm, developed for handling the eigenvalue problem for large and sparse matrices arising in quantum chemistry, was modified for use in atomic structure calculations. To date these calculations have used traditional eigenvalue methods, which limit the range of feasible calculations because of their excessive memory requirements and unsatisfactory performance attributed to time-consuming and costly processing of zero valued elements. The replacement of a traditional matrix eigenvalue method by the Davidson algorithm reduced these limitations. Significant speedup was found, which varied with the size of the underlying problem and its sparsity. Furthermore, the range of matrix sizes that can be manipulated efficiently was expended by more than one order or magnitude. On the CRAY X-MP the code was vectorized and the importance of gather/scatter analyzed. A parallelized version of the algorithm obtained an additional 35% reduction in execution time. Speedup due to vectorization and concurrency was also measured on the Alliant FX/8.

  9. Parallel O(log n) algorithms for open- and closed-chain rigid multibody systems based on a new mass matrix factorization technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, parallel O(log n) algorithms for computation of rigid multibody dynamics are developed. These parallel algorithms are derived by parallelization of new O(n) algorithms for the problem. The underlying feature of these O(n) algorithms is a drastically different strategy for decomposition of interbody force which leads to a new factorization of the mass matrix (M). Specifically, it is shown that a factorization of the inverse of the mass matrix in the form of the Schur Complement is derived as M(exp -1) = C - B(exp *)A(exp -1)B, wherein matrices C, A, and B are block tridiagonal matrices. The new O(n) algorithm is then derived as a recursive implementation of this factorization of M(exp -1). For the closed-chain systems, similar factorizations and O(n) algorithms for computation of Operational Space Mass Matrix lambda and its inverse lambda(exp -1) are also derived. It is shown that these O(n) algorithms are strictly parallel, that is, they are less efficient than other algorithms for serial computation of the problem. But, to our knowledge, they are the only known algorithms that can be parallelized and that lead to both time- and processor-optimal parallel algorithms for the problem, i.e., parallel O(log n) algorithms with O(n) processors. The developed parallel algorithms, in addition to their theoretical significance, are also practical from an implementation point of view due to their simple architectural requirements.

  10. Fast Formal Analysis of Requirements via "Topoi Diagrams"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Tim; Powell, John; Houle, Michael E.; Kelly, John C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Early testing of requirements can decrease the cost of removing errors in software projects. However, unless done carefully, that testing process can significantly add to the cost of requirements analysis. We show here that requirements expressed as topoi diagrams can be built and tested cheaply using our SP2 algorithm, the formal temporal properties of a large class of topoi can be proven very quickly, in time nearly linear in the number of nodes and edges in the diagram. There are two limitations to our approach. Firstly, topoi diagrams cannot express certain complex concepts such as iteration and sub-routine calls. Hence, our approach is more useful for requirements engineering than for traditional model checking domains. Secondly, out approach is better for exploring the temporal occurrence of properties than the temporal ordering of properties. Within these restrictions, we can express a useful range of concepts currently seen in requirements engineering, and a wide range of interesting temporal properties.

  11. An innovative algorithm for panoramic representation in observation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luison, Cristian; Aquilanti, Valeria; Riccobono, Aldo; Liberace, Claudio

    2013-06-01

    This document presents the study and test carried out for the development of an innovative algorithm designed to create a panoramic representation of the scene scanned by observation systems operating with passive sensors. The purpose of the algorithm is to represent 360° of scene using staring sensors mounted on stabilized or semi-stabilized platforms, without requirements on video output, both in terms of the transmission format and in terms of frame rate. The algorithm is real-time and does not require step-and-stare technique or special systems to scan the scene. The architecture of the algorithm requires a very low computational cost for the electronics contained in a Multi-Functional Display (MDP) used in defense applications. The algorithm has been implemented and tested on the JANUS NAVAL system, where the results were very satisfactory. Today, a patent is pendent.

  12. Specificity and Sensitivity of Claims-Based Algorithms for Identifying Members of Medicare+Choice Health Plans That Have Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rector, Thomas S; Wickstrom, Steven L; Shah, Mona; Thomas Greeenlee, N; Rheault, Paula; Rogowski, Jeannette; Freedman, Vicki; Adams, John; Escarce, José J

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of varying diagnostic and pharmaceutical criteria on the performance of claims-based algorithms for identifying beneficiaries with hypertension, heart failure, chronic lung disease, arthritis, glaucoma, and diabetes. Study Setting Secondary 1999–2000 data from two Medicare+Choice health plans. Study Design Retrospective analysis of algorithm specificity and sensitivity. Data Collection Physician, facility, and pharmacy claims data were extracted from electronic records for a sample of 3,633 continuously enrolled beneficiaries who responded to an independent survey that included questions about chronic diseases. Principal Findings Compared to an algorithm that required a single medical claim in a one-year period that listed the diagnosis, either requiring that the diagnosis be listed on two separate claims or that the diagnosis to be listed on one claim for a face-to-face encounter with a health care provider significantly increased specificity for the conditions studied by 0.03 to 0.11. Specificity of algorithms was significantly improved by 0.03 to 0.17 when both a medical claim with a diagnosis and a pharmacy claim for a medication commonly used to treat the condition were required. Sensitivity improved significantly by 0.01 to 0.20 when the algorithm relied on a medical claim with a diagnosis or a pharmacy claim, and by 0.05 to 0.17 when two years rather than one year of claims data were analyzed. Algorithms that had specificity more than 0.95 were found for all six conditions. Sensitivity above 0.90 was not achieved all conditions. Conclusions Varying claims criteria improved the performance of case-finding algorithms for six chronic conditions. Highly specific, and sometimes sensitive, algorithms for identifying members of health plans with several chronic conditions can be developed using claims data. PMID:15533190

  13. 32 CFR 1290.6 - Significant changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Significant changes. 1290.6 Section 1290.6 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS... Significant changes. This revision incorporates the DoD requirement for referral of traffic...

  14. 32 CFR 1290.6 - Significant changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Significant changes. 1290.6 Section 1290.6 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS... Significant changes. This revision incorporates the DoD requirement for referral of traffic...

  15. A segmentation algorithm for noisy images

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Olman, V.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a 2-D image segmentation algorithm and addresses issues related to its performance on noisy images. The algorithm segments an image by first constructing a minimum spanning tree representation of the image and then partitioning the spanning tree into sub-trees representing different homogeneous regions. The spanning tree is partitioned in such a way that the sum of gray-level variations over all partitioned subtrees is minimized under the constraints that each subtree has at least a specified number of pixels and two adjacent subtrees have significantly different ``average`` gray-levels. Two types of noise, transmission errors and Gaussian additive noise. are considered and their effects on the segmentation algorithm are studied. Evaluation results have shown that the segmentation algorithm is robust in the presence of these two types of noise.

  16. Adaptive computation algorithm for RBF neural network.

    PubMed

    Han, Hong-Gui; Qiao, Jun-Fei

    2012-02-01

    A novel learning algorithm is proposed for nonlinear modelling and identification using radial basis function neural networks. The proposed method simplifies neural network training through the use of an adaptive computation algorithm (ACA). In addition, the convergence of the ACA is analyzed by the Lyapunov criterion. The proposed algorithm offers two important advantages. First, the model performance can be significantly improved through ACA, and the modelling error is uniformly ultimately bounded. Secondly, the proposed ACA can reduce computational cost and accelerate the training speed. The proposed method is then employed to model classical nonlinear system with limit cycle and to identify nonlinear dynamic system, exhibiting the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Computational complexity analysis and simulation results demonstrate its effectiveness.

  17. A comprehensive review of swarm optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ab Wahab, Mohd Nadhir; Nefti-Meziani, Samia; Atyabi, Adham

    2015-01-01

    Many swarm optimization algorithms have been introduced since the early 60's, Evolutionary Programming to the most recent, Grey Wolf Optimization. All of these algorithms have demonstrated their potential to solve many optimization problems. This paper provides an in-depth survey of well-known optimization algorithms. Selected algorithms are briefly explained and compared with each other comprehensively through experiments conducted using thirty well-known benchmark functions. Their advantages and disadvantages are also discussed. A number of statistical tests are then carried out to determine the significant performances. The results indicate the overall advantage of Differential Evolution (DE) and is closely followed by Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), compared with other considered approaches. PMID:25992655

  18. A Comprehensive Review of Swarm Optimization Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many swarm optimization algorithms have been introduced since the early 60’s, Evolutionary Programming to the most recent, Grey Wolf Optimization. All of these algorithms have demonstrated their potential to solve many optimization problems. This paper provides an in-depth survey of well-known optimization algorithms. Selected algorithms are briefly explained and compared with each other comprehensively through experiments conducted using thirty well-known benchmark functions. Their advantages and disadvantages are also discussed. A number of statistical tests are then carried out to determine the significant performances. The results indicate the overall advantage of Differential Evolution (DE) and is closely followed by Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), compared with other considered approaches. PMID:25992655

  19. Optimal configuration algorithm of a satellite transponder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhodoev, M. S.; Savenko, I. I.; Martynov, Y. A.; Savina, N. I.; Asmolovskiy, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the algorithm of determining the optimal transponder configuration of the communication satellite while in service. This method uses a mathematical model of the pay load scheme based on the finite-state machine. The repeater scheme is shown as a weighted oriented graph that is represented as plexus in the program view. This paper considers an algorithm example for application with a typical transparent repeater scheme. In addition, the complexity of the current algorithm has been calculated. The main peculiarity of this algorithm is that it takes into account the functionality and state of devices, reserved equipment and input-output ports ranged in accordance with their priority. All described limitations allow a significant decrease in possible payload commutation variants and enable a satellite operator to make reconfiguration solutions operatively.

  20. Approximation algorithms for planning and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boddy, Mark; Dean, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A control system operating in a complex environment will encounter a variety of different situations, with varying amounts of time available to respond to critical events. Ideally, such a control system will do the best possible with the time available. In other words, its responses should approximate those that would result from having unlimited time for computation, where the degree of the approximation depends on the amount of time it actually has. There exist approximation algorithms for a wide variety of problems. Unfortunately, the solution to any reasonably complex control problem will require solving several computationally intensive problems. Algorithms for successive approximation are a subclass of the class of anytime algorithms, algorithms that return answers for any amount of computation time, where the answers improve as more time is allotted. An architecture is described for allocating computation time to a set of anytime algorithms, based on expectations regarding the value of the answers they return. The architecture described is quite general, producing optimal schedules for a set of algorithms under widely varying conditions.

  1. Neural algorithms on VLSI concurrent architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Caviglia, D.D.; Bisio, G.M.; Parodi, G.

    1988-09-01

    The research concerns the study of neural algorithms for developing CAD tools with A.I. features in VLSI design activities. In this paper the focus is on optimization problems such as partitioning, placement and routing. These problems require massive computational power to be solved (NP-complete problems) and the standard approach is usually based on euristic techniques. Neural algorithms can be represented by a circuital model. This kind of representation can be easily mapped in a real circuit, which, however, features limited flexibility with respect to the variety of problems. In this sense the simulation of the neural circuit, by mapping it on a digital VLSI concurrent architecture seems to be preferrable; in addition this solution offers a wider choice with regard to algorithms characteristics (e.g. transfer curve of neural elements, reconfigurability of interconnections, etc.). The implementation with programmable components, such as transputers, allows an indirect mapping of the algorithm (one transputer for N neurons) accordingly to the dimension and the characteristics of the problem. In this way the neural algorithm described by the circuit is reduced to the algorithm that simulates the network behavior. The convergence properties of that formulation are studied with respect to the characteristics of the neural element transfer curve.

  2. Sampling Within k-Means Algorithm to Cluster Large Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Bejarano, Jeremy; Bose, Koushiki; Brannan, Tyler; Thomas, Anita; Adragni, Kofi; Neerchal, Nagaraj; Ostrouchov, George

    2011-08-01

    Due to current data collection technology, our ability to gather data has surpassed our ability to analyze it. In particular, k-means, one of the simplest and fastest clustering algorithms, is ill-equipped to handle extremely large datasets on even the most powerful machines. Our new algorithm uses a sample from a dataset to decrease runtime by reducing the amount of data analyzed. We perform a simulation study to compare our sampling based k-means to the standard k-means algorithm by analyzing both the speed and accuracy of the two methods. Results show that our algorithm is significantly more efficient than the existing algorithm with comparable accuracy. Further work on this project might include a more comprehensive study both on more varied test datasets as well as on real weather datasets. This is especially important considering that this preliminary study was performed on rather tame datasets. Also, these datasets should analyze the performance of the algorithm on varied values of k. Lastly, this paper showed that the algorithm was accurate for relatively low sample sizes. We would like to analyze this further to see how accurate the algorithm is for even lower sample sizes. We could find the lowest sample sizes, by manipulating width and confidence level, for which the algorithm would be acceptably accurate. In order for our algorithm to be a success, it needs to meet two benchmarks: match the accuracy of the standard k-means algorithm and significantly reduce runtime. Both goals are accomplished for all six datasets analyzed. However, on datasets of three and four dimension, as the data becomes more difficult to cluster, both algorithms fail to obtain the correct classifications on some trials. Nevertheless, our algorithm consistently matches the performance of the standard algorithm while becoming remarkably more efficient with time. Therefore, we conclude that analysts can use our algorithm, expecting accurate results in considerably less time.

  3. Optimisation of nonlinear motion cueing algorithm based on genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Houshyar; Mohamed, Shady; Rahim Zadeh, Delpak; Nahavandi, Saeid

    2015-04-01

    Motion cueing algorithms (MCAs) are playing a significant role in driving simulators, aiming to deliver the most accurate human sensation to the simulator drivers compared with a real vehicle driver, without exceeding the physical limitations of the simulator. This paper provides the optimisation design of an MCA for a vehicle simulator, in order to find the most suitable washout algorithm parameters, while respecting all motion platform physical limitations, and minimising human perception error between real and simulator driver. One of the main limitations of the classical washout filters is that it is attuned by the worst-case scenario tuning method. This is based on trial and error, and is effected by driving and programmers experience, making this the most significant obstacle to full motion platform utilisation. This leads to inflexibility of the structure, production of false cues and makes the resulting simulator fail to suit all circumstances. In addition, the classical method does not take minimisation of human perception error and physical constraints into account. Production of motion cues and the impact of different parameters of classical washout filters on motion cues remain inaccessible for designers for this reason. The aim of this paper is to provide an optimisation method for tuning the MCA parameters, based on nonlinear filtering and genetic algorithms. This is done by taking vestibular sensation error into account between real and simulated cases, as well as main dynamic limitations, tilt coordination and correlation coefficient. Three additional compensatory linear blocks are integrated into the MCA, to be tuned in order to modify the performance of the filters successfully. The proposed optimised MCA is implemented in MATLAB/Simulink software packages. The results generated using the proposed method show increased performance in terms of human sensation, reference shape tracking and exploiting the platform more efficiently without reaching

  4. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: BESIII track fitting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Ke; Mao, Ze-Pu; Bian, Jian-Ming; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Gao, Yuan-Ning; He, Kang-Lin; He, Miao; Hua, Chun-Fei; Huang, Bin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Fei; Li, Bai-Bo; Li, Wei-Dong; Liang, Yu-Tie; Liu, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Suo; Liu, Ying-Jie; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Mao, Ya-Jun; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Pan, Ming-Hua; Pang, Cai-Ying; Ping, Rong-Gang; Qin, Ya-Hong; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Sun, Yong-Zhao; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wen, Shuo-Pin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Xie, Yu-Guang; Xu, Min; Yan, Liang; You, Zheng-Yun; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Bing-Yun; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Yang-Heng; Zhu, Ke-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Zhu, Zhi-Li; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2009-10-01

    A track fitting algorithm based on the Kalman filter method has been developed for BESIII of BEPCII. The effects of multiple scattering and energy loss when the charged particles go through the detector, non-uniformity of magnetic field (NUMF) and wire sag, etc., have been carefully handled. This algorithm works well and the performance satisfies the physical requirements tested by the simulation data.

  5. An improved algorithm for evaluating trellis phase codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, M. G.; Wilson, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for evaluating the minimum distance parameters of trellis phase codes, including CPFSK, partial response FM, and more importantly, coded CPM (continuous phase modulation) schemes. The algorithm provides dramatically faster execution times and lesser memory requirements than previous algorithms. Results of sample calculations and timing comparisons are included.

  6. An improved algorithm for evaluating trellis phase codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, M. G.; Wilson, S. G.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for evaluating the minimum distance parameters of trellis phase codes, including CPFSK, partial response FM, and more importantly, coded CPM (continuous phase modulation) schemes. The algorithm provides dramatically faster execution times and lesser memory requirements than previous algorithms. Results of sample calculations and timing comparisons are included.

  7. A general algorithm for the construction of contour plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Silva, F.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm is described that performs the task of drawing equal level contours on a plane, which requires interpolation in two dimensions based on data prescribed at points distributed irregularly over the plane. The approach is described in detail. The computer program that implements the algorithm is documented and listed.

  8. Comparison of Beam-Based Alignment Algorithms for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.; Gibbons, L.; Patterson, J.R.; Rubin, D.L.; Sagan, D.; Tenenbaum, P.; /SLAC

    2006-03-15

    The main linac of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires more sophisticated alignment techniques than those provided by survey alone. Various Beam-Based Alignment (BBA) algorithms have been proposed to achieve the desired low emittance preservation. Dispersion Free Steering, Ballistic Alignment and the Kubo method are compared. Alignment algorithms are also tested in the presence of an Earth-like stray field.

  9. Evolutionary pattern search algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, W.E.

    1995-09-19

    This paper defines a class of evolutionary algorithms called evolutionary pattern search algorithms (EPSAs) and analyzes their convergence properties. This class of algorithms is closely related to evolutionary programming, evolutionary strategie and real-coded genetic algorithms. EPSAs are self-adapting systems that modify the step size of the mutation operator in response to the success of previous optimization steps. The rule used to adapt the step size can be used to provide a stationary point convergence theory for EPSAs on any continuous function. This convergence theory is based on an extension of the convergence theory for generalized pattern search methods. An experimental analysis of the performance of EPSAs demonstrates that these algorithms can perform a level of global search that is comparable to that of canonical EAs. We also describe a stopping rule for EPSAs, which reliably terminated near stationary points in our experiments. This is the first stopping rule for any class of EAs that can terminate at a given distance from stationary points.

  10. Probabilistic streamflow forecasting for hydroelectricity production: A comparison of two non-parametric system identification algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Saket; Sharma, Ashish

    2014-05-01

    This study is motivated by the need to robustly specify, identify, and forecast runoff generation processes for hydroelectricity production. It atleast requires the identification of significant predictors of runoff generation and the influence of each such significant predictor on runoff response. To this end, we compare two non-parametric algorithms of predictor subset selection. One is based on information theory that assesses predictor significance (and hence selection) based on Partial Information (PI) rationale of Sharma and Mehrotra (2014). The other algorithm is based on a frequentist approach that uses bounds on probability of error concept of Pande (2005), assesses all possible predictor subsets on-the-go and converges to a predictor subset in an computationally efficient manner. Both the algorithms approximate the underlying system by locally constant functions and select predictor subsets corresponding to these functions. The performance of the two algorithms is compared on a set of synthetic case studies as well as a real world case study of inflow forecasting. References: Sharma, A., and R. Mehrotra (2014), An information theoretic alternative to model a natural system using observational information alone, Water Resources Research, 49, doi:10.1002/2013WR013845. Pande, S. (2005), Generalized local learning in water resource management, PhD dissertation, Utah State University, UT-USA, 148p.

  11. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.

  12. Optical rate sensor algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, Jo A.

    1989-12-01

    Optical sensors, in particular Charge Coupled Device (CCD) arrays, will be used on Space Station to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. Algorithms are presented to derive attitude rate from the optical sensors. The first algorithm is a recursive differentiator. A variance reduction factor (VRF) of 0.0228 was achieved with a rise time of 10 samples. A VRF of 0.2522 gives a rise time of 4 samples. The second algorithm is based on the direct manipulation of the pixel intensity outputs of the sensor. In 1-dimensional simulations, the derived rate was with 0.07 percent of the actual rate in the presence of additive Gaussian noise with a signal to noise ratio of 60 dB.

  13. Optical rate sensor algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, Jo A.

    1989-01-01

    Optical sensors, in particular Charge Coupled Device (CCD) arrays, will be used on Space Station to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. Algorithms are presented to derive attitude rate from the optical sensors. The first algorithm is a recursive differentiator. A variance reduction factor (VRF) of 0.0228 was achieved with a rise time of 10 samples. A VRF of 0.2522 gives a rise time of 4 samples. The second algorithm is based on the direct manipulation of the pixel intensity outputs of the sensor. In 1-dimensional simulations, the derived rate was with 0.07 percent of the actual rate in the presence of additive Gaussian noise with a signal to noise ratio of 60 dB.

  14. New Effective Multithreaded Matching Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Manne, Fredrik; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2014-05-19

    Matching is an important combinatorial problem with a number of applications in areas such as community detection, sparse linear algebra, and network alignment. Since computing optimal matchings can be very time consuming, several fast approximation algorithms, both sequential and parallel, have been suggested. Common to the algorithms giving the best solutions is that they tend to be sequential by nature, while algorithms more suitable for parallel computation give solutions of less quality. We present a new simple 1 2 -approximation algorithm for the weighted matching problem. This algorithm is both faster than any other suggested sequential 1 2 -approximation algorithm on almost all inputs and also scales better than previous multithreaded algorithms. We further extend this to a general scalable multithreaded algorithm that computes matchings of weight comparable with the best sequential algorithms. The performance of the suggested algorithms is documented through extensive experiments on different multithreaded architectures.

  15. Genetic Algorithms for Digital Quantum Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Las Heras, U.; Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Solano, E.; Sanz, M.

    2016-06-01

    We propose genetic algorithms, which are robust optimization techniques inspired by natural selection, to enhance the versatility of digital quantum simulations. In this sense, we show that genetic algorithms can be employed to increase the fidelity and optimize the resource requirements of digital quantum simulation protocols while adapting naturally to the experimental constraints. Furthermore, this method allows us to reduce not only digital errors but also experimental errors in quantum gates. Indeed, by adding ancillary qubits, we design a modular gate made out of imperfect gates, whose fidelity is larger than the fidelity of any of the constituent gates. Finally, we prove that the proposed modular gates are resilient against different gate errors.

  16. CARVE--a constructive algorithm for real-valued examples.

    PubMed

    Young, S; Downs, T

    1998-01-01

    A constructive neural-network algorithm is presented. For any consistent classification task on real-valued training vectors, the algorithm constructs a feedforward network with a single hidden layer of threshold units which implements the task. The algorithm, which we call CARVE, extends the "sequential learning" algorithm of Marchand et al. from Boolean inputs to the real-valued input case, and uses convex hull methods for the determination of the network weights. The algorithm is an efficient training scheme for producing near-minimal network solutions for arbitrary classification tasks. The algorithm is applied to a number of benchmark problems including Gorman and Sejnowski's sonar data, the Monks problems and Fisher's iris data. A significant application of the constructive algorithm is in providing an initial network topology and initial weights for other neural-network training schemes and this is demonstrated by application to backpropagation.

  17. Collaborative workbench for cyberinfrastructure to accelerate science algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, R.; Maskey, M.; Kuo, K.; Lynnes, C.

    2013-12-01

    There are significant untapped resources for information and knowledge creation within the Earth Science community in the form of data, algorithms, services, analysis workflows or scripts, and the related knowledge about these resources. Despite the huge growth in social networking and collaboration platforms, these resources often reside on an investigator's workstation or laboratory and are rarely shared. A major reason for this is that there are very few scientific collaboration platforms, and those that exist typically require the use of a new set of analysis tools and paradigms to leverage the shared infrastructure. As a result, adoption of these collaborative platforms for science research is inhibited by the high cost to an individual scientist of switching from his or her own familiar environment and set of tools to a new environment and tool set. This presentation will describe an ongoing project developing an Earth Science Collaborative Workbench (CWB). The CWB approach will eliminate this barrier by augmenting a scientist's current research environment and tool set to allow him or her to easily share diverse data and algorithms. The CWB will leverage evolving technologies such as commodity computing and social networking to design an architecture for scalable collaboration that will support the emerging vision of an Earth Science Collaboratory. The CWB is being implemented on the robust and open source Eclipse framework and will be compatible with widely used scientific analysis tools such as IDL. The myScience Catalog built into CWB will capture and track metadata and provenance about data and algorithms for the researchers in a non-intrusive manner with minimal overhead. Seamless interfaces to multiple Cloud services will support sharing algorithms, data, and analysis results, as well as access to storage and computer resources. A Community Catalog will track the use of shared science artifacts and manage collaborations among researchers.

  18. A multiresolution approach to iterative reconstruction algorithms in X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    De Witte, Yoni; Vlassenbroeck, Jelle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2010-09-01

    In computed tomography, the application of iterative reconstruction methods in practical situations is impeded by their high computational demands. Especially in high resolution X-ray computed tomography, where reconstruction volumes contain a high number of volume elements (several giga voxels), this computational burden prevents their actual breakthrough. Besides the large amount of calculations, iterative algorithms require the entire volume to be kept in memory during reconstruction, which quickly becomes cumbersome for large data sets. To overcome this obstacle, we present a novel multiresolution reconstruction, which greatly reduces the required amount of memory without significantly affecting the reconstructed image quality. It is shown that, combined with an efficient implementation on a graphical processing unit, the multiresolution approach enables the application of iterative algorithms in the reconstruction of large volumes at an acceptable speed using only limited resources. PMID:20350850

  19. Coordinate Update Algorithms for Robust Power Loading for the MU-MISO Downlink With Outage Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Foad; Davidson, Timothy N.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of power allocation for the single-cell multi-user (MU) multiple-input single-output (MISO) downlink with quality-of-service (QoS) constraints. The base station acquires an estimate of the channels and, for a given beamforming structure, designs the power allocation so as to minimize the total transmission power required to ensure that target signal-to-interference-and-noise ratios at the receivers are met, subject to a specified outage probability. We consider scenarios in which the errors in the base station's channel estimates can be modelled as being zero-mean and Gaussian. Such a model is particularly suitable for time division duplex (TDD) systems with quasi-static channels, in which the base station estimates the channel during the uplink phase. Under that model, we employ a precise deterministic characterization of the outage probability to transform the chance-constrained formulation to a deterministic one. Although that deterministic formulation is not convex, we develop a coordinate descent algorithm that can be shown to converge to a globally optimal solution when the starting point is feasible. Insight into the structure of the deterministic formulation yields approximations that result in coordinate update algorithms with good performance and significantly lower computational cost. The proposed algorithms provide better performance than existing robust power loading algorithms that are based on tractable conservative approximations, and can even provide better performance than robust precoding algorithms based on such approximations.

  20. Use of a genetic algorithm to solve fluid flow problems on an NCUBE/2 multiprocessor computer

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, R.J.; Cline, D.D.

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents a method to solve partial differential equations governing two-phase fluid flow by using a genetic algorithm on the NCUBE/2 multiprocessor computer. Genetic algorithms represent a significant departure from traditional approaches of solving fluid flow problems. The inherent parallelism of genetic algorithms offers the prospect of obtaining solutions faster than ever possible. The paper discusses the two-phase flow equations, the genetic representation of the unknowns, the fitness function, the genetic operators, and the implementation of the genetic algorithm on the NCUBE/2 computer. The paper investigates the implementation efficiency using a pipe blowdown test and presents the effects of varying both the genetic parameters and the number of processors. The results show that genetic algorithms provide a major advancement in methods for solving two-phase flow problems. A desired goal of solving these equations for a specific simulation problem in real time or faster requires computers with an order of magnitude more processors or faster than the NCUBE/2's 1024.

  1. Use of a genetic algorithm to solve fluid flow problems on an NCUBE/2 multiprocessor computer

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, R.J.; Cline, D.D.

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents a method to solve partial differential equations governing two-phase fluid flow by using a genetic algorithm on the NCUBE/2 multiprocessor computer. Genetic algorithms represent a significant departure from traditional approaches of solving fluid flow problems. The inherent parallelism of genetic algorithms offers the prospect of obtaining solutions faster than ever possible. The paper discusses the two-phase flow equations, the genetic representation of the unknowns, the fitness function, the genetic operators, and the implementation of the genetic algorithm on the NCUBE/2 computer. The paper investigates the implementation efficiency using a pipe blowdown test and presents the effects of varying both the genetic parameters and the number of processors. The results show that genetic algorithms provide a major advancement in methods for solving two-phase flow problems. A desired goal of solving these equations for a specific simulation problem in real time or faster requires computers with an order of magnitude more processors or faster than the NCUBE/2`s 1024.

  2. Dynamic gradient descent learning algorithms for enhanced empirical modeling of power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Parlos, A.G.; Atiya, Amir; Chong, K.T. )

    1991-11-01

    A newly developed dynamic gradient descent-based learning algorithm is used to train a recurrent multilayer perceptron network for use in empirical modeling of power plants. The two main advantages of the proposed learning algorithm are its ability to consider past error gradient information for future use and the two forward passes associated with its implementation, instead of one forward and one backward pass of the backpropagation algorithm. The latter advantage results in computational time saving because both passes can be performed simultaneously. The dynamic learning algorithm is used to train a hybrid feedforward/feedback neural network, a recurrent multilayer perceptron, which was previously found to exhibit good interpolation and extrapolation capabilities in modeling nonlinear dynamic systems. One of the drawbacks, however, of the previously reported work has been the long training times associated with accurate empirical models. The enhanced learning capabilities provided by the dynamic gradient descent-based learning algorithm are demonstrated by a case study of a steam power plant. The number of iterations required for accurate empirical modeling has been reduced from tens of thousands to hundreds, thus significantly expediting the learning process.

  3. Fast algorithm for scaling analysis with higher-order detrending moving average method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Yutaka; Miki, Yuki; Shimatani, Satoshi; Kiyono, Ken

    2016-05-01

    Among scaling analysis methods based on the root-mean-square deviation from the estimated trend, it has been demonstrated that centered detrending moving average (DMA) analysis with a simple moving average has good performance when characterizing long-range correlation or fractal scaling behavior. Furthermore, higher-order DMA has also been proposed; it is shown to have better detrending capabilities, removing higher-order polynomial trends than original DMA. However, a straightforward implementation of higher-order DMA requires a very high computational cost, which would prevent practical use of this method. To solve this issue, in this study, we introduce a fast algorithm for higher-order DMA, which consists of two techniques: (1) parallel translation of moving averaging windows by a fixed interval; (2) recurrence formulas for the calculation of summations. Our algorithm can significantly reduce computational cost. Monte Carlo experiments show that the computational time of our algorithm is approximately proportional to the data length, although that of the conventional algorithm is proportional to the square of the data length. The efficiency of our algorithm is also shown by a systematic study of the performance of higher-order DMA, such as the range of detectable scaling exponents and detrending capability for removing polynomial trends. In addition, through the analysis of heart-rate variability time series, we discuss possible applications of higher-order DMA.

  4. An Example-Based Super-Resolution Algorithm for Selfie Images.

    PubMed

    William, Jino Hans; Venkateswaran, N; Narayanan, Srinath; Ramachandran, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    A selfie is typically a self-portrait captured using the front camera of a smartphone. Most state-of-the-art smartphones are equipped with a high-resolution (HR) rear camera and a low-resolution (LR) front camera. As selfies are captured by front camera with limited pixel resolution, the fine details in it are explicitly missed. This paper aims to improve the resolution of selfies by exploiting the fine details in HR images captured by rear camera using an example-based super-resolution (SR) algorithm. HR images captured by rear camera carry significant fine details and are used as an exemplar to train an optimal matrix-value regression (MVR) operator. The MVR operator serves as an image-pair priori which learns the correspondence between the LR-HR patch-pairs and is effectively used to super-resolve LR selfie images. The proposed MVR algorithm avoids vectorization of image patch-pairs and preserves image-level information during both learning and recovering process. The proposed algorithm is evaluated for its efficiency and effectiveness both qualitatively and quantitatively with other state-of-the-art SR algorithms. The results validate that the proposed algorithm is efficient as it requires less than 3 seconds to super-resolve LR selfie and is effective as it preserves sharp details without introducing any counterfeit fine details.

  5. An Example-Based Super-Resolution Algorithm for Selfie Images

    PubMed Central

    William, Jino Hans; Venkateswaran, N.; Narayanan, Srinath; Ramachandran, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    A selfie is typically a self-portrait captured using the front camera of a smartphone. Most state-of-the-art smartphones are equipped with a high-resolution (HR) rear camera and a low-resolution (LR) front camera. As selfies are captured by front camera with limited pixel resolution, the fine details in it are explicitly missed. This paper aims to improve the resolution of selfies by exploiting the fine details in HR images captured by rear camera using an example-based super-resolution (SR) algorithm. HR images captured by rear camera carry significant fine details and are used as an exemplar to train an optimal matrix-value regression (MVR) operator. The MVR operator serves as an image-pair priori which learns the correspondence between the LR-HR patch-pairs and is effectively used to super-resolve LR selfie images. The proposed MVR algorithm avoids vectorization of image patch-pairs and preserves image-level information during both learning and recovering process. The proposed algorithm is evaluated for its efficiency and effectiveness both qualitatively and quantitatively with other state-of-the-art SR algorithms. The results validate that the proposed algorithm is efficient as it requires less than 3 seconds to super-resolve LR selfie and is effective as it preserves sharp details without introducing any counterfeit fine details. PMID:27064500

  6. Maximizing the nurses' preferences in nurse scheduling problem: mathematical modeling and a meta-heuristic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Hamed; Salmasi, Nasser

    2015-04-01

    The nurse scheduling problem (NSP) has received a great amount of attention in recent years. In the NSP, the goal is to assign shifts to the nurses in order to satisfy the hospital's demand during the planning horizon by considering different objective functions. In this research, we focus on maximizing the nurses' preferences for working shifts and weekends off by considering several important factors such as hospital's policies, labor laws, governmental regulations, and the status of nurses at the end of the previous planning horizon in one of the largest hospitals in Iran i.e., Milad Hospital. Due to the shortage of available nurses, at first, the minimum total number of required nurses is determined. Then, a mathematical programming model is proposed to solve the problem optimally. Since the proposed research problem is NP-hard, a meta-heuristic algorithm based on simulated annealing (SA) is applied to heuristically solve the problem in a reasonable time. An initial feasible solution generator and several novel neighborhood structures are applied to enhance performance of the SA algorithm. Inspired from our observations in Milad hospital, random test problems are generated to evaluate the performance of the SA algorithm. The results of computational experiments indicate that the applied SA algorithm provides solutions with average percentage gap of 5.49 % compared to the upper bounds obtained from the mathematical model. Moreover, the applied SA algorithm provides significantly better solutions in a reasonable time than the schedules provided by the head nurses.

  7. Description of the AILS Alerting Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanant, Paul; Jackson, Mike

    2000-01-01

    This document provides a complete description of the Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) alerting algorithms. The purpose of AILS is to provide separation assurance between aircraft during simultaneous approaches to closely spaced parallel runways. AILS will allow independent approaches to be flown in such situations where dependent approaches were previously required (typically under Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC)). This is achieved by providing multiple levels of alerting for pairs of aircraft that are in parallel approach situations. This document#s scope is comprehensive and covers everything from general overviews, definitions, and concepts down to algorithmic elements and equations. The entire algorithm is presented in complete and detailed pseudo-code format. This can be used by software programmers to program AILS into a software language. Additional supporting information is provided in the form of coordinate frame definitions, data requirements, calling requirements as well as all necessary pre-processing and post-processing requirements. This is important and required information for the implementation of AILS into an analysis, a simulation, or a real-time system.

  8. Highly Scalable Matching Pursuit Signal Decomposition Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Daniel; Das, Santanu; Srivastava, Ashok N.

    2009-01-01

    Matching Pursuit Decomposition (MPD) is a powerful iterative algorithm for signal decomposition and feature extraction. MPD decomposes any signal into linear combinations of its dictionary elements or atoms . A best fit atom from an arbitrarily defined dictionary is determined through cross-correlation. The selected atom is subtracted from the signal and this procedure is repeated on the residual in the subsequent iterations until a stopping criterion is met. The reconstructed signal reveals the waveform structure of the original signal. However, a sufficiently large dictionary is required for an accurate reconstruction; this in return increases the computational burden of the algorithm, thus limiting its applicability and level of adoption. The purpose of this research is to improve the scalability and performance of the classical MPD algorithm. Correlation thresholds were defined to prune insignificant atoms from the dictionary. The Coarse-Fine Grids and Multiple Atom Extraction techniques were proposed to decrease the computational burden of the algorithm. The Coarse-Fine Grids method enabled the approximation and refinement of the parameters for the best fit atom. The ability to extract multiple atoms within a single iteration enhanced the effectiveness and efficiency of each iteration. These improvements were implemented to produce an improved Matching Pursuit Decomposition algorithm entitled MPD++. Disparate signal decomposition applications may require a particular emphasis of accuracy or computational efficiency. The prominence of the key signal features required for the proper signal classification dictates the level of accuracy necessary in the decomposition. The MPD++ algorithm may be easily adapted to accommodate the imposed requirements. Certain feature extraction applications may require rapid signal decomposition. The full potential of MPD++ may be utilized to produce incredible performance gains while extracting only slightly less energy than the

  9. Advances in Significance Testing for Cluster Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Deidra Andrea

    Over the past two decades, much attention has been given to data driven project goals such as the Human Genome Project and the development of syndromic surveillance systems. A major component of these types of projects is analyzing the abundance of data. Detecting clusters within the data can be beneficial as it can lead to the identification of specified sequences of DNA nucleotides that are related to important biological functions or the locations of epidemics such as disease outbreaks or bioterrorism attacks. Cluster detection techniques require efficient and accurate hypothesis testing procedures. In this dissertation, we improve upon the hypothesis testing procedures for cluster detection by enhancing distributional theory and providing an alternative method for spatial cluster detection using syndromic surveillance data. In Chapter 2, we provide an efficient method to compute the exact distribution of the number and coverage of h-clumps of a collection of words. This method involves defining a Markov chain using a minimal deterministic automaton to reduce the number of states needed for computation. We allow words of the collection to contain other words of the collection making the method more general. We use our method to compute the distributions of the number and coverage of h-clumps in the Chi motif of H. influenza.. In Chapter 3, we provide an efficient algorithm to compute the exact distribution of multiple window discrete scan statistics for higher-order, multi-state Markovian sequences. This algorithm involves defining a Markov chain to efficiently keep track of probabilities needed to compute p-values of the statistic. We use our algorithm to identify cases where the available approximation does not perform well. We also use our algorithm to detect unusual clusters of made free throw shots by National Basketball Association players during the 2009-2010 regular season. In Chapter 4, we give a procedure to detect outbreaks using syndromic

  10. Research on Formation of Microsatellite Communication with Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guoqiang; Bai, Yuguang; Sun, Zhaowei

    2013-01-01

    For the formation of three microsatellites which fly in the same orbit and perform three-dimensional solid mapping for terra, this paper proposes an optimizing design method of space circular formation order based on improved generic algorithm and provides an intersatellite direct spread spectrum communication system. The calculating equation of LEO formation flying satellite intersatellite links is guided by the special requirements of formation-flying microsatellite intersatellite links, and the transmitter power is also confirmed throughout the simulation. The method of space circular formation order optimizing design based on improved generic algorithm is given, and it can keep formation order steady for a long time under various absorb impetus. The intersatellite direct spread spectrum communication system is also provided. It can be found that, when the distance is 1 km and the data rate is 1 Mbps, the input wave matches preferably with the output wave. And LDPC code can improve the communication performance. The correct capability of (512, 256) LDPC code is better than (2, 1, 7) convolution code, distinctively. The design system can satisfy the communication requirements of microsatellites. So, the presented method provides a significant theory foundation for formation-flying and intersatellite communication. PMID:24078796

  11. Research on formation of microsatellite communication with genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoqiang; Bai, Yuguang; Sun, Zhaowei

    2013-01-01

    For the formation of three microsatellites which fly in the same orbit and perform three-dimensional solid mapping for terra, this paper proposes an optimizing design method of space circular formation order based on improved generic algorithm and provides an intersatellite direct spread spectrum communication system. The calculating equation of LEO formation flying satellite intersatellite links is guided by the special requirements of formation-flying microsatellite intersatellite links, and the transmitter power is also confirmed throughout the simulation. The method of space circular formation order optimizing design based on improved generic algorithm is given, and it can keep formation order steady for a long time under various absorb impetus. The intersatellite direct spread spectrum communication system is also provided. It can be found that, when the distance is 1 km and the data rate is 1 Mbps, the input wave matches preferably with the output wave. And LDPC code can improve the communication performance. The correct capability of (512, 256) LDPC code is better than (2, 1, 7) convolution code, distinctively. The design system can satisfy the communication requirements of microsatellites. So, the presented method provides a significant theory foundation for formation-flying and intersatellite communication.

  12. A hierarchical exact accelerated stochastic simulation algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Orendorff, David; Mjolsness, Eric

    2012-01-01

    A new algorithm, “HiER-leap” (hierarchical exact reaction-leaping), is derived which improves on the computational properties of the ER-leap algorithm for exact accelerated simulation of stochastic chemical kinetics. Unlike ER-leap, HiER-leap utilizes a hierarchical or divide-and-conquer organization of reaction channels into tightly coupled “blocks” and is thereby able to speed up systems with many reaction channels. Like ER-leap, HiER-leap is based on the use of upper and lower bounds on the reaction propensities to define a rejection sampling algorithm with inexpensive early rejection and acceptance steps. But in HiER-leap, large portions of intra-block sampling may be done in parallel. An accept/reject step is used to synchronize across blocks. This method scales well when many reaction channels are present and has desirable asymptotic properties. The algorithm is exact, parallelizable and achieves a significant speedup over the stochastic simulation algorithm and ER-leap on certain problems. This algorithm offers a potentially important step towards efficient in silico modeling of entire organisms. PMID:23231214

  13. TIRS stray light correction: algorithms and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerace, Aaron; Montanaro, Matthew; Beckmann, Tim; Tyrrell, Kaitlin; Cozzo, Alexandra; Carney, Trevor; Ngan, Vicki

    2015-09-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) onboard Landsat 8 was tasked with continuing thermal band measurements of the Earth as part of the Landsat program. From first light in early 2013, there were obvious indications that stray light was contaminating the thermal image data collected from the instrument. Traditional calibration techniques did not perform adequately as non-uniform banding was evident in the corrected data and error in absolute estimates of temperature over trusted buoys sites varied seasonally and, in worst cases, exceeded 9 K error. The development of an operational technique to remove the effects of the stray light has become a high priority to enhance the utility of the TIRS data. This paper introduces the current algorithm being tested by Landsat's calibration and validation team to remove stray light from TIRS image data. The integration of the algorithm into the EROS test system is discussed with strategies for operationalizing the method emphasized. Techniques for assessing the methodologies used are presented and potential refinements to the algorithm are suggested. Initial results indicate that the proposed algorithm significantly removes stray light artifacts from the image data. Specifically, visual and quantitative evidence suggests that the algorithm practically eliminates banding in the image data. Additionally, the seasonal variation in absolute errors is flattened and, in the worst case, errors of over 9 K are reduced to within 2 K. Future work focuses on refining the algorithm based on these findings and applying traditional calibration techniques to enhance the final image product.

  14. TrackEye tracking algorithm characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, Michael T.; Shields, Robert W.; Reed, Jack M.

    2004-10-01

    TrackEye is a film digitization and target tracking system that offers the potential for quantitatively measuring the dynamic state variables (e.g., absolute and relative position, orientation, linear and angular velocity/acceleration, spin rate, trajectory, angle of attack, etc.) for moving objects using captured single or dual view image sequences. At the heart of the system is a set of tracking algorithms that automatically find and quantify the location of user selected image details such as natural test article features or passive fiducials that have been applied to cooperative test articles. This image position data is converted into real world coordinates and rates with user specified information such as the image scale and frame rate. Though tracking methods such as correlation algorithms are typically robust by nature, the accuracy and suitability of each TrackEye tracking algorithm is in general unknown even under good imaging conditions. The challenges of optimal algorithm selection and algorithm performance/measurement uncertainty are even more significant for long range tracking of high-speed targets where temporally varying atmospheric effects degrade the imagery. This paper will present the preliminary results from a controlled test sequence used to characterize the performance of the TrackEye tracking algorithm suite.

  15. Models of performance of evolutionary program induction algorithms based on indicators of problem difficulty.

    PubMed

    Graff, Mario; Poli, Riccardo; Flores, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    Modeling the behavior of algorithms is the realm of evolutionary algorithm theory. From a practitioner's point of view, theory must provide some guidelines regarding which algorithm/parameters to use in order to solve a particular problem. Unfortunately, most theoretical models of evolutionary algorithms are difficult to apply to realistic situations. However, in recent work (Graff and Poli, 2008, 2010), where we developed a method to practically estimate the performance of evolutionary program-induction algorithms (EPAs), we started addressing this issue. The method was quite general; however, it suffered from some limitations: it required the identification of a set of reference problems, it required hand picking a distance measure in each particular domain, and the resulting models were opaque, typically being linear combinations of 100 features or more. In this paper, we propose a significant improvement of this technique that overcomes the three limitations of our previous method. We achieve this through the use of a novel set of features for assessing problem difficulty for EPAs which are very general, essentially based on the notion of finite difference. To show the capabilities or our technique and to compare it with our previous performance models, we create models for the same two important classes of problems-symbolic regression on rational functions and Boolean function induction-used in our previous work. We model a variety of EPAs. The comparison showed that for the majority of the algorithms and problem classes, the new method produced much simpler and more accurate models than before. To further illustrate the practicality of the technique and its generality (beyond EPAs), we have also used it to predict the performance of both autoregressive models and EPAs on the problem of wind speed forecasting, obtaining simpler and more accurate models that outperform in all cases our previous performance models. PMID:23136918

  16. Models of performance of evolutionary program induction algorithms based on indicators of problem difficulty.

    PubMed

    Graff, Mario; Poli, Riccardo; Flores, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    Modeling the behavior of algorithms is the realm of evolutionary algorithm theory. From a practitioner's point of view, theory must provide some guidelines regarding which algorithm/parameters to use in order to solve a particular problem. Unfortunately, most theoretical models of evolutionary algorithms are difficult to apply to realistic situations. However, in recent work (Graff and Poli, 2008, 2010), where we developed a method to practically estimate the performance of evolutionary program-induction algorithms (EPAs), we started addressing this issue. The method was quite general; however, it suffered from some limitations: it required the identification of a set of reference problems, it required hand picking a distance measure in each particular domain, and the resulting models were opaque, typically being linear combinations of 100 features or more. In this paper, we propose a significant improvement of this technique that overcomes the three limitations of our previous method. We achieve this through the use of a novel set of features for assessing problem difficulty for EPAs which are very general, essentially based on the notion of finite difference. To show the capabilities or our technique and to compare it with our previous performance models, we create models for the same two important classes of problems-symbolic regression on rational functions and Boolean function induction-used in our previous work. We model a variety of EPAs. The comparison showed that for the majority of the algorithms and problem classes, the new method produced much simpler and more accurate models than before. To further illustrate the practicality of the technique and its generality (beyond EPAs), we have also used it to predict the performance of both autoregressive models and EPAs on the problem of wind speed forecasting, obtaining simpler and more accurate models that outperform in all cases our previous performance models.

  17. Effect of Acuros XB algorithm on monitor units for stereotactic body radiotherapy planning of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Rao F. Villarreal-Barajas, Eduardo; Lau, Harold; Liu, Hong-Wei

    2014-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a curative regimen that uses hypofractionated radiation-absorbed dose to achieve a high degree of local control in early stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the presence of heterogeneities, the dose calculation for the lungs becomes challenging. We have evaluated the dosimetric effect of the recently introduced advanced dose-calculation algorithm, Acuros XB (AXB), for SBRT of NSCLC. A total of 97 patients with early-stage lung cancer who underwent SBRT at our cancer center during last 4 years were included. Initial clinical plans were created in Aria Eclipse version 8.9 or prior, using 6 to 10 fields with 6-MV beams, and dose was calculated using the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) as implemented in Eclipse treatment planning system. The clinical plans were recalculated in Aria Eclipse 11.0.21 using both AAA and AXB algorithms. Both sets of plans were normalized to the same prescription point at the center of mass of the target. A secondary monitor unit (MU) calculation was performed using commercial program RadCalc for all of the fields. For the planning target volumes ranging from 19 to 375 cm{sup 3}, a comparison of MUs was performed for both set of algorithms on field and plan basis. In total, variation of MUs for 677 treatment fields was investigated in terms of equivalent depth and the equivalent square of the field. Overall, MUs required by AXB to deliver the prescribed dose are on an average 2% higher than AAA. Using a 2-tailed paired t-test, the MUs from the 2 algorithms were found to be significantly different (p < 0.001). The secondary independent MU calculator RadCalc underestimates the required MUs (on an average by 4% to 5%) in the lung relative to either of the 2 dose algorithms.

  18. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms. PMID:21561101

  19. Efficient Homotopy Continuation Algorithms with Application to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    New homotopy continuation algorithms are developed and applied to a parallel implicit finite-difference Newton-Krylov-Schur external aerodynamic flow solver for the compressible Euler, Navier-Stokes, and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. Many new analysis tools, calculations, and numerical algorithms are presented for the study and design of efficient and robust homotopy continuation algorithms applicable to solving very large and sparse nonlinear systems of equations. Several specific homotopies are presented and studied and a methodology is presented for assessing the suitability of specific homotopies for homotopy continuation. . A new class of homotopy continuation algorithms, referred to as monolithic homotopy continuation algorithms, is developed. These algorithms differ from classical predictor-corrector algorithms by combining the predictor and corrector stages into a single update, significantly reducing the amount of computation and avoiding wasted computational effort resulting from over-solving in the corrector phase. The new algorithms are also simpler from a user perspective, with fewer input parameters, which also improves the user's ability to choose effective parameters on the first flow solve attempt. Conditional convergence is proved analytically and studied numerically for the new algorithms. The performance of a fully-implicit monolithic homotopy continuation algorithm is evaluated for several inviscid, laminar, and turbulent flows over NACA 0012 airfoils and ONERA M6 wings. The monolithic algorithm is demonstrated to be more efficient than the predictor-corrector algorithm for all applications investigated. It is also demonstrated to be more efficient than the widely-used pseudo-transient continuation algorithm for all inviscid and laminar cases investigated, and good performance scaling with grid refinement is demonstrated for the inviscid cases. Performance is also demonstrated

  20. A Polynomial Time, Numerically Stable Integer Relation Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Helaman R. P.; Bailey, Daivd H.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Let x = (x1, x2...,xn be a vector of real numbers. X is said to possess an integer relation if there exist integers a(sub i) not all zero such that a1x1 + a2x2 + ... a(sub n)Xn = 0. Beginning in 1977 several algorithms (with proofs) have been discovered to recover the a(sub i) given x. The most efficient of these existing integer relation algorithms (in terms of run time and the precision required of the input) has the drawback of being very unstable numerically. It often requires a numeric precision level in the thousands of digits to reliably recover relations in modest-sized test problems. We present here a new algorithm for finding integer relations, which we have named the "PSLQ" algorithm. It is proved in this paper that the PSLQ algorithm terminates with a relation in a number of iterations that is bounded by a polynomial in it. Because this algorithm employs a numerically stable matrix reduction procedure, it is free from the numerical difficulties, that plague other integer relation algorithms. Furthermore, its stability admits an efficient implementation with lower run times oil average than other algorithms currently in Use. Finally, this stability can be used to prove that relation bounds obtained from computer runs using this algorithm are numerically accurate.

  1. Contact solution algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielking, John T.

    1989-01-01

    Two algorithms for obtaining static contact solutions are described in this presentation. Although they were derived for contact problems involving specific structures (a tire and a solid rubber cylinder), they are sufficiently general to be applied to other shell-of-revolution and solid-body contact problems. The shell-of-revolution contact algorithm is a method of obtaining a point load influence coefficient matrix for the portion of shell surface that is expected to carry a contact load. If the shell is sufficiently linear with respect to contact loading, a single influence coefficient matrix can be used to obtain a good approximation of the contact pressure distribution. Otherwise, the matrix will be updated to reflect nonlinear load-deflection behavior. The solid-body contact algorithm utilizes a Lagrange multiplier to include the contact constraint in a potential energy functional. The solution is found by applying the principle of minimum potential energy. The Lagrange multiplier is identified as the contact load resultant for a specific deflection. At present, only frictionless contact solutions have been obtained with these algorithms. A sliding tread element has been developed to calculate friction shear force in the contact region of the rolling shell-of-revolution tire model.

  2. Comprehensive eye evaluation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Zamora, G.; Vahtel, M.; Soliz, P.; Barriga, S.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, several research groups have developed automatic algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy (DR) in individuals with diabetes (DM), using digital retinal images. Studies have indicated that diabetics have 1.5 times the annual risk of developing primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) as do people without DM. Moreover, DM patients have 1.8 times the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although numerous investigators are developing automatic DR detection algorithms, there have been few successful efforts to create an automatic algorithm that can detect other ocular diseases, such as POAG and AMD. Consequently, our aim in the current study was to develop a comprehensive eye evaluation algorithm that not only detects DR in retinal images, but also automatically identifies glaucoma suspects and AMD by integrating other personal medical information with the retinal features. The proposed system is fully automatic and provides the likelihood of each of the three eye disease. The system was evaluated in two datasets of 104 and 88 diabetic cases. For each eye, we used two non-mydriatic digital color fundus photographs (macula and optic disc centered) and, when available, information about age, duration of diabetes, cataracts, hypertension, gender, and laboratory data. Our results show that the combination of multimodal features can increase the AUC by up to 5%, 7%, and 8% in the detection of AMD, DR, and glaucoma respectively. Marked improvement was achieved when laboratory results were combined with retinal image features.

  3. PSC algorithm description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the performance seeking control (PSC) algorithm and details of the important components of the algorithm are given. The onboard propulsion system models, the linear programming optimization, and engine control interface are described. The PSC algorithm receives input from various computers on the aircraft including the digital flight computer, digital engine control, and electronic inlet control. The PSC algorithm contains compact models of the propulsion system including the inlet, engine, and nozzle. The models compute propulsion system parameters, such as inlet drag and fan stall margin, which are not directly measurable in flight. The compact models also compute sensitivities of the propulsion system parameters to change in control variables. The engine model consists of a linear steady state variable model (SSVM) and a nonlinear model. The SSVM is updated with efficiency factors calculated in the engine model update logic, or Kalman filter. The efficiency factors are used to adjust the SSVM to match the actual engine. The propulsion system models are mathematically integrated to form an overall propulsion system model. The propulsion system model is then optimized using a linear programming optimization scheme. The goal of the optimization is determined from the selected PSC mode of operation. The resulting trims are used to compute a new operating point about which the optimization process is repeated. This process is continued until an overall (global) optimum is reached before applying the trims to the controllers.

  4. The Xmath Integration Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringslid, Odd

    2009-01-01

    The projects Xmath (Bringslid and Canessa, 2002) and dMath (Bringslid, de la Villa and Rodriguez, 2007) were supported by the European Commission in the so called Minerva Action (Xmath) and The Leonardo da Vinci programme (dMath). The Xmath eBook (Bringslid, 2006) includes algorithms into a wide range of undergraduate mathematical issues embedded…

  5. Quantum gate decomposition algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Slepoy, Alexander

    2006-07-01

    Quantum computing algorithms can be conveniently expressed in a format of a quantum logical circuits. Such circuits consist of sequential coupled operations, termed ''quantum gates'', or quantum analogs of bits called qubits. We review a recently proposed method [1] for constructing general ''quantum gates'' operating on an qubits, as composed of a sequence of generic elementary ''gates''.

  6. Robotic Follow Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-30

    The Robotic Follow Algorithm enables allows any robotic vehicle to follow a moving target while reactively choosing a route around nearby obstacles. The robotic follow behavior can be used with different camera systems and can be used with thermal or visual tracking as well as other tracking methods such as radio frequency tags.

  7. Data Structures and Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Niklaus

    1984-01-01

    Built-in data structures are the registers and memory words where binary values are stored; hard-wired algorithms are the fixed rules, embodied in electronic logic circuits, by which stored data are interpreted as instructions to be executed. Various topics related to these two basic elements of every computer program are discussed. (JN)

  8. The Lure of Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Michael

    2011-01-01

    One debate that periodically arises in mathematics education is the issue of how to teach calculation more effectively. "Modern" approaches seem to initially favour mental calculation, informal methods, and the development of understanding before introducing written forms, while traditionalists tend to champion particular algorithms. The debate is…

  9. A New ADPCM Image Compression Algorithm and the Effect of Fixed-Pattern Sensor Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, James R.

    1989-04-01

    High speed image compression algorithms that achieve visually lossless quality at low bit-rates are essential elements of many digital imaging systems. In examples such as remote sensing, there is often the additional requirement that the compression hardware be compact and consume minimal power. To meet these requirements a new adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM) algorithm was developed that significantly reduces edge errors by including quantizers that adapt to the local bias of the differential signal. In addition, to reduce the average bit-rate in certain applications a variable rate version of the algorithm called run adaptive differential coding (RADC) was developed that combines run-length and predictive coding and a variable number of levels in each quantizer to produce bit-rates comparable with adaptive discrete cosine transform (ADCT) at a visually lossless level of image quality. It will also be shown that this algorithm is relatively insensitive to fixed-pattern sensor noise and errors in sensor correction, making it possible to perform pixel correction on the decompressed image.

  10. The Separatrix Algorithm for Synthesis and Analysis of Stochastic Simulations with Applications in Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Daniel J.; Baym, Michael; Eckhoff, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Decision makers in epidemiology and other disciplines are faced with the daunting challenge of designing interventions that will be successful with high probability and robust against a multitude of uncertainties. To facilitate the decision making process in the context of a goal-oriented objective (e.g., eradicate polio by ), stochastic models can be used to map the probability of achieving the goal as a function of parameters. Each run of a stochastic model can be viewed as a Bernoulli trial in which “success” is returned if and only if the goal is achieved in simulation. However, each run can take a significant amount of time to complete, and many replicates are required to characterize each point in parameter space, so specialized algorithms are required to locate desirable interventions. To address this need, we present the Separatrix Algorithm, which strategically locates parameter combinations that are expected to achieve the goal with a user-specified probability of success (e.g. 95%). Technically, the algorithm iteratively combines density-corrected binary kernel regression with a novel information-gathering experiment design to produce results that are asymptotically correct and work well in practice. The Separatrix Algorithm is demonstrated on several test problems, and on a detailed individual-based simulation of malaria. PMID:25078087

  11. Instrument requirements for imaging the magnetosphere in extreme-ultraviolet and energetic neutral atoms derived from computer-simulated images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, Edmond C.; Mauk, Barry H.; Meier, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific requirements for He(+)(304 A) and energetic neutral atom (ENA) magnetospheric imaging, as well as the derived instrumental requirements are presented. Both ENA imaging of the hot plasma and EUV imaging of the cold plasma are highlighted. The question of the accuracy with which physically significant parameters can be extracted from actual images using computerized algorithms is addressed. An example of an ENA image analyzed by means of the Powell minimization algorithm is given. Automated unfolding of global magnetospheric images is also discussed. A Mercator projection of a model INA image is shown.

  12. Evolutionary algorithm for vehicle driving cycle generation.

    PubMed

    Perhinschi, Mario G; Marlowe, Christopher; Tamayo, Sergio; Tu, Jun; Wayne, W Scott

    2011-09-01

    Modeling transit bus emissions and fuel economy requires a large amount of experimental data over wide ranges of operational conditions. Chassis dynamometer tests are typically performed using representative driving cycles defined based on vehicle instantaneous speed as sequences of "microtrips", which are intervals between consecutive vehicle stops. Overall significant parameters of the driving cycle, such as average speed, stops per mile, kinetic intensity, and others, are used as independent variables in the modeling process. Performing tests at all the necessary combinations of parameters is expensive and time consuming. In this paper, a methodology is proposed for building driving cycles at prescribed independent variable values using experimental data through the concatenation of "microtrips" isolated from a limited number of standard chassis dynamometer test cycles. The selection of the adequate "microtrips" is achieved through a customized evolutionary algorithm. The genetic representation uses microtrip definitions as genes. Specific mutation, crossover, and karyotype alteration operators have been defined. The Roulette-Wheel selection technique with elitist strategy drives the optimization process, which consists of minimizing the errors to desired overall cycle parameters. This utility is part of the Integrated Bus Information System developed at West Virginia University.

  13. Bootstrap performance profiles in stochastic algorithms assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Lino; Espírito Santo, Isabel A.C.P.; Oliveira, Pedro

    2015-03-10

    Optimization with stochastic algorithms has become a relevant research field. Due to its stochastic nature, its assessment is not straightforward and involves integrating accuracy and precision. Performance profiles for the mean do not show the trade-off between accuracy and precision, and parametric stochastic profiles require strong distributional assumptions and are limited to the mean performance for a large number of runs. In this work, bootstrap performance profiles are used to compare stochastic algorithms for different statistics. This technique allows the estimation of the sampling distribution of almost any statistic even with small samples. Multiple comparison profiles are presented for more than two algorithms. The advantages and drawbacks of each assessment methodology are discussed.

  14. Algorithm for Controlling a Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedict, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for controlling a centrifugal compressor that serves as the prime mover in a heatpump system. Experimental studies have shown that the operating conditions for maximum compressor efficiency are close to the boundary beyond which surge occurs. Compressor surge is a destructive condition in which there are instantaneous reversals of flow associated with a high outlet-to-inlet pressure differential. For a given cooling load, the algorithm sets the compressor speed at the lowest possible value while adjusting the inlet guide vane angle and diffuser vane angle to maximize efficiency, subject to an overriding requirement to prevent surge. The onset of surge is detected via the onset of oscillations of the electric current supplied to the compressor motor, associated with surge-induced oscillations of the torque exerted by and on the compressor rotor. The algorithm can be implemented in any of several computer languages.

  15. Genetic Algorithm Approaches for Actuator Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, William A.

    2000-01-01

    This research investigated genetic algorithm approaches for smart actuator placement to provide aircraft maneuverability without requiring hinged flaps or other control surfaces. The effort supported goals of the Multidisciplinary Design Optimization focus efforts in NASA's Aircraft au program. This work helped to properly identify various aspects of the genetic algorithm operators and parameters that allow for placement of discrete control actuators/effectors. An improved problem definition, including better definition of the objective function and constraints, resulted from this research effort. The work conducted for this research used a geometrically simple wing model; however, an increasing number of potential actuator placement locations were incorporated to illustrate the ability of the GA to determine promising actuator placement arrangements. This effort's major result is a useful genetic algorithm-based approach to assist in the discrete actuator/effector placement problem.

  16. A timeline algorithm for astronomy missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. E.; Guffin, O. T.

    1975-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for generating viewing timelines for orbital astronomy missions of the pointing (nonsurvey/scan) type. The algorithm establishes a target sequence from a list of candidate targets in a way which maximizes total viewing time. Two special cases are treated. One concerns dim targets which, due to lighting constraints, are scheduled only during the antipolar portion of each orbit. They normally require long observation times extending over several revolutions. A minimum slew heuristic is employed to select the sequence of dim targets. The other case deals with bright, or short duration, targets, which have less restrictive lighting constraints and are scheduled during the portion of each orbit when dim targets cannot be viewed. Since this process moves much more rapidly than the dim path, an enumeration algorithm is used to select the sequence that maximizes total viewing time.

  17. Experiments with conjugate gradient algorithms for homotopy curve tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irani, Kashmira M.; Ribbens, Calvin J.; Watson, Layne T.; Kamat, Manohar P.; Walker, Homer F.

    1991-01-01

    There are algorithms for finding zeros or fixed points of nonlinear systems of equations that are globally convergent for almost all starting points, i.e., with probability one. The essence of all such algorithms is the construction of an appropriate homotopy map and then tracking some smooth curve in the zero set of this homotopy map. HOMPACK is a mathematical software package implementing globally convergent homotopy algorithms with three different techniques for tracking a homotopy zero curve, and has separate routines for dense and sparse Jacobian matrices. The HOMPACK algorithms for sparse Jacobian matrices use a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm for the computation of the kernel of the homotopy Jacobian matrix, a required linear algebra step for homotopy curve tracking. Here, variants of the conjugate gradient algorithm are implemented in the context of homotopy curve tracking and compared with Craig's preconditioned conjugate gradient method used in HOMPACK. The test problems used include actual large scale, sparse structural mechanics problems.

  18. A novel fitness evaluation method for evolutionary algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-feng; Tang, Ke-zong

    2013-03-01

    Fitness evaluation is a crucial task in evolutionary algorithms because it can affect the convergence speed and also the quality of the final solution. But these algorithms may require huge computation power for solving nonlinear programming problems. This paper proposes a novel fitness evaluation approach which employs similarity-base learning embedded in a classical differential evolution (SDE) to evaluate all new individuals. Each individual consists of three elements: parameter vector (v), a fitness value (f), and a reliability value(r). The f is calculated using NFEA, and only when the r is below a threshold is the f calculated using true fitness function. Moreover, applying error compensation system to the proposed algorithm further enhances the performance of the algorithm to make r much closer to true fitness value for each new child. Simulation results over a comprehensive set of benchmark functions show that the convergence rate of the proposed algorithm is much faster than much that of the compared algorithms.

  19. Decoherence in optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Chao; Bao, Wan-Su; Wang, Xiang; Fu, Xiang-Qun

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of decoherence generated by broken-link-type noise in the hypercube on an optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm. When the hypercube occurs with random broken links, the optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm with decoherence is depicted through defining the shift operator which includes the possibility of broken links. For a given database size, we obtain the maximum success rate of the algorithm and the required number of iterations through numerical simulations and analysis when the algorithm is in the presence of decoherence. Then the computational complexity of the algorithm with decoherence is obtained. The results show that the ultimate effect of broken-link-type decoherence on the optimized quantum random-walk search algorithm is negative. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB338002).

  20. The efficient algorithms for achieving Euclidean distance transformation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Frank Y; Wu, Yi-Ta

    2004-08-01

    Euclidean distance transformation (EDT) is used to convert a digital binary image consisting of object (foreground) and nonobject (background) pixels into another image where each pixel has a value of the minimum Euclidean distance from nonobject pixels. In this paper, the improved iterative erosion algorithm is proposed to avoid the redundant calculations in the iterative erosion algorithm. Furthermore, to avoid the iterative operations, the two-scan-based algorithm by a deriving approach is developed for achieving EDT correctly and efficiently in a constant time. Besides, we discover when obstacles appear in the image, many algorithms cannot achieve the correct EDT except our two-scan-based algorithm. Moreover, the two-scan-based algorithm does not require the additional cost of preprocessing or relative-coordinates recording.

  1. An Impact-Location Estimation Algorithm for Subsonic Uninhabited Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Teets, Edward

    1997-01-01

    An impact-location estimation algorithm is being used at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center to support range safety for uninhabited aerial vehicle flight tests. The algorithm computes an impact location based on the descent rate, mass, and altitude of the vehicle and current wind information. The predicted impact location is continuously displayed on the range safety officer's moving map display so that the flightpath of the vehicle can be routed to avoid ground assets if the flight must be terminated. The algorithm easily adapts to different vehicle termination techniques and has been shown to be accurate to the extent required to support range safety for subsonic uninhabited aerial vehicles. This paper describes how the algorithm functions, how the algorithm is used at NASA Dryden, and how various termination techniques are handled by the algorithm. Other approaches to predicting the impact location and the reasons why they were not selected for real-time implementation are also discussed.

  2. The evaluation of the OSGLR algorithm for restructurable controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnice, W. F.; Wagner, E.; Hall, S. R.; Motyka, P.

    1986-01-01

    The detection and isolation of commercial aircraft control surface and actuator failures using the orthogonal series generalized likelihood ratio (OSGLR) test was evaluated. The OSGLR algorithm was chosen as the most promising algorithm based on a preliminary evaluation of three failure detection and isolation (FDI) algorithms (the detection filter, the generalized likelihood ratio test, and the OSGLR test) and a survey of the literature. One difficulty of analytic FDI techniques and the OSGLR algorithm in particular is their sensitivity to modeling errors. Therefore, methods of improving the robustness of the algorithm were examined with the incorporation of age-weighting into the algorithm being the most effective approach, significantly reducing the sensitivity of the algorithm to modeling errors. The steady-state implementation of the algorithm based on a single cruise linear model was evaluated using a nonlinear simulation of a C-130 aircraft. A number of off-nominal no-failure flight conditions including maneuvers, nonzero flap deflections, different turbulence levels and steady winds were tested. Based on the no-failure decision functions produced by off-nominal flight conditions, the failure detection performance at the nominal flight condition was determined. The extension of the algorithm to a wider flight envelope by scheduling the linear models used by the algorithm on dynamic pressure and flap deflection was also considered. Since simply scheduling the linear models over the entire flight envelope is unlikely to be adequate, scheduling of the steady-state implentation of the algorithm was briefly investigated.

  3. Time optimal route planning algorithm of LBS online navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Bao, Shitai; Su, Kui; Fang, Qiushui; Yang, Jingfeng

    2011-02-01

    This paper proposes a time optimal route planning optimization algorithm in the mode of LBS online navigation based on the improved Dijkstra algorithms. Combined with the returning real-time location information by on-line users' handheld terminals, the algorithm can satisfy requirement of the optimal time in the mode of LBS online navigation. A navigation system is developed and applied in actual navigation operations. Operating results show that the algorithm could form a reasonable coordination on the basis of shortest route and fastest velocity in the requirement of optimal time. The algorithm could also store the calculated real-time route information in the cache to improve the efficiency of route planning and to reduce the planning time-consuming.

  4. Static algorithm based on MPLS and QoS routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ting; Sun, Yugeng; Liu, Bin

    2004-04-01

    This paper proposes a new static routing algorithm applying Traffic Engineering, which integrates Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Quality of Service (QoS) Routing. Because of using MPLS, centralized control is applied to the transmission paths of different service type in the algorithm. At the same time, to select LSP based on the state of networks and the requirements of QoS, the algorithm can make the resource using globally optimal. It avoids the traditional routings" shortage that the network congestion is produced by the disequilibrium of resource using. United object strategic in the algorithm can produce effective projects for the problem of satisfying Multi-requirement in one routing count, which is NP-hard. Finally the paper proves that the algorithm is feasible and preferable by computer simulation and theoretical deduction.

  5. Boundary-detection algorithm for locating edges in digital imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, V. I. (Principal Investigator); Russell, M. J.; Moore, D. G.; Nelson, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Initial development of a computer program which implements a boundary detection algorithm to detect edges in digital images is described. An evaluation of the boundary detection algorithm was conducted to locate boundaries of lakes from LANDSAT-1 imagery. The accuracy of the boundary detection algorithm was determined by comparing the area within boundaries of lakes located using digitized LANDSAT imagery with the area of the same lakes planimetered from imagery collected from an aircraft platform.

  6. Digital signal processing algorithms for automatic voice recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botros, Nazeih M.

    1987-01-01

    The current digital signal analysis algorithms are investigated that are implemented in automatic voice recognition algorithms. Automatic voice recognition means, the capability of a computer to recognize and interact with verbal commands. The digital signal is focused on, rather than the linguistic, analysis of speech signal. Several digital signal processing algorithms are available for voice recognition. Some of these algorithms are: Linear Predictive Coding (LPC), Short-time Fourier Analysis, and Cepstrum Analysis. Among these algorithms, the LPC is the most widely used. This algorithm has short execution time and do not require large memory storage. However, it has several limitations due to the assumptions used to develop it. The other 2 algorithms are frequency domain algorithms with not many assumptions, but they are not widely implemented or investigated. However, with the recent advances in the digital technology, namely signal processors, these 2 frequency domain algorithms may be investigated in order to implement them in voice recognition. This research is concerned with real time, microprocessor based recognition algorithms.

  7. An adaptive inverse kinematics algorithm for robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbaugh, R.; Glass, K.; Seraji, H.

    1990-01-01

    An adaptive algorithm for solving the inverse kinematics problem for robot manipulators is presented. The algorithm is derived using model reference adaptive control (MRAC) theory and is computationally efficient for online applications. The scheme requires no a priori knowledge of the kinematics of the robot if Cartesian end-effector sensing is available, and it requires knowledge of only the forward kinematics if joint position sensing is used. Computer simulation results are given for the redundant seven-DOF robotics research arm, demonstrating that the proposed algorithm yields accurate joint angle trajectories for a given end-effector position/orientation trajectory.

  8. Flocking algorithm for autonomous flying robots.

    PubMed

    Virágh, Csaba; Vásárhelyi, Gábor; Tarcai, Norbert; Szörényi, Tamás; Somorjai, Gergő; Nepusz, Tamás; Vicsek, Tamás

    2014-06-01

    Animal swarms displaying a variety of typical flocking patterns would not exist without the underlying safe, optimal and stable dynamics of the individuals. The emergence of these universal patterns can be efficiently reconstructed with agent-based models. If we want to reproduce these patterns with artificial systems, such as autonomous aerial robots, agent-based models can also be used in their control algorithms. However, finding the proper algorithms and thus understanding the essential characteristics of the emergent collective behaviour requires thorough and realistic modeling of the robot and also the environment. In this paper, we first present an abstract mathematical model of an autonomous flying robot. The model takes into account several realistic features, such as time delay and locality of communication, inaccuracy of the on-board sensors and inertial effects. We present two decentralized control algorithms. One is based on a simple self-propelled flocking model of animal collective motion, the other is a collective target tracking algorithm. Both algorithms contain a viscous friction-like term, which aligns the velocities of neighbouring agents parallel to each other. We show that this term can be essential for reducing the inherent instabilities of such a noisy and delayed realistic system. We discuss simulation results on the stability of the control algorithms, and perform real experiments to show the applicability of the algorithms on a group of autonomous quadcopters. In our case, bio-inspiration works in two ways. On the one hand, the whole idea of trying to build and control a swarm of robots comes from the observation that birds tend to flock to optimize their behaviour as a group. On the other hand, by using a realistic simulation framework and studying the group behaviour of autonomous robots we can learn about the major factors influencing the flight of bird flocks. PMID:24852272

  9. Flocking algorithm for autonomous flying robots.

    PubMed

    Virágh, Csaba; Vásárhelyi, Gábor; Tarcai, Norbert; Szörényi, Tamás; Somorjai, Gergő; Nepusz, Tamás; Vicsek, Tamás

    2014-06-01

    Animal swarms displaying a variety of typical flocking patterns would not exist without the underlying safe, optimal and stable dynamics of the individuals. The emergence of these universal patterns can be efficiently reconstructed with agent-based models. If we want to reproduce these patterns with artificial systems, such as autonomous aerial robots, agent-based models can also be used in their control algorithms. However, finding the proper algorithms and thus understanding the essential characteristics of the emergent collective behaviour requires thorough and realistic modeling of the robot and also the environment. In this paper, we first present an abstract mathematical model of an autonomous flying robot. The model takes into account several realistic features, such as time delay and locality of communication, inaccuracy of the on-board sensors and inertial effects. We present two decentralized control algorithms. One is based on a simple self-propelled flocking model of animal collective motion, the other is a collective target tracking algorithm. Both algorithms contain a viscous friction-like term, which aligns the velocities of neighbouring agents parallel to each other. We show that this term can be essential for reducing the inherent instabilities of such a noisy and delayed realistic system. We discuss simulation results on the stability of the control algorithms, and perform real experiments to show the applicability of the algorithms on a group of autonomous quadcopters. In our case, bio-inspiration works in two ways. On the one hand, the whole idea of trying to build and control a swarm of robots comes from the observation that birds tend to flock to optimize their behaviour as a group. On the other hand, by using a realistic simulation framework and studying the group behaviour of autonomous robots we can learn about the major factors influencing the flight of bird flocks.

  10. On algorithmic rate-coded AER generation.

    PubMed

    Linares-Barranco, Alejandro; Jimenez-Moreno, Gabriel; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Civit-Balcells, Antón

    2006-05-01

    This paper addresses the problem of converting a conventional video stream based on sequences of frames into the spike event-based representation known as the address-event-representation (AER). In this paper we concentrate on rate-coded AER. The problem is addressed as an algorithmic problem, in which different methods are proposed, implemented and tested through software algorithms. The proposed algorithms are comparatively evaluated according to different criteria. Emphasis is put on the potential of such algorithms for a) doing the frame-based to event-based representation in real time, and b) that the resulting event streams ressemble as much as possible those generated naturally by rate-coded address-event VLSI chips, such as silicon AER retinae. It is found that simple and straightforward algorithms tend to have high potential for real time but produce event distributions that differ considerably from those obtained in AER VLSI chips. On the other hand, sophisticated algorithms that yield better event distributions are not efficient for real time operations. The methods based on linear-feedback-shift-register (LFSR) pseudorandom number generation is a good compromise, which is feasible for real time and yield reasonably well distributed events in time. Our software experiments, on a 1.6-GHz Pentium IV, show that at 50% AER bus load the proposed algorithms require between 0.011 and 1.14 ms per 8 bit-pixel per frame. One of the proposed LFSR methods is implemented in real time hardware using a prototyping board that includes a VirtexE 300 FPGA. The demonstration hardware is capable of transforming frames of 64 x 64 pixels of 8-bit depth at a frame rate of 25 frames per second, producing spike events at a peak rate of 10(7) events per second. PMID:16722179

  11. Genetic Algorithms and Local Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Darrell

    1996-01-01

    The first part of this presentation is a tutorial level introduction to the principles of genetic search and models of simple genetic algorithms. The second half covers the combination of genetic algorithms with local search methods to produce hybrid genetic algorithms. Hybrid algorithms can be modeled within the existing theoretical framework developed for simple genetic algorithms. An application of a hybrid to geometric model matching is given. The hybrid algorithm yields results that improve on the current state-of-the-art for this problem.

  12. A Battery-Aware Algorithm for Supporting Collaborative Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, Sami; Chang-Yit, Cheryl

    Battery-powered devices such as laptops, cell phones, and MP3 players are becoming ubiquitous. There are several significant ways in which the ubiquity of battery-powered technology impacts the field of collaborative computing. First, applications such as collaborative data gathering, become possible. Also, existing applications that depend on collaborating devices to maintain the system infrastructure must be reconsidered. Fundamentally, the problem lies in the fact that collaborative applications often require end-user computing devices to perform tasks that happen in the background and are not directly advantageous to the user. In this work, we seek to better understand how laptop users use the batteries attached to their devices and analyze a battery-aware alternative to Gnutella’s ultrapeer selection algorithm. Our algorithm provides insight into how system maintenance tasks can be allocated to battery-powered nodes. The most significant result of our study indicates that a large portion of laptop users can participate in system maintenance without sacrificing any of their battery. These results show great promise for existing collaborative applications as well as new applications, such as collaborative data gathering, that rely upon battery-powered devices.

  13. Evaluating Algorithm Performance Metrics Tailored for Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Celaya, Jose; Saha, Bhaskar; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Prognostics has taken a center stage in Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) where it is desired to estimate Remaining Useful Life (RUL) of the system so that remedial measures may be taken in advance to avoid catastrophic events or unwanted downtimes. Validation of such predictions is an important but difficult proposition and a lack of appropriate evaluation methods renders prognostics meaningless. Evaluation methods currently used in the research community are not standardized and in many cases do not sufficiently assess key performance aspects expected out of a prognostics algorithm. In this paper we introduce several new evaluation metrics tailored for prognostics and show that they can effectively evaluate various algorithms as compared to other conventional metrics. Specifically four algorithms namely; Relevance Vector Machine (RVM), Gaussian Process Regression (GPR), Artificial Neural Network (ANN), and Polynomial Regression (PR) are compared. These algorithms vary in complexity and their ability to manage uncertainty around predicted estimates. Results show that the new metrics rank these algorithms in different manner and depending on the requirements and constraints suitable metrics may be chosen. Beyond these results, these metrics offer ideas about how metrics suitable to prognostics may be designed so that the evaluation procedure can be standardized. 1

  14. Adaptive path planning: Algorithm and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang C.

    1993-03-01

    Path planning has to be fast to support real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To alleviate this problem, we present a learning algorithm that uses past experience to enhance future performance. The algorithm relies on an existing path planner to provide solutions to difficult tasks. From these solutions, an evolving sparse network of useful subgoals is learned to support faster planning. The algorithm is suitable for both stationary and incrementally-changing environments. To analyze our algorithm, we use a previously developed stochastic model that quantifies experience utility. Using this model, we characterize the situations in which the adaptive planner is useful, and provide quantitative bounds to predict its behavior. The results are demonstrated with problems in manipulator planning. Our algorithm and analysis are sufficiently general that they may also be applied to task planning or other planning domains in which experience is useful.

  15. New Attitude Sensor Alignment Calibration Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, Joseph A.; Sedlak, Joseph E.; Harman, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Accurate spacecraft attitudes may only be obtained if the primary attitude sensors are well calibrated. Launch shock, relaxation of gravitational stresses and similar effects often produce large enough alignment shifts so that on-orbit alignment calibration is necessary if attitude accuracy requirements are to be met. A variety of attitude sensor alignment algorithms have been developed to meet the need for on-orbit calibration. Two new algorithms are presented here: ALICAL and ALIQUEST. Each of these has advantages in particular circumstances. ALICAL is an attitude independent algorithm that uses near simultaneous measurements from two or more sensors to produce accurate sensor alignments. For each set of simultaneous observations the attitude is overdetermined. The information content of the extra degrees of freedom can be combined over numerous sets to provide the sensor alignments. ALIQUEST is an attitude dependent algorithm that combines sensor and attitude data into a loss function that has the same mathematical form as the Wahba problem. Alignments can then be determined using any of the algorithms (such as the QUEST quaternion estimator) that have been developed to solve the Wahba problem for attitude. Results from the use of these methods on active missions are presented.

  16. Carbon export algorithm advancements in models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çağlar Yumruktepe, Veli; Salihoğlu, Barış

    2015-04-01

    The rate at which anthropogenic CO2 is absorbed by the oceans remains a critical question under investigation by climate researchers. Construction of a complete carbon budget, requires better understanding of air-sea exchanges and the processes controlling the vertical and horizontal transport of carbon in the ocean, particularly the biological carbon pump. Improved parameterization of carbon sequestration within ecosystem models is vital to better understand and predict changes in the global carbon cycle. Due to the complexity of processes controlling particle aggregation, sinking and decomposition, existing ecosystem models necessarily parameterize carbon sequestration using simple algorithms. Development of improved algorithms describing carbon export and sequestration, suitable for inclusion in numerical models is an ongoing work. Existing unique algorithms used in the state-of-the art ecosystem models and new experimental results obtained from mesocosm experiments and open ocean observations have been inserted into a common 1D pelagic ecosystem model for testing purposes. The model was implemented to the timeseries stations in the North Atlantic (BATS, PAP and ESTOC) and were evaluated with datasets of carbon export. Targetted topics of algorithms were PFT functional types, grazing and vertical movement of zooplankton, and remineralization, aggregation and ballasting dynamics of organic matter. Ultimately it is intended to feed improved algorithms to the 3D modelling community, for inclusion in coupled numerical models.

  17. AKITA: Application Knowledge Interface to Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Paul; Mathis, Allison; Newman, Kevin; Wilder, Steven

    2013-05-01

    We propose a methodology for using sensor metadata and targeted preprocessing to optimize which selection from a large suite of algorithms are most appropriate for a given data set. Rather than applying several general purpose algorithms or requiring a human operator to oversee the analysis of the data, our method allows the most effective algorithm to be automatically chosen, conserving both computational, network and human resources. For example, the amount of video data being produced daily is far greater than can ever be analyzed. Computer vision algorithms can help sift for the relevant data, but not every algorithm is suited to every data type nor is it efficient to run them all. A full body detector won't work well when the camera is zoomed in or when it is raining and all the people are occluded by foul weather gear. However, leveraging metadata knowledge of the camera settings and the conditions under which the data was collected (generated by automatic preprocessing), face or umbrella detectors could be applied instead, increasing the likelihood of a correct reading. The Lockheed Martin AKITA™ system is a modular knowledge layer which uses knowledge of the system and environment to determine how to most efficiently and usefully process whatever data it is given.

  18. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  19. A SAT Based Effective Algorithm for the Directed Hamiltonian Cycle Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Gerold; Zhang, Weixiong

    The Hamiltonian cycle problem (HCP) is an important combinatorial problem with applications in many areas. While thorough theoretical and experimental analyses have been made on the HCP in undirected graphs, little is known for the HCP in directed graphs (DHCP). The contribution of this work is an effective algorithm for the DHCP. Our algorithm explores and exploits the close relationship between the DHCP and the Assignment Problem (AP) and utilizes a technique based on Boolean satisfiability (SAT). By combining effective algorithms for the AP and SAT, our algorithm significantly outperforms previous exact DHCP algorithms including an algorithm based on the award-winning Concorde TSP algorithm.

  20. Self-calibration algorithm in an asynchronous P300-based brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettini, F.; Aloise, F.; Aricò, P.; Salinari, S.; Mattia, D.; Cincotti, F.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Reliability is a desirable characteristic of brain-computer interface (BCI) systems when they are intended to be used under non-experimental operating conditions. In addition, their overall usability is influenced by the complex and frequent procedures that are required for configuration and calibration. Earlier studies examined the issue of asynchronous control in P300-based BCIs, introducing dynamic stopping and automatic control suspension features. This report proposes and evaluates an algorithm for the automatic recalibration of the classifier's parameters using unsupervised data. Approach. Ten healthy subjects participated in five P300-based BCI sessions throughout a single day. First, we examined whether continuous adaptation of control parameters improved the accuracy of the asynchronous system over time. Then, we assessed the performance of the self-calibration algorithm with respect to the no-recalibration and supervised calibration conditions with regard to system accuracy and communication efficiency. Main results. Offline tests demonstrated that continuous adaptation of the control parameters significantly increased the communication efficiency of asynchronous P300-based BCIs. The self-calibration algorithm correctly assigned labels to unsupervised data with 95% accuracy, effecting communication efficiency that was comparable with that of supervised repeated calibration. Significance. Although additional online tests that involve end-users under non-experimental conditions are needed, these preliminary results are encouraging, from which we conclude that the self-calibration algorithm is a promising solution to improve P300-based BCI usability and reliability.

  1. Algorithms for systolic-array synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yiwan.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation presents efficient algorithms for solving some crucial transformation/optimization problems in the automatic synthesis of systolic arrays from algorithm specifications. The synthesis process consists of two steps. First, the given algorithm specification is transformed into a functionally equivalent form more amenable to systolic array implementation. Then, the computations defined by the equivalent form are assigned for execution on the processors (processor allocation) at different time steps (scheduling), with the objective that the time and space costs of the implementation be minimized. Many computation intensive algorithms, when expressed in their natural form, are unsuitable for systolic array implementations because they contain many-to-one data dependences (data sharing) which cannot be directly realized on processors with bounded fan-out and localized interconnections. A data routing scheme, called data propagation, is proposed which can be implemented as pipelining on a systolic array. It is shown that any data sharing can be transformed into data propagation and that the increase in I/O bandwidth requirement due to such transformation is bounded. Polynomial time procedures are devised for determining the necessary transformations. The time cost of a systolic array implementation of an algorithm is given by the product of two related quantities: the total number of systolic cycles required and the maximum duration of a cycle. It is shown that the scheduling which minimizes the time cost can be determined from solving a discrete optimization problem. Furthermore, the optimization problem is shown to have a bounded solution space, an efficient branch-and-bound method is proposed for determining the optimal solution. The space cost, on the other hand, is defined as the number of processors required for constructing the array.

  2. Evaluation of Algorithms for Compressing Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Sid; Harsanyi, Joseph; Faber, Vance

    2003-01-01

    With EO-1 Hyperion in orbit NASA is showing their continued commitment to hyperspectral imaging (HSI). As HSI sensor technology continues to mature, the ever-increasing amounts of sensor data generated will result in a need for more cost effective communication and data handling systems. Lockheed Martin, with considerable experience in spacecraft design and developing special purpose onboard processors, has teamed with Applied Signal & Image Technology (ASIT), who has an extensive heritage in HSI spectral compression and Mapping Science (MSI) for JPEG 2000 spatial compression expertise, to develop a real-time and intelligent onboard processing (OBP) system to reduce HSI sensor downlink requirements. Our goal is to reduce the downlink requirement by a factor > 100, while retaining the necessary spectral and spatial fidelity of the sensor data needed to satisfy the many science, military, and intelligence goals of these systems. Our compression algorithms leverage commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) spectral and spatial exploitation algorithms. We are currently in the process of evaluating these compression algorithms using statistical analysis and NASA scientists. We are also developing special purpose processors for executing these algorithms onboard a spacecraft.

  3. An efficient algorithm for function optimization: modified stem cells algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taherdangkoo, Mohammad; Paziresh, Mahsa; Yazdi, Mehran; Bagheri, Mohammad

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an optimization algorithm based on the intelligent behavior of stem cell swarms in reproduction and self-organization. Optimization algorithms, such as the Genetic Algorithm (GA), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) algorithm and Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm, can give solutions to linear and non-linear problems near to the optimum for many applications; however, in some case, they can suffer from becoming trapped in local optima. The Stem Cells Algorithm (SCA) is an optimization algorithm inspired by the natural behavior of stem cells in evolving themselves into new and improved cells. The SCA avoids the local optima problem successfully. In this paper, we have made small changes in the implementation of this algorithm to obtain improved performance over previous versions. Using a series of benchmark functions, we assess the performance of the proposed algorithm and compare it with that of the other aforementioned optimization algorithms. The obtained results prove the superiority of the Modified Stem Cells Algorithm (MSCA).

  4. Algorithm Visualization System for Teaching Spatial Data Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikander, Jussi; Helminen, Juha; Korhonen, Ari

    2010-01-01

    TRAKLA2 is a web-based learning environment for data structures and algorithms. The system delivers automatically assessed algorithm simulation exercises that are solved using a graphical user interface. In this work, we introduce a novel learning environment for spatial data algorithms, SDA-TRAKLA2, which has been implemented on top of the…

  5. Comparing barrier algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Jordan, Harry F.

    1987-01-01

    A barrier is a method for synchronizing a large number of concurrent computer processes. After considering some basic synchronization mechanisms, a collection of barrier algorithms with either linear or logarithmic depth are presented. A graphical model is described that profiles the execution of the barriers and other parallel programming constructs. This model shows how the interaction between the barrier algorithms and the work that they synchronize can impact their performance. One result is that logarithmic tree structured barriers show good performance when synchronizing fixed length work, while linear self-scheduled barriers show better performance when synchronizing fixed length work with an imbedded critical section. The linear barriers are better able to exploit the process skew associated with critical sections. Timing experiments, performed on an eighteen processor Flex/32 shared memory multiprocessor, that support these conclusions are detailed.

  6. Algorithms, games, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Erick; Livnat, Adi; Papadimitriou, Christos; Vazirani, Umesh

    2014-07-22

    Even the most seasoned students of evolution, starting with Darwin himself, have occasionally expressed amazement that the mechanism of natural selection has produced the whole of Life as we see it around us. There is a computational way to articulate the same amazement: "What algorithm could possibly achieve all this in a mere three and a half billion years?" In this paper we propose an answer: We demonstrate that in the regime of weak selection, the standard equations of population genetics describing natural selection in the presence of sex become identical to those of a repeated game between genes played according to multiplicative weight updates (MWUA), an algorithm known in computer science to be surprisingly powerful and versatile. MWUA maximizes a tradeoff between cumulative performance and entropy, which suggests a new view on the maintenance of diversity in evolution.

  7. On detection and assessment of statistical significance of Genomic Islands

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Raghunath; Chaudhuri, Keya; Chaudhuri, Probal

    2008-01-01

    Background Many of the available methods for detecting Genomic Islands (GIs) in prokaryotic genomes use markers such as transposons, proximal tRNAs, flanking repeats etc., or they use other supervised techniques requiring training datasets. Most of these methods are primarily based on the biases in GC content or codon and amino acid usage of the islands. However, these methods either do not use any formal statistical test of significance or use statistical tests for which the critical values and the P-values are not adequately justified. We propose a method, which is unsupervised in nature and uses Monte-Carlo statistical tests based on randomly selected segments of a chromosome. Such tests are supported by precise statistical distribution theory, and consequently, the resulting P-values are quite reliable for making the decision. Results Our algorithm (named Design-Island, an acronym for Detection of Statistically Significant Genomic Island) runs in two phases. Some 'putative GIs' are identified in the first phase, and those are refined into smaller segments containing horizontally acquired genes in the refinement phase. This method is applied to Salmonella typhi CT18 genome leading to the discovery of several new pathogenicity, antibiotic resistance and metabolic islands that were missed by earlier methods. Many of these islands contain mobile genetic elements like phage-mediated genes, transposons, integrase and IS elements confirming their horizontal acquirement. Conclusion The proposed method is based on statistical tests supported by precise distribution theory and reliable P-values along with a technique for visualizing statistically significant islands. The performance of our method is better than many other well known methods in terms of their sensitivity and accuracy, and in terms of specificity, it is comparable to other methods. PMID:18380895

  8. Adaptive continuous twisting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jaime A.; Negrete, Daniel Y.; Torres-González, Victor; Fridman, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an adaptive continuous twisting algorithm (ACTA) is presented. For double integrator, ACTA produces a continuous control signal ensuring finite time convergence of the states to zero. Moreover, the control signal generated by ACTA compensates the Lipschitz perturbation in finite time, i.e. its value converges to the opposite value of the perturbation. ACTA also keeps its convergence properties, even in the case that the upper bound of the derivative of the perturbation exists, but it is unknown.

  9. Quantum defragmentation algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Burgarth, Daniel; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2010-08-15

    In this addendum to our paper [D. Burgarth and V. Giovannetti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 100501 (2007)] we prove that during the transformation that allows one to enforce control by relaxation on a quantum system, the ancillary memory can be kept at a finite size, independently from the fidelity one wants to achieve. The result is obtained by introducing the quantum analog of defragmentation algorithms which are employed for efficiently reorganizing classical information in conventional hard disks.

  10. Genetic Algorithm for Optimization: Preprocessor and Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S. K.; Shaykhian, Gholam A.

    2006-01-01

    Genetic algorithm (GA) inspired by Darwin's theory of evolution and employed to solve optimization problems - unconstrained or constrained - uses an evolutionary process. A GA has several parameters such the population size, search space, crossover and mutation probabilities, and fitness criterion. These parameters are not universally known/determined a priori for all problems. Depending on the problem at hand, these parameters need to be decided such that the resulting GA performs the best. We present here a preprocessor that achieves just that, i.e., it determines, for a specified problem, the foregoing parameters so that the consequent GA is a best for the problem. We stress also the need for such a preprocessor both for quality (error) and for cost (complexity) to produce the solution. The preprocessor includes, as its first step, making use of all the information such as that of nature/character of the function/system, search space, physical/laboratory experimentation (if already done/available), and the physical environment. It also includes the information that can be generated through any means - deterministic/nondeterministic/graphics. Instead of attempting a solution of the problem straightway through a GA without having/using the information/knowledge of the character of the system, we would do consciously a much better job of producing a solution by using the information generated/created in the very first step of the preprocessor. We, therefore, unstintingly advocate the use of a preprocessor to solve a real-world optimization problem including NP-complete ones before using the statistically most appropriate GA. We also include such a GA for unconstrained function optimization problems.

  11. RADFLO physics and algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Symbalisty, E.M.D.; Zinn, J.; Whitaker, R.W.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the history, physics, and algorithms of the computer code RADFLO and its extension HYCHEM. RADFLO is a one-dimensional, radiation-transport hydrodynamics code that is used to compute early-time fireball behavior for low-altitude nuclear bursts. The primary use of the code is the prediction of optical signals produced by nuclear explosions. It has also been used to predict thermal and hydrodynamic effects that are used for vulnerability and lethality applications. Another closely related code, HYCHEM, is an extension of RADFLO which includes the effects of nonequilibrium chemistry. Some examples of numerical results will be shown, along with scaling expressions derived from those results. We describe new computations of the structures and luminosities of steady-state shock waves and radiative thermal waves, which have been extended to cover a range of ambient air densities for high-altitude applications. We also describe recent modifications of the codes to use a one-dimensional analog of the CAVEAT fluid-dynamics algorithm in place of the former standard Richtmyer-von Neumann algorithm.

  12. Evaluating super resolution algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youn Jin; Park, Jong Hyun; Shin, Gun Shik; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Park, Se Hyeok; Kim, Jaehyun

    2011-01-01

    This study intends to establish a sound testing and evaluation methodology based upon the human visual characteristics for appreciating the image restoration accuracy; in addition to comparing the subjective results with predictions by some objective evaluation methods. In total, six different super resolution (SR) algorithms - such as iterative back-projection (IBP), robust SR, maximum a posteriori (MAP), projections onto convex sets (POCS), a non-uniform interpolation, and frequency domain approach - were selected. The performance comparison between the SR algorithms in terms of their restoration accuracy was carried out through both subjectively and objectively. The former methodology relies upon the paired comparison method that involves the simultaneous scaling of two stimuli with respect to image restoration accuracy. For the latter, both conventional image quality metrics and color difference methods are implemented. Consequently, POCS and a non-uniform interpolation outperformed the others for an ideal situation, while restoration based methods appear more accurate to the HR image in a real world case where any prior information about the blur kernel is remained unknown. However, the noise-added-image could not be restored successfully by any of those methods. The latest International Commission on Illumination (CIE) standard color difference equation CIEDE2000 was found to predict the subjective results accurately and outperformed conventional methods for evaluating the restoration accuracy of those SR algorithms.

  13. "Clinical" Significance: "Clinical" Significance and "Practical" Significance are NOT the Same Things

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Lisa S.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical significance is an important concept in research, particularly in education and the social sciences. The present article first compares clinical significance to other measures of "significance" in statistics. The major methods used to determine clinical significance are explained and the strengths and weaknesses of clinical significance…

  14. Some Improvements on Signed Window Algorithms for Scalar Multiplications in Elliptic Curve Cryptosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vo, San C.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Scalar multiplication is an essential operation in elliptic curve cryptosystems because its implementation determines the speed and the memory storage requirements. This paper discusses some improvements on two popular signed window algorithms for implementing scalar multiplications of an elliptic curve point - Morain-Olivos's algorithm and Koyarna-Tsuruoka's algorithm.

  15. A scalable parallel algorithm for multiple objective linear programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiecek, Malgorzata M.; Zhang, Hong

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an ADBASE-based parallel algorithm for solving multiple objective linear programs (MOLP's). Job balance, speedup and scalability are of primary interest in evaluating efficiency of the new algorithm. Implementation results on Intel iPSC/2 and Paragon multiprocessors show that the algorithm significantly speeds up the process of solving MOLP's, which is understood as generating all or some efficient extreme points and unbounded efficient edges. The algorithm gives specially good results for large and very large problems. Motivation and justification for solving such large MOLP's are also included.

  16. Quantum-Inspired Genetic Algorithm or Quantum Genetic Algorithm: Which Is It?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Erika

    2015-04-01

    Our everyday work focuses on genetic algorithms (GAs) related to quantum computing where we call ``related'' algorithms those falling into one of two classes: (1) GAs run on classical computers but making use of quantum mechanical (QM) constructs and (2) GAs run on quantum hardware. Though convention has yet to be set with respect to usage of the accepted terms quantum-inspired genetic algorithm (QIGA) and quantum genetic algorithm (QGA), we find the two terms highly suitable respectively as labels for the aforementioned classes. With these specific definitions in mind, the difference between the QIGA and QGA is greater than might first be appreciated, particularly by those coming from a perspective emphasizing GA use as a general computational tool irrespective of QM aspects (1) suggested by QIGAs and (2) inherent in QGAs. We offer a theoretical standpoint highlighting key differences-both obvious, and more significantly, subtle-to be considered in general design of a QIGA versus that of a QGA.

  17. Faster Parameterized Algorithms for Minor Containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Isolde; Dorn, Frederic; Fomin, Fedor V.; Sau, Ignasi; Thilikos, Dimitrios M.

    The theory of Graph Minors by Robertson and Seymour is one of the deepest and significant theories in modern Combinatorics. This theory has also a strong impact on the recent development of Algorithms, and several areas, like Parameterized Complexity, have roots in Graph Minors. Until very recently it was a common belief that Graph Minors Theory is mainly of theoretical importance. However, it appears that many deep results from Robertson and Seymour's theory can be also used in the design of practical algorithms. Minor containment testing is one of algorithmically most important and technical parts of the theory, and minor containment in graphs of bounded branchwidth is a basic ingredient of this algorithm. In order to implement minor containment testing on graphs of bounded branchwidth, Hicks [NETWORKS 04] described an algorithm, that in time O(3^{k^2}\\cdot (h+k-1)!\\cdot m) decides if a graph G with m edges and branchwidth k, contains a fixed graph H on h vertices as a minor. That algorithm follows the ideas introduced by Robertson and Seymour in [J'CTSB 95]. In this work we improve the dependence on k of Hicks' result by showing that checking if H is a minor of G can be done in time O(2^{(2k +1 )\\cdot log k} \\cdot h^{2k} \\cdot 2^{2h^2} \\cdot m). Our approach is based on a combinatorial object called rooted packing, which captures the properties of the potential models of subgraphs of H that we seek in our dynamic programming algorithm. This formulation with rooted packings allows us to speed up the algorithm when G is embedded in a fixed surface, obtaining the first single-exponential algorithm for minor containment testing. Namely, it runs in time 2^{O(k)} \\cdot h^{2k} \\cdot 2^{O(h)} \\cdot n, with n = |V(G)|. Finally, we show that slight modifications of our algorithm permit to solve some related problems within the same time bounds, like induced minor or contraction minor containment.

  18. Load-balancing algorithms for climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.T.; Toonen, B.R.

    1994-06-01

    Implementations of climate models on scalable parallel computer systems can suffer from load imbalances due to temporal and spatial variations in the amount of computation required for physical parameterizations such as solar radiation and convective adjustment. We have developed specialized techniques for correcting such imbalances. These techniques are incorporated in a general-purpose, programmable load-balancing library that allows the mapping of computation to processors to be specified as a series of maps generated by a programmer-supplied load-balancing module. The communication required to move from one map to another is performed automatically by the library, without programmer intervention. In this paper, we de scribe the load-balancing problem and the techniques that we have developed to solve it. We also describe specific load-balancing algorithms that we have developed for PCCM2, a scalable parallel implementation of the community Climate Model, and present experimental results that demonstrate the effectiveness of these algorithms on parallel computers.

  19. Rare Event Detection Algorithm Of Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungs, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    A novel method is presented describing the development and implementation of an on-line water quality event detection algorithm. An algorithm was developed to distinguish between normal variation in water quality parameters and changes in these parameters triggered by the presence of contaminant spikes. Emphasis is placed on simultaneously limiting the number of false alarms (which are called false positives) that occur and the number of misses (called false negatives). The problem of excessive false alarms is common to existing change detection algorithms. EPA's standard measure of evaluation for event detection algorithms is to have a false alarm rate of less than 0.5 percent and a false positive rate less than 2 percent (EPA 817-R-07-002). A detailed description of the algorithm's development is presented. The algorithm is tested using historical water quality data collected by a public water supply agency at multiple locations and using spiking contaminants developed by the USEPA, Water Security Division. The water quality parameters of specific conductivity, chlorine residual, total organic carbon, pH, and oxidation reduction potential are considered. Abnormal data sets are generated by superimposing water quality changes on the historical or baseline data. Eddies-ET has defined reaction expressions which specify how the peak or spike concentration of a particular contaminant affects each water quality parameter. Nine default contaminants (Eddies-ET) were previously derived from pipe-loop tests performed at EPA's National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) Test and Evaluation (T&E) Facility. A contaminant strength value of approximately 1.5 is considered to be a significant threat. The proposed algorithm has been able to achieve a combined false alarm rate of less than 0.03 percent for both false positives and for false negatives using contaminant spikes of strength 2 or more.

  20. Integral Images: Efficient Algorithms for Their Computation and Storage in Resource-Constrained Embedded Vision Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ehsan, Shoaib; Clark, Adrian F.; ur Rehman, Naveed; McDonald-Maier, Klaus D.

    2015-01-01

    The integral image, an intermediate image representation, has found extensive use in multi-scale local feature detection algorithms, such as Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF), allowing fast computation of rectangular features at constant speed, independent of filter size. For resource-constrained real-time embedded vision systems, computation and storage of integral image presents several design challenges due to strict timing and hardware limitations. Although calculation of the integral image only consists of simple addition operations, the total number of operations is large owing to the generally large size of image data. Recursive equations allow substantial decrease in the number of operations but require calculation in a serial fashion. This paper presents two new hardware algorithms that are based on the decomposition of these recursive equations, allowing calculation of up to four integral image values in a row-parallel way without significantly increasing the number of operations. An efficient design strategy is also proposed for a parallel integral image computation unit to reduce the size of the required internal memory (nearly 35% for common HD video). Addressing the storage problem of integral image in embedded vision systems, the paper presents two algorithms which allow substantial decrease (at least 44.44%) in the memory requirements. Finally, the paper provides a case study that highlights the utility of the proposed architectures in embedded vision systems. PMID:26184211

  1. Integral Images: Efficient Algorithms for Their Computation and Storage in Resource-Constrained Embedded Vision Systems.

    PubMed

    Ehsan, Shoaib; Clark, Adrian F; Naveed ur Rehman; McDonald-Maier, Klaus D

    2015-01-01

    The integral image, an intermediate image representation, has found extensive use in multi-scale local feature detection algorithms, such as Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF), allowing fast computation of rectangular features at constant speed, independent of filter size. For resource-constrained real-time embedded vision systems, computation and storage of integral image presents several design challenges due to strict timing and hardware limitations. Although calculation of the integral image only consists of simple addition operations, the total number of operations is large owing to the generally large size of image data. Recursive equations allow substantial decrease in the number of operations but require calculation in a serial fashion. This paper presents two new hardware algorithms that are based on the decomposition of these recursive equations, allowing calculation of up to four integral image values in a row-parallel way without significantly increasing the number of operations. An efficient design strategy is also proposed for a parallel integral image computation unit to reduce the size of the required internal memory (nearly 35% for common HD video). Addressing the storage problem of integral image in embedded vision systems, the paper presents two algorithms which allow substantial decrease (at least 44.44%) in the memory requirements. Finally, the paper provides a case study that highlights the utility of the proposed architectures in embedded vision systems. PMID:26184211

  2. A zero-training algorithm for EEG single-trial classification applied to a face recognition ERP experiment.

    PubMed

    Lage-Castellanos, Agustin; Nieto, Juan I; Quiñones, Ileana; Martinez-Montes, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a machine learning based approach to discriminate between EEG single trials of two experimental conditions in a face recognition experiment. The algorithm works using a single-trial EEG database of multiple subjects and thus does not require subject-specific training data. This approach supports the idea that zero-training classification and on-line detection Brain Computer Interface (BCI) systems are areas with a significant amount of potential.

  3. Design of robust systolic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Varman, P.J.; Fussell, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    A primary reason for the susceptibility of systolic algorithms to faults is their strong dependence on the interconnection between the processors in a systolic array. A technique to transform any linear systolic algorithm into an equivalent pipelined algorithm that executes on arbitrary trees is presented. 5 references.

  4. Multipartite entanglement in quantum algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Bruss, D.; Macchiavello, C.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the entanglement features of the quantum states employed in quantum algorithms. In particular, we analyze the multipartite entanglement properties in the Deutsch-Jozsa, Grover, and Simon algorithms. Our results show that for these algorithms most instances involve multipartite entanglement.

  5. Two Meanings of Algorithmic Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Stephen B.

    1984-01-01

    Two mathematical topics are interpreted from the viewpoints of traditional (performing algorithms) and contemporary (creating algorithms and thinking in terms of them for solving problems and developing theory) algorithmic mathematics. The two topics are Horner's method for evaluating polynomials and Gauss's method for solving systems of linear…

  6. Algorithm for Constructing Contour Plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Silva, F.

    1984-01-01

    General computer algorithm developed for construction of contour plots. algorithm accepts as input data values at set of points irregularly distributed over plane. Algorithm based on interpolation scheme: points in plane connected by straight-line segments to form set of triangles. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  7. A lattice-free concept lattice update algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outrata, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Upon a change of input data, one usually wants an update of output computed from the data rather than recomputing the whole output over again. In Formal Concept Analysis, update of concept lattice of input data when introducing new objects to the data can be done by any of the so-called incremental algorithms for computing concept lattice. The algorithms use and update the lattice while introducing new objects to input data one by one. The present concept lattice of input data without the new objects is thus required by the computation. However, the lattice can be large and may not fit into memory. In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm for updating the lattice from the present and new objects only, not requiring the possibly large concept lattice of present objects. The algorithm results as a modification of the Close-by-One algorithm for computing the set of all formal concepts, or its modifications like Fast Close-by-One, Parallel Close-by-One or Parallel Fast Close-by-One, to compute new and modified formal concepts and the changes of the lattice order relation only. The algorithm can be used not only for updating the lattice when new objects are introduced but also when some existing objects are removed from the input data or attributes of the objects are changed. We describe the algorithm, discuss efficiency issues and present an experimental evaluation of its performance and a comparison with the AddIntent incremental algorithm for computing concept lattice.

  8. An Improved Back Propagation Neural Network Algorithm on Classification Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawi, Nazri Mohd; Ransing, R. S.; Salleh, Mohd Najib Mohd; Ghazali, Rozaida; Hamid, Norhamreeza Abdul

    The back propagation algorithm is one the most popular algorithms to train feed forward neural networks. However, the convergence of this algorithm is slow, it is mainly because of gradient descent algorithm. Previous research demonstrated that in 'feed forward' algorithm, the slope of the activation function is directly influenced by a parameter referred to as 'gain'. This research proposed an algorithm for improving the performance of the back propagation algorithm by introducing the adaptive gain of the activation function. The gain values change adaptively for each node. The influence of the adaptive gain on the learning ability of a neural network is analysed. Multi layer feed forward neural networks have been assessed. Physical interpretation of the relationship between the gain value and the learning rate and weight values is given. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is compared with conventional Gradient Descent Method and verified by means of simulation on four classification problems. In learning the patterns, the simulations result demonstrate that the proposed method converged faster on Wisconsin breast cancer with an improvement ratio of nearly 2.8, 1.76 on diabetes problem, 65% better on thyroid data sets and 97% faster on IRIS classification problem. The results clearly show that the proposed algorithm significantly improves the learning speed of the conventional back-propagation algorithm.

  9. The clinical algorithm nosology: a method for comparing algorithmic guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pearson, S D; Margolis, C Z; Davis, S; Schreier, L K; Gottlieb, L K

    1992-01-01

    Concern regarding the cost and quality of medical care has led to a proliferation of competing clinical practice guidelines. No technique has been described for determining objectively the degree of similarity between alternative guidelines for the same clinical problem. The authors describe the development of the Clinical Algorithm Nosology (CAN), a new method to compare one form of guideline: the clinical algorithm. The CAN measures overall design complexity independent of algorithm content, qualitatively describes the clinical differences between two alternative algorithms, and then scores the degree of similarity between them. CAN algorithm design-complexity scores correlated highly with clinicians' estimates of complexity on an ordinal scale (r = 0.86). Five pairs of clinical algorithms addressing three topics (gallstone lithotripsy, thyroid nodule, and sinusitis) were selected for interrater reliability testing of the CAN clinical-similarity scoring system. Raters categorized the similarity of algorithm pathways in alternative algorithms as "identical," "similar," or "different." Interrater agreement was achieved on 85/109 scores (80%), weighted kappa statistic, k = 0.73. It is concluded that the CAN is a valid method for determining the structural complexity of clinical algorithms, and a reliable method for describing differences and scoring the similarity between algorithms for the same clinical problem. In the future, the CAN may serve to evaluate the reliability of algorithm development programs, and to support providers and purchasers in choosing among alternative clinical guidelines.

  10. A Diagnoser Algorithm for Anomaly Detection in DEDS under Partial Unreliable Observations: Characterization and Inclusion in Sensor Configuration Optimizaton

    SciTech Connect

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Humberto Garcia; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2013-03-01

    Complex engineering systems have to be carefully monitored to meet demanding performance requirements, including detecting anomalies in their operations. There are two major monitoring challenges for these systems. The first challenge is that information collected from the monitored system is often partial and/or unreliable, in the sense that some occurred events may not be reported and/or may be reported incorrectly (e.g., reported as another event). The second is that anomalies often consist of sequences of event patterns separated in space and time. This paper introduces and analyzes a diagnoser algorithm that meets these challenges for detecting and counting occurrences of anomalies in engineering systems. The proposed diagnoser algorithm assumes that models are available for characterizing plant operations (via stochastic automata) and sensors (via probabilistic mappings) used for reporting partial and unreliable information. Methods for analyzing the effects of model uncertainties on the diagnoser performance are also discussed. In order to select configurations that reduce sensor costs, while satisfying diagnoser performance requirements, a sensor configuration selection algorithm developed in previous work is then extended for the proposed diagnoser algorithm. The proposed algorithms and methods are then applied to a multi-unit-operation system, which is derived from an actual facility application. Results show that the proposed diagnoser algorithm is able to detect and count occurrences of anomalies accurately and that its performance is robust to model uncertainties. Furthermore, the sensor configuration selection algorithm is able to suggest optimal sensor configurations with significantly reduced costs, while still yielding acceptable performance for counting the occurrences of anomalies.

  11. Improving word recognition in noise among hearing-impaired subjects with a single-channel cochlear noise-reduction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Fink, Nir; Furst, Miriam; Muchnik, Chava

    2012-09-01

    A common complaint of the hearing impaired is the inability to understand speech in noisy environments even with their hearing assistive devices. Only a few single-channel algorithms have significantly improved speech intelligibility in noise for hearing-impaired listeners. The current study introduces a cochlear noise reduction algorithm. It is based on a cochlear representation of acoustic signals and real-time derivation of a binary speech mask. The contribution of the algorithm for enhancing word recognition in noise was evaluated on a group of 42 normal-hearing subjects, 35 hearing-aid users, 8 cochlear implant recipients, and 14 participants with bimodal devices. Recognition scores of Hebrew monosyllabic words embedded in Gaussian noise at several signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were obtained with processed and unprocessed signals. The algorithm was not effective among the normal-hearing participants. However, it yielded a significant improvement in some of the hearing-impaired subjects under different listening conditions. Its most impressive benefit appeared among cochlear implant recipients. More than 20% improvement in recognition score of noisy words was obtained by 12, 16, and 26 hearing-impaired at SNR of 30, 24, and 18 dB, respectively. The algorithm has a potential to improve speech intelligibility in background noise, yet further research is required to improve its performances.

  12. Parallelism of the SANDstorm hash algorithm.

    SciTech Connect

    Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Draelos, Timothy John; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree

    2009-09-01

    Mainstream cryptographic hashing algorithms are not parallelizable. This limits their speed and they are not able to take advantage of the current trend of being run on multi-core platforms. Being limited in speed limits their usefulness as an authentication mechanism in secure communications. Sandia researchers have created a new cryptographic hashing algorithm, SANDstorm, which was specifically designed to take advantage of multi-core processing and be parallelizable on a wide range of platforms. This report describes a late-start LDRD effort to verify the parallelizability claims of the SANDstorm designers. We have shown, with operating code and bench testing, that the SANDstorm algorithm may be trivially parallelized on a wide range of hardware platforms. Implementations using OpenMP demonstrates a linear speedup with multiple cores. We have also shown significant performance gains with optimized C code and the use of assembly instructions to exploit particular platform capabilities.

  13. Pregestational diabetes: insulin requirements throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Langer, O; Anyaegbunam, A; Brustman, L; Guidetti, D; Levy, J; Mazze, R

    1988-09-01

    The management of pregestational diabetes requires tight metabolic control to reduce maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. It has been suggested that type I diabetes is a disorder characterized by insulin deficiency and type II diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance; however, it may be hypothesized that a difference in insulin requirements should emerge throughout pregnancy to reflect the dissimilarities in these two metabolic disturbances. The current investigation of 103 women with pregestational diabetes used a novel approach (reflectance meters with onboard memories) to uncover the actual insulin dosages required to reach and maintain optimum metabolic control throughout pregnancy. It was found that both type I and type II diabetes appear to have a triphasic insulin pattern, with the patient having type II diabetes requiring significantly higher doses of insulin during each trimester. This seems to suggest that the hormonal changes in pregnancy may have a similar effect on both type I and type II diabetes but to a different degree. Thus this should be considered in the treatment of pregestational diabetes and in the development of an algorithm for diabetes management.

  14. Specification of Selected Performance Monitoring and Commissioning Verification Algorithms for CHP Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2006-10-06

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Distributed Energy (DE) Program by developing advanced control algorithms that would lead to development of tools to enhance performance and reliability, and reduce emissions of distributed energy technologies, including combined heat and power technologies. This report documents phase 2 of the program, providing a detailed functional specification for algorithms for performance monitoring and commissioning verification, scheduled for development in FY 2006. The report identifies the systems for which algorithms will be developed, the specific functions of each algorithm, metrics which the algorithms will output, and inputs required by each algorithm.

  15. Asymmetric intimacy and algorithm for detecting communities in bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingyuan; Qin, Xiaomeng

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, an algorithm to choose a good partition in bipartite networks has been proposed. Bipartite networks have more theoretical significance and broader prospect of application. In view of distinctive structure of bipartite networks, in our method, two parameters are defined to show the relationships between the same type nodes and heterogeneous nodes respectively. Moreover, our algorithm employs a new method of finding and expanding the core communities in bipartite networks. Two kinds of nodes are handled separately and merged, and then the sub-communities are obtained. After that, objective communities will be found according to the merging rule. The proposed algorithm has been simulated in real-world networks and artificial networks, and the result verifies the accuracy and reliability of the parameters on intimacy for our algorithm. Eventually, comparisons with similar algorithms depict that the proposed algorithm has better performance.

  16. Analysis of image thresholding segmentation algorithms based on swarm intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Lu, Kai; Gao, Yinghui; Yang, Bo

    2013-03-01

    Swarm intelligence-based image thresholding segmentation algorithms are playing an important role in the research field of image segmentation. In this paper, we briefly introduce the theories of four existing image segmentation algorithms based on swarm intelligence including fish swarm algorithm, artificial bee colony, bacteria foraging algorithm and particle swarm optimization. Then some image benchmarks are tested in order to show the differences of the segmentation accuracy, time consumption, convergence and robustness for Salt & Pepper noise and Gaussian noise of these four algorithms. Through these comparisons, this paper gives qualitative analyses for the performance variance of the four algorithms. The conclusions in this paper would give a significant guide for the actual image segmentation.

  17. Compression Techniques for Improved Algorithm Computational Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.; Winfree, William P.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of thermal data requires the processing of large amounts of temporal image data. The processing of the data for quantitative information can be time intensive especially out in the field where large areas are inspected resulting in numerous data sets. By applying a temporal compression technique, improved algorithm performance can be obtained. In this study, analysis techniques are applied to compressed and non-compressed thermal data. A comparison is made based on computational speed and defect signal to noise.

  18. Chirp Scaling Algorithms for SAR Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, M.; Cheng, T.; Chen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The chirp scaling SAR processing algorithm is both accurate and efficient. Successful implementation requires proper selection of the interval of output samples, which is a function of the chirp interval, signal sampling rate, and signal bandwidth. Analysis indicates that for both airborne and spaceborne SAR applications in the slant range domain a linear chirp scaling is sufficient. To perform nonlinear interpolation process such as to output ground range SAR images, one can use a nonlinear chirp scaling interpolator presented in this paper.

  19. Stability analysis of a three-term backpropagation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zweiri, Yahya H; Seneviratne, Lakmal D; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2005-12-01

    Efficient learning by the backpropagation (BP) algorithm is required for many practical applications. The BP algorithm calculates the weight changes of artificial neural networks, and a common approach is to use a two-term algorithm consisting of a learning rate (LR) and a momentum factor (MF). The major drawbacks of the two-term BP learning algorithm are the problems of local minima and slow convergence speeds, which limit the scope for real-time applications. Recently the addition of an extra term, called a proportional factor (PF), to the two-term BP algorithm was proposed. The third increases the speed of the BP algorithm. However, the PF term also reduces the convergence of the BP algorithm, and criteria for evaluating convergence are required to facilitate the application of the three terms BP algorithm. This paper analyzes the convergence of the new three-term backpropagation algorithm. If the learning parameters of the three-term BP algorithm satisfy the conditions given in this paper, then it is guaranteed that the system is stable and will converge to a local minimum. It is proved that if at least one of the eigenvalues of matrix F (compose of the Hessian of the cost function and the system Jacobian of the error vector at each iteration) is negative, then the system becomes unstable. Also the paper shows that all the local minima of the three-term BP algorithm cost function are stable. The relationship between the learning parameters are established in this paper such that the stability conditions are met.

  20. Estimating the granularity coefficient of a Potts-Markov random field within a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Marcelo; Dobigeon, Nicolas; Batatia, Hadj; Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    2013-06-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating the Potts parameter β jointly with the unknown parameters of a Bayesian model within a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. Standard MCMC methods cannot be applied to this problem because performing inference on β requires computing the intractable normalizing constant of the Potts model. In the proposed MCMC method, the estimation of β is conducted using a likelihood-free Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Experimental results obtained for synthetic data show that estimating β jointly with the other unknown parameters leads to estimation results that are as good as those obtained with the actual value of β. On the other hand, choosing an incorrect value of β can degrade estimation performance significantly. To illustrate the interest of this method, the proposed algorithm is successfully applied to real bidimensional SAR and tridimensional ultrasound images.

  1. A fast and memory-sparing probabilistic selection algorithm for the GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, Laura M; Wendelberger, Joanne; Michalak, Sarah

    2010-09-29

    A fast and memory-sparing probabilistic top-N selection algorithm is implemented on the GPU. This probabilistic algorithm gives a deterministic result and always terminates. The use of randomization reduces the amount of data that needs heavy processing, and so reduces both the memory requirements and the average time required for the algorithm. This algorithm is well-suited to more general parallel processors with multiple layers of memory hierarchy. Probabilistic Las Vegas algorithms of this kind are a form of stochastic optimization and can be especially useful for processors having a limited amount of fast memory available.

  2. Combinatorial Multiobjective Optimization Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, William A.; Martin. Eric T.

    2002-01-01

    The research proposed in this document investigated multiobjective optimization approaches based upon the Genetic Algorithm (GA). Several versions of the GA have been adopted for multiobjective design, but, prior to this research, there had not been significant comparisons of the most popular strategies. The research effort first generalized the two-branch tournament genetic algorithm in to an N-branch genetic algorithm, then the N-branch GA was compared with a version of the popular Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA). Because the genetic algorithm is well suited to combinatorial (mixed discrete / continuous) optimization problems, the GA can be used in the conceptual phase of design to combine selection (discrete variable) and sizing (continuous variable) tasks. Using a multiobjective formulation for the design of a 50-passenger aircraft to meet the competing objectives of minimizing takeoff gross weight and minimizing trip time, the GA generated a range of tradeoff designs that illustrate which aircraft features change from a low-weight, slow trip-time aircraft design to a heavy-weight, short trip-time aircraft design. Given the objective formulation and analysis methods used, the results of this study identify where turboprop-powered aircraft and turbofan-powered aircraft become more desirable for the 50 seat passenger application. This aircraft design application also begins to suggest how a combinatorial multiobjective optimization technique could be used to assist in the design of morphing aircraft.

  3. Connected-Health Algorithm: Development and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vlahu-Gjorgievska, Elena; Koceski, Saso; Kulev, Igor; Trajkovik, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, there is a growing interest towards the adoption of novel ICT technologies in the field of medical monitoring and personal health care systems. This paper proposes design of a connected health algorithm inspired from social computing paradigm. The purpose of the algorithm is to give a recommendation for performing a specific activity that will improve user's health, based on his health condition and set of knowledge derived from the history of the user and users with similar attitudes to him. The algorithm could help users to have bigger confidence in choosing their physical activities that will improve their health. The proposed algorithm has been experimentally validated using real data collected from a community of 1000 active users. The results showed that the recommended physical activity, contributed towards weight loss of at least 0.5 kg, is found in the first half of the ordered list of recommendations, generated by the algorithm, with the probability > 0.6 with 1 % level of significance. PMID:26922593

  4. Benchmarking homogenization algorithms for monthly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M. J.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratiannil, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.; Willett, K.

    2013-09-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies. The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous values at various averaging scales, ii) the error in linear trend estimates and iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data. Moreover, state-of-the-art relative homogenization algorithms developed to work with an inhomogeneous reference are shown to perform best. The study showed that currently automatic algorithms can perform as well as manual ones.

  5. Genetic algorithms for route discovery.

    PubMed

    Gelenbe, Erol; Liu, Peixiang; Lainé, Jeremy

    2006-12-01

    Packet routing in networks requires knowledge about available paths, which can be either acquired dynamically while the traffic is being forwarded, or statically (in advance) based on prior information of a network's topology. This paper describes an experimental investigation of path discovery using genetic algorithms (GAs). We start with the quality-of-service (QoS)-driven routing protocol called "cognitive packet network" (CPN), which uses smart packets (SPs) to dynamically select routes in a distributed autonomic manner based on a user's QoS requirements. We extend it by introducing a GA at the source routers, which modifies and filters the paths discovered by the CPN. The GA can combine the paths that were previously discovered to create new untested but valid source-to-destination paths, which are then selected on the basis of their "fitness." We present an implementation of this approach, where the GA runs in background mode so as not to overload the ingress routers. Measurements conducted on a network test bed indicate that when the background-traffic load of the network is light to medium, the GA can result in improved QoS. When the background-traffic load is high, it appears that the use of the GA may be detrimental to the QoS experienced by users as compared to CPN routing because the GA uses less timely state information in its decision making.

  6. Genetic algorithms for route discovery.

    PubMed

    Gelenbe, Erol; Liu, Peixiang; Lainé, Jeremy

    2006-12-01

    Packet routing in networks requires knowledge about available paths, which can be either acquired dynamically while the traffic is being forwarded, or statically (in advance) based on prior information of a network's topology. This paper describes an experimental investigation of path discovery using genetic algorithms (GAs). We start with the quality-of-service (QoS)-driven routing protocol called "cognitive packet network" (CPN), which uses smart packets (SPs) to dynamically select routes in a distributed autonomic manner based on a user's QoS requirements. We extend it by introducing a GA at the source routers, which modifies and filters the paths discovered by the CPN. The GA can combine the paths that were previously discovered to create new untested but valid source-to-destination paths, which are then selected on the basis of their "fitness." We present an implementation of this approach, where the GA runs in background mode so as not to overload the ingress routers. Measurements conducted on a network test bed indicate that when the background-traffic load of the network is light to medium, the GA can result in improved QoS. When the background-traffic load is high, it appears that the use of the GA may be detrimental to the QoS experienced by users as compared to CPN routing because the GA uses less timely state information in its decision making. PMID:17186801

  7. Dual key speech encryption algorithm based underdetermined BSS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huan; He, Shaofang; Chen, Zuo; Zhang, Xixiang

    2014-01-01

    When the number of the mixed signals is less than that of the source signals, the underdetermined blind source separation (BSS) is a significant difficult problem. Due to the fact that the great amount data of speech communications and real-time communication has been required, we utilize the intractability of the underdetermined BSS problem to present a dual key speech encryption method. The original speech is mixed with dual key signals which consist of random key signals (one-time pad) generated by secret seed and chaotic signals generated from chaotic system. In the decryption process, approximate calculation is used to recover the original speech signals. The proposed algorithm for speech signals encryption can resist traditional attacks against the encryption system, and owing to approximate calculation, decryption becomes faster and more accurate. It is demonstrated that the proposed method has high level of security and can recover the original signals quickly and efficiently yet maintaining excellent audio quality. PMID:24955430

  8. Hierarchical Stochastic Simulation Algorithm for SBML Models of Genetic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Leandro H; Myers, Chris J

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a hierarchical stochastic simulation algorithm, which has been implemented within iBioSim, a tool used to model, analyze, and visualize genetic circuits. Many biological analysis tools flatten out hierarchy before simulation, but there are many disadvantages associated with this approach. First, the memory required to represent the model can quickly expand in the process. Second, the flattening process is computationally expensive. Finally, when modeling a dynamic cellular population within iBioSim, inlining the hierarchy of the model is inefficient since models must grow dynamically over time. This paper discusses a new approach to handle hierarchy on the fly to make the tool faster and more memory-efficient. This approach yields significant performance improvements as compared to the former flat analysis method.

  9. On the Formal Verification of Conflict Detection Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar; Butler, Ricky W.; Carreno, Victor A.; Dowek, Gilles

    2001-01-01

    Safety assessment of new air traffic management systems is a main issue for civil aviation authorities. Standard techniques such as testing and simulation have serious limitations in new systems that are significantly more autonomous than the older ones. In this paper, we present an innovative approach, based on formal verification, for establishing the correctness of conflict detection systems. Fundamental to our approach is the concept of trajectory, which is a continuous path in the x-y plane constrained by physical laws and operational requirements. From the Model of trajectories, we extract, and formally prove, high level properties that can serve as a framework to analyze conflict scenarios. We use the Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) alerting algorithm as a case study of our approach.

  10. Merging of synchrotron serial crystallographic data by a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zander, Ulrich; Cianci, Michele; Foos, Nicolas; Silva, Catarina S; Mazzei, Luca; Zubieta, Chloe; de Maria, Alejandro; Nanao, Max H

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in macromolecular crystallography have made it practical to rapidly collect hundreds of sub-data sets consisting of small oscillations of incomplete data. This approach, generally referred to as serial crystallography, has many uses, including an increased effective dose per data set, the collection of data from crystals without harvesting (in situ data collection) and studies of dynamic events such as catalytic reactions. However, selecting which data sets from this type of experiment should be merged can be challenging and new methods are required. Here, it is shown that a genetic algorithm can be used for this purpose, and five case studies are presented in which the merging statistics are significantly improved compared with conventional merging of all data. PMID:27599735

  11. Merging of synchrotron serial crystallographic data by a genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Ulrich; Cianci, Michele; Foos, Nicolas; Silva, Catarina S.; Mazzei, Luca; Zubieta, Chloe; de Maria, Alejandro; Nanao, Max H.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in macromolecular crystallography have made it practical to rapidly collect hundreds of sub-data sets consisting of small oscillations of incomplete data. This approach, generally referred to as serial crystallography, has many uses, including an increased effective dose per data set, the collection of data from crystals without harvesting (in situ data collection) and studies of dynamic events such as catalytic reactions. However, selecting which data sets from this type of experiment should be merged can be challenging and new methods are required. Here, it is shown that a genetic algorithm can be used for this purpose, and five case studies are presented in which the merging statistics are significantly improved compared with conventional merging of all data. PMID:27599735

  12. An efficient algorithm for incompressible N-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, S.

    2014-11-01

    We present an efficient algorithm within the phase field framework for simulating the motion of a mixture of N (N⩾2) immiscible incompressible fluids, with possibly very different physical properties such as densities, viscosities, and pairwise surface tensions. The algorithm employs a physical formulation for the N-phase system that honors the conservations of mass and momentum and the second law of thermodynamics. We present a method for uniquely determining the mixing energy density coefficients involved in the N-phase model based on the pairwise surface tensions among the N fluids. Our numerical algorithm has several attractive properties that make it computationally very efficient: (i) it has completely de-coupled the computations for different flow variables, and has also completely de-coupled the computations for the (N−1) phase field functions; (ii) the algorithm only requires the solution of linear algebraic systems after discretization, and no nonlinear algebraic solve is needed; (iii) for each flow variable the linear algebraic system involves only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices, which can be pre-computed during pre-processing, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the N-phase mixture; (iv) within a time step the semi-discretized system involves only individual de-coupled Helmholtz-type (including Poisson) equations, despite the strongly-coupled phase–field system of fourth spatial order at the continuum level; (v) the algorithm is suitable for large density contrasts and large viscosity contrasts among the N fluids. Extensive numerical experiments have been presented for several problems involving multiple fluid phases, large density contrasts and large viscosity contrasts. In particular, we compare our simulations with the de Gennes theory, and demonstrate that our method produces physically accurate results for multiple fluid phases. We also demonstrate the significant and sometimes dramatic effects of the

  13. Comparison of ice-sheet satellite altimeter retracking algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA and ESA retracking algorithms are compared with an algorithm based upon a combined surface and volume (S/V) scattering model. First, the S/V, NASA, and ESA algorithms were used to retrack over 1.3 million altimeter return waveforms from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. The surface elevations from the S/V algorithm were compared with the elevations produced by the NASA and ESA algorithms to determine the relative accuracy of these algorithms when subsurface volume scattering occurs. The results show that the ESA{sub 25%} algorithm produced slightly higher surface elevations than the S/V algorithm. The NASA retracking algorithm produced lower surface elevations than the S/V retracking algorithm, with average differences ranging from {minus}0.3 to {minus}0.9 m. The lower NASA elevations can only account for a portion of previously reported differences between altimeter and geoceiver surface elevations, suggesting that the remainder is probably due to orbital differences. Next, by analyzing several thousand satellite crossover points from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, the author estimated the repeatability of the surface elevations derived from the different retracking algorithms. The elevations derived from the ESA{sub 25%} and S/V algorithm had the smallest standard deviations for the crossover differences for a time period where no significant change in surface elevation should occur. The NASA standard deviations were approximately 0.2 m larger than those from the ESA{sub 25%} and S/V algorithm, which represents an average increase in error of approximately 0.5 m in the datasets.

  14. Required Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janko, Edmund

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the author insists that those seeking public office prove their literary mettle. As an English teacher, he does have a litmus test for all public officials, judges and senators included--a reading litmus test. He would require that all candidates and nominees have read and reflected on a nucleus of works whose ideas and insights…

  15. Algorithms to Automate LCLS Undulator Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-03

    Automation of the LCLS undulator tuning offers many advantages to the project. Automation can make a substantial reduction in the amount of time the tuning takes. Undulator tuning is fairly complex and automation can make the final tuning less dependent on the skill of the operator. Also, algorithms are fixed and can be scrutinized and reviewed, as opposed to an individual doing the tuning by hand. This note presents algorithms implemented in a computer program written for LCLS undulator tuning. The LCLS undulators must meet the following specifications. The maximum trajectory walkoff must be less than 5 {micro}m over 10 m. The first field integral must be below 40 x 10{sup -6} Tm. The second field integral must be below 50 x 10{sup -6} Tm{sup 2}. The phase error between the electron motion and the radiation field must be less than 10 degrees in an undulator. The K parameter must have the value of 3.5000 {+-} 0.0005. The phase matching from the break regions into the undulator must be accurate to better than 10 degrees. A phase change of 113 x 2{pi} must take place over a distance of 3.656 m centered on the undulator. Achieving these requirements is the goal of the tuning process. Most of the tuning is done with Hall probe measurements. The field integrals are checked using long coil measurements. An analysis program written in Matlab takes the Hall probe measurements and computes the trajectories, phase errors, K value, etc. The analysis program and its calculation techniques were described in a previous note. In this note, a second Matlab program containing tuning algorithms is described. The algorithms to determine the required number and placement of the shims are discussed in detail. This note describes the operation of a computer program which was written to automate LCLS undulator tuning. The algorithms used to compute the shim sizes and locations are discussed.

  16. On-orbit flight control algorithm description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Algorithms are presented for rotational and translational control of the space shuttle orbiter in the orbital mission phases, which are external tank separation, orbit insertion, on-orbit and de-orbit. The program provides a versatile control system structure while maintaining uniform communications with other programs, sensors, and control effectors by using an executive routine/functional subroutine format. Software functional requirements are described using block diagrams where feasible, and input--output tables, and the software implementation of each function is presented in equations and structured flow charts. Included are a glossary of all symbols used to define the requirements, and an appendix of supportive material.

  17. Efficient algorithms for Hirshfeld-I charges

    SciTech Connect

    Finzel, Kati; Martín Pendás, Ángel; Francisco, Evelio

    2015-08-28

    A new viewpoint on iterative Hirshfeld charges is presented, whereby the atomic populations obtained from such a scheme are interpreted as such populations which reproduce themselves. This viewpoint yields a self-consistent requirement for the Hirshfeld-I populations rather than being understood as the result of an iterative procedure. Based on this self-consistent requirement, much faster algorithms for Hirshfeld-I charges have been developed. In addition, new atomic reference densities for the Hirshfeld-I procedure are presented. The proposed reference densities are N-representable, display proper atomic shell structure and can be computed for any charged species.

  18. Algorithms for Contact in a Mulitphysics Environment

    2001-12-19

    Many codes require either a contact capability or a need to determine geometric proximity of non-connected topological entities (which is a subset of what contact requires). ACME is a library to provide services to determine contact forces and/or geometric proximity interactions. This includes generic capabilities such as determining points in Cartesian volumes, finding faces in Cartesian volumes, etc. ACME can be run in single or multi-processor mode (the basic algorithms have been tested up tomore » 4500 processors).« less

  19. Study of image matching algorithm and sub-pixel fitting algorithm in target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming-dong; Jia, Jianjun; Qiang, Jia; Wang, Jian-yu

    2015-03-01

    Image correlation matching is a tracking method that searched a region most approximate to the target template based on the correlation measure between two images. Because there is no need to segment the image, and the computation of this method is little. Image correlation matching is a basic method of target tracking. This paper mainly studies the image matching algorithm of gray scale image, which precision is at sub-pixel level. The matching algorithm used in this paper is SAD (Sum of Absolute Difference) method. This method excels in real-time systems because of its low computation complexity. The SAD method is introduced firstly and the most frequently used sub-pixel fitting algorithms are introduced at the meantime. These fitting algorithms can't be used in real-time systems because they are too complex. However, target tracking often requires high real-time performance, we put forward a fitting algorithm named paraboloidal fitting algorithm based on the consideration above, this algorithm is simple and realized easily in real-time system. The result of this algorithm is compared with that of surface fitting algorithm through image matching simulation. By comparison, the precision difference between these two algorithms is little, it's less than 0.01pixel. In order to research the influence of target rotation on precision of image matching, the experiment of camera rotation was carried on. The detector used in the camera is a CMOS detector. It is fixed to an arc pendulum table, take pictures when the camera rotated different angles. Choose a subarea in the original picture as the template, and search the best matching spot using image matching algorithm mentioned above. The result shows that the matching error is bigger when the target rotation angle is larger. It's an approximate linear relation. Finally, the influence of noise on matching precision was researched. Gaussian noise and pepper and salt noise were added in the image respectively, and the image

  20. A new minimax algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vardi, A.

    1984-01-01

    The representation min t s.t. F(I)(x). - t less than or equal to 0 for all i is examined. An active set strategy is designed of functions: active, semi-active, and non-active. This technique will help in preventing zigzagging which often occurs when an active set strategy is used. Some of the inequality constraints are handled with slack variables. Also a trust region strategy is used in which at each iteration there is a sphere around the current point in which the local approximation of the function is trusted. The algorithm is implemented into a successful computer program. Numerical results are provided.

  1. MLP iterative construction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, Thomas F.; Rogers, Steven K.; DeSimio, Martin P.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1997-04-01

    The MLP Iterative Construction Algorithm (MICA) designs a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) neural network as it trains. MICA adds Hidden Layer Nodes one at a time, separating classes on a pair-wise basis, until the data is projected into a linear separable space by class. Then MICA trains the Output Layer Nodes, which results in an MLP that achieves 100% accuracy on the training data. MICA, like Backprop, produces an MLP that is a minimum mean squared error approximation of the Bayes optimal discriminant function. Moreover, MICA's training technique yields novel feature selection technique and hidden node pruning technique

  2. An adaptive multi-level simulation algorithm for stochastic biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, C. Giles, M. B.; Baker, R. E.; Yates, C. A.

    2015-01-14

    Discrete-state, continuous-time Markov models are widely used in the modeling of biochemical reaction networks. Their complexity often precludes analytic solution, and we rely on stochastic simulation algorithms (SSA) to estimate system statistics. The Gillespie algorithm is exact, but computationally costly as it simulates every single reaction. As such, approximate stochastic simulation algorithms such as the tau-leap algorithm are often used. Potentially computationally more efficient, the system statistics generated suffer from significant bias unless tau is relatively small, in which case the computational time can be comparable to that of the Gillespie algorithm. The multi-level method [Anderson and Higham, “Multi-level Monte Carlo for continuous time Markov chains, with applications in biochemical kinetics,” SIAM Multiscale Model. Simul. 10(1), 146–179 (2012)] tackles this problem. A base estimator is computed using many (cheap) sample paths at low accuracy. The bias inherent in this estimator is then reduced using a number of corrections. Each correction term is estimated using a collection of paired sample paths where one path of each pair is generated at a higher accuracy compared to the other (and so more expensive). By sharing random variables between these paired paths, the variance of each correction estimator can be reduced. This renders the multi-level method very efficient as only a relatively small number of paired paths are required to calculate each correction term. In the original multi-level method, each sample path is simulated using the tau-leap algorithm with a fixed value of τ. This approach can result in poor performance when the reaction activity of a system changes substantially over the timescale of interest. By introducing a novel adaptive time-stepping approach where τ is chosen according to the stochastic behaviour of each sample path, we extend the applicability of the multi-level method to such cases. We demonstrate the

  3. The Optimization of Trained and Untrained Image Classification Algorithms for Use on Large Spatial Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocurek, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The HARVIST project seeks to automatically provide an accurate, interactive interface to predict crop yield over the entire United States. In order to accomplish this goal, large images must be quickly and automatically classified by crop type. Current trained and untrained classification algorithms, while accurate, are highly inefficient when operating on large datasets. This project sought to develop new variants of two standard trained and untrained classification algorithms that are optimized to take advantage of the spatial nature of image data. The first algorithm, harvist-cluster, utilizes divide-and-conquer techniques to precluster an image in the hopes of increasing overall clustering speed. The second algorithm, harvistSVM, utilizes support vector machines (SVMs), a type of trained classifier. It seeks to increase classification speed by applying a "meta-SVM" to a quick (but inaccurate) SVM to approximate a slower, yet more accurate, SVM. Speedups were achieved by tuning the algorithm to quickly identify when the quick SVM was incorrect, and then reclassifying low-confidence pixels as necessary. Comparing the classification speeds of both algorithms to known baselines showed a slight speedup for large values of k (the number of clusters) for harvist-cluster, and a significant speedup for harvistSVM. Future work aims to automate the parameter tuning process required for harvistSVM, and further improve classification accuracy and speed. Additionally, this research will move documents created in Canvas into ArcGIS. The launch of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) will provide a wealth of image data such as global maps of Martian weather and high resolution global images of Mars. The ability to store this new data in a georeferenced format will support future Mars missions by providing data for landing site selection and the search for water on Mars.

  4. An adaptive multi-level simulation algorithm for stochastic biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, C.; Yates, C. A.; Giles, M. B.; Baker, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    Discrete-state, continuous-time Markov models are widely used in the modeling of biochemical reaction networks. Their complexity often precludes analytic solution, and we rely on stochastic simulation algorithms (SSA) to estimate system statistics. The Gillespie algorithm is exact, but computationally costly as it simulates every single reaction. As such, approximate stochastic simulation algorithms such as the tau-leap algorithm are often used. Potentially computationally more efficient, the system statistics generated suffer from significant bias unless tau is relatively small, in which case the computational time can be comparable to that of the Gillespie algorithm. The multi-level method [Anderson and Higham, "Multi-level Monte Carlo for continuous time Markov chains, with applications in biochemical kinetics," SIAM Multiscale Model. Simul. 10(1), 146-179 (2012)] tackles this problem. A base estimator is computed using many (cheap) sample paths at low accuracy. The bias inherent in this estimator is then reduced using a number of corrections. Each correction term is estimated using a collection of paired sample paths where one path of each pair is generated at a higher accuracy compared to the other (and so more expensive). By sharing random variables between these paired paths, the variance of each correction estimator can be reduced. This renders the multi-level method very efficient as only a relatively small number of paired paths are required to calculate each correction term. In the original multi-level method, each sample path is simulated using the tau-leap algorithm with a fixed value of τ. This approach can result in poor performance when the reaction activity of a system changes substantially over the timescale of interest. By introducing a novel adaptive time-stepping approach where τ is chosen according to the stochastic behaviour of each sample path, we extend the applicability of the multi-level method to such cases. We demonstrate the

  5. Nonlinear inversion of potential-field data using a hybrid-encoding genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Xia, Jianghai; Liu, Jiangping; Feng, Guangding

    2006-03-01

    Using a genetic algorithm to solve an inverse problem of complex nonlinear geophysical equations is advantageous because it does not require computer gradients of models or "good" initial models. The multi-point search of a genetic algorithm makes it easier to find the globally optimal solution while avoiding falling into a local extremum. As is the case in other optimization approaches, the search efficiency for a genetic algorithm is vital in finding desired solutions successfully in a multi-dimensional model space. A binary-encoding genetic algorithm is hardly ever used to resolve an optimization problem such as a simple geophysical inversion with only three unknowns. The encoding mechanism, genetic operators, and population size of the genetic algorithm greatly affect search processes in the evolution. It is clear that improved operators and proper population size promote the convergence. Nevertheless, not all genetic operations perform perfectly while searching under either a uniform binary or a decimal encoding system. With the binary encoding mechanism, the crossover scheme may produce more new individuals than with the decimal encoding. On the other hand, the mutation scheme in a decimal encoding system will create new genes larger in scope than those in the binary encoding. This paper discusses approaches of exploiting the search potential of genetic operations in the two encoding systems and presents an approach with a hybrid-encoding mechanism, multi-point crossover, and dynamic population size for geophysical inversion. We present a method that is based on the routine in which the mutation operation is conducted in the decimal code and multi-point crossover operation in the binary code. The mix-encoding algorithm is called the hybrid-encoding genetic algorithm (HEGA). HEGA provides better genes with a higher probability by a mutation operator and improves genetic algorithms in resolving complicated geophysical inverse problems. Another significant

  6. Nonlinear inversion of potential-field data using a hybrid-encoding genetic algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Feng, G.

    2006-01-01

    Using a genetic algorithm to solve an inverse problem of complex nonlinear geophysical equations is advantageous because it does not require computer gradients of models or "good" initial models. The multi-point search of a genetic algorithm makes it easier to find the globally optimal solution while avoiding falling into a local extremum. As is the case in other optimization approaches, the search efficiency for a genetic algorithm is vital in finding desired solutions successfully in a multi-dimensional model space. A binary-encoding genetic algorithm is hardly ever used to resolve an optimization problem such as a simple geophysical inversion with only three unknowns. The encoding mechanism, genetic operators, and population size of the genetic algorithm greatly affect search processes in the evolution. It is clear that improved operators and proper population size promote the convergence. Nevertheless, not all genetic operations perform perfectly while searching under either a uniform binary or a decimal encoding system. With the binary encoding mechanism, the crossover scheme may produce more new individuals than with the decimal encoding. On the other hand, the mutation scheme in a decimal encoding system will create new genes larger in scope than those in the binary encoding. This paper discusses approaches of exploiting the search potential of genetic operations in the two encoding systems and presents an approach with a hybrid-encoding mechanism, multi-point crossover, and dynamic population size for geophysical inversion. We present a method that is based on the routine in which the mutation operation is conducted in the decimal code and multi-point crossover operation in the binary code. The mix-encoding algorithm is called the hybrid-encoding genetic algorithm (HEGA). HEGA provides better genes with a higher probability by a mutation operator and improves genetic algorithms in resolving complicated geophysical inverse problems. Another significant

  7. Formal verification of an oral messages algorithm for interactive consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John

    1992-01-01

    The formal specification and verification of an algorithm for Interactive Consistency based on the Oral Messages algorithm for Byzantine Agreement is described. We compare our treatment with that of Bevier and Young, who presented a formal specification and verification for a very similar algorithm. Unlike Bevier and Young, who observed that 'the invariant maintained in the recursive subcases of the algorithm is significantly more complicated than is suggested by the published proof' and who found its formal verification 'a fairly difficult exercise in mechanical theorem proving,' our treatment is very close to the previously published analysis of the algorithm, and our formal specification and verification are straightforward. This example illustrates how delicate choices in the formulation of the problem can have significant impact on the readability of its formal specification and on the tractability of its formal verification.

  8. Impact significance determination-Pushing the boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, David P.

    2007-11-15

    Impact significance determination practice tends to be highly variable. Too often insufficient consideration is given to good practice insights. Also, impact significance determinations are frequently narrowly defined addressing, for example, only individual, negative impacts, focusing on bio-physical impacts, and not seeking to integrate either the Precautionary Principle or sustainability. This article seeks to extend the boundaries of impact significance determination practice by providing an overview of good general impact significance practices, together with stakeholder roles and potential methods for addressing significance determination challenges. Relevant thresholds, criteria, contextual considerations and support methods are also highlighted. The analysis is then extended to address how impact significance determination practices change for positive as compared with negative impacts, for cumulative as compared with individual impacts, for socio-economic as compared with bio-physical impacts, when the Precautionary Principle is integrated into the process, and when sustainability contributions drive the EIA process and related impact significance determinations. These refinements can assist EIA practitioners in ensuring that the scope and nature of impact significance determinations reflect the broadened scope of emerging EIA requirements and practices. Suggestions are included for further refining and testing of the proposed changes to impact significance determination practice.

  9. Some problems in sequencing and scheduling utilizing branch and bound algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Gim, B.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation deals with branch and bound algorithms which are applied to the two-machine flow-shop problem with sparse precedence constraints and the optimal sequencing and scheduling of multiple feedstocks in a batch-type digester problem. The problem studied here is to find a schedule which minimizes the maximum flow time with the requirement that the schedule does not violate a set of sparse precedence constraints. This research provides a branch and bound algorithm which employs a lower bounding rule and is based on an adjustment of the sequence obtained by applying Johnson's algorithm. It is demonstrated that this lower bounding procedure in conjunction with Kurisu's branching rule is effective for the sparse precedence constraints problem case. Biomass to methane production systems have the potential of supplying 25% of the national gas demand. The optimal operation of a batch digester system requires the sequencing and scheduling of all batches from multiple feedstocks during a fixed time horizon. A significant characteristic of these systems is that the feedstock decays in storage before use in the digester system. The operational problem is to determine the time to allocate to each batch of several feedstocks and then sequence the individual batches so as to maximize biogas production for a single batch type digester over a fixed planning horizon. This research provides a branch and bound algorithm for sequencing and a two-step hierarchical dynamic programming procedure for time allocation scheduling. An efficient heuristic algorithm is developed for large problems and demonstrated to yield excellent results.

  10. An improved algorithm for polar cloud-base detection by ceilometer over the ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tricht, K.; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; Lhermitte, S.; Turner, D. D.; Schween, J. H.; Van Lipzig, N. P. M.

    2014-05-01

    Optically thin ice and mixed-phase clouds play an important role in polar regions due to their effect on cloud radiative impact and precipitation. Cloud-base heights can be detected by ceilometers, low-power backscatter lidars that run continuously and therefore have the potential to provide basic cloud statistics including cloud frequency, base height and vertical structure. The standard cloud-base detection algorithms of ceilometers are designed to detect optically thick liquid-containing clouds, while the detection of thin ice clouds requires an alternative approach. This paper presents the polar threshold (PT) algorithm that was developed to be sensitive to optically thin hydrometeor layers (minimum optical depth τ ≥ 0.01). The PT algorithm detects the first hydrometeor layer in a vertical attenuated backscatter profile exceeding a predefined threshold in combination with noise reduction and averaging procedures. The optimal backscatter threshold of 3 × 10-4 km-1 sr-1 for cloud-base detection near the surface was derived based on a sensitivity analysis using data from Princess Elisabeth, Antarctica and Summit, Greenland. At higher altitudes where the average noise level is higher than the backscatter threshold, the PT algorithm becomes signal-to-noise ratio driven. The algorithm defines cloudy conditions as any atmospheric profile containing a hydrometeor layer at least 90 m thick. A comparison with relative humidity measurements from radiosondes at Summit illustrates the algorithm's ability to significantly discriminate between clear-sky and cloudy conditions. Analysis of the cloud statistics derived from the PT algorithm indicates a year-round monthly mean cloud cover fraction of 72% (±10%) at Summit without a seasonal cycle. The occurrence of optically thick layers, indicating the presence of supercooled liquid water droplets, shows a seasonal cycle at Summit with a monthly mean summer peak of 40 % (±4%). The monthly mean cloud occurrence frequency

  11. A Vehicle Detection Algorithm Based on Deep Belief Network

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yingfeng; Chen, Long

    2014-01-01

    Vision based vehicle detection is a critical technology that plays an important role in not only vehicle active safety but also road video surveillance application. Traditional shallow model based vehicle detection algorithm still cannot meet the requirement of accurate vehicle detection in these applications. In this work, a novel deep learning based vehicle detection algorithm with 2D deep belief network (2D-DBN) is proposed. In the algorithm, the proposed 2D-DBN architecture uses second-order planes instead of first-order vector as input and uses bilinear projection for retaining discriminative information so as to determine the size of the deep architecture which enhances the success rate of vehicle detection. On-road experimental results demonstrate that the algorithm performs better than state-of-the-art vehicle detection algorithm in testing data sets. PMID:24959617

  12. A ray-based algorithm for multi-dimensional linearconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, Eugene R.; Kaufman, Allan N.; Jaun, Andre

    2004-04-19

    A numerical algorithm is proposed for connecting the incoming and outgoing wave fields in studies of linear conversion. This is the first such ray-based algorithm for wave conversion in multiple spatial dimensions. it is demonstrated that, aside from the overall phase of the coupling, one can directly evaluate all quantities needed for the connection coefficients from the ray geometry. The ray dynamics is generated using the determinant of the dispersion matrix as the hamiltonian. Using information available while following an incoming ray, the algorithm automatically detects that the ray has entered a conversion region, evaluates the transmission and conversion coefficients, and launches the transmitted ray. The algorithm does not require any prior knowledge of the geometry of the conversion region. The algorithm is illustrated using a two-dimensional toroidal model with resonant conversion from a magnetosonic to an ion-hybrid wave.

  13. Algorithmic and analytical methods in network biology.

    PubMed

    Koyutürk, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    During the genomic revolution, algorithmic and analytical methods for organizing, integrating, analyzing, and querying biological sequence data proved invaluable. Today, increasing availability of high-throughput data pertaining to functional states of biomolecules, as well as their interactions, enables genome-scale studies of the cell from a systems perspective. The past decade witnessed significant efforts on the development of computational infrastructure for large-scale modeling and analysis of biological systems, commonly using network models. Such efforts lead to novel insights into the complexity of living systems, through development of sophisticated abstractions, algorithms, and analytical techniques that address a broad range of problems, including the following: (1) inference and reconstruction of complex cellular networks; (2) identification of common and coherent patterns in cellular networks, with a view to understanding the organizing principles and building blocks of cellular signaling, regulation, and metabolism; and (3) characterization of cellular mechanisms that underlie the differences between living systems, in terms of evolutionary diversity, development and differentiation, and complex phenotypes, including human disease. These problems pose significant algorithmic and analytical challenges because of the inherent complexity of the systems being studied; limitations of data in terms of availability, scope, and scale; intractability of resulting computational problems; and limitations of reference models for reliable statistical inference. This article provides a broad overview of existing algorithmic and analytical approaches to these problems, highlights key biological insights provided by these approaches, and outlines emerging opportunities and challenges in computational systems biology.

  14. Sequence comparisons via algorithmic mutual information.

    PubMed

    Milosavljević, A

    1994-01-01

    One of the main problems in DNA and protein sequence comparisons is to decide whether observed similarity of two sequences should be explained by their relatedness or by mere presence of some shared internal structure, e.g., shared internal tandem repeats. The standard methods that are based on statistics or classical information theory can be used to discover either internal structure or mutual sequence similarity, but cannot take into account both. Consequently, currently used methods for sequence comparison employ "masking" techniques that simply eliminate sequences that exhibit internal repetitive structure prior to sequence comparisons. The "masking" approach precludes discovery of homologous sequences of moderate or low complexity, which abound at both DNA and protein levels. As a solution to this problem, we propose a general method that is based on algorithmic information theory and minimal length encoding. We show that algorithmic mutual information factors out the sequence similarity that is due to shared internal structure and thus enables discovery of truly related sequences. We extend that recently developed algorithmic significance method (Milosavljević & Jurka 1993) to show that significance depends exponentially on algorithmic mutual information.

  15. Algorithmic and analytical methods in network biology

    PubMed Central

    Koyutürk, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    During genomic revolution, algorithmic and analytical methods for organizing, integrating, analyzing, and querying biological sequence data proved invaluable. Today, increasing availability of high-throughput data pertaining functional states of biomolecules, as well as their interactions, enables genome-scale studies of the cell from a systems perspective. The past decade witnessed significant efforts on the development of computational infrastructure for large-scale modeling and analysis of biological systems, commonly using network models. Such efforts lead to novel insights into the complexity of living systems, through development of sophisticated abstractions, algorithms, and analytical techniques that address a broad range of problems, including the following: (1) inference and reconstruction of complex cellular networks; (2) identification of common and coherent patterns in cellular networks, with a view to understanding the organizing principles and building blocks of cellular signaling, regulation, and metabolism; and (3) characterization of cellular mechanisms that underlie the differences between living systems, in terms of evolutionary diversity, development and differentiation, and complex phenotypes, including human disease. These problems pose significant algorithmic and analytical challenges because of the inherent complexity of the systems being studied; limitations of data in terms of availability, scope, and scale; intractability of resulting computational problems; and limitations of reference models for reliable statistical inference. This article provides a broad overview of existing algorithmic and analytical approaches to these problems, highlights key biological insights provided by these approaches, and outlines emerging opportunities and challenges in computational systems biology. PMID:20836029

  16. a Distributed Polygon Retrieval Algorithm Using Mapreduce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Q.; Palanisamy, B.; Karimi, H. A.

    2015-07-01

    The burst of large-scale spatial terrain data due to the proliferation of data acquisition devices like 3D laser scanners poses challenges to spatial data analysis and computation. Among many spatial analyses and computations, polygon retrieval is a fundamental operation which is often performed under real-time constraints. However, existing sequential algorithms fail to meet this demand for larger sizes of terrain data. Motivated by the MapReduce programming model, a well-adopted large-scale parallel data processing technique, we present a MapReduce-based polygon retrieval algorithm designed with the objective of reducing the IO and CPU loads of spatial data processing. By indexing the data based on a quad-tree approach, a significant amount of unneeded data is filtered in the filtering stage and it reduces the IO overhead. The indexed data also facilitates querying the relationship between the terrain data and query area in shorter time. The results of the experiments performed in our Hadoop cluster demonstrate that our algorithm performs significantly better than the existing distributed algorithms.

  17. Statistical algorithms for ontology-based annotation of scientific literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ontologies encode relationships within a domain in robust data structures that can be used to annotate data objects, including scientific papers, in ways that ease tasks such as search and meta-analysis. However, the annotation process requires significant time and effort when performed by humans. Text mining algorithms can facilitate this process, but they render an analysis mainly based upon keyword, synonym and semantic matching. They do not leverage information embedded in an ontology's structure. Methods We present a probabilistic framework that facilitates the automatic annotation of literature by indirectly modeling the restrictions among the different classes in the ontology. Our research focuses on annotating human functional neuroimaging literature within the Cognitive Paradigm Ontology (CogPO). We use an approach that combines the stochastic simplicity of naïve Bayes with the formal transparency of decision trees. Our data structure is easily modifiable to reflect changing domain knowledge. Results We compare our results across naïve Bayes, Bayesian Decision Trees, and Constrained Decision Tree classifiers that keep a human expert in the loop, in terms of the quality measure of the F1-mirco score. Conclusions Unlike traditional text mining algorithms, our framework can model the knowledge encoded by the dependencies in an ontology, albeit indirectly. We successfully exploit the fact that CogPO has explicitly stated restrictions, and implicit dependencies in the form of patterns in the expert curated annotations. PMID:25093071

  18. Flexible surveillance system architecture for prototyping video content analysis algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnhoven, R. G. J.; Jaspers, E. G. T.; de With, P. H. N.

    2006-01-01

    Many proposed video content analysis algorithms for surveillance applications are very computationally intensive, which limits the integration in a total system, running on one processing unit (e.g. PC). To build flexible prototyping systems of low cost, a distributed system with scalable processing power is therefore required. This paper discusses requirements for surveillance systems, considering two example applications. From these requirements, specifications for a prototyping architecture are derived. An implementation of the proposed architecture is presented, enabling mapping of multiple software modules onto a number of processing units (PCs). The architecture enables fast prototyping of new algorithms for complex surveillance applications without considering resource constraints.

  19. Parallel algorithms for placement and routing in VLSI design. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brouwer, Randall Jay

    1991-01-01

    The computational requirements for high quality synthesis, analysis, and verification of very large scale integration (VLSI) designs have rapidly increased with the fast growing complexity of these designs. Research in the past has focused on the development of heuristic algorithms, special purpose hardware accelerators, or parallel algorithms for the numerous design tasks to decrease the time required for solution. Two new parallel algorithms are proposed for two VLSI synthesis tasks, standard cell placement and global routing. The first algorithm, a parallel algorithm for global routing, uses hierarchical techniques to decompose the routing problem into independent routing subproblems that are solved in parallel. Results are then presented which compare the routing quality to the results of other published global routers and which evaluate the speedups attained. The second algorithm, a parallel algorithm for cell placement and global routing, hierarchically integrates a quadrisection placement algorithm, a bisection placement algorithm, and the previous global routing algorithm. Unique partitioning techniques are used to decompose the various stages of the algorithm into independent tasks which can be evaluated in parallel. Finally, results are presented which evaluate the various algorithm alternatives and compare the algorithm performance to other placement programs. Measurements are presented on the parallel speedups available.

  20. Online Planning Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabideau, Gregg R.; Chien, Steve A.

    2010-01-01

    AVA v2 software selects goals for execution from a set of goals that oversubscribe shared resources. The term goal refers to a science or engineering request to execute a possibly complex command sequence, such as image targets or ground-station downlinks. Developed as an extension to the Virtual Machine Language (VML) execution system, the software enables onboard and remote goal triggering through the use of an embedded, dynamic goal set that can oversubscribe resources. From the set of conflicting goals, a subset must be chosen that maximizes a given quality metric, which in this case is strict priority selection. A goal can never be pre-empted by a lower priority goal, and high-level goals can be added, removed, or updated at any time, and the "best" goals will be selected for execution. The software addresses the issue of re-planning that must be performed in a short time frame by the embedded system where computational resources are constrained. In particular, the algorithm addresses problems with well-defined goal requests without temporal flexibility that oversubscribes available resources. By using a fast, incremental algorithm, goal selection can be postponed in a "just-in-time" fashion allowing requests to be changed or added at the last minute. Thereby enabling shorter response times and greater autonomy for the system under control.

  1. Contour Error Map Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis; Lane, John; Immer, Christopher; Case, Jonathan; Manobianco, John

    2005-01-01

    The contour error map (CEM) algorithm and the software that implements the algorithm are means of quantifying correlations between sets of time-varying data that are binarized and registered on spatial grids. The present version of the software is intended for use in evaluating numerical weather forecasts against observational sea-breeze data. In cases in which observational data come from off-grid stations, it is necessary to preprocess the observational data to transform them into gridded data. First, the wind direction is gridded and binarized so that D(i,j;n) is the input to CEM based on forecast data and d(i,j;n) is the input to CEM based on gridded observational data. Here, i and j are spatial indices representing 1.25-km intervals along the west-to-east and south-to-north directions, respectively; and n is a time index representing 5-minute intervals. A binary value of D or d = 0 corresponds to an offshore wind, whereas a value of D or d = 1 corresponds to an onshore wind. CEM includes two notable subalgorithms: One identifies and verifies sea-breeze boundaries; the other, which can be invoked optionally, performs an image-erosion function for the purpose of attempting to eliminate river-breeze contributions in the wind fields.

  2. An algorithm to enumerate sorting reversals for signed permutations.

    PubMed

    Siepel, Adam C

    2003-01-01

    The rearrangement distance between single-chromosome genomes can be estimated as the minimum number of inversions required to transform the gene ordering observed in one into that observed in the other. This measure, known as "inversion distance," can be computed as the reversal distance between signed permutations. During the past decade, much progress has been made both on the problem of computing reversal distance and on the related problem of finding a minimum-length sequence of reversals, which is known as "sorting by reversals." For most problem instances, however, many minimum-length sequences of reversals exist, and in the absence of auxiliary information, no one is of greater value than the others. The problem of finding all minimum-length sequences of reversals is thus a natural generalization of sorting by reversals, yet it has received little attention. This problem reduces easily to the problem of finding all "sorting reversals" of one permutation with respect to another - that is, all reversals rho such that, if rho is applied to one permutation, then the reversal distance of that permutation from the other is decreased. In this paper, an efficient algorithm is derived to solve the problem of finding all sorting reversals, and experimental results are presented indicating that, while the new algorithm does not represent a significant improvement in asymptotic terms (it takes O(n(3)) time, for permutations of size n; the problem can now be solved by brute force in Theta(n(3)) time), it performs dramatically better in practice than the best known alternative. An implementation of the algorithm is available at www.cse.ucsc.edu/~acs.

  3. GPS receiver algorithms for suppression of narrowband and structured wideband interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhani, Premal Harish

    This dissertation describes algorithms that enhance the acquisition and tracking performance of a GPS receiver in the presence of narrowband and structured wideband interference. As GPS becomes an essential element of the civil infrastructure in the areas of aviation, ground transportation, communications, and power distribution, its vulnerability to interference must be addressed. Unintentional interference typically takes the form of a narrowband signal. Structured wideband interference can result from the ground-based augmentation of GPS with pseudolites. Algorithms that enhance performance for these two situations are developed and described in detail. Pseudolites are a very useful augmentation to GPS that provide enhanced coverage in areas of high blockage or for critical missions such as aircraft landing. However, pseudolites may introduce what is known as near-far interference, where a pseudolite signal interferes with the acquisition and tracking of weaker satellite signals. I have applied the technique of successive interference cancellation (SIC) to improve acquisition performance in the presence of a pseudolite signal. An extension of SIC to the identification and cancellation of pseudolite multipath is also given. The performance of these algorithms is demonstrated on simulated and experimental data, showing significant improvement over conventional techniques. The low level of GPS signals makes them susceptible to narrowband interference, despite the inherent resistance to interference afforded by GPS spread spectrum modulation. In my research I have investigated a number of algorithms that can increase the robustness of GPS receivers in a hostile narrowband electromagnetic environment. This dissertation describes several adaptive estimators which are applied to simulated GPS data. Comparisons are made in terms of post-correlation signal-to-noise ratio, tracking errors, and computational requirements. Conventional techniques of high accuracy Doppler

  4. Generalized Weiszfeld Algorithms for Lq Optimization.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Khurrum; Hartley, Richard; Trumpf, Jochen

    2015-04-01

    In many computer vision applications, a desired model of some type is computed by minimizing a cost function based on several measurements. Typically, one may compute the model that minimizes the L2 cost, that is the sum of squares of measurement errors with respect to the model. However, the Lq solution which minimizes the sum of the qth power of errors usually gives more robust results in the presence of outliers for some values of q, for example, q = 1. The Weiszfeld algorithm is a classic algorithm for finding the geometric L1 mean of a set of points in Euclidean space. It is provably optimal and requires neither differentiation, nor line search. The Weiszfeld algorithm has also been generalized to find the L1 mean of a set of points on a Riemannian manifold of non-negative curvature. This paper shows that the Weiszfeld approach may be extended to a wide variety of problems to find an Lq mean for 1 ≤ q <; 2, while maintaining simplicity and provable convergence. We apply this problem to both single-rotation averaging (under which the algorithm provably finds the global Lq optimum) and multiple rotation averaging (for which no such proof exists). Experimental results of Lq optimization for rotations show the improved reliability and robustness compared to L2 optimization.

  5. An implementation of a data-transmission pipelining algorithm on Imote2 platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu; Dorvash, Siavash; Cheng, Liang; Pakzad, Shamim

    2011-04-01

    Over the past several years, wireless network systems and sensing technologies have been developed significantly. This has resulted in the broad application of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in many engineering fields and in particular structural health monitoring (SHM). The movement of traditional SHM toward the new generation of SHM, which utilizes WSNs, relies on the advantages of this new approach such as relatively low costs, ease of implementation and the capability of onboard data processing and management. In the particular case of long span bridge monitoring, a WSN should be capable of transmitting commands and measurement data over long network geometry in a reliable manner. While using single-hop data transmission in such geometry requires a long radio range and consequently a high level of power supply, multi-hop communication may offer an effective and reliable way for data transmissions across the network. Using a multi-hop communication protocol, the network relays data from a remote node to the base station via intermediary nodes. We have proposed a data-transmission pipelining algorithm to enable an effective use of the available bandwidth and minimize the energy consumption and the delay performance by the multi-hop communication protocol. This paper focuses on the implementation aspect of the pipelining algorithm on Imote2 platforms for SHM applications, describes its interaction with underlying routing protocols, and presents the solutions to various implementation issues of the proposed pipelining algorithm. Finally, the performance of the algorithm is evaluated based on the results of an experimental implementation.

  6. A Real-Time Algorithm for the Approximation of Level-Set-Based Curve Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonggang; Karl, William Clem

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a complete and practical algorithm for the approximation of level-set-based curve evolution suitable for real-time implementation. In particular, we propose a two-cycle algorithm to approximate level-set-based curve evolution without the need of solving partial differential equations (PDEs). Our algorithm is applicable to a broad class of evolution speeds that can be viewed as composed of a data-dependent term and a curve smoothness regularization term. We achieve curve evolution corresponding to such evolution speeds by separating the evolution process into two different cycles: one cycle for the data-dependent term and a second cycle for the smoothness regularization. The smoothing term is derived from a Gaussian filtering process. In both cycles, the evolution is realized through a simple element switching mechanism between two linked lists, that implicitly represents the curve using an integer valued level-set function. By careful construction, all the key evolution steps require only integer operations. A consequence is that we obtain significant computation speedups compared to exact PDE-based approaches while obtaining excellent agreement with these methods for problems of practical engineering interest. In particular, the resulting algorithm is fast enough for use in real-time video processing applications, which we demonstrate through several image segmentation and video tracking experiments. PMID:18390371

  7. Surpassing Humans and Computers with JellyBean: Crowd-Vision-Hybrid Counting Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Akash Das; Jain, Ayush; Nandi, Arnab; Parameswaran, Aditya; Widom, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Counting objects is a fundamental image processisng primitive, and has many scientific, health, surveillance, security, and military applications. Existing supervised computer vision techniques typically require large quantities of labeled training data, and even with that, fail to return accurate results in all but the most stylized settings. Using vanilla crowd-sourcing, on the other hand, can lead to significant errors, especially on images with many objects. In this paper, we present our JellyBean suite of algorithms, that combines the best of crowds and computer vision to count objects in images, and uses judicious decomposition of images to greatly improve accuracy at low cost. Our algorithms have several desirable properties: (i) they are theoretically optimal or near-optimal, in that they ask as few questions as possible to humans (under certain intuitively reasonable assumptions that we justify in our paper experimentally); (ii) they operate under stand-alone or hybrid modes, in that they can either work independent of computer vision algorithms, or work in concert with them, depending on whether the computer vision techniques are available or useful for the given setting; (iii) they perform very well in practice, returning accurate counts on images that no individual worker or computer vision algorithm can count correctly, while not incurring a high cost. PMID:26844304

  8. A pruning-based disk scheduling algorithm for heterogeneous I/O workloads.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeseok; Bahn, Hyokyung; Won, Youjip

    2014-01-01

    In heterogeneous I/O workload environments, disk scheduling algorithms should support different QoS (Quality-of-Service) for each I/O request. For example, the algorithm should meet the deadlines of real-time requests and at the same time provide reasonable response time for best-effort requests. This paper presents a novel disk scheduling algorithm called G-SCAN (Grouping-SCAN) for handling heterogeneous I/O workloads. To find a schedule that satisfies the deadline constraints and seek time minimization simultaneously, G-SCAN maintains a series of candidate schedules and expands the schedules whenever a new request arrives. Maintaining these candidate schedules requires excessive spatial and temporal overhead, but G-SCAN reduces the overhead to a manageable level via pruning the state space using two heuristics. One is grouping that clusters adjacent best-effort requests into a single scheduling unit and the other is the branch-and-bound strategy that cuts off inefficient or impractical schedules. Experiments with various synthetic and real-world I/O workloads show that G-SCAN outperforms existing disk scheduling algorithms significantly in terms of the average response time, throughput, and QoS-guarantees for heterogeneous I/O workloads. We also show that the overhead of G-SCAN is reasonable for on-line execution.

  9. A fast rebinning algorithm for 3D positron emission tomography using John's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrise, Michel; Liu, Xuan

    1999-08-01

    Volume imaging in positron emission tomography (PET) requires the inversion of the three-dimensional (3D) x-ray transform. The usual solution to this problem is based on 3D filtered-backprojection (FBP), but is slow. Alternative methods have been proposed which factor the 3D data into independent 2D data sets corresponding to the 2D Radon transforms of a stack of parallel slices. Each slice is then reconstructed using 2D FBP. These so-called rebinning methods are numerically efficient but are approximate. In this paper a new exact rebinning method is derived by exploiting the fact that the 3D x-ray transform of a function is the solution to the second-order partial differential equation first studied by John. The method is proposed for two sampling schemes, one corresponding to a pair of infinite plane detectors and another one corresponding to a cylindrical multi-ring PET scanner. The new FORE-J algorithm has been implemented for this latter geometry and was compared with the approximate Fourier rebinning algorithm FORE and with another exact rebinning algorithm, FOREX. Results with simulated data demonstrate a significant improvement in accuracy compared to FORE, while the reconstruction time is doubled. Compared to FOREX, the FORE-J algorithm is slightly less accurate but more than three times faster.

  10. Identification of Clathrate Hydrates, Hexagonal Ice, Cubic Ice, and Liquid Water in Simulations: the CHILL+ Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Andrew H; Molinero, Valeria

    2015-07-23

    Clathrate hydrates and ice I are the most abundant crystals of water. The study of their nucleation, growth, and decomposition using molecular simulations requires an accurate and efficient algorithm that distinguishes water molecules that belong to each of these crystals and the liquid phase. Existing algorithms identify ice or clathrates, but not both. This poses a challenge for cases in which ice and hydrate coexist, such as in the synthesis of clathrates from ice and the formation of ice from clathrates during self-preservation of methane hydrates. Here we present an efficient algorithm for the identification of clathrate hydrates, hexagonal ice, cubic ice, and liquid water in molecular simulations. CHILL+ uses the number of staggered and eclipsed water-water bonds to identify water molecules in cubic ice, hexagonal ice, and clathrate hydrate. CHILL+ is an extension of CHILL (Moore et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2010, 12, 4124-4134), which identifies hexagonal and cubic ice but not clathrates. In addition to the identification of hydrates, CHILL+ significantly improves the detection of hexagonal ice up to its melting point. We validate the use of CHILL+ for the identification of stacking faults in ice and the nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates. To our knowledge, this is the first algorithm that allows for the simultaneous identification of ice and clathrate hydrates, and it does so in a way that is competitive with respect to existing methods used to identify any of these crystals. PMID:25389702

  11. A diagnostic assessment of evolutionary algorithms for multi-objective surface water reservoir control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatarain Salazar, Jazmin; Reed, Patrick M.; Herman, Jonathan D.; Giuliani, Matteo; Castelletti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Globally, the pressures of expanding populations, climate change, and increased energy demands are motivating significant investments in re-operationalizing existing reservoirs or designing operating policies for new ones. These challenges require an understanding of the tradeoffs that emerge across the complex suite of multi-sector demands in river basin systems. This study benchmarks our current capabilities to use Evolutionary Multi-Objective Direct Policy Search (EMODPS), a decision analytic framework in which reservoirs' candidate operating policies are represented using parameterized global approximators (e.g., radial basis functions) then those parameterized functions are optimized using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms to discover the Pareto approximate operating policies. We contribute a comprehensive diagnostic assessment of modern MOEAs' abilities to support EMODPS using the Conowingo reservoir in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin, Pennsylvania, USA. Our diagnostic results highlight that EMODPS can be very challenging for some modern MOEAs and that epsilon dominance, time-continuation, and auto-adaptive search are helpful for attaining high levels of performance. The ɛ-MOEA, the auto-adaptive Borg MOEA, and ɛ-NSGAII all yielded superior results for the six-objective Lower Susquehanna benchmarking test case. The top algorithms show low sensitivity to different MOEA parameterization choices and high algorithmic reliability in attaining consistent results for different random MOEA trials. Overall, EMODPS poses a promising method for discovering key reservoir management tradeoffs; however algorithmic choice remains a key concern for problems of increasing complexity.

  12. A novel load-balanced fixed routing (LBFR) algorithm for wavelength routed optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Gangxiang; Li, Yongcheng; Peng, Limei

    2011-11-01

    In the wavelength-routed optical transport networks, fixed shortest path routing is one of major lightpath service provisioning strategies, which shows simplicity in network control and operation. Specifically, once a shortest route is found for a node pair, the route is always used for any future lightpath service provisioning, which therefore does not require network control and management system to maintain any active network-wide link state database. On the other hand, the fixed shortest path routing strategy suffers from the disadvantage of unbalanced network traffic load distribution and network congestion because it keeps on employing the same fixed shortest route between each pair of nodes. To avoid the network congestion and meanwhile retain the operational simplicity, in this study we develop a Load-Balanced Fixed Routing (LBFR) algorithm. Through a training process based on a forecasted network traffic load matrix, the proposed algorithm finds a fixed (or few) route(s) for each node pair and employs the fixed route(s) for lightpath service provisioning. Different from the fixed shortest path routes between node pairs, these routes can well balance traffic load within the network when they are used for lightpath service provisioning. Compared to the traditional fixed shortest path routing algorithm, the LBFR algorithm can achieve much better lightpath blocking performance according to our simulation and analytical studies. Moreover, the performance improvement is more significant with the increase of network nodal degree.

  13. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  14. Generalized SIMD algorithm for efficient EM-PIC simulations on modern CPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Ricardo; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren; Silva, Luis

    2012-10-01

    There are several relevant plasma physics scenarios where highly nonlinear and kinetic processes dominate. Further understanding of these scenarios is generally explored through relativistic particle-in-cell codes such as OSIRIS [1], but this algorithm is computationally intensive, and efficient use high end parallel HPC systems, exploring all levels of parallelism available, is required. In particular, most modern CPUs include a single-instruction-multiple-data (SIMD) vector unit that can significantly speed up the calculations. In this work we present a generalized PIC-SIMD algorithm that is shown to work efficiently with different CPU (AMD, Intel, IBM) and vector unit types (2-8 way, single/double). Details on the algorithm will be given, including the vectorization strategy and memory access. We will also present performance results for the various hardware variants analyzed, focusing on floating point efficiency. Finally, we will discuss the applicability of this type of algorithm for EM-PIC simulations on GPGPU architectures [2]. [4pt] [1] R. A. Fonseca et al., LNCS 2331, 342, (2002)[0pt] [2] V. K. Decyk, T. V. Singh; Comput. Phys. Commun. 182, 641-648 (2011)

  15. Optimized simulations of Olami-Feder-Christensen systems using parallel algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Rachele; Necaise, Rance; Montag, Eric

    The sequential nature of the Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model for earthquake simulations limits the benefits of parallel computing approaches because of the frequent communication required between processors. We developed a parallel version of the OFC algorithm for multi-core processors. Our data, even for relatively small system sizes and low numbers of processors, indicates that increasing the number of processors provides significantly faster simulations; producing more efficient results than previous attempts that used network-based Beowulf clusters. Our algorithm optimizes performance by exploiting the multi-core processor architecture, minimizing communication time in contrast to the networked Beowulf-cluster approaches. Our multi-core algorithm is the basis for a new algorithm using GPUs that will drastically increase the number of processors available. Previous studies incorporating realistic structural features of faults into OFC models have revealed spatial and temporal patterns observed in real earthquake systems. The computational advances presented here will allow for studying interacting networks of faults, rather than individual faults, further enhancing our understanding of the relationship between the earth's structure and the triggering process. Support for this project comes from the Chenery Research Fund, the Rashkind Family Endowment, the Walter Williams Craigie Teaching Endowment, and the Schapiro Undergraduate Research Fellowship.

  16. Volume reconstruction optimization for tomo-PIV algorithms applied to experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Fabio J. W. A.; Foucaut, Jean-Marc; Thomas, Lionel; Azevedo, Luis F. A.; Stanislas, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Tomographic PIV is a three-component volumetric velocity measurement technique based on the tomographic reconstruction of a particle distribution imaged by multiple camera views. In essence, the performance and accuracy of this technique is highly dependent on the parametric adjustment and the reconstruction algorithm used. Although synthetic data have been widely employed to optimize experiments, the resulting reconstructed volumes might not have optimal quality. The purpose of the present study is to offer quality indicators that can be applied to data samples in order to improve the quality of velocity results obtained by the tomo-PIV technique. The methodology proposed can potentially lead to significantly reduction in the time required to optimize a tomo-PIV reconstruction, also leading to better quality velocity results. Tomo-PIV data provided by a six-camera turbulent boundary-layer experiment were used to optimize the reconstruction algorithms according to this methodology. Velocity statistics measurements obtained by optimized BIMART, SMART and MART algorithms were compared with hot-wire anemometer data and velocity measurement uncertainties were computed. Results indicated that BIMART and SMART algorithms produced reconstructed volumes with equivalent quality as the standard MART with the benefit of reduced computational time.

  17. A hybrid genetic—instance based learning algorithm for CE-QUAL-W2 calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostfeld, Avi; Salomons, Shani

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents a calibration model for CE-QUAL-W2. CE-QUAL-W2 is a two-dimensional (2D) longitudinal/vertical hydrodynamic and water quality model for surface water bodies, modeling eutrophication processes such as temperature-nutrient-algae-dissolved oxygen-organic matter and sediment relationships. The proposed methodology is a combination of a 'hurdle-race' and a hybrid Genetic- k-Nearest Neighbor algorithm (GA-kNN). The 'hurdle race' is formulated for accepting-rejecting a proposed set of parameters during a CE-QUAL-W2 simulation; the k-Nearest Neighbor algorithm (kNN)—for approximating the objective function response surface; and the Genetic Algorithm (GA)—for linking both. The proposed methodology overcomes the high, non-applicable, computational efforts required if a conventional calibration search technique was used, while retaining the quality of the final calibration results. Base runs and sensitivity analysis are demonstrated on two example applications: a synthetic hypothetical example calibrated for temperature, serving for tuning the GA-kNN parameters; and the Lower Columbia Slough case study in Oregon US calibrated for temperature and dissolved oxygen. The GA-kNN algorithm was found to be robust and reliable, producing similar results to those of a pure GA, while reducing running times and computational efforts significantly, and adding additional insights and flexibilities to the calibration process.

  18. Application and evaluation of two nutrient algorithms of Hydrological Simulation Program Fortran in Wolf River watershed.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijun; Kingery, William L; Huddleston, David H; Hossain, Faisal; Hashim, Noor B; Kieffer, Janna M

    2008-06-01

    This study performs a comparison of two nutrient algorithms of Hydrological Simulation Program Fortran, PQUAL/IQUAL and AGCHEM. Watershed nutrient models with, PQUAL/IQUAL and AGCHEM, were developed and calibrated separately with observed data in the Wolf River watershed. Compared to AGCHEM modules, the PQUAL/IQUAL algorithm was found to have several disadvantages. Examples are: (i) it is a simple loading estimation algorithm, and cannot represent the soil nutrient processes; and (ii) the interactions of modeled nutrient species in the soil cannot be simulated. The AGCHEM modules are capable of explicitly representing the comprehensive nutrient processes in the soil such as fertilization, atmospheric deposition, manure application, plant uptake process, and the transformation processes. Therefore, AGCHEM modules afford the ability to evaluate the alternative management practice and model the interactions between nutrient species. However, our modeling results indicated that the inclusion of AGCHEM modules do not significantly improve the nutrient modeling performance but rather take much more time in model development. The nutrient algorithms selection for total maximum daily loads development depends on the data availability, required modeling accuracy, and available time for model development.

  19. Sideband Algorithm for Automatic Wind Turbine Gearbox Fault Detection and Diagnosis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Zappala, D.; Tavner, P.; Crabtree, C.; Sheng, S.

    2013-01-01

    Improving the availability of wind turbines (WT) is critical to minimize the cost of wind energy, especially for offshore installations. As gearbox downtime has a significant impact on WT availabilities, the development of reliable and cost-effective gearbox condition monitoring systems (CMS) is of great concern to the wind industry. Timely detection and diagnosis of developing gear defects within a gearbox is an essential part of minimizing unplanned downtime of wind turbines. Monitoring signals from WT gearboxes are highly non-stationary as turbine load and speed vary continuously with time. Time-consuming and costly manual handling of large amounts of monitoring data represent one of the main limitations of most current CMSs, so automated algorithms are required. This paper presents a fault detection algorithm for incorporation into a commercial CMS for automatic gear fault detection and diagnosis. The algorithm allowed the assessment of gear fault severity by tracking progressive tooth gear damage during variable speed and load operating conditions of the test rig. Results show that the proposed technique proves efficient and reliable for detecting gear damage. Once implemented into WT CMSs, this algorithm can automate data interpretation reducing the quantity of information that WT operators must handle.

  20. Vibrational molecular quantum computing: basis set independence and theoretical realization of the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Carmen M; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2004-12-22

    The phase of quantum gates is one key issue for the implementation of quantum algorithms. In this paper we first investigate the phase evolution of global molecular quantum gates, which are realized by optimally shaped femtosecond laser pulses. The specific laser fields are calculated using the multitarget optimal control algorithm, our modification of the optimal control theory relevant for application in quantum computing. As qubit system we use vibrational modes of polyatomic molecules, here the two IR-active modes of acetylene. Exemplarily, we present our results for a Pi gate, which shows a strong dependence on the phase, leading to a significant decrease in quantum yield. To correct for this unwanted behavior we include pressure on the quantum phase in our multitarget approach. In addition the accuracy of these phase corrected global quantum gates is enhanced. Furthermore we could show that in our molecular approach phase corrected quantum gates and basis set independence are directly linked. Basis set independence is also another property highly required for the performance of quantum algorithms. By realizing the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm in our two qubit molecular model system, we demonstrate the good performance of our phase corrected and basis set independent quantum gates.

  1. A New Distributed Algorithm for Side-Chain Positioning in the Process of Protein Docking*

    PubMed Central

    Moghadasi, Mohammad; Kozakov, Dima; Vakili, Pirooz; Vajda, Sandor; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Side-chain positioning (SCP) is an important component of computational protein docking methods. Existing SCP methods and available software have been designed for protein folding applications where side-chain positioning is also important. As a result they do not take into account significant special structure that SCP for docking exhibits. We propose a new algorithm which poses SCP as a Maximum Weighted Independent Set (MWIS) problem on an appropriately constructed graph. We develop an approximate algorithm which solves a relaxation of the MWIS and then rounds the solution to obtain a high-quality feasible solution to the problem. The algorithm is fully distributed and can be executed on a large network of processing nodes requiring only local information and message-passing between neighboring nodes. Motivated by the special structure in docking, we establish optimality guarantees for a certain class of graphs. Our results on a benchmark set of enzyme-inhibitor protein complexes show that our predictions are close to the native structure and are comparable to the ones obtained by a state-of-the-art method. The results are substantially improved if rotamers from unbound protein structures are included in the search. We also establish that the use of our SCP algorithm substantially improves docking results. PMID:24844567

  2. A Hybrid Shortest Path Algorithm for Navigation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hsun-Jung; Lan, Chien-Lun

    2007-12-01

    Combined with Geographic Information System (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS), the vehicle navigation system had become a quite popular product in daily life. A key component of the navigation system is the Shortest Path Algorithm. Navigation in real world must face a network consists of tens of thousands nodes and links, and even more. Under the limited computation capability of vehicle navigation equipment, it is difficult to satisfy the realtime response requirement that user expected. Hence, this study focused on shortest path algorithm that enhances the computation speed with less memory requirement. Several well-known algorithms such as Dijkstra, A* and hierarchical concepts were integrated to build hybrid algorithms that reduce searching space and improve searching speed. Numerical examples were conducted on Taiwan highway network that consists of more than four hundred thousands of links and nearly three hundred thousands of nodes. This real network was divided into two connected sub-networks (layers). The upper layer is constructed by freeways and expressways; the lower layer is constructed by local networks. Test origin-destination pairs were chosen randomly and divided into three distance categories; short, medium and long distances. The evaluation of outcome is judged by actual length and travel time. The numerical example reveals that the hybrid algorithm proposed by this research might be tens of thousands times faster than traditional Dijkstra algorithm; the memory requirement of the hybrid algorithm is also much smaller than the tradition algorithm. This outcome shows that this proposed algorithm would have an advantage over vehicle navigation system.

  3. Survivable algorithms and redundancy management in NASA's distributed computing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malek, Miroslaw

    1992-01-01

    The design of survivable algorithms requires a solid foundation for executing them. While hardware techniques for fault-tolerant computing are relatively well understood, fault-tolerant operating systems, as well as fault-tolerant applications (survivable algorithms), are, by contrast, little understood, and much more work in this field is required. We outline some of our work that contributes to the foundation of ultrareliable operating systems and fault-tolerant algorithm design. We introduce our consensus-based framework for fault-tolerant system design. This is followed by a description of a hierarchical partitioning method for efficient consensus. A scheduler for redundancy management is introduced, and application-specific fault tolerance is described. We give an overview of our hybrid algorithm technique, which is an alternative to the formal approach given.

  4. Hybrid Neural-Network: Genetic Algorithm Technique for Aircraft Engine Performance Diagnostics Developed and Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    As part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program, a unique model-based diagnostics method that employs neural networks and genetic algorithms for aircraft engine performance diagnostics has been developed and demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center against a nonlinear gas turbine engine model. Neural networks are applied to estimate the internal health condition of the engine, and genetic algorithms are used for sensor fault detection, isolation, and quantification. This hybrid architecture combines the excellent nonlinear estimation capabilities of neural networks with the capability to rank the likelihood of various faults given a specific sensor suite signature. The method requires a significantly smaller data training set than a neural network approach alone does, and it performs the combined engine health monitoring objectives of performance diagnostics and sensor fault detection and isolation in the presence of nominal and degraded engine health conditions.

  5. STAR Algorithm Integration Team - Facilitating operational algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikles, V. J.

    2015-12-01

    The NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Research and Applications (STAR) provides technical support of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) algorithm development and integration tasks. Utilizing data from the S-NPP satellite, JPSS generates over thirty Environmental Data Records (EDRs) and Intermediate Products (IPs) spanning atmospheric, ocean, cryosphere, and land weather disciplines. The Algorithm Integration Team (AIT) brings technical expertise and support to product algorithms, specifically in testing and validating science algorithms in a pre-operational environment. The AIT verifies that new and updated algorithms function in the development environment, enforces established software development standards, and ensures that delivered packages are functional and complete. AIT facilitates the development of new JPSS-1 algorithms by implementing a review approach based on the Enterprise Product Lifecycle (EPL) process. Building on relationships established during the S-NPP algorithm development process and coordinating directly with science algorithm developers, the AIT has implemented structured reviews with self-contained document suites. The process has supported algorithm improvements for products such as ozone, active fire, vegetation index, and temperature and moisture profiles.

  6. Algorithm aversion: people erroneously avoid algorithms after seeing them err.

    PubMed

    Dietvorst, Berkeley J; Simmons, Joseph P; Massey, Cade

    2015-02-01

    Research shows that evidence-based algorithms more accurately predict the future than do human forecasters. Yet when forecasters are deciding whether to use a human forecaster or a statistical algorithm, they often choose the human forecaster. This phenomenon, which we call algorithm aversion, is costly, and it is important to understand its causes. We show that people are especially averse to algorithmic forecasters after seeing them perform, even when they see them outperform a human forecaster. This is because people more quickly lose confidence in algorithmic than human forecasters after seeing them make the same mistake. In 5 studies, participants either saw an algorithm make forecasts, a human make forecasts, both, or neither. They then decided whether to tie their incentives to the future predictions of the algorithm or the human. Participants who saw the algorithm perform were less confident in it, and less likely to choose it over an inferior human forecaster. This was true even among those who saw the algorithm outperform the human.

  7. Astronomical Significance of Ancient Monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, I.

    2011-06-01

    Astronomical significance of Gokhnari megalithic monument (eastern Georgia) is considered. Possible connection of Amirani ancient legend with Gokhnari monument is discussed. Concepts of starry practicality and solar stations are proposed.

  8. [Forensic significance of depressive syndromes].

    PubMed

    Lammel, M

    1987-10-01

    The three chief problems arising when an expert opinion is to be given are dealt with in brief, and the forensic significance of the depressive syndrome is described, without entering into the question of giving an opinion as to responsibility.

  9. A comparison between anisotropic analytical and multigrid superposition dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Tse, Teddy K.H.; Ho, Cola L.M.; Yeung, Eric C.Y.

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is currently the most accurate dose calculation algorithm in radiotherapy planning but requires relatively long processing time. Faster model-based algorithms such as the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) by the Eclipse treatment planning system and multigrid superposition (MGS) by the XiO treatment planning system are 2 commonly used algorithms. This study compared AAA and MGS against MC, as the gold standard, on brain, nasopharynx, lung, and prostate cancer patients. Computed tomography of 6 patients of each cancer type was used. The same hypothetical treatment plan using the same machine and treatment prescription was computed for each case by each planning system using their respective dose calculation algorithm. The doses at reference points including (1) soft tissues only, (2) bones only, (3) air cavities only, (4) soft tissue-bone boundary (Soft/Bone), (5) soft tissue-air boundary (Soft/Air), and (6) bone-air boundary (Bone/Air), were measured and compared using the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), which was a function of the percentage dose deviations from MC. Besides, the computation time of each treatment plan was recorded and compared. The MAPEs of MGS were significantly lower than AAA in all types of cancers (p<0.001). With regards to body density combinations, the MAPE of AAA ranged from 1.8% (soft tissue) to 4.9% (Bone/Air), whereas that of MGS from 1.6% (air cavities) to 2.9% (Soft/Bone). The MAPEs of MGS (2.6%±2.1) were significantly lower than that of AAA (3.7%±2.5) in all tissue density combinations (p<0.001). The mean computation time of AAA for all treatment plans was significantly lower than that of the MGS (p<0.001). Both AAA and MGS algorithms demonstrated dose deviations of less than 4.0% in most clinical cases and their performance was better in homogeneous tissues than at tissue boundaries. In general, MGS demonstrated relatively smaller dose deviations than AAA but required longer computation time.

  10. Zombie algorithms: a timesaving remote sensing systems engineering tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardanuy, Philip E.; Powell, Dylan C.; Marley, Stephen

    2008-08-01

    In modern horror fiction, zombies are generally undead corpses brought back from the dead by supernatural or scientific means, and are rarely under anyone's direct control. They typically have very limited intelligence, and hunger for the flesh of the living [1]. Typical spectroradiometric or hyperspectral instruments providess calibrated radiances for a number of remote sensing algorithms. The algorithms typically must meet specified latency and availability requirements while yielding products at the required quality. These systems, whether research, operational, or a hybrid, are typically cost constrained. Complexity of the algorithms can be high, and may evolve and mature over time as sensor characterization changes, product validation occurs, and areas of scientific basis improvement are identified and completed. This suggests the need for a systems engineering process for algorithm maintenance that is agile, cost efficient, repeatable, and predictable. Experience on remote sensing science data systems suggests the benefits of "plug-n-play" concepts of operation. The concept, while intuitively simple, can be challenging to implement in practice. The use of zombie algorithms-empty shells that outwardly resemble the form, fit, and function of a "complete" algorithm without the implemented theoretical basis-provides the ground systems advantages equivalent to those obtained by integrating sensor engineering models onto the spacecraft bus. Combined with a mature, repeatable process for incorporating the theoretical basis, or scientific core, into the "head" of the zombie algorithm, along with associated scripting and registration, provides an easy "on ramp" for the rapid and low-risk integration of scientific applications into operational systems.

  11. Statistical Significance vs. Practical Significance: An Exploration through Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Brittany L.; DeMaria, Andrea L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences between statistical and practical significance, including strengths and criticisms of both methods, as well as provide information surrounding the application of various effect sizes and confidence intervals within health education research. Provided are recommendations, explanations and…

  12. Fast Optimal Load Balancing Algorithms for 1D Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Pinar, Ali; Aykanat, Cevdet

    2002-12-09

    One-dimensional decomposition of nonuniform workload arrays for optimal load balancing is investigated. The problem has been studied in the literature as ''chains-on-chains partitioning'' problem. Despite extensive research efforts, heuristics are still used in parallel computing community with the ''hope'' of good decompositions and the ''myth'' of exact algorithms being hard to implement and not runtime efficient. The main objective of this paper is to show that using exact algorithms instead of heuristics yields significant load balance improvements with negligible increase in preprocessing time. We provide detailed pseudocodes of our algorithms so that our results can be easily reproduced. We start with a review of literature on chains-on-chains partitioning problem. We propose improvements on these algorithms as well as efficient implementation tips. We also introduce novel algorithms, which are asymptotically and runtime efficient. We experimented with data sets from two different applications: Sparse matrix computations and Direct volume rendering. Experiments showed that the proposed algorithms are 100 times faster than a single sparse-matrix vector multiplication for 64-way decompositions on average. Experiments also verify that load balance can be significantly improved by using exact algorithms instead of heuristics. These two findings show that exact algorithms with efficient implementations discussed in this paper can effectively replace heuristics.

  13. A new algorithm for ccomputing theory prime implicates compilations

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, P.; Sadaoui, S.

    1996-12-31

    We present a new algorithm (called TPI/BDD) for computing the theory prime implicates compilation of a knowledge base {Sigma}. In contrast to many compilation algorithms, TPI/BDD does not require the prime implicates of {Sigma} to be generated. Since their number can easily be exponential in the size of {Sigma}, TPI/BDD can save a lot of computing. Thanks to TPI/BDD, we can now conceive of compiling knowledge bases impossible to before.

  14. A novel iris localization algorithm using correlation filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohit, Mausumi; Sharma, Jitu

    2015-06-01

    Fast and efficient segmentation of iris from the eye images is a primary requirement for robust database independent iris recognition. In this paper we have presented a new algorithm for computing the inner and outer boundaries of the iris and locating the pupil centre. Pupil-iris boundary computation is based on correlation filtering approach, whereas iris-sclera boundary is determined through one dimensional intensity mapping. The proposed approach is computationally less extensive when compared with the existing algorithms like Hough transform.

  15. A Review of Surrogate Assisted Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Manríquez, Alan; Toscano, Gregorio; Barron-Zambrano, Jose Hugo; Tello-Leal, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    Multiobjective evolutionary algorithms have incorporated surrogate models in order to reduce the number of required evaluations to approximate the Pareto front of computationally expensive multiobjective optimization problems. Currently, few works have reviewed the state of the art in this topic. However, the existing reviews have focused on classifying the evolutionary multiobjective optimization algorithms with respect to the type of underlying surrogate model. In this paper, we center our focus on classifying multiobjective evolutionary algorithms with respect to their integration with surrogate models. This interaction has led us to classify similar approaches and identify advantages and disadvantages of each class. PMID:27382366

  16. An algorithm for a generalization of the Richardson extrapolation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, William F.; Sidi, Avram

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a recursive method, designated the W exp (m)-algorithm, for implementing a generalization of the Richardson extrapolation process. Compared to the direct solution of the linear sytems of equations defining the extrapolation procedure, this method requires a small number of arithmetic operations and very little storage. The technique is also applied to solve recursively the coefficient problem associated with the rational approximations obtained by applying a d-transformation to power series. In the course of development a new recursive algorithm for implementing a very general extrapolation procedure is introduced, for solving the same problem. A FORTRAN program for the W exp (m)-algorithm is also appended.

  17. Subsurface biological activity zone detection using genetic search algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Mahinthakumar, G.; Gwo, J.P.; Moline, G.R.; Webb, O.F.

    1999-12-01

    Use of generic search algorithms for detection of subsurface biological activity zones (BAZ) is investigated through a series of hypothetical numerical biostimulation experiments. Continuous injection of dissolved oxygen and methane with periodically varying concentration stimulates the cometabolism of indigenous methanotropic bacteria. The observed breakthroughs of methane are used to deduce possible BAZ in the subsurface. The numerical experiments are implemented in a parallel computing environment to make possible the large number of simultaneous transport simulations required by the algorithm. The results show that genetic algorithms are very efficient in locating multiple activity zones, provided the observed signals adequately sample the BAZ.

  18. Aquarius Salinity Retrieval Algorithm: Final Pre-Launch Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Le Vine, David M.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides the theoretical basis for the Aquarius salinity retrieval algorithm. The inputs to the algorithm are the Aquarius antenna temperature (T(sub A)) measurements along with a number of NCEP operational products and pre-computed tables of space radiation coming from the galaxy and sun. The output is sea-surface salinity and many intermediate variables required for the salinity calculation. This revision of the Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD) is intended to be the final pre-launch version.

  19. Flower pollination algorithm: A novel approach for multiobjective optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin-She; Karamanoglu, Mehmet; He, Xingshi

    2014-09-01

    Multiobjective design optimization problems require multiobjective optimization techniques to solve, and it is often very challenging to obtain high-quality Pareto fronts accurately. In this article, the recently developed flower pollination algorithm (FPA) is extended to solve multiobjective optimization problems. The proposed method is used to solve a set of multiobjective test functions and two bi-objective design benchmarks, and a comparison of the proposed algorithm with other algorithms has been made, which shows that the FPA is efficient with a good convergence rate. Finally, the importance for further parametric studies and theoretical analysis is highlighted and discussed.

  20. Real-time ECG algorithms for ambulatory patient monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pino, Esteban; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Wiechmann, Eduardo; Curtis, Dorothy

    2005-01-01

    Brigham & Women's Hospital is designing a wireless monitoring system for patients on the waiting area of the Emergency Department. A real-time ECG algorithm is required to monitor and alert changes in patients that have not yet been admitted to the Emergency Room. For this purpose, three simple algorithms are compared in terms of processing time, beat detection accuracy and heart rate (HR) estimation. Varying amounts of noise were added to records from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database [1] to mimic expected waiting room conditions. Some recommendations regarding selection of an algorithm and further processing of HR series are presented.